WorldWideScience

Sample records for human herpesvirus family

  1. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP Proteins with Implications for Human Disease

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    Marshall V. Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person’s lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase, as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein–Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

  2. Differential activation of murine herpesvirus 68- and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF74 G protein-coupled receptors by human and murine chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, D.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Van Dijk, M.; Stewart, J.P.; Timmerman, H.; Smit, M.J.; Leurs, R.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a well-characterized small animal model for the study of gammaherpesvirus infection. MHV-68 belongs to the same herpesvirus family as herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) of New World squirrel monkeys and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) (also referred

  3. PREVALENCE OF INFECTION WITH HUMAN HERPESVIRUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8): Distribution of infection in Kaposi's sarcoma risk groups and evidence of sexual transmission. Nat Med 1996; 2: 918-924. 14. Kedes OH, Ganem 0, Ameli N, Bacchetti p. Greenblatt R The prevalence of serum antibody to human herpesvirus 8 (Kaposi sarcoma-associated hepesvirus) among ...

  4. Activation of human herpesvirus replication by apoptosis.

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    Prasad, Alka; Remick, Jill; Zeichner, Steven L

    2013-10-01

    A central feature of herpesvirus biology is the ability of herpesviruses to remain latent within host cells. Classically, exposure to inducing agents, like activating cytokines or phorbol esters that stimulate host cell signal transduction events, and epigenetic agents (e.g., butyrate) was thought to end latency. We recently showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, or human herpesvirus-8 [HHV-8]) has another, alternative emergency escape replication pathway that is triggered when KSHV's host cell undergoes apoptosis, characterized by the lack of a requirement for the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein, accelerated late gene kinetics, and production of virus with decreased infectivity. Caspase-3 is necessary and sufficient to initiate the alternative replication program. HSV-1 was also recently shown to initiate replication in response to host cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that an alternative apoptosis-triggered replication program might be a general feature of herpesvirus biology and that apoptosis-initiated herpesvirus replication may have clinical implications, particularly for herpesviruses that almost universally infect humans. To explore whether an alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program is a common feature of herpesvirus biology, we studied cell lines latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus/HHV-4, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, HHV-7, and KSHV. We found that apoptosis triggers replication for each HHV studied, with caspase-3 being necessary and sufficient for HHV replication. An alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program appears to be a common feature of HHV biology. We also found that commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents activate HHV replication, which suggests that treatments that promote apoptosis may lead to activation of latent herpesviruses, with potential clinical significance.

  5. Koi herpesvirus represents a third cyprinid herpesvirus (CyHV-3) in the family Herpesviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltzek, Thomas B; Kelley, Garry O; Stone, David M; Way, Keith; Hanson, Larry; Fukuda, Hideo; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi; Davison, Andrew J; Hedrick, Ronald P

    2005-06-01

    The sequences of four complete genes were analysed in order to determine the relatedness of koi herpesvirus (KHV) to three fish viruses in the family Herpesviridae: carp pox herpesvirus (Cyprinid herpesvirus 1, CyHV-1), haematopoietic necrosis herpesvirus of goldfish (Cyprinid herpesvirus 2, CyHV-2) and channel catfish virus (Ictalurid herpesvirus 1, IcHV-1). The genes were predicted to encode a helicase, an intercapsomeric triplex protein, the DNA polymerase and the major capsid protein. The results showed that KHV is related closely to CyHV-1 and CyHV-2, and that the three cyprinid viruses are related, albeit more distantly, to IcHV-1. Twelve KHV isolates from four diverse geographical areas yielded identical sequences for a region of the DNA polymerase gene. These findings, with previously published morphological and biological data, indicate that KHV should join the group of related lower-vertebrate viruses in the family Herpesviridae under the formal designation Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3).

  6. Human herpesvirus 8 – A novel human pathogen

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    Edelman Daniel C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1994, Chang and Moore reported on the latest of the gammaherpesviruses to infect humans, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 1. This novel herpesvirus has and continues to present challenges to define its scope of involvement in human disease. In this review, aspects of HHV-8 infection are discussed, such as, the human immune response, viral pathogenesis and transmission, viral disease entities, and the virus's epidemiology with an emphasis on HHV-8 diagnostics.

  7. Pityriasis rosea is associated with systemic active infection with both human herpesvirus-7 and human herpesvirus-6.

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    Watanabe, Takahiro; Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Jacob, Sharon E; Aquilino, Elisabeth A; Orenstein, Jan M; Black, Jodi B; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2002-10-01

    Pityriasis rosea is a common skin disease that has been suspected to have a viral etiology. We performed nested polymerase chain reaction to detect human herpesvirus-7, human herpesvirus-6, and cytomegalovirus DNA in lesional skin, nonlesional skin, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, serum, and saliva samples isolated from 14 pityriasis rosea patients. Viral mRNA expression and virion visualization within lesional skin were studied by in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. By nested polymerase chain reaction, human herpesvirus-7 DNA was present in lesional skin (93%), nonlesional skin (86%), saliva (100%), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (83%), and serum (100%) samples, whereas human herpesvirus-6 DNA was detected in lesional skin (86%), nonlesional skin (79%), saliva (80%), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (83%), and serum (88%) samples. By contrast, cytomegalovirus DNA was not detected in these tissues. Control samples from 12 healthy volunteers and 10 psoriasis patients demonstrated rare positivity for either human herpesvirus-7 or human herpesvirus-6 DNA in skin or serum. By in situ hybridization, infiltrating mononuclear cells expressing human herpesvirus-7 and human herpesvirus-6 mRNA were identified in perivascular and periappendageal areas in 100% and 75% pityriasis rosea skin lesions, respectively, compared to herpesviral mRNA positivity in only 13% normal skin and psoriasis skin controls. Transmission electron microscopy failed to reveal herpesviral virions in pityriasis rosea lesional skin. Nested polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization enabled detection of human herpesvirus-7 and human herpesvirus-6 in skin and other tissues isolated from patients with pityriasis rosea. These results suggest that pityriasis rosea is associated with systemic active infection with both human herpesvirus-7 and human herpesvirus-6.

  8. Impacts of Genome-Wide Analyses on Our Understanding of Human Herpesvirus Diversity and Evolution.

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    Renner, Daniel W; Szpara, Moriah L

    2018-01-01

    Until fairly recently, genome-wide evolutionary dynamics and within-host diversity were more commonly examined in the context of small viruses than in the context of large double-stranded DNA viruses such as herpesviruses. The high mutation rates and more compact genomes of RNA viruses have inspired the investigation of population dynamics for these species, and recent data now suggest that herpesviruses might also be considered candidates for population modeling. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatics have expanded our understanding of herpesviruses through genome-wide comparisons of sequence diversity, recombination, allele frequency, and selective pressures. Here we discuss recent data on the mechanisms that generate herpesvirus genomic diversity and underlie the evolution of these virus families. We focus on human herpesviruses, with key insights drawn from veterinary herpesviruses and other large DNA virus families. We consider the impacts of cell culture on herpesvirus genomes and how to accurately describe the viral populations under study. The need for a strong foundation of high-quality genomes is also discussed, since it underlies all secondary genomic analyses such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation, and ribosome profiling. Areas where we foresee future progress, such as the linking of viral genetic differences to phenotypic or clinical outcomes, are highlighted as well. Copyright © 2017 Renner and Szpara.

  9. Impacts of Genome-Wide Analyses on Our Understanding of Human Herpesvirus Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Until fairly recently, genome-wide evolutionary dynamics and within-host diversity were more commonly examined in the context of small viruses than in the context of large double-stranded DNA viruses such as herpesviruses. The high mutation rates and more compact genomes of RNA viruses have inspired the investigation of population dynamics for these species, and recent data now suggest that herpesviruses might also be considered candidates for population modeling. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatics have expanded our understanding of herpesviruses through genome-wide comparisons of sequence diversity, recombination, allele frequency, and selective pressures. Here we discuss recent data on the mechanisms that generate herpesvirus genomic diversity and underlie the evolution of these virus families. We focus on human herpesviruses, with key insights drawn from veterinary herpesviruses and other large DNA virus families. We consider the impacts of cell culture on herpesvirus genomes and how to accurately describe the viral populations under study. The need for a strong foundation of high-quality genomes is also discussed, since it underlies all secondary genomic analyses such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation, and ribosome profiling. Areas where we foresee future progress, such as the linking of viral genetic differences to phenotypic or clinical outcomes, are highlighted as well. PMID:29046445

  10. Structure of replicating intermediates of human herpesvirus type 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severini, Alberto; Sevenhuysen, Claire; Garbutt, Michael; Tipples, Graham A.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the structure of the replicative intermediates of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, partial digestion, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and sedimentation centrifugation. The results show that DNA replication of HHV-6 produces head-to-tail concatemeric intermediates as well as approximately equal amounts of circular monomers or oligomers. Unlike the situation in herpes simplex virus, the intermediates of human herpesvirus 6 replication are not highly branched, suggesting a difference in the mechanism of replication or a lower frequency of homologous recombination in human herpesvirus 6 compared to herpes simplex virus

  11. Contributions of neurotropic human herpesviruses herpes simplex virus 1 and human herpesvirus 6 to neurodegenerative disease pathology

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    Jessica M Hogestyn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses (HVs have developed ingenious mechanisms that enable them to traverse the defenses of the central nervous system (CNS. The ability of HVs to enter a state of latency, a defining characteristic of this viral family, allows them to persist in the human host indefinitely. As such, HVs represent the most frequently detected pathogens in the brain. Under constant immune pressure, these infections are largely asymptomatic in healthy hosts. However, many neurotropic HVs have been directly connected with CNS pathology in the context of other stressors and genetic risk factors. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which neurotropic HVs contribute to neurodegenerative disease (NDD pathology by highlighting two prominent members of the HV family, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6. We (i introduce the infectious pathways and replicative cycles of HSV-1 and HHV-6 and then (ii review the clinical evidence supporting associations between these viruses and the NDDs Alzheimer's disease (AD and multiple sclerosis (MS, respectively. We then (iii highlight and discuss potential mechanisms by which these viruses exert negative effects on neurons and glia. Finally, we (iv discuss how these viruses could interact with other disease-modifying factors to contribute to the initiation and/or progression of NDDs.

  12. Human Herpesvirus 6 and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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    Daniel Eymard

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is still enigmatic. Using indirect immunofluorescence testing for measuring antibody against human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6, this study investigated the association of CFS with infection by HHV-6. Seventeen patients (group A fulfilling the Centers for Disease Control (CDC definition for CFS were compared with eight patients (group B with chronic fatigue but not meeting the CDC criteria. No significant difference was found between the two groups for 30 parameters including sex, age, exposure to children and serology for Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and toxoplasma. Univariate analysis showed that patients in group A complained more frequently of a sore throat, headache and of recurrent type of fatigue. These three parameters are discriminant in identifying patients who will meet the CDC case definition of CFS. The titre of antibody against HHV-6 in group A (1:99 was significantly higher than in group B (1:15 (P=0.007. Elevated HHV-6 titres suggests that this virus could be a cofactor in the pathogenesis of CFS.

  13. A Murine Herpesvirus Closely Related to Ubiquitous Human Herpesviruses Causes T-Cell Depletion.

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    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-05-01

    The human roseoloviruses human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, and HHV-7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology, because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4 + T cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By next-generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174-kb genome sequence containing 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7, than to another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7. IMPORTANCE Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesviruses 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  14. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53...

  15. Association of human herpesvirus 6 subtypes with symptomatic apical periodontitis.

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    Hernádi, Katinka; Csoma, Eszter; Adám, Balázs; Szalmás, Anita; Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Veress, György; Ildikó-Márton; Kónya, József

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 subtypes A and B in apical periodontitis was determined. The relationship of HHV-6 subtypes to other disease associated herpesviruses, i.e., Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus, was also investigated. Forty apical periodontitis samples (17 symptomatic and 23 asymptomatic) and 40 healthy pulp control samples were collected. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to detect HHV-6 DNA. HHV-6 DNA was observed in significantly higher frequencies in apical periodontitis samples than in control samples (20% vs. 2.5%; P = .03). Further classification of apical lesions revealed that subtype B of HHV-6 was significantly associated with large-sized and symptomatic lesions (P apical lesions (77%) harbored ≥1 of the tested herpesviruses: EBV was the most frequent herpesvirus (72.5%) in apical periodontitis, followed by HHV-6 (20%). Our findings suggest that EBV and HHV-6B infections can be associated with symptomatic apical periodontitis. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE SYNDROMES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HERPESVIRUS-6A AND HUMAN HERPESVIRUS-6B

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    Eva Eliassen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B (HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been noted since their discovery for their T-lymphotropism. Although it has proven difficult to determine the extent to which HHV-6A and HHV-6B are involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, evidence suggests that primary infection and reactivation of both viruses may induce or contribute to the progression of several lymphoproliferative disorders, ranging from benign to malignant and including infectious mononucleosis-like illness, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS, and nodular sclerosis Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Herein, we discuss the conditions associated with the lymphoproliferative capacity of HHV-6, as well as the potential mechanisms behind them. Continued exploration on this topic may add to our understanding of the interactions between HHV-6 and the immune system and may open the doors to more accurate diagnosis and treatment of certain lymphoproliferative disorders.

  17. Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Sun Shipeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE. Results In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108 with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122 were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001; significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1. Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625. Conclusion Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

  18. Laboratory and Clinical Aspects of Human Herpesvirus 6 Infections

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    Bonnafous, Pascale; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a widespread betaherpesvirus which is genetically related to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and now encompasses two different species: HHV-6A and HHV-6B. HHV-6 exhibits a wide cell tropism in vivo and, like other herpesviruses, induces a lifelong latent infection in humans. As a noticeable difference with respect to other human herpesviruses, genomic HHV-6 DNA is covalently integrated into the subtelomeric region of cell chromosomes (ciHHV-6) in about 1% of the general population. Although it is infrequent, this may be a confounding factor for the diagnosis of active viral infection. The diagnosis of HHV-6 infection is performed by both serologic and direct methods. The most prominent technique is the quantification of viral DNA in blood, other body fluids, and organs by means of real-time PCR. Many active HHV-6 infections, corresponding to primary infections, reactivations, or exogenous reinfections, are asymptomatic. However, the virus may be the cause of serious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. As emblematic examples of HHV-6 pathogenicity, exanthema subitum, a benign disease of infancy, is associated with primary infection, whereas further virus reactivations can induce severe encephalitis cases, particularly in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Generally speaking, the formal demonstration of the causative role of HHV-6 in many acute and chronic human diseases is difficult due to the ubiquitous nature of the virus, chronicity of infection, existence of two distinct species, and limitations of current investigational tools. The antiviral compounds ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir are effective against active HHV-6 infections, but the indications for treatment, as well as the conditions of drug administration, are not formally approved to date. There are still numerous pending questions about HHV-6 which should stimulate future research works on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and

  19. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with human herpesvirus-6 reactivation

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    Najeeba Riyaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man, on carbamazepine for the past 3 months, was referred as a case of atypical measles. On examination, he had high-grade fever, generalized itchy rash, cough, vomiting and jaundice. A provisional diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity syndrome to carbamazepine was made with a differential diagnosis of viral exanthema with systemic complications. Laboratory investigations revealed leukocytosis with eosnophilia and elevated liver enzymes. Real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on throat swab and blood was suggestive of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6. Measles was ruled out by PCR and serology. The diagnosis of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS was confirmed, which could explain all the features manifested by the patient. HHV-6 infects almost all humans by age 2 years. It infects and replicates in CD4 T lymphocytes and establishes latency in human peripheral blood monocytes or macrophages and early bone marrow progenitors. In DIHS, allergic reaction to the causative drug stimulates T cells, which leads to reactivation of the herpesvirus genome. DIHS is treated by withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids. Our patient responded well to steroids and HHV-6 was negative on repeat real-time multiplex PCR at the end of treatment.

  20. Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia.

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    Engel, Gregory A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Schillaci, Michael A; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a "monkey forest" (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B.

  1. Prevalence of infection with human herpesvirus 8/Kaposi's sarcoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    8)/Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHY) and to gain some insight into possible transmission dynamics of this novel virus in South Africa. Methods. Stored, anonymous serum from 50 patients with a ~ sexually transmitted disease (STD), ...

  2. Human herpesvirus-6A/B binds to spermatozoa acrosome and is the most prevalent herpesvirus in semen from sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Larsen, Peter B.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of all known human herpesviruses has not previously been reported on sperm from normal donors. Using an array-based detection method, we determined the cross-sectional frequency of human herpesviruses in semen from 198 Danish sperm donors. Fifty-five of the donors had at least one...... ejaculate that was positive for one or more human herpesvirus. Of these 27.3% (n = 15) had a double herpesvirus infection. If corrected for the presence of multiple ejaculates from some donors, the adjusted frequency of herpesviruses in semen was 27.2% with HSV-1 in 0.4%; HSV-2 in 0.1%; EBV in 6.3%; HCMV...... not necessarily remain positive over time. For the most frequently found herpesvirus, HHV-6A/B, we examined its association with sperm. For HHV-6A/B PCR-positive semen samples, HHV-6A/B could be detected on the sperm by flow cytometry. Conversely, PCR-negative semen samples were negative by flow cytometry. HHV-6B...

  3. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

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    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype.

  4. [Studies on the novel association of human herpesvirus-7 with skin diseases].

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    Vág, Tibor; Sonkoly, Enikó; Kemény, Béla; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Horváth, Attila; Ongrádi, József

    2003-08-17

    Human herpesvirus 7 in pityriasis rosea, this and other viruses in papular-purpuric gloves-and-socks syndrome have been implicated, but their primary or recurrent infections are still in question. In one available blood sample, therefore, IgM, IgG and its high avidity fraction characteristic for recurrent infections were quantitated by indirect immunofluorescence. Peripheral lymphocytes were subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction to detect viral DNA, or cocultivated with several cell cultures. One third of 33 pityriasis rosea patients had elevated IgM, another third had elevated IgG without high avidity molecules to human herpesvirus 7 suggesting primary infection. Thirty percent of controls, more than half of the patients had virtual DNA in their lymphocytes, but only one in 5 skin biopsy specimens were PCR positive. All three co-cultivation attempts yielded viruses extremely rapidly, verified by electron microscopy, polymerase chain reaction and monoclonal antibodies as human herpesvirus 7. These are the first isolates in the geographical regions of Hungary. These data suggest that pityriasis rosea is the consequence of a primary human herpesvirus 7 infection in seronegative adults, and only occasionally is due to virus reactivation. One patient with gloves-and-socks syndrome had an acute, another patient had a persistent coinfection with human herpesvirus 7 and parvovirus B19, two others had a primary herpesvirus 7 infection. Interestingly, this disease might be elicited by both viruses individually or in synergism. Neither human herpesvirus 7 nor parvovirus B19 infect skin cells, but both can be detected in the infiltrating lymphocytes of skin eruptions, in which they induce an altered mediator production, that might be responsible for the general and local symptoms.

  5. Association of classic lichen planus with human herpesvirus-7 infection.

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    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Esmaily, Habibollah; Esmaeelzadeh, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous papulosquamous itchy disease with unknown etiology. A number of factors such as immune mechanisms, viral agents, and drugs have been implicated in pathogenesis of lichen planus. In recent years, several studies have indicated the role of viral agents in this disease, including human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7). Studies have given contradictory results, which is why we decided to study the possible association between lichen planus with HHV-7. In this case-control study, which was conducted on 60 cutaneous classic lichen planus samples as well as 60 healthy control skin samples after matching the two groups in terms of gender and age, tissue samples of patients and controls were studied by real time polymerase chain reaction to detect for HHV-7. According to this study, HHV-7 DNA was found in 18 samples of the case group (30.0%) and in six (10.0%) of the control group (P = 0.006). The results of this study support the likely role of HHV-7 in pathogenesis of lichen planus. As an exogenous antigen, this virus may be involved in cellular immune-mediated destruction of keratinocytes. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine-like, secreted protein product of the U83 gene from human herpesvirus 6, here named vCCL4, was chemically synthesized to be characterized in a complete library of the 18 known human chemokine receptors expressed individually in stably transfected cell lines. vCCL4 was found to cause...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  7. Two distinct gamma-2 herpesviruses in African green monkeys: a second gamma-2 herpesvirus lineage among old world primates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greensill, J.; Sheldon, J. A.; Renwick, N. M.; Beer, B. E.; Norley, S.; Goudsmit, J.; Schulz, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Primate gamma-2 herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses) have so far been found in humans (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV], also called human herpesvirus 8), macaques (Macaca spp.) (rhesus rhadinovirus [RRV] and retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus [RFHV]), squirrel monkeys (Saimiri

  8. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  9. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Kotler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae. Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus.

  10. Herpesviruses that infect fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Larry; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2011-11-01

    Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae) and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae). Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus) and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus).

  11. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Larry; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae) and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae). Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus) and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus). PMID:22163339

  12. High Level Human Herpesvirus-6 Viremia Associated with onset of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Report of 2 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppercorn, Amanda F.; Miller, Melissa B.; Fitzgerald, David; Weber, David J.; Groben, Pamela A.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) remains obscure but it has been associated with various infectious agents, including members of the Herpes virus family. We present the first report of high level human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) viremia at the onset of SJS suggesting a possible new association. This finding supports the need for further investigation into the possible relationship between HHV-6 and SJS which may illuminate the pathogenesis of SJS and bring us closer to achieving enhanced prevention and treatment of this rare disease. PMID:20182379

  13. Herpesvirus systematics☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the taxonomy and genomics of herpesviruses. Each theme is presented as a digest of current information flanked by commentaries on past activities and future directions. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses recently instituted a major update of herpesvirus classification. The former family Herpesviridae was elevated to a new order, the Herpesvirales, which now accommodates 3 families, 3 subfamilies, 17 genera and 90 species. Future developments will include revisiting the herpesvirus species definition and the criteria used for taxonomic assignment, particularly in regard to the possibilities of classifying the large number of herpesviruses detected only as DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequence accessions in primary databases, such as GenBank, consist of the sequences plus annotations of the genetic features. The quality of these accessions is important because they provide a knowledge base that is used widely by the research community. However, updating the accessions to take account of improved knowledge is essentially reserved to the original depositors, and this activity is rarely undertaken. Thus, the primary databases are likely to become antiquated. In contrast, secondary databases are open to curation by experts other than the original depositors, thus increasing the likelihood that they will remain up to date. One of the most promising secondary databases is RefSeq, which aims to furnish the best available annotations for complete genome sequences. Progress in regard to improving the RefSeq herpesvirus accessions is discussed, and insights into particular aspects of herpesvirus genomics arising from this work are reported. PMID:20346601

  14. Seroconversion for human herpesvirus 8 during HIV infection is highly predictive of Kaposi's sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renwick, N.; Halaby, T.; Weverling, G. J.; Dukers, N. H.; Simpson, G. R.; Coutinho, R. A.; Lange, J. M.; Schulz, T. F.; Goudsmit, J.

    1998-01-01

    The finding of antibodies against human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with the occurrence of Kaposi's sarcoma in persons infected with HIV. However, the predictive value of HHV-8 antibodies for Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV infection is unknown. The Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS

  15. Human herpesvirus 6B inhibits cell proliferation by a p53-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kaspersen, M.D.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various forms of cellular stress can activate the tumour suppressor protein p53, an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Cells infected by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) accumulate aberrant amounts of p53. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...

  16. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...

  17. Induction of cell-cell fusion from without by human herpesvirus 6B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Øster, Bodil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 6A induce fusion from without (FFWO), whereas HHV-6B is believed to be ineffective in this process. Here, we demonstrate that HHV-6B induces rapid fusion in both epithelial cells and lymphocytes. The fusion was identified 1 h postinfection, could be inhibited by antibodies...

  18. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpesviruses reacted with fewer HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M r polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105k and gp82k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  19. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: human herpesvirus 1 [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term human herpesvirus 1 名詞 一般 * * * * 単純ヘルペスウイルス1型 タンジュンヘルペスウイ...ルス1ガタ タンジュンヘルペスーイルスイチガタ Thesaurus2015 200906015205132965 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 human herpesvirus 1

  20. Estimating immunoregulatory gene networks in human herpesvirus type 6-infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Tomoiku; Ohyashiki, Junko H.; Zhang, Yu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2005-01-01

    The immune response to viral infection involves complex network of dynamic gene and protein interactions. We present here the dynamic gene network of the host immune response during human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) infection in an adult T-cell leukemia cell line. Using a pathway-focused oligonucleotide DNA microarray, we found a possible association between chemokine genes regulating Th1/Th2 balance and genes regulating T-cell proliferation during HHV-6B infection. Gene network analysis using an integrated comprehensive workbench, VoyaGene, revealed that a gene encoding a TEC-family kinase, ITK, might be a putative modulator in the host immune response against HHV-6B infection. We conclude that Th2-dominated inflammatory reaction in host cells may play an important role in HHV-6B-infected T cells, thereby suggesting the possibility that ITK might be a therapeutic target in diseases related to dysregulation of Th1/Th2 balance. This study describes a novel approach to find genes related with the complex host-virus interaction using microarray data employing the Bayesian statistical framework

  1. Dual transcriptomics of virus-host interactions: comparing two Pacific oyster families presenting contrasted susceptibility to ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Amélie; Mauduit, Florian; Faury, Nicole; Trancart, Suzanne; Dégremont, Lionel; Tourbiez, Delphine; Haffner, Philippe; Barbosa-Solomieu, Valérie; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2014-07-09

    Massive mortality outbreaks affecting Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) spat in various countries have been associated with the detection of a herpesvirus called ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). However, few studies have been performed to understand and follow viral gene expression, as it has been done in vertebrate herpesviruses. In this work, experimental infection trials of C. gigas spat with OsHV-1 were conducted in order to test the susceptibility of several bi-parental oyster families to this virus and to analyze host-pathogen interactions using in vivo transcriptomic approaches. The divergent response of these oyster families in terms of mortality confirmed that susceptibility to OsHV-1 infection has a significant genetic component. Two families with contrasted survival rates were selected. A total of 39 viral genes and five host genes were monitored by real-time PCR. Initial results provided information on (i) the virus cycle of OsHV-1 based on the kinetics of viral DNA replication and transcription and (ii) host defense mechanisms against the virus. In the two selected families, the detected amounts of viral DNA and RNA were significantly different. This result suggests that Pacific oysters are genetically diverse in terms of their susceptibility to OsHV-1 infection. This contrasted susceptibility was associated with dissimilar host gene expression profiles. Moreover, the present study showed a positive correlation between viral DNA amounts and the level of expression of selected oyster genes.

  2. Simultaneous radioimmunoassay for specific antibodies to members of the human herpesvirus group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehle, W.D.; Smith, K.O.; Fuccillo, D.A.; Perry, A.; Andrese, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous radioimmunoassay (RIA) for antibody to members of the human herpesvirus group. The RIA is compared with some of the conventional serologic techniques used to quantitate antibody to these viruses (Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus). Color-coded beads, each coated with the antigens of a different herpesvirus, were simultaneously placed in a well which contained a human serum to be assayed for antibody to each of these 4 viruses. The results of this test were compared with the results obtained when the serum was assayed for antibody to the 4 viruses in 4 separate tests. We conclude that the antigen-antibody reactions do not significantly interfere with each other when a serum is assayed for antibody to the 4 viruses simultaneously. A comparison of the RIA with conventional serologic techniques shows excellent correlation in the antibody titers obtained. Features of the solid-phase RIA allow significant savings of time, reagents and space, and thus make it feasible for the small laboratory to screen large numbers of sera for antibody to a variety of antigens. (Auth.)

  3. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpes viruses reacted with few HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M/sub r/ polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105K and gp92k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  4. No increased sperm DNA fragmentation index in semen containing human papillomavirus or herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Bungum, Mona; Fedder, Jens

    2013-01-01

    It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or human herpesviruses (HHVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen from 76 sperm donors was examined by a PCR......-based hybridization array that identifies all HHVs and 35 of the most common HPVs. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by the sperm chromatin structure assay. HPVs or HHVs, or both, were found in 57% of semen samples; however, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses....

  5. Predominant CD4 T-lymphocyte tropism of human herpesvirus 6-related virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, K; Sonoda, S; Higashi, K; Kondo, T; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, M; Yamanishi, K

    1989-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-related virus was isolated from CD4+ CD8- and CD3+ CD4+ mature T lymphocytes but could not be isolated from CD4- CD8+, CD4- CD8-, and CD3- T cells in the peripheral blood of exanthem subitum patients. HHV-6-related virus predominantly infected CD4+ CD8+, CD4+ CD8-, and CD3+ CD4+ cells with mature phenotypes and rarely infected CD4- CD8+ cells from cord blood mononuclear cells, which suggested predominant CD4 mature T-lymphocyte tropism of HHV-6-related virus.

  6. Detection of human herpesvirus 8 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction: development and standardisation of methods

    OpenAIRE

    Speicher, David J; Johnson, Newell W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), the aetiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is rare in Australia, but endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of South-east Asia and Oceania. While the treatment of external KS lesions can be monitored by clinical observation, the internal lesions of KS, MCD and PEL require extensive and expensive internal imaging, or autopsy. In patients with MCD and PEL, if HHV-8 vi...

  7. High seroprevalence of human herpesviruses in HIV-infected individuals attending primary healthcare facilities in rural South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Schaftenaar (Willem); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); S. Getu (Sarah); J.A. McIntyre (James); H.E. Struthers (Helen); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.P.H. Peters (Remco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSeroprevalence data of human herpesviruses (HHVs) are limited for sub-Saharan Africa. These are important to provide an indication of potential burden of HHV-related disease, in particular in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals who are known to be at increased risk of

  8. Lack of association between human herpesvirus and vestibular schwannoma: analysis of 121 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimrao, Sanjiv K; Maguire, John; Garnis, Cathie; Tang, Patrick; Lea, Jane; Akagami, Ryojo; Westerberg, Brian D

    2015-03-01

    To assess for the presence of human herpesvirus (HHV) using immunohistochemical and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in surgically excised vestibular schwannoma (VS) samples. Cross-sectional study. A retrospective laboratory-based study of tumors from patients with vestibular schwannoma. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) representing sporadic and NF2-associated VS from 121 patients, as well as appropriate positive and negative controls, were studied. TMA sections were immunostained using antibodies directed against HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3, HHV-4, HHV-5, and HHV-8. PCR was used for the detection of all 8 known human herpesviruses. There was no detectable HHV (HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3, HHV-4, HHV-5, HHV-8) by immunohistochemistry in any of the 121 cases of sporadic and NF2 cases analyzed. These data were further validated by DNA sequence analyses using PCR in a subset of the VS samples, all of which were found to be negative for all HHV. The data offer no support for an association between HHV and the development of sporadic or NF2-associated VS in humans. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  9. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael L; Royle, Nicola J

    2017-07-12

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  10. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  11. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) encoded by human herpesvirus 8 is a highly constitutively active seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor stimulated by angiogenic chemokines, e.g. growth-related oncogene-alpha, and inhibited by angiostatic chemokines e.g. interferon-gamma-inducible protein. Transgenic mice...

  12. Influenza-associated encephalopathy: no evidence for neuroinvasion by influenza virus nor for reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 or 7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeijl, J.H.; Bakkers, J.; Wilbrink, B.; Melchers, W.J.; Mullaart, R.A.; Galama, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    During 2 consecutive influenza seasons we investigated the presence of influenza virus, human herpesvirus (HHV) type 6, and HHV-7 in cerebrospinal fluid samples from 9 white children suffering from influenza-associated encephalopathy. We conclude that it is unlikely that neuroinvasion by influenza

  13. Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus type 8 infections of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Antonio

    2004-06-01

    In developing guidelines for the improved management of herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), the International Herpes Management Forum (IHMF) has studied Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8)- related diseases. EBV has been associated with numerous CNS diseases including meningitis, encephalitis and post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). The pathogenesis of EBV-associated CNS disorders is not completely understood but may be due to direct virus invasion of the CNS. Alternatively, damage may be immunologically mediated by infiltration of cytotoxic CD8+ lymphocytes into neural tissue or deposition of antibody-antigen complexes. The IHMF recommends that diagnosis of EBV infections of the CNS may involve polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for EBV DNA but the sensitivity and specificity of the technique remains to be determined. Furthermore, the value of PCR in this context may be limited as EBV DNA is often detected in patients without neurological symptoms. Antiviral therapy has not demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of EBV-related CNS disorders. CNS complications of HHV-8 infection are rare, but the virus has been associated with AIDS-dementia complex, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary CNS lymphoma; however these links remain to be proven.

  14. Human herpesvirus-6 and -7 DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of facial palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Mervi; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Suvela, Minna; Piiparinen, Heli; Vaheri, Antti; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Finding human herpesvirus (HHV)-7 and dual HHV-6A and -6B DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two facial palsy (FP) patients is intriguing but does not allow etiologic conclusions as such. HHV-6 or -7 DNA was revealed in 10% of the CSF samples tested from 70 immunocompetent adolescents and adults; a highly unusual result. How these findings are associated with the diseases they accompany remains to be defined. To determine whether herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and -2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), HHV-6A, -6B, and -7, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA could be found in CSF of FP patients or controls. In all, 33 peripheral FP patients (26 idiopathic, 5 with herpesvirus infection, 1 puerperal, 1 Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome) (34 CSF samples) and 36 controls (16 nonidiopathic FP, 7 hearing loss, 6 vertigo, 5 headache, 2 other) previously tested for HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were tested with highly sensitive multiplex-PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray method. One FP patient had HHV-7 DNA and another had HHV-6A and -6B DNA simultaneously. In the control group, one HHV-7, one HHV-6A, and three HHV-6B DNA-positive specimens were found.

  15. Increasing seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) with age confirms HHV-8 endemicity in Amazon Amerindians from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A M G; Caterino-de-Araujo, A; Costa, S C B; Santos-Fortuna, E; Boa-Sorte, N C A; Gonçalves, M S; Costa, F F; Galvão-Castro, B

    2005-09-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) seroprevalences were determined in two isolated Amazon Amerindian tribes, according to age, gender and familial aggregation. Plasma and serum samples obtained from 982 Amazon Amerindians (664 Tiriyó and 318 Waiampi) were tested for antibodies against lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens by using 'in-house' immunofluorescence assays. Overall, HHV-8 seroprevalence was 56.8 % (57.4 % in the Tiriyó tribe and 55.7 % in the Waiampi tribe). Seroprevalence was independent of gender and increased linearly with age: it was 35.0 % among children aged 2-9 years, 51.4 % in adolescents (10-19 years), 72.9 % in adults and 82.3 % in adults aged >50 years. Interestingly, 44.4 % of children under 2 years of age were HHV-8-seropositive. No significant differences in seroprevalence between tribes and age groups were detected. It is concluded that HHV-8 is hyperendemic in Brazilian Amazon Amerindians, with vertical and horizontal transmission during childhood, familial transmission and sexual contact in adulthood contributing to this high prevalence in these isolated populations.

  16. MicroRNAs in large herpesvirus DNA genomes: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorel, Océane; Dewals, Benjamin G

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. They alter mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity, leading to regulation of genes during both physiological and pathological processes. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to take advantage of the host cells to multiply and/or persist over the lifetime of the host. Herpesviridae are a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with a number of important diseases, including lymphoproliferative diseases. Herpesviruses establish lifelong latent infections through modulation of the interface between the virus and its host. A number of reports have identified miRNAs in a very large number of human and animal herpesviruses suggesting that these short non-coding transcripts could play essential roles in herpesvirus biology. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances on the functions of herpesvirus miRNAs in infection and pathogenesis.

  17. The Neutralizing Linear Epitope of Human Herpesvirus 6A Glycoprotein B Does Not Affect Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakata, Aika; Kanemoto, Satoshi; Tang, Huamin; Kawabata, Akiko; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Jasirwan, Chyntia; Mahmoud, Nora Fahmy; Mori, Yasuko

    2018-03-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) glycoprotein B (gB) is a glycoprotein consisting of 830 amino acids and is essential for the growth of the virus. Previously, we reported that a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) called 87-y-13 specifically reacts with HHV-6A gB, and we identified its epitope residue at asparagine (Asn) 347 on gB. In this study, we examined whether the epitope recognized by the neutralizing MAb is essential for HHV-6A infection. We constructed HHV-6A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomes harboring substitutions at Asn347, namely, HHV-6A BACgB(N347K) and HHV-6A BACgB(N347A). These mutant viruses could be reconstituted and propagated in the same manner as the wild type and their revertants, and MAb 87-y-13 could not inhibit infection by either mutant. In a cell-cell fusion assay, Asn at position 347 on gB was found to be nonessential for cell-cell fusion. In addition, in building an HHV-6A gB homology model, we found that the epitope of the neutralizing MAb is located on domain II of gB and is accessible to solvents. These results indicate that Asn at position 347, the linear epitope of the neutralizing MAb, does not affect HHV-6A infectivity. IMPORTANCE Glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the most conserved glycoproteins among all herpesviruses and is a key factor for virus entry. Therefore, antibodies targeted to gB may neutralize virus entry. Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) encodes gB, which is translated to a protein of about 830 amino acids (aa). Using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for HHV-6A gB, which has a neutralizing linear epitope, we analyzed the role of its epitope residue, N347, in HHV-6A infectivity. Interestingly, this gB linear epitope residue, N347, was not essential for HHV-6A growth. By constructing a homology model of HHV-6A gB, we found that N347 was located in the region corresponding to domain II. Therefore, with regard to its neutralizing activity against HHV-6A infection, the epitope on gB might be exposed to solvents

  18. Human herpesvirus-8 positive iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in the setting of refractory ulcerative colitis.

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    Duh, Erica; Fine, Sean

    2017-12-16

    Although Kaposi sarcoma (KS) has been more traditionally considered an AIDS-defining illness, it may also be seen in individuals on immunosuppresive therapy. We report a case of a patient who presented to the hospital in the setting of increasingly refractory ulcerative colitis. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen was consistent with sigmoid diverticulititis and blood cultures were positive for Klebsiella. After a course of antibiotics with resolution of infection, a colonoscopy was performed to evaluate his diverticulitis and incidentally revealed a new rectal tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed the tumor was consistent with KS, with cells staining strongly positive for human herpesvirus-8. This case not only illustrates a rare case of KS found in an HIV-negative individual, but it also highlights the importance of considering an alternative diagnosis in a patient refractory to medical treatment. We discuss the management and care of an ulcerative colitis patient diagnosed with KS on immunosuppressive therapy.

  19. [Human herpesvirus-6 pneumonitis following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yuu; Gotoh, Moritaka; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Akahane, Daigo; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2018-01-01

    A-46-year-old man was diagnosed with peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. He achieved a complete remission after pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (THP-COP) therapy and successful autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation (AutoSCT). However, 6 months post AutoSCT, he complained of fever. Chest computed tomography of the patient displayed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Therefore, the patient was confirmed for HHV-6 pneumonitis. The treatment with foscarnet was effective, and no relapse was noticed in the patient. Besides, we have experienced pneumonitis of unknown origin in some patients after autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantations. Moreover, most of the above patients were clinically diagnosed using serum or plasma markers. Therefore, examining respiratory symptoms after AutoSCT would enable a more accurate diagnosis as well as treatment of patients with HHV-6 pneumonitis.

  20. Presence of Human Herpesvirus 6B in the Pancreas of Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes.

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    Ericsson, Maja; Skog, Oskar

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) A and B in human pancreata and to search for signs of active infection in this organ of subjects with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). Pancreata from brain-dead organ donors with and without T1D were examined for the presence of HHV6 genomic sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), transcripts by reverse transcriptase-PCR, and protein by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative PCR of isolated pancreatic islets and exocrine cell clusters was used to determine the intrapancreatic location of HHV6 DNA. Human herpesvirus 6B genomic sequences were present in 1 of 2 donors who died of acute-onset T1D, 4 of 6 donors with long-standing T1D, and 9 of 12 nondiabetic donors. Higher copy numbers of HHV6B DNA were present in isolated islets than in exocrine tissue from the same donors. No signs of active HHV6 transcription were found. Human herpesvirus 6A was not present in any tested pancreas. The herein presented data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of a latent HHV6B infection in the pancreas and islets of Langerhans. Whether this virus can contribute to disease in the pancreas remains to be determined.

  1. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

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    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  2. Advances in the Characterization of the T-Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus-6

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    Derek J. Hanson

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus (HHV 6 is thought to remain clinically latent in most individuals after primary infection and to reactivate to cause disease in persons with severe immunosuppression. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, reactivation of HHV-6 species B is a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality. HHV-6B reactivation is the most frequent cause of infectious meningoencephalitis in this setting and has been associated with a variety of other complications such as graft rejection and acute graft versus host disease. This has inspired efforts to develop HHV-6-targeted immunotherapies. Basic knowledge of HHV-6-specific adaptive immunity is crucial for these endeavors, but remains incomplete. Many studies have focused on specific HHV-6 antigens extrapolated from research on human cytomegalovirus, a genetically related betaherpesvirus. Challenges to the study of HHV-6-specific T-cell immunity include the very low frequency of HHV-6-specific memory T cells in chronically infected humans, the large genome size of HHV-6, and the lack of an animal model. This review will focus on emerging techniques and methodological improvements that are beginning to overcome these barriers. Population-prevalent antigens are now becoming clear for the CD4+ T-cell response, while definition and ranking of CD8+ T-cell antigens and epitopes is at an earlier stage. This review will discuss current knowledge of the T-cell response to HHV-6, new research approaches, and translation to clinical practice.

  3. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

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    Sawbridge Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of herpesviruses. Results We sequenced the genome of a neurotropic virus linked to a fatal ganglioneuritis devastating parts of a valuable wild abalone fishery in Australia. We show that the newly identified virus forms part of an ancient clade with its nearest relatives being a herpesvirus infecting bivalves (oyster and, unexpectedly, one we identified, from published data, apparently integrated within the genome of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. Predicted protein sequences from the abalone virus genome have significant similarity to several herpesvirus proteins including the DNA packaging ATPase subunit of (putative terminase and DNA polymerase. Conservation of amino acid sequences in the terminase across all herpesviruses and phylogenetic analysis using the DNA polymerase and terminase proteins demonstrate that the herpesviruses infecting the molluscs, oyster and abalone, are distantly related. The terminase and polymerase protein sequences from the putative amphioxus herpesvirus share more sequence similarity with those of the mollusc viruses than with sequences from any of the vertebrate herpesviruses analysed. Conclusions A family of mollusc herpesviruses, Malacoherpesviridae, that was based on a single virus infecting oyster can now be further established by including a distantly related herpesvirus infecting abalone, which, like many vertebrate viruses is neurotropic. The genome of Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus provides evidence for the

  4. Association between human herpesvirus infections and dementia or mild cognitive impairment: a systematic review protocol.

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    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Forbes, Harriet; Breuer, Judith; Hayward, Andrew C; Mavrodaris, Angelique; Ridha, Basil H; Rossor, Martin; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam

    2017-06-23

    Persisting neurotropic viruses are proposed to increase the risk of dementia, but evidence of association from robust, adequately powered population studies is lacking. This is essential to inform clinical trials of targeted preventive interventions. We will carry out a comprehensive systematic review of published and grey literature of the association between infection with, reactivation of, vaccination against or treatment of any of the eight human herpesviruses and dementia or mild cognitive impairment. We will search the Cochrane Library, Embase, Global Health, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, clinical trials registers, the New York Academy of Medicine Grey Literature Report, Electronic Theses Online Service through the British Library and the ISI Conference Proceedings Citation Index for randomised controlled trials, cohort, caseâ€"control, case crossover or self-controlled case series studies reported in any language up to January 2017. Titles, abstracts and full-text screening will be conducted by two researchers independently. Data will be extracted systematically from eligible studies using a piloted template. We will assess risk of bias of individual studies in line with the Cochrane Collaboration tool. We will conduct a narrative synthesis, grouping studies by exposure and outcome definitions, and will describe any differences by population subgroups and dementia subtypes. We will consider performing meta-analyses if there are adequate numbers of sufficiently homogeneous studies. The overall quality of cumulative evidence will be assessed using selected Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations criteria. As this is a review of existing studies, no ethical approval is required. Results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and at national and international conferences. We anticipate the review will clarify the current extent and quality of evidence for a link between herpesviruses and dementia

  5. Antibodies against six human herpesviruses in relation to seven cancers in black South Africans: A case control study

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    Ruff P

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with certain human herpesviruses have been established as risk factors for some cancer types. For example, Epstein-Barr Virus is considered a cause of Burkitt's lymphoma and other immunosuppression related lymphomas, Hodgkin lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal cancer. Several other human herpesviruses have been linked to cancers but the totality of evidence is inconclusive. Methods We conducted a systematic sub-study from within an ongoing case control study of adult black South Africans to investigate the relationship between antibodies to six human herpesviruses and seven cancer groups that may be caused by infectious agents. Subjects had incident cancers of the oral cavity(n = 88, the cervix(n = 53, the prostate(n = 66, Hodgkin lymphoma(n = 83, non-Hodgkin lymphoma(n = 80, multiple myeloma(n = 94 or leukaemia(n = 203. For comparison, patients with other cancers(n = 95 or cardiovascular disease(n = 101 were randomly selected from within the study. Patients were interviewed and their blood was tested for IgG antibodies against HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, EBV-EBNA, CMV and HHV-6 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Because these viruses are highly prevalent in this population, optical density results from the assays were used as an indirect, quantitative measure of antibody level. Results There was significant variation in the mean log antibody measures for HSV-2, VZV, CMV and HHV-6 between the disease groups. However, none of the specific cancer groups had significantly higher mean log antibody measures for any of the viruses compared to either control group. In a more detailed examination of seven associations between cancers and herpesviruses for which there had been prior reports, two statistically significant associations were found: a decreasing risk of myeloid leukaemia and an increasing risk of oral cancer with increasing tertiles of antibodies against HHV-6 compared to all other patients (p-trend = 0.03 and 0

  6. Neuroimaging of herpesvirus infections in children

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    Baskin, Henry J. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hedlund, Gary [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Six members of the herpesvirus family cause well-described neurologic disease in children: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster (VZV), Epstein-Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). When herpesviruses infect the central nervous system (CNS), the clinical presentation is non-specific and often confounding. The clinical urgency is often underscored by progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, or even death, and prompt diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on neuroimaging. This review focuses on the spectrum of cerebral manifestations caused by these viruses, particularly on non-congenital presentations. Recent advances in our understanding of these viruses are discussed, including new polymerase chain reaction techniques that allow parallel detection, which has improved our recognition that the herpesviruses are neurotropic and involve the CNS more often than previously thought. Evolving knowledge has also better elucidated viral neuropathology, particularly the role of VZV vasculitis in the brain, HHV-6 in febrile seizures, and herpesvirus reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. The virology, clinical course, and CNS manifestations of each virus are reviewed, followed by descriptions of neuroimaging findings when these agents infect the brain. Characteristic but often subtle imaging findings are discussed, as well as technical pearls covering appropriate use of MRI and MRI adjuncts to help differentiate viral infection from mimics. (orig.)

  7. Neuroimaging of herpesvirus infections in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, Henry J.; Hedlund, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Six members of the herpesvirus family cause well-described neurologic disease in children: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster (VZV), Epstein-Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). When herpesviruses infect the central nervous system (CNS), the clinical presentation is non-specific and often confounding. The clinical urgency is often underscored by progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, or even death, and prompt diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on neuroimaging. This review focuses on the spectrum of cerebral manifestations caused by these viruses, particularly on non-congenital presentations. Recent advances in our understanding of these viruses are discussed, including new polymerase chain reaction techniques that allow parallel detection, which has improved our recognition that the herpesviruses are neurotropic and involve the CNS more often than previously thought. Evolving knowledge has also better elucidated viral neuropathology, particularly the role of VZV vasculitis in the brain, HHV-6 in febrile seizures, and herpesvirus reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. The virology, clinical course, and CNS manifestations of each virus are reviewed, followed by descriptions of neuroimaging findings when these agents infect the brain. Characteristic but often subtle imaging findings are discussed, as well as technical pearls covering appropriate use of MRI and MRI adjuncts to help differentiate viral infection from mimics. (orig.)

  8. Development and validation of a Q-PCR based TCID50 method for human herpesvirus 6

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    Gustafsson Rasmus K L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For titer assessment of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6, IFA targeting viral proteins or a TCID50 method with ocular inspection for CPE can be used. These methods rely on the subjective decision of the assessor, obstructing the ability to obtain unanimous results. Findings We have developed and validated an alternative TCID50 read-out approach where infection in the titration culture plate is assessed by viral DNA load change by quantitative PCR. A ten time increase in viral DNA load was determined as cut point for infection since that yielded a maximum correlation with viral protein expression (93%. The average intra-assay CV was 9% for quantitative PCR read-out of TCID50 compared to 45% for ocular inspection read-out of TCID50, 14% for IFA read-out of TCID50, and 43% for an infectious units approach using IFA. The average inter-assay CV for quantitative PCR read-out of TCID50 was 73%, compared to 66%, 25% and 77% for the ocular inspection read-out for TCID50, IFA read-out of TCID50 and infectious unit approaches respectively. Conclusions The quantitative PCR based read-out of TCID50 proved to be more robust and easier to interpret than traditional TCID50 assessment approaches for HHV-6, and therefore it might be considered as an alternative method.

