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Sample records for human herpesvirus family

  1. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP Proteins with Implications for Human Disease

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    Marshall V. Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person’s lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase, as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein–Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

  2. Human herpesviruses and MS

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    Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in MS pathogenesis; the human herpesviruses (HHV) are likely candidates for such factors. HHV share a number of properties: they are almost ubiquitous, they are highly prevalent worldwide, they all cause latent infections...

  3. Autophagy and immunity – insights from human herpesviruses

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    Luke eWilliams

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The herpesviruses are a family of double-stranded DNA viruses that infect a large variety of organisms. Having co-evolved with their hosts over millennia, herpesviruses have developed a large repertoire of mechanisms to manipulate normal cellular processes. Given the important role of autophagy in cells, this pathway is a target for manipulation by herpesviruses. Here we describe the ways that human herpesviruses interact and interfere with the cellular autophagy machinery in order to escape innate and adaptive immunity. Recent research on the human herpesvirus Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV suggesting that localisation within the nucleus can shelter viral proteins from autophagy is also discussed.

  4. Human herpesvirus 8 – A novel human pathogen

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    Edelman Daniel C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1994, Chang and Moore reported on the latest of the gammaherpesviruses to infect humans, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 1. This novel herpesvirus has and continues to present challenges to define its scope of involvement in human disease. In this review, aspects of HHV-8 infection are discussed, such as, the human immune response, viral pathogenesis and transmission, viral disease entities, and the virus's epidemiology with an emphasis on HHV-8 diagnostics.

  5. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

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    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  6. СHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 6

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    M. A. Nikolskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the problem of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (CIHHV-6. The main features of CIHHV-6 are wide prevalence (near 1% of population, ability to inheritance, which leads to problems of diagnostics of acute HHV-6 infection. Also there is the opportunity of activation CIHHV-6, linked to immunodeficiency and conditions after transplantation. Potentially CIHHV-6 can be associated with the abnormalities of nervous system development, autoimmune disorders and conditions, related to damage of telomere. 

  7. Regulation of the retinoblastoma proteins by the human herpesviruses

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    Kalejta Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that alter the environment of infected cells in order to replicate more efficiently. One way viruses achieve this is by modulating cell cycle progression. The main regulators of progression out of G0, through G1, and into S phase are the members of the retinoblastoma (Rb family of tumor suppressors. Rb proteins repress the transcription of genes controlled by the E2F transcription factors. Because the expression of E2F-responsive genes is required for cell cycle progression into the S phase, Rb arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1. A number of viral proteins directly target Rb family members for inactivation, presumably to create an environment more hospitable for viral replication. Such viral proteins include the extensively studied oncoproteins E7 (from human papillomavirus, E1A (from adenovirus, and the large T (tumor antigen (from simian virus 40. Elucidating how these three viral proteins target and inactivate Rb has proven to be an invaluable approach to augment our understanding of both normal cell cycle progression and carcinogenesis. In addition to these proteins, a number of other virally-encoded inactivators of the Rb family have subsequently been identified including a surprising number encoded by human herpesviruses. Here we review how the human herpesviruses modulate Rb function during infection, introduce the individual viral proteins that directly or indirectly target Rb, and speculate about what roles Rb modulation by these proteins may play in viral replication, pathogenesis, and oncogenesis.

  8. Herpesvirus Herpesvirus

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    A. Bascones-Martínez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El Herpesvirus (HSV destaca por ser el principal responsable de un gran número de infecciones de la región orofacial, así como de la región genital. El virus del herpes simple es el prototipo de una gran familia de virus de doble cadena de ADN, los herpesviridiae, que causan una gran morbilidad en humanos. La infección en las células de la mucosa epitelial da lugar a una serie de signos clínicos y a la infección latente a nivel de las neuronas sensoriales. Durante la fase de infección productiva se expresan múltiples proteínas virales mientras que en fases latentes apenas se expresan dichas proteínas. La reactivación del virus da lugar a infecciones recurrentes, desencadenando en lisis celular y múltiples cuadros con manifestaciones clínicas bien definidas y que desarrollaremos en esta revisión. Por otro lado analizaremos la evidencia disponible que relaciona ciertos virus de esta familia con la progresión de la enfermedad periodontal tanto en adultos como en niños.The HSV is a virus that causes of a great number of infections both in the orofacial and in the genital area. The herpes simple virus is the prototype of a big family of double DNA strand viruses, the herpesviridiae, which causes a great morbidity in humans. The infection of epithelial cells of the oral mucosa gives rise to a series of clinical signs and symptoms and to a latent infection of the sensitive neurons. During the active phase of infection, multiple viral proteins are expressed while in the latent phase they are barely expressed. When the virus is reactivated, recurrent infection starts, producing cell lisis and different clinical manifestations that we are will reviewed in this article. We will explain the. The fact that certain virus of the herpesvirus family might be related with the progression of periodontal diseases in adults and children which is gaining interest lately.

  9. Human herpesvirus 6 infections after liver transplantation

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    Rima Camille Abdel Massih; Raymund R Razonable

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infections occur in > 95% of humans. Primary infection, which occurs in early childhood as an asymptomatic illness or manifested clinically as roseola infantum, leads to a state of subclinical viral persistence and latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation, possibly induced and facilitated by allograft rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. Since the vast majority of humans harbor the virus in a latent state, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are believed to be mostly due to endogenous reactivation or superinfection (reactivation in the transplanted organ). In a minority of cases, however,primary HHV-6 infection may occur when an HHV-6 negative individual receives a liver allograft from an HHV-6 positive donor. The vast majority of documented HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are asymptomatic. In a minority of cases, HHV-6 has been implicated as a cause of febrile illness with rash and myelosuppression, hepatitis, pneumonitis, and encephalitis after liver transplantation. In addition,HHV-6 has been associated with a variety of indirect effects such as allograft rejection, and increased predisposition and severity of other infections including cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis C virus, and opportunistic fungi. Because of the uncommon nature of the clinical illnesses directly attributed to HHV-6, there is currently no recommended HHV-6- specific approach to prevention. However, ganciclovir and valganciclovir, which are primarily intended for the prevention of CMV disease, are also active against HHV-6 and may prevent its reactivation after transplantation. The treatment of established HHV-6 disease is usually with intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir,or foscarnet, complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. This article reviews the current advances in the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutic modalities against HHV6 in the setting of liver transplantation.

  10. Molecular and immunohistochemical detection of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8.

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    Chadburn, Amy; Wilson, Janet; Wang, Y Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) is etiologically related to the development of several human diseases, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL)/extra-cavitary (EC) PEL, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and large B-cell lymphoma arising in KSHV/HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. Although serologic studies can identify persons infected with this virus, molecular genetics, specifically PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical techniques, are rapid, sensitive, and specific, and are able to more closely link KSHV/HHV-8 to a given disease process. As these KSHV/HHV-8-related diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals, the identification of the virus within lesional tissue will allow for more targeted therapy.

  11. Human herpesvirus 6 in hematological malignancies.

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    Ogata, Masao

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenetic roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 in lymphoproliferative diseases have been of continued interest. Many molecular studies have tried to establish a pathogenic role for HHV-6 in lymphoid malignancies. However, whether HHV-6 plays a role in these pathologies remains unclear, as positive polymerase chain reaction results for HHV-6 in those studies may reflect latent infection or reactivation rather than presence of HHV-6 in neoplastic cells. A small number of studies have investigated HHV-6 antigen expression in pathologic specimens. As a result, the lack of HHV-6 antigen expression on neoplastic cells argues against any major pathogenic role of HHV-6. The role of HHV-6 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has also been of interest but remains controversial, with 2 studies documenting higher levels of HHV-6 antibody in ALL patients, and another 2 large-scale studies finding no significant differences in HHV-6 seroprevalences between ALL patients and controls. Alternatively, HHV-6 is increasingly recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen. HHV-6 reactivation is common among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and is linked to various clinical manifestations. In particular, HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be significant, life-threatening complication. Most HHV-6 encephalitis develops in patients receiving transplant from an unrelated donor, particularly cord blood, typically around the time of engraftment. Symptoms are characterized by short-term memory loss and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Prognosis for HHV-6 encephalitis is poor, but appropriate prophylactic measures have not been established. Establishment of preventive strategies against HHV-6 encephalitis represents an important challenge for physicians involved with SCT.

  12. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

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    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    Mouse models of human herpesvirus infections The human roseoloviruses HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with Roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T-cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By Next Generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174Kb genome sequence encoding 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7, than another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV6A/HHV6B/HHV7.Importance: Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  13. Herpesvirus

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    A. Bascones-Martínez

    Full Text Available El Herpesvirus (HSV destaca por ser el principal responsable de un gran número de infecciones de la región orofacial, así como de la región genital. El virus del herpes simple es el prototipo de una gran familia de virus de doble cadena de ADN, los herpesviridiae, que causan una gran morbilidad en humanos. La infección en las células de la mucosa epitelial da lugar a una serie de signos clínicos y a la infección latente a nivel de las neuronas sensoriales. Durante la fase de infección productiva se expresan múltiples proteínas virales mientras que en fases latentes apenas se expresan dichas proteínas. La reactivación del virus da lugar a infecciones recurrentes, desencadenando en lisis celular y múltiples cuadros con manifestaciones clínicas bien definidas y que desarrollaremos en esta revisión. Por otro lado analizaremos la evidencia disponible que relaciona ciertos virus de esta familia con la progresión de la enfermedad periodontal tanto en adultos como en niños.

  14. Features of Human Herpesvirus-6A and -6B Entry

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    Takahiro Maeki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 is a T lymphotropic herpesvirus belonging to the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. HHV-6 was long classified into variants A and B (HHV-6A and HHV-6B; however, recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B were reclassified as different species. The process of herpesvirus entry into target cells is complicated, and in the case of HHV-6A and HHV-6B, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated, although both viruses are known to enter cells via endocytosis. In this paper, (1 findings about the cellular receptor and its ligand for HHV-6A and HHV-6B are summarized, and (2 a schematic model of HHV-6A’s replication cycle, including its entry, is presented. In addition, (3 reports showing the importance of lipids in both the HHV-6A envelope and target-cell membrane for viral entry are reviewed, and (4 glycoproteins involved in cell fusion are discussed.

  15. High prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 in schizophrenic patients.

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    Hannachi, Neila; El Kissi, Yousri; Samoud, Samar; Nakhli, Jaafar; Letaief, Leila; Gaabout, Samia; Ali, Bechir Ben Hadj; Boukadida, Jalel

    2014-05-15

    Many studies have reported an association between Herpes family viruses and an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the role of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) has never been investigated. This study aimed to assess HHV8 prevalence in schizophrenic patients as well as the possible association between HHV8 infection and schizophrenia clinical features. We consecutively enrolled 108 patients meeting fourth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria of schizophrenia and 108 age and sex matched controls. Data about a number of demographic characteristics and potential HHV8 risk factors of infection were collected. Standardized psychopathology measures, disease severity and functioning level were obtained using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) and Global Assessment of functioning (GAF). The presence of anti-HHV8 antibodies was analyzed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. A higher prevalence of HHV8 infection in schizophrenic patients than in controls was found. Marital status, having children, sexual behavior and risk factors of blood transmission were not associated with HHV8 prevalence. However, among schizophrenic patients, HHV8 prevalence was statically associated with positive symptoms. To our knowledge, this would be the first report of a possible role of HHV8 in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. To prove this hypothesis, further investigation of HHV8 in schizophrenia with larger samples is needed.

  16. Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Sun Shipeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE. Results In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108 with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122 were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001; significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1. Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625. Conclusion Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

  17. Studying Herpesvirus Pathogenesis Using SCID Mice Implanted With Human Tissues

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    Marvin; Sommer; Shannon; Taylor; Stacey; Leisenfelder; Robert; Morton; Ann; Arvin; Jennifer; Moffat

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus(HCMV)and Varicella Zoster virus(VZV)are belongto herpesvirusfamily.HCMVrarelycaus-es symptomatic diseaseinanimmunocompetent host;however,itis a major cause of infectious morbidityand mortalityinimmunocompromised individuals and developingfetuses.VZVinfectioncauses chickenpoxandshingles.Sincethese spe-cies-specific herpesviruses do notinfect other animals,noanimal model is availablefor pathogenesis studies.Severe com-binedimmunodeficient(SCID)mice implanted with humantissues(SCID-hu)pro...

  18. Susceptibility of human placenta derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells to human herpesviruses infection.

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    Simone Avanzi

    Full Text Available Fetal membranes (FM derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs are higher in number, expansion and differentiation abilities compared with those obtained from adult tissues, including bone marrow. Upon systemic administration, ex vivo expanded FM-MSCs preferentially home to damaged tissues promoting regenerative processes through their unique biological properties. These characteristics together with their immune-privileged nature and immune suppressive activity, a low infection rate and young age of placenta compared to other sources of SCs make FM-MSCs an attractive target for cell-based therapy and a valuable tool in regenerative medicine, currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In the present study we investigated the permissivity of FM-MSCs to all members of the human Herpesviridae family, an issue which is relevant to their purification, propagation, conservation and therapeutic use, as well as to their potential role in the vertical transmission of viral agents to the fetus and to their potential viral vector-mediated genetic modification. We present here evidence that FM-MSCs are fully permissive to infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, Varicella zoster virus (VZV, and Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV, but not with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Human Herpesvirus-6, 7 and 8 (HHV-6, 7, 8 although these viruses are capable of entering FM-MSCs and transient, limited viral gene expression occurs. Our findings therefore strongly suggest that FM-MSCs should be screened for the presence of herpesviruses before xenotransplantation. In addition, they suggest that herpesviruses may be indicated as viral vectors for gene expression in MSCs both in gene therapy applications and in the selective induction of differentiation.

  19. Patterns of human herpesvirus-8 oral shedding among diverse cohorts of human herpesvirus-8 seropositive persons.

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    Bender Ignacio, Rachel A; Goldman, Jason D; Magaret, Amalia S; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Gantt, Soren; Johnston, Christine; Phipps, Warren T; Schiffer, Joshua T; Zuckerman, Richard A; McClelland, R Scott; Celum, Connie; Corey, Larry; Wald, Anna; Casper, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), the etiologic agent of Kaposi sarcoma (KS), establishes lifelong latent infection with periodic lytic replication ("shedding") at mucosal sites, especially the oropharynx. Patterns of HHV-8 shedding are not well understood, and require elucidation to better predict risk of HHV-8 related malignancies in those infected. We sought to characterize patterns of HHV-8 oropharyngeal shedding among diverse cohorts that enrolled HHV-8 seropositive persons. We quantified HHV-8 oral shedding using PCR among HHV-8 seropositive persons who collected at least 14 days of oral swabs in 22 studies on 3 continents. We excluded persons taking antivirals during sampling or any prior use of antiretrovirals in those who were HIV-infected. 248 participants were enrolled from the US, Peru, Cameroon, Uganda, and Kenya; 61 % were men, 58 % were HIV seropositive, and 16 % had KS. Overall, 3,123 of 10,557 samples (29.6 %) had HHV-8 detected. Quantity of virus shed was highly correlated with shedding rate, (ρ = 0.72, p < 0.0001). HHV-8 was detected in ≥1 sample in 55 % of participants with a median of 7 % of days in the US and Kenya, 0 % in Uganda and Peru, and 18 % in Cameroon. Median episode duration was three days, and episodes with high median quantity lasted longer (42 vs 3 days, p < 0.0001). In persons with multiple observations over time, 66 % of shedding rate variance was attributable to differences between individuals. In HHV-8 infected individuals from diverse settings, oral mucosal shedding rate, quantity, and duration were correlated; individual shedding was highly variable. Studies are needed to determine factors accounting for between-person variation and the relationship of HHV-8 shedding to development of associated diseases.

  20. Human herpesviruses 6, 7, and 8 from a dermatologic perspective.

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    Wolz, Michael M; Sciallis, Gabriel F; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2012-10-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) have frequently been suspected as etiologic agents or cofactors in cutaneous disease. However, clearly established associations are rare. Investigations into an etiologic association between HHVs and cutaneous disease are complicated by the ubiquity and nearly universal prevalence of some herpesviruses. This article summarizes the associations between cutaneous disease and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8. In addition to a personal library of references, the PubMed database of biomedical literature was searched using the following Medical Subject Heading terms: HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8, each in conjunction with cutaneous manifestations, virology, epidemiology, dermatopathology, and therapeutics, between 1998 and March 2011. Free-text searches with known or suspected disease associations were added for broader coverage. The results have been summarized to provide a practical review for the physician likely to encounter cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Herpesvirus-6A/B Binds to Spermatozoa Acrosome and Is the Most Prevalent Herpesvirus in Semen from Sperm Donors

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    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Larsen, Peter; Kofod-Olsen, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    ejaculate that was positive for one or more human herpesvirus. Of these 27.3% (n = 15) had a double herpesvirus infection. If corrected for the presence of multiple ejaculates from some donors, the adjusted frequency of herpesviruses in semen was 27.2% with HSV-1 in 0.4%; HSV-2 in 0.1%; EBV in 6.3%; HCMV...

  2. Human Exposure to Herpesvirus B–Seropositive Macaques, Bali, Indonesia

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    Engel, Gregory A.; Schillaci, Michael A.; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a “monkey forest” (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B. PMID:12141963

  3. Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia.

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    Engel, Gregory A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Schillaci, Michael A; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a "monkey forest" (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B.

  4. High prevalence of antibodies to human herpesvirus 8 in relatives of patients with classic Kaposi's sarcoma from Sardinia

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    Angeloni, Antonio; Heston, Lee; Uccini, Stefania; Sirianni, Maria Caterina; Cottoni, Francesca Maria Giovanna; Masala, Maria Vittoria; Cerimele, Decio; Lin, Su-Fang; Sun, Ren; Rigsby, Michael; Faggioni, Alberto; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    A survey for antibodies to a recombinant small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV‐8) was conducted in Sardinia, one of the world's highest incidence areas for classic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Prevalence of antibodies to HHV‐8 sVCA was greatest in patients with KS (95%), followed by family members (39%) and a Sardinian control population age‐ and sex‐matched to the relatives (11%). Within families, prevalence of antibodies was about equal among spouses, children, and si...

  5. Influence of ganciclovir prophylaxis on citomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6, and human herpesvirus 7 viremia in renal transplant recipients.

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    Galarraga, M C; Gomez, E; de Oña, M; Rodriguez, A; Laures, A; Boga, J A; Melon, S

    2005-06-01

    In order to know the influence of ganciclovir (GCV) prophylaxis on cytomegalovirus (CMV) human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and HHV-7 replication in renal transplant recipients, three groups were studies: 54 patients without GCV; 29, with short-term GCV prophylaxis (less than 30 days); and 51, with long-term GCV prophylaxis (more than 60 days). CMV viremia was more prevalent in the first group (74%, 55%, and 29%, respectively), but CMV replication was also found in 14 patients during therapy, in the other two groups. The antiviral did not affect the prevalence of HHV-6 (67.2%) or HHV-7 (76%), but HHV-6 viremia appeared later (42 +/- 31 vs 21 +/- 25/38 +/- 29 days posttransplant) and was shorter (29 +/- 30 vs 62 +/- 34/41 +/- 33 days) among patients with long-term GCV prophylaxis. On the other hand, CMV viremia was longer when HHV-6 replication was present (40 +/- 25 days vs 18 +/- 16 days). In addition, HHV-7 DNA was detected in all patients with CMV disease.

  6. Human herpesvirus 6 infection in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients.

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    Altay, Mustafa; Akay, Hatice; Ünverdi, Selman; Altay, Filiz; Ceri, Mevlüt; Altay, F Aybala; Cesur, Salih; Duranay, Murat; Demiroz, Ali Pekcan

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection occurs worldwide and can be reactivated from latency during periods of immunosuppression, especially after organ transplantation. No previous study has evaluated the influence of dialysis type on HHV-6 infection. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of HHV-6 antibodies in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We studied 36 PD patients, 35 HD patients, and 20 healthy subjects, all with no history of organ transplantation. After systematic inquiries and a physical examination, blood was drawn for determination of biochemical parameters, cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), hepatitis B surface antigen, and the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus antibodies. Titers of HHV-6 IgM and IgG antibodies were determined by ELISA. Titers for HHV-6 IgM antibody were positive in 9 HD patients (25.7%), 8 PD patients (22.2%), and 2 control subjects (10.0%, p > 0.05). More HD patients (20.0%) than PD patients (5.6%, p = 0.07) or control subjects (0.0%, p = 0.03) were positive for HHV-6 IgG antibody. In HD patients, HHV-6 IgG seropositivity and duration of dialysis were positively correlated (R = 0.33, p = 0.05). Infection with HHV-6 is not rare in PD and HD patients. In addition, HHV-6 IgG seropositivity was significantly higher in HD patients than in control subjects and approached significance when compared with seropositivity in PD patients. Moreover, in HD patients, HHV-6 IgG seropositivity correlated with duration on HD. These preliminary findings provide insight into the pre-transplantation period for patients and may aid our understanding of how to best protect patients against HHV-6 after transplantation.

  7. Multiple sclerosis and herpesvirus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and its etiology is believed to have both genetic and environmental components. Several viruses have already been implicated as triggers and there are several studies that implicate members of the Herpesviridae family in the pathogenesis of MS. The most important characteristic of these viruses is that they have periods of latency and exacerbations within their biological sanctuary, the central nervous system. The Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 viruses are the members that are most studied as being possible triggers of multiple sclerosis. According to evidence in the literature, the herpesvirus family is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, but it is unlikely that they are the only component responsible for its development. There are probably multiple triggers and more studies are necessary to investigate and define these interactions.

  8. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Kotler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae. Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus.

  9. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine-like, secreted protein product of the U83 gene from human herpesvirus 6, here named vCCL4, was chemically synthesized to be characterized in a complete library of the 18 known human chemokine receptors expressed individually in stably transfected cell lines. vCCL4 was found to cause...

  10. High prevalence of antibodies to human herpesvirus 8 in relatives of patients with classic Kaposi's sarcoma from Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, A; Heston, L; Uccini, S; Sirianni, M C; Cottoni, F; Masala, M V; Cerimele, D; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Rigsby, M; Faggioni, A; Miller, G

    1998-06-01

    A survey for antibodies to a recombinant small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) was conducted in Sardinia, one of the world's highest incidence areas for classic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Prevalence of antibodies to HHV-8 sVCA was greatest in patients with KS (95%), followed by family members (39%) and a Sardinian control population age- and sex-matched to the relatives (11%). Within families, prevalence of antibodies was about equal among spouses, children, and siblings of KS patients, a finding that raises the possibilities of intrafamilial person-to-person or vertical transmission. Antibodies were detected 2-3 times more frequently in males than in females. The data show that prevalence of antibodies to HHV-8 sVCA correlates with the distribution of classic KS in a high- incidence area. Clustering of seroprevalence within some families suggests the presence of familial risk factors for active HHV-8 infection.

  11. Human herpesvirus 8 seropositivity among sexually active adults in Uganda.

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    Fatma M Shebl

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sexual transmission of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 has been implicated among homosexual men, but the evidence for sexual transmission among heterosexual individuals is controversial. We investigated the role of sexual transmission of HHV8 in a nationally representative sample in Uganda, where HHV8 infection is endemic and transmitted mostly during childhood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population was a subset of participants (n = 2681 from a population-based HIV/AIDS serobehavioral survey of adults aged 15-59 years conducted in 2004/2005. High risk for sexual transmission was assessed by questionnaire and serological testing for HIV and herpes simplex virus 2. Anti-HHV8 antibodies were measured using two enzyme immunoassays targeting synthetic peptides from the K8.1 and orf65 viral genes. The current study was restricted to 2288 sexually active adults. ORs and 95% CIs for HHV8 seropositivity were estimated by fitting logistic regression models with a random intercept using MPLUS and SAS software. RESULTS: The weighted prevalence of HHV8 seropositivity was 56.2%, based on 1302 seropositive individuals, and it increased significantly with age (P(trend<0.0001. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, geography, education, and HIV status, HHV8 seropositivity was positively associated with reporting two versus one marital union (OR:1.52, 95% CI: 1.17-1.97 and each unit increase in the number of children born (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.08, and was inversely associated with ever having used a condom (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.45-0.89. HHV8 seropositivity was not associated with HIV (P = 0.660 or with herpes simplex virus 2 (P = 0.732 seropositivity. Other sexual variables, including lifetime number of sexual partners or having had at least one sexually transmitted disease, and socioeconomic variables were unrelated to HHV8 seropositivity. CONCLUSION: Our findings are compatible with the conclusion that sexual transmission of HHV8 in

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, human herpesvirus 8 viremia, and HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc O. Siegel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma and multicentric Castleman Disease are HIV-related disease processes that are associated with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection. The development of multicentric Castleman disease can often be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome phenomenon and is associated with markedly elevated levels of HHV-8 viremia, as illustrated by this case.

  13. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arnež

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient’s serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness.

  14. The Biology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di QIN; Chun LU

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV),also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8),is discovered in 1994 from Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesion of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)patient.In addition to its association with KS,KSHV has also been implicated as the causative agent of two other AIDS-associated malignancies:primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD).KSHV is a complex DNA virus that not only has the ability to promote cellular growth and survival for tumor development,but also can provoke deregulated angiogenesis,inflammation,and modulate the patient's immune system in favor of tumor growth.As KSHV is a necessary but not sufficient etiological factor for KS,human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a very important cofactor.Here we review the basic information about the biology of KSHV,development of pathogenesis and interaction between KSHV and HIV.

  15. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...

  16. [Human herpesvirus-6-associated diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Masao

    2016-03-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 belongs to the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily of human herpesviruses. Primary HHV-6 infection commonly causes exanthem subitum. Like other herpesviruses, HHV-6 is capable of persisting in the host after the primary infection. Under conditions of immunosuppression, latent HHV-6 can be reactivated. Between 30% and 70% of patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) experience HHV-6 reactivation at 2-4 weeks after transplantation. Accumulating evidence indicates that HHV-6 is an actual cause of encephalitis after allo-HCT. Risk factors for HHV-6 encephalitis include cord blood transplantation and an inflammatory milieu, which occurs in the early period after allo-HCT. Although HHV-6 encephalitis is associated with a poor prognosis, no validated treatments or preventative measures have as yet been established. HHV-6 reactivation may also cause myelitis, bone marrow suppression, lung disease, hepatitis, delirium, and graft-versus-host disease. However, such associations have not been consistently demonstrated and causality remains uncertain. This review updates the latest information regarding the clinical syndrome accompanying HHV-6 reactivation, with a particular focus on HHV-6 encephalitis, in the form of a series of questions and answers.

  17. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in heart failure: prevalence and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Wallaschek, Nina; Gross, Ulrich M; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Seeberg, Bettina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Escher, Felicitas; Poller, Wolfgang; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) A and B are two betaherpesviruses that are associated with many conditions including roseola, drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, limbic encephalitis, and myocarditis. HHV-6 is integrated in the germline [chromosomically integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6)] in ∼0.8% of the human population. To date, the prevalence, species distribution, and treatment responses of ciHHV-6 are unknown for cardiac patients. We determined the prevalence of HHV-6 and ciHHV-6 genotypes in 1656 endomyocardial biopsies of patients with persisting unexplained symptoms of heart failure. Infection of cardiac tissue was identified by nested PCR, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Virus load and mRNA levels were followed in ciHHV-6 patients treated with ganciclovir. HHV-6 was detected in 273 of 1656 cardiac tissues (16.5%; HHV-6B, 98.2%, HHV-6A, 1.8%) by PCR. Nineteen of the 1656 patients (1.1%) presented with persistently high HHV-6 copy numbers indicative of ciHHV-6. Sequencing confirmed ciHHV-6A in seven patients (36.8%) which was considerably higher than detected in non-ciHHV-6 patients. Inheritance was demonstrated in three selected families, confirming ciHHV-6 chromosomal integration by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization. HHV-6 reactivation and chromosomal integration were confirmed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and heart tissue. Virus particles were identified in degenerating myocytes and interstitial cells. Antiviral treatment abolished viral mRNA and ameliorated cardiac symptoms. Virus replication in cardiac tissue of ciHHV-6 heart failure patients suggests that ciHHV-6 reactivation causes persistence of unexplained heart failure symptoms. We demonstrated that antiviral treatment, effective in decreasing viral transcripts and clinical complaints of cardiomyopathies, is a new therapeutic option for ciHHV-6-associated diseases. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  18. Attack, parry and riposte: molecular fencing between the innate immune system and human herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Trilling, V T K; Trilling, M

    2015-07-01

    Once individuals acquire one of the eight human-pathogenic herpesviruses, the upcoming relationship is predefined to last lifelong. Despite the fact that acute phases of herpesviral replication are usually confined and controlled by a concerted action of all branches of the healthy immune system, sterile immunity is never reached. To accomplish this, herpesviruses evolved the unique ability to outlast episodes of efficient immunity in a dormant state called latency and a remarkable array of immune antagonists which counteract most (if not all) relevant aspects of intrinsic, innate and adaptive immune responses. Certain psychological and physiological conditions (such as stress, immuno-suppression or pregnancy) predispose for viral reactivation which can lead to recurrent disease and virus spread. One important pillar of immunity is the innate immune system. The leading cytokines of the innate immune response are interferons (IFN). IFNs reinforce intrinsic immunity, induce a cell-intrinsic antiviral state and recruit and orchestrate adaptive immunity. Consistently, individuals lacking a functional IFN system suffer from otherwise harmless opportunists and live-attenuated vaccines. The selective pressure elicited by IFNs drove herpesviruses to evolve numerous IFN antagonistic gene products. A molecular in-depth understanding of (herpes-) viral IFN antagonists might allow the design of novel antiviral drugs which reconstitute IFN responses by blocking the antagonistic function and thereby help the host to help himself. Additionally, virus mutants lacking immune evasins constitute promising candidates for vaccine viruses. Here we summarize the current knowledge on IFN antagonistic strategies of the eight human herpesviruses and try to decipher common strategies.

  19. Human herpesvirus 8-associated neoplasms: the roles of viral replication and antiviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey

    2011-08-01

    In this review, we highlight the importance of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) lytic replication and the potential for antiviral therapies to prevent or treat HHV-8-related neoplasms. Diseases caused by HHV-8 infection include Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which occur primarily in patients with HIV infection. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. MCD and PEL occur less commonly but, like Kaposi sarcoma, are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Like all herpesviruses, HHV-8 is capable of either latent or lytic infection of cells. Although HHV-8 infection of tumor cells is predominately latent, accumulating data point to the importance of both lytic phase viral gene products and production of infectious virus. Antiviral agents that target herpesvirus DNA synthesis, such as ganciclovir, inhibit HHV-8 lytic replication and can prevent Kaposi sarcoma. Several HIV protease inhibitors may interfere with tumor growth and angiogenesis, and one protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, directly inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro. Controlled trials are indicated to determine the clinical utility of antiviral suppression of HHV-8 replication, and identify the optimal antiretroviral regimens, for the prevention and treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  20. No increased sperm DNA fragmentation index in semen containing human papillomavirus or herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Bungum, Mona; Fedder, Jens

    2013-01-01

    -based hybridization array that identifies all HHVs and 35 of the most common HPVs. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by the sperm chromatin structure assay. HPVs or HHVs, or both, were found in 57% of semen samples; however, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses.......It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or human herpesviruses (HHVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen from 76 sperm donors was examined by a PCR...