  9. Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Human Herpesvirus-6-Associated Acute Encephalopathy/Febrile Seizures

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    Naoyuki Tanuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of acute encephalopathy associated with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 infection, we measured the levels of oxidative stress markers 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, tau protein, and cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF obtained from patients with HHV-6-associated acute encephalopathy (HHV-6 encephalopathy (n=16 and complex febrile seizures associated with HHV-6 (HHV-6 complex FS (n=10. We also examined changes in CSF-8OHdG and CSF-HEL levels in patients with HHV-6 encephalopathy before and after treatment with edaravone, a free radical scavenger. CSF-8-OHdG levels in HHV-6 encephalopathy and HHV-6 complex FS were significantly higher than in control subjects. In contrast, CSF-HEL levels showed no significant difference between groups. The levels of total tau protein in HHV-6 encephalopathy were significantly higher than in control subjects. In six patients with HHV-6 infection (5 encephalopathy and 1 febrile seizure, the CSF-8-OHdG levels of five patients decreased after edaravone treatment. Our results suggest that oxidative DNA damage is involved in acute encephalopathy associated with HHV-6 infection.

  10. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

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    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and quantitative investigations of the protein content of HHV-6A virions. In our iodixanol gradient purified preparation, we detected high levels of viral DNA by real-time PCR and viral proteins by metabolic labelling, silver staining and western blots. In contrast, the background level of cellular contamination was low in the purified samples as demonstrated by the silver staining and metabolic labelling analyses. Western blot analyses showed that the cellular complement protein CD46, the receptor for HHV-6A, is associated with the purified and infectious virions. Also, the cellular proteins clathrin, ezrin and Tsg101 are associated with intact HHV-6A virions. Conclusion Cellular proteins are associated with HHV-6A virions. The relevance of the association in disease and especially in autoimmunity will be further investigated.

  11. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Hoellsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction

  12. The genome of herpesvirus saimiri C488 which is capable of transforming human T cells

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    Ensser, Armin; Thurau, Mathias; Wittmann, Sabine; Fickenscher, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS), the rhadinovirus prototype, is apathogenic in the persistently infected natural host, the squirrel monkey, but causes acute T cell leukemia in other New World primate species. In contrast to subgroups A and B, only strains of HVS subgroup C such as C488 are capable of transforming primary human T cells to stable antigen-independent growth in culture. Here, we report the complete 155-kb genome sequence of the transformation-competent HVS strain C488. The A+T-rich unique L-DNA of 113,027 bp encodes at least 77 open reading frames and 5 URNAs. In addition to the viral oncogenes stp and tip, only a few genes including the transactivator orf50 and the glycoprotein orf51 are highly divergent. In a series of new primary HVS isolates, the subgroup-specific divergence of the orf50/orf51 alleles was studied. In these new isolates, the orf50/orf51 alleles of the respective subgroup segregate with the stp and/or tip oncogene alleles, which are essential for transformation

  13. Feline herpesvirus.

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    Gaskell, Rosalind; Dawson, Susan; Radford, Alan; Thiry, Etienne

    2007-01-01

    Feline herpesvirus (FHV-1; felid herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1)) is an alphaherpesvirus of cats closely related to canine herpesvirus-1 and phocine herpesvirus-1. There is only one serotype of the virus and it is relatively homogenous genetically. FeHV-1 is an important cause of acute upper respiratory tract and ocular disease in cats. In addition, its role in more chronic ocular disease and skin lesions is increasingly being recognised. Epidemiologically, FeHV-1 behaves as a typical alphaherpesvirus whereby clinically recovered cats become latently infected carriers which undergo periodic episodes of virus reactivation, particularly after a stress. The primary site of latency is the trigeminal ganglion. Conventional inactivated and modified-live vaccines are available and protect reasonably well against disease but not infection, although viral shedding may be reduced. Genetically engineered vaccines have also been developed, both for FeHV-1 and as vector vaccines for other pathogens, but none is as yet marketed.

  14. Nuclear Factor kappa B is required for the production of infectious human herpesvirus 8 virions

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    Negin N Blattman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 infection leads to potent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFB in primary and transformed cells. We used recombinant HHV8 (rKSHV.219 expressing green fluorescent protein under the constitutive cellular promoter elongation factor 2 and red fluorescent protein under an early HHV8 lytic gene promoter T1.1, to monitor replication during infection of human foreskin fibroblasts (HF, noting changes in NFB activity. In primary HF, NFB levels do not affect HHV8 ability to establish infection or maintain latency. Furthermore, there was no effect on the percent of cells undergoing reactivation from latency, and there were similar numbers of released and cell associated HHV8 viral particles following reactivation in the presence of inhibitors. Reactivation of HHV8 in latently infected HF in the presence of NFB inhibitors resulted in production of viral particles that did not efficiently establish infection, due to deficiencies in binding and/or entry into normally permissive cells. Exogenous expression of glycoprotein M, an envelope protein involved in viral binding and entry was able to partially overcome the deficiency induced by NFB inhibitors. Our data indicate that in primary cells, NFB is not required for infection, establishment of latency, or entry into the lytic cycle, but is required for the expression of virion associated genes involved in the initial steps of virion infectivity. These studies suggest that strategies to inhibit NFB may prevent HHV8 spread and should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for preventing HHV8 associated diseases.

  15. Serological evidence of herpesvirus infection in gibbons

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    Ratanakorn Parntep

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses are not only infectious agents of worldwide distribution in humans, but have also been demonstrated in various non-human primates as well. Seventy-eight gibbons were subjected to serological tests by ELISA for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV. Results The prevalence of IgG antibodies against HSV-1, HSV-2, EBV and CMV was 28.2%, 28.2%, 14.1% and 17.9%, respectively. Conclusions Antigenic cross-reactivity is expected to exist between the human herpesviruses and gibbon herpesviruses. Gibbons have antibodies to human herpesviruses that may reflect zoonotic infection with human herpesviruses or infection with indigenous gibbon herpesviruses. Therefore, it is difficult to draw concrete conclusions from serological studies alone. Identification should be based on further isolation and molecular characterization of viruses from seropositive animals.

  16. Occupational trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome: human herpesvirus 6 reactivation and rash phenotypes.

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    Kamijima, Michihiro; Wang, Hailan; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Ito, Yuki; Xia, Lihua; Yanagiba, Yukie; Chen, Cishan; Okamura, Ai; Huang, Zhenlie; Qiu, Xinxiang; Song, Xiangrong; Cai, Tingfeng; Liu, Lili; Ge, Yichen; Deng, Yingyu; Naito, Hisao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Nakajima, Tamie

    2013-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent which can cause severe generalized dermatitis, i.e., occupational TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. Reactivation of latent human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) can occur in such patients, which has made TCE known as a causative chemical of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). This study aimed to clarify HHV6 status, cytokine profiles and their association with rash phenotypes in patients with TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. HHV6 DNA copy numbers, anti-HHV6 antibody titers, and cytokines were measured in blood prospectively sampled 5-7 times from 28 hospitalized patients with the disease. The patients (19 had exfoliative dermatitis (ED) and 9 had non-ED type rash) generally met the diagnostic criteria for DIHS. Viral reactivation defined as increases in either HHV6 DNA (≥100 genomic copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells) or antibody titers was identified in 24 (89%) patients. HHV6 DNA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were remarkably higher in the patients than in the healthy workers (p<0.01). Positive correlations between HHV6 DNA, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-10 were significant (p<0.05) except for that between HHV6 DNA and IFN-γ. An increase in HHV6 DNA was positively associated with an increase in TNF-α on admission (p<0.01). HHV6 DNA, the antibody titers, TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in ED than in the non-ED type (p<0.05). Reactivated HHV6 and the increased cytokines could be biomarkers of TCE hypersensitivity syndrome. The higher-level reactivation and stronger humoral responses were associated with ED-type rash. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic assays for active infection with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6).

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    Caserta, Mary T; Hall, Caroline Breese; Schnabel, Kenneth; Lofthus, Geraldine; Marino, Andrea; Shelley, Lynne; Yoo, Christina; Carnahan, Jennifer; Anderson, Linda; Wang, Hongyue

    2010-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) causes ubiquitous infection in early childhood with lifelong latency or persistence. Reactivation of HHV-6 has been associated with multiple diseases including encephalitis. Chromosomal integration of HHV-6 also occurs. Previous studies have suggested that the detection of HHV-6 DNA in plasma is an accurate marker of active viral replication. We sought to determine whether PCR assays on plasma could correctly differentiate between primary HHV-6 infection, chromosomal integration of HHV-6 and latent HHV-6 infection. We performed qualitative PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR), and reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays on samples of peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells, as well as plasma, from groups of subjects with well defined HHV-6 infection, including subjects with chromosomally integrated HHV-6. The detection of HHV-6 DNA in plasma was 92% sensitive compared to viral isolation for the identification of primary infection with HHV-6. All plasma samples from infants with chromosomally integrated HHV-6 had HHV-6 DNA detectable in plasma while only 5.6% were positive by RT-PCR. The specificity of plasma PCR for active replication of HHV-6 was 84% compared to viral culture while the specificity of RT-PCR was 98%. Our results demonstrate that qualitative or quantitative PCR of plasma is insufficient to distinguish between active viral replication and chromosomal integration with HHV-6. We found a higher specificity of RT-PCR performed on PBMC samples compared to PCR or RQ-PCR performed on plasma when evaluating samples for active HHV-6 replication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

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    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  19. Seroprevalence of Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nategh Rakhshandeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seroepidemiological surveys show that the prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection mostly varies in various geographical areas and reflects the local incidence of classic and endemic KS, being widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean countries and uncommon in the USA and Northern Europe. In the Middle East only few populations, such as Ashkenazi and Sephardic groups in Israel, have been adequately evaluated for HHV-8 seroprevalence. Among Iranian population a striking higher seroprevalence of HHV8 has been reported among haemodialysis (16.9%, renal transplant recipients (25% and HIV (45.7% patients compared to blood donors (2%. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is the rarest cancer in Iran, with an annual age-standardized incidence varying from 0.10 to 0.17 per 100,000 in males and from 0.06 to 0.08 per 100,000 in females. KS, however, is one of the most important malignancies in Iranian renal transplanted patients affecting up to 2.4% of organ recipients. The epidemiology of HHV8 and KS in Iran needs further evaluation. While the high prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in HIV positive and haemodialysis individuals may be attributed to high-risk sexual behavior and polytransfusions, respectively, unknown determinants may be responsible for high seroprevalence of HHV8 and high incidence of KS in solid organ recipients. A global survey on HHV8 seroprevalence in Iran is mandatory to define co-factors associated with HHV8 infection and KS risk in the general Iranian population and in specific patient groups.

  20. Selective reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccolo, Francesco; Drago, Francesco; Cassina, Giulia; Fava, Andrea; Fusetti, Lisa; Matteoli, Barbara; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Lusso, Paolo; Parodi, Aurora; Malnati, Mauro S

    2013-11-01

    Viral infections have been associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases. To evaluate whether active infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus (HHV)-6, -7, -8, as well as parvovirus B19 (B19V) occur in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, viral DNA loads were assessed in paired samples of serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 115 patients affected by different disorders, including systemic sclerosis, systemic, and discoid lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and dermatomyositis. Two additional groups, patients affected by inflammatory diseases (n=51) and healthy subjects (n=58) were studied as controls. The titers of anti-HHV-6 and anti-EBV antibodies were also evaluated. Cell-free HHV-6 serum viremia was detected in a significantly higher proportion of connective tissue diseases patients compared to controls (Preactivation and the active disease state was found only for lupus erythematosus (P=0.021). By contrast, the rate of cell-free EBV viremia was similar in patients and controls groups. Cell-free CMV, HHV-8, and B19V viremia was not detected in any subject. Anti-HHV-6 and anti-EBV early antigen IgG titers were both significantly higher in autoimmune diseases patients as compared to healthy controls, although they were not associated with the presence of viremia. EBV, HHV-6, -7 prevalence and viral load in PBMCs of patients with connective tissue diseases and controls were similar. These data suggest that HHV-6 may act as a pathogenic factor predisposing patients to the development of autoimmune connective tissue diseases or, conversely, that these disorders may predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    -associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...

  2. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: Innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    -associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...

  3. Cell Culture Systems To Study Human Herpesvirus 6A/B Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Collin, Vanessa; Hall-Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R; Mori, Yasuko; Carbonneau, Julie; Boivin, Guy; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A/B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their viral genomes in the telomeres of human chromosomes. The viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration remain largely unknown, mostly due to the lack of efficient and reproducible cell culture models to study HHV-6A/B integration. In this study, we characterized the HHV-6A/B integration efficiencies in several human cell lines using two different approaches. First, after a short-term infection (5 h), cells were processed for single-cell cloning and analyzed for chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/B (ciHHV-6A/B). Second, cells were infected with HHV-6A/B and allowed to grow in bulk for 4 weeks or longer and then analyzed for the presence of ciHHV-6. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate that HHV-6A/B integrated in most human cell lines tested, including telomerase-positive (HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116, and HEK293T) and telomerase-negative cell lines (U2OS and GM847). Our results also indicate that inhibition of DNA replication, using phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect HHV-6A/B integration. Certain clones harboring ciHHV-6A/B spontaneously express viral genes and proteins. Treatment of cells with phorbol ester or histone deacetylase inhibitors triggered the expression of many viral genes, including U39 , U90 , and U100 , without the production of infectious virus, suggesting that the tested stimuli were not sufficient to trigger full reactivation. In summary, both integration models yielded comparable results and should enable the identification of viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration and the screening of drugs influencing viral gene expression, as well as the release of infectious HHV-6A/B from the integrated state. IMPORTANCE The analysis and understanding of HHV-6A/B genome integration into host DNA is currently limited due to the lack of reproducible and efficient viral integration systems. In the

  4. Human herpesvirus 6B U19 protein is a PML-regulated transcriptional activator that localizes to nuclear foci in a PML-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) contains an IE-B domain spanning open reading frames U16/17-U19, based on homology with human cytomegalovirus. Here, the protein product, U19, of the HHV-6B U19 gene is identified as a 47 kDa transcriptional activator. HHV-6B infection or overexpression of U19...

  5. Stabilization of Telomere G-Quadruplexes Interferes with Human Herpesvirus 6A Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Gravel, Annie; Artusi, Sara; Richter, Sara N; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes using a mechanism that remains poorly understood. To achieve a better understanding of the HHV-6A/B integration mechanism, we made use of BRACO-19, a compound that stabilizes G-quadruplex secondary structures and prevents telomere elongation by the telomerase complex. First, we analyzed the folding of telomeric sequences into G-quadruplex structures and their binding to BRACO-19 using G-quadruplex-specific antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. Circular dichroism studies indicate that BRACO-19 modifies the conformation and greatly stabilizes the G-quadruplexes formed in G-rich telomeric DNA. Subsequently we assessed the effects of BRACO-19 on the HHV-6A initial phase of infection. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 does not affect entry of HHV-6A DNA into cells. We next investigated if stabilization of G-quadruplexes by BRACO-19 affected HHV-6A's ability to integrate its genome into host chromosomes. Incubation of telomerase-expressing cells with BRACO-19, such as HeLa and MCF-7, caused a significant reduction in the HHV-6A integration frequency ( P integration frequency in U2OS cells that lack telomerase activity and elongate their telomeres through alternative lengthening mechanisms. Our data suggest that the fluidity of telomeres is important for efficient chromosomal integration of HHV-6A and that interference with telomerase activity negatively affects the generation of cellular clones containing integrated HHV-6A. IMPORTANCE HHV-6A/B can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of infected cells. Telomeres consist of repeated hexanucleotides (TTAGGG) of various lengths (up to several kilobases) and end with a single-stranded 3' extension. To avoid recognition and induce a DNA damage response, the single-stranded overhang folds back on itself and forms a telomeric loop (T-loop) or adopts a tertiary structure, referred to as a G-quadruplex. In the

  6. Proteflazid® and local immunity in diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Vjacheslav; Chernyshov, Viktor; Grynevych, Oleksandr; Benyuk, Vasil; Kornatskaya, Alla; Shalko, Miroslava; Usevich, Igor; Revenko, Oleg; Shepetko, Maxim; Solomakha, Ludmila

    2017-03-21

    Reporting of clinical trials results for Proteflazid® in the drug formulation suppositories and vaginal swabs soaked in the solution of the drug to the local immunity of the female reproductive tract. The aim of study was to examine the state of local immunity in the reproductive tract of women with sexually transmitted diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpes viruses (Type 1, 2) and mixed infection (herpes viruses + chlamydia). The trials involved 216 women with viral sexually transmitted diseases: Cervical Dysplasia associated with papillomavirus infection (HPV) (Group 1); Herpes genitalis type 1 (HSV- 1) and type 2 (HSV-1) (Group 2); mixed infection - HSV-1, HSV-2 and chlamydia (Group 3). Treatment results have confirmed that Proteflazid® contributes to sustainable performance improvement of basic factors of local immunity - sIgA, lysozyme and complement component C3 in the cervical mucus for all three groups of women. Proteflazid® enhances level of local immunity markers (sIgA, lysozyme, C3 complement component) and improves their ratios. Also it intensifies anticontagious activity of mucosal protection and female reproductive system as whole, during treatment diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections (herpesvirus and chlamydia).

  7. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  8. Prevalence and correlates of human herpesvirus 8 infection among Peruvian men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanira, Juan V; Casper, Corey; Lama, Javier R; Morrow, Rhoda; Montano, Silvia M; Caballero, Patricia; Suárez, Luis; Whittington, William L H; Wald, Anna; Sanchez, Jorge; Celum, Connie

    2008-12-15

    Infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) in North America and Europe and is also found to be endemic in some regions of South America. Little is known about HHV-8 prevalence and its correlates among MSM in the Andean region. We assessed HHV-8 seroprevalence among 497 MSM recruited for the 2002 Peruvian HIV sentinel surveillance program using a combined HHV-8 enzyme immunoassay and immunofluorescence assay algorithm. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine the association between selected covariates and HHV-8 seropositivity. One hundred thirty-one (66.5%, 95% CI 63.1% to 69.9%) of 197 HIV-infected and 80 (26.7%, 95% CI 24.4% to 29.0%) of 300 HIV-uninfected MSM had serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection. Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were education<12 years (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7), anal receptive sex with the last partner (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), self-reported sexually transmitted infection symptoms during the last year (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.0), coinfection with HIV (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.8 to 6.4) and chronic hepatitis B (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.5 to 15.8). MSM with long-standing HIV infection were more likely to have serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection when compared with men with recently acquired HIV (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.7 to 9.1). HHV-8 infection is common among both HIV-infected and HIV-negative MSM in Lima, Peru. HHV-8 seropositivity is correlated with anal receptive sex, self-reported sexually transmitted infection symptoms, and HIV infection among these MSM and thus seems to be sexually transmitted. HHV-8 infection seems to be acquired after HIV infection, suggesting that future studies should evaluate the mode of HHV-8 transmission and prevention strategies among HIV-uninfected MSM.

  9. Human herpesvirus-8 infection leads to expansion of the preimmune/natural effector B cell compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Della Bella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS and of some lymphoproliferative disorders of B cells. Most malignancies develop after long-lasting viral dormancy, and a preventing role for both humoral and cellular immune control is suggested by the high frequency of these pathologies in immunosuppressed patients. B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells of peripheral lymphoid organs and blood represent the major reservoir of HHV-8. Due to the dual role of B cells in HHV-8 infection, both as virus reservoir and as agents of humoral immune control, we analyzed the subset distribution and the functional state of peripheral blood B cells in HHV-8-infected individuals with and without cKS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Circulating B cells and their subsets were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry in the following groups: 1- patients HHV-8 positive with classic KS (cKS (n = 47; 2- subjects HHV-8 positive and cKS negative (HSP (n = 10; 3- healthy controls, HHV-8 negative and cKS negative (HC (n = 43. The number of B cells belonging to the preimmune/natural effector compartment, including transitional, pre-naïve, naïve and MZ-like subsets, was significantly higher among HHV-8 positive subjects, with or without cKS, while was comparable to healthy controls in the antigen-experienced T-cell dependent compartment. The increased number of preimmune/natural effector B cells was associated with increased resistance to spontaneous apoptosis, while it did not correlate with HHV-8 viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that long-lasting HHV-8 infection promotes an imbalance in peripheral B cell subsets, perturbing the equilibrium between earlier and later steps of maturation and activation processes. This observation may broaden our understanding of the complex interplay between viral and immune factors leading HHV-8-infected individuals to develop HHV-8-associated malignancies.

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection among Peruvian Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanira, Juan V.; Casper, Corey; Lama, Javier R.; Morrow, Rhoda; Montano, Silvia M; Caballero, Patricia; Suárez, Luis; Whittington, William L. H.; Wald, Anna; Sanchez, Jorge; Celum, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) in North America and Europe, and is also found to be endemic in some regions of South America. Little is known about HHV-8 prevalence and its correlates among MSM in the Andean region. Methods We assessed HHV-8 seroprevalence among 497 MSM recruited for the 2002 Peruvian HIV sentinel surveillance program using a combined HHV-8 enzyme immunoassay and immunofluorescence assay algoritm. Logistic regression was used to estimate Odds Ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) to determine the association between selected covariates and HHV-8 seropositivity. Results 483 (97%) of 497 men had stored sera and demographic data available for analysis. 131 (66.5%, 95% CI 63.1%-69.9%) of 197 HIV-infected and 80 (26.7%, 95% CI 24.4%-29.0%) of 300 HIV-uninfected MSM had serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection. Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were education <12 years (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.7), anal receptive sex with the last partner (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.3), self-reported STI symptoms during the last year (OR: 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0), and co-infection with HIV (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.8-6.4) and Chronic Hepatitis B (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.5-15.8). MSM with long-standing HIV infection were more likely to have serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection when compared to men with recently-acquired HIV (OR: 3.8, 95% CI 1.7-9.1). Conclusions HHV-8 infection is common among both HIV-infected and negative MSM in Lima, Peru. HHV-8 seropositivity is correlated with anal receptive sex, self-reported STI symptoms, and HIV infection among these MSM, and thus appears to be sexually transmitted. HHV-8 infection appears to be acquired after HIV infection, suggesting that future studies should evaluate the mode of HHV-8 transmission and prevention strategies among HIV-infected MSM. PMID:18989224

  11. Detection of human herpesvirus 8 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction: development and standardisation of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, David J; Johnson, Newell W

    2012-09-11

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), the aetiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is rare in Australia, but endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of South-east Asia and Oceania. While the treatment of external KS lesions can be monitored by clinical observation, the internal lesions of KS, MCD and PEL require extensive and expensive internal imaging, or autopsy. In patients with MCD and PEL, if HHV-8 viraemia is not reduced quickly, ~50% die within 24 months. HHV-8 qPCR is a valuable tool for monitoring HHV-8 viraemia, but is not available in many parts of the world, including those with high prevalence of KS and HHV-8. A new molecular facility with stringent three-phase workflow was established, adhering to NPAAC and CLSI guidelines. Three fully validated quantitative assays were developed: two for detection and quantification of HHV-8; one for GAPDH, necessary for normalisation of viral loads in tissue and peripheral blood. The HHV-8 ORF73 and ORF26 qPCR assays were 100% specific. All qPCR assays, displayed a broad dynamic range (102 to 1010 copies/μL TE Buffer) with a limit of detection of 4.85x103, 5.61x102, and 2.59x102 copies/μL TE Buffer and a limit of quantification of 4.85x103, 3.01x102, and 1.38x102 copies/μL TE Buffer for HHV-8 ORF73, HHV-8 ORF26, and GAPDH respectively.The assays were tested on a panel of 35 KS biopsies from Queensland. All were HHV-8 qPCR positive with average viral load of 2.96x105 HHV-8 copies/μL DNA extract (range: 4.37x103 to 1.47x106 copies/μL DNA extract): When normalised these equate to an average viral load of 2.44x104 HHV-8 copies/103 cells (range: 2.20x102 to 7.38x105 HHV-8 copies/103 cells). These are the first fully optimised, validated and MIQE compliant HHV-8 qPCR assays established in Australia. They worked well for qualitative detection of HHV-8 in archival tissue, and are well-suited for quantitative detection in whole blood. They are now

  12. Detection of human herpesvirus 8 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction: development and standardisation of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speicher David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, the aetiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is rare in Australia, but endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of South-east Asia and Oceania. While the treatment of external KS lesions can be monitored by clinical observation, the internal lesions of KS, MCD and PEL require extensive and expensive internal imaging, or autopsy. In patients with MCD and PEL, if HHV-8 viraemia is not reduced quickly, ~50% die within 24 months. HHV-8 qPCR is a valuable tool for monitoring HHV-8 viraemia, but is not available in many parts of the world, including those with high prevalence of KS and HHV-8. Methods A new molecular facility with stringent three-phase workflow was established, adhering to NPAAC and CLSI guidelines. Three fully validated quantitative assays were developed: two for detection and quantification of HHV-8; one for GAPDH, necessary for normalisation of viral loads in tissue and peripheral blood. Results The HHV-8 ORF73 and ORF26 qPCR assays were 100% specific. All qPCR assays, displayed a broad dynamic range (102 to 1010 copies/μL TE Buffer with a limit of detection of 4.85x103, 5.61x102, and 2.59x102 copies/μL TE Buffer and a limit of quantification of 4.85x103, 3.01x102, and 1.38x102 copies/μL TE Buffer for HHV-8 ORF73, HHV-8 ORF26, and GAPDH respectively. The assays were tested on a panel of 35 KS biopsies from Queensland. All were HHV-8 qPCR positive with average viral load of 2.96x105 HHV-8 copies/μL DNA extract (range: 4.37x103 to 1.47x106 copies/μL DNA extract: When normalised these equate to an average viral load of 2.44x104 HHV-8 copies/103 cells (range: 2.20x102 to 7.38x105 HHV-8 copies/103 cells. Conclusions These are the first fully optimised, validated and MIQE compliant HHV-8 qPCR assays established in Australia. They worked well for qualitative detection of HHV-8 in archival tissue, and are well

  13. Human herpesvirus 6A induces apoptosis of primary human fetal astrocytes via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Bin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a T-lymphtropic and neurotropic virus that can infect various types of cells. Sequential studies reported that apoptosis of glia and neurons induced by HHV-6 might act a potential trigger for some central nervous system (CNS diseases. HHV-6 is involved in the pathogenesis of encephalitis, multiple sclerosis (MS and fatigue syndrome. However, the mechanisms responsible for the apoptosis of infected CNS cells induced by HHV-6 are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the cell death processes of primary human fetal astrocytes (PHFAs during productive HHV-6A infection and the underlying mechanisms. Results HHV-6A can cause productive infection in primary human fetal astrocytes. Annexin V-PI staining and electron microscopic analysis indicated that HHV-6A was an inducer of apoptosis. The cell death was associated with activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, which is known to be an important substrate for activated caspase-3. Caspase-8 and -9 were also significantly activated in HHV-6A-infected cells. Moreover, HHV-6A infection led to Bax up-regulation and Bcl-2 down-regulation. HHV-6A infection increased the release of Smac/Diablo, AIF and cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, which induced apoptosis via the caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. In addition, we also found that anti-apoptotic factors such as IAPs and NF-κB decreased in HHV-6A infected PHFAs. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis in HHV-6A-infected glial cells. These findings would be helpful in understanding the mechanisms of CNS diseases caused by HHV-6.

  14. Human herpesvirus 6B induces phosphorylation of p53 in its regulatory domain by a CK2- and p38-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Bundgaard, B; Hupp, T R

    2008-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) infection upregulates the tumour suppressor p53 and induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392. Interestingly, phosphorylation at the equivalent site has previously been shown to correlate with p53 tumour suppression in murine models. Although...

  15. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R. [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Shukla, Deepak, E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  16. The genome of herpesvirus papio 2 is closely related to the genomes of human herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, John E; Martin, David W

    2003-06-01

    Infection of baboons (Papio species) with herpesvirus papio 2 (HVP-2) produces a disease that is clinically similar to herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infection of humans. The development of a primate model of simplexvirus infection based on HVP-2 would provide a powerful resource to study virus biology and test vaccine strategies. In order to characterize the molecular biology of HVP-2 and justify further development of this model system we have constructed a physical map of the HVP-2 genome. The results of these studies have identified the presence of 26 reading frames that closely resemble HSV homologues. Furthermore, the HVP-2 genome shares a collinear arrangement with the genome of HSV. These studies further validate the development of the HVP-2 model as a surrogate system to study the biology of HSV infections.

  17. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  18. Herpesvirus Evasion of Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmaeker, Steffi; Romero, Nicolas; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W

    2018-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the host response against viral infections and cancer development. They are able to kill virus-infected and tumor cells, and they produce different important cytokines that stimulate the antiviral and antitumor adaptive immune response, particularly interferon gamma. NK cells are of particular importance in herpesvirus infections, which is illustrated by systemic and life-threatening herpesvirus disease symptoms in patients with deficiencies in NK cell activity and by the myriad of reports describing herpesvirus NK cell evasion strategies. The latter is particularly obvious for cytomegaloviruses, but increasing evidence indicates that most, if not all, members of the herpesvirus family suppress NK cell activity to some extent. This review discusses the different NK cell evasion strategies described for herpesviruses and how this knowledge may translate to clinical applications. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated malignant lymphoma in eastern Denmark diagnosed from 1990-1996: clinical features, histopathology, and association with Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Penkowa, M; Kirk, O

    2000-01-01

    The clinicopathological features of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lymphoma were investigated in a retrospective study of 85 adult patients in eastern Denmark diagnosed during the period 1990-1996. The possible pathogenetic role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 8...

  20. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893942

  1. Synergistic immune responses induced by endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens result in increased production of inflammatory cytokines in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Christensen, Tove; Hansen, Hans Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) and herpesviruses are increasingly associated with the pathogenesis of the neurological inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Herpesviruses are capable of HERV activation and simultaneous presence of HERV and herpesvirus antigens have a synergistic...

  2. The first genome sequence of a metatherian herpesvirus: Macropodid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Paola K; Mahony, Timothy J; Hartley, Carol A; Fowler, Elizabeth V; Ficorilli, Nino; Lee, Sang W; Gilkerson, James R; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2016-01-22

    While many placental herpesvirus genomes have been fully sequenced, the complete genome of a marsupial herpesvirus has not been described. Here we present the first genome sequence of a metatherian herpesvirus, Macropodid herpesvirus 1 (MaHV-1). The MaHV-1 viral genome was sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq sequencer, de novo assembly was performed and the genome was annotated. The MaHV-1 genome was 140 kbp in length and clustered phylogenetically with the primate simplexviruses, sharing 67% nucleotide sequence identity with Human herpesviruses 1 and 2. The MaHV-1 genome contained 66 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to those in other herpesvirus genomes, but lacked homologues of UL3, UL4, UL56 and glycoprotein J. This is the first alphaherpesvirus genome that has been found to lack the UL3 and UL4 homologues. We identified six novel ORFs and confirmed their transcription by RT-PCR. This is the first genome sequence of a herpesvirus that infects metatherians, a taxonomically unique mammalian clade. Members of the Simplexvirus genus are remarkably conserved, so the absence of ORFs otherwise retained in eutherian and avian alphaherpesviruses contributes to our understanding of the Alphaherpesvirinae. Further study of metatherian herpesvirus genetics and pathogenesis provides a unique approach to understanding herpesvirus-mammalian interactions.

  3. Prospective Characterization of the Risk Factors for Transmission and Symptoms of Primary Human Herpesvirus Infections Among Ugandan Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Orem, Jackson; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Morrow, Rhoda Ashley; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Schiffer, Joshua T; Jerome, Keith R; Nakaganda, Annet; Wald, Anna; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) infections are common during infancy. Primary infections are frequently asymptomatic and best studied prospectively by using direct viral detection. Oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected weekly from Ugandan newborn infants, their mothers, and other children in the household. Blood specimens were collected every 4 months. Samples were tested for herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-8, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirty-two infants, 32 mothers, and 49 other household children were followed for a median of 57 weeks. Seventeen mothers had human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection; no infants acquired HIV-1. The 12-month incidence of postnatal infection was 76% for HHV-6B, 59% for CMV, 47% for EBV, 8% for HSV-1, and 0% for HHV-8. The quantity of oropharyngeal shedding by contacts was associated with HHV-6A or HHV-6B transmission. Maternal HIV-1 infection was associated with EBV transmission, while breastfeeding and younger child contacts were associated with CMV transmission. Except for HSV-1, primary HHV infections were subclinical. By capturing exposures and acquisition events, we found that the incidence and risk factors of infection vary by HHV type. HSV-1 infection, unlike other HHV infections, caused acute clinical illness in these infants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Virus and host-specific differences in oral human herpesvirus shedding kinetics among Ugandan women and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrajt, Laura; Gantt, Soren; Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Orem, Jackson; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Schiffer, Joshua T; Casper, Corey

    2017-10-12

    Human herpesviruses (HHV) establish lifelong latent infection and are transmitted primarily via shedding at mucosal surfaces. Each HHV causes a unique spectrum of disease depending on the infected individual's age and immunity. We collected weekly oral swabs from young children and mothers in 32 Ugandan households for a median of one year. We characterized kinetics of oral shedding during primary and chronic infection for each virus. Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HHV-6 were shed at high rates following primary infection. The rate of oral herpes simplex virus (HSV) shedding was lower overall, and children and mothers with chronic HSV infection had lower shedding rates than children with primary infection. CMV shedding rate and viral load were higher in children with primary infection compared to children with chronic infection, and even lower in mothers with chronic infection. HHV-6 shedding rate and viral load were similar between children with primary or chronic infection, but lower in mothers. EBV shedding rate and quantity decreased less dramatically in mothers versus children, with HIV-positive mothers shedding at a higher rate than HIV-negative mothers. Each HHV has a distinct pattern of oral shedding which depends partially on the age and immune status of the host.

  5. Seroprevalence and determinants of Kaposi sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus 8 in Indian HIV-infected males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawwar, Arshi; Sharma, Surendra K; Gupta, Somesh; Singh, Sarman

    2014-12-01

    In India Kaposi's sarcoma is rarely seen in AIDS patients. Hence the current belief is that the incidence of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is very low in this subcontinent, most probably due to the heterosexual route of HIV transmission. However, there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of HHV-8 in India. In India the primary mode of HIV transmission is the heterosexual route. Therefore we aimed to determine the prevalence of antibodies against HHV-8 in North Indian HIV-infected men naive of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a prospective study, 165 Indian adult males were recruited from an ART clinic. Blood samples were collected before administering any antiretroviral drug. The sera were tested for antibodies against HHV-8 using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, which detects IgG antibodies to lytic antigens of HHV-8. All positive samples were confirmed for the presence of anti-HHV-8 antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The IFA kit is intended to detect primary, latent, persistent, or reactivated infection of HHV-8. Of the 165 males, 43 (26.06%) were positive by ELISA while 26 (15.8%) were also positive by IFA. Seroprevalence decreased with increasing age (p<0.05). Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were younger age group and alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that even in a heterosexual population, HHV-8 can be transmitted frequently.

  6. Association between the human herpesvirus 8 and the diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the small intestine in common variable immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokuina, Elena; Dominguez Alvarez, Carlos; Noa Pedroso, Guillermo; Martinez Rodriguez Pedro Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the more frequent primary immunodeficiency in clinical field and its presentation forms are very variable. We describe the case of a women presenting with adult CVID with chronic diarrhea syndrome, weight loss and diffuse lymphadenopathies, where the more marked immunologic features were a deep hypogammaglobulinemia of the three major kinds of immunoglobulins and numerical decrease of B cells (CD19 +) and NK cells (CD3 -C D56 +) in peripheral blood. Biopsy of small intestine obtained by video-assisted panendoscope, showed the presence of a multinodular lymphoid hyperplasia with partial atrophy of hairinesses. Immunohistochemistry showed that nodules were high germinal centers with distribution of B cells (CD20 +) and T cells (CD3 +) , similar to that of normal follicle. There was not differential expression of the K and λ light chains. The real time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) method detected many copies from the genome of type 8 human herpesvirus (VHH-8) (133 copies/μL of DNA) in biopsy of intestinal nodule DNA. VHH-8 infection may to be a significant factor in pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients presenting with CVID

  7. Role of dendritic cells infected with human herpesvirus 6 in virus transmission to CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Masaya; Imasawa, Takayoshi; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous betaherpesvirus that predominantly infects and replicates in CD4 + T lymphocytes. However, the mechanism of HHV-6 transmission to T cells from the peripheral mucosa is unknown. Here we found that dendritic cells (DCs) can transmit HHV-6 to T cells, resulting in productive infection. In immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) infected with HHV-6, viral early and late antigens were expressed, and nucleocapsids containing a DNA core were observed, although few virions were detected in the cytoplasm by electron microscopy, indicating that the maturation of HHV-6 virions may be incomplete in MDDCs. However, HHV-6 transmission from MDDCs to stimulated CD4 + T cells occurred efficiently in coculture of these cells, but not from MDDCs culture supernatants. This transmission was partially inhibited by treating the DCs with a viral DNA synthesis blocker, indicating that viral replication in MDDCs is required for this transmission. Furthermore, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs infected with HHV-6 could also transmit the virus to stimulated T cells. Thus, DCs may be the first cell population targeted by HHV-6 and could play an important role in the virus' transmission to T cells for their further propagation

  8. Novel marmoset (Callithrix jacchus model of human Herpesvirus 6A and 6B infections: immunologic, virologic and radiologic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Leibovitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous virus with an estimated seroprevalence of 95% in the adult population. HHV-6 is associated with several neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the CNS. Animal models of HHV-6 infection would help clarify its role in human disease but have been slow to develop because rodents lack CD46, the receptor for cellular entry. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HHV-6 infections in a non-human primate, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. We inoculated a total of 12 marmosets with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously and HHV-6A intranasally. Animals were monitored for 25 weeks post-inoculation clinically, immunologically and by MRI. Marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms and generated virus-specific antibody responses, while those inoculated intravenously with HHV-6B were asymptomatic and generated comparatively lower antibody responses. Viral DNA was detected at a low frequency in paraffin-embedded CNS tissue of a subset of marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously. When different routes of HHV-6A inoculation were compared, intravenous inoculation resulted in virus-specific antibody responses and infrequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery, while intranasal inoculation resulted in negligible virus-specific antibody responses and frequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery. Moreover, marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms, while marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intranasally were asymptomatic. We demonstrate that a marmoset model of HHV-6 infection can serve to further define the contribution of this ubiquitous virus to human neurologic disorders.

  9. Comparative Genomics of Carp Herpesviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Tomofumi; Gatherer, Derek; Cunningham, Charles; Korf, Ian; Fukuda, Hideo; Hedrick, Ronald P.; Waltzek, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Three alloherpesviruses are known to cause disease in cyprinid fish: cyprinid herpesviruses 1 and 3 (CyHV1 and CyHV3) in common carp and koi and cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV2) in goldfish. We have determined the genome sequences of CyHV1 and CyHV2 and compared them with the published CyHV3 sequence. The CyHV1 and CyHV2 genomes are 291,144 and 290,304 bp, respectively, in size, and thus the CyHV3 genome, at 295,146 bp, remains the largest recorded among the herpesviruses. Each of the three genomes consists of a unique region flanked at each terminus by a sizeable direct repeat. The CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 genomes are predicted to contain 137, 150, and 155 unique, functional protein-coding genes, respectively, of which six, four, and eight, respectively, are duplicated in the terminal repeat. The three viruses share 120 orthologous genes in a largely colinear arrangement, of which up to 55 are also conserved in the other member of the genus Cyprinivirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1. Twelve genes are conserved convincingly in all sequenced alloherpesviruses, and two others are conserved marginally. The reference CyHV3 strain has been reported to contain five fragmented genes that are presumably nonfunctional. The CyHV2 strain has two fragmented genes, and the CyHV1 strain has none. CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 have five, six, and five families of paralogous genes, respectively. One family unique to CyHV1 is related to cellular JUNB, which encodes a transcription factor involved in oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first time that JUNB-related sequences have been reported in a herpesvirus. PMID:23269803

  10. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H; Jerome, Keith R; Flamand, Louis

    2015-06-30

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6- subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73-6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23-7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6- without angina, iciHHV-6- with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina.

  11. Pathogenetic Influences of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    Science 1974;186:1213-1215. 11. Wilson JD, Griffin JE, Leshin M, George FW. Role of gonadal hormones in development of the sexual phenotypes. Hum Genet... Cantor A, Muro-Cacho C, Livingston S, Karras J, Pow-Sang J, Jove R. Constitutive activation of Stat3 in human prostate tumors and cell lines: direct

  12. Human herpesvirus 8-associated lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Lin; Huang, Wen-Ya; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma, a human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-associated lymphoma, is uncommon, and it is usually seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It presents as a body cavity-based lymphomatous effusion, but several cases of the so-called solid primary effusion lymphoma presenting as solid tumors without associated lymphomatous effusion have been reported. They have similar clinical, histopathological and immunophenotypical features. Most of them have a B-cell genotype. This suggests the solid variant may represent a clinicopathological spectrum of primary effusion lymphoma. We report a case of HHV8-associated lymphoma histopathologically and immunophenotypically mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was a 31-year-old HIV-seropositive man presenting with skin nodules over his right thigh. Biopsy of the nodules showed anaplastic large cells infiltrating the dermis. These malignant cells strongly expressed CD3, CD30 and CD43. Cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma was initially diagnosed, but further tests, including immunoreactivity for HHV8 protein and clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes, confirmed the diagnosis of HHV8-associated B-cell lymphoma with aberrant T-cell marker expression. This case provides an example of solid primary effusion lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma and highlights the importance of HHV8 immunohistochemistry and molecular tests in the diagnosis of HHV8-associated lymphoma with a cutaneous presentation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Co-infection of human herpesvirus type 2 (HHV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; Fernandes, Luis Eduardo Barros Costa; Villela, Daniel A M; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves; Pilotto, José Henrique; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2018-03-01

    Pregnant women who are infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are particularly vulnerable to severe and recurrent infections with Human Herpesvirus 2 (HHV-2). Neonatal transmission of HHV-2 has been associated with malformations and neurological sequelae in infants, which makes it very important to perform antenatal monitoring for genital herpes. In the study, 134 pregnant women infected with HIV were tested for HHV-2 IgM and IgG using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and had HHV-2 DNA analyzed by Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). Fisher's exact test was applied to analyze the epidemiological dates (p pregnant women infected with HIV had HHV-2 IgG and 3.75% of them showed HHV-2 viremia. HHV-2 IgM was found in 6% of the pregnant women and 25% of them had HHV-2 viremia. The risk factors associated with HHV-2 seropositive were age under 20 and a CD4/CD8 ratio > 1. Our study found high HHV-2/HIV coinfection prevalence and HHV-2 viremia among patients with recurrent and primary genital infection, reinforcing the need of prevention and control of HHV-2 infection in order to avoid this virus transmission.

  14. Elevated Serum PSA is Associated With Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Increased Circulating Cytokine Levels in Men From Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jill D; Karamchandani, Jaideep M; Bonachea, Luis A; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Jenkins, Frank J

    2017-05-01

    Serum-prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels have been used for many years as a biomarker for prostate cancer. This usage is under scrutiny due to the fact that elevated PSA levels can be caused by other conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and infections of or injury to the prostate. As a result, the identification of specific pathogens capable of increasing serum levels of PSA is important. A potential candidate responsible for elevated PSA is human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We have reported previously that HHV-8 is capable of infecting and establishing a latent infection in the prostate. In this current study we test the hypothesis that HHV-8 infection is associated with elevated PSA levels. Circulating cytokine levels between men with elevated PSA and controls are also compared. HHV-8 serostatus was determined among men with elevated serum PSA (≥4 ng/ml; n = 168, no prostate cancer on biopsy) and age-matched controls (PSA PSA and 85 controls). Men with an elevated serum PSA were significantly more likely to be HHV-8 seropositive (42.9%) than the age-matched cancer-free men (22.2%; OR 2.51; 95%CI 1.48-4.29, P = 00001). Comparison of circulating cytokine levels between men with elevated serum PSA and controls indicated that elevated serum PSA is associated with a pro-inflammatory response with a mixed Th1/Th2 response while HHV-8 infection was associated with significantly higher levels of IL12p70, IL-10, and IL-13 indicating a Th2 immune response. We found a significant association between HHV-8 infection and increased levels of serum PSA. In an age of patient-centered medicine, men with an elevated serum PSA should be considered for HHV-8 serology testing to determine if HHV-8 is responsible for the elevated PSA. Prostate 77: 617-624, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. T-cell immunity to herpesviruses in immune disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherrenburg, J.

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) are wide-spread herpesviruses, which establish life-long persistence in the host upon primary infection. Primary infection with herpesviruses causes usually only mild symptoms, however in some situations, such as during immunosuppression or human

  16. Exploitation of herpesvirus immune evasion strategies to modify the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cell transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel S de la Garza-Rodea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells residing in the connective tissue of many organs and holding great potential for tissue repair. In culture, human MSCs (hMSCs are capable of extensive proliferation without showing chromosomal aberrations. Large numbers of hMSCs can thus be acquired from small samples of easily obtainable tissues like fat and bone marrow. MSCs can contribute to regeneration indirectly by secretion of cytokines or directly by differentiation into specialized cell types. The latter mechanism requires their long-term acceptance by the recipient. Although MSCs do not elicit immune responses in vitro, animal studies have revealed that allogeneic and xenogeneic MSCs are rejected. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We aim to overcome MSC immune rejection through permanent down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I proteins on the surface of these MHC class II-negative cells through the use of viral immune evasion proteins. Transduction of hMSCs with a retroviral vector encoding the human cytomegalovirus US11 protein resulted in strong inhibition of MHC class I surface expression. When transplanted into immunocompetent mice, persistence of the US11-expressing and HLA-ABC-negative hMSCs at levels resembling those found in immunodeficient (i.e., NOD/SCID mice could be attained provided that recipients' natural killer (NK cells were depleted prior to cell transplantation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate the potential utility of herpesviral immunoevasins to prevent rejection of xenogeneic MSCs. The observation that down-regulation of MHC class I surface expression renders hMSCs vulnerable to NK cell recognition and cytolysis implies that multiple viral immune evasion proteins are likely required to make hMSCs non-immunogenic and thereby universally transplantable.

  17. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  18. Human herpesviruses and MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    and they are capable of reactivation. Epstein Barr virus (EBV), HHV-6A and varicella zoster virus (VZV) are consistently linked with MS, particularly with respect to epidemiology, antibody responses in serum (EBV) and cerebrospinal fluid (EBV and HHV-6A), and with MS exacerbations that are associated with viral...... reactivation (VZV, HHV-6A and EBV). HHV have the potential for a causal role in MS--they may be key players in the disease process--and this role could be mediated through several direct or indirect mechanisms....

  19. Human Herpesvirus 6B Induces Hypomethylation on Chromosome 17p13.3, Correlating with Increased Gene Expression and Virus Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Elin; Dunn, Nicky; Niehusmann, Pitt; Wideman, Sarah; Wipfler, Peter; Becker, Albert J; Ekström, Tomas J; Almgren, Malin; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) is a neurotropic betaherpesvirus that achieves latency by integrating its genome into host cell chromosomes. Several viruses can induce epigenetic modifications in their host cells, but no study has investigated the epigenetic modifications induced by HHV-6B. This study analyzed methylation with an Illumina 450K array, comparing HHV-6B-infected and uninfected Molt-3 T cells 3 days postinfection. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to validate the Illumina results and to investigate methylation over time in vitro Expression of genes was investigated using quantitative PCR (qPCR), and virus integration was investigated with PCR. A total of 406 CpG sites showed a significant HHV-6B-induced change in methylation in vitro Remarkably, 86% (351/406) of these CpGs were located integration in Molt-3 cell DNA 3 days after infection. The telomere at 17p has repeatedly been described as an integration site for HHV-6B, and we show for the first time that HHV-6B induces hypomethylation in this region during acute infection, which may play a role in the integration process, possibly by making the DNA more accessible. IMPORTANCE The ability to establish latency in the host is a hallmark of herpesviruses, but the mechanisms differ. Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) is known to establish latency through integration of its genome into the telomeric regions of host cells, with the ability to reactivate. Our study is the first to show that HHV-6B specifically induces hypomethylated regions close to the telomeres and that integrating viruses may use the host methylation machinery to facilitate their integration process. The results from this study contribute to knowledge of HHV-6B biology and virus-host interaction. This in turn will lead to further progress in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which HHV-6B contributes to pathological processes and may have important implications in both disease prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2017 American

  20. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  1. Human Herpesvirus-8 Infection Associated with Kaposi Sarcoma, Multicentric Castleman's Disease, and Plasmablastic Microlymphoma in a Man with AIDS: A Case Report with Review of Pathophysiologic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS, multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma, are all linked to human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 infection and HIV-induced immunodeficiency. Herein, we describe the case of a Kenyan man diagnosed with HIV in 2000. He deferred highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and remained in good health until his CD4+ count declined in 2006. He was hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia in 2008, after which he agreed to take HAART but did so sporadically. In 2010, he was hospitalized with fever, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia, and an elevated HHV-8 viral load. A lymph node biopsy showed findings consistent with KS, MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma. Eight months after starting liposomal doxorubicin, Rituximab, and a new HAART regimen, he has improved clinically, and his HIV and HHV-8 viral loads are suppressed. These three conditions, found in the same lymph node, underscore the inflammatory and malignant potential of HHV-8, particularly in the milieu of HIV-induced immunodeficiency.