  1. Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 among individuals participating in a case–control study in Havana City, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, L; Serraino, D; Rezza, G; Lence, J; Ortiz, R M; Cruz, T; Vaccarella, S; Sarmati, L; Andreoni, M; Franceschi, S

    2002-01-01

    Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and with human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 shows strong geographic variations. We conducted this study to assess prevalence and risk factors for human herpesvirus type 8 infection in Havana City, Cuba. Information and residual serum samples already collected for a hospital based case–control study were used. A total of 379 individuals (267 males and 112 females; median age=63 years) were evaluated. Antibodies to the lytic antigen of human herpesvirus type 8 were detected by using an immunofluorescence assay, while human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 serology was performed by means of an ELISA test (alpha Biotech). Overall, 64 subjects (16.9%, 95% confidence interval: 13.1–20.0) were positive for human herpesvirus type 8 antibodies. Human herpesvirus type 8 seroprevalence significantly increased with age (odds ratio=1.9 for ⩾65 vs Havana City, Cuba, suggesting that Cuba may represent an intermediate endemical area. Sexual transmission does not seem to play a major role in the spread human herpesvirus type 8 infection. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1253–1256. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600613 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12439714

  2. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  3. Human herpesvirus 6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients infected with HIV: frequency and clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    Bossolasco, S.; Marenzi, R.; Dahl, H; Vago, L; Terreni, M.R.; Broccolo, F.; Lazzarin, A; Linde, A.; Cinque, P

    1999-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the frequency of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA detection in the CSF of patients infected with HIV and its relation to brain disease and systemic HHV-6 infection.
 Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyse CSF samples from 365 consecutive HIV infected patients with neurological symptoms. When available, plasma and brain tissues from patients whose CSF was HHV-6 positive were also studied.
 HHV-6 was found in the CSF of eight ...

  4. Non-human primate model of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesoon Chang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Since Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8 was first identified in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS lesions of HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, the basic biological understanding of KSHV has progressed remarkably. However, the absence of a proper animal model for KSHV continues to impede direct in vivo studies of viral replication, persistence, and pathogenesis. In response to this need for an animal model of KSHV infection, we have explored whether common marmosets can be experimentally infected with human KSHV. Here, we report the successful zoonotic transmission of KSHV into common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, Cj, a New World primate. Marmosets infected with recombinant KSHV rapidly seroconverted and maintained a vigorous anti-KSHV antibody response. KSHV DNA and latent nuclear antigen (LANA were readily detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and various tissues of infected marmosets. Remarkably, one orally infected marmoset developed a KS-like skin lesion with the characteristic infiltration of leukocytes by spindle cells positive for KSHV DNA and proteins. These results demonstrate that human KSHV infects common marmosets, establishes an efficient persistent infection, and occasionally leads to a KS-like skin lesion. This is the first animal model to significantly elaborate the important aspects of KSHV infection in humans and will aid in the future design of vaccines against KSHV and anti-viral therapies targeting KSHV coinfected tumor cells.

  5. In vitro and in vivo human herpesvirus 8 infection of placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariantonietta Di Stefano

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus infection of placenta may be harmful in pregnancy leading to disorders in fetal growth, premature delivery, miscarriage, or major congenital abnormalities. Although a correlation between human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection and abortion or low birth weight in children has been suggested, and rare cases of in utero or perinatal HHV-8 transmission have been documented, no direct evidence of HHV-8 infection of placenta has yet been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo susceptibility of placental cells to HHV-8 infection. Short-term infection assays were performed on placental chorionic villi isolated from term placentae. Qualitative and quantitative HHV-8 detection were performed by PCR and real-time PCR, and HHV-8 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Term placenta samples from HHV-8-seropositive women were analyzed for the presence of HHV-8 DNA and antigens. In vitro infected histocultures showed increasing amounts of HHV-8 DNA in tissues and supernatants; cyto- and syncitiotrophoblasts, as well as endothelial cells, expressed latent and lytic viral antigens. Increased apoptotic phenomena were visualized by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine nick end-labeling method in infected histocultures. Ex vivo, HHV-8 DNA and a latent viral antigen were detected in placenta samples from HHV-8-seropositive women. These findings demonstrate that HHV-8, like other human herpesviruses, may infect placental cells in vitro and in vivo, thus providing evidence that this phenomenon might influence vertical transmission and pregnancy outcome in HHV-8-infected women.

  6. Human Herpesvirus 7 U21 Tetramerizes To Associate with Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nathan A.; Wang, Qiuhong; Balbo, Andrea; Konrad, Sheryl L.; Buchli, Rico; Hildebrand, William H.; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The U21 gene product from human herpesvirus 7 binds to and redirects class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to a lysosomal compartment. The molecular mechanism by which U21 reroutes class I MHC molecules to lysosomes is not known. Here, we have reconstituted the interaction between purified soluble U21 and class I MHC molecules, suggesting that U21 does not require additional cellular proteins to interact with class I MHC molecules. Our results demonstrate that U21, itself predicted to contain an MHC class I-like protein fold, interacts tightly with class I MHC molecules as a tetramer, in a 4:2 stoichiometry. These observations have helped to elucidate a refined model describing the mechanism by which U21 escorts class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. IMPORTANCE In this report, we show that the human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) immunoevasin U21, itself a class I MHC-like protein, binds with high affinity to class I MHC molecules as a tetramer and escorts them to lysosomes, where they are degraded. While many class I MHC-like molecules have been described in detail, this unusual viral class I-like protein functions as a tetramer, associating with class I MHC molecules in a 4:2 ratio, illuminating a functional significance of homooligomerization of a class I MHC-like protein. PMID:24390327

  7. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  8. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  9. Influenza-associated encephalopathy: no evidence for neuroinvasion by influenza virus nor for reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 or 7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeijl, J.H.; Bakkers, J.; Wilbrink, B.; Melchers, W.J.; Mullaart, R.A.; Galama, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    During 2 consecutive influenza seasons we investigated the presence of influenza virus, human herpesvirus (HHV) type 6, and HHV-7 in cerebrospinal fluid samples from 9 white children suffering from influenza-associated encephalopathy. We conclude that it is unlikely that neuroinvasion by influenza

  10. Human Herpesvirus 6B Downregulates Expression of Activating Ligands during Lytic Infection To Escape Elimination by Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Dominik; Tai, Julie; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Dovrat, Sarah; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-11-01

    The Herpesviridae family consists of eight viruses, most of which infect a majority of the human population. One of the less-studied members is human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) (Roseolovirus), which causes a mild, well-characterized childhood disease. Primary HHV-6 infection is followed by lifelong latency. Reactivation frequently occurs in immunocompromised patients, such as those suffering from HIV infection or cancer or following transplantation, and causes potentially life-threatening complications. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that HHV-6 utilizes to remain undetected by natural killer (NK) cells, which are key participants in the innate immune response to infections. We revealed viral mechanisms which downregulate ligands for two powerful activating NK cell receptors: ULBP1, ULBP3, and MICB, which trigger NKG2D, and B7-H6, which activates NKp30. Accordingly, this downregulation impaired the ability of NK cells to recognize HHV-6-infected cells. Thus, we describe for the first time immune evasion mechanisms of HHV-6 that protect lytically infected cells from NK elimination. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) latently infects a large portion of the human population and can reactivate in humans lacking a functional immune system, such as cancer or AIDS patients. Under these conditions, it can cause life-threatening diseases. To date, the actions and interplay of immune cells, and particularly cells of the innate immune system, during HHV-6 infection are poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to understand how cells undergoing lytic HHV-6 infection interact with natural killer (NK) cells, innate lymphocytes constituting the first line of defense against viral intruders. We show that HHV-6 suppresses the expression of surface proteins that alert the immune cells by triggering two major receptors on NK cells, NKG2D and NKp30. As a consequence, HHV-6 can replicate undetected by the innate immune system and potentially spread infection throughout the body. This

  11. Prevalence of human herpesvirus-8 salivary shedding in HIV increases with CD4 count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, M; Koelle, D M; Ameli, N; Bacchetti, P; Greenspan, J S; Navazesh, M; Anastos, K; Greenblatt, R M

    2004-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which occurs in epidemic form in human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-infected individuals. Saliva is the only mucosal fluid in which infectious HHV-8 has been identified, although factors associated with HHV-8 salivary shedding remain unclear. Our study performed PCR analysis for HHV-8 DNA in saliva (and other body fluids) in 66 HIV- and HHV-8-co-infected women without KS so that we could examine predictors for HHV-8 DNA detection. CD4 count was the most significant predictor of HHV-8 salivary shedding, with increased prevalence of HHV-8 salivary DNA at higher CD4 counts. The odds of salivary HHV8 shedding at CD4 counts > = 350 cells/microL was 63 times the odds of shedding at CD4 200. Analysis of these data suggests an increased potential for HHV-8 transmission early in HIV infection, with implications for HHV-8 prevention.

  12. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  13. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: Innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env......-H and the antiviral immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease....

  14. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...... immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb...

  15. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Seth L; DiBlasi, Daniel; Arora, Navin S

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  16. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer

    OpenAIRE

    Cornell, Seth L.; Daniel DiBlasi; Arora, Navin S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  17. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: DRESS following Initiation of Oxcarbazepine with Elevated Human Herpesvirus-6 Titer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth L. Cornell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS is a rare and potentially fatal severe cutaneous reaction, which has a delayed onset after the initiation of an inciting medication. After recognition and withdrawal of the causative agent, along with aggressive management, a majority of patients will have complete recovery over several months. We present a rare case of DRESS secondary to oxcarbazepine with an elevated human herpesvirus-6 titer.

  18. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  19. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  20. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  1. Herpesvirus Respiratory Infections in Immunocompromised Patients: Epidemiology, Management, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gail E; Lynch, Joseph P; Weigt, Samuel; Sayah, David; Belperio, John A; Grim, Shellee A; Clark, Nina M

    2016-08-01

    Among immunocompromised individuals, members of the human Herpesviridae family are frequently encountered pathogens. Cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus-6, -7, and -8 all establish latency after infection and can reactivate during periods of immunosuppression, leading to both direct and indirect adverse effects on the host including severe organ dysfunction as well as allograft rejection and loss after transplantation. While not all herpesviruses are primary respiratory pathogens, many of their manifestations include involvement of the respiratory tract. This article discusses the individual viruses, their epidemiology, and clinical manifestations as well as recommended treatment and preventive strategies.

  2. Presence of human herpesviruses in young children with acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinogami, Masanobu; Ishibashi, Toshio

    2004-02-01

    Some herpesviruses have been detected in middle ear fluid (MEF) of patients with acute otitis media (AOM), but their role in middle ear disease is unknown. We examined 73 middle ear fluid samples from 73 children with acute otitis media for the presence of four major herpesviral DNA, respiratory viral genomes, and bacterial DNA by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Herpesviruses were detected in 16 specimens (22%), with 18 viral infections were identified overall. Respiratory viruses were detected in 35 specimens (48%), 39 viral infections overall. Bacterial DNA was detected in 51 specimens (70%), 60 bacterial infections overall. Clinical outcome was compared in patients with and without herpesvirus DNA, respiratory viral genomes, or bacterial DNA. Progression to otitis media with effusion (OME) was more common when herpesviral DNA was present. Presence of herpesvirus DNA may reflect an immunocompromised state that may make it difficult to eliminate bacteria from the middle ear after infection.

  3. The putative U94 integrase is dispensable for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) chromosomal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaschek, Nina; Gravel, Annie; Flamand, Louis; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2016-08-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) can integrate its genome into the telomeres of host chromosomes and is present in the germline of about 1 % of the human population. HHV-6 encodes a putative integrase U94 that possesses all molecular functions required for recombination including DNA-binding, ATPase, helicase and nuclease activity, and was hypothesized by many researchers to facilitate integration ever since the discovery of HHV-6 integration. However, analysis of U94 in the virus context has been hampered by the lack of reverse-genetic systems and efficient integration assays. Here, we addressed the role of U94 and the cellular recombinase Rad51 in HHV-6 integration. Surprisingly, we could demonstrate that HHV-6 efficiently integrated in the absence of U94 using a new quantitative integration assay. Additional inhibition of the cellular recombinase Rad51 had only a minor impact on virus integration. Our results shed light on this complex integration mechanism that includes factors beyond U94 and Rad51.

  4. Partial Sequence Analysis of the Genome of Human Herpesvirus 7 YY5 Isolated from Saliva Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify Nanjing local strains of Human Herpesvirus 7 (HH-V-7), and to analyze their partia l genome characteristic. Methods The saliva specimens were collected from 2 healthy adults and 5 children with kidney disease. After treatment with antibiotics and filtering. they were inoculated on to the phytohemagglutin stimulated umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells ( CBMCs). When the infected cells presented the typical ballooning and polykaryotic cytopathic effects (CPE), we identified them by transvnission electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction.PCR product was also sequenced. Results Four strains were isolated from the seven saliva specimens. The 186-base-pair fragment of the isolated strain YY5 PCR products was sequenced, which encoded part of the HHV-7 U10 gene. The DNA sequence revealed an identity of 57. 5% and 36.0%, respectively with HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus ( HCMV). At the amino acid level, the similarity of 51.6% was found between HHV-7 and HHV-6, and that of 25.8% between HHV-7and HCMV. Conclusion The isolated viruses were HHV-7, and 186 bp fragments revealed an identity with HHV-7 RK and Jl of 100%.

  5. Frequency of chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus 6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Gravel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. METHODOLOGY: A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n=255, pre-pre-B (n=4, pre-T (n=26 and undetermined (n=8 leukemia were analyzed for ciHHV-6 by quantitative TaqMan PCR (QPCR using HHV-6 specific primers and probe. As control, DNA samples from 288 healthy individuals were used. Primers and probe specific to the cellular GAPDH gene were used to estimate integrity and DNA content. RESULTS: Out of 293 DNA samples from the leukemic cohort, 287 contained amplifiable DNA. Of these, only 1 (0.35% contained ciHHV-6. Variant typing indicates that the ci-HHV-6 corresponds to variant A. None of the 288 DNA samples from healthy individuals contained ciHHV-6. CONCLUSION: The frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is similar (p=0.5 to that of healthy individuals. These results suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not originate as a consequence to integration of HHV-6 within the chromosomes.

  6. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140).

  7. Neuroimaging of herpesvirus infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskin, Henry J. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hedlund, Gary [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Six members of the herpesvirus family cause well-described neurologic disease in children: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster (VZV), Epstein-Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). When herpesviruses infect the central nervous system (CNS), the clinical presentation is non-specific and often confounding. The clinical urgency is often underscored by progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, or even death, and prompt diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on neuroimaging. This review focuses on the spectrum of cerebral manifestations caused by these viruses, particularly on non-congenital presentations. Recent advances in our understanding of these viruses are discussed, including new polymerase chain reaction techniques that allow parallel detection, which has improved our recognition that the herpesviruses are neurotropic and involve the CNS more often than previously thought. Evolving knowledge has also better elucidated viral neuropathology, particularly the role of VZV vasculitis in the brain, HHV-6 in febrile seizures, and herpesvirus reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. The virology, clinical course, and CNS manifestations of each virus are reviewed, followed by descriptions of neuroimaging findings when these agents infect the brain. Characteristic but often subtle imaging findings are discussed, as well as technical pearls covering appropriate use of MRI and MRI adjuncts to help differentiate viral infection from mimics. (orig.)

  8. Association between human herpesvirus infections and dementia or mild cognitive impairment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Forbes, Harriet; Breuer, Judith; Hayward, Andrew C; Mavrodaris, Angelique; Ridha, Basil H; Rossor, Martin; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam

    2017-06-23

    Persisting neurotropic viruses are proposed to increase the risk of dementia, but evidence of association from robust, adequately powered population studies is lacking. This is essential to inform clinical trials of targeted preventive interventions. We will carry out a comprehensive systematic review of published and grey literature of the association between infection with, reactivation of, vaccination against or treatment of any of the eight human herpesviruses and dementia or mild cognitive impairment. We will search the Cochrane Library, Embase, Global Health, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, clinical trials registers, the New York Academy of Medicine Grey Literature Report, Electronic Theses Online Service through the British Library and the ISI Conference Proceedings Citation Index for randomised controlled trials, cohort, caseâ€"control, case crossover or self-controlled case series studies reported in any language up to January 2017. Titles, abstracts and full-text screening will be conducted by two researchers independently. Data will be extracted systematically from eligible studies using a piloted template. We will assess risk of bias of individual studies in line with the Cochrane Collaboration tool. We will conduct a narrative synthesis, grouping studies by exposure and outcome definitions, and will describe any differences by population subgroups and dementia subtypes. We will consider performing meta-analyses if there are adequate numbers of sufficiently homogeneous studies. The overall quality of cumulative evidence will be assessed using selected Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations criteria. As this is a review of existing studies, no ethical approval is required. Results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and at national and international conferences. We anticipate the review will clarify the current extent and quality of evidence for a link between herpesviruses and dementia

  9. Acute liver failure due to Human Herpesvirus 6 in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Tronconi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus, drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6 genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases’ review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus’s genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus.

  10. [Acute liver failure due to human herpesvirus 6 in an infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronconi, G M; Mariani, B; Pajno, R; Fomasi, M; Cococcioni, L; Biffi, V; Bove, M; Corsin, P; Garbetta, G; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases' review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus's genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus.

  11. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Broccolo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD, including multiple sclerosis (MS, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentioned AD associated with HHV-6 and the mechanisms proposed for HHV-6A/B-induced autoimmunity. HHV-6A/B could trigger autoimmunity by exposing high amounts of normally sequestered cell antigens, through lysis of infected cells. Another potential trigger is represented by molecular mimicry, with the synthesis of viral proteins that resemble cellular molecules, as a mechanism of immune escape. The virus could also induce aberrant expression of histocompatibility molecules thereby promoting the presentation of autoantigens. CD46-HHV-6A/B interaction is a new attractive mechanism proposed: HHV-6A/B (especially HHV-6A could participate in neuroinflammation in the context of MS by promoting inflammatory processes through CD46 binding. Although HHV-6A/B has the ability to trigger all the above-mentioned mechanisms, more studies are required to fully elucidate the possible role of HHV-6A/B as a trigger of AD.

  12. Human herpesvirus 6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients infected with HIV: frequency and clinical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossolasco, S.; Marenzi, R.; Dahl, H.; Vago, L.; Terreni, M. R.; Broccolo, F.; Lazzarin, A.; Linde, A.; Cinque, P.

    1999-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the frequency of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA detection in the CSF of patients infected with HIV and its relation to brain disease and systemic HHV-6 infection.
 Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyse CSF samples from 365 consecutive HIV infected patients with neurological symptoms. When available, plasma and brain tissues from patients whose CSF was HHV-6 positive were also studied.
 HHV-6 was found in the CSF of eight of the 365 patients (2.2%): two had type A and four type B; the HHV-6 variant could not be defined in the remaining two. All eight patients had neurological symptoms and signs related to concomitant opportunistic brain diseases, including cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis in five patients whose CSF was also positive for CMV-DNA. Opportunistic infections but no other unexplained lesions were also found in the brain of all of the four patients who underwent neuropathological examination. Both HHV-6 and CMV were also detected in the plasma of respectively five and seven of seven patients whose CSF was HHV-6 positive.
 In conclusion, HHV-6 type A or B DNA was infrequently found in the CSF of HIV infected patients, in association with both CMV brain infection and systemic HHV-6 replication. However, no certain relation between HHV-6 and brain disease was found.

 PMID:10567500

  13. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...... affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described...... that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction....

  14. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and quantitative investigations of the protein content of HHV-6A virions. In our iodixanol gradient purified preparation, we detected high levels of viral DNA by real-time PCR and viral proteins by metabolic labelling, silver staining and western blots. In contrast, the background level of cellular contamination was low in the purified samples as demonstrated by the silver staining and metabolic labelling analyses. Western blot analyses showed that the cellular complement protein CD46, the receptor for HHV-6A, is associated with the purified and infectious virions. Also, the cellular proteins clathrin, ezrin and Tsg101 are associated with intact HHV-6A virions. Conclusion Cellular proteins are associated with HHV-6A virions. The relevance of the association in disease and especially in autoimmunity will be further investigated.

  15. Development and validation of a Q-PCR based TCID50 method for human herpesvirus 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Rasmus K L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For titer assessment of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6, IFA targeting viral proteins or a TCID50 method with ocular inspection for CPE can be used. These methods rely on the subjective decision of the assessor, obstructing the ability to obtain unanimous results. Findings We have developed and validated an alternative TCID50 read-out approach where infection in the titration culture plate is assessed by viral DNA load change by quantitative PCR. A ten time increase in viral DNA load was determined as cut point for infection since that yielded a maximum correlation with viral protein expression (93%. The average intra-assay CV was 9% for quantitative PCR read-out of TCID50 compared to 45% for ocular inspection read-out of TCID50, 14% for IFA read-out of TCID50, and 43% for an infectious units approach using IFA. The average inter-assay CV for quantitative PCR read-out of TCID50 was 73%, compared to 66%, 25% and 77% for the ocular inspection read-out for TCID50, IFA read-out of TCID50 and infectious unit approaches respectively. Conclusions The quantitative PCR based read-out of TCID50 proved to be more robust and easier to interpret than traditional TCID50 assessment approaches for HHV-6, and therefore it might be considered as an alternative method.

  16. Herpesvirus and calicivirus infection in a black-footed cat (Fels nigripes) family group following vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Anne E; Langan, Jennifer N; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Terio, Karen; Adkesson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Preventive healthcare recommendations for zoo felids include vaccination against primary viral diseases that affect domestic felids. Although associated with a more-substantial immune response in their domestic counterparts, use of modified live virus vaccines (MLV) in nondomestic carnivores can result in vaccine-induced viral disease. This case report details a feline herpesvirus and calicivirus outbreak in two black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) kittens and their dam following use of an MLV in the kittens. Clinical signs included anorexia, nasal discharge, sneezing, and tachypnea. Patient history, clinical signs, real-time polymerase chain reaction results, and histopathologic evaluation of tissues confirmed the diagnosis. Although unable to definitively prove that the disease observed in these cases was caused by the MLV, there is strong temporal and circumstantial evidence that this was the case. This outbreak of feline upper respiratory infection following vaccination with a multivalent MLV resulted in significant morbidity and mortality, serving as an important reminder that recombinant or killed vaccines are the safest choice for use in nondomestic species, particularly in kittens.

  17. The Natural History of Human Polyomaviruses and Herpesviruses in Early Life--The Rhea Birth Cohort in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Marianna; Waterboer, Tim; Casabonne, Delphine; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Michel, Angelika; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Chatzi, Leda; Pawlita, Michael; Kogevinas, Manolis; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Sparse data exist on the patterns and determinants of acquisition of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses in childhood. We measured immunoglobulin G seroreactivity against 10 polyomaviruses (BKPyV, JCPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, MCPyV, HPyV6, HPyV7, TSPyV, HPyV9, HPyV10) and 5 herpesviruses (Epstein Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 8) using multiplex serology on blood samples collected at birth (cord blood, n = 626) and at follow-up at 3 years (n = 81) and 4 years (n = 690) of age among the Rhea birth cohort recruited in Greece from pregnant women in 2007-2008. We used Poisson regression with robust variance to identify determinants of seropositivity at age 4. Seroprevalence of polyomaviruses ranged from 38.5% to 99.8% in cord blood and from 20.9% to 82.3% at age 4. Seroprevalence of EBV, CMV, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and human herpesvirus 8 was 99.4%, 74.9%, 26.2%, 8.0%, and 1.6% in cord blood and 52.5%, 25.8%, 3.6%, 1.4%, and 0% at age 4, respectively. Determinants of seropositivity at age 4 were cord seropositivity (JCPyV, HPyV7, HPyV10, CMV), vaginal delivery (HPyV10), breastfeeding (CMV), younger age at day-care entry (BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, TSPyV, HPyV10, HPyV9, EBV, CMV), and swimming pool attendance (BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, HPyV10). Television viewing, parental stress, and hygiene practices were inversely associated with the seroprevalence of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Stabilization of Telomere G-Quadruplexes Interferes with Human Herpesvirus 6A Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Gravel, Annie; Artusi, Sara; Richter, Sara N; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes using a mechanism that remains poorly understood. To achieve a better understanding of the HHV-6A/B integration mechanism, we made use of BRACO-19, a compound that stabilizes G-quadruplex secondary structures and prevents telomere elongation by the telomerase complex. First, we analyzed the folding of telomeric sequences into G-quadruplex structures and their binding to BRACO-19 using G-quadruplex-specific antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. Circular dichroism studies indicate that BRACO-19 modifies the conformation and greatly stabilizes the G-quadruplexes formed in G-rich telomeric DNA. Subsequently we assessed the effects of BRACO-19 on the HHV-6A initial phase of infection. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 does not affect entry of HHV-6A DNA into cells. We next investigated if stabilization of G-quadruplexes by BRACO-19 affected HHV-6A's ability to integrate its genome into host chromosomes. Incubation of telomerase-expressing cells with BRACO-19, such as HeLa and MCF-7, caused a significant reduction in the HHV-6A integration frequency (P G-quadruplex. In the current study, we have examined the effects of a G-quadruplex binding and stabilizing agent, BRACO-19, on HHV-6A chromosomal integration. By stabilizing G-quadruplex structures, BRACO-19 affects the ability of the telomerase complex to elongate telomeres. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 reduces the number of clones harboring integrated HHV-6A. This study is the first of its kind and suggests that telomerase activity is essential to restore a functional telomere of adequate length following HHV-6A integration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Nuclear Factor kappa B is required for the production of infectious human herpesvirus 8 virions

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    Negin N Blattman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 infection leads to potent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFB in primary and transformed cells. We used recombinant HHV8 (rKSHV.219 expressing green fluorescent protein under the constitutive cellular promoter elongation factor 2 and red fluorescent protein under an early HHV8 lytic gene promoter T1.1, to monitor replication during infection of human foreskin fibroblasts (HF, noting changes in NFB activity. In primary HF, NFB levels do not affect HHV8 ability to establish infection or maintain latency. Furthermore, there was no effect on the percent of cells undergoing reactivation from latency, and there were similar numbers of released and cell associated HHV8 viral particles following reactivation in the presence of inhibitors. Reactivation of HHV8 in latently infected HF in the presence of NFB inhibitors resulted in production of viral particles that did not efficiently establish infection, due to deficiencies in binding and/or entry into normally permissive cells. Exogenous expression of glycoprotein M, an envelope protein involved in viral binding and entry was able to partially overcome the deficiency induced by NFB inhibitors. Our data indicate that in primary cells, NFB is not required for infection, establishment of latency, or entry into the lytic cycle, but is required for the expression of virion associated genes involved in the initial steps of virion infectivity. These studies suggest that strategies to inhibit NFB may prevent HHV8 spread and should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for preventing HHV8 associated diseases.

  20. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

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    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  1. Seroprevalence of Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nategh Rakhshandeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seroepidemiological surveys show that the prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection mostly varies in various geographical areas and reflects the local incidence of classic and endemic KS, being widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean countries and uncommon in the USA and Northern Europe. In the Middle East only few populations, such as Ashkenazi and Sephardic groups in Israel, have been adequately evaluated for HHV-8 seroprevalence. Among Iranian population a striking higher seroprevalence of HHV8 has been reported among haemodialysis (16.9%, renal transplant recipients (25% and HIV (45.7% patients compared to blood donors (2%. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is the rarest cancer in Iran, with an annual age-standardized incidence varying from 0.10 to 0.17 per 100,000 in males and from 0.06 to 0.08 per 100,000 in females. KS, however, is one of the most important malignancies in Iranian renal transplanted patients affecting up to 2.4% of organ recipients. The epidemiology of HHV8 and KS in Iran needs further evaluation. While the high prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in HIV positive and haemodialysis individuals may be attributed to high-risk sexual behavior and polytransfusions, respectively, unknown determinants may be responsible for high seroprevalence of HHV8 and high incidence of KS in solid organ recipients. A global survey on HHV8 seroprevalence in Iran is mandatory to define co-factors associated with HHV8 infection and KS risk in the general Iranian population and in specific patient groups.

  2. First survey for detecting the presence of human herpesvirus 8 infection (HHV-8 in Maputo, Mozambique

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    Adele Caterino-de-Araujo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, is endemic in parts of the sub-Saharan, and KS has increased concomitantly with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In Mozambique (MZ, no data concerning HHV-8 infection was available, thus the main of this work was to investigate, for the first time, the presence of HHV-8 infection in Maputo, MZ. Latent and lytic HHV-8-specific antibodies were assessed in blood samples from 189 individuals from the Central Hospital of Maputo, MZ, using "in-house" immunofluorescence assays conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. The results obtained were analyzed according to socio-demographic and clinical variables using the Chi-square test and logistic regression. An HHV-8 seropositivity of 1.8% and 9.7% was detected among 57 medical students and 31 individuals from the staff, respectively, in contrast to 16.4% detected among 67 out-patients. Concerning 34 hospitalized patients from the Dermatology Unit, 47.1% were HHV-8-seropositive overall, while the rate was 85.7% among KS patients. The present survey, conducted in Maputo, MZ, demonstrates great variation in HHV-8 infection frequencies depending on the group analyzed and epidemiological variables. An association between HHV-8 seropositivity and male gender (OR 5.72, the central origin of patients (OR 5.33, blood transfusions (OR 3.25, and KS (OR 24.0 was detected among hospitalized patients, and primary school (OR 7.18 and HIV-1 infection (OR 8.76 among out-patients.

  3. Reduced human herpesvirus-8 oropharyngeal shedding associated with protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Cattamanchi, Ashok; Krantz, Elizabeth; Magaret, Amalia; Selke, Stacy; Kuntz, Steven R; Huang, Meei-Li; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Casper, Corey

    2014-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) replication increases the risk of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). Highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces the incidence of KS, and regimens that contain protease inhibitors (PIs) may be particularly effective. To determine whether PI-based HAART regimens may more effectively inhibit HHV-8 shedding compared to regimens without PIs. Prospective, observational study of 142 HIV-1 and HHV-8 co-infected men conducted in Seattle, Washington. Quantitative HHV-8 PCR testing was performed on daily swabs of the oropharynx, the primary site of HHV-8 replication. Associations between antiretroviral regimen and detection of HHV-8 DNA in swabs were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. HHV-8 DNA was detected in 3016 (26%) of 11,608 specimens collected. PI-based HAART was associated with a statistically significantly lower frequency of detection (RR 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.5) compared to ART-naïve persons, whereas HAART without a PI was not (RR 0.7; 95% CI 0.4-1.3). Compared to ART-naïve persons, there was also a trend toward lower quantities of HHV-8 detected during treatment with HAART regimens that contained a PI. These associations between PIs and measures of HHV-8 shedding could not be attributed to use of nelfinavir, which inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro, and were independent of CD4 count and HIV plasma viral load (VL). HAART regimens that contain PIs appear to decrease HHV-8 shedding compared to NNRTIs. Further study of PI-based HAART is warranted to determine the optimal regimens for prevention and treatment of KS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Following Haploidentical Transplantation: Immune Recovery and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Raffaella; Crucitti, Lara; Noviello, Maddalena; Racca, Sara; Mannina, Daniele; Forcina, Alessandra; Lorentino, Francesca; Valtolina, Veronica; Rolla, Serena; Dvir, Roee; Morelli, Mara; Giglio, Fabio; Barbanti, Maria Chiara; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Oltolini, Chiara; Vago, Luca; Scarpellini, Paolo; Assanelli, Andrea; Carrabba, Matteo G; Marktel, Sarah; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Clementi, Massimo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Bonini, Chiara; Ciceri, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is increasingly recognized as a potentially life-threatening pathogen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We retrospectively evaluated 54 adult patients who developed positivity to HHV-6 after alloSCT. The median time from alloSCT to HHV-6 reactivation was 34 days. HHV-6 was present in plasma samples from 31 patients, in bone marrow (BM) of 9 patients, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and liver or gut biopsy specimens from 33 patients, and in cerebrospinal fluid of 7 patients. Twenty-nine patients developed acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), mainly grade III-IV, and 15 had concomitant cytomegalovirus reactivation. The median absolute CD3(+) lymphocyte count was 207 cells/µL. We reported the following clinical manifestations: fever in 43 patients, skin rash in 22, hepatitis in 19, diarrhea in 24, encephalitis in 10, BM suppression in 18, and delayed engraftment in 11. Antiviral pharmacologic treatment was administered to 37 patients; nonetheless, the mortality rate was relatively high in this population (overall survival [OS] at 1 year, 38% ± 7%). A better OS was significantly associated with a CD3(+) cell count ≥200/µL at the time of HHV-6 reactivation (P = .0002). OS was also positively affected by the absence of acute GVHD grade III-IV (P = .03) and by complete disease remission (P = .03), but was not significantly influenced by steroid administration, time after alloSCT, type of antiviral prophylaxis, plasma viral load, or organ involvement. Although HHV-6 detection typically occurred early after alloSCT, better T cell immune reconstitution seems to have the potential to improve clinical outcomes. Our findings provide new insight into the interplay between HHV-6 and the transplanted immune system.