  2. Summary of the 10th International Conference on Human Herpesviruses-6 and -7 (HHV-6A, -6B, and HHV-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaroff, Anthony L; Boeckh, Michael; Eliason, Eva; Phan, Tuan; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2018-04-01

    The 10th International Conference on Human herpesviruses-6 and -7 (HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7) was held at the Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany from July 23-26, 2017. It attracted more than 130 basic, translational and clinical scientists from 19 countries. Important new information was presented regarding: the biology of HHV-6A and -6B; the biology and epidemiology of inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6A and -6B; improved diagnostic tests; animal models for and animal viruses with similarities to HHV-6A, -6B, and -7; established and possible disease associations; and new treatment strategies. Here, we summarize work presented at the meeting that is of particular interest. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Tweedy, J; Spyrou, MA; Pearson, M; Lassner, D; Kuhl, U; Gompels, UA

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, imp...

  4. Human CD134 (OX40) expressed on T cells plays a key role for human herpesvirus 6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamata, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Miwako; Kawabata, Akiko; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Morioka, Ichiro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Iijima, Kazumoto; Yamada, Hideto; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Mori, Yasuko

    2018-05-01

    CD134 (OX40), which is a cellular receptor for human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) and expresses on activated T cells, may play a key role for HHV-6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Therefore, we examined the CD134 expression on T cells and HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, and analyzed the correlation between them. Twenty-three patients after allo-HSCT were enrolled. The percentages of CD134-positive cells within the CD4 + and CD8 + cell populations were measured by flow cytometry, and the viral copy number of HHV-6B was simultaneously quantified by real-time PCR. The correlation between CD134 and HHV-6B viral load was then statistically analyzed. HHV-6B reactivation occurred in 11 of 23 patients (47.8%). CD134 expression was seen on T cells and was coincident with the time of peak viral load. The percentage of CD134-positive cells decreased significantly when HHV-6B DNA disappeared (p = .005 in CD4 + T cells, p = .02 in CD8 + T cells). In the 4 patients who underwent umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT), the viral load varied with the percentage of CD134-positive cells. In the comparison between the HHV-6B reactivation group and non-reactivation group, maximum percentages of CD134-positive cells among CD4 + T cells in reactivation group were significantly higher than those in non-reactivation group (p = .04). This is the first study to show that a correlation of CD134 expression on T cells with HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, especially in UCBT. The results possibly indicate that CD134 on T cells plays a key role for HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human parvovirus B19, varicella zoster virus, and human herpesvirus-6 in mesenchymal stem cells of patients with osteoarthritis: analysis with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollín, R; Alvarez-Lafuente, R; Marco, F; Jover, J A; Hernández-García, C; Rodríguez-Navas, C; López-Durán, L; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B

    2007-04-01

    To investigate whether there is a possible viral transmission using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in autologous or allogeneic transplantation in the context of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The presence of parvovirus B19 (B19), varicella zoster virus (VZV), and human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) was studied in MSCs from bone marrow of patients with OA and healthy controls. MSCs were prepared from bone marrow aspirates obtained from 18 patients undergoing joint replacement as a result of OA and from 10 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from primary MSCs' culture established from these cells and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyse the prevalence and viral load of B19, VZV and HHV-6. The prevalence of total viral DNA among patients with OA was 16.7% (3/18), with a mean viral load of 29.7 copies/microg of DNA. One out of 18 was positive for B19 (viral load, 61.2 copies/microg of DNA), two for VZV (mean viral load, 14.4 copies/microg of DNA), and none for HHV-6. The prevalence of total viral DNA in the control group was 20% (2/10), with a mean viral load of 13.4 copies/microg of DNA. Both positive results were of B19 parvoviruses. There were no statistically significant differences among patients and controls. This first approach to the viral prevalence in MSCs of bone marrow in OA patients and healthy controls seems to show a very low risk of viral transmission or reactivation in a possible MSCs' transplantation.

  6. Koi herpesvirus disease in carp

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    Jeremić Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A disease in the koi carp (Cyprinus carpio koi and the common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio, caused by the herpesvirus and accompanied by a high mortality rate, has spread across numerous fish ponds all over the world since 1998, resulting in massive mortality and significant financial losses. The herpesvirus-like virus, called the koi herpesvirus (KHV has been isolated and identified from the koi and the common carp in the course of the incidences of massive mortalities. The first appearance of a disease with a high mortality in the common and the koi carp caused by the koi herpesvirus (KHV was described in 1998 in Israel and the United States of America (USA. Since that time, a large number of cases of outbreaks of this disease have been confirmed throughout the world, including the USA, Israel, and a large number of European countries. The deaths occurred seasonally, in late spring or early autumn, when the water temperature was from 18-28ºC. The most important factor of the environment that affects the occurrence and gravity of this disease is the water temperature. This disease is currently considered one of the factors that present the biggest threat to populations of the common and the koi carp. Diseased fish are disoriented, their movements uncoordinated, their breathing rapid, gills swollen, and they have local skin lesions. The virus was isolated from tissue of diseased fish and cultivated on a KF-1 (koi fin cells cell line. Electronic microscopy examinations revealed virus identical viral particles of the Herpesviridae family. Analyses of the virion polypeptide and DNA established differences between the KHV and the previously known herpesvirus of the Cyprinida family, Herpesvirus cyprini (CHV, and the virus of the channel catfish (Channel catfish virus - CCV. In the years 2004 and 2005, high mortality was established among one-year and two-year carp fry on three fish ponds. At two ponds, the deaths occurred among one year and two

  7. Prevalence of antibodies to human herpesvirus-8 in populations with and without risk for infection in São Paulo State

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    Souza V.A.U.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 is a newly described herpesvirus that is etiologically associated with all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Seroepidemiological studies have shown high prevalence rates of HHV-8 antibodies among men who have sex with men (MSM and AIDS patients, African children, Brazilian Amerindians, and elderly individuals in certain regions of Europe. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in healthy children and young adults from different cities in São Paulo State, and in a population at high risk for HHV-8 infection: HIV-negative MSM, and AIDS patients with and without KS. Antibodies to HHV-8 latency-associated nuclear antigen and lytic-phase antigens were detected by immunofluorescence assays. In 643 healthy children and young adults from the general population attending a vaccination program for yellow fever in ten different cities in São Paulo State, the prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies detected by the presence of latent or lytic antigens ranged from 1.0 to 4.1% in the different age groups (mean = 2.5%. In the MSM group, the prevalence was 31/95 (32.6%. In the group of patients with AIDS, the prevalence was 39.2% (51/130 for non-KS patients and 98.7% (77/78 for AIDS patients with the diagnosis of KS confirmed by histopathological examination. We conclude that HHV-8 has a restricted circulation among healthy children and young adults in the general population of São Paulo State and a high prevalence among MSM and AIDS patients.

  8. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

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    Borgia Guglielmo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug. We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  9. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 antibodies in women from São Paulo, Brazil: association with behavioral factors and Kaposi's sarcoma

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    Caterino-de-Araujo Adele

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the spread of AIDS, many HIV-infected women have been diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, especially in Africa. Since the discovery of a novel herpesvirus as the causative agent of KS (human herpesvirus 8 - HHV-8 several seroepidemiological studies have been conducted to identify groups at risk for KS. The risk for women in Brazil has not been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched for HHV-8 antibodies in sera obtained from a bank made up of samples from 3 groups of individuals: Group I: 163 HIV-1-infected women attended at an ambulatory clinic in 1994; Group II: 108 children born to HIV-1-infected mothers from 1990 to 1992, their antibodies reflected maternal infection, and Group III: 630 HIV-1-seronegative, healthy women. In-house immunofluorescence and Western-Blot assays based on the BCBL-1 cell line were used to detect anti-latent and anti-lytic HHV-8 antibodies. RESULTS: Group I had an overall frequency of antibodies of 8.6%, with a 1.2% frequency of anti-latent antibodies and an 8.0% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. Similar results were detected in Group II, i.e., no cases with anti-latent antibodies and a 7.4% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. In contrast, prevalences of 1.1% anti-latent antibodies and 0.3% anti-lytic antibodies were observed in Group III. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiologic pattern of HHV-8 in women from São Paulo varies according to behavioral factors, with emphasis on the sexual and blood routes of virus transmission/acquisition. Although HHV-8 anti-lytic antibodies were found in HIV-1-infected women, no case of KS was detected. Protective factors against KS are probably related to gender and/or to antiretroviral therapies introduced in Brazil since 1994.

  10. Amplification of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 lytic origin of DNA replication is dependent upon a cis-acting AT-rich region and an ORF50 response element and the trans-acting factors ORF50 (K-Rta) and K8 (K-bZIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AuCoin, David P.; Colletti, Kelly S.; Cei, Sylvia A.; Papouskova, Iva; Tarrant, Margaret; Pari, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), has significant sequence homology to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In cell culture, HHV8 is primarily latent, and viral genes associated with lytic replication are not expressed. Two lytic origins of DNA replication (oriLyt) are present within the HHV8 genome and are composed of an AT-rich region adjacent to GC-rich DNA sequences. We have now identified essential cis- and trans-acting elements required for oriLyt-dependent DNA replication. The transient replication assay was used to show that two AT-rich elements, three consensus AP1 transcription factor-binding sites, an ORF50 response element (RE), and a consensus TATA box motif are essential for efficient origin-dependent DNA replication. Transient transfection of luciferase reporter constructs indicated that the downstream region of the HHV8 oriLyt responds to ORF50 and suggests that part of the oriLyt may be an enhancer/promoter. In addition, a transient cotransfection-replication assay elucidated the set of trans-acting factors required for lytic DNA replication. These factors consist of homologues to the core replication proteins: ORF6 (ssDNA binding protein), ORF9 (DNA polymerase), ORF40-41 (primase-associated factor), ORF44 (helicase), ORF56 (primase), and ORF59 (polymerase processivity factor) common to all herpesviruses along with ORF50 (K-Rta) and K8 (K-bZIP)

  11. Bioactive activities of natural products against herpesvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Sung, Gi-Ho; Lee, Taeho; Shin, Yu Su; Cho, Hyosun; Lieberman, Paul M; Kang, Hyojeung

    2013-10-01

    More than 90% of adults have been infected with at least one human herpesvirus, which establish long-term latent infection for the life of the host. While anti-viral drugs exist that limit herpesvirus replication, many of these are ineffective against latent infection. Moreover, drug-resistant strains of herpesvirus emerge following chemotherapeutic treatment. For example, resistance to acyclovir and related nucleoside analogues can occur when mutations arise in either HSV thymidine kinase or DNA polymerases. Thus, there exists an unmet medical need to develop new anti-herpesvirus agents with different mechanisms of action. In this Review, we discuss the promise of anti-herpetic substances derived from natural products including extracts and pure compounds from potential herbal medicines. One example is Glycyrrhizic acid isolated from licorice that shows promising antiviral activity towards human gammaherpesviruses. Secondly, we discuss anti-herpetic mechanisms utilized by several natural products in molecular level. While nucleoside analogues inhibit replicating herpesviruses in lytic replication, some natural products can disrupt the herpesvirus latent infection in the host cell. In addition, natural products can stimulate immune responses against herpesviral infection. These findings suggest that natural products could be one of the best choices for development of new treatments for latent herpesvirus infection, and may provide synergistic anti-viral activity when supplemented with nucleoside analogues. Therefore, it is important to identify which natural products are more efficacious anti-herpetic agents, and to understand the molecular mechanism in detail for further advance in the anti-viral therapies.

  12. Animal herpesviruses and their zoonotic potential for cross-species infection

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    Grzegorz Woźniakowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses of humans and animals cause severe diseases that influence not only the health and epidemiological status but are also economically important in the context of food production. The members of Herpesviridae are host specific agents that also share many properties that potentially make them capable of crossing the species barriers. The objective of presented review paper was to summarize the relationship between herpesviruses of animals and humans and their zoonotic potential. In humans, the most epidemiologically important herpesviruses are represented by Human herepesvirus-1 and Human herpesvirus-2, which are commonly known as herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2, varicella-zooster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, cytomegalovirus (CMV, as well as Human herpesviruses: HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7. However, in terms of the potential to cross the species barrier, there are a few herpesviruses, including B virus disease (CeHV-1, Marek’s disease virus (MDV, Equid herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1 or pseudorabies virus (PRV, which are potentially able to infect different hosts. To summarize, in advantageous conditions the host specific herpesviruses may pose a threat for public health but also may exert a negative impact on the economical aspects of animal production. The most probable of these are zoonotic infections caused by B virus disease; however, close contact between infected animal hosts and humans may lead to transmission and replication of other Herpesviridae members.

  13. Serological evidence that activation of ubiquitous human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) plays a role in chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, D H

    2016-02-01

    Acute infection with viral pathogens in the herpesviridae family can trigger acute urticaria, and reactivation of herpesviridae is associated with cutaneous urticarial-like syndromes such as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Reactivation of latent herpesviridae has not been studied systematically in chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU). This review proposes that CIU is an inflammatory disorder with autoimmune features (termed 'CVU' for chronic viral urticaria), based on serology consistent with the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpesvirus or -viruses may play a role in CIU. Serology obtained from a cohort of omalizumab (Xolair)-dependent patients with severe CIU was consistent with previous HHV-6 infection, persistent viral gene expression and replication. CIU patients also exhibited serological evidence of increased immune response to HHV-4 (Epstein-Barr virus, or EBV) but not all CIU patients were infected with EBV. These observations, combined with case reports of CIU response to anti-viral therapy, suggest that HHV-6, possibly interacting with HHV-4 in cutaneous tissues, is a candidate for further prospective study as a co-factor in CIU. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  14. A Simple Proteomics-Based Approach to Identification of Immunodominant Antigens from a Complex Pathogen: Application to the CD4 T Cell Response against Human Herpesvirus 6B.

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    Aniuska Becerra-Artiles

    Full Text Available Most of humanity is chronically infected with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6, with viral replication controlled at least in part by a poorly characterized CD4 T cell response. Identification of viral epitopes recognized by CD4 T cells is complicated by the large size of the herpesvirus genome and a low frequency of circulating T cells responding to the virus. Here, we present an alternative to classical epitope mapping approaches used to identify major targets of the T cell response to a complex pathogen like HHV-6B. In the approach presented here, extracellular virus preparations or virus-infected cells are fractionated by SDS-PAGE, and eluted fractions are used as source of antigens to study cytokine responses in direct ex vivo T cell activation studies. Fractions inducing significant cytokine responses are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify viral proteins, and a subset of peptides from these proteins corresponding to predicted HLA-DR binders is tested for IFN-γ production in seropositive donors with diverse HLA haplotypes. Ten HHV-6B viral proteins were identified as immunodominant antigens. The epitope-specific response to HHV-6B virus was complex and variable between individuals. We identified 107 peptides, each recognized by at least one donor, with each donor having a distinctive footprint. Fourteen peptides showed responses in the majority of donors. Responses to these epitopes were validated using in vitro expanded cells and naturally expressed viral proteins. Predicted peptide binding affinities for the eight HLA-DRB1 alleles investigated here correlated only modestly with the observed CD4 T cell responses. Overall, the response to the virus was dominated by peptides from the major capsid protein U57 and major antigenic protein U11, but responses to other proteins including glycoprotein H (U48 and tegument proteins U54 and U14 also were observed. These results provide a means to follow and potentially modulate the CD4 T-cell immune

  15. Human herpesvirus 6B U19 protein is a PML-regulated transcriptional activator that localizes to nuclear foci in a PML-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) contains an IE-B domain spanning open reading frames U16/17-U19, based on homology with human cytomegalovirus. Here, the protein product, U19, of the HHV-6B U19 gene is identified as a 47 kDa transcriptional activator. HHV-6B infection or overexpression of U19...... transactivated the RANTES promoter. Mutational analysis of the promoter indicated that transactivation was not critically dependent on the promoter sites CRE, NF-kappaB, ISRE or NF-IL6. ND10 are nuclear substructures that are involved in several cellular regulatory pathways, including those controlling gene...... structure, U19 also localized to the centre of ND10. Knockdown of PML by small interfering RNA did not prevent U19 localization to ND10-like foci, but instead led to a fourfold increase in U19-induced transcription from the RANTES promoter. Generation of four truncated U19 proteins indicated that the N...

  16. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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    Full Text Available ... sq how to do kids infect kids links & resources M.O.V.E. parents for prevention ... go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  17. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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    Full Text Available ... getvaxed about GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles ... free-of-charge. Branded videos contain the "PKIDs.ORG" end slate; unbranded videos are provided for organizations ...

  18. An Epstein–Barr-related herpesvirus from marmoset lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Gyu; Ramer, Jan; Rivailler, Pierre; Quink, Carol; Garber, Richard L.; Beier, David R.; Wang, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is implicated in the development of human B cell lymphomas and carcinomas. Although related oncogenic herpesviruses were believed to be endemic only in Old World primate species, we now find these viruses to be endemic in New World primates. We have isolated a transforming, EBV-related virus from spontaneous B cell lymphomas of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Sequencing of two-thirds of the genome reveals considerable divergence from the genomes of EBV and Old World primate EBV-related viruses, including differences in genes important for virus-induced cell growth transformation and pathogenesis. DNA related to the C. jacchus herpesvirus is frequently detected in squirrel monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that persistent infection with EBV-related viruses is prevalent in both New World primate families. Understanding how these more divergent EBV-related viruses achieve similar biologic outcomes in their natural host is likely to provide important insights into EBV infection, B cell growth transformation, and oncogenesis. PMID:11158621

  19. Proteomic characterization of murid herpesvirus 4 extracellular virions.

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    Sarah Vidick

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesvirinae, such as the human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and the Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV are highly prevalent pathogens that have been associated with several neoplastic diseases. As EBV and KSHV are host-range specific and replicate poorly in vitro, animal counterparts such as Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 have been widely used as models. In this study, we used MuHV-4 in order to improve the knowledge about proteins that compose gammaherpesviruses virions. To this end, MuHV-4 extracellular virions were isolated and structural proteins were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. These analyses allowed the identification of 31 structural proteins encoded by the MuHV-4 genome which were classified as capsid (8, envelope (9, tegument (13 and unclassified (1 structural proteins. In addition, we estimated the relative abundance of the identified proteins in MuHV-4 virions by using exponentially modified protein abundance index analyses. In parallel, several host proteins were found in purified MuHV-4 virions including Annexin A2. Although Annexin A2 has previously been detected in different virions from various families, its role in the virion remains controversial. Interestingly, despite its relatively high abundance in virions, Annexin A2 was not essential for the growth of MuHV-4 in vitro. Altogether, these results extend previous work aimed at determining the composition of gammaherpesvirus virions and provide novel insights for understanding MuHV-4 biology.

  20. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 sero-detection and HIV association in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, non-KS tumors and non-neoplastic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Fatemeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association of the human herpesvirus-8/Kaposi's sarcoma (KS-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV serology with various malignancies in Tanzania is not currently well established while previous studies were based on either PCR or immunofluorescence assays [IFA] but not with a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Selected archival diagnostic biopsies (n = 184 and sera from indigenous patients with KS (n = 120, non-KS tumors (n = 24 and non-neoplastic lesions (n = 40 at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH, Tanzania, were evaluated by diagnostic histopathology, immunohistology [anti-HHV-8 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA] and serology for HIV (ELISA and HHV-8 (IFA and ELISA. Results About 66.3% (n = 122 cases including AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (AKS (n = 93, reactive conditions (n = 28 and only one non-KS tumour were HIV positive. Endemic KS (EKS patients were mostly males (96.3%, 26/27 who were less (69.9%, 65/93 predominant in AIDS-associated (AKS. A high (89% percentage of patients with anti-HHV-8 antibodies was found in the cohort including the HIV positive (92% cases, males (81.2%, KS patients (93%, non-KS tumors (92%, and reactive conditions (75%. All HHV-8 seronegative KS cases were nodular stage whereas both sera and corresponding biopsies from early stage KS were HHV-8+. Assay sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV and specificity were 98.6%, 93.5% and 16.7% for IFA and 93.5%, 98.6% and 50.0% for ELISA respectively. Conclusion HHV-8 seroprevalence at MNH appears high as expected among AKS cases and males but also in non-KS patients. ELISA showed a combination of high HHV-8 sensitivity as well as higher PPV and specificity than IFA which however, showed higher sensitivity. The apparent stage-dependent, inverted serum HHV-8 immunoreactivity supports a notion of viral immune-segregation during KS development. Routine HHV-8 screening should be considered particularly in patients at risk of

  1. CYTOKINE DISBALANCE AT HERPESVIRUS MYOCARDITIS

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    Peremot S. D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral myocarditis is a heterogeneous group of diseases not only by etiologic factors, which belong to different families of Vira kingdom, but is also characterized by a unique mechanism of inflammatory process and cytokine levels specific for each of them. According to numerous researches in сardio-immunology, at herpesvirus infection of the cardiovascular system occur both systemic and localized violations of the immune response. Unfortunately, the accessible literature did not provide the data analysis of complex cardio-immunological research that would take into account the features of herpesvirus myocarditis clinical course. This grounds relevance of immunodiagnosis directed on the exposure of dysimmunities by study of indices of general and local immunity with the estimation of the immune status in patients depending on the stage of exasperation or relapse of chronic herpetic infection in the complex of diagnostic tests. The purpose of our research was to determine features of the state of the immune system with the complex analysis of cytokine profile data, immune and interferon statuses in subacute and chronic forms of herpesvirus myocarditis. Materials and methods. 87 myocarditis patients who were receiving inpatient treatment in medical establishments of Kharkiv were examined. The average age was (M ± m 36 ± 3,46 years old. The diagnosis of myocarditis was established according to the order № 436 by the Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine from 03.07.2006 of clinical findings protocol. In accordance with the term of myocarditis clinical course, the patients were divided in two sub-groups: 44 patients with subacute (from 2 to 6 months, and 43 patients with chronic (over 6 months clinical course of viral myocarditis. The control group correlated with patients of basic group by age and gender and consisted of 40 practically healthy persons without implications of cardial pathology. Definition of cytokine concentration: IL-2, IL-4, IL-6

  2. Sequence analysis of malacoherpesvirus proteins: Pan-herpesvirus capsid module and replication enzymes with an ancient connection to "Megavirales".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Arcady; Karin, Eli Levy; Pupko, Tal

    2018-01-01

    The order Herpesvirales includes animal viruses with large double-strand DNA genomes replicating in the nucleus. The main capsid protein in the best-studied family Herpesviridae contains a domain with HK97-like fold related to bacteriophage head proteins, and several virion maturation factors are also homologous between phages and herpesviruses. The origin of herpesvirus DNA replication proteins is less well understood. While analyzing the genomes of herpesviruses in the family Malacohepresviridae, we identified nearly 30 families of proteins conserved in other herpesviruses, including several phage-related domains in morphogenetic proteins. Herpesvirus DNA replication factors have complex evolutionary history: some are related to cellular proteins, but others are closer to homologs from large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the core replication machinery of herpesviruses may have been recruited from the same pool as in the case of other large DNA viruses of eukaryotes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. An animal model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome: herpesvirus papio frequently induces fatal lymphoproliferative disorders with hemophagocytic syndrome in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Ohara, N; Teramoto, N; Onoda, S; Chen, H L; Oka, T; Kondo, E; Yoshino, T; Takahashi, K; Yates, J; Akagi, T

    2001-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis. However, the animal model for EBV-AHS has not been developed. We reported the first animal model for EBV-AHS using rabbits infected with EBV-related herpesvirus of baboon (HVP). Eleven of 13 (85%) rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells developed fatal lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) between 22 and 105 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in nine of these 11 rabbits. The peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced the virus infection with increased anti-EBV-viral capsid antigen-IgG titers in three of five rabbits, and two of these three infected rabbits died of LPD with HPS. Autopsy revealed hepatosplenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes. Atypical lymphoid T cells expressing EBV-encoded small RNA-1 infiltrated diffusely in many organs, frequently involving the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by polymerase chain reaction or Southern blot analysis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed both HVP-EBNA1 and HVP-EBNA2 transcripts, suggesting latency type III infection. These data indicate that the high rate of rabbit LPD with HPS induction is caused by HVP. This system is useful for studying the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of human EBV-AHS.

  4. Optimisation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based strategy for the detection and quantification of human herpesvirus 6 DNA in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam YH Ueda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 may cause severe complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Monitoring this virus and providing precise, rapid and early diagnosis of related clinical diseases, constitute essential measures to improve outcomes. A prospective survey on the incidence and clinical features of HHV-6 infections after HSCT has not yet been conducted in Brazilian patients and the impact of this infection on HSCT outcome remains unclear. A rapid test based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR has been optimised to screen and quantify clinical samples for HHV-6. The detection step was based on reaction with TaqMan® hydrolysis probes. A set of previously described primers and probes have been tested to evaluate efficiency, sensitivity and reproducibility. The target efficiency range was 91.4% with linearity ranging from 10-106 copies/reaction and a limit of detection of five copies/reaction or 250 copies/mL of plasma. The qPCR assay developed in the present study was simple, rapid and sensitive, allowing the detection of a wide range of HHV-6 loads. In conclusion, this test may be useful as a practical tool to help elucidate the clinical relevance of HHV-6 infection and reactivation in different scenarios and to determine the need for surveillance.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Suppresses Human Herpesvirus 8 Replication and Induces ROS Leading to Apoptosis and Autophagy in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major constituent of green tea, has been shown to induce cell death in cancer cells. Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8. In this study, we examined the role of EGCG on PEL cells in cell death and HHV8 replication. We performed trypan blue exclusion assay to assess the cell viability of PEL cells, flow cytometry analysis to examine the cell cycle distribution and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, caspase-3 activity to assay apoptosis, acridine orange staining to determine autophagy, and immunoblotting to detect the protein levels involved in apoptosis and autophagy as well as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs activation upon EGCG treatment. The expression of the HHV8 lytic gene was determined by luciferase reporter assay and reverse transcription-PCR, and viral progeny production was determined by PCR. Results revealed that EGCG induced cell death and ROS generation in PEL cells in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetylcysteine (NAC inhibited the EGCG-induced ROS and rescued the cell from EGCG-induced cell death. Even though EGCG induced ROS generation in PEL cells, it reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells without causing HHV8 reactivation. These results suggest that EGCG may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of HHV8 infection and HHV8-associated lymphomas.

  6. Attempt of differentiation acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus from febrile convulsive status epilepticus induced by human herpesvirus 6 at early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junichi; Yamamuro, Miho; Togawa, Masao; Shiomi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult for clinicians to predict the subsequent development of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE), when febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) develops. Comparing clinical and laboratory characteristics between patients with AEFCSE and those with FCSE, we investigated the factors which predict the later development of febrile convulsive status caused by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). The subjects of this study were patients treated for FCSE or AEFCSE due to HHV6 in our hospital between April 2004 and January 2008. The AEFCSE group included 5 patients, and the FCSE group included 6 patients. There were few differences in clinical characteristics or brain images on admission between the 2 groups. Disturbance of consciousness persisted for 24 hours or more in all patients in the AEFCSE group and in 2 patients in the FCSE group. The serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in the AEFCSE group. Serum creatinine concentration could be a good indicator for the prediction of AEFCSE in patients with FCSE. (author)

  7. Attempt of differentiation acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus from febrile convulsive status epilepticus induced by human herpesvirus 6 at early stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Junichi; Yamamuro, Miho; Togawa, Masao; Shiomi, Masashi [Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    It is difficult for clinicians to predict the subsequent development of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE), when febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) develops. Comparing clinical and laboratory characteristics between patients with AEFCSE and those with FCSE, we investigated the factors which predict the later development of febrile convulsive status caused by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). The subjects of this study were patients treated for FCSE or AEFCSE due to HHV6 in our hospital between April 2004 and January 2008. The AEFCSE group included 5 patients, and the FCSE group included 6 patients. There were few differences in clinical characteristics or brain images on admission between the 2 groups. Disturbance of consciousness persisted for 24 hours or more in all patients in the AEFCSE group and in 2 patients in the FCSE group. The serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in the AEFCSE group. Serum creatinine concentration could be a good indicator for the prediction of AEFCSE in patients with FCSE. (author)

  8. Analyses of Tissue Culture Adaptation of Human Herpesvirus-6A by Whole Genome Deep Sequencing Redefines the Reference Sequence and Identifies Virus Entry Complex Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua G; Escriva, Eric; Topf, Maya; Gompels, Ursula A

    2017-12-31

    Tissue-culture adaptation of viruses can modulate infection. Laboratory passage and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)mid cloning of human cytomegalovirus, HCMV, resulted in genomic deletions and rearrangements altering genes encoding the virus entry complex, which affected cellular tropism, virulence, and vaccine development. Here, we analyse these effects on the reference genome for related betaherpesviruses, Roseolovirus, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) strain U1102. This virus is also naturally "cloned" by germline subtelomeric chromosomal-integration in approximately 1% of human populations, and accurate references are key to understanding pathological relationships between exogenous and endogenous virus. Using whole genome next-generation deep-sequencing Illumina-based methods, we compared the original isolate to tissue-culture passaged and the BACmid-cloned virus. This re-defined the reference genome showing 32 corrections and 5 polymorphisms. Furthermore, minor variant analyses of passaged and BACmid virus identified emerging populations of a further 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 loci, half non-synonymous indicating cell-culture selection. Analyses of the BAC-virus genome showed deletion of the BAC cassette via loxP recombination removing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based selection. As shown for HCMV culture effects, select HHV-6A SNPs mapped to genes encoding mediators of virus cellular entry, including virus envelope glycoprotein genes gB and the gH/gL complex. Comparative models suggest stabilisation of the post-fusion conformation. These SNPs are essential to consider in vaccine-design, antimicrobial-resistance, and pathogenesis.

  9. Herpesviruses and breast milk

    OpenAIRE

    C. Pietrasanta; B. Ghirardi; M.F. Manca; S. Uccella; C. Gualdi; E. Tota; L. Pugni; F. Mosca

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections ar...

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen prolongs the life span of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Sugaya, Makoto; Atkins, April M; Aquilino, Elisabeth A; Yang, Aparche; Borris, Debra L; Brady, John; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    Tumor spindle cells in all clinical types of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) are infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Although KSHV contains more than 80 genes, only a few are expressed in tumor spindle cells, including latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) and k-cyclin (kCYC). To assess the oncogenic potential of LANA and kCYC, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine NIH 3T3 cells were stably transduced by using recombinant retroviruses expressing these genes or the known viral oncogene simian virus 40 large T antigen (LTAg). Interestingly, LANA-transduced HUVEC proliferated faster and demonstrated a greatly prolonged life span (mean +/- standard deviation, 38.3 +/- 11.0 passages) than untransduced cells and vector-transduced cells (<20 passages). By contrast, kCYC-transduced HUVEC did not proliferate faster or live longer than control cells. LANA- and kCYC-transduced HUVEC, but not LTAg-transduced HUVEC, retained the ability to form normal vessel-like structures in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. In cellular assays of transformation, LANA- and kCYC-transduced NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated minimal or no anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and no tumorigenicity when injected into nude mice, unlike LTAg-transduced NIH 3T3 cells. Lastly, gene expression profiling revealed down-regulation, or silencing, of a number of genes within LANA-transduced HUVEC. Taken together, these results suggest that KSHV LANA is capable of inducing prolonged life span, but not transformation, in primary human cells. These findings may explain why LANA-expressing spindle cells proliferate within KS tumors, yet most often do not demonstrate biologic characteristics of transformation or true malignant conversion.

  11. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR in HIV patients with or without Kaposi's sarcoma. An analytic cross-sectional study

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    Paula Renata Lima Machado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is a common neoplastic disease in AIDS patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients, with or without KS manifestations and correlate HHV-8 detection with KS staging. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytic cross-sectional study conducted in a public tertiary-level university hospital in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Antibodies against HHV-8 lytic-phase antigens were detected by means of the immunofluorescence assay. HHV-8 DNA was detected in the patient samples through a nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR that amplified a region of open reading frame (ORF-26 of HHV-8. RESULTS: Anti-HHV-8 antibodies were detected in 30% of non-KS patients and 100% of patients with KS. Furthermore, the HHV-8 DNA detection rates observed in HIV-positive patients with KS were 42.8% in serum, 95.4% in blood samples and 100% in skin biopsies; and in patients without KS, the detection rate was 4% in serum. Out of the 16 serum samples from patients with KS-AIDS who were classified as stage II, two were positive (12.5%; and out of the 33 samples from patients in stage IV, 19 (57.6% were positive. CONCLUSION: We observed an association between HHV-8 detection and disease staging, which was higher in the serum of patients in stage IV. This suggests that detection of HHV-8 DNA in serum could be very useful for clinical assessment of patients with KS and for monitoring disease progression.

  12. The First Endogenous Herpesvirus, Identified in the Tarsier Genome, and Novel Sequences from Primate Rhadinoviruses and Lymphocryptoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a diverse family of large and complex pathogens whose genomes are extremely difficult to sequence. This is particularly true for clinical samples, and if the virus, host, or both genomes are being sequenced for the first time. Although herpesviruses are known to occasionally integrate in host genomes, and can also be inherited in a Mendelian fashion, they are notably absent from the genomic fossil record comprised of endogenous viral elements (EVEs). Here, we combine paleovirological and metagenomic approaches to both explore the constituent viral diversity of mammalian genomes and search for endogenous herpesviruses. We describe the first endogenous herpesvirus from the genome of the Philippine tarsier, belonging to the Roseolovirus genus, and characterize its highly defective genome that is integrated and flanked by unambiguous host DNA. From a draft assembly of the aye-aye genome, we use bioinformatic tools to reveal over 100,000 bp of a novel rhadinovirus that is the first lemur gammaherpesvirus, closely related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus. We also identify 58 genes of Pan paniscus lymphocryptovirus 1, the bonobo equivalent of human Epstein-Barr virus. For each of the viruses, we postulate gene function via comparative analysis to known viral relatives. Most notably, the evidence from gene content and phylogenetics suggests that the aye-aye sequences represent the most basal known rhadinovirus, and indicates that tumorigenic herpesviruses have been infecting primates since their emergence in the late Cretaceous. Overall, these data show that a genomic fossil record of herpesviruses exists despite their extremely large genomes, and expands the known diversity of Herpesviridae, which will aid the characterization of pathogenesis. Our analytical approach illustrates the benefit of intersecting evolutionary approaches with metagenomics, genetics and paleovirology. PMID:24945689

  13. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  14. Human herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system: laboratory diagnosis based on DNA detection by nested PCR in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimério, Carla Aparecida Tavares; De Oliveira, Renato Souza; de Almeida Bonatelli, Murilo Queiroz; Nucci, Anamarli; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-04-01

    Infections of the central nervous systems (CNS) present a diagnostic problem for which an accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential. Invasive practices, such as cerebral biopsy, have been replaced by obtaining a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis using cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) as a reference method. Tests on DNA extracted from plasma are noninvasive, thus avoiding all of the collateral effects and patient risks associated with CSF collection. This study aimed to determine whether plasma can replace CSF in nested PCR analysis for the detection of CNS human herpesvirus (HHV) diseases by analysing the proportion of patients whose CSF nested PCR results were positive for CNS HHV who also had the same organism identified by plasma nested PCR. In this study, CSF DNA was used as the "gold standard," and nested PCR was performed on both types of samples. Fifty-two patients with symptoms of nervous system infection were submitted to CSF and blood collection. For the eight HHV, one positive DNA result-in plasma and/or CSF nested PCR-was considered an active HHV infection, whereas the occurrence of two or more HHVs in the same sample was considered a coinfection. HHV infections were positively detected in 27/52 (51.9%) of the CSF and in 32/52 (61.5%) of the plasma, difference not significant, thus nested PCR can be performed on plasma instead of CSF. In conclusion, this findings suggest that plasma as a useful material for the diagnosis of cases where there is any difficulty to perform a CSF puncture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Bovine herpesvirus 1 interferes with TAP-dependent peptide transport and intracellular trafficking of MHC class I molecules in human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppers-Lalic, D.; Rychlowski, M.; Leeuwen, D.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Ressing, M.E.; Neefjes, J.J.; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, K.; Wiertz, E.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), the cause of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in cattle, establishes a lifelong infection, despite the presence of antiviral immunity in the host. BoHV-1 has been shown to elude the host immune system, but the viral gene products

  16. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma Herpesvírus humano tipo 8 (HHV-8 e a etiopatogênese do sarcoma de Kaposi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Carneiro Leão

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on human herpesvirus 8 with particular attention to the aspects related to the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors searched original research and review articles on specific aspects of human herpesvirus 8 infection, including virology, epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis, natural history, therapy, and Kaposi's sarcoma etiopathogenesis. The relevant material was evaluated and reviewed. RESULTS: Human herpesvirus 8 is a recently discovered DNA virus that is present throughout the world but with major geographic variation. In the Western world, the virus, transmitted mainly by means of sexual contact, is strongly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma and more controversially with multiple myeloma and other non-proliferative disorders. There is no specific effective treatment, but HIV protease inhibitors may play an indirect role in the clearance of human herpesvirus 8 DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA is present in saliva, but there are as yet no documented cases of nosocomial transmission to health care workers. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 among health care workers is probably similar to that in the general population. CONCLUSION: Human herpesvirus 8 appears to be, at least in Western Europe and United States, restricted to a population at risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8 certainly has the means to overcome cellular control and immune responses and thus predispose carriers to malignancy, particularly Kaposi's sarcoma. The wide diffusion of Human herpesvirus 8 in classic Kaposi's sarcoma areas appears to represent an important factor in the high incidence of the disease. However, additional co-factors are likely to play a role in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente artigo foi revisar a literatura recente em rela

  17. Human Service Employees Coping with Job Stress, Family Stress and Work-Family Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Dominic J.

    The intersection of work and family life has always been a popular topic of discussion among family theorists. This study examined human service employees in direct service positions coping with work stress, family stress, and work-family conflict. The effects of work stress, family stress and work-family conflict on depression were examined.…

  18. Dissecting the host response to a gamma-herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, P C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Belz, G T

    2001-01-01

    The murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) provides a unique experimental model for dissecting immunity to large DNA viruses that persist in B lymphocytes. The analysis is greatly facilitated by the availability of genetically disrupted (-/-) mice that lack key host-response elements, and by the fact...... cells, which is apparently MHC independent, could represent some sort of 'smoke screen' used by MHV-68 to subvert immunity. Although MHV-68 is neither Epstein-Barr virus nor human herpesvirus-8, the results generated from this system suggest possibilities that may usefully be addressed with these human...

  19. Herpesvirus pan encodes a functional homologue of BHRF1, the Epstein-Barr virus v-Bcl-2

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    Williams Tracey

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latently infects about 90% of the human population and is associated with benign and malignant diseases of lymphoid and epithelial origin. BHRF1, an early lytic cycle antigen, is an apoptosis suppressing member of the Bcl-2 family. In vitro studies imply that BHRF1 is dispensable for both virus replication and transformation. However, the fact that BHRF1 is highly conserved not only in all EBV isolates studied to date but also in the analogous viruses Herpesvirus papio and Herpesvirus pan that infect baboons and chimpanzees respectively, suggests BHRF1 may play an important role in vivo. Results Herpesvirus papio BHRF1 has been shown to function in an analogous manner to EBV BHRF1 in response to DNA damaging agents in human keratinocytes. In this study we show that the heterologous expression of the previously uncharacterised Herpesvirus pan BHRF1 in the human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Ramos-BL provides similar anti-apoptotic functions to that of EBV BHRF1 in response to apoptosis triggered by serum withdrawal, etoposide treatment and ultraviolet (UV radiation. We also map the amino acid changes onto the recently solved structure of the EBV BHRF1 and reveal that these changes are unlikely to alter the 3D structure of the protein. Conclusions These findings show that the functional conservation of BHRF1 extends to a lymphoid background, suggesting that the primate virus proteins interact with cellular proteins that are themselves highly conserved across the higher primates. Further weight is added to this suggestion when we show that the difference in amino acid sequences map to regions on the 3D structure of EBV BHRF1 that are unlikely to change the conformation of the protein.

  20. HERPESVIRUS INFECTIONS: MYTHS AND REALITIES

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    Makarenko VD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available millennia, and its main symptoms described by Hippocrates more. But our time HVI remains mysterious and before the end of the unknown. Among the issues are not sufficiently clarified latency of infection and persistence of herpes viruses, the causes of the frequent occurrence of the disease in the form of subclinical forms, high infection rate of the world population, and others. Note that virologists and clinicians are showing in the last 20 years to the HVI, is associated with a variety of everincreasing role Herpesviridae in infectious pathology of human and social importance of diseases caused by them. It is now known 8 herpesviruses pathogenic for humans. Because of the difference in a number of biological properties, the nature of replication in cell cultures, the clinical picture and the pathogenesis of diseases caused by all herpesviruses are distributed according to the recommendations of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, in three subfamilies (α, β, γ. Activators of herpes simplex virus can be endogenous and exogenous factors: reduction of immunoreactivity of the organism (immunodeficiency, interferon failure, physical and emotional stress, overheating or overcooling, hormonal disorders, ultraviolet irradiation, corticosteroids treatment, cytotoxic drugs. It is important to understand that the HVI is a disease of the whole body with lesions in varying degrees, all organs and systems (immune, hematopoietic, lymphatic, CNS, which is responsible for the homeostasis of the human body. These data give reason to believe HVI systemic disease, mainly affecting a particular organ. However, more is still not widely used etiopathogenetical and "topical" diagnosis, indicating the loss of any one body. Due to the fact that the clinical forms of HVI are characterized by marked polymorphism, the timely establishment of the etiologic diagnosis is a difficult task and is based on the use of specific molecular genetic, virological

  1. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 Glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: 1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; 2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, 3) coexpression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis. PMID:19747451

  2. Humanized care in the family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Tamar Oliveira de Sousa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Health Community Agent (HCA has contributed in a meaningful way to enhance the bond professional-user/family, providing, thus, the humanized care for the users who receive attention from the Family Health Strategy (FHS. This research had the aim to investigate the strategies adopted by the health community agents in order to supply the humanized care for the FHS user. It is an exploratory research of qualitative nature which was accomplished in the Basic Health Units – BHU, placed in the Distrito Sanitário III, in João Pessoa – PB. Thirtyhealth community agents, from the Family Health Strategy, took part in the research. The data were collected by means of a questionnaire related to the objective proposed by the investigation and, afterwards, they were analyzed qualitatively through the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD technique. In this way, it was possible to foresee three main ideas: promoting care based on respect for the user’s singularity as well as the valuing of empathic relationship; home visit, guidance, surveillance, pointing out solutions for the user’sneeds; enhancement of the bond between community and the team responsible for action planning. The Collective Subject Discourse of the participants involved in the research, as regards the humanized care practice, had as core the respect for the patient’s dignity, prioritizing his or her real needs and emphasizing the multidisciplinary task. This investigation enables the reflection about the valuable contribution of the health community agents concerning the promotion of the humanized care having as reference the mentioned strategies.

  3. Association between Herpesviruses and Chronic Periodontitis: A Meta-Analysis Based on Case-Control Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Wong, May Chun Mei; Feng, Xi-Ping; Lu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the associations between herpesviruses and chronic periodontitis; however, the results remain controversial. To derive a more precise estimation, a meta-analysis on all available studies was performed to identify the association between herpesviruses and chronic periodontitis. A computerized literature search was conducted in December 2014 to identify eligible case-control studies from the PUBMED and EMBASE databases according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the association between herpesviruses and risk of chronic periodontitis. A fixed or random effects model was determined based on a heterogeneity test. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate stability and reliability. Publication bias was investigated using the Begg rank correlation test and Egger's funnel plot. Ten eligible studies were included to investigate the association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and chronic periodontitis. The results showed that EBV has a significant association with chronic periodontitis compared with periodontally healthy group (OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 2.53-13.00, Pchronic periodontitis was analyzed in 10 studies. The pooled result showed that HCMV also has a significant association with chronic periodontitis (OR = 3.59, 95% CI = 1.41-9.16, P = 0.007). Similar results were found in the sensitivity analyses. No significant publication bias was observed. Two eligible studies were included to investigate the association between herpes simplex virus (HSV) and chronic periodontitis risk. The association between HSV and chronic periodontitis was inconclusive (OR = 2.81 95% CI = 0.95-8.27, P = 0.06). Only one included study investigated the association between human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and chronic periodontitis risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.21-4.86). The findings of this meta-analysis suggest that two members of the herpesvirus family, EBV

  4. Functional homology of gHs and gLs from EBV-related γ-herpesviruses for EBV-induced membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omerovic, Jasmina; Longnecker, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human γ-herpesvirus that primarily infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells. Entry of EBV into B cells requires the viral glycoproteins gp42, gH/gL and gB, while gp42 is not necessary for infection of epithelial cells. In EBV, gH and gL form two distinct complexes, a bipartite complex that contains only gH and gL, used for infection of epithelial cells, and a tripartite complex that additionally includes gp42, used for infection of B cells. The gH/gL complex is conserved within the herpesvirus family, but its exact role in entry and mechanism of fusion is not yet known. To understand more about the functionality of EBVgH/gL, we investigated the functional homology of gHs and gLs from human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and two primate (rhesus and marmoset) γ-herpesviruses in EBV-mediated virus-free cell fusion assay. Overall, gHs and gLs from the more homologous primate herpesviruses were better at complementing EBV gH and gL in fusion than HHV8 gH and gL. Interestingly, marmoset gH was able to complement fusion with epithelial cells, but not B cells. Further investigation of this led to the discovery that EBVgH is the binding partner of gp42 in the tripartite complex and the absence of fusion with B cells in the presence of marmoset gH/gL is due to its inability to bind gp42

  5. The CXC chemokine receptor encoded by herpesvirus saimiri, ECRF3, shows ligand-regulated signaling through Gi, Gq, and G12/13 proteins but constitutive signaling only through Gi and G12/13 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) of many gamma(2)-herpesviruses encodes a CXC chemokine receptor. The molecular pharmacological profile of ORF74 from herpesvirus saimiri, ECRF3, is characterized here and compared with that of the well known ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). The ECRF3 receptor...... ligand selectivity of ECRF3 among ORF74 receptors could reflect differences in the cellular tropism of the gamma(2)-herpesviruses....

  6. Coordinated and sequential transcription of the cyprinid herpesvirus-3 annotated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilouze, Maya; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-10-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) is the cause of a fatal disease in carp and koi fish. The disease is seasonal and appears when water temperatures range from 18 to 28°C. CyHV-3 is a member of the Alloherpesviridae, a family in the Herpesvirales order that encompasses mammalian, avian and reptilian viruses. CyHV-3 is a large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) herpesvirus with a genome of approximately 295kbp, divergent from other mammalian, avian and reptilian herpesviruses, but bearing several genes similar to cyprinid herpesvirus-1 (CyHV-1), CyHV-2, anguillid herpesvirus-1 (AngHV-1), ictalurid herpesvirus-1 (IcHV-1) and ranid herpes virus-1 (RaHV-1). Here we show that viral DNA synthesis commences 4-8h post-infection (p.i.), and is completely inhibited by pre-treatment with cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C). Transcription of CyHV-3 genes initiates after infection as early as 1-2h p.i., and precedes viral DNA synthesis. All 156 annotated open reading frames (ORFs) of the CyHV-3 genome are transcribed into RNAs, most of which can be classified into immediate early (IE or α), early (E or β) and late (L or γ) classes, similar to all other herpesviruses. Several ORFs belonging to these groups are clustered along the viral genome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent advances in understanding Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Dissinger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic human herpesvirus. KSHV is associated with three cancers in the human population: KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD. KS is the leading cause of cancer in HIV-infected individuals. In this review, we discuss the most recent discoveries behind the mechanisms of KSHV latency maintenance and lytic replication. We also review current therapies for KSHV-associated cancers.

  8. Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3: An Archetype of Fish Alloherpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Rakus, Krzysztof; Jazowiecka-Rakus, Joanna; Vancsok, Catherine; Morvan, Léa; Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Stone, David M; Way, Keith; van Beurden, Steven J; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The order Herpesvirales encompasses viruses that share structural, genetic, and biological properties. However, members of this order infect hosts ranging from molluscs to humans. It is currently divided into three phylogenetically related families. The Alloherpesviridae family contains viruses infecting fish and amphibians. There are 12 alloherpesviruses described to date, 10 of which infect fish. Over the last decade, cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) infecting common and koi carp has emerged as the archetype of fish alloherpesviruses. Since its first description in the late 1990s, this virus has induced important economic losses in common and koi carp worldwide. It has also had negative environmental implications by affecting wild carp populations. These negative impacts and the importance of the host species have stimulated studies aimed at developing diagnostic and prophylactic tools. Unexpectedly, the data generated by these applied studies have stimulated interest in CyHV-3 as a model for fundamental research. This review intends to provide a complete overview of the knowledge currently available on CyHV-3. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Herpesviruses and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrasanta, C; Ghirardi, B; Manca, M F; Uccella, S; Gualdi, C; Tota, E; Pugni, L; Mosca, F

    2014-06-30

    Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections are conditions during which breastfeeding may be temporarily contraindicated, but expressed breast milk should always be given to the infant. CMV infection acquired through breast milk rarely causes disease in healthy term newborns; an increased risk of CMV disease has been documented in preterm infants. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not regard maternal CMV seropositivity as a contraindication to breastfeeding; according to the AAP, in newborns weighing less than 1500 g, the decision should be taken after weighing the benefits of breast milk against the risk of transmission of infection. The real efficacy of the different methods of inactivating CMV in breast milk should be compared in controlled clinical trials, rigorously examining the negative consequences that each of these methods can have on the immunological and nutritional properties of the milk itself, with a view to establish the best risk-benefit ratio of these strategies before they are recommended for use in clinical practice.

  10. Herpesviruses and breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pietrasanta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV and cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections are conditions during which breastfeeding may be temporarily contraindicated, but expressed breast milk should always be given to the infant. CMV infection acquired through breast milk rarely causes disease in healthy term newborns; an increased risk of CMV disease has been documented in preterm infants. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP does not regard maternal CMV seropositivity as a contraindication to breastfeeding; according to the AAP, in newborns weighing less than 1500 g, the decision should be taken after weighing the benefits of breast milk against the risk of transmission of infection. The real efficacy of the different methods of inactivating CMV in breast milk should be compared in controlled clinical trials, rigorously examining the negative consequences that each of these methods can have on the immunological and nutritional properties of the milk itself, with a view to establish the best risk-benefit ratio of these strategies before they are recommended for use in clinical practice.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A.

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated “CiHHV-6A/B”. These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections. PMID:26784220

  13. Epidemiology, disease and control of infections in ruminants by herpesviruses - an overview : review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Patel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There are at least 16 recognised herpesviruses that naturally infect cattle, sheep, goats and various species of deer and antelopes. Six of the viruses are recognised as distinct alphaherpesviruses and 9 as gammaherpesviruses. Buffalo herpesvirus (BflHV and ovine herpesvirus-1 (OvHV-1 remain officially unclassified. The prevalence of ruminant herpesviruses varies from worldwide to geographically restricted in distribution. Viruses in both subfamilies Alphaherpesvirinae and Gammaherpesvirinae cause mild to moderate and severe disease in respective natural or secondary ruminant hosts. Accordingly, the economic and ecological impact of the viruses is also variable. The molecular characteristics of some members have been investigated in detail. This has led to the identification of virulence-associated genes and construction of deletion mutants and recombinant viruses. Some of the latter have been developed as commercial vaccines. This paper aims to give an overview of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of infection by these viruses, immuno-prophylaxis and mechanisms of recovery from infection. Since there are 128 ruminant species in the family Bovidae, it is likely that some herpesviruses remain undiscovered. We conclude that currently known ruminant alphaherpesviruses occur only in their natural hosts and do not cross stably into other ruminant species. By contrast, gammaherpesviruses have a much broader host range as evidenced by the fact that antibodies reactive to alcelaphine herpesvirus type 1 have been detected in 4 subfamilies in the family Bovidae, namely Alcelaphinae, Hippotraginae, Ovibovinae and Caprinae. New gammaherpesviruses within these subfamilies are likely to be discovered in the future.

  14. In vivo growth-restricted and reversible malignancy induced by Human Herpesvirus-8/ KSHV: a cell and animal model of virally induced Kaposi's sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Agata D'Agostino; Cavallin, Lucas E.; Vincent, Loïc; Chiozzini, Chiara; Eroles, Pilar; Duran, Elda M.; Asgari, Zahra; Hooper, Andrea T.; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Hilsher, Chelsey; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Rafii, Shahin; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2007-01-01

    Transfection of a Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV) Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (KSHVBac36) into mouse bone marrow endothelial lineage cells generates a cell (mECK36) that forms KS-like tumors in mice. mECK36 expressed most KSHV genes and were angiogenic, but didn't form colonies in soft agar. In nude mice, mECK36 formed KSHV-harboring vascularized spindle-cell sarcomas that were LANA+/podoplanin+, overexpressed VEGF and Angiopoietin ligands and receptors, and displayed KSHV and host transcriptomes reminiscent of KS. mECK36 that lost the KSHV episome reverted to non-tumorigenicity. siRNA suppression of KSHV vGPCR, an angiogenic gene up-regulated in mECK36 tumors, inhibited angiogenicity and tumorigenicity. These results show that KSHV malignancy is in vivo growth-restricted and reversible, defining mECK36 as a biologically sensitive animal model of KSHV-dependent KS. PMID:17349582

  15. The role of herpesviruses in ocular infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim V Farooq

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Asim V Farooq1, Arpeet Shah1, Deepak Shukla21Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Ocular infections caused by herpesviruses are an important cause of morbidity. The majority of cases are believed to be associated with herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1, although HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV, cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV are also associated with various ocular diseases. The ability of some herpes viruses to infect various anatomic regions of the eye may be facilitated by entry processes that are cell-type specific, and in many cases may occur more frequently in the immunocompromised. The elimination of the role of herpesviruses in ocular disease remains elusive, as they often develop life-long latency in a large proportion of humans. Experimental vaccines for ocular HSV have shown some benefit in animal models, a result that has not been adequately demonstrated in clinical trials. Meanwhile, ocular involvement in VZV remains unpredictable, and CMV retinitis continues to be an important cause of blindness in those infected by HIV.Keywords: ocular herpes, viral entry, antivirals, epidemiology, seroprevalence, ocular lymphomas, viral vaccine

  16. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  17. Synergistic immune responses induced by endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens result in increased production of inflammatory cytokines in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, T; Christensen, T; Hansen, H J

    2008-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) and herpesviruses are increasingly associated with the pathogenesis of the neurological inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Herpesviruses are capable of HERV activation and simultaneous presence of HERV and herpesvirus antigens have a synergistic...... effect on cell-mediated immune responses, which tend to be higher in MS patients in comparison with healthy individuals. Here, we investigate whether these synergistic immune responses are reflected in changes in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays...

  18. Detection of novel strains of cyprinid herpesvirus closely related to koi herpesvirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Way, K.; Dodge, M.J.; Voorbergen-Laarman, H.A.; Panzarin, V.M.; Abbadi, M.; El-Matbouli, M.; Skall, H.F.; Kahns, S.; Stone, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) or koi herpesvirus (KHV) is a devastating virus of carp. Using generic primers for the DNA polymerase and the major capsid protein genes of cyprinid herpesviruses, nucleotide sequences divergent from previously described CyHV-3 were obtained. At least 3 novel groups

  19. Detection of novel strains of cyprinid herpesvirus closely related to koi herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelsma, Marc Y.; Way, Keith; Dodge, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) or koi herpesvirus (KHV) is a devastating virus of carp. Using generic primers for the DNA polymerase and the major capsid protein genes of cyprinid herpesviruses, nucleotide sequences divergent from previously described CyHV-3 were obtained. At least 3 novel groups...

  20. The Human-Canine Bond: Closer than Family Ties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Sandra B.; Barker, Randolph T.

    1988-01-01

    Used Family Life Space Diagram to compare relationship between human family members with the human-canine relationship. Subjects were 29 dog enthusiasts, 66 typical pet owners, and 27 elementary school students with dogs. Results suggest that individuals may perceive their relationship with their pet dog as being as close as their relationship…

  1. Ranid Herpesvirus 3 and Proliferative Dermatitis in Free-Ranging Wild Common Frogs (Rana Temporaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, F C; Schmidt, B R; Lohmann, P; Otten, P; Akdesir, E; Gaschen, V; Aguilar-Bultet, L; Wahli, T; Sattler, U; Stoffel, M H

    2017-07-01

    Amphibian pathogens are of current interest as contributors to the global decline of amphibians. However, compared with chytrid fungi and ranaviruses, herpesviruses have received relatively little attention. Two ranid herpesviruses have been described: namely, Ranid herpesvirus 1 (RHV1) and Ranid herpesvirus 2 (RHV2). This article describes the discovery and partial characterization of a novel virus tentatively named Ranid herpesvirus 3 (RHV3), a candidate member of the genus Batrachovirus in the family Alloherpesviridae. RHV3 infection in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria) was associated with severe multifocal epidermal hyperplasia, dermal edema, a minor inflammatory response, and variable mucous gland degeneration. Intranuclear inclusions were numerous in the affected epidermis together with unique extracellular aggregates of herpesvirus-like particles. The RHV3-associated skin disease has features similar to those of a condition recognized in European frogs for the last 20 years and whose cause has remained elusive. The genome of RHV3 shares most of the features of the Alloherpesviruses. The characterization of this presumptive pathogen may be of value for amphibian conservation and for a better understanding of the biology of Alloherpesviruses.

  2. Initial Detection and Molecular Characterization of Namaycush Herpesvirus (Salmonid Herpesvirus 5) in Lake Trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, Gavin W; Barbash, Patricia A; Coll, John A

    2016-03-01

    A novel herpesvirus was found by molecular methods in samples of Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush from Lake Erie, Pennsylvania, and Lake Ontario, Keuka Lake, and Lake Otsego, New York. Based on PCR amplification and partial sequencing of polymerase, terminase, and glycoprotein genes, a number of isolates were identified as a novel virus, which we have named Namaycush herpesvirus (NamHV) salmonid herpesvirus 5 (SalHV5). Phylogenetic analyses of three NamHV genes indicated strong clustering with other members of the genus Salmonivirus, placing these isolates into family Alloherpesviridae. The NamHV isolates were identical in the three partially sequenced genes; however, they varied from other salmonid herpesviruses in nucleotide sequence identity. In all three of the genes sequenced, NamHV shared the highest sequence identity with Atlantic Salmon papillomatosis virus (ASPV; SalHV4) isolated from Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar in northern Europe, including northwestern Russia. These results lead one to believe that NamHV and ASPV have a common ancestor that may have made a relatively recent host jump from Atlantic Salmon to Lake Trout or vice versa. Partial nucleotide sequence comparisons between NamHV and ASPV for the polymerase and glycoprotein genes differ by >5% and >10%, respectively. Additional nucleotide sequence comparisons between NamHV and epizootic epitheliotropic disease virus (EEDV/SalHV3) in the terminase, glycoprotein, and polymerase genes differ by >5%, >20%, and >10%, respectively. Thus, NamHV and EEDV may be occupying discrete ecological niches in Lake Trout. Even though NamHV shared the highest genetic identity with ASPV, each of these viruses has a separate host species, which also implies speciation. Additionally, NamHV has been detected over the last 4 years in four separate water bodies across two states, which suggests that NamHV is a distinct, naturally replicating lineage. This, in combination with a divergence in nucleotide sequence from EEDV

  3. Epidemiological situation of Herpesvirus infections in buffalo herds: Bubaline Herpesvirus1 or Bovine Herpesvirus1?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.L. Autorino

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Information on the distribution and related epidemiological characteristics of herpesvirus infections, and in particular referring to Bovine Herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1 and Bubaline Herpesvirus 1 (BuHV1 in buffaloes, have to date not been reported. Different studies based on serological surveys and viral isolation describe the circulation of both infections in this species. The specific etiological attribution of the infections in sero-surveys can be uncertain because of antigenic cross-reactivity of these ruminant α-herpesvirus and therefore depends on the diagnostic techniques employed. For this , we proceeded in verifying the diffusion of the two infections in a buffalo population of Central Italy. The sample size for the number of herds to test was defined considering an expected prevalence > 20% and the number of heads to be tested within each herd was established using an expected prevalence of > 25% (absolute precision of 5%, with 95% confidence level. The 155 herds to test were those with no IBR vaccination history. A maximum of 15 random blood samples were collected within the >3 year age category. The same sampling criteria was adopted when cows were present on buffalo farms to study the possible role of this species. Through the combined use of gB-gE Elisa tests, we assigned a specific infection status, for the BuHV1 infection status (gB-pos/gE-neg, as confirmed by an experimental infection conducted by us inoculating buffaloes with the BuHV1 “strain Metzler”, and for the BoHV1 status (gBpos/ gE-pos as that observed for the infection in bovines. Prevalence of infection, based on the Elisa status of each animal, were estimated for the whole sample and within each herd. Furthermore, the selected farms were investigated for their numeric consistency, presence of bovines, occurrence of typical clinical herpesvirus disorders occurring during the year prior to sampling. The association of these factors with the infection status was verified

  4. New Rising Infection: Human Herpesvirus 6 Is Frequent in Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation after Induction Therapy with Bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netanel Horowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 infection is a common complication during immunosuppression. Its significance for multiple myeloma (MM patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT after treatment with novel agents affecting immune system remains undetermined. Data on 62 consecutive MM patients receiving bortezomib-dexamethasone (VD (; 66% or thalidomide-dexamethasone (TD (, 34% induction, together with melphalan 200 mg/m2 autograft between 01.2005 and 09.2010, were reviewed. HHV-6 reactivation was diagnosed in patients experiencing postengraftment unexplained fever (PEUF in the presence of any level of HHHV-6 DNA in blood. There were no statistically significant differences in patient characteristics between the groups, excluding dexamethasone dosage, which was significantly higher in patients receiving TD. Eight patients in TD and 18 in VD cohorts underwent viral screening for PEUF. HHV-6 reactivation was diagnosed in 10 patients of the entire series (16%, accounting for 35% of those screened; its incidence was 19.5% ( in the VD group versus 9.5% ( in the TD group. All patients recovered without sequelae. In conclusion, HHV-6 reactivation is relatively common after ASCT, accounting for at least a third of PEUF episodes. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether bortezomib has an impact on HHV-6 reactivation development.

  5. Comparing Families of Suicide Attempters, Human

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rezaei: Family process and content of suicide attempters and HIV positive patients. Annals of Medical ... the exclusion criteria (psychotic disorders, suicidal ideation, addiction, refusing ..... A review of mood disorders among juvenile offenders.

  6. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  7. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  8. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  9. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  10. Overexpression and purification of U24 from human herpesvirus type-6 in E. coli: unconventional use of oxidizing environments with a maltose binding protein-hexahistine dual tag to enhance membrane protein yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Suzana K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining membrane proteins in sufficient quantity for biophysical study and biotechnological applications has been a difficult task. Use of the maltose binding protein/hexahistidine dual tag system with E.coli as an expression host is emerging as a high throughput method to enhance membrane protein yield, solubility, and purity, but fails to be effective for certain proteins. Optimizing the variables in this system to fine-tune for efficiency can ultimately be a daunting task. To identify factors critical to success in this expression system, we have selected to study U24, a novel membrane protein from Human Herpesvirus type-6 with potent immunosuppressive ability and a possible role in the pathogenesis of the disease multiple sclerosis. Results We expressed full-length U24 as a C-terminal fusion to a maltose binding protein/hexahistidine tag and examined the effects of temperature, growth medium type, cell strain type, oxidizing vs. reducing conditions and periplasmic vs. cytoplasmic expression location. Temperature appeared to have the greatest effect on yield; at 37°C full-length protein was either poorly expressed (periplasm or degraded (cytoplasm whereas at 18°C, expression was improved especially in the periplasm of C41(DE3 cells and in the cytoplasm of oxidizing Δtrx/Δgor mutant strains, Origami 2 and SHuffle. Expression of the fusion protein in these strains were estimated to be 3.2, 5.3 and 4.3 times greater, respectively, compared to commonly-used BL21(DE3 cells. We found that U24 is isolated with an intramolecular disulfide bond under these conditions, and we probed whether this disulfide bond was critical to high yield expression of full-length protein. Expression analysis of a C21SC37S cysteine-free mutant U24 demonstrated that this disulfide was not critical for full-length protein expression, but it is more likely that strained metabolic conditions favour factors which promote protein expression. This

  11. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  12. Ekhaya : Human displacement and the yearning for familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekhaya : Human displacement and the yearning for familial homecoming. From Throne (Cathedra) to Home ( Oikos ) in a grassroots ecclesiology of place and space: Fides Quaerens Domum et Locum [Faith Seeking Home and Space

  13. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  14. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus microRNAs

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    Eva eGottwein

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human pathogenic -herpesvirus strongly associated with the development of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and B cell proliferative disorders, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL. The identification and functional investigation of non-coding RNAs expressed by KSHV is a topic with rapidly emerging importance. KSHV miRNAs derived from 12 stem-loops located in the major latency locus have been the focus of particular attention. Recent studies describing the transcriptome-wide identification of mRNA targets of the KSHV miRNAs suggest that these miRNAs have evolved a highly complex network of interactions with the cellular and viral transcriptomes. Relatively few KSHV miRNA targets, however, have been characterized at a functional level. Here, our current understanding of KSHV miRNA expression, targets and function will be reviewed.

  15. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Diogo; Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel

    2016-06-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis.

  16. Enhanced resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of herpesvirus entry mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Etsuro; Yoshino, Saori; Amagai, Keiko; Taharaguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Chiemi; Morimoto, Junko; Inobe, Manabu; Uenishi, Tomoko; Uede, Toshimitsu

    2004-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family used as a cellular receptor by virion glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Both human and mouse forms of HVEM can mediate entry of HSV-1 but have no entry activity for pseudorabies virus (PRV). To assess the antiviral potential of HVEM in vivo, three transgenic mouse lines expressing a soluble form of HVEM (HVEMIg) consisting of an extracellular domain of murine HVEM and the Fc portion of human IgG1 were generated. All of the transgenic mouse lines showed marked resistance to HSV-1 infection when the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with HSV-1, but not to PRV infection. The present results demonstrate that HVEMIg is able to exert a significant antiviral effect against HSV-1 infection in vivo

  17. Targeting herpesvirus reliance of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N

    2006-01-01

    the infection. However, since both virus and host exist, the organisms struggle must reach an ecological equilibrium. Among the best-studied interactions between viruses and the host immune system are those between herpesviruses and their hosts. Herpesviruses are known to devote a significant part...... of their large genomes on immuno-modulatory genes, some encoding chemokines or chemokine receptors. These genes, which may be dispensable for viral replication in vitro, are highly important for viral growth in vivo, for viral dissemination and disease progression. Indeed, all beta and gamma-herpesviruses have...... chemokine receptors seems to be their constitutive activity. The biological function of the constitutive activity is still unclear, but it has become clear that the receptors are involved in important parts of the viral lifecycle in vivo, and that the receptor signaling is involved in gamma-herpesvirus...

  18. Investigation of Koi Herpesvirus Latency in Koi▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Kathleen E.; Miller-Morgan, Tim; Heidel, Jerry R.; Kent, Michael L.; Bildfell, Rob J.; LaPatra, Scott; Watson, Gregory; Jin, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) has recently been classified as a member of the family of Alloherpesviridae within the order of Herpesvirales. One of the unique features of Herpesviridae is latent infection following a primary infection. However, KHV latency has not been recognized. To determine if latency occurs in clinically normal fish from facilities with a history of KHV infection or exposure, the presence of the KHV genome was investigated in healthy koi by PCR and Southern blotting. KHV DNA, but not infectious virus or mRNAs from lytic infection, was detected in white blood cells from investigated koi. Virus shedding was examined via tissue culture and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) testing of gill mucus and feces from six koi every other day for 1 month. No infectious virus or KHV DNA was detected in fecal secretion or gill swabs, suggesting that neither acute nor persistent infection was present. To determine if KHV latent infections can be reactivated, six koi were subjected to a temperature stress regime. KHV DNA and infectious virus were detected in both gill and fecal swabs by day 8 following temperature stress. KHV DNA was also detectable in brain, spleen, gills, heart, eye, intestine, kidney, liver, and pancreas in euthanized koi 1 month post-temperature stress. Our study suggests that KHV may become latent in leukocytes and other tissues, that it can be reactivated from latency by temperature stress, and that it may be more widespread in the koi population than previously suspected. PMID:21389134

  19. [Research Advances in Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shucheng; Wang, Qing; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Chun; Liang, Hongru; Shi, Cunbin

    2016-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the causative agent of an extremely contagious and aggressive disease afflicting common corp Cyprinus carpio L. termed koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD). Since it was first reported in 1997, the virus has spread worldwide rapidly, leading to enormous financial losses in industries based on common carp and koi carp. This review summarizes recent advances in CyHV-3 research on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and control of KHVD.

  20. Off-the-Shelf Virus-Specific T Cells to Treat BK Virus, Human Herpesvirus 6, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Naik, Swati; Leung, Kathryn; Martinez, Caridad A; Ramos, Carlos A; Carrum, George; Sasa, Ghadir; Lulla, Premal; Watanabe, Ayumi; Kuvalekar, Manik; Gee, Adrian P; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Grilley, Bambi J; Krance, Robert A; Gottschalk, Stephen; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Leen, Ann M; Omer, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Improvement of cure rates for patients treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) will require efforts to decrease treatment-related mortality from severe viral infections. Adoptively transferred virus-specific T cells (VSTs) generated from eligible, third-party donors could provide broad antiviral protection to recipients of HSCT as an immediately available off-the-shelf product. Patient and Methods We generated a bank of VSTs that recognized five common viral pathogens: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus (BKV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). The VSTs were administered to 38 patients with 45 infections in a phase II clinical trial. Results A single infusion produced a cumulative complete or partial response rate of 92% (95% CI, 78.1% to 98.3%) overall and the following rates by virus: 100% for BKV (n = 16), 94% for CMV (n = 17), 71% for AdV (n = 7), 100% for EBV (n = 2), and 67% for HHV-6 (n = 3). Clinical benefit was achieved in 31 patients treated for one infection and in seven patients treated for multiple coincident infections. Thirteen of 14 patients treated for BKV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis experienced complete resolution of gross hematuria by week 6. Infusions were safe, and only two occurrences of de novo graft-versus host disease (grade 1) were observed. VST tracking by epitope profiling revealed persistence of functional VSTs of third-party origin for up to 12 weeks. Conclusion The use of banked VSTs is a feasible, safe, and effective approach to treat severe and drug-refractory infections after HSCT, including infections from two viruses (BKV and HHV-6) that had never been targeted previously with an off-the-shelf product. Furthermore, the multispecificity of the VSTs ensures extensive antiviral coverage, which facilitates the treatment of patients with multiple infections.

  1. Persistence of herpesvirus of eel (Herpesvirus anguillae) in farmed European ell (Anguilla anguilla L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwstadt, van A.P.; Dijkstra, S.G.; Haenen, O.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Herpesvirus of eel Herpesvirus anguillae (HVA) was isolated repeatedly from farmed eel of an outwardly healthy stock, but virus isolation was much greater in an experimental group of fish that were injected with dexamethasone. The results suggest that HVA can establish a latent infection in eel.

  2. Lysine supplementation is not effective for the prevention or treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection in cats: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Sebastiaan; Bunnik, Evelien M

    2015-11-16

    Feline herpesvirus 1 is a highly contagious virus that affects many cats. Virus infection presents with flu-like signs and irritation of ocular and nasal regions. While cats can recover from active infections without medical treatment, examination by a veterinarian is recommended. Lysine supplementation appears to be a popular intervention (recommended by > 90 % of veterinarians in cat hospitals). We investigated the scientific merit of lysine supplementation by systematically reviewing all relevant literature. NCBI's PubMed database was used to search for published work on lysine and feline herpesvirus 1, as well as lysine and human herpesvirus 1. Seven studies on lysine and feline herpesvirus 1 (two in vitro studies and 5 studies with cats), and 10 publications on lysine and human herpesvirus 1 (three in vitro studies and 7 clinical trials) were included for qualitative analysis. There is evidence at multiple levels that lysine supplementation is not effective for the prevention or treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection in cats. Lysine does not have any antiviral properties, but is believed to act by lowering arginine levels. However, lysine does not antagonize arginine in cats, and evidence that low intracellular arginine concentrations would inhibit viral replication is lacking. Furthermore, lowering arginine levels is highly undesirable since cats cannot synthesize this amino acid themselves. Arginine deficiency will result in hyperammonemia, which may be fatal. In vitro studies with feline herpesvirus 1 showed that lysine has no effect on the replication kinetics of the virus. Finally, and most importantly, several clinical studies with cats have shown that lysine is not effective for the prevention or the treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection, and some even reported increased infection frequency and disease severity in cats receiving lysine supplementation. We recommend an immediate stop of lysine supplementation because of the complete lack of

  3. Characterization of phocid herpesvirus-1 and -2 as putative alpha- and gamma-herpesviruses of North American and European pinnipeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Harder (Timm); M. Harder; H. Vos; K. Kulonen; S. Kennedy-Stoskopf; B. Liess; M.J.G. Appel (Max); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo study the relationships between herpesvirus recently isolated from different pinniped species, antigenic and genetic analyses were performed. First, herpesviruses isolated from North American harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), a Californian sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and a

  4. CyHV-3: the third cyprinid herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotesman, Michael; Kattlun, Julia; Bergmann, Sven M; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2013-07-22

    Common carp (including ornamental koi carp) Cyprinus carpio L. are ecologically and economically important freshwater fish in Europe and Asia. C. carpio have recently been endangered by a third cyprinid herpesvirus, known as cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3), the etiological agent of koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD), which causes significant morbidity and mortality in koi and common carp. Clinical and pathological signs include epidermal abrasions, excess mucus production, necrosis of gill and internal organs, and lethargy. KHVD has decimated major carp populations in Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan, Japan, Germany, Canada, and the USA, and has been listed as a notifiable disease in Germany since 2005, and by the World Organisation for Animal Health since 2007. KHVD is exacerbated in aquaculture because of the relatively high host stocking density, and CyHV-3 may be concentrated by filter-feeding aquatic organisms. CyHV-3 is taxonomically grouped within the family Alloherpesviridae, can be propagated in a number of cell lines, and is active at a temperature range of 15 to 28°C. Three isolates originating from Japan (KHV-J), USA (KHV-U), and Israel (KHV-I) have been sequenced. CyHV-3 has a 295 kb genome with 156 unique open reading frames and replicates in the cell nucleus, and mature viral particles are 170 to 200 nm in diameter. CyHV-3 can be detected by multiple PCR-based methods and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Several modes of immunization have been developed for KHVD; however, fish immunized with either vaccine or wild-type virus may become carriers for CyHV-3. There is no current treatment for KHVD.

  5. Favourable effect of chemotherapy on clinical symptoms and human herpesvirus-8 DNA load in a patient with Kaposi's sarcoma presenting with fever and anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J. M.; Sol, C. J.; Renwick, N.; Goudsmit, J.; Veenstra, J.; Reiss, P.

    1999-01-01

    The case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with Kaposi's sarcoma who presented with fever of unknown origin, severe anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypoalbuminemia but only limited involvement of the skin is presented. Chemotherapy directed at Kaposi's sarcoma

  6. Subclinical herpesvirus shedding among HIV-1-infected men on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Hernandez, Arcadio; Chen, Yue; Bullotta, Arlene; Buchanan, William G; Klamar-Blain, Cynthia R; Borowski, Luann; Riddler, Sharon A; Rinaldo, Charles R; Macatangay, Bernard J C

    2017-09-24

    We evaluated the subclinical shedding of six different herpesviruses in antiretroviral drug-treated HIV-positive [HIV(+)] MSM, and determined how this is associated with markers of inflammation and immune activation. We obtained blood, semen, throat washing, urine, and stool from 15 antiretroviral-treated HIV-1-infected MSM with CD4 T-cell reconstitution, and 12 age-matched HIV-negative [HIV (-)] MSM from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study at four timepoints over 24 weeks to measure DNA levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6), and HHV8. T-cell activation and plasma levels of soluble markers of inflammation and activation were also measured at the corresponding timepoints. HIV(+) participants had a trend for higher total herpesvirus shedding rate. HIV(+) participants also had a significantly higher rate of shedding EBV and CMV compared with the HIV(-) group. Herpesvirus shedding was mostly seen in throat washings. In the HIV(+) group, herpesvirus shedding rate inversely correlated with plasma levels of interferon γ-induced protein 10 and soluble CD163. CMV DNA levels negatively correlated with levels of T-cell activation. There was a trend for a positive correlation between EBV shedding rate and plasma soluble CD14. HHV6 shedding rate negatively correlated with plasma levels of interleukin-6, soluble CD163, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Correlations were not observed among HIV(-) individuals. Among treated HIV-infected MSM, there are higher subclinical shedding rates of some herpesviruses that occur in different body compartments and negatively correlate with levels of inflammation and immune activation.

  7. The human PDI family: Versatility packed into a single fold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Ellgaard, Lars

    2007-01-01

    in promoting oxidative protein folding in the ER has been extended in recent years to include roles in other processes such as ER-associated degradation (ERAD), trafficking, calcium homeostasis, antigen presentation and virus entry. Some of these functions are performed by non-catalytic members of the family...... that lack the active-site cysteines. Regardless of their function, all human PDIs contain at least one domain of approximately 100 amino acid residues with structural homology to thioredoxin. As we learn more about the individual proteins of the family, a complex picture is emerging that emphasizes as much...... their differences as their similarities, and underlines the versatility of the thioredoxin fold. Here, we primarily explore the diversity of cellular functions described for the human PDIs. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-3...

  8. Genetic characterization of human herpesvirus type 1: Full-length genome sequence of strain obtained from an encephalitis case from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay P Bondre

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the full-length genome sequence generated from an Indian HSV-1 isolate shared close genetic relationship with the American KOS and Chinese CR38 strains which belonged to the Asian genetic lineage. Recombination analysis of Indian isolate demonstrated multiple recombination crossover points throughout the genome. This full-length genome sequence amplified from the Indian isolate would be helpful to study HSV evolution, genetic basis of differential pathogenesis, host-virus interactions and viral factors contributing towards differential clinical outcome in human infections.

  9. Koi herpesvirus disease (khvd) surveillance and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Way, K.; Bergmann, S. M.; Engelsma, Marc

    together skills and experience on this fish disease from different parts of Europe. In the report of the meeting sent to the commission important issues concerning serology and cyprinid herpesvirus variants were raised. We hope that our recommendations to resolve these issues will be considered...

  10. Scattered Families : Transnational family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands in the light of the human rights based protection of the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P.H.A.M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165624647

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands, within and across borders. While family life constitutes a foundation in the lives of human beings, the disruption of the family through external causes has a huge impact on the people involved. In the case of refugees, many of

  11. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding...

  12. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  13. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  14. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stokol

    Full Text Available Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V. Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM. A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis

  15. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  16. Single tube multiplex real-time PCR for the rapid detection of herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankuntaw, Nipaporn; Sukprasert, Saovaluk; Engchanil, Chulapan; Kaewkes, Wanlop; Chantratita, Wasun; Pairoj, Vantanit; Lulitanond, Viraphong

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus infection of immunocompromised hosts may lead to central nervous system (CNS) infection and diseases. In this study, a single tube multiplex real-time PCR was developed for the detection of five herpesviruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, EBV and CMV) in clinical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. Two primer pairs specific for the herpesvirus polymerase gene and five hybridization probe pairs for the specific identification of the herpesvirus types were used in a LightCycler multiplex real-time PCR. A singleplex real-time PCR was first optimized and then applied to the multiplex real-time PCR. The singleplex and multiplex real-time PCRs showed no cross-reactivity. The sensitivity of the singleplex real-time PCR was 1 copy per reaction for each herpesvirus, while that of the multiplex real-time PCR was 1 copy per reaction for HSV-1 and VZV and 10 copies per reaction for HSV-2, EBV and CMV. Intra and inter-assay variations of the single tube multiplex assay were in the range of 0.02%-3.67% and 0.79%-4.35%, respectively. The assay was evaluated by testing 62 clinical CSF samples and was found to have equivalent sensitivity, specificity and agreement as the routine real-time PCR, but reducing time, cost and amount of used sample. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three novel herpesviruses of endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Newton, Alisa L; Chang, Tylis Y; Zarate, Brian; Whitlock, Alison L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The rich diversity of the world's reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta) and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata) turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204) and smaller numbers of positive wood (5) and spotted (1) turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts.

  18. The role of DNA repair in herpesvirus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jay C

    2014-10-01

    In cells latently infected with a herpesvirus, the viral DNA is present in the cell nucleus, but it is not extensively replicated or transcribed. In this suppressed state the virus DNA is vulnerable to mutagenic events that affect the host cell and have the potential to destroy the virus' genetic integrity. Despite the potential for genetic damage, however, herpesvirus sequences are well conserved after reactivation from latency. To account for this apparent paradox, I have tested the idea that host cell-encoded mechanisms of DNA repair are able to control genetic damage to latent herpesviruses. Studies were focused on homologous recombination-dependent DNA repair (HR). Methods of DNA sequence analysis were employed to scan herpesvirus genomes for DNA features able to activate HR. Analyses were carried out with a total of 39 herpesvirus DNA sequences, a group that included viruses from the alpha-, beta- and gamma-subfamilies. The results showed that all 39 genome sequences were enriched in two or more of the eight recombination-initiating features examined. The results were interpreted to indicate that HR can stabilize latent herpesvirus genomes. The results also showed, unexpectedly, that repair-initiating DNA features differed in alpha- compared to gamma-herpesviruses. Whereas inverted and tandem repeats predominated in alpha-herpesviruses, gamma-herpesviruses were enriched in short, GC-rich initiation sequences such as CCCAG and depleted in repeats. In alpha-herpesviruses, repair-initiating repeat sequences were found to be concentrated in a specific region (the S segment) of the genome while repair-initiating short sequences were distributed more uniformly in gamma-herpesviruses. The results suggest that repair pathways are activated differently in alpha- compared to gamma-herpesviruses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Three Novel Herpesviruses of Endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiboff, Robert J.; Raphael, Bonnie L.; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D.; Seimon, Tracie A.; Newton, Alisa L.; Chang, Tylis Y.; Zarate, Brian; Whitlock, Alison L.; McAloose, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The rich diversity of the world’s reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta) and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata) turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204) and smaller numbers of positive wood (5) and spotted (1) turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts. PMID

  20. Three novel herpesviruses of endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ossiboff

    Full Text Available The rich diversity of the world's reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204 and smaller numbers of positive wood (5 and spotted (1 turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts.

  1. The complete genome sequence of herpesvirus papio 2 (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 16) shows evidence of recombination events among various progenitor herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Shaun D; Severini, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    We have sequenced the entire genome of herpesvirus papio 2 (HVP-2; Cercopithecine herpesvirus 16) strain X313, a baboon herpesvirus with close homology to other primate alphaherpesviruses, such as SA8, monkey B virus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2. The genome of HVP-2 is 156,487 bp in length, with an overall GC content of 76.5%. The genome organization is identical to that of the other members of the genus Simplexvirus, with a long and a short unique region, each bordered by inverted repeats which end with an "a" sequence. All of the open reading frames detected in this genome were homologous and colinear with those of SA8 and B virus. The HSV gene RL1 (gamma(1)34.5; neurovirulence factor) is not present in HVP-2, as is the case for SA8 and B virus. The HVP-2 genome is 85% homologous to its closest relative, SA8. However, segment-by-segment bootstrap analysis of the genome revealed at least two regions that display closer homology to the corresponding sequences of B virus. The first region comprises the UL41 to UL44 genes, and the second region is located within the UL36 gene. We hypothesize that this localized and defined shift in homology is due to recombination events between an SA8-like progenitor of HVP-2 and a herpesvirus species more closely related to the B virus. Since some of the genes involved in these putative recombination events are determinants of virulence, a comparative analysis of their function may provide insight into the pathogenic mechanism of simplexviruses.

  2. [Herpesvirus detection in clinically healthy West African mud turtles (Pelusioscastaneus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, R E; Heckers, K O; Heynol, V; Weider, K; Behncke, H

    2015-01-01

    First description of a herpesvirus in West African mud turtles. A herpesvirus was detected in two clinically healthy West African mud turtles (Pelusios castaneus) by PCR during a quarantine exam. The animals had been imported from Togo, West Africa to Germany for the pet trade. Analysis of a portion of the genome of the detected virus showed that it is a previously unknown virus related to other chelonid herpesviruses. The virus was named pelomedusid herpesvirus 1. This case highlights the importance of testing for infectious agents during quarantine, even in clinically healthy animals.

  3. Complete genome sequence and architecture of crucian carp Carassius auratus herpesvirus (CaHV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiao-Tao; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Deng, Yuan-Sheng; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-12-01

    Crucian carp Carassius auratus herpesvirus (CaHV) was isolated from diseased crucian carp with acute gill hemorrhages and high mortality. The CaHV genome was sequenced and analyzed. The data showed that it consists of 275,348 bp and contains 150 predicted ORFs. The architecture of the CaHV genome differs from those of four cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV1, CyHV2, SY-C1, CyHV3), with insertions, deletions and the absence of a terminal direct repeat. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA polymerase sequences of 17 strains of Herpesvirales members, and the concatenated 12 core ORFs from 10 strains of alloherpesviruses showed that CaHV clustered together with members of the genus Cyprinivirus, family Alloherpesviridae.

  4. Taking stock of work-family initiatives: How announcements of "family-friendly" human resource decisions affect shareholder value.

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle M. Arthur; Alison Cook

    2004-01-01

    This study examines share price reactions to 231 work-family human resource policies adopted by Fortune 500 companies and announced in the Wall Street Journal between 1971 and 1996. Consistent with past research, the results suggest that firm announcements of work-family initiatives positively affected shareholder return. The authors also empirically test three hypotheses concerning how the timing of work-family initiatives influences shareholder reaction. They find that a pioneering company ...

  5. Interference with the Autophagic Process as a Viral Strategy to Escape from the Immune Control: Lesson from Gamma Herpesviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Santarelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarized the most recent findings on the role of autophagy in antiviral immune response. We described how viruses have developed strategies to subvert the autophagic process. A particular attention has been given to Epstein-Barr and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated Herpesvirus, viruses studied for many years in our laboratory. These two viruses belong to γ-Herpesvirus subfamily and are associated with several human cancers. Besides the effects on the immune response, we have described how autophagy subversion by viruses may also concur to the enhancement of their replication and to viral tumorigenesis.

  6. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area. PMID:27482898

  7. Resources, attractiveness, family commitment; reproductive decisions in human mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczkei, T; Voros, S; Gal, A; Bernath, L

    1997-08-01

    This study of reproductive decisions in human mate selection used data from "lonely hearts" advertisements to examine a series of predictions based on the mate preferences of male and females relating to age; physical appearance; financial condition and socioeconomic status; family commitment and personal traits; short- and long-term mating; and marital status and preexisting children. The sample consisted of 1000 personal advertisements (500 male) placed in two daily, national papers between February and October 1994 in Hungary. The research procedure included a pilot study of 150 advertisers (75 male) to refine the categories examined. Analysis was performed using 1) a matrix with one axis referring to offers and the other to demands of males and females separately; 2) a matrix of offers only to derive correlated traits of claims by males and females; and 3) a matrix with columns describing sex, offers, demands, advertiser's age, and required age and a row for each of the 1000 samples. It was found that men preferred younger mates, while women preferred older ones. Men were more likely to seek physical attractiveness, while women were more likely to seek financial resources (ranked 7th) and high status (ranked 6th). Women strongly preferred male domestic virtue and family commitment, and twice as many women as men demanded long-term relationships. Women more frequently declared preexisting children, and men exhibited a reluctance to accept these children. Both males and females employed "trade-off" strategies, making greater demands if they felt they had attractive offers.

  8. Herpesvirus infections in psittacine birds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Park, J H; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1993-03-01

    Herpesvirus infection was diagnosed histologically and electron microscopically in 21 out of 241 pet birds examined. The infected birds included 14 parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) with respiratory infection and three parrots (Ama-zona aestiva aestiva), two cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and two rosellas (Platycercus emimius) with Pacheco's disease. The consistent lesions of respiratory herpesvirus infection were the formation of syncytial cells associated with the presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies, mainly in the lung and air sac. There was lack of an apparent cellular reaction in situ. The agent induced tubular structures containing a clear core in the nuclei of the affected cells. The present study indicated that it was a distinct entity from infectious laryngotracheitis based on tissue tropism, host reaction and morphology of the tubular structures. The striking lesions of Pacheco's disease consisted of syncytial cell formation with intranuclear inclusion bodies in various organs, especially the liver, parathyroid, ovary, bone marrow and intestine. This agent showed similar morphology to that of the respiratory herpesvirus infection, but was larger in size and had no tubular structure formation in the nuclei of affected cells.

  9. Human heavy-chain variable region gene family nonrandomly rearranged in familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, A.; Humphries, C.; Tucker, P.; Blattner, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have identified a family of human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (V/sub H/) genes, one member of which is rearranged in two affected members of a family in which the father and four of five siblings developed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged V/sub H/ genes from leukemic lymphocytes of three affected siblings showed that two siblings had rearranged V/sub H/ genes (V/sub H/TS1 and V/sub H/WS1) that were 90% homologous. The corresponding germ-line gene, V/sub H/251, was found to part of a small (four gene) V/sub H/ gene family, which they term V/sub H/V. The DNA sequence homology to V/sub H/WS1 (95%) and V/sub H/TS1 (88%) and identical restriction sites on the 5' side of V/sub H/ confirm that rearrangement of V/sub H/251 followed by somatic mutation produced the identical V/sub H/ gene rearrangements in the two siblings. V/sub H/TS1 is not a functional V/sub H/ gene; a functional V/sub H/ rearrangement was found on the other chromosome of this patient. The other two siblings had different V/sub H/ gene rearrangements. All used different diversity genes. Mechanisms proposed for nonrandom selection of a single V/sub H/ gene include developmental regulation of this V/sub H/ gene rearrangement or selection of a subpopulation of B cells in which this V/sub H/ has been rearranged

  10. Immunofluorescent staining of nuclear antigen in lymphoid cells transformed by Herpesvirus papio (HVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H

    1981-01-01

    An improved fixation method for antigen detection in lymphoblastoid cells is described. Herpesvirus papio nuclear antigen (HUPNA) could be stained in several transformed lymphoid cell lines by anti-complement immunofluorescence (ACIF). Antibody to HUPNA was detected in many human sera containing antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid and nuclear antigen (EBNA). Rheumatoid arthritis sera showed a high incidence of both anti-EBNA and anti-HUPNA antibodies.

  11. Agonists and inverse agonists for the herpesvirus 8-encoded constitutively active seven-transmembrane oncogene product, ORF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1999-01-01

    A number of CXC chemokines competed with similar, nanomolar affinity against 125I-interleukin-8 (IL-8) binding to ORF-74, a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8. However, in competition against 125I-labeled growth-related oncogene (GRO)-alpha, the ORF-74...

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of the latent nuclear antigen-1 of the human herpesvirus type 8 to differentiate cutaneous epidemic Kaposi sarcoma and its histological simulators Detecção imuno-histoquímica do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvirus tipo 8 para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi epidêmico cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fonseca Pereira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common neoplasia diagnosed in AIDS patients and the expression of the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen-1 has been useful for its histological diagnosis. The aim of this study is to confirm that immunohistochemistry is a valuable tool for differentiating KS from its simulators in skin biopsies of HIV patients. Immunohistochemical and histological analyses were performed in 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and 60 of its histological simulators. Positivity was present in the 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and no staining was observed in the 60 simulators analyzed, resulting in sensibility and specificity of 100%. HHV-8 immunohistochemical detection is an effective tool for diagnosing Kaposi's sarcoma, especially in early lesions in which neoplastic features are not evident. It also contributes to its histological differential diagnosis.O sarcoma de Kaposi é a neoplasia mais diagnosticada em pacientes com SIDA e a expressão do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvírus humano tipo-8 (HHV-8 tem se mostrado útil no seu diagnóstico histológico. O objetivo deste estudo é confirmar que o método imuno-histoquímico é uma ferramenta útil para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos em pacientes HIV positivos. Análise histológica e imuno-histoquímica foram realizadas em 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo e 60 casos de seus simuladores histológicos. Positividade à imuno-histoquímica para o antígeno nuclear latente 1 do HHV-8 foi observada nos 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi e nenhuma reação foi detectada nos 60 simuladores analisados, resultando em 100% de sensibilidade e especificidade. A detecção do HHV-8 por imuno-histoquímica é uma ferramenta útil para o diagnóstico de sarcoma de Kaposi, especialmente na lesão inicial cujo caráter neoplásico não é evidente, e contribui para seu diagnóstico diferencial histológico.

  13. Absence of frequent herpesvirus transmission in a nonhuman primate predator-prey system in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sripriya; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Metzger, Sonja; Nowak, Kathrin; De Nys, Helene; Boesch, Christophe; Wittig, Roman; Jarvis, Michael A; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Emergence of viruses into the human population by transmission from nonhuman primates (NHPs) represents a serious potential threat to human health that is primarily associated with the increased bushmeat trade. Transmission of RNA viruses across primate species appears to be relatively frequent. In contrast, DNA viruses appear to be largely host specific, suggesting low transmission potential. Herein, we use a primate predator-prey system to study the risk of herpesvirus transmission between different primate species in the wild. The system was comprised of western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and their primary (western red colobus, Piliocolobus badius badius) and secondary (black-and-white colobus, Colobus polykomos) prey monkey species. NHP species were frequently observed to be coinfected with multiple beta- and gammaherpesviruses (including new cytomegalo- and rhadinoviruses). However, despite frequent exposure of chimpanzees to blood, organs, and bones of their herpesvirus-infected monkey prey, there was no evidence for cross-species herpesvirus transmission. These findings suggest that interspecies transmission of NHP beta- and gammaherpesviruses is, at most, a rare event in the wild.

  14. Turning the Key: Unlocking Human Potential in the Family in the Family-Friendly Federal Workplace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gore, Al

    1997-01-01

    .... Your 1994 and 1996 directives to agency heads on the family-friendly federal workplace led agencies to review and improve their efforts to help employees balance and integrate work and family demands...

  15. Adenovirus and Herpesvirus Diversity in Free-Ranging Great Apes in the Sangha Region of the Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimon, Tracie A.; Olson, Sarah H.; Lee, Kerry Jo; Rosen, Gail; Ondzie, Alain; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Patricia; Anthony, Simon J.; Joly, Damien O.; McAloose, Denise; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused die-offs in both free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees. Understanding pathogen diversity and disease ecology is therefore critical for conserving these endangered animals. To determine viral diversity in free-ranging, non-habituated gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo, genetic testing was performed on great-ape fecal samples collected near Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Samples were analyzed to determine ape species, identify individuals in the population, and to test for the presence of herpesviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, bocaviruses, flaviviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, filoviruses, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We identified 19 DNA viruses representing two viral families, Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae, of which three herpesviruses had not been previously described. Co-detections of multiple herpesviruses and/or adenoviruses were present in both gorillas and chimpanzees. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and lymphocryptovirus (LCV) were found primarily in the context of co-association with each other and adenoviruses. Using viral discovery curves for herpesviruses and adenoviruses, the total viral richness in the sample population of gorillas and chimpanzees was estimated to be a minimum of 23 viruses, corresponding to a detection rate of 83%. These findings represent the first description of DNA viral diversity in feces from free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in or near the Odzala-Kokoua National Park and form a basis for understanding the types of viruses circulating among great apes in this region. PMID:25781992

  16. Current status of herpesvirus identification in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel dos Santos Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Some viruses of the Herpesviridae family are frequently the etiologic agents of oral lesions associated with HIV. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1, HSV-2, Varicella Zoster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus type 6, type 7 and type 8 (HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children/adolescents and verify the association between viral subtypes and clinical factors. METHODS: The cells of oral mucosa were collected from 50 HIV infected children/adolescents, 3-13 years old (mean age 8.66. The majority (66% of selected were girls, and they were all outpatients at the pediatric AIDS clinic of a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Nested-PCR was used to identify the viral types. RESULTS: Absence of immunosuppression was observed in 66% of the children. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was used by 72.1% of selected and moderate viral load was observed in 56% of the children/adolescents. Viral types were found in 86% of the children and the subtypes were: HSV-1 (4%, HSV-2 (2%, VZV (4%, EBV (0%, HCMV (24%, HHV6 (18%, HHV-7 (68%, HHV8 (0%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of HAART has helped to reduce oral lesions, especially with herpes virus infections. The health professionals who work with these patients should be aware of such lesions because of their predictive value and the herpes virus can be found circulating in the oral cavity without causing lesions.

  17. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8 + T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8 + T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8 + T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8 + T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107 a/b cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8 + T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14 286-294 ), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14 504-512 ), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14 544-552 ), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RA low CD44 high CCR7 low CD62L low CD8 + effector memory T cells (T EM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8 + T EM -cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8 + T EM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the phenotypic

  18. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-06-15

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women.

  19. Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses EEHV1A, EEHV1B, and EEHV2 from Cases of Hemorrhagic Disease Are Highly Diverged from Other Mammalian Herpesviruses and May Form a New Subfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Laura K.; Zong, Jian-Chao; Latimer, Erin M.; Lock, Justin; Fleischer, Robert C.; Heaggans, Sarah Y.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A family of novel endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) assigned to the genus Proboscivirus have been identified as the cause of fatal hemorrhagic disease in 70 young Asian elephants worldwide. Although EEHV cannot be grown in cell culture, we have determined a total of 378 kb of viral genomic DNA sequence directly from clinical tissue samples from six lethal cases and two survivors. Overall, the data obtained encompass 57 genes, including orthologues of 32 core genes common to all herpesviruses, 14 genes found in some other herpesviruses, plus 10 novel genes, including a single large putative transcriptional regulatory protein (ORF-L). On the basis of differences in gene content and organization plus phylogenetic analyses of conserved core proteins that have just 20% to 50% or less identity to orthologues in other herpesviruses, we propose that EEHV1A, EEHV1B, and EEHV2 could be considered a new Deltaherpesvirinae subfamily of mammalian herpesviruses that evolved as an intermediate branch between the Betaherpesvirinae and Gammaherpesvirinae. Unlike cytomegaloviruses, EEHV genomes encode ribonucleotide kinase B subunit (RRB), thymidine kinase (TK), and UL9-like origin binding protein (OBP) proteins and have an alphaherpesvirus-like dyad symmetry Ori-Lyt domain. They also differ from all known betaherpesviruses by having a 40-kb large-scale inversion of core gene blocks I, II, and III. EEHV1 and EEHV2 DNA differ uniformly by more than 25%, but EEHV1 clusters into two major subgroups designated EEHV1A and EEHV1B with ancient partially chimeric features. Whereas large segments are nearly identical, three nonadjacent loci totaling 15 kb diverge by between 21 and 37%. One strain of EEHV1B analyzed is interpreted to be a modern partial recombinant with EEHV1A. IMPORTANCE Asian elephants are an endangered species whose survival is under extreme pressure in wild range countries and whose captive breeding populations in zoos are not self-sustaining. In 1999, a

  20. [Molecular tests in diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using real-time PCR in HIV positive and HIV-negative pregnant women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Alice Rogomenoma; Kabre, Madeleine; Bisseye, Cyrille; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Asshi, Maleki; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Diarra, Birama; Traore, Lassina; Djigma, Florencia Wendkuuni; Ouermi, Djénéba; Pietra, Virginio; Barro, Nicolas; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Herpesvirus EBV, CMV and HHV-6 are viruses that evolve based on pandemic modeling and are responsible for congenital infections causing severe sequelae in infants. This study aims to determine the prevalence of CMV, EBV and HHV-6 among HIV (+) and HIV (-) pregnant women in Ouagadougou. In this study 200 blood plasma samples taken from pregnant women, of whom 100 with HIV(+) and 100 with HIV(-), were analyzed using multiplex real-time PCR which detected three infections (EBV, CMV and HHV-6). Out of the 200 samples tested, 18(9.0%) were positive for at least one of the three viruses, 12(6.0%) were positive for EBV, 13(6.5%) were positive for CMV and 12(6.0%) were positive for HHV-6. Among the 18 cases with infections, 10 cases (55.6%) had co-infections of whom 90.0% (9/10) with multiple EBV/CMV/HHV6 infection and 10.0% with EBV/HHV6 co-infection. HHVs infection rate was higher among HIV (-) pregnant women than among HIV (+) pregnant women (12.0% versus 6.0%). Among HIV (+) pregnant women, PCR showed 7.1% (6/85) of HHVs infection in patients who were not treated with ARV against 0% in those treated with ARVs. Herpes virus infections are a common condition in pregnant women in Burkina Faso. They may represent a real threat to pregnant women because of complications and risks of infection in infants.