  5. Classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma and human herpesvirus 8 infection in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnur, P; Katano, H; Wang, Z H; Osakabe, Y; Kudo, M; Sata, T; Ebihara, Y

    2001-11-01

    We report 17 cases of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, which is located in the north-western area of China surrounded by Mongolia in the east, Russia in the north and Kazakhstan in the west. Fifteen of the patients were of the Uygur people. All patients were male and did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Most of the lesions were found in the lower and/or upper extremities, with 16 patients showing multiple lesions. Immunohistochemical examination of the lesions revealed that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen was expressed in the nuclei of spindle-shaped tumor cells. HHV-8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all seven cases examined. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DNA sequences of the HHV-8-encoded K1 gene in the seven Kaposi's sarcoma cases were classified as subtype C that was common in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and East Asian countries. In addition, using immunofluorescence we investigated the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in 73 Uygur patients with diseases other than Kaposi's sarcoma. Surprisingly, the serological study revealed that 34 of the patients (46.6%) were positive for antibodies against HHV-8, suggesting that HHV-8 infection is widespread in Xinjiang area. The occurrence of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma with a high seropositivity rate implies that Xinjiang is the most endemic area for HHV-8 infection in the world known to date. Considering that Xinjiang is located at the middle point of the Silk Road that used to extend from Rome to China, these data imply that the virus may have been in circulation in this area due to the migration of the people via the Silk Road.

  6. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: Innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    -associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...

  7. Human herpesvirus 6: report of emerging pathogen in five patients with HIV/AIDS and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Corti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 in patients with AIDS can result in an acute and severe diffuse meningoencephalitis. We describe the epidemiological, clinical and outcome findings of five patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system involvement (CNS due to HHV-6. Fever was present in all the patients. Meningeal compromise, seizures and encephalitis were present in some of the patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimens was positive for HHV-6 in all the patients. HHV-6 should be included among opportunistic and emerging pathogens that involve the CNS in patients with AIDS.

  8. Acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia due to co-infection of human herpesvirus-6 and adenovirus mimicking myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naselli, Aldo; Pala, Giovanna; Cresta, Federico; Finetti, Martina; Biancheri, Roberta; Renna, Salvatore

    2014-11-26

    Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is a relatively common neurological disease in children. Most common types of ACA are acute post-infectious (APCA) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Less common but important causes include opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and acute cerebellitis. Cerebellar neoplasms and acute hydrocephalus are additional causes of paediatric ataxia. APCA is the most common cause of ACA in children, comprising about 30-50% of total cases. This is a report about an immunocompetent 4-yrs-old male affected by APCA, due to co-infection by human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and adenovirus, with symptoms mimicking myositis.

  9. Insight into the Mechanism of Human Herpesvirus 7 U21-mediated Diversion of Class I MHC Molecules to Lysosomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosson, Nicole L.; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Schneider, Christine L.; Ristow, Laura C.; Wang, Qiuhong; Hudson, Amy W.

    2010-01-01

    The U21 open reading frame from human herpesvirus-7 encodes a membrane protein that associates with and redirects class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which U21 accomplishes this trafficking excursion is unknown. Here we have examined the contribution of localization, glycosylation, domain structure, and the absence of substrate class I MHC molecules on the ability of U21 to traffic to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a cellular protein necessary for U21-mediated rerouting of class I MHC molecules. PMID:20833720

  10. Molecular piracy of chemokine receptors by herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P M

    1994-01-01

    To succeed as a biological entity, viruses must exploit normal cellular functions and elude the host immune system; they often do so by molecular mimicry. One way that mimicry may occur is when viruses copy and modify host genes. The best studied examples of this are the oncogenes of RNA retroviruses, but a growing number of examples are also known for DNA viruses. So far they all come from just two groups of DNA viruses, the herpesviruses and poxviruses, and the majority of examples are for genes whose products regulate immune responses, such as cytokines, cytokine receptors, and complement control proteins. This review will focus on human and herpesvirus receptors for chemokines, a family of leukocyte chemoattractant and activating factors that are thought to be important mediators of inflammation. Although the biological roles of the viral chemokine receptor homologues are currently unknown, their connection to specific sets of chemokines has suggested a number of possible functions.

  11. Cell Culture Systems To Study Human Herpesvirus 6A/B Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Collin, Vanessa; Hall-Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R; Mori, Yasuko; Carbonneau, Julie; Boivin, Guy; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A/B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their viral genomes in the telomeres of human chromosomes. The viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration remain largely unknown, mostly due to the lack of efficient and reproducible cell culture models to study HHV-6A/B integration. In this study, we characterized the HHV-6A/B integration efficiencies in several human cell lines using two different approaches. First, after a short-term infection (5 h), cells were processed for single-cell cloning and analyzed for chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/B (ciHHV-6A/B). Second, cells were infected with HHV-6A/B and allowed to grow in bulk for 4 weeks or longer and then analyzed for the presence of ciHHV-6. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate that HHV-6A/B integrated in most human cell lines tested, including telomerase-positive (HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116, and HEK293T) and telomerase-negative cell lines (U2OS and GM847). Our results also indicate that inhibition of DNA replication, using phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect HHV-6A/B integration. Certain clones harboring ciHHV-6A/B spontaneously express viral genes and proteins. Treatment of cells with phorbol ester or histone deacetylase inhibitors triggered the expression of many viral genes, including U39, U90, and U100, without the production of infectious virus, suggesting that the tested stimuli were not sufficient to trigger full reactivation. In summary, both integration models yielded comparable results and should enable the identification of viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration and the screening of drugs influencing viral gene expression, as well as the release of infectious HHV-6A/B from the integrated state.IMPORTANCE The analysis and understanding of HHV-6A/B genome integration into host DNA is currently limited due to the lack of reproducible and efficient viral integration systems. In the

  12. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  13. Prevalence of Human Herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) in untreated patients with early stage Mycosis Fungoides (A retrospective study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Al Saif

    2010-01-01

    Background : Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi’s Sarcoma – associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was first identified and detected in 1994 in patients with Kaposi’s Sarcoma. Recently, a strong association has been shown between HHV-8 and large-plaque parapsoriasis and mycosis fungoides(MF). This association has been attributed to either recent infection or reactivation of HHV-8 in patients who had extensive and/or who had an advanced stage of the diseases. This intriguing observation prompted us to perform a retrospective study in which tested previous histopathology specimens of untreated patients with early stage MF for presence of (HHV-8) by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology Objective: To investigate the presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) in lesional skin of patients with early MF. Method: Retrospective study of the presence of HHV-8 in patients with early stages (1a,1b) MF. Fifty Paraffin–embedded lesional skin specimens were selected, 27 specimens were from patients with MF stage la and lb, 21 specimens from patients with psoriasis as negative control and 2 specimens from patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma as positive control. The presence of HHV-8 was analyzed from paraffin-embedded lesional tissue samples using a real time PCR technology. Results: A low association of HHV-8 infection in early stages of MF was observed. Only two samples were tested positive, while none tested positive in psoriatic samples. Conclusions: It may be concluded that HHV-8 is not significantly associated with early stages MF. PMID:21475551

  14. Herpesvirus BACs: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Charles; Tang, Qiyi; Zhu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The herpesviridae are a large family of DNA viruses with large and complicated genomes. Genetic manipulation and the generation of recombinant viruses have been extremely difficult. However, herpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that were developed approximately 10 years ago have become useful and powerful genetic tools for generating recombinant viruses to study the biology and pathogenesis of herpesviruses. For example, BAC-directed deletion mutants are commonly used to determine the function and essentiality of viral genes. In this paper, we discuss the creation of herpesvirus BACs, functional analyses of herpesvirus mutants, and future applications for studies of herpesviruses. We describe commonly used methods to create and mutate herpesvirus BACs (such as site-directed mutagenesis and transposon mutagenesis). We also evaluate the potential future uses of viral BACs, including vaccine development and gene therapy.

  15. Herpesvirus BACs: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Warden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The herpesviridae are a large family of DNA viruses with large and complicated genomes. Genetic manipulation and the generation of recombinant viruses have been extremely difficult. However, herpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs that were developed approximately 10 years ago have become useful and powerful genetic tools for generating recombinant viruses to study the biology and pathogenesis of herpesviruses. For example, BAC-directed deletion mutants are commonly used to determine the function and essentiality of viral genes. In this paper, we discuss the creation of herpesvirus BACs, functional analyses of herpesvirus mutants, and future applications for studies of herpesviruses. We describe commonly used methods to create and mutate herpesvirus BACs (such as site-directed mutagenesis and transposon mutagenesis. We also evaluate the potential future uses of viral BACs, including vaccine development and gene therapy.

  16. Proteflazid® and local immunity in diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Vjacheslav; Chernyshov, Viktor; Grynevych, Oleksandr; Benyuk, Vasil; Kornatskaya, Alla; Shalko, Miroslava; Usevich, Igor; Revenko, Oleg; Shepetko, Maxim; Solomakha, Ludmila

    2017-03-21

    Reporting of clinical trials results for Proteflazid® in the drug formulation suppositories and vaginal swabs soaked in the solution of the drug to the local immunity of the female reproductive tract. The aim of study was to examine the state of local immunity in the reproductive tract of women with sexually transmitted diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpes viruses (Type 1, 2) and mixed infection (herpes viruses + chlamydia). The trials involved 216 women with viral sexually transmitted diseases: Cervical Dysplasia associated with papillomavirus infection (HPV) (Group 1); Herpes genitalis type 1 (HSV- 1) and type 2 (HSV-1) (Group 2); mixed infection - HSV-1, HSV-2 and chlamydia (Group 3). Treatment results have confirmed that Proteflazid® contributes to sustainable performance improvement of basic factors of local immunity - sIgA, lysozyme and complement component C3 in the cervical mucus for all three groups of women. Proteflazid® enhances level of local immunity markers (sIgA, lysozyme, C3 complement component) and improves their ratios. Also it intensifies anticontagious activity of mucosal protection and female reproductive system as whole, during treatment diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections (herpesvirus and chlamydia).

  17. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

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    Baptiste Leroy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections.

  18. Detection of human herpesvirus 8 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction: development and standardisation of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speicher David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, the aetiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is rare in Australia, but endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of South-east Asia and Oceania. While the treatment of external KS lesions can be monitored by clinical observation, the internal lesions of KS, MCD and PEL require extensive and expensive internal imaging, or autopsy. In patients with MCD and PEL, if HHV-8 viraemia is not reduced quickly, ~50% die within 24 months. HHV-8 qPCR is a valuable tool for monitoring HHV-8 viraemia, but is not available in many parts of the world, including those with high prevalence of KS and HHV-8. Methods A new molecular facility with stringent three-phase workflow was established, adhering to NPAAC and CLSI guidelines. Three fully validated quantitative assays were developed: two for detection and quantification of HHV-8; one for GAPDH, necessary for normalisation of viral loads in tissue and peripheral blood. Results The HHV-8 ORF73 and ORF26 qPCR assays were 100% specific. All qPCR assays, displayed a broad dynamic range (102 to 1010 copies/μL TE Buffer with a limit of detection of 4.85x103, 5.61x102, and 2.59x102 copies/μL TE Buffer and a limit of quantification of 4.85x103, 3.01x102, and 1.38x102 copies/μL TE Buffer for HHV-8 ORF73, HHV-8 ORF26, and GAPDH respectively. The assays were tested on a panel of 35 KS biopsies from Queensland. All were HHV-8 qPCR positive with average viral load of 2.96x105 HHV-8 copies/μL DNA extract (range: 4.37x103 to 1.47x106 copies/μL DNA extract: When normalised these equate to an average viral load of 2.44x104 HHV-8 copies/103 cells (range: 2.20x102 to 7.38x105 HHV-8 copies/103 cells. Conclusions These are the first fully optimised, validated and MIQE compliant HHV-8 qPCR assays established in Australia. They worked well for qualitative detection of HHV-8 in archival tissue, and are well

  19. Human herpesvirus-8 infection leads to expansion of the preimmune/natural effector B cell compartment.

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    Silvia Della Bella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS and of some lymphoproliferative disorders of B cells. Most malignancies develop after long-lasting viral dormancy, and a preventing role for both humoral and cellular immune control is suggested by the high frequency of these pathologies in immunosuppressed patients. B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells of peripheral lymphoid organs and blood represent the major reservoir of HHV-8. Due to the dual role of B cells in HHV-8 infection, both as virus reservoir and as agents of humoral immune control, we analyzed the subset distribution and the functional state of peripheral blood B cells in HHV-8-infected individuals with and without cKS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Circulating B cells and their subsets were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry in the following groups: 1- patients HHV-8 positive with classic KS (cKS (n = 47; 2- subjects HHV-8 positive and cKS negative (HSP (n = 10; 3- healthy controls, HHV-8 negative and cKS negative (HC (n = 43. The number of B cells belonging to the preimmune/natural effector compartment, including transitional, pre-naïve, naïve and MZ-like subsets, was significantly higher among HHV-8 positive subjects, with or without cKS, while was comparable to healthy controls in the antigen-experienced T-cell dependent compartment. The increased number of preimmune/natural effector B cells was associated with increased resistance to spontaneous apoptosis, while it did not correlate with HHV-8 viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that long-lasting HHV-8 infection promotes an imbalance in peripheral B cell subsets, perturbing the equilibrium between earlier and later steps of maturation and activation processes. This observation may broaden our understanding of the complex interplay between viral and immune factors leading HHV-8-infected individuals to develop HHV-8-associated malignancies.

  20. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

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    José Eduardo Levi

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140.