  1. Polarized DNA Ejection from the Herpesvirus Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William W.; Cockrell, Shelley K.; Homa, Fred L.; Brown, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Ejection of DNA from the capsid is an early step in infection by all herpesviruses. Ejection or DNA uncoating occurs after a parental capsid has entered the host cell cytoplasm, migrated to the nucleus and bound to a nuclear pore. DNA exits the capsid through the portal vertex and proceeds by way of the nuclear pore complex into the nucleoplasm where it is transcribed and replicated. Here we describe use of an in vitro uncoating system to determine which genome end exits first from the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) capsid. Purified DNA-containing capsids were bound to a solid surface and warmed under conditions in which some, but not all, of the DNA was ejected. Restriction endonuclease digestion was then used to identify the genomic origin of the ejected DNA. The results support the view that the S segment end exits the capsid first. Preferential release at the S end demonstrates that herpesvirus DNA uncoating conforms to the paradigm in dsDNA bacteriophage where the last end packaged is the first to be ejected. Release of HSV-1 DNA beginning at the S end causes the first gene to enter the host cell nucleus to be α4, a transcription factor required for expression of early genes. PMID:19631662

  2. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of α3β1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor

  3. Isolation and characterization of a herpesvirus from feral pigeons in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Ma, Jian; Guo, Ying; Tian, Li; Guo, Guangyang; Zhang, Kexin; Xing, Mingwei

    2015-12-01

    A herpesvirus was isolated during a diagnostic investigation of severe cases of conjunctivitis in feral pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica). Isolates of the virus were recovered from throat swabs of the pigeons followed by inoculation of the swab samples in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Pigeons inoculated with the isolated virus had similar clinical signs to those observed in naturally infected birds. Transmission electron microscopy revealed viral structures with typical herpesvirus morphology. Polymerase chain reaction amplification, using herpesvirus-identifying primers resulted in an amplicon of the expected size for herpesvirus. Sequencing of these amplicons and database comparisons identified the herpesvirus UL30 homologue. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggested that the isolated herpesvirus belongs to the Mardivirus genus of Alphaherpesvirinae. Using the current herpesvirus nomenclature conventions, the authors propose that the herpesvirus be named Columbid herpesvirus-1 Heilongjiang. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ties That Bind: Family and Community. First Edition. Our Human Family Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Rebecca

    This book examines the cultural universal of family and community from a multicultural perspective. The text is written for juveniles, and includes many color photographs. Chapters include: (1) "Families Are Everywhere"; (2) "The Americas"; (3) "Africa"; (4) "Europe and the Middle East"; (5) "Asia"; and (6) "Australia and the South Pacific." The…

  5. Turning the Key: Unlocking Human Potential in the Family in the Family-Friendly Federal Workplace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gore, Al

    1997-01-01

    .... Your signature on the Family and Medical Leave Act not only provided federal employees with additional flexibility in meeting their life needs but was a powerful signal of your determination to help...

  6. Rabbit model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS): sequential autopsy analysis and characterization of IL-2-dependent cell lines established from herpesvirus papio-induced fatal rabbit lymphoproliferative diseases with HPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Jin, Zaishun; Onoda, Sachiyo; Joko, Hiromasa; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohara, Nobuya; Oda, Wakako; Tanaka, Takehiro; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Koirala, Tirtha Raj; Oka, Takashi; Kondo, Eisaku; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu

    2003-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD). To elucidate the true nature of fatal LPD observed in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-induced rabbit hemophagocytosis, reactive or neoplastic, we analyzed sequential development of HVP-induced rabbit LPD and their cell lines. All of the seven Japanese White rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP died of fatal LPD 18 to 27 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in five of these seven rabbits. Sequential autopsy revealed splenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes, often accompanied by bleeding, which developed in the last week. Atypical lymphoid cells infiltrated many organs with a "starry sky" pattern, frequently involving the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. HVP-small RNA-1 expression in these lymphoid cells was clearly demonstrated by a newly developed in situ hybridization (ISH) system. HVP-ISH of immunomagnetically purified lymphoid cells from spleen or lymph nodes revealed HVP-EBER1+ cells in each CD4+, CD8+, or CD79a+ fraction. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by PCR or Southern blot analysis. Clonality analysis of HVP-induced LPD by Southern blotting with TCR gene probe revealed polyclonal bands, suggesting polyclonal proliferation. Six IL-2-dependent rabbit T-cell lines were established from transplanted scid mouse tumors from LPD. These showed latency type I/II HVP infection and had normal karyotypes except for one line, and three of them showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. These data suggest that HVP-induced fatal LPD in rabbits is reactive polyclonally in nature.

  7. Language, Mind, Practice: Families of Recursive Thinking in Human Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Marika

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, Chomsky, Hauser, and Fitch asserted that recursion may be the one aspect of the human language faculty that makes human language unique in the narrow sense--unique to language and unique to human beings. They also argue somewhat more quietly (as do Pinker and Jackendoff 2005) that recursion may be possible outside of language: navigation,…

  8. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivations during and after severe drug eruptions: their relation to the clinical phenotype and therapeutic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, T; Kano, Y; Mizukawa, Y; Shiohara, T

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) represent contrasting poles of severe drug eruptions, and sequential reactivations of several herpesviruses have exclusively been demonstrated in the former. No previous studies, however, were extended beyond the acute stage. We sought to investigate whether herpesvirus reactivations could also be observed in SJS/TEN and beyond the acute stage of both diseases. Patients with SJS (n = 16), SJS/TEN overlap (n = 2), TEN (n = 10), and DIHS/DRESS (n = 34) were enrolled. We performed a retrospective analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA loads sequentially determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction during a 2-year period after onset. Persistently increased EBV loads were detected in SJS during the acute stage and long after resolution, but not in others. In contrast, high HHV-6 loads were exclusively detected in DIHS/DRESS during the acute stage. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivation varied in DIHS/DRESS according to the use of systemic corticosteroids: While EBV loads were higher in patients not receiving systemic corticosteroids, CMV and HHV-6 loads were higher in those receiving them. Distinct patterns of herpesvirus reactivation according to the pathological phenotype and to the use of systemic corticosteroids were observed during the acute stage and follow-up period, which may contribute, at least in part, to the difference in the clinical manifestations and long-term outcomes. Systemic corticosteroids during the acute stage may improve the outcomes in DIHS/DRESS. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Music in human terminality: the family members' conceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Catarina Aparecida; da Silva, Vladimir Araujo; Pilger, Calíope; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study was performed using the multiple case study method and Heidegger's existential phenomenology for data analysis. The objective was to understand how family members perceive the influence of musical experiences on the physical and mental health of a relative living with a terminal illness. Participants were seven individuals belonging to two families. Data collection was performed through interviews and observation from May to June 2009. Results showed that using music while providing care to beings living with cancer can provide well-being to patients as well as their caregivers. Considering the deficit of leisure and the monotony of the home environment, using music contemplates the philosophical and humanitarian precepts of palliative care, thus being characterized as a complementary resource to nursing care, as besides being a communication resource, it improves the interpersonal relationship between patients and their families.

  10. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  11. Herpesvirus capsid assembly and DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Jason D.; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. During productive lytic infection, over 80 viral proteins are expressed in a highly regulated manner, resulting in the replication of viral genomes and assembly of progeny virions. The virion of all herpesviruses consists of an external membrane envelope, a proteinaceous layer called the tegument, and an icosahedral capsid containing the double-stranded linear DNA genome. The capsid shell of HSV-1 is built from four structural proteins: a major capsid protein, VP5, which forms the capsomers (hexons and pentons), the triplex consisting of VP19C and VP23 found between the capsomers, and VP26 which binds to VP5 on hexons but not pentons. In addition, the dodecameric pUL6 portal complex occupies one of the 12 capsid vertices, and the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC), a heterotrimer complex of pUL17, pUL25 and pUL36 binds specifically to the triplexes adjacent to each penton. The capsid is assembled in the nucleus where the viral genome is packaged into newly assembled closed capsid shells. Cleavage and packaging of replicated, concatemeric viral DNA requires the seven viral proteins encoded by the UL6, UL15, UL17, UL25, UL28, UL32, and UL33 genes. Considerable advances have been made in understanding the structure of the herpesvirus capsid and the function of several of the DNA packaging proteins by applying biochemical, genetic, and structural techniques. This review is a summary of recent advances with respect to the structure of the HSV-1 virion capsid and what is known about the function of the seven packaging proteins and their interactions with each other and with the capsid shell. PMID:28528442

  12. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...

  13. Conducting Family Interviews for a Course in Human Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Kandi M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a student project that requires students to administer a questionnaire on sexual attitudes to family members and age-peers. Since students predict responses before administering the questionnaires, the results can illustrate the differences between actual and perceived generation gaps and other aspects of sexual socialization and value…

  14. Human capital in family businesses: an exploratory analysis in Spanish firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Carrasco Hernández

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze how family firms identify, develop and protect their human capital. From an exploratoryperspective based on the resource-based view, the key human resource practices are examined in a sample of 433Spanish companies. Specifically, we examine the orientation and idiosyncrasies that family firms confer to the selection andpromotion mechanism, to the training and developing practices, to the design of compensation and executive paymentsand, finally, to the process of succession

  15. Identification of a novel herpesvirus in captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Richard R; Norton, Terry M; Bronson, Ellen; Allender, Matthew C; Stedman, Nancy; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-02-25

    Herpesviruses are significant pathogens of chelonians which most commonly cause upper respiratory tract disease and necrotizing stomatitis. Herpesvirus infection was identified in two populations of captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) using histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA sequencing. Necrotizing lesions with eosinophilic to amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were identified in the tissues of one hatch-year individual in January 2013, which was herpesvirus positive by PCR. A separate captive group of adults had an observed herpesvirus prevalence of 58% using PCR in July 2011. In these cases, a novel herpesvirus, Terrapene herpesvirus 1 (TerHV1), was identified and serves as the first herpesvirus sequenced in the genus Terrapene. Similar to the other herpesviruses of the Order Testudines, TerHV1 clusters with the genus Scutavirus of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Herpesvirus papio 2 encodes a virion host shutoff function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, John E; Martin, David W

    2002-12-05

    Infection of baboons with herpesvirus papio 2 (HVP-2) produces a disease that is similar to human infection with herpes simplex viruses (HSV). Molecular characterization of HVP-2 has demonstrated that the virion contains a factor which rapidly shuts off host cell protein synthesis after infection. Reduction of host cell protein synthesis occurs in parallel with the degradation of mRNA species. A homolog of the HSV virion host shutoff (vhs) gene was identified by Southern and DNA sequence analysis. The sequence of the HVP-2 vhs gene homolog had greater than 70% identity with the vhs genes of HSV 1 and 2. Disruption of the HVP-2 vhs open reading frame diminished the ability of the virus to shut off protein synthesis and degrade cellular mRNA, indicating that this gene was responsible for the vhs activity. The HVP-2 model system provides the opportunity to study the biological role of vhs in the context of a natural primate host. Further development of this system will provide a platform for proof-of-concept studies that will test the efficacy of vaccines that utilize vhs-deficient viruses.

  17. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  18. The herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vMIP-II, but not the poxvirus-encoded chemokine MC148, inhibits the CCR10 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Lewis, I C; Gerstoft, J

    2001-01-01

    The viral chemokine antagonist vMIP-II encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and MC148 encoded by the poxvirus - Molluscum contagiosum - were tested against the newly identified chemokine receptor CCR10. As the CCR10 ligand ESkine / CCL27 had the highest identity to MC148 and because both...

  19. Chromosomal locations of members of a family of novel endogenous human retroviral genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, T.M.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.; Callahan, R.

    1986-01-01

    Human cellular DNA contains two distinguishable families of retroviral related sequences. One family shares extensive nucleotide sequence homology with infectious mammalian type C retroviral genomes. The other family contains major regions of homology with the pol genes of infectious type A and B and avian type C and D retroviral genomes. Analysis of the human recombinant clone HLM-2 has shown that the pol gene in the latter family is located within an endogenous proviral genome. The authors show that the proviral genome in HLM-2 and the related recombinant clone HLM-25 are located, respectively, on human chromosomes 1 and 5. Other related proviral genomes are located on chromosomes 7, 8, 11, 14, and 17

  20. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  1. Repair of DNA damage in the human metallothionein gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Snowden, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to distinguish enhanced repair of a sequence due to its transcriptional activity from enhanced repair due to chromatin alterations brought about by integration of a sequence into the genome, we have investigated the repair of damage both in endogenous genes and in cell lines that contain an integrated gene with an inducible promoter. The endogenous genes we are studying are the metallothioneins (MTs), a multigene family in man consisting of about 10-12 members. Cultured cells were exposed to 10-J/m 2 uv light and allowed to repair in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The DNA was then isolated, digested with Eco RI, and fully hybrid density DNA made by semiconservative synthesis was separated from unreplicated DNA by centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. Unreplicated, parental-density DNA was then reacted with a monoclonal antibody against bromouracil. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Identification of herpesvirus proteins that contribute to G1/S arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Patrick; Marcon, Edyta; Greenblatt, Jack; Frappier, Lori

    2014-04-01

    Lytic infection by herpesviruses induces cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. This appears to be a function of multiple herpesvirus proteins, but only a minority of herpesvirus proteins have been examined for cell cycle effects. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the viral proteins that contribute to G1/S arrest, we screened a library of over 200 proteins from herpes simplex virus type 1, human cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) for effects on the G1/S interface, using HeLa fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) cells in which G1/S can be detected colorimetrically. Proteins from each virus were identified that induce accumulation of G1/S cells, predominantly tegument, early, and capsid proteins. The identification of several capsid proteins in this screen suggests that incoming viral capsids may function to modulate cellular processes. The cell cycle effects of selected EBV proteins were further verified and examined for effects on p53 and p21 as regulators of the G1/S transition. Two EBV replication proteins (BORF2 and BMRF1) were found to induce p53 but not p21, while a previously uncharacterized tegument protein (BGLF2) was found to induce p21 protein levels in a p53-independent manner. Proteomic analyses of BGLF2-interacting proteins identified interactions with the NIMA-related protein kinase (NEK9) and GEM-interacting protein (GMIP). Silencing of either NEK9 or GMIP induced p21 without affecting p53 and abrogated the ability of BGLF2 to further induce p21. Collectively, these results suggest multiple viral proteins contribute to G1/S arrest, including BGLF2, which induces p21 levels likely by interfering with the functions of NEK9 and GMIP. Most people are infected with multiple herpesviruses, whose proteins alter the infected cells in several ways. During lytic infection, the viral proteins block cell proliferation just before the cellular DNA replicates. We used a novel screening method to identify proteins

  3. Herpesviruses in asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions: an immunohistochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboia-Dantas, C J; Coutrin de Toledo, L F; Sampaio-Filho, H R; Siqueira, J F

    2007-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been recently detected in samples from apical periodontitis lesions by means of molecular biology techniques and a role in the pathogenesis of this disease has been suggested. The present study was designed to survey asymptomatic primary apical periodontitis lesions for the presence of HCMV- and/or EBV-infected cells by means of immunohistochemistry. Apical periodontitis lesions were obtained from 35 patients [26 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -seronegative patients and nine HIV-seropositive patients] after tooth extraction and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibodies specific for HCMV and EBV. Fifteen of the 35 apical periodontitis lesions were positive for the target herpesviruses. Overall, EBV was found in 31% of the samples and HCMV in 23%, with 14% of the lesions showing EBV and HCMV dual infection. No association was found between HCMV or EBV with any particular histopathological type of apical periodontitis (P > 0.05). HCMV was significantly more frequent in apical periodontitis lesions from HIV-positive patients (67%) than in lesions from HIV-negative patients (8%) (P = 0.001). EBV was detected in 44% of lesions from HIV-positive patients and in 27% of lesions from HIV-negative patients, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.91). Our results showed that cells infected by HCMV and EBV can be found in apical periodontitis lesions, with a higher prevalence in HIV-positive patients. The specific role that these viruses play in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis remains to be described.

  4. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco C Origgi

    Full Text Available We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3, one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1 the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2 the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This

  5. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, Francesco C.; Tecilla, Marco; Pilo, Paola; Aloisio, Fabio; Otten, Patricia; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Sattler, Ursula; Roccabianca, Paola; Romero, Carlos H.; Bloom, David C.; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3), one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB) gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected) and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions) were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1) the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2) the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This novel

  6. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucha Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05 and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001. Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05 and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05 in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites.

  7. Signal integration: a framework for understanding the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the human EGFR family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, H. Michael; Brdlik, Cathleen M.; Schreiber, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The human EGFR (HER) family is essential for communication between many epithelial cancer cell types and the tumor microenvironment. Therapeutics targeting the HER family have demonstrated clinical success in the treatment of diverse epithelial cancers. Here we propose that the success of HER family–targeted monoclonal antibodies in cancer results from their ability to interfere with HER family consolidation of signals initiated by a multitude of other receptor systems. Ligand/receptor systems that initiate these signals include cytokine receptors, chemokine receptors, TLRs, GPCRs, and integrins. We further extrapolate that improvements in cancer therapeutics targeting the HER family are likely to incorporate mechanisms that block or reverse stromal support of malignant progression by isolating the HER family from autocrine and stromal influences. PMID:18982164

  8. mRNA related to insulin family in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.A.; D'Agostino, J.B.; Frazier, M.L.; Besch, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that human term placenta contains mRNA displaying sequence homology to a rat preproinsulin I cDNA clone (p119). When placental poly(A + ) RNA was analyzed for homology to p119 by RNA/DNA blot hybridization, prominent hybridization was observed which was found by densitometric analysis to be three-fold higher than control. To further characterize this insulin-like message, a cDNA library was generated (approx.7000 transformants) using normal term cesarean-sectioned tissue to prepare placental poly(A + ) RNA templates. Five hundred transformants were initially screened by colony hybridization using a 32 P-labeled rat preproinsulin I cDNA as probe. Of the ten initial positives obtained, three were found to be true positives based on Southern hybridization analyses of the recombinant plasmids. Using Taq I digested pBr322 as a size marker, the cDNAs were found to be approximately 300 bp in length. Preliminary DNA sequencing using the Sanger dideoxy chain termination method has revealed that one of these clones displays significant homology to the 5' region of human insulin-like growth factors I and II

  9. mRNA related to insulin family in human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, M.A.; D' Agostino, J.B.; Frazier, M.L.; Besch, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that human term placenta contains mRNA displaying sequence homology to a rat preproinsulin I cDNA clone (p119). When placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA was analyzed for homology to p119 by RNA/DNA blot hybridization, prominent hybridization was observed which was found by densitometric analysis to be three-fold higher than control. To further characterize this insulin-like message, a cDNA library was generated (approx.7000 transformants) using normal term cesarean-sectioned tissue to prepare placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA templates. Five hundred transformants were initially screened by colony hybridization using a /sup 32/P-labeled rat preproinsulin I cDNA as probe. Of the ten initial positives obtained, three were found to be true positives based on Southern hybridization analyses of the recombinant plasmids. Using Taq I digested pBr322 as a size marker, the cDNAs were found to be approximately 300 bp in length. Preliminary DNA sequencing using the Sanger dideoxy chain termination method has revealed that one of these clones displays significant homology to the 5' region of human insulin-like growth factors I and II.

  10. THE POSSIBILITIES OF MODERN DIAGNOSTICS OF HERPESVIRUS INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Bokovoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical history, clinical and laboratory data were studied in 828 children aged from 2 months to 14 years. All of them had different clinical forms of herpesvirus infections (HVI. The combination of the information allows to form the etiologic diagnosis timely and to evaluate the activity of the current infection. Given the polymorphism of clinical symptoms of HVI, it was very important to determine herpesvirus genomes in three media (blood, saliva, urine by PCR, and high titers of G-antibodies (439 u for CMV and 212.3 u for HHV-6. 

  11. African leaders' views on critical human resource issues for the implementation of family medicine in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Shabir; Downing, Raymond; Essuman, Akye; Pentz, Stephen; Reid, Stephen; Mash, Robert

    2014-01-17

    The World Health Organisation has advocated for comprehensive primary care teams, which include family physicians. However, despite (or because of) severe doctor shortages in Africa, there is insufficient clarity on the role of the family physician in the primary health care team. Instead there is a trend towards task shifting without thought for teamwork, which runs the risk of dangerous oversimplification. It is not clear how African leaders understand the challenges of implementing family medicine, especially in human resource terms. This study, therefore, sought to explore the views of academic and government leaders on critical human resource issues for implementation of family medicine in Africa. In this qualitative study, key academic and government leaders were purposively selected from sixteen African countries. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. There were 27 interviews conducted with 16 government and 11 academic leaders in nine Sub-Saharan African countries: Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. Respondents spoke about: educating doctors in family medicine suited to Africa, including procedural skills and holistic care, to address the difficulty of recruiting and retaining doctors in rural and underserved areas; planning for primary health care teams, including family physicians; new supervisory models in primary health care; and general human resource management issues. Important milestones in African health care fail to specifically address the human resource issues of integrated primary health care teamwork that includes family physicians. Leaders interviewed in this study, however, proposed organising the district health system with a strong embrace of family medicine in Africa, especially with regard to providing clinical leadership in team-based primary health care. Whilst these

  12. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brian J; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam; Washietl, Stefan; Wen, Jiayu; Kellis, Manolis; Breaker, Ronald; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating both bioinformatic and experimental characterization. We have developed a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein-coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we identify potential new regulatory networks, including large families of short hairpins enriched in immunity-related genes, e.g., TNF, FOS, and CTLA4, which include known transcript destabilizing elements. Our findings exemplify the diversity of post-transcriptional regulation and provide a resource for further characterization of new regulatory mechanisms and families of noncoding RNAs.

  13. THE IMPACT OF PERSISTENT HERPESVIRUS INFECTION ON IMMUNITY AND VACCINATION RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volyanskiy AYu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we summarize current knowledge on the ability of latent herpesviruses to modulate the immunity and response to vaccination. Nearly all humans are latently infected with multiple herpesviruses but little is known about virus-host interactions. Meanwhile, the study of the immune response to Epshtein-Barr virus (EBV and сytomegalovirus (CMV has revealed significant regulatory effects on the immune system. During the primary infection a human cytomegalovirus is predominately found in peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. However, the virus can not be replicated in these cells. CMV induces the survival and differentiation of infected monocytes into long-lived macrophages capable of supporting viral replication and the release of virions, which infect CD34+ myeloid progenitor cells. CMV latently persists in myeloid progenitor cells and monocytes and reactivates during their differentiation into macrophages. CMV-infected monocytes exhibit a unique reprogramming of their differentiation and secret both pro-inflammatory M1- and anti-inflammatory M2-associated cytokines. But cytomegalovirus induced macrophage phenotype skewed towards pro-inflammatory M1 type. MV has profound effects on the composition and function of both T cells and NK cells. CMV constantly reactivates during differentiation of monocytes into macrophages. Consequently, persons with latent CMV infection have substantially increased numbers and proportions of CD8+ T cells that lead to exhaustion and an early onset of immunosenescence. Also, it has been shown that the latent CMV virus infection markedly increases the proportion of NK cells expressing the activating NKG2C receptor. So, it has been proposed that CMV alters the composition of T cell and NK cell subsets and accelerates immune aging. Given the capacity of CMV to alter a macrophage, as well as NK and T cell responses it is reasonable to hypothesize that latent infection would alter the

  14. The structures of bovine herpesvirus 1 virion and concatemeric DNA: implications for cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schynts, Frederic; McVoy, Michael A.; Meurens, Francois; Detry, Bruno; Epstein, Alberto L.; Thiry, Etienne

    2003-01-01

    Herpesvirus genomes are often characterized by the presence of direct and inverted repeats that delineate their grouping into six structural classes. Class D genomes consist of a long (L) segment and a short (S) segment. The latter is flanked by large inverted repeats. DNA replication produces concatemers of head-to-tail linked genomes that are cleaved into unit genomes during the process of packaging DNA into capsids. Packaged class D genomes are an equimolar mixture of two isomers in which S is in either of two orientations, presumably a consequence of homologous recombination between the inverted repeats. The L segment remains predominantly fixed in a prototype (P) orientation; however, low levels of genomes having inverted L (I L ) segments have been reported for some class D herpesviruses. Inefficient formation of class D I L genomes has been attributed to infrequent L segment inversion, but recent detection of frequent inverted L segments in equine herpesvirus 1 concatemers [Virology 229 (1997) 415-420] suggests that the defect may be at the level of cleavage and packaging rather than inversion. In this study, the structures of virion and concatemeric DNA of another class D herpesvirus, bovine herpesvirus 1, were determined. Virion DNA contained low levels of I L genomes, whereas concatemeric DNA contained significant amounts of L segments in both P and I L orientations. However, concatemeric termini exhibited a preponderance of L termini derived from P isomers which was comparable to the preponderance of P genomes found in virion DNA. Thus, the defect in formation of I L genomes appears to lie at the level of concatemer cleavage. These results have important implications for the mechanisms by which herpesvirus DNA cleavage and packaging occur

  15. Family Aggregation of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1-Associated Diseases: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alvarez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that produces a persistent infection. Two transmission routes (from mother to child and via sexual intercourse favor familial clustering of HTLV-1. It is yet unknown why most HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic while about 10% of them develop complications. HTLV-1 associated diseases were originally described as sporadic entities, but familial presentations have been reported. To explore what is known about family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases we undertook a systematic review. We aimed at answering whether, when and where family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases was reported, which relatives were affected and which hypotheses were proposed to explain aggregation. We searched MEDLINE, abstract books of HTLV conferences and reference lists of selected papers. Search terms used referred to HTLV-1 infection, and HTLV-1-associated diseases, and family studies. HTLV-1-associated diseases considered are adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, HTLV-1-associated uveitis, and infective dermatitis. Seventy-four records reported HTLV-1-associated diseases in more than one member of the same family and were included. Most reports came from HTLV-1-endemic countries, mainly Japan (n=30 and Brazil (n=10. These reports described a total of 270 families in which more than one relative had HTLV-1-associated diseases. In most families, different family members suffered from the same disease (n=221. The diseases most frequently reported were ATLL (114 families and HAM/TSP (101 families. Most families (n=142 included two to four affected individuals. The proportion of ATLL patients with family history of ATLL ranged from 2% to 26%. The proportion of HAM/TSP patients with family history of HAM/TSP ranged from 1% to 48%. The predominant cluster types for ATLL were clusters of siblings and parent-child pairs and for HAM/TSP, an

  16. Psittacid herpesviruses associated with mucosal papillomas in neotropical parrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styles, Darrel K.; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Jaeger, Laurie A.; Phalen, David N.

    2004-01-01

    Mucosal papillomas are relatively common lesions in several species of captive neotropical parrots. They cause considerable morbidity and in some cases, result in mortality. Previous efforts to identify papillomavirus DNA and proteins in these lesions have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, increasing evidence suggests that mucosal papillomas may contain psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs). In this study, 41 papillomas from 30 neotropical parrots were examined by PCR with PsHV-specific primers. All 41 papillomas were found to contain PsHV DNA. This 100% prevalence of PsHV infection in the papilloma population was found to be significantly higher than PsHV infection prevalence observed in other surveys of captive parrots. PsHV genotypes 1, 2, and 3, but not 4 were found in these lesions. Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus DNA and finch papillomavirus DNA were not found in the papillomas. A papilloma from a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) was found to contain cells that had immunoreactivity to antiserum made to the common antigenic region of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 major capsid protein. However, four other mucosal papillomas were negative for this immunoreactivity, and negative control tissues from a parrot embryo showed a similar staining pattern to that seen in the cloaca papilloma of the hyacinth macaw, strongly suggesting that the staining seen in hyacinth macaw papilloma was nonspecific. Based on these findings, it was concluded that specific genotypes of PsHV play a direct role in the development of mucosal papillomas of neotropical parrots and there is no evidence to suggest the concurrent presence of a papillomavirus in these lesions

  17. Association of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome with Herpesvirus 6, 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskay, Tuğba; Karademir, Asli; Ertürk, Ozcan I

    2006-07-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is one of the most severe forms of drug eruption with potentially lethal, and multiorgan involvement. Recently, it has been suggested that Human Herpesvirus (HHV) infection has been involved in this syndrome, although the pathogenesis of this syndrome remains still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of AHS and the possible role of viral infection as a co-factor. We prospectively analyzed clinical, laboratory and virological findings for 23 cases of AHS. A viral study including viral serology and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. The most common anticonvulsant was carbamazepine (12) followed by phenytoin (6), phenobarbital (4) and gabapentin (1). All patients met fulfill the clinical criteria of AHS. Even though internal organ involvement such as liver (52%), kidney (34%), and lung (13%) has been observed, involvement of heart, lung, thyroid, muscle, pancreas, spleen, and brain was less frequent. We also noted two patients who died due to multiorgan failure. No association with viral infection including HSV, VZV, HHV-8, CMV, EBV, measles, rubella and parvovirus B19 was detected in the current series. Increased serum anti-HHV-6 IgG and HHV-7 titers and presence of HHV-6 and -7 DNA in serum, revealed by PCR analysis, suggested reactivation of HHV-6. In contrast to the control groups, DNA for HHV-6 was detected in serum in 5 out of the 23 patients while HHV-7 was seen in two patients. We found an evidence to link reactivation of HHV-6 or HHV-7 in the development of only carbamazepine-induced AHS. We propose that some cases of AHS are accompanied by reactivation of not only HHV-6 but also HHV-7. HHV infection may contribute to the severity, prolongation, or relapse of AHS and may possibly have fatal consequences in some susceptible individuals receiving the anticonvulsants.

  18. A shared promoter region suggests a common ancestor for the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG gene families and the murine CYPT family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin A; Nielsen, John E; Retelska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    , sequences corresponding to the shared promoter region of the CYPT family were identified at 39 loci. Most loci were located immediately upstream of genes belonging to the VCX/Y, SPANX, or CSAG gene families. Sequence comparison of the loci revealed a conserved CYPT promoter-like (CPL) element featuring TATA...... cell types. The genomic regions harboring the gene families were rich in direct and inverted segmental duplications (SD), which may facilitate gene conversion and rapid evolution. The conserved CPL and the common expression profiles suggest that the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG2 gene families together......Many testis-specific genes from the sex chromosomes are subject to rapid evolution, which can make it difficult to identify murine genes in the human genome. The murine CYPT gene family includes 15 members, but orthologs were undetectable in the human genome. However, using refined homology search...

  19. Dynamics of virus shedding and in situ confirmation of chelonid herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian green turtles with Fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Schettle, Nelli; Ackermann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5.

  20. Dynamics of Virus Shedding and In Situ Confirmation of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian Green Turtles With Fibropapillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T M; Dagenais, J; Balazs, G H; Schettle, N; Ackermann, M

    2015-11-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. DDX11L: a novel transcript family emerging from human subtelomeric regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Urso Michele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes exhibit an extraordinary plasticity. To date, due to the high GC content and to the presence of telomeric repeats, the subtelomeric sequences are underrepresented in the genomic libraries and consequently their sequences are incomplete in the finished human genome sequence, and still much remains to be learned about subtelomere organization, evolution and function. Indeed, only in recent years, several studies have disclosed, within human subtelomeres, novel gene family members. Results During a project aimed to analyze genes located in the telomeric region of the long arm of the human X chromosome, we have identified a novel transcript family, DDX11L, members of which map to 1pter, 2q13/14.1, 2qter, 3qter, 6pter, 9pter/9qter, 11pter, 12pter, 15qter, 16pter, 17pter, 19pter, 20pter/20qter, Xpter/Xqter and Yqter. Furthermore, we partially sequenced the underrepresented subtelomeres of human chromosomes showing a common evolutionary origin. Conclusion Our data indicate that an ancestral gene, originated as a rearranged portion of the primate DDX11 gene, and propagated along many subtelomeric locations, is emerging within subtelomeres of human chromosomes, defining a novel gene family. These findings support the possibility that the high plasticity of these regions, sites of DNA exchange among different chromosomes, could trigger the emergence of new genes.

  2. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpesvirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are well known etiological agents of cattle that produce important economic losses due to reproductive failures and calf mortality, as well as enteric and respiratory disease. Tamaulipas is located northeast of Mexico, an important cattle production and ...

  3. The impact of herpesviruses on reproductive performance in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The thesis addresses the largely-undefined influence of the equine herpesviruses (EHVs) and in particular EHV-1 and -4 on reproductive performance in horse-breeding systems. These pathogens cause significant losses to the international equine breeding industry primarily through infectious abortion

  4. Structural and functional analysis of bovine herpesvirus 1 minor glycoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranowski, E.; Keil, G.; Lyaku, J.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.; Pastoret, P.P.; Thiry, E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper focuses on the structure and functions of bovine herpesvirus 1 minor glycoproteins gH, gE, gG and gp42. It reviews the progress which has been made in their identification and characterization, in the study of their temporal expression and processing in infected cells, and finally in the

  5. The vaccines for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1: A review | Zhao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the pathogen of Infectious Bovine Rhinothracheitis (IBR) disease, causing great economic losses in the livestock industry. Vaccine is a powerful means to control the virus. Here, the review described the currently available knowledge regarding to the advance in the field of BoHV-1 ...

  6. A simple method for purification of herpesvirus DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Normann, Preben

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and reliable method for purification of herpesvirus DNA from cell cultures is described. The method is based on the isolation of virus particles and/or nucleocapsids by differential centrifugation and exploits the solubilizing and denaturing capabilities of cesium trifluoroacetate during...

  7. Advances in development and evaluation of bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Kaashoek, M.J.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    This review deals with conventional and modern bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccines. Conventional vaccines are widely used to prevent clinical signs of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis. The use of conventional vaccines, however, does not appear to have resulted in reduction of the prevalence of

  8. Growth hormone secretion is diminished and tightly controlled in humans enriched for familial longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Spoel, Evie; Jansen, Steffy W; Akintola, Abimbola A

    2016-01-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) signaling has been consistently associated with increased health and lifespan in various mouse models. Here, we assessed GH secretion and its control in relation with human familial longevity. We frequently sampled blood over 24 h in 19 middle-aged offspring of long......-living families from the Leiden Longevity Study together with 18 of their partners as controls. Circulating GH concentrations were measured every 10 min and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) every 4 h. Using deconvolution analysis, we found that 24-h.......39-0.53)] compared with controls [0.66 (0.56-0.77)], indicating tighter control of GH secretion. No significant differences were observed in circulating levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP3 between offspring and controls. In conclusion, GH secretion in human familial longevity is characterized by diminished secretion rate...

  9. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  10. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  11. CD1d expression and invariant NKT cell responses in herpesvirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusung eTan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a highly conserved subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that express a canonical, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR and surface markers shared with the natural killer cell lineage. iNKT cells recognize exogenous and endogenous glycolipid antigens restricted by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules, and are highly responsive to the prototypical agonist, α-galactosylceramide. Upon activation, iNKT cells rapidly coordinate signaling between innate and adaptive immune cells through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, leading to the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Because of their potent immunoregulatory properties, iNKT cells have been extensively studied and are known to play a pivotal role in mediating immune responses against microbial pathogens including viruses. Here, we review evidence that herpesviruses manipulate CD1d expression to escape iNKT cell surveillance and establish lifelong latency in humans. Collectively, published findings suggest that iNKT cells play critical roles in anti-herpesvirus immune responses and could be harnessed therapeutically to limit viral infection and viral-associated disease.

  12. Naturally transmitted herpesvirus papio-2 infection in a black and white colobus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troan, Brigid V; Perelygina, Ludmila; Patrusheva, Irina; Wettere, Arnaud J van; Hilliard, Julia K; Loomis, Michael R; Voe, Ryan S De

    2007-12-15

    A 6.5-year-old female eastern black and white colobus monkey (Colobus guereza) was evaluated after acute onset of ataxia and inappetence. The monkey was ataxic and lethargic, but no other abnormalities were detected via physical examination, radiography, or clinicopathologic analyses. During the next 2 days, the monkey's clinical condition deteriorated, and its WBC count decreased dramatically. Cytologic examination of a CSF sample revealed marked lymphohistiocytic inflammation. Despite supportive care, the monkey became apneic; after 20 hours of mechanical ventilation, fatal cardiac arrest occurred. At necropsy, numerous petechiae were detected within the white matter tracts of the brain; microscopic lesions of multifocal necrosis and hemorrhage with intranuclear inclusions identified in the brain and adrenal glands were consistent with an acute herpesvirus infection. A specific diagnosis of herpesvirus papio-2 (HVP-2) infection was made on the basis of results of serologic testing; PCR assay of tissue specimens; live virus isolation from the lungs; and immunohistochemical identification of the virus within brain, spinal cord, and adrenal gland lesions. Via phylogenetic tree analysis, the colobus HVP-2 isolate was grouped with neuroinvasive strains of the virus. The virus was most likely transmitted to the colobus monkey through toys shared with a nearby colony of baboons (the natural host of HVP-2). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of natural transmission of HVP-2 to a nonhost species. Infection with HVP-2 should be a differential diagnosis for acute encephalopathy in primate monkeys and humans, particularly following exposure to baboons.

  13. Biological and immunogenic properties of rabies virus glycoprotein expressed by canine herpesvirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, X; Tuchiya, K; Sato, I; Nishikawa, Y; Onoderaz, Y; Takashima, Y; Yamamoto, A; Katsumata, A; Iwata, A; Ueda, S; Mikami, T; Otsuka, H

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether canine herpesvirus (CHV) could be used as a live vector for the expression of heterologous immunogenes, we constructed a recombinant canine herpesvirus (CHV) expressing glycoprotein (G protein) of rabies virus (RV). The gene of G protein was inserted within the thymidine kinase gene of CHV YP11mu strain under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter. The G protein expressed by the recombinant CHV was processed and transported to the cell surface as in RV infected cells, and showed the same biological activities such as low pH dependent cell fusion and hemadsorption. The antigenic authenticity of the recombinant G protein was confirmed by a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific for G protein. Dogs inoculated intransally with the recombinant CHV produced higher titres of virus neutralizing antibodies against RV than those inoculated with a commercial, inactivated rabies vaccine. These results suggest that the CHV recombinant expressing G protein can be used as a vaccine to control canine rabies and that CHV may be useful as a vector to develop live recombinant against other infectious diseases in dogs.

  14. Multiplexed colorimetric detection of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus and Bartonella DNA using gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Matthew; Jiang, Li; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an infectious cancer occurring most commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients and in endemic regions, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where KS is among the top four most prevalent cancers. The cause of KS is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that while routinely diagnosed in developed nations, provides challenges to developing world medical providers and point-of-care detection. A major challenge in the diagnosis of KS is the existence of a number of other diseases with similar clinical presentation and histopathological features, requiring the detection of KSHV in a biopsy sample. In this work we develop an answer to this challenge by creating a multiplexed one-pot detection system for KSHV DNA and DNA from a frequently confounding disease, bacillary angiomatosis. Gold and silver nanoparticle aggregation reactions are tuned for each target and a multi-color change system is developed capable of detecting both targets down to levels between 1 nM and 2 nM. The system developed here could later be integrated with microfluidic sample processing to create a final device capable of solving the two major challenges in point-of-care KS detection.

  15. Biochemical reconstitution and phylogenetic comparison of human SET1 family core complexes involved in histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Monteith, Kelsey E; Viggiano, Susan; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-03-06

    Mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases that are required for metazoan development. MLL1 is the best characterized human SET1 family member, which includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B. MLL1 assembles with WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the MLL1 core complex, which is required for H3K4 dimethylation and transcriptional activation. Because all SET1 family proteins interact with WRAD in vivo, it is hypothesized they are regulated by similar mechanisms. However, recent evidence suggests differences among family members that may reflect unique regulatory inputs in the cell. Missing is an understanding of the intrinsic enzymatic activities of different SET1 family complexes under standard conditions. In this investigation, we reconstituted each human SET1 family core complex and compared subunit assembly and enzymatic activities. We found that in the absence of WRAD, all but one SET domain catalyzes at least weak H3K4 monomethylation. In the presence of WRAD, all SET1 family members showed stimulated monomethyltransferase activity but differed in their di- and trimethylation activities. We found that these differences are correlated with evolutionary lineage, suggesting these enzyme complexes have evolved to accomplish unique tasks within metazoan genomes. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we employed a "phylogenetic scanning mutagenesis" assay and identified a cluster of amino acid substitutions that confer a WRAD-dependent gain-of-function dimethylation activity on complexes assembled with the MLL3 or Drosophila trithorax proteins. These results form the basis for understanding how WRAD differentially regulates SET1 family complexes in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3: an interesting virus for applied and fundamental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), a member of the family Alloherpesviridae is the causative agent of a lethal, highly contagious and notifiable disease in common and koi carp. The economic importance of common and koi carp industries together with the rapid spread of CyHV-3 worldwide, explain why this virus became soon after its isolation in the 1990s a subject of applied research. In addition to its economic importance, an increasing number of fundamental studies demonstrated that CyHV-3 is an original and interesting subject for fundamental research. In this review, we summarized recent advances in CyHV-3 research with a special interest for studies related to host-virus interactions. PMID:24073814

  17. Structural similarities in DNA packaging and delivery apparatuses in Herpesvirus and dsDNA bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixon, Frazer J; Schmid, Michael F

    2014-04-01

    Structural information can inform our understanding of virus origins and evolution. The herpesviruses and tailed bacteriophages constitute two large families of dsDNA viruses which infect vertebrates and prokaryotes respectively. A relationship between these disparate groups was initially suggested by similarities in their capsid assembly and DNA packaging strategies. This relationship has now been confirmed by a range of studies that have revealed common structural features in their capsid proteins, and similar organizations and sequence conservation in their DNA packaging machinery and maturational proteases. This concentration of conserved traits in proteins involved in essential and primordial capsid/packaging functions is evidence that these structures are derived from an ancient, common ancestor and is in sharp contrast to the lack of such evidence for other virus functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. 42 CFR 59.7 - What criteria will the Department of Health and Human Services use to decide which family...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What criteria will the Department of Health and Human Services use to decide which family planning services projects to fund and in what amount? 59.7... FOR FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES Project Grants for Family Planning Services § 59.7 What criteria will the...

  19. Evolution of the NANOG pseudogene family in the human and chimpanzee genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maughan Peter J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NANOG gene is expressed in mammalian embryonic stem cells where it maintains cellular pluripotency. An unusually large family of pseudogenes arose from it with one unprocessed and ten processed pseudogenes in the human genome. This article compares the NANOG gene and its pseudogenes in the human and chimpanzee genomes and derives an evolutionary history of this pseudogene family. Results The NANOG gene and all pseudogenes except NANOGP8 are present at their expected orthologous chromosomal positions in the chimpanzee genome when compared to the human genome, indicating that their origins predate the human-chimpanzee divergence. Analysis of flanking DNA sequences demonstrates that NANOGP8 is absent from the chimpanzee genome. Conclusion Based on the most parsimonious ordering of inferred source-gene mutations, the deduced evolutionary origins for the NANOG pseudogene family in the human and chimpanzee genomes, in order of most ancient to most recent, are NANOGP6, NANOGP5, NANOGP3, NANOGP10, NANOGP2, NANOGP9, NANOGP7, NANOGP1, and NANOGP4. All of these pseudogenes were fixed in the genome of the human-chimpanzee common ancestor. NANOGP8 is the most recent pseudogene and it originated exclusively in the human lineage after the human-chimpanzee divergence. NANOGP1 is apparently an unprocessed pseudogene. Comparison of its sequence to the functional NANOG gene's reading frame suggests that this apparent pseudogene remained functional after duplication and, therefore, was subject to selection-driven conservation of its reading frame, and that it may retain some functionality or that its loss of function may be evolutionarily recent.

  20. Rab11 family expression in the human placenta: Localization at the maternal-fetal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiuk, Patrycja A.; Hanscom, Sara R.; Lindsay, Andrew J.; Wuebbolt, Danielle; Breathnach, Fionnuala M.; Tully, Elizabeth C.; Khan, Amir R.; McCaffrey, Mary W.

    2017-01-01

    Rab proteins are a family of small GTPases involved in a variety of cellular processes. The Rab11 subfamily in particular directs key steps of intracellular functions involving vesicle trafficking of the endosomal recycling pathway. This Rab subfamily works through a series of effector proteins including the Rab11-FIPs (Rab11 Family-Interacting Proteins). While the Rab11 subfamily has been well characterized at the cellular level, its function within human organ systems is still being explored. In an effort to further study these proteins, we conducted a preliminary investigation of a subgroup of endosomal Rab proteins in a range of human cell lines by Western blotting. The results from this analysis indicated that Rab11a, Rab11c(Rab25) and Rab14 were expressed in a wide range of cell lines, including the human placental trophoblastic BeWo cell line. These findings encouraged us to further analyse the localization of these Rabs and their common effector protein, the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), by immunofluorescence microscopy and to extend this work to normal human placental tissue. The placenta is a highly active exchange interface, facilitating transfer between mother and fetus during pregnancy. As Rab11 proteins are closely involved in transcytosis we hypothesized that the placenta would be an interesting human tissue model system for Rab investigation. By immunofluorescence microscopy, Rab11a, Rab11c(Rab25), Rab14 as well as their common FIP effector RCP showed prominent expression in the placental cell lines. We also identified the expression of these proteins in human placental lysates by Western blot analysis. Further, via fluorescent immunohistochemistry, we noted abundant localization of these proteins within key functional areas of primary human placental tissues, namely the outer syncytial layer of placental villous tissue and the endothelia of fetal blood vessels. Overall these findings highlight the expression of the Rab11 family within the human

  1. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  2. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Clark, David J; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-07-30

    Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4. U83A diverts human chemokines from signalling, but not

  3. Detection of testudinid herpesvirus type 4 in a leopard tortoise (Stigmochelys pardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnik, Ekaterina; Mittenzwei, Frank; Marschang, Rachel E

    2016-08-17

    Several animals from a mixed species collection of tortoises in Germany died unexpectedly. Some of the affected leopard tortoises (Stigmochelys pardalis) from this group showed respiratory signs. Samples were collected from one of the ill tortoises, and a Mycoplasma spp. and a herpesvirus were detected by PCR. Sequencing of a portion of the DNA polymerase gene of the herpesvirus showed 99% identity with testudinid herpesvirus 4, previously described only once in a bowsprit tortoise (Chersina angulata) in the United States.