  1. High incidence of Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and human herpesvirus 6 infections in children with cancer

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    Horvath Radek

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prospective single-center study was performed to study infection with lymphotropic herpesviruses (LH Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus (CMV and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 in children with cancer. Methods The group of 186 children was examined for the presence of LH before, during and 2 months after the end of anticancer treatment. Serology of EBV and CMV was monitored in all children, serology of HHV-6 and DNA analysis of all three LH was monitored in 70 children. Results At the time of cancer diagnosis (pre-treatment, there was no difference between cancer patients and age-matched healthy controls in overall IgG seropositivity for EBV (68.8% vs. 72.0%; p = 0.47 and CMV (37.6% vs. 41.7%; p = 0.36. During anticancer therapy, primary or reactivated EBV and CMV infection was present in 65 (34.9% and 66 (35.4% of 186 patients, respectively, leading to increased overall post-treatment IgG seropositivity that was significantly different from controls for EBV (86.6% vs. 72.0%; p = 0.0004 and CMV (67.7% vs. 41.7%; p Conclusion EBV, CMV and HHV-6 infections are frequently present during therapy of pediatric malignancy.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 negative factor protein promotes human herpesvirus-8 viral interleukin-6-induced angiogenesis: role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β/ β-catenin signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚水洪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of glycogen synthase kinase(GSK)-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway on human immunodeficiency virus-1(HIV-1)negative factor(Nef)protein promoting of human herpesvirus-8(HHV-8)viral interleukin-6(v IL-6)induced angiogenesis.Methods GSK-3βmutant plasmid GSK-3β-S9A,dominant-negative(DN)form GSK-3β-DN and the control vector pc DNA3.1+were transfected into endothelial cells which

  3. The Telomeric Repeats of Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) Are Required for Efficient Virus Integration.

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    Wallaschek, Nina; Sanyal, Anirban; Pirzer, Fabian; Gravel, Annie; Mori, Yasuko; Flamand, Louis; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2016-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and 6B (HHV-6B) are ubiquitous betaherpesviruses that infects humans within the first years of life and establishes latency in various cell types. Both viruses can integrate their genomes into telomeres of host chromosomes in latently infected cells. The molecular mechanism of viral integration remains elusive. Intriguingly, HHV-6A, HHV-6B and several other herpesviruses harbor arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) identical to human telomere sequences at the ends of their genomes. The HHV-6A and HHV-6B genomes harbor two TMR arrays, the perfect TMR (pTMR) and the imperfect TMR (impTMR). To determine if the TMR are involved in virus integration, we deleted both pTMR and impTMR in the HHV-6A genome. Upon reconstitution, the TMR mutant virus replicated comparable to wild type (wt) virus, indicating that the TMR are not essential for HHV-6A replication. To assess the integration properties of the recombinant viruses, we established an in vitro integration system that allows assessment of integration efficiency and genome maintenance in latently infected cells. Integration of HHV-6A was severely impaired in the absence of the TMR and the virus genome was lost rapidly, suggesting that integration is crucial for the maintenance of the virus genome. Individual deletion of the pTMR and impTMR revealed that the pTMR play the major role in HHV-6A integration, whereas the impTMR only make a minor contribution, allowing us to establish a model for HHV-6A integration. Taken together, our data shows that the HHV-6A TMR are dispensable for virus replication, but are crucial for integration and maintenance of the virus genome in latently infected cells.

  4. The Telomeric Repeats of Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A Are Required for Efficient Virus Integration.

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    Nina Wallaschek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A and 6B (HHV-6B are ubiquitous betaherpesviruses that infects humans within the first years of life and establishes latency in various cell types. Both viruses can integrate their genomes into telomeres of host chromosomes in latently infected cells. The molecular mechanism of viral integration remains elusive. Intriguingly, HHV-6A, HHV-6B and several other herpesviruses harbor arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR identical to human telomere sequences at the ends of their genomes. The HHV-6A and HHV-6B genomes harbor two TMR arrays, the perfect TMR (pTMR and the imperfect TMR (impTMR. To determine if the TMR are involved in virus integration, we deleted both pTMR and impTMR in the HHV-6A genome. Upon reconstitution, the TMR mutant virus replicated comparable to wild type (wt virus, indicating that the TMR are not essential for HHV-6A replication. To assess the integration properties of the recombinant viruses, we established an in vitro integration system that allows assessment of integration efficiency and genome maintenance in latently infected cells. Integration of HHV-6A was severely impaired in the absence of the TMR and the virus genome was lost rapidly, suggesting that integration is crucial for the maintenance of the virus genome. Individual deletion of the pTMR and impTMR revealed that the pTMR play the major role in HHV-6A integration, whereas the impTMR only make a minor contribution, allowing us to establish a model for HHV-6A integration. Taken together, our data shows that the HHV-6A TMR are dispensable for virus replication, but are crucial for integration and maintenance of the virus genome in latently infected cells.

  5. Capacitive DNA sensor for rapid and sensitive detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 dsDNA in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Oueslati, Rania; Wu, Jayne; Chen, Jiangang; Eda, Shigetoshi

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a rapid, highly sensitive, low-cost, and specific capacitive DNA sensor for detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 DNA. This sensor is capable of direct DNA detection with a response time of 30 s, and it can be used to test standard buffer or serum samples. The sensing approach for DNA detection is based on alternating current (AC) electrokinetics. By applying an inhomogeneous AC electric field on sensor electrodes, positive dielectrophoresis is induced to accelerate DNA hybridization. The same applied AC signal also directly measures the hybridization of target with the probe on the sensor surface. Experiments are conducted to optimize the AC signal, as well as the buffers for probe immobilization and target DNA hybridization. The assay is highly sensitive and specific, with no response to human herpesvirus-2 DNA at 5 ng/mL and a LOD of 1.0 pg/mL (6.5 copies/μL or 10.7 aM) in standard buffer. When testing the double stranded (ds) DNA spiked in human serum samples, the sensor yields a LOD of 20.0 pg/mL (129.5 copies/μL or 0.21 femtomolar (fM)) in neat serum. In this work, the target is whole genome dsDNA, consequently the test can be performed without the use of enzyme or amplification, which considerably simplifies the sensor operation and is highly suitable for point of care disease diagnosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Effect of electrochemotherapy on human herpesvirus 8 kinetics in classic Kaposi sarcoma.

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    Starita, Noemy; Di Monta, Gianluca; Cerasuolo, Andrea; Marone, Ugo; Anniciello, Anna Maria; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) has shown to be an effective treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. However, no study has investigated the impact of ECT treatment on the kinetics of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV8), which is considered the necessary causal agent of KS. We aimed to evaluate HHV8 viral load and expression levels in patients affected by classic KS who received one or more ECT treatments and have been followed semi annually for up to four years. A total of 27 classic KS patients were enrolled in this study. Tumour biopsies and blood samples were obtained before ECT treatment. Additional blood samples were collected at six month intervals for 12-48 months. HHV8 viral load and expression profiles of latent (ORF72 and ORF73) and lytic (K2, K8, K8.1, K10/K10.1, K10.5/K10.6 and ORF16) genes were assessed in all samples by real-time PCR. HHV8 ORF26 and K1 regions were amplified and subjected to direct nucleotide sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis for variant identification. All KS biopsies and 46.4% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected before ECT treatment were positive for HHV8 DNA. Viral load ranged from 0.02 to 2.3 copies per cell in KS lesions and 3.0 × 10(-7) to 6.9 × 10(-4) copies per cell in PBMCs. Overall, latent ORF72 and ORF73 as well as lytic K2, K8 and K10/K10.1 were expressed in all KS biopsies. ORF16 mRNA was detected in 71.4% and both K8.1 and K10.5/K10.6 mRNAs in 57.1% of KS samples. The ORF72, ORF73 and K2 transcripts were amplified in 37.5%, 25% and 25% of PBMCs collected before ECT, respectively. After the first ECT session, complete response was achieved in 20 out of 27 (74.1%) patients and HHV8 DNA was detected in four out of 27 (14.8%) PBMC samples at six month follow up. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF26 amplimers showed that most viral variants belonged to A/C (82.3%), and few to C2 (5.9%) or C3 (11.8%) subtype. The K1/VR1 variants fell into A (33.3%) and C (66.7%) HHV8 clade

  7. y Human herpesvirus 6 envelope components enriched in lipid rafts: evidence for virion-associated lipid rafts

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    Yamanishi Koichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In general, enveloped viruses are highly dependent on their lipid envelope for entry into host cells. Here, we demonstrated that during the course of virus maturation, a significant proportion of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 envelope proteins were selectively concentrated in the detergent-resistant glycosphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich membranes (rafts in HHV-6-infected cells. In addition, the ganglioside GM1, which is known to partition preferentially into lipid rafts, was detected in purified virions, along with viral envelope glycoproteins, gH, gL, gB, gQ1, gQ2 and gO indicating that at least one raft component was included in the viral particle during the assembly process.

  8. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

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    Tiwari, Vaibhav [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R. [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Shukla, Deepak, E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  9. Visceral Kaposi's Sarcoma Related to Human Herpesvirus-8 in Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review

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    H. Benhammane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS in transplant recipients is about 400 to 500 times rate in the general population. It is strongly associated to Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 infection which has been found in 95% of KS lesions. The optimal approach to managing posttransplantation KS is to reduce or discontinue immunosuppressive therapy but this strategy carries a risk of the acute rejection of the graft. Recently, the use of an mTOR inhibitor has added new opportunities for KS treatment and prevention. Case Report. We report a case of 24 years-old Turkish woman with visceral HHV-8-associated Kaposi's sarcoma after orthotopic liver transplantation. Conclusion. Posttransplantation KS is considered an experimental model of virus induced tumor suggesting the usefulness of HHV-8 screening in transplant recipient and donor. Therapeutic approaches are complex and require a multidisciplinary team.

  10. Detection of DNA of Lymphotropic Herpesviruses in Plasma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients: Frequency and Clinical Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccolo, Francesco; Bossolasco, Simona; Careddu, Anna M.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2002-01-01

    The frequency and clinical significance of detection of DNA of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, and HHV-8 in plasma were investigated by PCR. The plasma was obtained from 120 selected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, of whom 75 had AIDS-related manifestations, 32 had primary HIV infection (PHI), and 13 had asymptomatic infections. Nested PCR analysis revealed that none of the lymphotropic herpesviruses tested were found in patients with PHI, in asymptomatic HIV-positive individuals, or in HIV-negative controls. By contrast, DNA of one or more of the viruses was found in 42 (56%) of 75 patients with AIDS-related manifestations, including CMV disease (CMV-D) or AIDS-related tumors. The presence of CMV DNA in plasma was significantly associated with CMV-D (P < 0.001). By contrast, EBV detection was not significantly associated with AIDS-related lymphomas (P = 0.31). Interestingly, the presence of HHV-8 DNA in plasma was significantly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) disease (P < 0.001) and with the clinical status of KS patients (P < 0.001). CMV (primarily), EBV, and HHV-8 were the viruses most commonly reactivated in the context of severe immunosuppression (P < 0.05). In contrast, HHV-6 and HHV-7 infections were infrequent at any stage of disease. In conclusion, plasma PCR was confirmed to be useful in the diagnosis of CMV-D but not in that of tumors or other conditions possibly associated with EBV, HHV-6, and HHV-7. Our findings support the hypothesis of a direct involvement of HHV-8 replication in KS pathogenesis, thus emphasizing the usefulness of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests to monitor HHV-8 infection. PMID:12414753

  11. Rapid quantitative PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus 6 DNA in blood and other clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelmann, I.; Petzold, D. R.; Kosinska, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Schulz, T. F.; Heim, A.

    Rapid diagnosis of human herpesvirus primary infections or reactivations is facilitated by quantitative PCRs. Quantitative PCR assays with a standard thermal cycling profile permitting simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV),

  12. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  13. Prospective Characterization of the Risk Factors for Transmission and Symptoms of Primary Human Herpesvirus Infections Among Ugandan Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Orem, Jackson; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Morrow, Rhoda Ashley; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Schiffer, Joshua T; Jerome, Keith R; Nakaganda, Annet; Wald, Anna; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) infections are common during infancy. Primary infections are frequently asymptomatic and best studied prospectively by using direct viral detection. Oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected weekly from Ugandan newborn infants, their mothers, and other children in the household. Blood specimens were collected every 4 months. Samples were tested for herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-8, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirty-two infants, 32 mothers, and 49 other household children were followed for a median of 57 weeks. Seventeen mothers had human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection; no infants acquired HIV-1. The 12-month incidence of postnatal infection was 76% for HHV-6B, 59% for CMV, 47% for EBV, 8% for HSV-1, and 0% for HHV-8. The quantity of oropharyngeal shedding by contacts was associated with HHV-6A or HHV-6B transmission. Maternal HIV-1 infection was associated with EBV transmission, while breastfeeding and younger child contacts were associated with CMV transmission. Except for HSV-1, primary HHV infections were subclinical. By capturing exposures and acquisition events, we found that the incidence and risk factors of infection vary by HHV type. HSV-1 infection, unlike other HHV infections, caused acute clinical illness in these infants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Human Herpesvirus 8-Negative and Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Effusion-Based Lymphoma in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    Jung-Woo Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old man infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of chest pain. Chest radiography revealed pneumothorax of the right lung. Computed tomographic scans disclosed a 5.8-cm-sized emphysematous bulla in the right middle lobe of the lung. Histologically, the wedge-resected lung showed medium to large atypical cells within the bullous cavity of the Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, without solid mass formation. These atypical cells were confirmed to be large B-cell lymphoma, Epstein-Barr virus–positive and human herpesvirus 8–negative. Therefore, this case was not diagnosed as primary effusion lymphoma, but effusion-based lymphoma arising in an emphysematous cavity of an HIV-infected patient. This type of effusion-based lymphoma has never been reported, and, although rare, it should be noted in order to clinically diagnose this lymphoma.

  15. Cycling probe-based real-time PCR for the detection of Human herpesvirus 6A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihira, Masaru; Yamaki, Ayumi; Kato, Yuri; Higashimoto, Yuki; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-09-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is classified as two distinct species: HHV-6A and B. HHV-6B infection can cause several clinical manifestations in transplant recipients including encephalitis, bone marrow suppression, and pneumonitis. In contrast to HHV-6B, the clinical features of HHV-6A infection remain largely undefined. Herein, we developed a multiplex cycling probe real-time PCR that discriminated between HHV-6A and HHV-6B. The assay was HHV-6-specific and no cross amplification was demonstrated for other herpesviruses. Moreover, the assay had a broad, linear dynamic range of detection between 1 and 10(6) copies of viral DNA. The quantification of HHV-6A DNA was suppressed by an excess amount of HHV-6B DNA (1 × 10(6) copies/tube) in the multiplex PCR assay; however, 1 × 10(6) copies/tube of HHV-6A DNA did not affect the quantification of 1 × 10(4) copies/tube of HHV-6B DNA. To determine the reliability of the assay for analysis of clinical specimens, DNAs extracted from the peripheral blood of hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients were assayed using our multiplex real-time PCR versus the standard TaqMan PCR. Strong correlations were demonstrated between the two different assay systems for both HHV-6A (R(2)  = 0.913) and HHV-6B (R(2)  = 0.909). Therefore, our multiplex HHV-6 species-specific cycling probe real-time PCR is useful for evaluating the precise copy numbers of HHV-6A and B in transplant recipients. However, as HHV-6A copy numbers was affected by presence of high copies of HHV-6B DNA (1 × 10(6) copies/tube), it may be difficult to measure precise copy numbers of HHV-6A in inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6B patient. J. Med. Virol. 88:1628-1635, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Novel marmoset (Callithrix jacchus model of human Herpesvirus 6A and 6B infections: immunologic, virologic and radiologic characterization.

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    Emily Leibovitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous virus with an estimated seroprevalence of 95% in the adult population. HHV-6 is associated with several neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the CNS. Animal models of HHV-6 infection would help clarify its role in human disease but have been slow to develop because rodents lack CD46, the receptor for cellular entry. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HHV-6 infections in a non-human primate, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. We inoculated a total of 12 marmosets with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously and HHV-6A intranasally. Animals were monitored for 25 weeks post-inoculation clinically, immunologically and by MRI. Marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms and generated virus-specific antibody responses, while those inoculated intravenously with HHV-6B were asymptomatic and generated comparatively lower antibody responses. Viral DNA was detected at a low frequency in paraffin-embedded CNS tissue of a subset of marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously. When different routes of HHV-6A inoculation were compared, intravenous inoculation resulted in virus-specific antibody responses and infrequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery, while intranasal inoculation resulted in negligible virus-specific antibody responses and frequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery. Moreover, marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms, while marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intranasally were asymptomatic. We demonstrate that a marmoset model of HHV-6 infection can serve to further define the contribution of this ubiquitous virus to human neurologic disorders.

  17. Novel marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) model of human Herpesvirus 6A and 6B infections: immunologic, virologic and radiologic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovitch, Emily; Wohler, Jillian E; Cummings Macri, Sheila M; Motanic, Kelsey; Harberts, Erin; Gaitán, María I; Maggi, Pietro; Ellis, Mary; Westmoreland, Susan; Silva, Afonso; Reich, Daniel S; Jacobson, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous virus with an estimated seroprevalence of 95% in the adult population. HHV-6 is associated with several neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the CNS. Animal models of HHV-6 infection would help clarify its role in human disease but have been slow to develop because rodents lack CD46, the receptor for cellular entry. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HHV-6 infections in a non-human primate, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. We inoculated a total of 12 marmosets with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously and HHV-6A intranasally. Animals were monitored for 25 weeks post-inoculation clinically, immunologically and by MRI. Marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms and generated virus-specific antibody responses, while those inoculated intravenously with HHV-6B were asymptomatic and generated comparatively lower antibody responses. Viral DNA was detected at a low frequency in paraffin-embedded CNS tissue of a subset of marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously. When different routes of HHV-6A inoculation were compared, intravenous inoculation resulted in virus-specific antibody responses and infrequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery, while intranasal inoculation resulted in negligible virus-specific antibody responses and frequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery. Moreover, marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms, while marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intranasally were asymptomatic. We demonstrate that a marmoset model of HHV-6 infection can serve to further define the contribution of this ubiquitous virus to human neurologic disorders.

  18. Human Herpesvirus-6 Pneumonitis around the Engraftment of Cord Blood Transplantation following Foscarnet Prophylaxis in a Patient with Acute Leukemia

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    Takashi Ishio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 reactivation is sometimes observed in immunocompromised patients, especially after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The complications of HHV-6 reactivation in this setting are mainly recognized as HHV-6 encephalitis. We herein report the case of a patient who developed HHV-6 pneumonitis after cord blood transplantation (CBT. A 35-year-old male underwent CBT for T-cell/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia and achieved neutrophil engraftment on day 31. He had received foscarnet as prophylaxis for HHV-6 reactivation. A computed tomography (CT scan to evaluate the leukemic tumor showed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis on day 33, although he had no respiratory symptoms. The findings of the CT scan were consistent with those of HHV-6 pneumonitis that were reported previously. HHV-6 DNA, but no other pathogens, was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. The patient was successfully treated with a therapeutic dose of foscarnet. This case indicates that performing a CT scan around the time of neutrophil engraftment can play an important role in detecting the early phase of HHV-6 pneumonia, and BAL should be considered if features consistent with HHV-6 pneumonitis are observed in patients with a risk of HHV-6 reactivation.

  19. Use of plasma human herpesvirus-8 viral load measurement: evaluation of practice in three UK HIV treatment centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, D B; Webster, D; Mabayoje, D; Chung, E; El Bouzidi, K; O'Sullivan, A; Ainsworth, J; Miller, R F

    2017-02-01

    A retrospective audit of plasma human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) viral load testing was performed in three HIV treatment centres over 24 months. Reasons for testing (360 tests) were: symptoms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (fever, lymphadenopathy and raised inflammatory markers); monitoring in known HHV-8 pathology other than Kaposi sarcoma (KS); investigation of known/suspected KS, and other/no reason. Of patients with multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), 14/16 (88%) had detectable plasma HHV-8, as did 27/45 (60%) with biopsy proven or clinically confirmed KS, and 6/19 (32%) with lymphoma. Neither of the two patients with MCD and no detectable HHV-8 had SIRS symptoms at the time of the test. There was wide variation between centres in the indications prompting HHV-8 testing, with a more conservative approach resulting in a higher proportion of positive results. Measuring plasma HHV-8 in the absence of SIRS symptoms, established HHV-8 disease monitoring, or confirmed/suspected KS is unlikely to yield detectable HHV-8 thus allowing potential cost savings.

  20. High Prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection in Diabetes Type 2 Patients and Detection of a New Virus Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Enrica; Madeddu, Maria A; Palmieri, Giuseppina; Angius, Fabrizio; Contini, Pierpaolo; Pompei, Raffaello; Ingianni, Angela

    2016-11-19

    The prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) DNA and antiviral antibodies in Diabetes type 2 (DM2) and control subjects was studied, in order to confirm a possible link between DM2 and HHV8 infection. The HHV8-DNA from diabetic patients was typed for detecting possible genomic differences with known HHV8 reference viruses.DM2 patients and healthy controls were examined for the presence of HHV8 DNA into the peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both anti-lytic and latent phase antibodies were detected in HHV8 positive and negative diabetic patients, as well in a number of controls. The HHV8 ORF K1 and ORF 26 genes from DM2 patients were typed and matched to reference strains.A significant prevalence of HHV8 DNA in DM2 subjects versus healthy controls was detected (about 58 % against 27 %). Anti-lytic phase, but not anti-latent phase antibodies, were significantly increased in DM2 patients versus controls. In addition, about 30 % of HHV8 strains isolated from DM2 lymphocytes showed consistent differences in the ORF 26 gene sequence, so that a new HHV8 subtype was proposed. These findings give additional support to the hypothesis that HHV8 could be considered an additional risk factor for DM2 onset.

  1. Viral interactions in human lymphoid tissue: Human herpesvirus 7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 via CD4 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angélique; Vanpouille, Christophe; Origgi, Francesco; Malnati, Mauro S; Schols, Dominique; Lusso, Paolo; Margolis, Leonid B

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affects HIV-1 by upregulating RANTES, HHV-7 did not upregulate any CCR5-binding chemokine. Rather, the inhibition of R5 HIV-1 by HHV-7 was associated with a marked downregulation of CD4, the cellular receptor shared by HHV-7 and HIV-1. HHV-7-induced CD4 downregulation was sufficient for HIV-1 inhibition, since comparable downregulation of CD4 with cyclotriazadisulfonamide, a synthetic macrocycle that specifically modulates expression of CD4, resulted in the suppression of HIV infection similar to that seen in HHV-7-infected tissues. In contrast to R5 HIV-1, CXCR4-tropic (X4) HIV-1 was only minimally suppressed by HHV-7 coinfection. This selectivity in suppression of R5 and X4 HIV-1 is explained by a suppression of HHV-7 replication in X4- but not in R5-coinfected tissues. These results suggest that HIV-1 and HHV-7 may interfere in lymphoid tissue in vivo, thus potentially affecting the progression of HIV-1 disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction of HIV-1 with HHV-7, as well as with other pathogens that modulate HIV-1 replication, may provide new insights into HIV pathogenesis and lead to the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic strategies.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) replication and transcription factor activates the K9 (vIRF) gene through two distinct cis elements by a non-DNA-binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keiji; Ishikawa, Kayo; Nishimura, Ken; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Do, Eunju; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8, a homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 or Rta, is a strong transactivator and inducer of lytic replication. RTA acting alone can induce lytic replication of KSHV in infected cell lines that originated from primary effusion lymphomas, leading to virus production. During the lytic replication process, RTA activates many kinds of genes, including polyadenylated nuclear RNA, K8, K9 (vIRF), ORF57, and so on. We focused here on the mechanism of how RTA upregulates the K9 (vIRF) promoter and identified two independent cis-acting elements in the K9 (vIRF) promoter that responded to RTA. These elements were finally confined to the sequence 5'-TCTGGGACAGTC-3' in responsive element (RE) I-2B and the sequence 5'-GTACTTAAAATA-3' in RE IIC-2, both of which did not share sequence homology. Multiple factors bound specifically with these elements, and their binding was correlated with the RTA-responsive activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with nuclear extract from infected cells and the N-terminal part of RTA expressed in Escherichia coli, however, did not show that RTA interacted directly with these elements, in contrast to the RTA responsive elements in the PAN/K12 promoter region, the ORF57/K8 promoter region. Thus, it was likely that RTA could transactivate several kinds of unique cis elements without directly binding to the responsive elements, probably through cooperation with other DNA-binding factors.

  3. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects: correlation with the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma and response to anticytomegalovirus therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Gaudreau, A; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Routy, J P; Murray, G; Handfield, J; Bergeron, M G

    1999-02-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 microgram of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed.

  4. Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA Load in Leukocytes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects: Correlation with the Presence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Response to Anticytomegalovirus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy; Gaudreau, Annie; Toma, Emil; Lalonde, Richard; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Murray, Gilles; Handfield, Julie; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 μg of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed. PMID:9925538

  5. Suppression of CCR5- but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 in lymphoid tissue by human herpesvirus 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivel, J C; Ito, Y; Fagà, G; Santoro, F; Shaheen, F; Malnati, M S; Fitzgerald, W; Lusso, P; Margolis, L

    2001-11-01

    HIV-1 infects target cells via a receptor complex formed by CD4 and a chemokine receptor, primarily CCR5 or CXCR4 (ref. 1). Commonly, HIV-1 transmission is mediated by CCR5-tropic variants, also designated slow/low, non-syncytia-inducer or macrophage-tropic, which dominate the early stages of HIV-1 infection and frequently persist during the entire course of the disease. In contrast, HIV-1 variants that use CXCR4 are typically detected at the later stages, and are associated with a rapid decline in CD4+ T cells and progression to AIDS (refs. 2,7-11). Disease progression is also associated with the emergence of concurrent infections that may affect the course of HIV disease by unknown mechanisms. A lymphotropic agent frequently reactivated in HIV-infected patients is human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), which has been proposed as a cofactor in AIDS progression. Here we show that in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo, HHV-6 affects HIV-1 infection in a coreceptor-dependent manner, suppressing CCR5-tropic but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 replication, as shown with both uncloned viral isolates and isogenic molecular chimeras. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HHV-6 increases the production of the CCR5 ligand RANTES ('regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted'), the most potent HIV-inhibitory CC chemokine, and that exogenous RANTES mimics the effects of HHV-6 on HIV-1, providing a mechanism for the selective blockade of CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Our data suggest that HHV-6 may profoundly influence the course of HIV-1 infection.

  6. Characterization of human herpesvirus 6A/B U94 as ATPase, helicase, exonuclease and DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trempe, Frédéric; Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Collin, Vanessa; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Morissette, Guillaume; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2015-07-13

    Human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes, however, the mechanisms leading to integration remain unknown. HHV-6A/B encode a protein that has been proposed to be involved in integration termed U94, an ortholog of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) Rep68 integrase. In this report, we addressed whether purified recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-U94 fusion proteins of HHV-6A/B possess biological functions compatible with viral integration. We could demonstrate that MBP-U94 efficiently binds both dsDNA and ssDNA containing telomeric repeats using gel shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. MBP-U94 is also able to hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, providing the energy for further catalytic activities. In addition, U94 displays a 3' to 5' exonuclease activity on dsDNA with a preference for 3'-recessed ends. Once the DNA strand reaches 8-10 nt in length, the enzyme dissociates it from the complementary strand. Lastly, MBP-U94 compromises the integrity of a synthetic telomeric D-loop through exonuclease attack at the 3' end of the invading strand. The preferential DNA binding of MBP-U94 to telomeric sequences, its ability to hydrolyze ATP and its exonuclease/helicase activities suggest that U94 possesses all functions required for HHV-6A/B chromosomal integration. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Financing Human Capital: Families & Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neantro Saavedra-Rivano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD describes human capital as “knowledge, skills, competencies and attributes embodied in individuals that facilitate the creation of personal, social and economic wellbeing.”* It follows from this interpretation that investment in human capital includes the sum of all costs that allow a new being to reach economic autonomy. In this paper we analyze the family and social dimensions of human capital and discuss how decisions on human capital formation are taken and how its associated costs are shared. The discussion leads us to identify an important paradox underlying human capital formation, namely the fact that while families are its main contributors the benefits of such investment go primarily to society as a whole. This paradox and its consequences are central to two very important current issues. The first issue, one that is common to many developed countries, is low female fertility which is the source, in particular, of population aging. The second issue, affecting chiefly developing countries, is the inequality of opportunities, a problem lying at the root of underdevelopment. Two options are discussed to respond to this dilemma, one based on redistributive programs and another on market solutions. The paper discusses the limits inherent to redistributive programs and goes on to present at length the alternative market solution. In a nutshell this consists of securitizing the human capital of individuals so as to finance the expenses leading to their upbringing, from birth to adulthood. In addition to describing this scheme the paper analyzes its advantages as well as the difficulties associated with its implementation. It concludes by exploring possible interpretations of the scheme and feasible routes for its adoption.

  8. Evaluation of a viral microarray based on simultaneous extraction and amplification of viral nucleotide acid for detecting human herpesviruses and enteroviruses.

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    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus (CMV, enterovirus 71 (EV71, coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16 and B 5(CB5. The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5'-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90 from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63 and CA16 (0.74 displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses' detection.

  9. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 genotypes in Kaposi\\\\\\'s sarcoma in Iran by using molecular technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shah Siah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Mediterranean region , Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has a high prevalence especially in patients with AIDS. Iran is located close to the Mediterranean region and the HIV prevalence is increasing in our country . In some stages, Kaposi's sarcoma is morphologically similar to other vascular tumors. Owing to the presence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 in all cases of Kaposi's sarcoma , detection of virus DNA by PCR method can help in the identification of non-diagnostic cases. Moreover, the prevalence of HHV-8 genotypes is different in various regions of the world and in different races. There are limited studies performed on the HHV-8 genotypes in Iranian population. Methods: Patients with Kaposi's sarcoma from 2001 to 2011 who refer to Tehran Razi Hospital were enrolled in this study. HHV-8 DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and amplification of the virus genome was performed by PCR method . Finally, the target DNA fragment was used for sequencing and genotype determination. Results: PCR was performed on 53 cases. In 8 cases with suspicious morphology, PCR was negative and they were excluded from study. Of remaining 45 cases, 35 had positive PCR results, 7 had negative results and 3 had low PCR product. Samples from 28 cases that had positive PCR results, which were acceptable for genotyping, were chosen for sequencing. Twenty cases had genotype C, 7 cases had genotype A and one case was negative. The results are consistent with other studies in our geographical area. No correlation was found between the different microscopic stages and HHV-8 Genotypes. Conclusion: Since the HHV-8 is obtained in almost 100% of KS lesions and PCR s ensitivity in detection of the virus is close to 100 %, KS diagnosis can be confirmed in suspicious cases by detection of HHV-8 DNA on paraffin blocks. Moreover the prevalence of HHV-8 genotype was determined in Iran.