  4. Elevated expression and potential roles of human Sp5, a member of Sp transcription factor family, in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongxin; Guo Yingqiu; Ge Xijin; Itoh, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Akira; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we describe the expression and function of human Sp5, a member of the Sp family of zinc finger transcription factors. Like other family members, the Sp5 protein contains a Cys2His2 zinc finger DNA binding domain at the C-terminus. Our experiments employing Gal4-Sp5 fusion proteins reveal multiple transcriptional domains, including a N-terminal activity domain, an intrinsic repressive element, and a C-terminal synergistic domain. Elevated expression of Sp5 was noted in several human tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, and colon cancer. To study the effects of the Sp5 protein on growth properties of human cancer cells and facilitate the identification of its downstream genes, we combined an inducible gene expression system with microarray analysis to screen for its transcriptional targets. Transfer of Sp5 into MCF-7 cells that expressed no detectable endogenous Sp5 protein elicited significant growth promotion activity. Several of the constitutively deregulated genes have been associated with tumorigenesis (CDC25C, CEACAM6, TMPRSS2, XBP1, MYBL1, ABHD2, and CXCL12) and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways (BAMBI, SIX1, IGFBP5, AES, and p21 WAF1 ). This information could be utilized for further mechanistic research and for devising optimized therapeutic strategies against human cancers

  5. γ-Herpesvirus load as surrogate marker of early death in HIV-1 lymphoma patients submitted to high dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pratesi

    Full Text Available Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT is a feasible procedure for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 lymphoma patients, whose underlying disease and intrinsic HIV-1- and ASCT-associated immunodeficiency might increase the risk for γ-herpesvirus load persistence and/or reactivation. We evaluated this hypothesis by investigating the levels of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV- and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-DNA levels in the peripheral blood of 22 HIV-1-associated lymphoma patients during ASCT, highlighting their relationship with γ-herpesvirus lymphoma status, immunological parameters, and clinical events. EBV-DNA was detected in the pre-treatment plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 12 (median 12,135 copies/mL and 18 patients (median 417 copies/10(6 PBMCs, respectively; the values in the two compartments were correlated (r = 0.77, p = 0.0001. Only EBV-positive lymphomas showed detectable levels of plasma EBV-DNA. After debulking chemotherapy, plasma EBV-DNA was associated with lymphoma chemosensitivity (p = 0.03 and a significant higher mortality risk by multivariate Cox analysis adjusted for EBV-lymphoma status (HR, 10.46, 95% CI, 1.11-98.32, p = 0.04. After infusion, EBV-DNA was detectable in five EBV-positive lymphoma patients who died within six months. KSHV-DNA load was positive in only one patient, who died from primary effusion lymphoma. Fluctuations in levels of KSHV-DNA reflected the patient's therapy and evolution of his underlying lymphoma. Other γ-herpesvirus-associated malignancies, such as multicentric Castleman disease and Kaposi sarcoma, or end-organ complications after salvage treatment were not found. Overall, these findings suggest a prognostic and predictive value of EBV-DNA and KSHV-DNA, the monitoring of which could be a simple, complementary tool for the management of γ-herpesvirus-positive lymphomas in HIV-1 patients submitted to ASCT.

  6. The juspuniendi at the roman home and the humanization of the family relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Garcé García y Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The family is one of the legal institutions that has most evolved through the time. Its historical tracking allows not only the comprehension of its transformation as an institute, but much of the general process of humanization of the Law. The family evolution is due to the modification in kinship systems. Gradually, blood links have been incorporated as a basic element and has been developed a legal regulation that aims parity inside the home. Under the growing influence of Christianity, the Roman law was attenuating the disciplinary powers of the paterfamilias, in particular the right to freely arrange the death of the wife and children without the intervention of judges (jus vitae necisque. In this historical context, this paper summarizes the development of private jus puniendi and the ethical and legal progress associated to the transformation of the family.

  7. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  8. Focal epithelial hyperplasia associated with human papillomavirus 13 and common human leukocyte antigen alleles in a Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoğlu, Gülşen; Metin, Ahmet; Ceylan, Gülay Güleç; Emre, Selma; Akpolat, Demet; Süngü, Nuran

    2015-02-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a rare and benign papillomatous disease of the oral cavity, which is closely associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 13 and 32. Genetic susceptibility to HPV infections are supported by recent studies involving the human leukocyte antigen system (HLA). In this report, we aimed to determine the clinicopathological features of a Turkish family with FEH and to detect the shared HLA DR and DQ types. HPV DNA typing of tissue samples and HLA determination from blood samples of four family members were performed by polymerase chain reaction. Histopathological examination of all patients revealed acanthotic papillomatous epidermis, koilocytes, apoptotic keratinocytes, and mitosoid bodies. HPV13 was detected by polymerase chain reaction. HLA DQA1*0501, HLA DQB1*0302, and HLA DRB1*11 alleles were common in all family members. HLA DRB1*04 was detected in three of them. This report is the first step for the investigation of involvement of HLA types in the pathogenesis of Turkish patients with FEH. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Human Capital of Family and Social Mobility in Rural Areas-Evidence from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-hua; YU Mei-lian; WU Fang-wei; CHEN Wei

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on the impact of family’s human capital on social mobility in China’s rural community. Empirical research is conducted based on data from surveying a typical rural community in the past 20 yr. The study indicates that social mobility in rural area is active in the past 20 yr, and the human capital of family, represented by primary labor’s education level, has played an essential role in mobility of low social class. Meanwhile, socio-economic development and the change of supply and demand in labor market dims the signaling role of degree education, but the impact of occupational training is increasingly remarkable. Therefore, the change from sole degree education to multi-leveled education including occupational education and training is a main way for China’s rural families in low class to realize social mobility.

  10. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family

  11. Human capital identification process: linkage for family medicine and community medicine to mobilize the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasugarn, Chanuantong; Thongbunjob, Krid

    2012-06-01

    Community diagnosis and approach has shifted from a professional focus to a community focus. The information system has also been developed to reflect socio-cultural information. This new system has been established throughout the country and is being recorded in the computer system. However these data still lack human capital information to promote community mobilization. The present study aims to develop a process which reflects human capital from the insider and outsider points of view and which builds on the existing work system of primary care service, family medicine, and community medicine. The present study applies the participatory action research design with mixed methods including community grand-tour, household survey socio-metric questionnaire and focus group discussion in order to gather insider view of human capital. A key instrument developed in the present study is the socio-metric questionnaire which was designed according to the community grand tour and household survey results. The findings indicate that the process is feasible and the insider point of view given a longer evidence based list of the human capital. The model enhanced a closer relationship between professional and community people and suggested the realistic community mobilizer name list. Human capital identification process is feasible and should be recommended to integrate in the existing work process of the health staff in family and community practice.

  12. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  13. Glis family proteins are differentially implicated in the cellular reprogramming of human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Young; Noh, Hye Bin; Kim, Hyeong-Taek; Lee, Kang-In; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2017-09-29

    The ground-breaking discovery of the reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), was accomplished by delivering 4 transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, into fibroblasts. Since then, several efforts have attempted to unveil other factors that are directly implicated in or might enhance reprogramming. Importantly, a number of transcription factors are reported to retain reprogramming activity. A previous study suggested Gli-similar 1 (Glis1) as a factor that enhances the reprogramming of fibroblasts during iPSC generation. However, the implication of other Glis members, including Glis2 and Glis3 (variants 1 and 2), in cellular reprogramming remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential involvement of human Glis family proteins, including hGlis1-3, in cellular reprogramming. Our results demonstrate that hGlis1, which is reported to reprogram human fibroblasts, promotes the reprogramming of human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs), indicating that the reprogramming activity of Glis1 is not cell type-specific. Strikingly, hGlis3 promoted the reprogramming of hADSCs as efficiently as hGlis1. On the contrary, hGlis2 showed a strong negative effect on reprogramming. Together, our results reveal clear differences in the cellular reprogramming activity among Glis family members and provide valuable insight into the development of a new reprogramming strategy using Glis family proteins.

  14. Central nervous system disease and genital disease in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are associated with different herpesviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. van Elk; M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); P.R.W.A. van Run (Peter); De Jong, A. (Anton); S. Getu (Sarah); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHerpesvirus infection causes disease of variable severity in many species, including cetaceans. However, little is known about herpesvirus infection in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), despite being widespread in temperate coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, we

  15. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozalo, Alfonso S.; Montoya, Enrique J.; Weller, Richard E.

    2008-08-16

    Abstract Dyscoria was observed in a female owl monkey and her two offspring. A third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two males paired with the female died, one of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all three animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly, H. simplex or H. saimiri-1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing animals into breeding or research colonies that were previously kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is observed in nonhuman primates.

  16. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gaspar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4, infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  17. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  18. Identification and characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 11 promotor activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Open reading frame 11 (ORF11) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus belongs to a herpesviral homologous protein family shared by some members of the gamma- herpesvirus subfamily. Little is known about this ORF11 homologous protein family. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, ORF11, located adjacent and in the opposite orientation to a well-characterized viral IL-6 gene. Northern blot analysis reveals that ORF11 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle with delayed-early transcription kinetics. We have determined the 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated region of the unspliced ORF11 transcript and identified both the transcription start site and the transcription termination site. Core promoter region, representing ORF11 promoter activity, was mapped to a 159nt fragment 5{prime} most proximal to the transcription start site. A functional TATA box was identified in the core promoter region. Interestingly, we found that ORF11 transcriptional activation is not responsive to Rta, the KSHV lytic switch protein. We also discovered that part of the ORF11 promoter region, the 209nt fragment upstream of the transcription start site, was repressed by phorbol esters. Our data help to understand transcription regulation of ORF11 and to elucidate roles of ORF11 in KSHV pathogenesis and life cycle.

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Solid Lymphoma Involving the Heart and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Andrews

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The disorders most strongly linked to KSHV are multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD, primary effusion lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We report an unusual case of KSHV-associated lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient manifesting with myocardial and central nervous system involvement. We discuss this case in the context of increasing array of KSHV-associated lymphomas. In the HIV-infected patient with a mass lesion, a history of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and prolonged immunosuppression should alert clinicians as to the possibility of KSHV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, in order to establish a timely diagnosis.

  20. Genomic organization of the canine herpesvirus US region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanes, E J; Tomlinson, C C

    1998-02-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) is an alpha-herpesvirus of limited pathogenicity in healthy adult dogs and infectivity of the virus appears to be largely limited to cells of canine origin. CHV's low virulence and species specificity make it an attractive candidate for a recombinant vaccine vector to protect dogs against a variety of pathogens. As part of the analysis of the CHV genome, the authors determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the CHV US region as well as portions of the flanking inverted repeats. Seven full open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins larger than 100 amino acids were identified within, or partially within the CHV US: cUS2, cUS3, cUS4, cUS6, cUS7, cUS8 and cUS9; which are homologs of the herpes simplex virus type-1 US2; protein kinase; gG, gD, gI, gE; and US9 genes, respectively. An eighth ORF was identified in the inverted repeat region, cIR6, a homolog of the equine herpesvirus type-1 IR6 gene. The authors identified and mapped most of the major transcripts for the predicted CHV US ORFs by Northern analysis.

  1. Antiviral activity of exopolysaccharides from Arthrospira platensis against koi herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, M; Bergmann, S M; Hwang, J; Buchholz, R; Lindenberger, C

    2017-10-01

    Although koi herpesvirus (KHV) has a history of causing severe economic losses in common carp and koi farms, there are still no treatments available on the market. Thus, the aim of this study was to test exopolysaccharides (EPS) for its antiviral activity against KHV, by monitoring inhibition and cytotoxic effects in common carp brain cells. These substances can be easily extracted from extracellular algae supernatant and were identified as groups of sulphated polysaccharides. In order to reach this aim, Arthrospira platensis, which is well known for its antiviral activity of intra- and extracellular compounds towards mammalian herpesviruses, was investigated as standard organism and compared to commercial antiviral drug, ganciclovir, which inhibits the viral DNA polymerization. The antiviral activity of polysaccharides of A. platensis against KHV was confirmed in vitro using qualitative assessment of KHV life cycle genes, and it was found by RT-PCR that EPS, applied at a concentration of >18 μg mL -1 and a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.45 of KHV, suppressed the viral replication in common carp brain (CCB) cells even after 22 days post-infection, entirely. Further, this study presents first data indicating an enormous potential using polysaccharides as an additive for aquacultures to lower or hinder the spread of the KHV and koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD) in future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Stalder

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis, a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus. In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus, 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus, 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius. In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI of 22.6-32.2%, but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1-63.7% in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2 were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1-55.9% of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0-99.0% in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1-297.8. Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research.

  3. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kathryn; Vaz, Paola K; Gilkerson, James R; Baker, Rupert; Whiteley, Pam; Ficorilli, Nino; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Portas, Timothy; Skogvold, Kim; Anderson, Garry A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis), a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius). In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses) were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 22.6-32.2%), but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1-63.7%) in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2) were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1-55.9%) of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0-99.0%) in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1-297.8). Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research.

  4. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kathryn; Vaz, Paola K.; Gilkerson, James R.; Baker, Rupert; Whiteley, Pam; Ficorilli, Nino; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Portas, Timothy; Skogvold, Kim; Anderson, Garry A.; Devlin, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis), a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius). In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses) were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 22.6–32.2%), but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1–63.7%) in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2) were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1–55.9%) of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0–99.0%) in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1–297.8). Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research. PMID:26222660

  5. The Fundamental Human Right to Marry and to Family Life and their Protection in the Legal Framework of the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    MSc. Albana Metaj-Stojanova

    2017-01-01

    The right to family life is a fundamental human right, recognized by a series of international and European acts, which not only define and ensure its protection, but also emphasize the social importance of the family unit and the institution of marriage. The right to family life has evolved rapidly, since it was first introduced as an international human right by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The family structure and the concept of family life have changed dramatically ov...

  6. Homologous and heterologous antibody responses of mice immunized with purified feline herpesvirus type 1 and canine herpesvirus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limcumpao, J A; Horimoto, T; Xuan, X N; Tohya, Y; Azetaka, M; Takahashi, E; Mikami, T

    1991-06-01

    The three glycoproteins each of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) were purified by affinity chromatography using glycoprotein-specific monoclonal antibodies and used individually or in combination in immunizing mice to determine their relative immunogenicity. All the glycoproteins induced detectable virus neutralizing antibodies to the homologous virus but FHV-1 gp143/108 and its cross-reacting counterpart, CHV gp145/112, elicited the highest titers not only to the homologous virus but to the heterologous virus as well. The production of ELISA antibodies after glycoprotein immunization was variable, while hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies were produced by only 1 out of 10 FHV-1 gp60-inoculated mice. In general, the antibody titers induced by CHV glycoproteins were lower than those by FHV-1 glycoproteins. These results indicate that these glycoproteins may be useful as subunit vaccines against FHV-1 and CHV infections.

  7. Genetic variation and dynamics of infections of equid herpesvirus 5 in individual horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Helena; Ullman, Karin; Leijon, Mikael; Söderlund, Robert; Penell, Johanna; Ståhl, Karl; Pringle, John; Valarcher, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus 5 (EHV-5) is related to the human Epstein-Barr virus (human herpesvirus 4) and has frequently been observed in equine populations worldwide. EHV-5 was previously assumed to be low to non-pathogenic; however, studies have also related the virus to the severe lung disease equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis (EMPF). Genetic information of EHV-5 is scanty: the whole genome was recently described and only limited nucleotide sequences are available. In this study, samples were taken twice 1 year apart from eight healthy horses at the same professional training yard and samples from a ninth horse that was diagnosed with EMPF with samples taken pre- and post-mortem to analyse partial glycoprotein B (gB) gene of EHV-5 by using next-generation sequencing. The analysis resulted in 27 partial gB gene sequences, 11 unique sequence types and five amino acid sequences. These sequences could be classified within four genotypes (I-IV) of the EHV-5 gB gene based on the degree of similarity of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, and in this work horses were shown to be identified with up to three different genotypes simultaneously. The observations showed a range of interactions between EHV-5 and the host over time, where the same virus persists in some horses, whereas others have a more dynamic infection pattern including strains from different genotypes. This study provides insight into the genetic variation and dynamics of EHV-5, and highlights that further work is needed to understand the EHV-5 interaction with its host.

  8. A Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection and Quantification of Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus (EEDV; Salmonid Herpesvirus 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, Gavin W; Barbash, Patricia A; Coll, John A

    2016-03-01

    Epizootic epitheliotropic disease virus (EEDV; salmonid herpesvirus [SalHV3]; family Alloherpesviridae) causes a systemic disease of juvenile and yearling Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. No cell lines are currently available for the culture and propagation of EEDV, so primary diagnosis is limited to PCR and electron microscopy. To better understand the pervasiveness of EEDV (carrier or latent state of infection) in domesticated and wild Lake Trout populations, we developed a sensitive TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect the presence of the EEDV terminase gene in Lake Trout tissues. This assay was able to detect a linear standard curve over nine logs of plasmid dilution and was sensitive enough to detect single-digit copies of EEDV. The efficiency of the PCR assay was 99.4 ± 0.06% (mean ± SD), with a 95% confidence limit of 0.0296 (R(2) = 0.994). Methods were successfully applied to collect preliminary data from a number of species and water bodies in the states of Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont, indicating that EEDV is more common in wild fish than previously known. In addition, through the development of this qPCR assay, we detected EEDV in a new salmonid species, the Cisco Coregonus artedi. The qPCR assay was unexpectedly able to detect two additional herpesviruses, the Atlantic Salmon papillomatosis virus (ASPV; SalHV4) and the Namaycush herpesvirus (NamHV; SalHV5), which both share high sequence identity with the EEDV terminase gene. With these unexpected findings, we subsequently designed three primer sets to confirm initial TaqMan qPCR assay positives and to differentiate among EEDV, ASPV, and NamHV by detecting the glycoprotein genes via SYBR Green qPCR. Received April 20, 2015; accepted November 10, 2015.

  9. RANAVIRUS EPIZOOTIC IN CAPTIVE EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) WITH CONCURRENT HERPESVIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA INFECTION: MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Richard R; Allender, Matthew C; Crawford, LaTasha K; Wack, Allison N; Murphy, Kevin J; Mankowski, Joseph L; Bronson, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) and FV3-like viruses are members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) and are becoming recognized as significant pathogens of eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) in North America. In July 2011, 5 turtles from a group of 27 in Maryland, USA, presented dead or lethargic with what was later diagnosed as fibrinonecrotic stomatitis and cloacitis. The presence of FV3-like virus and herpesvirus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the tested index cases. The remaining 22 animals were isolated, segregated by severity of clinical signs, and treated with nutritional support, fluid therapy, ambient temperature management, antibiotics, and antiviral therapy. Oral swabs were tested serially for FV3-like virus by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and tested at day 0 for herpesvirus and Mycoplasma sp. by conventional PCR. With oral swabs, 77% of the 22 turtles were FV3-like virus positive; however, qPCR on tissues taken during necropsy revealed the true prevalence was 86%. FV3-like virus prevalence and the median number of viral copies being shed significantly declined during the outbreak. The prevalence of herpesvirus and Mycoplasma sp. by PCR of oral swabs at day 0 was 55% and 68%, respectively. The 58% survival rate was higher than previously reported in captive eastern box turtles for a ranavirus epizootic. All surviving turtles brumated normally and emerged the following year with no clinical signs during subsequent monitoring. The immediate initiation of treatment and intensive supportive care were considered the most important contributing factors to the successful outcome in this outbreak.

  10. The Complete Genome Sequence of Herpesvirus Papio 2 (Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 16) Shows Evidence of Recombination Events among Various Progenitor Herpesviruses†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Shaun D.; Severini, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    We have sequenced the entire genome of herpesvirus papio 2 (HVP-2; Cercopithecine herpesvirus 16) strain X313, a baboon herpesvirus with close homology to other primate alphaherpesviruses, such as SA8, monkey B virus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2. The genome of HVP-2 is 156,487 bp in length, with an overall GC content of 76.5%. The genome organization is identical to that of the other members of the genus Simplexvirus, with a long and a short unique region, each bordered by inverted repeats which end with an “a” sequence. All of the open reading frames detected in this genome were homologous and colinear with those of SA8 and B virus. The HSV gene RL1 (γ134.5; neurovirulence factor) is not present in HVP-2, as is the case for SA8 and B virus. The HVP-2 genome is 85% homologous to its closest relative, SA8. However, segment-by-segment bootstrap analysis of the genome revealed at least two regions that display closer homology to the corresponding sequences of B virus. The first region comprises the UL41 to UL44 genes, and the second region is located within the UL36 gene. We hypothesize that this localized and defined shift in homology is due to recombination events between an SA8-like progenitor of HVP-2 and a herpesvirus species more closely related to the B virus. Since some of the genes involved in these putative recombination events are determinants of virulence, a comparative analysis of their function may provide insight into the pathogenic mechanism of simplexviruses. PMID:16414998

  11. Evaluation of metaphylactic RNA interference to prevent equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in experimental herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gillian A; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Pusterla, Nicola; Erb, Hollis N; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate metaphylactic RNA interference to prevent equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection in experimental herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy in horses and to determine whether horses infected with a neuropathogenic strain of the virus that develop equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) have differences in viremia. 13 seronegative horses. EHV-1 strain Ab4 was administered intranasally on day 0, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs [EHV-1 specific siRNAs {n = 7} or an irrelevant siRNA {6}]) were administered intranasally 24 hours before and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after infection. Physical and neurologic examinations, nasal swab specimens, and blood samples were collected for virus isolation and quantitative PCR assay. Data from the study were combined with data from a previous study of 14 horses. No significant difference was detected in clinical variables, viremia, or detection of EHV-1 in nasal swab specimens of horses treated with the EHV-1 targeted siRNAs (sigB3-siOri2) versus controls. No significant differences in viremia were detected between horses that developed EHM and those that did not. Administration of siRNAs targeted against EHV-1 around the time of EHV-1 infection was not protective with this experimental design. Horses infected with the neuropathogenic EHV-1 strain Ab4 that developed EHM did not have a more pronounced viremia.

  12. Expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and spontaneous apoptosis in normal human testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldereid, N B; Angelis, P D; Wiger, R; Clausen, O P

    2001-05-01

    We investigated the frequency of spontaneous apoptosis and expression of the Bcl-2 family of proteins during normal spermatogenesis in man. Testicular tissue with both normal morphology and DNA content was obtained from necro-donors and fixed in Bouin's solution. A TdT-mediated dUTP end-labelling method (TUNEL) was used for the detection of apoptotic cells. Expression of apoptosis regulatory Bcl-2 family proteins and of p53 and p21(Waf1) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Germ cell apoptosis was detected in all testes and was mainly seen in primary spermatocytes and spermatids and in a few spermatogonia. Bcl-2 and Bak were preferentially expressed in the compartments of spermatocytes and differentiating spermatids, while Bcl-x was preferentially expressed in spermatogonia. Bax showed a preferential expression in nuclei of round spermatids, whereas Bad was only seen in the acrosome region of various stages of spermatids. Mcl-1 staining was weak without a particular pattern, whereas expression of Bcl-w, p53 and p21(Waf1) proteins was not detected by immunohistochemistry. The results show that spontaneous apoptosis occurs in all male germ cell compartments in humans. Bcl-2 family proteins are distributed preferentially within distinct germ cell compartments suggesting a specific role for these proteins in the processes of differentiation and maturation during human spermatogenesis.

  13. Data Resources for Biodemographic Studies on Familial Clustering of Human Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The main cause that hampered many previous biodemographic studies of human longevity is the lack of appropriate data. At the same time, many existing data resources (millions of genealogical records are under-utilized, because their very existence is not widely known, let alone the quality and scientific value of these data sets are not yet validated. The purpose of this work is to review the data resources that could be used in familial studies of human longevity. This is an extended and supplemented version of the previous study made by the authors upon the request of the National Institute on Aging (1998 NIH Professional Service Contract. The review describes: (1 data resources developed for biodemographic studies, (2 data collected in the projects on historical demography, (3 data resources for long lived individuals and their families, (4 publicly available computerized genealogical data resources, (5 published genealogical and family history data. The review also contains the description of databases developed by the participants of the Research Workshops "Genes, Genealogies, and Longevity" organized by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.

  14. Prolonged persistence of bovine herpesvirus in small cattle herds: a model-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, E.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Boven, van R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Herpesviruses can remain dormant in once-infected hosts and, upon reactivation, cause such hosts to become infectious. This phenomenon of latency and reactivation may enable herpesviruses to persist for a long time in small host populations. To quantify the effect of reactivation on persistence, the

  15. Identification and localization of the structural proteins of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Leroy, B.; Wattiez, R.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Boeren, S.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Vanderplasschen, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the known fish herpesviruses have important aquaculture species as their natural host, and may cause serious disease and mortality. Anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV-1) causes a hemorrhagic disease in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Despite their importance, fundamental molecular knowledge on

  16. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Weberruss, Marion; Lorenz, Michael; Cheleski, Juliana; Hellberg, Teresa; Whittle, Cathy; El Omari, Kamel; Vasishtan, Daven; Dent, Kyle C.; Harlos, Karl; Franzke, Kati; Hagen, Christoph; Klupp, Barbara G.; Antonin, Wolfram; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Gruenewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC), which, in turn, mediates

  17. Reactivation of Herpesvirus in Patients With Hepatitis C Treated With Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelló M, Christie; Fernández-Carrillo, Carlos; Londoño, María-Carlota; Arias-Loste, Teresa; Hernández-Conde, Marta; Llerena, Susana; Crespo, Javier; Forns, Xavier; Calleja, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    We performed a case-series analysis of reactivation of herpesvirus in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treated with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents. We collected data from 576 patients with HCV infection treated with DAA combinations at 3 hospitals in Spain, from November 2014 through November 2015. We also collected data from a control population (230 HCV-infected patients, matched for sex and age; 23 untreated and 213 treated with interferon-based regimens). Herpesvirus was reactivated in 10 patients who received DAA therapy (7 patients had cirrhosis and 3 patients had received liver transplants), a median of 8 weeks after the therapy was initiated. None of the controls had herpesvirus reactivation. Patients with herpesvirus reactivation were receiving the DAA agents sofosbuvir with ledipasvir (with or without ribavirin, 7/10), ombitasvir with paritaprevir and ritonavir plus dasabuvir (with or without ribavirin, 2/10), or sofosbuvir with simeprevir plus ribavirin (1/10). Two of the 10 patients developed postherpetic neuralgia and 1 patient developed kerato-uveitis. All 10 patients with herpesvirus reactivation achieved a sustained virologic response. Immune changes that follow clearance of HCV might lead to reactivation of other viruses, such as herpesvirus. Patients with HCV infection suspected of having herpesvirus infection should be treated immediately. Some groups also might be screened for herpesvirus infection. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis ...

  19. The Genome of a Tortoise Herpesvirus (Testudinid Herpesvirus 3) Has a Novel Structure and Contains a Large Region That Is Not Required for Replication In Vitro or Virulence In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandar, Frédéric; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Gatherer, Derek; Kerr, Karen; Marlier, Didier; Diez, Marianne; Marschang, Rachel E.; Mast, Jan; Dewals, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV-3) is the causative agent of a lethal disease affecting several tortoise species. The threat that this virus poses to endangered animals is focusing efforts on characterizing its properties, in order to enable the development of prophylactic methods. We have sequenced the genomes of the two most studied TeHV-3 strains (1976 and 4295). TeHV-3 strain 1976 has a novel genome structure and is most closely related to a turtle herpesvirus, thus supporting its classification into genus Scutavirus, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae. The sequence of strain 1976 also revealed viral counterparts of cellular interleukin-10 and semaphorin, which have not been described previously in members of subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. TeHV-3 strain 4295 is a mixture of three forms (m1, m2, and M), in which, in comparison to strain 1976, the genomes exhibit large, partially overlapping deletions of 12.5 to 22.4 kb. Viral subclones representing these forms were isolated by limiting dilution assays, and each replicated in cell culture comparably to strain 1976. With the goal of testing the potential of the three forms as attenuated vaccine candidates, strain 4295 was inoculated intranasally into Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni). All inoculated subjects died, and PCR analyses demonstrated the ability of the m2 and M forms to spread and invade the brain. In contrast, the m1 form was detected in none of the organs tested, suggesting its potential as the basis of an attenuated vaccine candidate. Our findings represent a major step toward characterizing TeHV-3 and developing prophylactic methods against it. IMPORTANCE Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV-3) causes a lethal disease in tortoises, several species of which are endangered. We have characterized the viral genome and used this information to take steps toward developing an attenuated vaccine. We have sequenced the genomes of two strains (1976 and 4295), compared their growth in

  20. Changes in human gut flora with age: an Indian familial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Nachiket; Shetty, Sudarshan; Lanjekar, Vikram; Ranade, Dilip; Shouche, Yogesh

    2012-09-26

    The gut micro flora plays vital role in health status of the host. The majority of microbes residing in the gut have a profound influence on human physiology and nutrition. Different human ethnic groups vary in genetic makeup as well as the environmental conditions they live in. The gut flora changes with genetic makeup and environmental factors and hence it is necessary to understand the composition of gut flora of different ethnic groups. Indian population is different in physiology from western population (YY paradox) and thus the gut flora in Indian population is likely to differ from the extensively studied gut flora in western population. In this study we have investigated the gut flora of two Indian families, each with three individuals belonging to successive generations and living under the same roof. Denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed age-dependant variation in gut microflora amongst the individuals within a family. Different bacterial genera were dominant in the individual of varying age in clone library analysis. Obligate anaerobes isolated from individuals within a family showed age related differences in isolation pattern, with 27% (6 out of 22) of the isolates being potential novel species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. In qPCR a consistent decrease in Firmicutes number and increase in Bacteroidetes number with increasing age was observed in our subjects, this pattern of change in Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratio with age is different than previously reported in European population. There is change in gut flora with age amongst the individuals within a family. The isolation of high percent of novel bacterial species and the pattern of change in Firmicutes /Bacteroidetes ratio with age suggests that the composition of gut flora in Indian individuals may be different than the western population. Thus, further extensive study is needed to define the gut flora in Indian population.

  1. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano (Toronto); (Colorado)

    2011-12-14

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure:function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform

  2. FEATURES OF REPRODUCTION OF THE HUMAN CAPITAL IN THE SOCIAL INSTITUTION OF THE FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar'ya G. Bykova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  Subject / topic. The article deals with the problem of increasing the qualitytion of human capital on the basis of enhancing the role of the social institution of the family. The issues of socialization of young people and involving them in a motivated work.Purpose. The main purpose of the presentation material in this article we conclude, is to find methods to increase efficiency chelovechesky potential on the basis of family relationships.Methodology. In this paper, the methods used: abstractstion, analysis and synthesis, analogy, dialectic method of induction and deduction, observation, generalization, objectivism, compare.Conclusions / relevance. In the context of the trends of aging and reduction of the country's population, the reform of the pension system creates a number of conditions on the one hand, contribute to the solution of the demographic problem, but on the other – has a multifactorial effect on the quality of human capital as a result of parental work. The article presents the possible approaches to solving this problem. Practical application of the results of this work will allow to rethink the approach to the concept of human resources, improving the socio-economic development of theRussian Federation. 

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramos-da-Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS became a critical health issue with the emergence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in the 1980s. Four clinical-epidemiological forms of KS have been described: classical KS, endemic KS, iatrogenic KS, and AIDS-associated KS. In 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus type 8 was identified by Chang and colleagues, and has been detected worldwide at frequencies ranging from 80 to 100%. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of KSHV infection in KS lesions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Brazil, as well as to review the current knowledge about KS transmission and detection. For these purposes, DNA from 51 cases of KS was assessed by PCR: 20 (39.2% cases of classical KS, 29 (56.9% of AIDS-associated KS and 2 (3.9% of iatrogenic KS. Most patients were males (7.5:1, M/F, and mean age was 47.9 years (SD = ± 18.7 years. As expected, HIV-positive KS patients were younger than patients with classical KS. On the other hand, patients with AIDS-associated KS have early lesions (patch and plaque compared to classical KS patients (predominantly nodular lesions. This is assumed to be the result of the early diagnose of KS in the HIV-positive setting. KSHV infection was detected by PCR in almost all cases (48/51; 94.1%, irrespectively of the clinical-epidemiological form of KS. These results show that KSHV is associated with all forms of KS in Brazilian patients, a fact that supports the role of this virus in KS pathogenesis.

  4. Structural profiles of human miRNA families from pairwise clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Þórarinsson, Elfar; Reiche, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    secondary structure already predicted, little is known about the patterns of structural conservation among pre-miRNAs. We address this issue by clustering the human pre-miRNA sequences based on pairwise, sequence and secondary structure alignment using FOLDALIGN, followed by global multiple alignment...... of obtained clusters by WAR. As a result, the common secondary structure was successfully determined for four FOLDALIGN clusters: the RF00027 structural family of the Rfam database and three clusters with previously undescribed consensus structures. Availability: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/mirclust...

  5. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Paul E; Newson, Lesley; Schank, Jeffrey C; Richerson, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  6. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Smaldino

    Full Text Available Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  7. A Plea for the traditional family: Situating marriage within John Paul II's realist, or personalist, perspective of human freedom1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Michele M.

    2014-01-01

    This article is an attempt to defend the rights of the traditional family: not simply against the redefinition of marriage, but more fundamentally against a re-conceptualization of human freedom and human rights. To this end, it contrasts what Saint John Paul II calls an individualistic understanding of freedom and a personalistic notion of the same in order to argue that human freedom is called by the Creator to be in service of, and not in opposition to, the good of the human family. From this perspective—that of the social doctrine of the Catholic Church—it argues for the harmony between natural marriage and the respect of fundamental human rights, and it presents the social dimension of marriage as fundamental with respect to the legal and social protection of the family. PMID:25473131

  8. Asociación del virus herpes humano 8 y la hiperplasia linfoide nodular difusa del intestino delgado en la inmunodeficiencia variable común Association between the human herpesvirus 8 and the diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the small intestine in common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kokuina

    2009-12-01

    hairinesses. Immunohistochemistry showed that nodules were high germinal centers with distribution of B cells (CD20+ and T cells (CD3+, similar to that of normal follicle. There was not differential expression of the K and λ light chains. The real time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR method detected many copies from the genome of type 8 human herpesvirus (VHH-8 (133 copies/µL of DNA in biopsy of intestinal nodule DNA. VHH-8 infection may to be a significant factor in pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients presenting with CVID.

  9. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and its relationship with herpesvirus in Indian subjects with chronic periodontitis: A cross-sectional study

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    Vinayak M Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen that is commonly harbored in the dental plaque of humans. The aim of this study was to look into the prevalence of P. gingivalis and its association with herpesvirus in Indian subjects. This is probably the first study on the association of this bacterium with herpesvirus in Indians. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consists of 200 subjects, with 100 subjects each in the healthy group and the chronic periodontitis (CP group. Upon plaque collection, one portion of the samples was immediately plated, on culture media that is selective for P. gingivalis. Total colony-forming units (CFU/mL from each plate was recorded. The remaining plaque sample was subjected to DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed using specific primers for Cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV. The data are analyzed using the chi-square test, Spearman's rho correlation coefficient, and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: P. gingivalis was detected in 66% of the subjects with CP and in 40% in the healthy group, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.00023. The correlation of clinical parameters with P. gingivalis showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that higher levels of clinical parameters were associated with higher CFUs of P. gingivalis in culture. The comparison of the presence of P. gingivalis between herpesvirus-negative and -positive cases showed that CMV-positive cases had significantly higher levels of this bacterium. Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the earlier finding of P. gingivalis presence in significantly higher levels in CP subjects and in CMV-positive sites. In addition, there was a positive association of the bacterium with clinical parameters.

  10. The concept of milk kinship in Islam: issues raised when offering preterm infants of Muslim families donor human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khuffash, Afif; Unger, Sharon

    2012-05-01

    Research has documented health benefits associated with donor human milk (DHM). Offering DHM to people of the Muslim faith raises important religious concerns for these families. Knowledge of these beliefs and an understanding of the rationale for these beliefs enable the health care team to establish rapport and build a foundation of trust with patients and their families, thereby paving the way to developing a treatment plan that is in the best interest of the patients without compromising care. This article describes the issues and a rationale for them and provides physicians caring for preterm infants of Muslim families with information to facilitate advocating DHM to those families.

  11. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M.; Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the ∼1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5' regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family

  12. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duangtum, Natapol [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Limjindaporn, Thawornchai, E-mail: limjindaporn@yahoo.com [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  13. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duangtum, Natapol; Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). → The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. → The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. → A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. → KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl - /HCO 3 - exchange and the failure of proton (H + ) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney α-intercalated cells.

  14. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family

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    Samin Alavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus (HPV B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  15. Family history of alcoholism and the human brain response to oral sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, William J A; Dzemidzic, Mario; Soeurt, Christina M; Carron, Claire R; Oberlin, Brandon G; Considine, Robert V; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Kareken, David A

    2018-01-01

    A heightened hedonic response to sweet tastes has been associated with increased alcohol preference and alcohol consumption in both humans and animals. The principal goal of this study was to examine blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation to high- and low-concentration sweet solutions in subjects who are either positive (FHP) or negative (FHN) for a family history of alcoholism. Seventy-four non-treatment seeking, community-recruited, healthy volunteers (22.8 ± 1.6 SD years; 43% men) rated a range of sucrose concentrations in a taste test and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during oral delivery of water, 0.83 M, and 0.10 M sucrose. Sucrose compared to water produced robust activation in primary gustatory cortex, ventral insula, amygdala, and ventral striatum. FHP subjects displayed greater bilateral amygdala activation than FHN subjects in the low sucrose concentration (0.10 M). In secondary analyses, the right amygdala response to the 0.10 M sucrose was greatest in FHP women. When accounting for group differences in drinks per week, the family history groups remained significantly different in their right amygdala response to 0.10 M sucrose. Our findings suggest that the brain response to oral sucrose differs with a family history of alcoholism, and that this response to a mildly reinforcing primary reward might be an endophenotypic marker of alcoholism risk.

  16. Family history of alcoholism and the human brain response to oral sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J.A. Eiler, II

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A heightened hedonic response to sweet tastes has been associated with increased alcohol preference and alcohol consumption in both humans and animals. The principal goal of this study was to examine blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation to high- and low-concentration sweet solutions in subjects who are either positive (FHP or negative (FHN for a family history of alcoholism. Seventy-four non-treatment seeking, community-recruited, healthy volunteers (22.8 ± 1.6 SD years; 43% men rated a range of sucrose concentrations in a taste test and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during oral delivery of water, 0.83 M, and 0.10 M sucrose. Sucrose compared to water produced robust activation in primary gustatory cortex, ventral insula, amygdala, and ventral striatum. FHP subjects displayed greater bilateral amygdala activation than FHN subjects in the low sucrose concentration (0.10 M. In secondary analyses, the right amygdala response to the 0.10 M sucrose was greatest in FHP women. When accounting for group differences in drinks per week, the family history groups remained significantly different in their right amygdala response to 0.10 M sucrose. Our findings suggest that the brain response to oral sucrose differs with a family history of alcoholism, and that this response to a mildly reinforcing primary reward might be an endophenotypic marker of alcoholism risk.

  17. Tip, an Lck-interacting protein of Herpesvirus saimiri, causes Fas- and Lck-dependent apoptosis of T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasham, Muneer G.; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.

    2004-01-01

    Saimiriine herpesvirus-2 (Herpesvirus saimiri) transforms T lymphocytes, including human, to continuous growth in vitro. H. saimiri-induced transformation is becoming an important tool of T-cell biology, including studies of HIV replication. Two proteins of H. saimiri subgroup C, Tip and StpC, are essential for T-cell transformation. In spite of the important role of these proteins, their biological functions and the molecular mechanisms of their action remain insufficiently understood. To further elucidate the effects of Tip on T cells, we transduced T lymphocytes, using an efficient lentiviral gene transfer system, to express Tip in the absence of other H. saimiri proteins. Our results indicate that Tip specifically inhibits IL-2 production by human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, Tip promotes T-cell apoptosis, which appears to be the reason for the observed decrease in IL-2 production. Finally, the apoptotic effect of Tip in T cells is mediated by Fas and requires the presence of active Lck in the cell

  18. Cryo-gamma radiation inactivation of bovine herpesvirus type-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiorgi, C. Fernández; Smolko, E. E.; Lombardo, J. H.

    1999-07-01

    The radioresistance of bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), commonly known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), suspended in free serum Glasgow-MEM medium and frozen at -78°C was studied. The number of surviving virus at a given dose of gamma-radiation was determined by a plaque assay system. D 10 values were calculated before and after removal of cell debris. The D 10 values obtained were 4.72 kGy and 7.31 kGy before and after removal of cell debris, respectively. Our results indicate that the inactivated viral particles could be used for vaccine preparation or diagnostic reagents.

  19. Incidence of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus in Asian elephants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nagendra N; Choudhury, Bhaskar; Kumar, Vishnu; Koul, Monika; Gogoi, Sophia M; Khatoon, Elina; Chakroborty, A; Basumatary, P; Barua, B; Rahman, T; Das, S K; Kumar, Sachin

    2017-09-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) are the cause of acute hemorrhagic disease in endangered Asian and African elephants. In the present study, we report the incidence of EEHV infection and associated mortality in the captive elephant of Assam, India. Our result showed the gross morphology and histopathological changes of EEHV infection in the elephant. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase, helicase, and GPCR genes from the infected tissue samples suggested the presence of EEHV1A virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Herpesvirus canino 1: agente etiológico y enfermedad

    OpenAIRE

    Galosi, Cecilia Mónica

    2007-01-01

    El herpesvirus canino 1 es un alphaherpesvirus del cual se describe un solo serotipo. Este virus fue aislado en varios paises y en Europa es enzoótico en la población canina. Es uno de los principales agentes infecciosos relacionados a lesiones vesiculares en mucosas genitales y es causante de desórdenes reproductivos en caninos tales como reabsorciones fetales, abortos y muertes perinatales. Participa ocasionalmente como causante de la denominada Tos de las Perreras. Epidemiológicamente revi...

  1. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  2. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keypour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report, General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28 and Family Assessment Device (FAD, conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0. Results: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40% and conduct problem (33.3%. There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001. There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers′ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention. Conclusions: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  3. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keypour, Maryam; Arman, Soroor; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member. There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old) with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report), General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28) and Family Assessment Device (FAD), conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0). Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40%) and conduct problem (33.3%). There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms) in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention). Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  4. The expression and serological reactivity of recombinant canine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarkéŽta Vaňkov‡á

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to express recombinant glycoprotein D of canine herpesvirus 1 in bacterial cells and to evaluate its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when compared to traditional serological methods. The gene fragment coding glycoprotein D of canine herpesvirus 1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned into plasmid vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Recombinant protein was then purified and used as an antigen in immunoblot for a detection of canine herpesvirus 1 specific antibodies. Antibody testing was performed on the panel of 100 canine sera by immunoblot with recombinant glycoprotein D as antigen and compared with indirect immunofluorescence assay. Serum samples were collected from 83 dogs with no history of canine herpesvirus 1 or reproductive disorders, and from 17 dogs from breeding kennels with a history of canine herpesvirus 1 related reproductive disorders. Sensitivity of glycoprotein D based immunoblot was 89.2% and specificity was 93%. Kappa value was calculated to be 0.8 between immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Antibodies against canine herpesvirus 1 infection were detected in 33% of samples by immunoblot assay. Our study confirms that recombinant glycoprotein D expressed in bacterial cells could be used as a suitable and sensitive antigen for immunological tests and that herpesvirus infection seems to be common among the canine population in the Czech Republic.

  5. Anti-herpesvirus agents: a patent and literature review (2003 to present).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2014-08-01

    The standard therapy used to treat herpesvirus infections is based on the application of DNA polymerase inhibitors such as ganciclovir or aciclovir. Unfortunately, all of these compounds exhibit relatively high toxicity and the mutation of herpesviruses results in the appearance of new drug-resistant strains. Consequently, there is a great need for the development of new, effective and safe anti-herpesvirus agents that employ different patterns of therapeutic action at various stages of the virus life cycle. Patents and patent applications concerning the development of anti-herpesvirus agents displaying different mechanisms of action that have been published since 2003 are reviewed. In addition, major discoveries in this field that have been published in academic papers have also been included. Among all the anti-herpesvirus agents described in this article, the inhibitors of viral serine protease seem to present one of the most effective/promising therapeutics. Unfortunately, the practical application of these antiviral agents has not yet been proven in any clinical trials. Nevertheless, the dynamic and extensive work on this subject gives hope that a new class of anti-herpesvirus agents aimed at the enzymatic activity of herpesvirus serine protease may be developed.

  6. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

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    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  7. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medveczky, Maria M; Sherwood, Tracy A; Klein, Thomas W; Friedman, Herman; Medveczky, Peter G

    2004-09-15

    The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68), and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC. These studies may also provide the foundation for the development

  8. Use of whole genome deep sequencing to define emerging minority variants in virus envelope genes in herpesvirus treated with novel antimicrobial K21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua G; Prusty, Bhupesh K; Gompels, Ursula A

    2017-10-01

    New antivirals are required to prevent rising antimicrobial resistance from replication inhibitors. The aim of this study was to analyse the range of emerging mutations in herpesvirus by whole genome deep sequencing. We tested human herpesvirus 6 treatment with novel antiviral K21, where evidence indicated distinct effects on virus envelope proteins. We treated BACmid cloned virus in order to analyse mechanisms and candidate targets for resistance. Illumina based next generation sequencing technology enabled analyses of mutations in 85 genes to depths of 10,000 per base detecting low prevalent minority variants (<1%). After four passages in tissue culture the untreated virus accumulated mutations in infected cells giving an emerging mixed population (45-73%) of non-synonymous SNPs in six genes including two envelope glycoproteins. Strikingly, treatment with K21 did not accumulate the passage mutations; instead a high frequency mutation was selected in envelope protein gQ2, part of the gH/gL complex essential for herpesvirus infection. This introduced a stop codon encoding a truncation mutation previously observed in increased virion production. There was reduced detection of the glycoprotein complex in infected cells. This supports a novel pathway for K21 targeting virion envelopes distinct from replication inhibition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Respiratory herpesvirus infection in two Indian Ringneck parakeets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Tatjana; Ackermann, Mark R; Drahos, Jo M; Stasko, Judith; Haynes, Joseph S

    2008-03-01

    A flock of Indian Ringneck parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) was imported to the United States from Australia. Soon after, 1 parakeet suddenly died, and a second parakeet died after a 2-day course of illness, which consisted of anorexia, lethargy, emaciation, and dyspnea. At necropsy, the affected birds had diffuse consolidation and red discoloration of the lungs, as well as thickened, congested air sacs. The microscopic examination revealed multifocal, necrotizing bronchitis, parabronchitis, and interstitial pneumonia. The lumen of the affected airways contained numerous, large syncytial cells with up to 15 nuclei. The nuclei of these syncytial cells often contained large, eosinophilic inclusion bodies, consistent with herpesvirus. The epithelium of the trachea and air sacs was hypertrophied and contained syncytial cells with intranuclear inclusion bodies similar to the bronchi. In addition, a few intranuclear inclusion bodies were also present in the epithelial cells that line the air capillaries. On ultrastructural examination, the nuclei of degenerating epithelial cells contained clusters of viral nucleocapsid proteins and unenveloped, icosahedral, viral particles that were approximately 90 nm in diameter. In addition, some epithelial cells contained clusters of enveloped viral particles approximately 105 nm in diameter, within the cytocavitary network. These lesions are characteristic of those caused by respiratory herpesvirus of parakeets.

  10. Herpesviruses in the Activated Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-δ Syndrome

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    Jeffrey I. Cohen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is important for multiple stages of herpesvirus replication including virus entry, replication, latency, and reactivation. Recently, patients with gain-of-function mutations in the p110δ-catalytic subunit of PI3K or in the p85-regulatory subunit of PI3K have been reported. These patients have constitutively active PI3K with hyperactivation of Akt. They present with lymphoproliferation and often have infections, particularly recurrent respiratory infections and/or severe virus infections. The most frequent virus infections are due to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV; patients often present with persistent EBV and/or CMV viremia, EBV lymphoproliferative disease, or CMV lymphadenitis. No patients have been reported with CMV pneumonia, colitis, or retinitis. Other herpesvirus infections have included herpes simplex pneumonia, recurrent zoster, and varicella after vaccination with the varicella vaccine. Additional viral infections have included adenovirus viremia, severe warts, and extensive Molluscum contagiosum virus infection. The increased susceptibility to virus infections in these patients is likely due to a reduced number of long-lived memory CD8 T cells and an increased number of terminally differentiated effector CD8 T cells.

  11. The haemagglutination activity of equine herpesvirus type 1 glycoprotein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Kiyohiko; Hattori, Shiho; Mahmoud, Hassan Y A H; Takasugi, Maaya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Matsumura, Tomio; Kondo, Takashi; Kirisawa, Rikio; Mochizuki, Masami; Maeda, Ken

    2015-01-02

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) has haemagglutination (HA) activity toward equine red blood cells (RBCs), but the identity of its haemagglutinin is unknown. To identify the haemagglutinin of EHV-1, the major glycoproteins of EHV-1 were expressed in 293T cells, and the cells or cell lysates were mixed with equine RBCs. The results showed that only EHV-1 glycoprotein C (gC)-producing cells adsorbed equine RBCs, and that the lysate of EHV-1 gC-expressing cells agglutinated equine RBCs. EHV-1 lacking gC did not show HA activity. HA activity was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for gC, but not by antibodies directed against other glycoproteins. In addition, HA activity was not inhibited by the addition of heparin. These results indicate that EHV-1 gC can bind equine RBCs irrespective of heparin, in contrast to other herpesvirus gC proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-20

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies.

  13. Molecular cloning of the human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin: A member of the ribonuclease gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, H.F.; Tenen, D.G.; Ackerman, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated a 725-base-pair cDNA clone for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). EDN is a distinct cationic protein of the eosinophil's large specific granule known primarily for its ability to induce ataxia, paralysis, and central nervous system cellular degeneration in experimental animals (Gordon phenomenon). The open reading frame encodes a 134-amino acid mature polypeptide with a molecular mass of 15.5 kDa and a 27-residue amino-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence. The sequence of the mature polypeptide is identical to that reported for human urinary ribonuclease, and to the amino-terminal sequence of human liver ribonuclease; the cDNA encodes a tryptophan in position 7. Both EDN and the related granule protein, eosinophil cationic protein, have ribonucleolytic activity; sequence similarities among EDN, eosinophil cationic protein, ribonucleases from liver, urine, and pancreas, and angiogenin define a ribonuclease multigene family. mRNA encoding EDN was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells and was up-regulated in cells induced toward eosinophilic differentiation with B-cell growth factor 2/interleukin 5 and toward neutrophilic differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide. EDN mRNA was detected in mature neutrophils even though EDN-like neurotoxic activity is not found neutrophil extracts. These results suggest that neutrophils contain a protein that is closely related or identical to EDN

  14. Identification of a novel gene family that includes the interferon-inducible human genes 6–16 and ISG12

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    Parker Nadeene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human 6–16 and ISG12 genes are transcriptionally upregulated in a variety of cell types in response to type I interferon (IFN. The predicted products of these genes are small (12.9 and 11.5 kDa respectively, hydrophobic proteins that share 36% overall amino acid identity. Gene disruption and over-expression studies have so far failed to reveal any biochemical or cellular roles for these proteins. Results We have used in silico analyses to identify a novel family of genes (the ISG12 gene family related to both the human 6–16 and ISG12 genes. Each ISG12 family member codes for a small hydrophobic protein containing a conserved ~80 amino-acid motif (the ISG12 motif. So far we have detected 46 family members in 25 organisms, ranging from unicellular eukaryotes to humans. Humans have four ISG12 genes: the 6–16 gene at chromosome 1p35 and three genes (ISG12(a, ISG12(b and ISG12(c clustered at chromosome 14q32. Mice have three family members (ISG12(a, ISG12(b1 and ISG12(b2 clustered at chromosome 12F1 (syntenic with human chromosome 14q32. There does not appear to be a murine 6–16 gene. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, genomic organisation and intron-alignments we suggest that this family has arisen through divergent inter- and intra-chromosomal gene duplication events. The transcripts from human and mouse genes are detectable, all but two (human ISG12(b and ISG12(c being upregulated in response to type I IFN in the cell lines tested. Conclusions Members of the eukaryotic ISG12 gene family encode a small hydrophobic protein with at least one copy of a newly defined motif of ~80 amino-acids (the ISG12 motif. In higher eukaryotes, many of the genes have acquired a responsiveness to type I IFN during evolution suggesting that a role in resisting cellular or environmental stress may be a unifying property of all family members. Analysis of gene-function in higher eukaryotes is complicated by the possibility of

  15. Expression of REG family genes in human inflammatory bowel diseases and its regulation

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    Chikatsugu Tsuchida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD reflects a balance between mucosal injury and reparative mechanisms. Some regenerating gene (Reg family members have been reported to be expressed in Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC and to be involved as proliferative mucosal factors in IBD. However, expression of all REG family genes in IBD is still unclear. Here, we analyzed expression of all REG family genes (REG Iα, REG Iβ, REG III, HIP/PAP, and REG IV in biopsy specimens of UC and CD by real-time RT-PCR. REG Iα, REG Iβ, and REG IV genes were overexpressed in CD samples. REG IV gene was also overexpressed in UC samples. We further analyzed the expression mechanisms of REG Iα, REG Iβ, and REG IV genes in human colon cells. The expression of REG Iα was significantly induced by IL-6 or IL-22, and REG Iβ was induced by IL-22. Deletion analyses revealed that three regions (− 220 to − 211, − 179 to − 156, and − 146 to − 130 in REG Iα and the region (− 274 to− 260 in REG Iβ promoter were responsible for the activation by IL-22/IL-6. The promoters contain consensus transcription factor binding sequences for MZF1, RTEF1/TEAD4, and STAT3 in REG Iα, and HLTF/FOXN2F in REG Iβ, respectively. The introduction of siRNAs for MZF1, RTEF1/TEAD4, STAT3, and HLTF/FOXN2F abolished the transcription of REG Iα and REG Iβ. The gene activation mechanisms of REG Iα/REG Iβ may play a role in colon mucosal regeneration in IBD.

  16. Psychological problems of families and health workers dealing with people infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, M

    1991-03-01

    The psychological problems of the families of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected people, and of the health workers taking care of them, have been addressed in a few empirical studies and in several anecdotal reports and theoretical contributions. Apparently, HIV-1 infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are able to elicit a wide range of emotional reactions, from rejection and refusal to provide care to immersion in the infected person's needs and burnout. Since irrational fears and attitudes play an important role in conditioning these reactions, education may not be sufficient to change behaviour. Counselling sessions and mutual support groups are often the most appropriate contexts where fears and concerns can receive an individually tailored response, and where formal and informal caregivers can be helped to manage stress.

  17. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

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    Douglas R Boettner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK, was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932. Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  18. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932)). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932) also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  19. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program

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    Everton Faccini Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. METHOD: we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. RESULTS: virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. CONCLUSION: in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types.

  20. Frequent downregulation of miR-34 family in human ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corney, David C; Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Vogt, Markus; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Godwin, Andrew K; Kamat, Aparna A; Sood, Anil K; Ellenson, Lora H; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2010-02-15

    The miR-34 family is directly transactivated by tumor suppressor p53, which is frequently mutated in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We hypothesized that miR-34 expression would be decreased in EOC and that reconstituted miR-34 expression might reduce cell proliferation and invasion of EOC cells. miR-34 expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization in a panel of 83 human EOC samples. Functional characterization of miR-34 was accomplished by reconstitution of miR-34 expression in EOC cells with synthetic pre-miR molecules followed by determining changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. miR-34a expression is decreased in 100%, and miR-34b*/c in 72%, of EOC with p53 mutation, whereas miR-34a is also downregulated in 93% of tumors with wild-type p53. Furthermore, expression of miR-34b*/c is significantly reduced in stage IV tumors compared with stage III (P = 0.0171 and P = 0.0029, respectively). Additionally, we observed promoter methylation and copy number variations at mir-34. In situ hybridization showed that miR-34a expression is inversely correlated with MET immunohistochemical staining, consistent with translational inhibition by miR-34a. Finally, miR-34 reconstitution experiments in p53 mutant EOC cells resulted in reduced proliferation, motility, and invasion, the latter of which was dependent on MET expression. Our work suggests that miR-34 family plays an important role in EOC pathogenesis and reduced expression of miR-34b*/c may be particularly important for progression to the most advanced stages. Part of miR-34 effects on motility and invasion may be explained by regulation of MET, which is frequently overexpressed in EOC.

  1. Molecular detection of a putatively novel cyprinid herpesvirus in sichel (Pelecus cultratus) during a mass mortality event in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doszpoly, Andor; Papp, Melitta; Deákné, Petra P; Glávits, Róbert; Ursu, Krisztina; Dán, Ádám

    2015-05-01

    In the early summer of 2014, mass mortality of sichel (Pelecus cultratus) was observed in Lake Balaton, Hungary. Histological examination revealed degenerative changes within the tubular epithelium, mainly in the distal tubules and collecting ducts in the kidneys and multifocal vacuolisation in the brain stem and cerebellum. Routine molecular investigations showed the presence of the DNA of an unknown alloherpesvirus in some specimens. Subsequently, three genes of the putative herpesviral genome (DNA polymerase, terminase, and helicase) were amplified and partially sequenced. A phylogenetic tree reconstruction based on the concatenated sequence of these three conserved genes implied that the virus belongs to the genus Cyprinivirus within the family Alloherpesviridae. The sequences of the sichel herpesvirus differ markedly from those of the cypriniviruses CyHV-1, CyHV-2 and CyHV-3, putatively representing a fifth species in the genus.

  2. Src-family kinases negatively regulate NFAT signaling in resting human T cells.

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    Alan Baer

    Full Text Available T cell signaling is required for activation of both natural and therapeutic T cells including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells. Identification of novel factors and pathways regulating T cell signaling may aid in development of effective T cell therapies. In resting human T cells, the majority of Src-family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs are inactive due to phosphorylation of a conserved carboxy-terminal tyrosine residue. Recently, a pool of enzymatically active SFKs has been identified in resting T cells; however, the significance of these is incompletely understood. Here, we characterized the role of active SFKs in resting human T cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of active SFKs enhanced distal TCR signaling as measured by IL-2 release and CD25 surface expression following TCR-independent activation. Mechanistically, inhibition of the active pool of SFKs induced nuclear translocation of NFAT1, and enhanced NFAT1-dependent signaling in resting T cells. The negative regulation of NFAT1 signaling was in part mediated by the Src-kinase Lck as human T cells lacking Lck had increased levels of nuclear NFAT1 and demonstrated enhanced NFAT1-dependent gene expression. Inhibition of active SFKs in resting primary human T cells also increased nuclear NFAT1 and enhanced NFAT1-dependent signaling. Finally, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 and Cyclosporin A reversed the effect of SFKs inhibition on NFAT1. Together, these data identified a novel role of SFKs in preventing aberrant NFAT1 activation in resting T cells, and suggest that maintaining this pool of active SFKs in therapeutic T cells may increase the efficacy of T cell therapies.

  3. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  4. Herpesvirus infections in immunocompromised patients : treatment, treatment failure and antiviral resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Martha Trijntje van der

    2012-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to study determinants of the course and outcome of treatment of herpesvirus infections in immunocompromised patients. Both viral factors, such as antiviral resistance, and patient factors, including immunological parameters, were investigated. Techniques to

  5. Herpesvirus microRNAs for use in gene therapy immune-evasion strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, S T F; Hoeben, R C

    2017-07-01

    Transplantation of allogeneic cells as well as of genetically corrected autologous cells are potent approaches to restore cellular functions in patients suffering from genetic diseases. The recipient's immune responses against non-self-antigens may compromise the survival of the grafted cells. Recipients of the graft may therefore require lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. An alternative approach to reduce graft rejection could involve the use of immune-evasion molecules. Expression of such molecules in cells of the graft may subvert recognition by the host's immune system. Viruses in particular are masters of exploitation and modulation of their hosts immune response. The Herpesviridae family provides a proof of concept for this as these viruses are capable to establish latency and a lifelong persistence in the infected hosts. While several viral proteins involved in immune evasion have been characterized, the Herpesviridae also encode a multitude of viral microRNA (miRNAs). Several of these miRNAs have been demonstrated to reduce the sensitivity of the infected cells to the destructive action of the host's immune cells. In this review, the miRNAs of some common herpesviruses that are associated with immune modulation will be discussed with a focus on their potential use in strategies aiming at generating non-immunogenic cells for transplantation.

  6. Development of a recombinant poxvirus expressing bovine herpesvirus-1 glycoprotein D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Saenz, Julian; Osorio, Jorge E; Vera, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 is a DNA virus belonging to the family herpesviridae, which affects cattle, causing a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and economic losses. The main immunogenic component is its envelope glycoprotein d (GD), which has been characterized and used as immunogen in different expression systems. The aim of this work was to generate a recombinant poxvirus (raccoonpox [RCN]) expressing a truncated version of BHV-1 GD to be used as a vaccine. to do this, it was amplified the gene for a truncated version of GD which subsequently was cloned in transfer plasmid PTK/IRES/TPA which has homology to sites of poxvirus thymidine kinase, an internal site of ribosome entry (IRES) and a secretory signal (TPA), generating the construct PTK/GD/IRES/TPA. to generate the recombinant RCN, we took BSC-1 cells and we infected with a wild type RCN (CDC/v71-i-85a) at a multiplicity of infection of 0.05, then cells were transfected with the construct PTK/GD/IRES/TPA, generating different viral populations with and without the gene of interest. To select recombinant viruses expressing the gene of interest, we performed a selection of recombinant thymidine kinase negative and positive for GD by three rounds of plaque purification on rat-2 cells monolayers which are thymidine kinase null and using bromodeoxyuridine. Recombinant viruses were recovered and confirmed by PCR and nucleotide sequencing and so called RCN-GD.

  7. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  8. First identification of Herpesvirus infections among endemic and exotic psittacines in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Turral Ramírez, Ma. Montserrat; Córdova Ponce, Rodolfo; González Ruíz, Cynthia; Castañeda Aceves, Graciela; Marín Flamand, Ernesto; Garrido Fariña, Germán; Ramírez Álvarez, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The illegal trafficking of exotic birds such as parrots is now the third most lucrative business in the world and has been a problem for several years. As a result of this trafficking, there has been an increase in the emergence of exotic diseases. Herpesvirus is a pathogen of psittacines that has not been identified in Mexico to date. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and pathological analyses, the present study demonstrates the presence of herpesvirus in en...

  9. Herpesvirus in a captive Australian Krefft's river turtle (Emydura macquarii krefftii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, M L; Raidal, S R; Peters, A

    2015-01-01

    A mature, captive Krefft's river turtle (Emydura macquarii krefftii) was presented with severe proliferative and ulcerative lesions of the skin and shell. The areas were biopsied and histopathological examination demonstrated orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with keratinocytes containing eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions. Molecular diagnostics confirmed the presence of a herpesvirus in the affected tissues. This is the first recorded case of herpesvirus infection in an Australian freshwater turtle species. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. Herpesvirus-associated central nervous system diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Fen; Jiang, Xinmiao; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Jiang, Qianli; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ke; Xuan, Li; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Fuhua; Yin, Changxin; Sun, Jing; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases), 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542) days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 6.3% ± 1.9% and 4.1% ± 1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells (7/11) and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11) in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases.

  11. Identification of a novel herpesvirus associated with a penile proliferative lesion in a beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellehumeur, Christian; Lair, Stéphane; Romero, Carlos H; Provost, Chantale; Nielsen, Ole; Gagnon, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    The carcass of an adult male beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) was found beach cast in 2008 on the shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary at Rivière-Ouelle, Quebec, Canada. The carcass was transported to the Faculté de médecine vétérinaire of the Université de Montréal for postmortem examination. Aspiration pneumonia was the probable cause of death. Necropsy revealed a focal papilloma-like penile lesion, characterized by focal mucosal thickening with disorganization of the epithelial layers and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. A pan-herpesvirus nested PCR assay on frozen tissue from the penile lesion was positive. The PCR product sequencing revealed a partial herpesvirus DNA polymerase (DPOL) gene sequence of 600 nucleotides. Its nearest nucleotide identity was with the partial DPOL gene of an alphaherpesvirus, bovine herpesvirus 5 (79.5% identity). It also shared high identity with several other marine mammal herpesviruses (50.2 to 77.3% identity). This new herpesvirus was tentatively named beluga whale herpesvirus (BWHV). Virus isolation was unsuccessful. The pathogenic potential of BWHV is unknown, but the evaluation of archived tissues suggests that the virus is endemic in the St. Lawrence Estuary beluga population.

  12. Mechanisms of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchun Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV consists of latent and lytic replication phases. During latent infection, only a limited number of KSHV genes are expressed. However, this phase of replication is essential for persistent infection, evasion of host immune response, and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. KSHV reactivation from latency produces a wide range of viral products and infectious virions. The resulting de novo infection and viral lytic products modulate diverse cellular pathways and stromal microenvironment, which promote the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. The mechanisms controlling KSHV latency and reactivation are complex, involving both viral and host factors, and are modulated by diverse environmental factors. Here, we review the cellular and molecular basis of KSHV latency and reactivation with a focus on the most recent advancements in the field.

  13. Esophagitis and enteritis caused by herpesvirus in pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egobol, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The pigeon squabs, aged 5-26 day-old, showed clinical signs of dullness, anorexia, indigestion, reten-tion of feed in crop, progressive emaciation then died. The morbidity rate and mortality rate were 7.14% (50/700. The adult pigeons did not show any signs of disease. From pathological finding, pharyngitis, esophagitis were found with diphtheritic membrane covering necrotic ulcers on the mucosa of pharynx, esophagus and crop. From histopathological findings, esophagitis with epithelial hyperplasia and sloughed, lamina propria mucosa edema with lymphoid cells infiltration were found in duodenum and jejunum. The intranuclear inclusion body, Cowdry type A, was found in epithelial mucosa of esophagus, enterocyte of jejunum and lymphoid cells in spleen. FA test to duck virus enteritis and inoculation to ducklings showed negative results. Electron microscopic study revealed electron dense core sized 146-167 nm., which was identified as herpesvirus.

  14. Enterovirus and herpesviridae family as etiologic agents of lymphomonocytary meningitis, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luine Rosele Renaud Vidal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Viral meningitis is a common infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS that occurs worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the etiologic agent of lymphomonocytary meningitis in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. During the period of July 2005 to December 2006, 460 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples with lymphomonocytary meningitis were analyzed by PCR methodologies. Fifty nine (12.8% samples were positive. Enteroviruses was present in 49 (83% samples and herpes virus family in 10 (17%, of these 6 (10% herpes simplex virus, 1 (2% Epstein Barr virus, 2 (3% human herpes virus type 6 and 1 (2% mixed infection of enterovirus and Epstein Barr virus. As conclusion enterovirus was the most frequent virus, with circulation during summer and was observed with higher frequency between 4 to 17 years of age. PCR methodology is an important method for rapid detection of RNA enterovirus and DNA herpesvirus in CSF.

  15. [Familial febrile convulsions is supposed to link to human chromosome 19p13.3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y; Lü, J; Wu, X

    2001-01-10

    To localize the familial febrile convulsion (FC) genes on human chromosomes. For 63 FC pedigrees, tetranucleotide repeat markers D19S253 D19S395 and D19S591 on the short arm of chromosome 19, as well as dinucleotide repeat markers D8S84 and D8S85 on the long arm of chromosome 8 were genotyped. Transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and Lod score calculation were carried out. The data were processed by PPAP software package. All the alleles in every locus of FC probands and normal controls were in Hardy-Weinburg balance. Transmission disequilibrium was found on D8S84, D19S395 and D19S591 in FC families. chi(2) values were 4.0, 5.124 and 7.364 separately. Each P value was < 0.05, and significantly meaningful. The two-point Lod scores between D8S84 and FC, D8S85 and FC, D19S253 and FC, D19S395 and FC, D19S591 and FC are 0.00002, 0.000017, 0.58, 1.53 and 1.42 respectively. The multi-point Lod score among markers on chromosome 8q and FC was 0.88, while Lod score among markers on chromosome 19p and FC reached 2.78. The results by both the non-parameter (TDT) and parameter (Lod score) methods were consistant on a whole. FC is linked with chromosome region 19p13.3, but not with chromosome 8q.

  16. Participatory Assessment of a Matched Savings Program for Human Trafficking Survivors and their Family Members in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cordisco Tsai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of human trafficking often experience considerable financial difficulties upon exiting human trafficking, including pressure to provide financially for their families, challenges securing employment, lack of savings, and familial debt. Few evaluations have been conducted of reintegration support interventions addressing financial vulnerability among trafficking survivors. In this article, we present findings from a participatory assessment of the BARUG program, a matched savings and financial capability program for survivors of human trafficking and their family members in the Philippines. Photovoice was used to understand the experiences of two cohorts of BARUG participants. Survivors collaborated with research team members in conducting thematic analysis of transcripts from the photovoice sessions. Themes included: the positive emotional impact of financial wellness, overcoming the challenges of saving, applying financial management skills in daily decision making, developing a habit of savings, building a future-oriented mindset, receiving guidance and enlightenment, the learning process, and the change process. Findings reinforce the importance of interventions to support trafficked persons and their family members in getting out of debt and accumulating emergency savings, while also providing emotional support to survivors in coping with family financial pressures. The study also highlights the value of using participatory research methods to understand the experiences of trafficked persons. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1702116

  17. Major immunogenic proteins of phocid herpes-viruses and their relationships to proteins of canine and feline herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, T C; Harder, M; de Swart, R L; Osterhaus, A D; Liess, B

    1998-04-01

    The immunogenic proteins of cells infected with the alpha- or the gamma-herpesvirus of seals, phocid herpesvirus-1 and -2 (PhHV-1, -2), were examined in radioimmunoprecipitation assays as a further step towards the development of a PhHV-1 vaccine. With sera obtained from convalescent seals of different species or murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs), at least seven virus-induced glycoproteins were detected in lysates of PhHV-1-infected CrFK cells. A presumably disulphide-linked complex composed of glycoproteins of 59, 67 and 113/120 kDa, expressed on the surface of infected cells, was characterized as a major immunogenic infected cell protein of PhHV-1. This glycoprotein complex has previously been identified as the proteolytically cleavable glycoprotein B homologue of PhHV-1 (14). At least three distinct neutralization-relevant epitopes were operationally mapped, by using Mabs, on the glycoprotein B of PhHV-1. Among the infected cell proteins of the antigenically closely related feline and canine herpesvirus, the glycoprotein B equivalent proved to be the most highly conserved glycoprotein. Sera obtained from different seal species from Arctic, Antarctic, and European habitats did not precipitate uniform patterns of infected cell proteins from PhHV-1-infected cell lysates although similar titres of neutralizing antibodies were displayed. Thus, antigenic differences among the alphaherpesvirus species prevalent in the different pinniped populations cannot be excluded. PhHV-2 displayed a different pattern of infected cell proteins and only limited cross-reactivity to PhHV-1 at the protein level was detected, which is in line with its previous classification as a distinct species, based on nucleotide sequence analysis, of the gammaherpesvirus linenge. A Mab raised against PhHV-2 and specific for a major glycoprotein of 117 kDa, cross reacted with the glycoprotein B of PhHV-1. The 117-kDa glycoprotein could represent the uncleaved PhHV-2 glycoprotein B homologue.

  18. Coagulation parameters following equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M E; Holz, C L; Kopec, A K; Dau, J J; Luyendyk, J P; Soboll Hussey, G

    2018-04-15

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is the cause of respiratory disease, abortion storms, and outbreaks of herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM). Infection of the spinal cord is characterised by multifocal regions of virally infected vascular endothelium, associated with vasculitis, thrombosis and haemorrhage that result in ischaemia and organ dysfunction. However, the mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. To evaluate tissue factor (TF) procoagulant activity and thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) levels in horses following infection with EHV-1. In vitro and in vivo studies following experimental EHV-1 infection. Horses were infected with EHV-1 and levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated TF activity; plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived microvesicle (MV)-associated TF activity and TAT complexes in plasma were examined. EHV-1 infection increased PBMC TF procoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo. In infected horses, this increase was observed during the acute infection and was most marked at the onset and end of viraemia. However, no significant differences were observed between the horses that showed signs of EHM and the horses that did not develop EHM. Significant changes in MV-associated TF procoagulant activity and TAT complexes were not observed in infected horses. A small number of horses typically exhibit clinical EHM following experimental infection. The results indicate that EHV-1 infection increases PBMC-associated TF procoagulant activity in vivo and in vitro. Additional in vivo studies are needed to better understand the role of TF-dependent coagulation during EHM pathogenesis in horses. © 2018 EVJ Ltd.

  19. Envelope proteins of bovine herpesvirus 1: immunological and biochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Roque, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors studied immunological and biochemical properties of the bovid herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) envelope proteins in order to understand the pathogenesis of BHV-1 infection and to provide basic information for the production of effective subunit vaccines against BHV-1. Ten glycoproteins MW 180, 150, 130, 115, 97, 77, 74, 64, 55, and 45 kilodaltons (K), and a single non-glycosylated 108 K protein were quantitatively removed from purified BHV-1 virions by detergent treatment. These glycoproteins were present on the virion envelope and on the surface of BHV-1 infected cells. The quantitative removal from virions by treatment with nonionic detergents and their presence on the surface of infected cells indicate that 180/97, 150/77, and 130/74/55 K are major components of the BHV-1 envelope and are also the targets of virus neutralizing humoral immune response. Envelope glycoproteins of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) bind immunoglobulin by the Fc end and it is suggested this may increase pathogenicity of this virus. They searched for a similar function in BVH-1 by measuring the ability of BHV-1 infected cells and viral envelope proteins to bind radiolabelled rabbit and bovine IgG. Binding activity for rabbit IgG or bovine IgG-Fc could not be demonstrated by BHV-1 infected MDBK cells, whereas, MDBK cells infected with HSV-1 bound rabbit IgG and bovine IgG-Fc. None of the three major envelope proteins of BHV-1 bound to rabbit or bovine IgG. The results of this study indicate that BHV-1, unlike some other herpesviruses, lack Fc binding activity

  20. The development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and sensitive detection of abalone herpesvirus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M H; Kuo, S T; Renault, T; Chang, P H

    2014-02-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for the detection of abalone herpesvirus DNA. Two pairs of primers were designed, based on the sequence of the DNA polymerase gene of abalone herpesvirus. The reaction temperature and time were optimized to 63°C and 60min, respectively. LAMP amplicons were analyzed by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis or by visual inspection of a colour change emitted by fluorescent dye. The method developed was specific for the detection of abalone herpesvirus, without cross-reactions with other tested herpesviruses including ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1), European eel herpesvirus, koi herpesvirus (KHV) and an avian herpesvirus. The LAMP assay was 100 folds more sensitive than a conventional PCR and 10 folds less sensitive than a SYBR Green PCR. These results indicate that the developed LAMP assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, specific and reliable technique for the detection of abalone herpesvirus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Family and Consumer Sciences Focus on the Human Dimension: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Katherine L.; Chipman, Helen; Forstadt, Leslie A.; Rasco, Mattie R.; Sellers, Debra M.; Stephenson, Laura; York, De'Shoin A.

    2017-01-01

    The history of family and consumer sciences (FCS) and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is discussed with an emphasis on the critical importance of the human dimension. EFNEP's focus on people, education for change, accountability, strategic partnerships, and public value are highlighted as an example and model for…

  2. Discovery of α-L-arabinopyranosidases from human gut microbiome expands the diversity within glycoside hydrolase family 42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Katayama, Takane; Arakawa, Takatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Enzymes of the glycoside hydrolase family 42 (GH42) are widespread in bacteria of the human gut microbiome and play fundamental roles in the decomposition of both milk and plant oligosaccharides. All GH42 enzymes characterized so far have β-galactosidase activity. Here, we report the existence...

  3. Genetic variations in the DNA replication origins of human papillomavirus family correlate with their oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2018-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) encompass a large family of viruses that range from benign to highly carcinogenic. The crucial differences between benign and carcinogenic types of HPV remain unknown, except that the two HPV types differ in the frequency of DNA replication. We have systematically analyzed the mechanism of HPV DNA replication initiation in low-risk and high-risk HPVs. Our results demonstrate that HPV-encoded E2 initiator protein and its four binding sites in the replication origin play pivotal roles in determining the destiny of the HPV-infected cell. We have identified strain-specific single nucleotide variations in E2 binding sites found only in the high-risk HPVs. We have demonstrated that these variations result in attenuated formation of the E2-DNA complex. E2 binding to these sites is linked to the activation of the DNA replication origin as well as initiation of DNA replication. Both electrophoretic mobility shift assay and atomic force microscopy studies demonstrated that binding of E2 from either low- or high-risk HPVs with variant binding sequences lacked multimeric E2-DNA complex formation in vitro. These results provided a molecular basis of differential DNA replication in the two types of HPVs and pointed to a correlation with the development of cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Protein complexes associated with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Rajeev; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2007-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the major biological cofactor contributing to development of Kaposi's sarcoma. KSHV establishes a latent infection in human B cells expressing the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a critical factor in the regulation of viral latency. LANA is known to modulate viral and cellular gene expression. We report here on some initial proteomic studies to identify cellular proteins associated with the amino and carboxy-terminal domains of LANA. The results of these studies show an association of known cellular proteins which support LANA functions and have identified additional LANA-associated proteins. These results provide new evidence for complexes involving LANA with a number of previously unreported functional classes of proteins including DNA polymerase, RNA helicase and cell cycle control proteins. The results also indicate that the amino terminus of LANA can interact with its carboxy-terminal domain. This interaction is potentially important for facilitating associations with other cell cycle regulatory proteins which include CENP-F identified in association with both the amino and carboxy-termini. These novel associations add to the diversity of LANA functions in relation to the maintenance of latency and subsequent transformation of KSHV infected cells

  5. The dynamics of herpesvirus and polyomavirus reactivation and shedding in healthy adults: a 14-month longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Lednicky, John A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; White, Zoe S.; Peng, RongSheng; Liu, Zhensheng; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Rooney, Cliona M.; hide

    2003-01-01

    Humans are infected with viruses that establish long-term persistent infections. To address whether immunocompetent individuals control virus reactivation globally or independently and to identify patterns of sporadic reactivation, we monitored herpesviruses and polyomaviruses in 30 adults, over 14 months. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was quantitated in saliva and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), cytomegalovirus (CMV) was assayed in urine, and JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) DNAs were assayed in urine and PBMCs. All individuals shed EBV in saliva, whereas 67% had >or=1 blood sample positive for EBV. Levels of EBV varied widely. CMV shedding occurred infrequently but occurred more commonly in younger individuals (Por=40 years old (P.50). Thus, adults independently control persistent viruses, which display discordant, sporadic reactivations.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  7. Functional characterization of viral tumor necrosis factor receptors encoded by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yang; Qi, Hemei; Yuan, Jimin; Wang, Rui; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2015-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) is a large double-stranded DNA virus of Alloherpesviridae family in the order Herpesvirales. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in common carp and its ornamental koi variety, and threatens the aquaculture industries worldwide. Mimicry of cytokines and cytokine receptors is a particular strategy for large DNA viruses in modulating the host immune response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two novel viral homologues of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) encoded by CyHV3-ORF4 and -ORF12, respectively. CyHV3-ORF4 was identified as a homologue of HVEM and CyHV3-ORF12 as a homologue of TNFRSF1. Overexpression of ORF4 and ORF12 in zebrafish embryos results in embryonic lethality, morphological defects and increased apoptosis. Although we failed to identify any interaction between the two vTNFRs and their potential ligands in zebrafish TNF superfamily by yeast two-hybrid system, the expression of some genes in TNF superfamily or TNFR superfamily were mis-regulated in ORF4 or ORF12-overexpressing embryos, especially the death receptor zHDR and its cognate ligand DL1b. Further studies showed that the apoptosis induced by the both CyHV3 vTNFRs is mainly activated through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and requires the crosstalk between the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Additionally, using RT-qPCR and Western blot assays, the expression patterns of the both vTNFRs were also analyzed during CyHV3 productive infection. Collectively, this is the first functional study of two unique vTNFRs encoded by a herpesvirus infecting non-mammalian vertebrates, which may provide novel insights into viral immune regulation mechanism and the pathogenesis of CyHV3 infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 infection among Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Spat: relevance of water temperature to virus replication and circulation prior to the onset of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Tristan; Bouquet, Anne Lise; Maurice, Julien-Thomas; Lupo, Coralie; Blachier, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    A number of bivalve species worldwide, including the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have been affected by mass mortality events associated with herpesviruses, resulting in significant losses. A particular herpesvirus was purified from naturally infected larval Pacific oysters, and its genome was completely sequenced. This virus has been classified as Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) within the family Malacoherpesviridae. Since 2008, mass mortality outbreaks among C. gigas in Europe have been related to the detection of a variant of OsHV-1 called μVar. Additional data are necessary to better describe mortality events in relation to environmental-parameter fluctuations and OsHV-1 detection. For this purpose, a single batch of Pacific oyster spat was deployed in 4 different locations in the Marennes-Oleron area (France): an oyster pond ("claire"), a shellfish nursery, and two locations in the field. Mortality rates were recorded based on regular observation, and samples were collected to search for and quantify OsHV-1 DNA by real-time PCR. Although similar massive mortality rates were reported at the 4 sites, mortality was detected earlier in the pond and in the nursery than at both field sites. This difference may be related to earlier increases in water temperature. Mass mortality was observed among oysters a few days after increases in the number of PCR-positive oysters and viral-DNA amounts were recorded. An initial increment in the number of PCR-positive oysters was reported at both field sites during the survey in the absence of significant mortality. During this period, the water temperature was below 16°C. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) in diseases of cattle. Recent findings on BoHV-5 association with genital disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, P.A.; Marin, M.S.; Pérez, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. This virus is a major causative agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in young cattle. It was first isolated in 1962 from a neurological disease outbreak in Australia. BoHV-5 is genetically and antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1), a highly prevalent virus responsible for respiratory and genital disease in cattle. Initially, BoHV-5 was considered a subtype of BoHV-1 (BoHV-1.3). However, the exclusive presentation of outbreaks of neurological disease suggested that the virus was a new agent with characteristics of neuropathogenicity. Even though both are neurotropic viruses, only BoHV-5 is capable of replicating extensively in the central nervous system and inducing neurological disease. Occasionally, encephalitis caused by BoHV-1 has been reported. Like other alpha-herpesviruses, BoHV-5 can establish latency in nervous ganglia and, by stress factors or glucocorticoid treatment, latent virus can be reactivated. During episodes of reactivation, the virus is excreted in nasal, ocular and genital secretions and transmitted to other susceptible hosts. Recently, BoHV-5 has been associated with infection of the reproductive tract. The virus has been isolated and the presence of viral DNA has been demonstrated in semen samples from Brazil and Australia and natural transmission of the virus through contaminated semen has also been described. Embryos and oocytes are permissive for BoHV-5 infection and BoHV-5 DNA has been detected in the central nervous system of aborted fetuses. The objective of this review is to compile the limited information on the recent association between BoHV-5 and reproductive disorders in cattle. PMID:26623291

  10. Replacement of glycoprotein B in alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 by its ovine herpesvirus 2 homolog: Implications in vaccine development for sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine development is a top priority in malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) research. In the case of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF), caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), progress towards this objective has been hindered by the absence of methods to attenuate or modify the virus, since it cannot be pr...

  11. In Vitro Replication of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 in Organotypic Skin Cultures from Hawaiian Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M; Dagenais, Julie; Weatherby, Tina M; Balazs, George H; Ackermann, Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a tumor disease of marine turtles associated with chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), which has historically been refractory to growth in tissue culture. Here we show, for the first time, de novo formation of ChHV5-positive intranuclear inclusions in cultured green turtle cells, which is indicative of active lytic replication of the virus. The minimal requirements to achieve lytic replication in cultured cells included (i) either in vitro cultures of ChHV5-positive tumor biopsy specimens (plugs) or organotypic cultures (rafts) consisting of ChHV5-positive turtle fibroblasts in collagen rafts seeded with turtle keratinocytes and (ii) keratinocyte maturation induced by raising raft or biopsy cultures to the air-liquid interface. Virus growth was confirmed by detailed electron microscopic studies that revealed intranuclear sun-shaped capsid factories, tubules, various stages of capsid formation, nuclear export by budding into the perinuclear space, tegument formation, and envelopment to complete de novo virus production. Membrane synthesis was also observed as a sign of active viral replication. Interestingly, cytoplasmic particles became associated with keratin filaments, a feature not seen in conventional monolayer cell cultures, in which most studies of herpesvirus replication have been performed. Our findings draw a rich and realistic picture of ChHV5 replication in cells derived from its natural host and may be crucial not only to better understand ChHV5 circulation but also to eventually complete Koch's postulates for FP. Moreover, the principles described here may serve as a model for culture of other viruses that are resistant to replication in conventional cell culture. IMPORTANCE A major challenge in virology is the study of viruses that cannot be grown in the laboratory. One example is chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), which is associated with fibropapillomatosis, a globally distributed, debilitating, and fatal tumor disease of

  12. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  13. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Toettcher, Jared E; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-11-15

    The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses. How mammalian cells detect and respond to DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus is poorly understood. Here, we decipher the distinct functions of two viral DNA sensors, IFI16 and cGAS, during active immune signaling upon infection with two herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We show that IFI16

  14. Epidemiology and molecular detection of equine herpesviruses in western Algeria in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabassi, F; Hue, E; Fortier, C; Morilland, E; Legrand, L; Hans, A; Pronost, S

    2017-08-01

    An episode of acute equine respiratory infection was reported in western Algeria (Tiaret province) between February and March 2011, affecting a large population of horses. Nasal swabs (n=100) were taken from horses aged between 1 and 27 years, presenting with cough and mucopurulent nasal discharge. The prevalence of equine respiratory virus infections was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). One, or more, of four equine respiratory viruses were detected in the nasal swabs of 90 of 100 horses (90%) and the detection rate of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4), equine herpesvirus type 2 (EHV-2) and equine herpesvirus type 5 (EHV-5) were 2%, 14%, 90% and 75%, respectively. Equine influenza virus and equine arteritis virus were not detected in any samples. Among the 90 infected horses, 70 were co-infected with EHV-2 and EHV-5 and 14 others were co-infected with EHV-4, EHV-2 and EHV-5. The present study shows a positivity rate of 97.3% for EHV-5 in young horses aged equine herpesviruses 1, 2, 4 and 5 are endemic in horse populations from Algeria as detected for the first time by qPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégremont, Lionel; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A) one family per bag; (B) one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C) same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas.

  16. Training of Family Planning Counselors in Jordan: Developing Human Resources through Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Sinaria Kamil Abdel

    2012-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the development and status of family planning (FP) services, including counseling, in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. It also reports extensively on a FP counseling training course organized by the Jordanian Association for Family Planning and Protection (JAFPP) which is a local NGO. A field survey approach, with…

  17. Segmental duplications and evolutionary acquisition of UV damage response in the SPATA31 gene family of primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekpen, Cemalettin; Künzel, Sven; Xie, Chen; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Lin, Yen-Lung; Gokcumen, Omer; Akdis, Cezmi A; Tautz, Diethard

    2017-03-06

    Segmental duplications are an abundant source for novel gene functions and evolutionary adaptations. This mechanism of generating novelty was very active during the evolution of primates particularly in the human lineage. Here, we characterize the evolution and function of the SPATA31 gene family (former designation FAM75A), which was previously shown to be among the gene families with the strongest signal of positive selection in hominoids. The mouse homologue for this gene family is a single copy gene expressed during spermatogenesis. We show that in primates, the SPATA31 gene duplicated into SPATA31A and SPATA31C types and broadened the expression into many tissues. Each type became further segmentally duplicated in the line towards humans with the largest number of full-length copies found for SPATA31A in humans. Copy number estimates of SPATA31A based on digital PCR show an average of 7.5 with a range of 5-11 copies per diploid genome among human individuals. The primate SPATA31 genes also acquired new protein domains that suggest an involvement in UV response and DNA repair. We generated antibodies and show that the protein is re-localized from the nucleolus to the whole nucleus upon UV-irradiation suggesting a UV damage response. We used CRISPR/Cas mediated mutagenesis to knockout copies of the gene in human primary fibroblast cells. We find that cell lines with reduced functional copies as well as naturally occurring low copy number HFF cells show enhanced sensitivity towards UV-irradiation. The acquisition of new SPATA31 protein functions and its broadening of expression may be related to the evolution of the diurnal life style in primates that required a higher UV tolerance. The increased segmental duplications in hominoids as well as its fast evolution suggest the acquisition of further specific functions particularly in humans.

  18. Genome and Transcriptome Sequencing of the Ostreid herpesvirus 1 From Tomales Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, C. A.; Langevin, S.; Closek, C. J.; Roberts, S. B.; Friedman, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mass mortalities of larval and seed bivalve molluscs attributed to the Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) occur globally. OsHV-1 was fully sequenced and characterized as a member of the Family Malacoherpesviridae. Multiple strains of OsHV-1 exist and may vary in virulence, i.e. OsHV-1 µvar. For most global variants of OsHV-1, sequence data is limited to PCR-based sequencing of segments, including two recent genomes. In the United States, OsHV-1 is limited to detection in adjacent embayments in California, Tomales and Drakes bays. Limited DNA sequence data of OsHV-1 infecting oysters in Tomales Bay indicates the virus detected in Tomales Bay is similar but not identical to any one global variant of OsHV-1. In order to better understand both strain variation and virulence of OsHV-1 infecting oysters in Tomales Bay, we used genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. Meta-genomic sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was conducted from infected oysters (n=4 per year) collected in 2003, 2007, and 2014, where full OsHV-1 genome sequences and low overall microbial diversity were achieved from highly infected oysters. Increased microbial diversity was detected in three of four samples sequenced from 2003, where qPCR based genome copy numbers of OsHV-1 were lower. Expression analysis (SOLiD RNA sequencing) of OsHV-1 genes expressed in oyster larvae at 24 hours post exposure revealed a nearly complete transcriptome, with several highly expressed genes, which are similar to recent transcriptomic analyses of other OsHV-1 variants. Taken together, our results indicate that genome and transcriptome sequencing may be powerful tools in understanding both strain variation and virulence of non-culturable marine viruses.

  19. Genotypic characterization of psittacid herpesvirus isolates from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppi, Marcela Miranda; Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira Franco; Coelho, Fabiana Magalhães; Ecco, Roselene; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Resende, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-six isolates of psittacid herpesvirus (PsHV), obtained from 12 different species of psittacids in Brazil, were genotypically characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and PCR amplification. RFLP analysis with the PstI enzyme revealed four distinct restriction patterns (A1, X, W and Y), of which only A1 (corresponding to PsHV-1) had previously been described. To study PCR amplification patterns, six pairs of primers were used. Using this method, six variants were identified, of which, variants 10, 8, and 9 (in this order) were most prevalent, followed by variants 1, 4, and 5. It was not possible to correlate the PCR and RFLP patterns. Twenty-nine of the 36 isolates were shown to contain a 419bp fragment of the UL16 gene, displaying high similarity to the PsHV-1 sequences available in GenBank. Comparison of the results with the literature data suggests that the 36 Brazilian isolates from this study belong to genotype 1 and serotype 1. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Nationwide Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 contamination in natural rivers of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Honjo, Mie N; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Uchii, Kimiko; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2012-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) disease is a significant threat for common and koi carp cultivators and for freshwater ecosystems. To determine the prevalence of CyHV-3 in Japanese rivers, a nationwide survey of all national class-A rivers was undertaken in the Summer of 2008. The virus was concentrated from river water samples using the cation-coated filter method. CyHV-3 DNA was detected in 90 rivers, representing 90% of 103 successfully analysed rivers. More than 100,000 copies of CyHV-3 DNA per litre of sample were detected in four rivers, higher than that reported during the Yura River outbreak in 2007. For CyHV-3-positive rivers, the log CyHV-3 density was negatively correlated with the water temperature on the sampling date and positively correlated with the suspended solids and dissolved oxygen, which are annually averaged for each river. Our results demonstrate that virus detection using molecular biology techniques is a powerful tool for monitoring the presence of CyHV-3 in natural environments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Fundamental Human Right to Marry and to Family Life and their Protection in the Legal Framework of the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Albana Metaj-Stojanova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The right to family life is a fundamental human right, recognized by a series of international and European acts, which not only define and ensure its protection, but also emphasize the social importance of the family unit and the institution of marriage. The right to family life has evolved rapidly, since it was first introduced as an international human right by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR. The family structure and the concept of family life have changed dramatically over the last few decades, influenced by the everchanging social reality of our time and the decline of the institution of marriage. Aside from the traditional European nuclear family composed of two married persons of opposite sex and their marital children, new forms of family structures have arisen. LGTB families are at the centre of the ongoing debate on re-defining marriage and the concept of family life. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of protection accorded to family life and to the right to marry, which has long been recognized as one of the vital personal rights essential to the pursuit of happiness by free men by both, international acts ratified by the Republic of Macedonia and the legal system of the country. The methodology applied is qualitative research and use of the analytical, historical and comparative methods. The paper concludes that in general Republic of Macedonia has a solid legal framework, in compliance with the international law, that protects and promotes the right to family life.

  2. The Crystal Structure of PF-8, the DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit from Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltz, Jennifer L.; Filman, David J.; Ciustea, Mihai; Silverman, Janice Elaine Y.; Lautenschlager, Catherine L.; Coen, Donald M.; Ricciardi, Robert P.; Hogle, James M.; (UPENN)

    2009-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an emerging pathogen whose mechanism of replication is poorly understood. PF-8, the presumed processivity factor of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA polymerase, acts in combination with the catalytic subunit, Pol-8, to synthesize viral DNA. We have solved the crystal structure of residues 1 to 304 of PF-8 at a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. This structure reveals that each monomer of PF-8 shares a fold common to processivity factors. Like human cytomegalovirus UL44, PF-8 forms a head-to-head dimer in the form of a C clamp, with its concave face containing a number of basic residues that are predicted to be important for DNA binding. However, there are several differences with related proteins, especially in loops that extend from each monomer into the center of the C clamp and in the loops that connect the two subdomains of each protein, which may be important for determining PF-8's mode of binding to DNA and to Pol-8. Using the crystal structures of PF-8, the herpes simplex virus catalytic subunit, and RB69 bacteriophage DNA polymerase in complex with DNA and initial experiments testing the effects of inhibition of PF-8-stimulated DNA synthesis by peptides derived from Pol-8, we suggest a model for how PF-8 might form a ternary complex with Pol-8 and DNA. The structure and the model suggest interesting similarities and differences in how PF-8 functions relative to structurally similar proteins.

  3. Columbid herpesvirus-1 in two Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) with fatal inclusion body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Marie E; Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Childress, April L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kinsel, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    We report two separate naturally occurring cases of fatal herpesviral disease in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii). Gross lesions included splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with diffuse pale mottling or scattered small white foci. Histologic lesions included splenic and hepatic necrosis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies characteristic of herpesvirus. In one case, necrosis and inclusions were also noted in bone marrow, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, ceca, and the enteric system. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated viral particles typical of herpesvirus within hepatocyte nuclei and budding from the nuclear membrane. Herpesviral DNA was amplified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of paraffin-embedded liver and spleen, and sequence data were consistent with columbid herpesvirus-1, an alphaherpesvirus of Rock Pigeons (Columba livia). PCR results provide evidence that this disease is transmitted to raptors via Rock Pigeons, most likely through ingestion of Rock Pigeons as prey.

  4. Prevalence of asinine herpesvirus type 5 (AsHV-5) infection in clinically normal Lipizzaner horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, James Oliver; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nell, Barbara; Nowotny, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent of asinine herpesvirus (AsHV) type 5 infection in 'closed' populations of clinically normal Lipizzaner horses. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells plus nasal and conjunctival swabs were obtained on four occasions over an 18 month period from 266 animals as part of a health surveillance programme. Sequence analysis of samples that were positive by nested consensus herpesvirus PCR but negative using quantified equid herpesvirus (EHV) type 2 and 5 PCR, revealed a total of 51 samples from 39 horses positive for AsHV-5. No statistically significant association between animal age, gender or geographical location and infection status was identified. The findings suggest sub-clinical AsHV-5 infection may be encountered more frequently than previously reported. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of the human fibrillin/LTBP gene family, key regulators of mesenchymal cell functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Margaret R.; Andersson, Robin; Severin, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    in the structure of the extracellular matrix and controlling the bioavailability of TGFβ family members. Genes encoding these proteins show differential expression in mesenchymal cell types which synthesize the extracellular matrix. We have investigated the promoter regions of the seven gene family members using...... of the family members were expressed in a range of mesenchymal and other cell types, often associated with use of alternative promoters or transcription start sites within a promoter in different cell types. FBN3 was the lowest expressed gene, and was found only in embryonic and fetal tissues. The different...

  6. Herpesvirus of turkeys: microarray analysis of host gene responses to infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaca, Gamze; Anobile, Jonathan; Downs, Danielle; Burnside, Joan; Schmidt, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) provides an economically important live vaccine for prevention of Marek's disease (MD) of chickens. MD, characterized by both immunosuppression and T-cell lymphoma, is caused by another herpesvirus termed Marek's disease virus (MDV). Microarrays were used to investigate the response of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) to infection with HVT. Genes responding to HVT infection include several induced by interferon along with others modulating signal transduction, transcription, scaffolding proteins, and the cytoskeleton. Results are compared with earlier studies examining the responses of CEF cells to infection with MDV

  7. Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfaro Nuñez, Luis Alonso; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundFibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease characterized by cutaneous tumours that has been documented to infect all sea turtle species. Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV) is believed to be the aetiological agent of FP, based principally on consistent PCR......-based detection of herpesvirus DNA sequences from FP tumours. We used a recently described PCR-based assay that targets 3 conserved CFPHV genes, to survey 208 green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This included both FP tumour exhibiting and clinically healthy individuals. An additional 129 globally distributed...

  8. THE ROLE OF HERPESVIRUS IN THE PARADIGM OF INFECTIOUS MYOCARDITIS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peremot S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the research of the last decade, there has been growth in the noncoronary disease infarction, increased their share among the causes temporary or persistent disability, disability and deaths. Among others myocarditis, which constitute 11% of all diseases of the cardiovascular system and is responsible for almost 20% of cases of sudden death in people physically safe. The disease is an inflammatory damage to cardiomyocytes, which is caused by direct action or indirectly through immune mechanisms of infectious agents of bacterial, viral, protozoan nature, as well as chemical and physical factors. The term "myocarditis" was first proposed I F Soberheim in 1837 and in 1900. A. Fiedler described the myocardial injury and justified the very concept of primary myocarditis. It is widely accepted that myocarditis - natural complications of infectious diseases in which etiological factor may be any infectious agent. However, at the present stage bacterial pathogens give way to viral. Those viruses according to numerous studies result in the development of myocarditis and consequently lead to the development of myocardial dysfunction. Until recently, most were considered cardiotropic ECHO viruses, Coxsackie group A, B, causing half of all cases of viral myocarditis. However recently reviewed the role of enteroviruses in favor of persistent virus and particularly the family Herpesviridae. The significance in the etiology of myocarditis herpes simplex virus, human herpes type 6, Epstein - Barr virus, cytomegalovirus. Published data indicate that the development of viral myocarditis patients after serous meningoencephalitis caused by the varicella-zoster virus. Widespread herpesvirus diseases their tropism for endothelial cells and myocardium, the capacity for long-term persistence in the body the opportunity to explain virus inducted inflammatory damage to cardiomyocytes. Increased attention to this issue recently linked with the present stage

  9. Empirical Studies of Human Capital Formation: The Role of Family, Sibling, and Neighborhood

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huei-Ling III

    1998-01-01

    The formation of human capital is the main issue in this dissertation. More specifically, this dissertation discusses two alternative types of transferring human capital, in contrast to the transfer of human capital from parents to their children's education. These two types of transfer are sibling effect and neighborhood effect on children's education. Chapter 1 discusses the sibling effect on children's education, "Household Models and Formations of Human Capital with Sibling Effect in I...

  10. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Cai

    Full Text Available Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R, whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  11. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingying; Liu, Yuting; Culhane, Kelly J; DeVree, Brian T; Yang, Yang; Sunahara, Roger K; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2017-01-01

    Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP1R), whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  12. Identification of an evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain in a family of nucleolar proteins extending from human to yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzikov, Mikhail; Zatsepina, Olga; Magoulas, Charalambos

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian SURF-6 protein is localized in the nucleolus, yet its function remains elusive in the recently characterized nucleolar proteome. We discovered by searching the Protein families database that a unique evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain is present in the carboxy-terminal of a novel family of eukaryotic proteins extending from human to yeast. By using the enhanced green fluorescent protein as a fusion protein marker in mammalian cells, we show that proteins from distantly related taxonomic groups containing the SURF-6 domain are localized in the nucleolus. Deletion sequence analysis shows that multiple regions of the SURF-6 protein are capable of nucleolar targeting independently of the evolutionary conserved domain. We identified that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae member of the SURF-6 family, named rrp14 or ykl082c, has been categorized in yeast databases to interact with proteins involved in ribosomal biogenesis and cell polarity. These results classify SURF-6 as a new family of nucleolar proteins in the eukaryotic kingdom and point out that SURF-6 has a distinct domain within the known nucleolar proteome that may mediate complex protein-protein interactions for analogous processes between yeast and mammalian cells

  13. Molecular characterization of Marek's disease herpesvirus B antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isfort, R.J.; Sithole, I.; Kung, H.J.; Velicer, L.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDHV) B antigen (MDHV-B) was identified and molecularly characterized as a set of three glycoproteins of 100,000, 60,000, and 49,000 apparent molecular weight (gp100, gp60, and gp49, respectively) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after immunoprecipitation from [ 35 S]methionine-labeled infected cells by specific rabbit antiserum directed against MDHV-B (RαB), as previously determined by immunodiffusion. Further identification was accomplished by blocking this immunoprecipitation with highly purified MDHV-B. The same set of three polypeptides was also immunoprecipitated from [ 35 S] methionine- and 14 C-labeled infected cells into two other sera shown to have anti-B activity. These data serve to clarify the molecular identification of the polypeptides found in common between MDHV and HVT by linking them to MDHV-B. Collectively, the data presented here and by others support the conclusion that all three glycoproteins now identified as gp100, gp60, and gp49 have MDHV-B determinants. Finally, detection of the same three polypeptides with well-absorbed RαPM, which was directed against purified infected-cell plasma membranes, suggests that at least one component of the B-antigen complex has a plasma membrane location in the infected cell. These preliminary data point to the future membrane biochemistry and membrane immunology experiments needed to understand the MDHV system, and they may explain the high level of immunogenicity of MDHV-B in the infected chicken, as shown by its immunoprecipitation with immune chicken serum

  14. Linkage map of the fragments of herpesvirus papio DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y S; Tanaka, A; Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M; Rabin, H

    1981-01-01

    Herpesvirus papio (HVP), an Epstein-Barr-like virus, causes lymphoblastoid disease in baboons. The physical map of HVP DNA was constructed for the fragments produced by cleavage of HVP DNA with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HindIII, SalI, and PvuI, which produced 12, 12, 10, and 4 fragments, respectively. The total molecular size of HVP DNA was calculated as close to 110 megadaltons. The following methods were used for construction of the map; (i) fragments near the ends of HVP DNA were identified by treating viral DNA with lambda exonuclease before restriction enzyme digestion; (ii) fragments containing nucleotide sequences in common with fragments from the second enzyme digest of HVP DNA were examined by Southern blot hybridization; and (iii) the location of some fragments was determined by isolating individual fragments from agarose gels and redigesting the isolated fragments with a second restriction enzyme. Terminal heterogeneity and internal repeats were found to be unique features of HVP DNA molecule. One to five repeats of 0.8 megadaltons were found at both terminal ends. Although the repeats of both ends shared a certain degree of homology, it was not determined whether they were identical repeats. The internal repeat sequence of HVP DNA was found in the EcoRI-C region, which extended from 8.4 to 23 megadaltons from the left end of the molecule. The average number of the repeats was calculated to be seven, and the molecular size was determined to be 1.8 megadaltons. Similar unique features have been reported in EBV DNA (D. Given and E. Kieff, J. Virol. 28:524-542, 1978). Images PMID:6261015

  15. Identification of an essential virulence gene of cyprinid herpesvirus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutier, Maxime; Gao, Yuan; Vancsok, Catherine; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2017-09-01

    The genus Cyprinivirus consists of a growing list of phylogenetically related viruses, some of which cause severe economic losses to the aquaculture industry. The archetypal member, cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) causes mass mortalities worldwide in koi and common carp. A CyHV-3 mutant was described previously that is attenuated in vivo by a deletion affecting two genes (ORF56 and ORF57). The relative contributions of ORF56 and ORF57 to the safety and efficacy profile of this vaccine candidate have now been assessed by analysing viruses individually deleted for ORF56 or ORF57. Inoculation of these viruses into carp demonstrated that the absence of ORF56 did not affect virulence, whereas the absence of ORF57 led to an attenuation comparable to, though slightly less than, that of the doubly deleted virus. To demonstrate further the role of ORF57 as a key virulence factor, a mutant retaining the ORF57 region but unable to express the ORF57 protein was produced by inserting multiple in-frame stop codons into the coding region. Analysis of this virus in vivo revealed a safety and efficacy profile comparable to that of the doubly deleted virus. These findings show that ORF57 encodes an essential CyHV-3 virulence factor. They also indicate that ORF57 orthologues in other cypriniviruses may offer promising targets for the rational design of attenuated recombinant vaccines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Geographic variation in the prevalence of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and risk factors for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanjose, Silvia; Mbisa, Georgina; Perez-Alvarez, Susana; Benavente, Yolanda; Sukvirach, Sukhon; Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Shin, Hai-Rim; Anh, Pham Thi Hoang; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Lazcano, Eduardo; Matos, Elena; Herrero, Rolando; Muñoz, Nubia; Molano, Monica; Franceschi, Silvia; Whitby, Denise

    2009-05-15

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the female general population, to define geographic variation in and heterosexual transmission of the virus. The study included 10,963 women from 9 countries for whom information on sociodemographic characteristics and reproductive, sexual, and smoking behaviors were available. Antibodies against KSHV that encoded lytic antigen K8.1 and latent antigen ORF73 were determined. The range of prevalence of KSHV (defined as detection of any antigen) was 3.81%-46.02%, with significant geographic variation noted. In Nigeria, the prevalence was 46.02%; in Colombia, 13.32%; in Costa Rica, 9.81%; in Argentina, 6.40%; in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 15.50%; in Hanoi, Vietnam, 11.26%; in Songkla, Thailand, 10%; in Lampang, Thailand, 8.63%; in Korea, 4.93%; and in Spain, 3.65%. The prevalence of KSHV slightly increased with increasing age among subjects in geographic areas where the prevalence of KSHV was high, such as Nigeria and Colombia, and it significantly decreased with increases in the educational level attained by subjects in those areas. KSHV was not statistically associated with age at first sexual intercourse, number of sex partners, number of children, patterns of oral contraceptive use, presence of cervical human papillomavirus DNA, or smoking status. The study provides comparable estimates of KSHV prevalence in diverse cultural settings across 4 continents and provides evidence that sexual transmission of KSHV is not a major source of infection in the general population.

  17. LACK OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HERPESVIRUS DETECTION IN SALIVA AND GINGIVITIS IN HIV‑INFECTED CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Renata A; Nascimento, Flávia N N; Souza, Ivete P R; Silva, Raquel C; Lima, Rodrigo S; Robaina, Tatiana F; Câmara, Fernando P; Santos, Norma; Castro, Gloria F

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the detection of human herpesviruses (HHVs) in the saliva of HIV-infected and healthy control children, and to evaluate associations between viral infection and gingivitis and immunodeficiency. Saliva samples were collected from 48 HIV-infected and 48 healthy control children. Clinical and laboratory data were collected during dental visits and from medical records. A trained dentist determined gingival indices and extension of gingivitis. Saliva samples were tested for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) by nested polymerase chain reaction assays. Thirty-five HIV-infected and 16 control children had gingivitis. Seventeen (35.4%) HIV-infected children and 13 (27%) control children were positive for HHVs. CMV was the most commonly detected HHV in both groups (HIV-infected, 25%; control, 12.5%), followed by HSV-1 (6.2% in both groups) and HSV-2 (HIV-infected, 4.2%; control, 8.3%). The presence of HHVs in saliva was not associated with the presence of gingivitis in HIV-1-infected children (p = 0.104) or healthy control children (p = 0.251), or with immunosuppression in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.447). Gingivitis was correlated with HIV infection (p = 0.0001). These results suggest that asymptomatic salivary detection of HHVs is common in HIV-infected and healthy children, and that it is not associated with gingivitis.

  18. Global Mapping of O-Glycosylation of Varicella Zoster Virus, Human Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J.; King, Sarah L.; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Olofsson, Sigvard; Wandall, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are among the most complex and widespread viruses, infection and propagation of which depend on envelope proteins. These proteins serve as mediators of cell entry as well as modulators of the immune response and are attractive vaccine targets. Although envelope proteins are known to carry glycans, little is known about the distribution, nature, and functions of these modifications. This is particularly true for O-glycans; thus we have recently developed a “bottom up” mass spectrometry-based technique for mapping O-glycosylation sites on herpes simplex virus type 1. We found wide distribution of O-glycans on herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins and demonstrated that elongated O-glycans were essential for the propagation of the virus. Here, we applied our proteome-wide discovery platform for mapping O-glycosites on representative and clinically significant members of the herpesvirus family: varicella zoster virus, human cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. We identified a large number of O-glycosites distributed on most envelope proteins in all viruses and further demonstrated conserved patterns of O-glycans on distinct homologous proteins. Because glycosylation is highly dependent on the host cell, we tested varicella zoster virus-infected cell lysates and clinically isolated virus and found evidence of consistent O-glycosites. These results present a comprehensive view of herpesvirus O-glycosylation and point to the widespread occurrence of O-glycans in regions of envelope proteins important for virus entry, formation, and recognition by the host immune system. This knowledge enables dissection of specific functional roles of individual glycosites and, moreover, provides a framework for design of glycoprotein vaccines with representative glycosylation. PMID:27129252

  19. Identification and Characterization of Cyprinid Herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3 Encoded MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen H Donohoe

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Some viruses encode their own miRNAs and these are increasingly being recognized as important modulators of viral and host gene expression. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3 is a highly pathogenic agent that causes acute mass mortalities in carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio and koi (Cyprinus carpio koi worldwide. Here, bioinformatic analyses of the CyHV-3 genome suggested the presence of non-conserved precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA fractions prepared from in vitro CyHV-3 infections led to the identification of potential miRNAs and miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs derived from some bioinformatically predicted pre-miRNAs. DNA microarray hybridization analysis, Northern blotting and stem-loop RT-qPCR were then used to definitively confirm that CyHV-3 expresses two pre-miRNAs during infection in vitro. The evidence also suggested the presence of an additional four high-probability and two putative viral pre-miRNAs. MiRNAs from the two confirmed pre-miRNAs were also detected in gill tissue from CyHV-3-infected carp. We also present evidence that one confirmed miRNA can regulate the expression of a putative CyHV-3-encoded dUTPase. Candidate homologues of some CyHV-3 pre-miRNAs were identified in CyHV-1 and CyHV-2. This is the first report of miRNA and moRNA genes encoded by members of the Alloherpesviridae family, a group distantly related to the Herpesviridae family. The discovery of these novel CyHV-3 genes may help further our understanding of the biology of this economically important virus and their encoded miRNAs may have potential as biomarkers for the diagnosis of latent CyHV-3.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Cyprinid Herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) Encoded MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Owen H.; Henshilwood, Kathy; Way, Keith; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Stone, David M.; Walls, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Some viruses encode their own miRNAs and these are increasingly being recognized as important modulators of viral and host gene expression. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a highly pathogenic agent that causes acute mass mortalities in carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio) and koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) worldwide. Here, bioinformatic analyses of the CyHV-3 genome suggested the presence of non-conserved precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA fractions prepared from in vitro CyHV-3 infections led to the identification of potential miRNAs and miRNA–offset RNAs (moRNAs) derived from some bioinformatically predicted pre-miRNAs. DNA microarray hybridization analysis, Northern blotting and stem-loop RT-qPCR were then used to definitively confirm that CyHV-3 expresses two pre-miRNAs during infection in vitro. The evidence also suggested the presence of an additional four high-probability and two putative viral pre-miRNAs. MiRNAs from the two confirmed pre-miRNAs were also detected in gill tissue from CyHV-3-infected carp. We also present evidence that one confirmed miRNA can regulate the expression of a putative CyHV-3-encoded dUTPase. Candidate homologues of some CyHV-3 pre-miRNAs were identified in CyHV-1 and CyHV-2. This is the first report of miRNA and moRNA genes encoded by members of the Alloherpesviridae family, a group distantly related to the Herpesviridae family. The discovery of these novel CyHV-3 genes may help further our understanding of the biology of this economically important virus and their encoded miRNAs may have potential as biomarkers for the diagnosis of latent CyHV-3. PMID:25928140

  1. Complementing or Conflicting Human Rights Conventions? Realising an Inclusive Approach to Families with a Young Person with a Disability and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Kristy; Goldblatt, Beth

    2011-01-01

    United Nation's conventions exist to help facilitate and protect vulnerable people's human rights: including people with disabilities (Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 2006) and children (Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989). However, for some families where a family member has a disability, there may be inherent…

  2. Novel human CRYGD rare variant in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gabriel Gorgone; Tavares, Anderson; da Silva, Márcio José; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel polymorphism in the γD-crystallin (CRYGD) gene in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract. Methods A Brazilian four-generation family was analyzed. The proband had bilateral lamellar cataract and the phenotypes were classified by slit lamp examination. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the αA-crystallin (CRYAA), γC-crystallin (CRYGC), and CRYGD genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Results Sequencing of the coding regions of CRYGD showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at c.401 position, which results in the substitution of a tyrosine to a cysteine (Y134C). The polymorphism was identified in three individuals, two affected and one unaffected. Conclusions A novel rare variant in CRYGD (Y134C) was detected in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract. Because there is no segregation between the substitution and the phenotypes in this family, other genetic alterations are likely to be present. PMID:21866214

  3. Love, Safety, and Companionship: The Human-Animal Bond and Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faver, Catherine A.; Cavazos, Alonzo M., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    A survey found that 69.2% of a sample of 208 Latino university students in south Texas owned companion animals. Dogs were the most commonly owned companion animals, and 92% of dog and cat guardians regarded their companion animals as family members. Over 80% of the dog and cat guardians specified companionship and unconditional love as benefits…

  4. The role of retrotransposons in gene family expansions in the human and mouse genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušek, Václav; Laukaitis, C. M.; Yanchukov, Alexey; Karn, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2016), s. 2632-2650 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : gene families * transposable elements * retrotransposons * LINE * LTR * SINE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.979, year: 2016

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel Cut family cDNA that encodes human copper transporter protein CutC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jixi; Ji Chaoneng; Chen Jinzhong; Yang Zhenxing; Wang Yijing; Fei, Xiangwei; Zheng Mei; Gu Xing; Wen Ge; Xie Yi; Mao Yumin

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential heavy metal trace element that plays important roles in cell physiology. The Cut family was associated with the copper homeostasis and involved in several important metabolisms, such as uptake, storage, delivery, and efflux of copper. In this study, a novel Cut family cDNA was isolated from the human fetal brain library, which encodes a 273 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of about 29.3 kDa and a calculated pI of 8.17. It was named hCutC (human copper transporter protein CutC). The ORF of hCutC gene was cloned into pQE30 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The secreted hCutC protein was purified to a homogenicity of 95% by using the Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. RT-PCR analysis showed that the hCutC gene expressed extensively in human tissues. Subcellular location analysis of hCutC-EGFP fusion protein revealed that hCutC was distributed to cytoplasm of COS-7 cells, and both cytoplasm and nucleus of AD293 cells. The results suggest that hCutC may be one shuttle protein and play important roles in intracellular copper trafficking

  6. Ethical issues in human genome epidemiology: a case study based on the Japanese American Family Study in Seattle, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A

    2002-04-01

    Recent completion of the draft sequence of the human genome has been greeted with both excitement and skepticism, and the potential of this accomplishment for advancing public health has been tempered by ethical concerns about the protection of human subjects. This commentary explores ethical issues arising in human genome epidemiology by using a case study approach based on the ongoing Japanese American Family Study at the University of Washington in Seattle (1994-2003). Ethical issues encountered in designing the study, collecting the data, and reporting the study results are considered. When developing studies, investigators must consider whether to restrict the study to specific racial or ethnic groups and whether community involvement is appropriate. Once the study design is in place, further ethical issues emerge, including obtaining informed consent for DNA banking and protecting the privacy and confidentiality of family members. Finally, investigators must carefully consider whether to report genotype results to study participants and whether pedigrees illustrating the results of the study will be published. Overall, the promise of genomics for improving public health must be pursued based on the fundamental ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice.

  7. Phylogenetic characterization of a novel herpesvirus found in the liver and lungs of a Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdill, Christopher C; Barnes, Julie A; Garner, Michael M; Hinton, Kevin L; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-05-01

    A novel herpesvirus was detected in a 17-day-old Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis) with pneumonia, hepatopathy, and severe anemia that was housed in California. Postmortem examination identified a pale, enlarged liver, mildly increased fluid in the lungs, and red foci in the spleen. Histologic examination revealed marked hepatic necrosis with syncytia, splenic necrosis, and interstitial pneumonia with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions within hepatocytes and in unidentified cells of the lung. Transmission electron microscopy identified virions consistent with a herpesvirus in the nucleus and cytoplasm of degenerative hepatocytes. Nested consensus PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis identified a novel herpesvirus within the genus Iltovirus in the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Virulence and genotype of a bovine herpesvirus 1 isolate from semen of a subclinically infected bull

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Straver, P.J.; Ruuls, R.C.; Quak, J.; Davidse, A.; Westenbrink, E.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Dijk, van J.E.; Moerman, A.

    1995-01-01

    A bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) isolate from the semen of a subclinically infected bull was administered to cattle by various routes to assess its virulence. Cattle that were artificially inseminated or inoculated intrapreputially did not develop clinical signs, but did transmit the virus to contact

  9. High frequency intergenomic recombination of suid herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1, Aujeszkys-disease virus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Lomniczi, B.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are given of observations made with field isolates of suid herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1) which indicate that intergenomic recombination is a common phenomenon associated with the virus. This was further confirmed by experimental co-infection of a pig with 2 virus strains with different, stable...

  10. The genomic diversity and stability of field strains of Suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Sørensen, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    The genomic diversity among isolates of suid herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1) collected in the same herd and among clones from the same isolate was studied by restriction fragment pattern (RFP) analysis using BamHI. Tentatively defining a field strain as a transmissible entity, it was concluded that strains...

  11. Emydid herpesvirus 1 infection in northern map turtles (Graptemys geographica) and painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Newton, Alisa L; Seimon, Tracie A; Moore, Robert P; McAloose, Denise

    2015-05-01

    A captive, juvenile, female northern map turtle (Graptemys geographica) was found dead following a brief period of weakness and nasal discharge. Postmortem examination identified pneumonia with necrosis and numerous epithelial, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies, consistent with herpesviral pneumonia. Similar intranuclear inclusions were also associated with foci of hepatocellular and splenic necrosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of fresh, frozen liver for the herpesviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene yielded an amplicon with 99.2% similarity to recently described emydid herpesvirus 1 (EmyHV-1). Molecular screening of turtles housed in enclosures that shared a common circulation system with the affected map turtle identified 4 asymptomatic, EmyHV-1 PCR-positive painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and 1 asymptomatic northern map turtle. Herpesvirus transmission between painted and map turtles has been previously suggested, and our report provides the molecular characterization of a herpesvirus in asymptomatic painted turtles that can cause fatal herpesvirus-associated disease in northern map turtles. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Further evidence of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) latency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfaro Nuñez, Luis Alonso; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2016-01-01

    The Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) has been consistently associated with fibropapillomatosis (FP), a transmissible neoplastic disease of marine turtles. Whether ChHV5 plays a causal role remains debated, partly because while FP tumours have been clearly documented to contain high concentrations...

  13. The coinfection between herpesviruses and periodontopathic microbiota in increasing severity of chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mukhit Abdul Gaffar Kazi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Coinfection helps in the increasing severity of chronic periodontitis when a particular combination of herpesviruses and periodontopathic microbiota is detected from the cases of chronic periodontitis. Herpes simplex virus-2 and P. gingivalis seem to play a crucial role in the increasing severity of chronic periodontitis as compared to other coinfection combinations in the studied populations.

  14. Simultaneous intramammary and intranasal inoculation of lactating cows with bovine herpesvirus 4 induce subclinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Wisselink, H.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether an experimental bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV4) infection can induce bovine mastitis, or can enhance bovine mastitis induced by Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis). Four lactating cows were inoculated intramammarily and intranasally with BHV4, and four lactating control

  15. The isolation and partial characterization of a highly pathogenic herpesvirus from the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H. Yang (Hong); H.E.M. Spijkers (Ine); J. Groen (Jan); J.S. Teppema; G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThis report describes the first isolation and partial characterization of a herpesvirus from the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina). The virus was isolated during a disease outbreak in a group of young seals nursed in a seal orphanage in The Netherlands. Almost half of the seals died with

  16. Equine herpesvirus 1 and/or 4 in working equids: se- roprevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EHV-1 and EHV-4 were found to be prevalent in working equids in central. Ethiopia ..... and Equine Herpesvirus-1/-4 in the Spanish Purebred horse population in central. Spain: Risk factors and association with reproductive problems. PHD Thesis. Fac- ultad De Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense De Madrid, Madrid.

  17. Kinetic Analysis of the Bypass of a Bulky DNA Lesion Catalyzed by Human Y-family DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Sanman, Laura E.; Xia, Cynthia X.; Bolin, Eric R.; Malik, Chanchal K.; Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Basu, Ashis K.; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP), a mutagen and potential carcinogen, is the most abundant nitro polyaromatic hydrocarbon in diesel exhaust, which reacts with DNA to form predominantly N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene (dGAP). If not repaired, this DNA lesion is presumably bypassed in vivo by any of human Y-family DNA polymerases kappa (hPolκ), iota (hPolτ), eta (hPolη), and Rev1 (hRev1). Our running start assays demonstrated that each of these enzymes was indeed capable of traversing a site-specifically placed dGAP on a synthetic DNA template but hRev1 was stopped after lesion bypass. The time required to bypass 50% of the dGAP sites (t50bypass ) encountered by hPolη, hPolκ and hPolτ was determined to be 2.5 s, 4.1 s, and 106.5 s, respectively. The efficiency order of catalyzing translesion synthesis of dGAP (hPolη > hPolκ > hPolτ >> hRev1) is the same as the order for these human Y-family enzymes to elongate undamaged DNA. Although hPolη bypassed dGAP efficiently, replication by both hPolκ and hPolτ was strongly stalled at the lesion site and at a site immediately downstream from dGAP. By employing pre-steady state kinetic methods, a kinetic basis was established for polymerase pausing at these DNA template sites. Besides efficiency of bypass, the fidelity of those low-fidelity polymerases at these pause sites was also significantly decreased. Thus, if the translesion DNA synthesis of dGAP in vivo is catalyzed by a human Y-family DNA polymerase, e.g. hPolη, the process is certainly mutagenic. PMID:22324639

  18. Complete Unique Genome Sequence, Expression Profile, and Salivary Gland Tissue Tropism of the Herpesvirus 7 Homolog in Pigtailed Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staheli, Jeannette P; Dyen, Michael R; Deutsch, Gail H; Basom, Ryan S; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P; Lewis, Patrick; Barcy, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, and HHV-7 are classified as roseoloviruses and are highly prevalent in the human population. Roseolovirus reactivation in an immunocompromised host can cause severe pathologies. While the pathogenic potential of HHV-7 is unclear, it can reactivate HHV-6 from latency and thus contributes to severe pathological conditions associated with HHV-6. Because of the ubiquitous nature of roseoloviruses, their roles in such interactions and the resulting pathological consequences have been difficult to study. Furthermore, the lack of a relevant animal model for HHV-7 infection has hindered a better understanding of its contribution to roseolovirus-associated diseases. Using next-generation sequencing analysis, we characterized the unique genome of an uncultured novel pigtailed macaque roseolovirus. Detailed genomic analysis revealed the presence of gene homologs to all 84 known HHV-7 open reading frames. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the virus is a macaque homolog of HHV-7, which we have provisionally named Macaca nemestrina herpesvirus 7 (MneHV7). Using high-throughput RNA sequencing, we observed that the salivary gland tissue samples from nine different macaques had distinct MneHV7 gene expression patterns and that the overall number of viral transcripts correlated with viral loads in parotid gland tissue and saliva. Immunohistochemistry staining confirmed that, like HHV-7, MneHV7 exhibits a natural tropism for salivary gland ductal cells. We also observed staining for MneHV7 in peripheral nerve ganglia present in salivary gland tissues, suggesting that HHV-7 may also have a tropism for the peripheral nervous system. Our data demonstrate that MneHV7-infected macaques represent a relevant animal model that may help clarify the causality between roseolovirus reactivation and diseases. Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, and HHV-7 are classified as roseoloviruses. We have recently discovered that pigtailed macaques are naturally

  19. Role of defective Oct-2 and OCA-B expression in immunoglobulin production and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivation in primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolo, Daniel L; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Keller, Shannon; Guasparri, Ilaria; Deng, Hongyu; Sun, Ren; Chadburn, Amy; Knowles, Daniel M; Cesarman, Ethel

    2009-05-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a distinct type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/human herpesvirus 8). Despite having a genotype and gene expression signature of highly differentiated B cells, PEL does not usually express surface or cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (Ig). We show the lack of Oct-2 and OCA-B transcription factors to be responsible, at least in part, for this defect in Ig production. Like Ig genes, ORF50, the key regulator of the switch from latency to lytic reactivation, contains an octamer motif within its promoter. We therefore examined the impact of Oct-2 and OCA-B on ORF50 activation. The binding of Oct-1 to the ORF50 promoter has been shown to significantly enhance ORF50 transactivation. We found that Oct-2, on the other hand, inhibited ORF50 expression and consequently lytic reactivation by competing with Oct-1 for the octamer motif in the ORF50 promoter. Our data suggest that Oct-2 downregulation in infected cells would be favorable to KSHV in allowing for efficient viral reactivation.

  20. Genotype-Specific Clearance of Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infections among Mothers in the Finnish Family HPV Study▿

    OpenAIRE

    Louvanto, Karolina; Syrjänen, Kari J.; Rintala, Marjut A. M.; Grénman, Seija E.; Syrjänen, Stina M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young women are transient, but whether the clearance differs among different HPV genotypes and the different factors predicting genotype-specific clearance are partly unknown. In the Finnish Family HPV Study, 131 of 252 women (mean age, 25.5 years) cleared their infection during the prospective follow-up of 6 years (median, 62.4 months; range, 1.6 to 94.5 months). Cervical scrapings collected at each visit were tested for 24 lo...

  1. Genetic characterization of complete open reading frame of glycoprotein C gene of bovine herpesvirus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Majumder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize one of the major glycoprotein genes viz., glycoprotein C (gC; UL44, unique long region 44 of bovineherpesvirus 1(BoHV1 of Indian origin at genetic and phylogenetic level.Materials and Methods: A bovine herpesvirus 1 isolate viz., (BoHV1/IBR 216 II/ 1976/ India maintained at Division ofVirology, IVRI, Mukteswar was used for the current study. The DNA was extracted using commercial kit and the completeORF of gC gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced by conventional Sanger sequencing method. The sequence wasgenetically and phylogenetically analysed using various bioinformatic tools. The sequence was submitted in the Genbankwith accession number Kc756965.Results: The complete ORF of gC gene was amplified and sequenced. It showed 100% sequence homology with referencecooper strain of BoHV1 and divergence varied from 0% to 2.7% with other isolates of BoHV1. The isolate under study haddivergence of 9.2%, 13%, 26.6%, and 9.2% with BoHV5 (Bovine herpesvirus 5, CvHV1 (Cervid herpesvirus 1, CpHV1(Caprine herpesvirus 1, and BuHV1 (Bubaline herpesvirus 1, respectively.Conclusion: This is the first genetic characterization of complete open reading frame (ORF of glycoprotein C gene (UL44 ofIndian isolate of BoHV1. The gC gene of BoHV1 is highly conserved among all BoHV1 isolates and it can be used as a targetfor designing diagnostic primers for the specific detection of BoHV1.

  2. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWDBP, a member of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herde, Petra; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-01-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWD-binding protein (MAWDBP) are described. MAWDBP is the only representative of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family in the human genome. Its expression is elevated in several disease processes, including insulin resistance, folate deficiency and hypotension, and it may also be involved in carcinogenesis. The exact molecular function of MAWDBP is unknown. Native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled MAWDBP were expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at room temperature from precipitants containing 10 mM KF, 14%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 5.4. Crystals belong to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 187, c = 241 Å, indicative of three to five monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystals were cryoprotected with 15%(v/v) glycerol and data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution

  3. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWDBP, a member of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herde, Petra; Blankenfeldt, Wulf, E-mail: wulf.blankenfeldt@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2006-06-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWD-binding protein (MAWDBP) are described. MAWDBP is the only representative of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family in the human genome. Its expression is elevated in several disease processes, including insulin resistance, folate deficiency and hypotension, and it may also be involved in carcinogenesis. The exact molecular function of MAWDBP is unknown. Native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled MAWDBP were expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at room temperature from precipitants containing 10 mM KF, 14%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 5.4. Crystals belong to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 187, c = 241 Å, indicative of three to five monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystals were cryoprotected with 15%(v/v) glycerol and data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  4. Immunoaffinity purification and reconstitution of the human bilirubin/phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seppen, J.; Jansen, P. L.; Oude Elferink, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    When membrane proteins are solubilized and subjected to purification procedures, the loss of lipids surrounding the protein often results in irreversible inactivation. We describe a procedure for the immunoaffinity purification of the membrane protein UDP-glucuronosyltransferase from human liver.

  5. IMMUNOAFFINITY PURIFICATION AND RECONSTITUTION OF THE HUMAN BILIRUBIN PHENOL UDP-GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASE FAMILY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SEPPEN, J; JANSEN, PLM; ELFERINK, RPJO

    When membrane proteins are solubilized and subjected to purification procedures, the loss of lipids surrounding the protein often results in irreversible inactivation. We describe a procedure for the immunoaffinity purification of the membrane protein UDP-glucuronosyltransferase from human liver.

  6. Structural analysis of the core COMPASS family of histone H3K4 methylases from yeast to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoh-hei; Westfield, Gerwin H; Oleskie, Austin N; Trievel, Raymond C; Shilatifard, Ali; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2011-12-20

    Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation is catalyzed by the highly evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complex known as Set1/COMPASS or MLL/COMPASS-like complexes from yeast to human, respectively. Here we have reconstituted fully functional yeast Set1/COMPASS and human MLL/COMPASS-like complex in vitro and have identified the minimum subunit composition required for histone H3K4 methylation. These subunits include the methyltransferase C-terminal SET domain of Set1/MLL, Cps60/Ash2L, Cps50/RbBP5, Cps30/WDR5, and Cps25/Dpy30, which are all common components of the COMPASS family from yeast to human. Three-dimensional (3D) cryo-EM reconstructions of the core yeast complex, combined with immunolabeling and two-dimensional (2D) EM analysis of the individual subcomplexes reveal a Y-shaped architecture with Cps50 and Cps30 localizing on the top two adjacent lobes and Cps60-Cps25 forming the base at the bottom. EM analysis of the human complex reveals a striking similarity to its yeast counterpart, suggesting a common subunit organization. The SET domain of Set1 is located at the juncture of Cps50, Cps30, and the Cps60-Cps25 module, lining the walls of a central channel that may act as the platform for catalysis and regulative processing of various degrees of H3K4 methylation. This structural arrangement suggested that COMPASS family members function as exo-methylases, which we have confirmed by in vitro and in vivo studies.

  7. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within thealphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of “atypical” DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis

  8. CYTOKINES AND HERPESVIRUSES IN CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Zheleznikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was determined earlier (G.P. Ivanova, 2012 that a chronic course of leukoencephalitis in teenagers caused by inadequate response of cytokine system to the combination of two herpesviruses (HV — EBV and HHV-6, leads to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS in 44% of cases. The research objective was to characterize the cytokine response in children with MS with simultaneous screening of the presence of active HV infections. 39 children with the diagnosis “MS” were under observation, 34 of them had relapsing-remitting (RR MS, and 5 children had a progressing course of MS (PMS. Concentration of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNα, IFNγ, and IL-4 was identified in blood serum and cerebrospinal liquid (CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, HV DNA was revealed by PCR. Cytokine status in children with MS had some differences depending on the phase of the disease, clinical severity of the relapse and the course of MS. The relapse phase of RRMS was associated with the accumulation of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-6 in the blood, and index IFNγ/IL-4 modulations in accordance with the clinical severity of the relapse. A severe aggravation of the disease in children with PMS was accompanied by the increase of IL-8 system response. HV DNA was revealed in 27 patients from 39 ones (69% in blood and in 17 patients (44% in CSF with the predominance of EBV (93%, frequently in combination with HHV-6. During an acute period the frequency of HV DNA identification increased 2–3 times to compare with the remission period. Unlike children with RRMS, a mixed-infection of 3–4 herpes viruses was revealed in all 5 patients with PMS. According to the results summary it is possible to make a conclusion that HV-infection has an important role in MS pathogenesis in teenagers, taking part in the aggravation and progression of the disease by its effect on the cytokine system response. EBV-infection dominates among HV, however the risk of MS development

  9. Broken Families. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Family and Human Services of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (March 22 and 24, 1983) on Oversight on the Breakdown of the Traditional Family Unit, Focusing on the Effects of Divorce, Separation and Conflict within Marriage on Children and on Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    These hearings of the Subcommittee on Family and Human Services deal with the effects of divorce and single parenthood on children and adults. Discussion centers on the types of effects and their variations based on the age of the child; the time of divorce; sex of the child; and degree of communication between the child and both parents following…

  10. The Human Gene SLC25A29, of Solute Carrier Family 25, Encodes a Mitochondrial Transporter of Basic Amino Acids*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation. PMID:24652292

  11. The human gene SLC25A29, of solute carrier family 25, encodes a mitochondrial transporter of basic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-05-09

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation.

  12. Roles of the insulinlike growth factor family in nonpregnant human endometrium and at the decidual: trophoblast interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, L C; Irwin, J C

    1999-01-01

    The insulinlike growth factor (IGF) family is believed to be important in endometrial development during the menstrual cycle and in the process of implantation. The mitogenic, differentiative, and antiapoptotic properties of the IGFs and their binding proteins, as well as their spatial and temporal expression in cycling endometrium, suggest that they may participate in endometrial growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and perhaps angiogenesis. IGFBP proteases, which increase IGF bioavailability, have been localized to endometrial stromal cells and to the human cytotrophoblast and likely play important roles in endometrial, decidual, and trophoblast physiology. IGFBP-1 is a major protein product of nonpregnant endometrium during the mid-late secretory phase and occurs in abundance in decidua. Its roles as an IGF-binding protein and as a trophoblast integrin ligand suggest that it may have multiple roles in endometrial development and in interactions between the decidua and the invading trophoblast. Recent evidence suggests that it may have a role in the process of shallow implantation in the clinical disorder of preclampsia. In contrast to knowledge about the roles of IGF peptides, IGFBP proteases, and IGFBPs in normal endometrial development and early human pregnancy, little information is available regarding this family in abnormal endometrial development, in occult endometrial defects, and in uterine receptivity and nonreceptivity.

  13. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome.

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Ballestas, Mary E.; Komatsu, Takashi; Kaye, Kenneth M.

    2007-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes

  15. Involvement of ERK, Bcl-2 family and caspase 3 in recombinant human activin A-induced apoptosis in A549

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baiding; Feng Yuling; Song Xingbo; Liu Qingqing; Ning Yunye; Ou Xuemei; Yang Jie; Zhang Xiaohong; Wen, Fuqiang

    2009-01-01

    Background: Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. Previous studies have shown that activin A may have a central role in regulating both apoptosis and proliferation. However, direct studies of recombination human activin A on human NSCLC A549 cells have not yet been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether activin A could induce apoptosis in A549 cells and the possible mechanisms via which it worked. Methods: Cellular apoptosis induced by activin A was detected by TUNEL assay and the levels of protein expression were detected by western blot. Results: Recombination human activin A induced apoptosis in human NSCLC A549 cells in a concentrate-dependent manner. Activin A-induced A549 apoptosis was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax, Bad and Bcl-Xs and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, activin A treatment increased the expression of its typeII receptors, activated ERK and caspase 3 in A549. These results clearly demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis by activin-A involves multiple cellular/molecular pathways and strongly suggest that pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and caspase 3 participate in activin A-induced apoptotic process in A549 cells. On the other hand, activin A treatment had little effect on primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). Conclusion: Recombination human activin A induced apoptosis in A549 cells, at least partially, through ERK and mitochondrial pathway. The result that activin A did not affect the normal SAEC revealed activin A might be considered as a potential anticancer agent and worthy of further studies

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Oritani, Kenji [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuda, Tadashi, E-mail: tmatsuda@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR.

  18. Molecular cloning of a human gene that is a member of the nerve growth factor family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Reichardt, L.F. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Cell death within the developing vertebrate nervous system is regulated in part by interactions between neurons and their innervation targets that are mediated by neurotrophic factors. These factors also appear to have a role in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Two neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, share substantial amino acid sequence identity. The authors have used a screen that combines polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA and low-stringency hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides to isolate human BDNF and a human gene, neurotrophin-3, that is closely related to both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. mRNA products of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 genes were detected in the adult human brain, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Neurotrophin-3 is also expected to function in embryonic neural development.

  19. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristina K.; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L.; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J.; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27022937

  20. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as

  1. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Dégremont

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A one family per bag; (B one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas.

  2. Global and disease-associated genetic variation in the human Fanconi anemia gene family

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Kai J.; Fu, Wenqing; Akey, Joshua M.; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human recessive genetic disease resulting from inactivating mutations in any of 16 FANC (Fanconi) genes. Individuals with FA are at high risk of developmental abnormalities, early bone marrow failure and leukemia. These are followed in the second and subsequent decades by a very high risk of carcinomas of the head and neck and anogenital region, and a small continuing risk of leukemia. In order to characterize base pair-level disease-associated (DA) and population gen...

  3. A Novel Mechanism of Sugar Selection Utilized by a Human X-family DNA Polymerase†

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jessica A.; Fiala, Kevin A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Newmister, Sean A.; Dyum, Wade W.; Suo, Zucai

    2009-01-01

    During DNA synthesis, most DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases select against ribonucleotides via a steric clash between the ribose 2′-hydroxyl group and the bulky side chain of an active site residue. Here, we demonstrated that human DNA polymerase λ used a novel sugar selection mechanism to discriminate against ribonucleotides, whereby the ribose 2′-hydroxyl group was excluded mostly by a backbone segment and slightly by the side chain of Y505. Such a steric clash was further demonst...

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández, Israel S. [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ständker, Ludger [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hannover Medical School, Center of Pharmacology, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Forssmann, Wolf-Georg [Hannover Medical School, Center of Pharmacology, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio, E-mail: romero@cib.csic.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  5. Structure and function of the human metallothionein gene family: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karin, M.

    1986-01-01

    The full nucleotide sequence of two additional human metallothionein (hMT) genes has been determined. These genes, hMT-I/sub B/ and hMT-I/sub F/, are located within the MT-I gene cluster we have described originally. The hMT-I/sub F/ gene is the first hMT-I gene whose amino acid sequence is in complete agreement with the published sequence of the human MT-I proteins. Therefore it is likely to be an active gene encoding a functional protein. However, since we have just completed the sequence analysis, we have not characterized this gene further yet. The hMT-I/sub B/ gene is closely linked to the hMT-I/sub A/ gene, and two pseudogenes, hMT-I/sub C/ and hMT-I/sub D/ separate the two. From its nucleotide sequence hMT-I/sub B/ seems to be an active gene, encoding a functional protein even though it differs in four positions from the published sequence of human MT-I proteins. This gene is expressed in a human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, and its expression is stimulated by Cd ++ . Using gene fusions to the viral thymidine-kinase gene we find that hMT-I/sub B/, like the hMT-I/sub A/ and hMT-II/sub A/ genes, contains a heavy metal responsive promoterregulatory element within its 5' flanking region. We analyzed the level of hMT-I/sub B/ mRNA in a variety of human cell lines by the S1 nuclease technique, and compared it to the expression of the hMT-II/sub A/ gene. While the hMT-II/sub A/ gene was expressed in all of the cell lines analyzed, the hMT-I/sub B/ gene was expressed in liver and kidney derived cell lines cells. This suggest that the expression of the hMT-I/sub B/ gene is controlled in a tissue specific manner. 13 refs

  6. Detection of Equid herpesvirus type 2 and 5 DNA in uterine flushings of mares with reproductive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Sforna, Monica; Stefanetti, Valentina; Casagrande Proietti, Patrizia; Brignone, Luca; Del Sero, Andrea; Falcioni, Fabio; Orvieto, Simona; Tamantini, Cristina; Tiburzi, Alessandra; Valentini, Silvia; Coletti, Mauro; Timoney, Peter J; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2014-12-05

    In recent years, there has been increasing evidence of the potential pathogenic significance of equine gammaherpesviruses in the horse. In humans, cattle and mice, gammaherpesviruses have already been associated with uterine infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of gammaherpesviruses in uterine flushings of mares with reproductive problems and to evaluate if there was a possible statistical association with clinical and laboratory findings in these cases. A total of 80 uterine flushings were collected from 61 mares with different reproductive problems and these were tested for equine herpesviruses (EHV) 1-5 by PCR. In the case of each mare in the study, the age, history of infertility, presence of anatomical defects in the reproductive tract, presence of systemic or local disease at time of sampling, phase in the oestrous cycle, post-partum interval, nature of uterine lavage performed (low versus large volume lavage), cytological and bacteriological examination results from the uterine flushing, and PCR herpesvirus results were recorded. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify possible statistical associations and risk factors. Nine out of 61 mares (14.7%) had EHV-5 DNA in their uterine flushings. Co-infections with EHV-1 and EHV-2 were present in two cases. Of all the variables analyzed, only the cytological examination findings were associated with EHV-5 PCR positive results, both on univariate and multivariable analysis, especially in cases with an inflammation score of 3. It is postulated that presence of EHV-5 infection in the non-pregnant uterus may have a role to play in reproductive dysfunction and have a negative consequence on the pregnant uterus. Additional studies involving both healthy mares and mares with reproductive problems need to be performed, however, to elucidate whatever role equine gammaherpesviruses may play in the reproductive tract. This would be very

  7. Early childhood development: impact of national human development, family poverty, parenting practices and access to early childhood education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T D; Luchters, S; Fisher, J

    2017-05-01

    This study was to describe and quantify the relationships among family poverty, parents' caregiving practices, access to education and the development of children living in low- and middle-income countries (LAMIC). We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected in UNICEF's Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS). Early childhood development was assessed in four domains: language-cognitive, physical, socio-emotional and approaches to learning. Countries were classified into three groups on the basis of the Human Development Index (HDI). Overall, data from 97 731 children aged 36 to 59 months from 35 LAMIC were included in the after analyses. The mean child development scale score was 4.93 out of a maximum score of 10 (95%CI 4.90 to 4.97) in low-HDI countries and 7.08 (95%CI 7.05 to 7.12) in high-HDI countries. Family poverty was associated with lower child development scores in all countries. The total indirect effect of family poverty on child development score via attending early childhood education, care for the child at home and use of harsh punishments at home was -0.13 SD (77.8% of the total effect) in low-HDI countries, -0.09 SD (23.8% of the total effect) in medium-HDI countries and -0.02 SD (6.9% of the total effect) in high-HDI countries. Children in the most disadvantaged position in their societies and children living in low-HDI countries are at the greatest risk of failing to reach their developmental potential. Optimizing care for child development at home is essential to reduce the adverse effects of poverty on children's early development and subsequent life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of cDNA encoding human placental anticoagulant protein (PP4): Homology with the lipocortin family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Abel, K.J.; Bohn, H.; Loebermann, H.; Lottspeich, F.; Kuepper, H.

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human placenta was screened for sequences encoding the placental protein 4 (PP4). PP4 is an anticoagulant protein that acts as an indirect inhibitor of the thromboplastin-specific complex, which is involved in the blood coagulation cascade. Partial amino acid sequence information from PP4-derived cyanogen bromide fragments was used to design three oligonucleotide probes for screening the library. From 10 6 independent recombinants, 18 clones were identified that hybridized to all three probes. These 18 recombinants contained cDNA inserts encoding a protein of 320 amino acid residues. In addition to the PP4 cDNA the authors identified 9 other recombinants encoding a protein with considerable similarity (74%) to PP4, which was termed PP4-X. PP4 and PP4-X belong to the lipocortin family, as judged by their homology to lipocortin I and calpactin I

  9. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... of patients with RA, and the cells are assumed to play a role in joint destruction in that disorder. Therefore, we examined whether neutrophils are a source of YKL-40. YKL-40 was found to colocalize and comobilize with lactoferrin (the most abundant protein of specific granules) but not with gelatinase...... YKL-40 at the myelocyte-metamyelocyte stage, the stage of maturation at which other specific granule proteins are formed. Assuming that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in RA by inducing T cell-mediated autoimmune response, YKL-40 released from neutrophils in the inflamed joint could be essential...

  10. Harnessing Integrative Omics to Facilitate Molecular Imaging of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Martin; de Boer, H Rudolf; Hooge, Marjolijn N Lub-de; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a growing problem worldwide. The cause of death in cancer patients is often due to treatment-resistant metastatic disease. Many molecularly targeted anticancer drugs have been developed against 'oncogenic driver' pathways. However, these treatments are usually only effective in properly selected patients. Resistance to molecularly targeted drugs through selective pressure on acquired mutations or molecular rewiring can hinder their effectiveness. This review summarizes how molecular imaging techniques can potentially facilitate the optimal implementation of targeted agents. Using the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family as a model in (pre)clinical studies, we illustrate how molecular imaging may be employed to characterize whole body target expression as well as monitor drug effectiveness and the emergence of tumor resistance. We further discuss how an integrative omics discovery platform could guide the selection of 'effect sensors' - new molecular imaging targets - which are dynamic markers that indicate treatment effectiveness or resistance.

  11. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mirzaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma, 5637 (bladder tumor and U-87MG (brain tumor cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion.

  12. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

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    Suman Kumar Nandy

    Full Text Available Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  13. Investigation of latent infections caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 in koi ( Cyprinus carpio) in southern China.

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    Zheng, Shucheng; Wang, Qing; Bergmann, Sven M; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Chun; Shi, Cunbin

    2017-05-01

    Although herpesviruses such as cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) can establish lifelong latent infections, little is known about latency conditions in farmed koi populations in China. We used nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the TK gene and an indirect antibody ELISA to screen asymptomatic fish obtained from southern China for evidence of CyHV-3 infection. CyHV-3 DNA could be detected either in peripheral blood leukocytes or from gills of asymptomatic koi. Most koi sera did not contain anti-CyHV-3 antibodies; however, 5 samples were ELISA positive, providing evidence of prior CyHV-3 infections. These findings suggest that koi may survive CyHV-3 infections and become virus carriers.

  14. Psittacid herpesvirus 3 infection in the eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, M; Gabor, L J; Peacock, L; Srivastava, M; Rosenwax, A; Phalen, D

    2013-11-01

    Psittacid herpesvirus 3 (PsHV-3) has recently been implicated as the cause of a severe respiratory disease in Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii) in the United States. In this report, the clinical manifestations and gross and microscopic lesions of PsHV-3 infection in 2 eclectus parrots (Eclectus roratus) in Australia are described. The presence of a PsHV-3 infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of PsHV-3 DNA using degenerate and PsHV-3 primers. Electron microscopy of infected cells demonstrated the assembly of herpesvirus virions as well as intranuclear tubular structures. The detection of PsHV-3 in Australia in 2 eclectus parrots broadens the list of known affected species and confirms the presence of this virus in Australia.

  15. The prevalence of ovine herpesvirus-2 in 4 sheep breeds from different regions in South Africa

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    C.W. Bremer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available About 90% of bovine malignant catarrhal fever (BMCF PCR-positive cases in South Africa are caused by alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AlHV-1 and the other 10 % by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2. The prevalence of OvHV-2 in different sheep breeds in South Africa was determined in order to investigate whether the lower incidence of BMCF caused by OvHV-2 in comparison with AlHV-1 can be ascribed to a low incidence of the virus in sheep. A single-tube hemi-nested PCR was developed, evaluated and applied to detect OvHV-2 DNA. The prevalence of the virus in 4 sheep breeds from various regions in South Africa was shown to be 77 %. No statistically significant difference was found amongst the sheep breeds tested.

  16. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.L.; Aparisio, D.I.; Bandyopadhyay, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR 0 ) resistant to 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [ 125 I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro

  17. Global and disease-associated genetic variation in the human Fanconi anemia gene family.

    Science.gov (U