  10. Human and viral interleukin-6 and other cytokines in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wang, Victoria; Aleman, Karen; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; O’Mahony, Deirdre; Whitby, Denise; Tosato, Giovanna; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a polyclonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Human (h) IL-6 and a KSHV-encoded homolog, viral IL-6, have been hypothesized to contribute to its pathogenesis, but their relative contributions to disease activity is not well understood. We prospectively characterized KSHV viral load (VL), viral (v) and hIL-6, and other cytokines during KSHV-MCD flare and remission in 21 patients with 34 flares and 20 remissions. KSHV-VL, vIL-6, hIL-6, IL-10, and to a lesser extent TNF-α, and IL-1β were each elevated during initial flares compared with remission. Flares fell into 3 distinct IL-6 profiles: those associated with elevations of vIL6-only (2 flares, 6%), hIL-6 elevations only (17 flares, 50%), and elevations in both hIL-6 and vIL-6 (13 flares, 38%). Compared with hIL-6–only flares, flares with elevated hIL-6 plus vIL-6 exhibited higher C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = .0009); worse hyponatremia (P = .02); higher KSHV VL (P = .016), and higher IL-10 (P = .012). This analysis shows vIL-6 and hIL-6 can independently or together lead to KSHV-MCD flares, and suggests that vIL-6 and hIL-6 may jointly contribute to disease severity. These findings have implications for the development of novel KSHV-MCD therapies targeting IL-6 and its downstream signaling. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT099073. PMID:24174627

  11. Anti-human herpesvirus 6A/B IgG correlates with relapses and progression in multiple sclerosis.

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    Isabel Ortega-Madueño

    Full Text Available To analyze the titers of the IgG and IgM antibodies against human herpesvirus 6A/B (HHV-6A/B in multiple sclerosis (MS patients treated with different disease modified therapies (DMTs along two-years of follow-up.We collected 2163 serum samples from 596 MS; for 301 MS patients a 2-years follow-up was performed. Serum samples of 337 healthy controls were also analyzed. Anti-HHV-6A/B IgG and IgM were analyzed by ELISA (Panbio.We found that 129/187 (69.0% MS patients with a decrease of the anti-HHV-6A/B IgG titers after 2-years with DMTs were free of relapses and progression vs. 46/113 (40.7% of MS patients with an increase of the anti-HHV-6A/B IgG titers (p = 0.0000015; the higher significance was found for natalizumab. Furthermore, we found that anti-HHV-6A/B IgG titers reached their highest value two weeks before the relapse (p = 0.0142, while the anti-HHV-6A/B IgM titers reached their highest value one month before the relapse (p = 0.0344.The measurement of the anti-HHV-6A/B IgG titers could be a good biomarker of clinical response to the different DMTs. The increase of the anti-HHV-6A/B IgG and IgM titers predicts the upcoming clinical relapses. However, further longitudinal studies are needed to validate these results.

  12. Fulminant hepatic failure attributed to infection with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) in an immunocompetent woman: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Baewer, David; Cook, Linda; David, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Mild disease due to human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) has been reported in healthy children. Severe disease due to this virus can occur in immunocompromised patients but is rarely reported in previously healthy adults. We report the case of a previously healthy woman who presented with a skin rash, mild upper respiratory symptoms, and abdominal pain and succumbed to fulminant hepatic failure attributed to infection with HHV-6B. HHV-6 may be more commonly associated with fulminant hepatitis in immunocompetent patients than previously thought and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with skin rash, upper respiratory symptoms, and unexplained hepatitis.

  13. Coinfection with human herpesvirus 8 is associated with persistent inflammation and immune activation in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

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    Mar Masiá

    Full Text Available Infection with co-pathogens is one of the postulated factors contributing to persistent inflammation and non-AIDS events in virologically-suppressed HIV-infected patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8, a vasculotropic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients.Prospective study including virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. Several blood biomarkers (highly-sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, malondialdehyde, plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1], D-dimer, sCD14, sCD163, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, serological tests for HHV-8 and the majority of herpesviruses, carotid intima-media thickness, and endothelial function through flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery were measured.A total of 136 patients were included, 34.6% of them infected with HHV-8. HHV-8-infected patients were more frequently co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 (P<0.001, and less frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV (P = 0.045, and tended to be older (P = 0.086. HHV-8-infected patients had higher levels of hsCRP (median [interquartile range], 3.63 [1.32-7.54] vs. 2.08 [0.89-4.11] mg/L, P = 0.009, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR (7.67% [4.10-11.86]% vs. 3.86% [2.51-7.42]%, P = 0.035 and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR (8.02% [4.98-14.09]% vs. 5.02% [3.66-6.96]%, P = 0.018. After adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HCV and HSV-2 infection, the associations remained significant: adjusted difference between HHV-8 positive and negative patients (95% confidence interval for hsCRP, 74.19% (16.65-160.13%; for CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, 89.65% (14.34-214.87%; and for CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, 58.41% (12.30-123.22%. Flow-mediated dilatation and total carotid intima

  14. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H; Jerome, Keith R; Flamand, Louis

    2015-06-30

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6- subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73-6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23-7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6- without angina, iciHHV-6- with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina.

  15. Chemotherapy of herpesvirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, E

    1975-07-01

    Herpesviruses commonly produce lesions that come to the attention of physicians. Many different chemicals are known to suppress the growth of herpesviruses in vitro, but only a few of these have found application in clinical practice. A critical assessment of the place of some of these forms of chemotherapy was briefly presented.

  16. Anguillid herpesvirus 1 transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Gatherer, D.; Kerr, K.; Galbraith, J.; Herzyk, P.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Davidson, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We used deep sequencing of poly(A) RNA to characterize the transcriptome of an economically important eel virus, anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1), at a stage during the lytic life cycle when infectious virus was being produced. In contrast to the transcription of mammalian herpesviruses, the overall

  17. Human telomeres that carry an integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 are often short and unstable, facilitating release of the viral genome from the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Wig, Gunjan; Medina-Calzada, Zahara; Neumann, Rita; Jeffreys, Alec J; Winney, Bruce; Wilson, James F; Clark, Duncan A; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Linear chromosomes are stabilized by telomeres, but the presence of short dysfunctional telomeres triggers cellular senescence in human somatic tissues, thus contributing to ageing. Approximately 1% of the population inherits a chromosomally integrated copy of human herpesvirus 6 (CI-HHV-6), but the consequences of integration for the virus and for the telomere with the insertion are unknown. Here we show that the telomere on the distal end of the integrated virus is frequently the shortest measured in somatic cells but not the germline. The telomere carrying the CI-HHV-6 is also prone to truncations that result in the formation of a short telomere at a novel location within the viral genome. We detected extra-chromosomal circular HHV-6 molecules, some surprisingly comprising the entire viral genome with a single fully reconstituted direct repeat region (DR) with both terminal cleavage and packaging elements (PAC1 and PAC2). Truncated CI-HHV-6 and extra-chromosomal circular molecules are likely reciprocal products that arise through excision of a telomere-loop (t-loop) formed within the CI-HHV-6 genome. In summary, we show that the CI-HHV-6 genome disrupts stability of the associated telomere and this facilitates the release of viral sequences as circular molecules, some of which have the potential to become fully functioning viruses.

  18. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  19. Exploitation of herpesvirus immune evasion strategies to modify the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cell transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel S de la Garza-Rodea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells residing in the connective tissue of many organs and holding great potential for tissue repair. In culture, human MSCs (hMSCs are capable of extensive proliferation without showing chromosomal aberrations. Large numbers of hMSCs can thus be acquired from small samples of easily obtainable tissues like fat and bone marrow. MSCs can contribute to regeneration indirectly by secretion of cytokines or directly by differentiation into specialized cell types. The latter mechanism requires their long-term acceptance by the recipient. Although MSCs do not elicit immune responses in vitro, animal studies have revealed that allogeneic and xenogeneic MSCs are rejected. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We aim to overcome MSC immune rejection through permanent down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I proteins on the surface of these MHC class II-negative cells through the use of viral immune evasion proteins. Transduction of hMSCs with a retroviral vector encoding the human cytomegalovirus US11 protein resulted in strong inhibition of MHC class I surface expression. When transplanted into immunocompetent mice, persistence of the US11-expressing and HLA-ABC-negative hMSCs at levels resembling those found in immunodeficient (i.e., NOD/SCID mice could be attained provided that recipients' natural killer (NK cells were depleted prior to cell transplantation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate the potential utility of herpesviral immunoevasins to prevent rejection of xenogeneic MSCs. The observation that down-regulation of MHC class I surface expression renders hMSCs vulnerable to NK cell recognition and cytolysis implies that multiple viral immune evasion proteins are likely required to make hMSCs non-immunogenic and thereby universally transplantable.

  20. Kaposi's Sarcoma and Human Herpesvirus 8 in Cuba: evidence of subtype B expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourí, Vivian; Martínez, Pedro A; Capó, Virginia; Blanco, Orestes; Rodríguez, María E; Jiménez, Narciso; Fleites, Gilberto; Caballero, Iraida; Dovigny, María C; Alemán, Yoan; Correa, Consuelo; Pérez, Lissette; Soto, Yudira; Cardellá, Lidia; Álvarez, Alina; Nambiar, Sandeep; Hengge, Ulrich

    2012-10-25

    To evaluate the temporal distribution (1991-2009) and associated variation of KSHV subtypes in Cuba. Phylogenetic characterization based on the KSHV K1 gene was performed using 90 KSHV positive samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the prevalence of a wide range of KSHV subtypes (A: n=48 [A5=12]; C: n=15; B: n=22; and E: n=5). In the current study, we observed a significant increase in HHV-8 subtype B after 2004 (p=0.0063). This Subtype B in Cuba was associated with: heterosexual behaviour (OR: 3.63, CI: 1,2-10,98; p=0.03), with the antecedent of acquiring HIV/KSHV in Africa (p=0.0003), with nodular stage of KS lesions (OR 4.2, CI: 1.1 to 15.7; p=0.04). Our study is the first to report KSHV Subtype B expansion in Cuba, that might be reflective of a change in human behavioural pattern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serologic association of human herpesvirus eight with posttransplant Kaposi's sarcoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qunibi, W; Al-Furayh, O; Almeshari, K; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Ross, D; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1998-02-27

    In Saudi Arabia, Kaposi's sarcoma occurs in 4.1% of renal transplant recipients and accounts for 70% of malignancies in this group. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) has been identified in the DNA of many of these patients. The association between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma was investigated further in post-renal transplant Kaposi's sarcoma patients from a tertiary care hospital (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (n = 14), and non-Kaposi's sarcoma controls with renal transplant (n = 18), chronic renal failure (n = 14), other cancers that did not affect renal function (n = 15), and healthy volunteers (n = 15). The median time from transplant to Kaposi's sarcoma was 13 months. A serum sample was assumed to have antibodies to HHV8 if antibody to either p40 or sVCA was detected. The prevalence of HHV8 seroreactivity was 13/14 (93%) in cases, 5/18 (28%) in renal transplants without Kaposi's sarcoma, and 11/62 (18%) in the aggregate control group. HHV8 seroreactivity was significantly more common (p 0.001) among transplant patients with Kaposi's sarcoma than those without this cancer (odds ratio, 33.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.96-904). These findings suggest an etiologic link between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma presumably due to immunologic or cellular factors that influence host-virus interactions.

  2. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  3. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infects both B and T lymphocytes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, W J; Medveczky, P; Mulder, C; Hinze, H C; Sullivan, J L

    1985-01-01

    Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) was studied as a model of herpesvirus-induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukocytosis, splenomegaly, proliferation of T cells and virus production by lymphocytes characterized this infectious mononucleosis-like disease. Approximately two copies of circular herpesvirus sylvilagus genomes per cell were detected in spleen cells at 2 weeks postinfection, and circular genomes could still be observed after 4 months. Circular viral genomes were found in both B and T lymphocytes. Small amounts of linear viral DNA (0.1 to 0.3 copies per cell) were also detected in both B and T cells. These results indicated that the virus did not replicate in the majority of lymphocytes in vivo. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection in cottontail rabbits could be useful as a model for studying the complex virus-host relationships of lymphotropic herpesviruses and perhaps as an animal model for Epstein-Barr virus infection in humans. Images PMID:2993667

  4. Human Herpesvirus-8 Infection Associated with Kaposi Sarcoma, Multicentric Castleman's Disease, and Plasmablastic Microlymphoma in a Man with AIDS: A Case Report with Review of Pathophysiologic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS, multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma, are all linked to human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 infection and HIV-induced immunodeficiency. Herein, we describe the case of a Kenyan man diagnosed with HIV in 2000. He deferred highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and remained in good health until his CD4+ count declined in 2006. He was hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia in 2008, after which he agreed to take HAART but did so sporadically. In 2010, he was hospitalized with fever, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia, and an elevated HHV-8 viral load. A lymph node biopsy showed findings consistent with KS, MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma. Eight months after starting liposomal doxorubicin, Rituximab, and a new HAART regimen, he has improved clinically, and his HIV and HHV-8 viral loads are suppressed. These three conditions, found in the same lymph node, underscore the inflammatory and malignant potential of HHV-8, particularly in the milieu of HIV-induced immunodeficiency.

  5. Lack of evidence of human herpesvirus 8 DNA sequences in HIV-negative patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, N; Franck, N; Calvez, V; Gorin, I; Grandadam, M; Huraux, J M; Leibowitch, M; Agut, H; Escande, J P

    1997-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is a new virus which has been reported in Kaposi's sarcoma and some lymphoproliferative disorders such as Castleman's disease and body-cavity-based lymphoma. Because HHV-8 shares homology with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we searched for the presence of HHV-8 DNA sequences in various cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphoma by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Forty-seven HIV-negative patients with cutaneous lymphoma or large plaque parapsoriasis were enrolled in the study. For the detection of HHV-8 DNA sequences we used PCR followed by a hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled probe and nested-PCR. HHV-8 DNA sequences could only be detected in a patient with large plaque parapsoriasis. Our study does not suggest any direct implication of HHV-8 in the pathogenesis of most cutaneous lymphoma. Serological studies will be helpful to appreciate if there is an epidemiological link between HHV-8 and cutaneous lymphomas.

  6. [Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV-8)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Harutaka

    2010-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8) are members of gamma-herpes virus family. Both viruses infect to B cells and cause malignancies such as lymphoma. Since EBV and HHV-8 are so-called 'oncovirus', their oncogenecities have been focused in the researches on EBV and KSHV for a long time. EBV was discovered in 1964, whereas KSHV was identified in 1994. However, KSHV was analyzed rapidly in these fifteen years. One of the recent progresses in the research on EBV and KSHV is that virus-encoded small RNAs were identified in their genomes and characterized. EBV is the first human virus in whose genome microRNA was identified. The oncogenecity of EBV and KSHV remains unclear. Here, I discuss the pathogenesis by EBV and KSHV with special reference to recent progress in this field.

  7. A Simple Proteomics-Based Approach to Identification of Immunodominant Antigens from a Complex Pathogen: Application to the CD4 T Cell Response against Human Herpesvirus 6B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Artiles, Aniuska; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Stern, Lawrence J; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Most of humanity is chronically infected with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), with viral replication controlled at least in part by a poorly characterized CD4 T cell response. Identification of viral epitopes recognized by CD4 T cells is complicated by the large size of the herpesvirus genome and a low frequency of circulating T cells responding to the virus. Here, we present an alternative to classical epitope mapping approaches used to identify major targets of the T cell response to a complex pathogen like HHV-6B. In the approach presented here, extracellular virus preparations or virus-infected cells are fractionated by SDS-PAGE, and eluted fractions are used as source of antigens to study cytokine responses in direct ex vivo T cell activation studies. Fractions inducing significant cytokine responses are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify viral proteins, and a subset of peptides from these proteins corresponding to predicted HLA-DR binders is tested for IFN-γ production in seropositive donors with diverse HLA haplotypes. Ten HHV-6B viral proteins were identified as immunodominant antigens. The epitope-specific response to HHV-6B virus was complex and variable between individuals. We identified 107 peptides, each recognized by at least one donor, with each donor having a distinctive footprint. Fourteen peptides showed responses in the majority of donors. Responses to these epitopes were validated using in vitro expanded cells and naturally expressed viral proteins. Predicted peptide binding affinities for the eight HLA-DRB1 alleles investigated here correlated only modestly with the observed CD4 T cell responses. Overall, the response to the virus was dominated by peptides from the major capsid protein U57 and major antigenic protein U11, but responses to other proteins including glycoprotein H (U48) and tegument proteins U54 and U14 also were observed. These results provide a means to follow and potentially modulate the CD4 T-cell immune response to HHV-6

  8. Herpesvirus infections in xenotransplantation: pathogenesis and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-11-01

    Infectious risk remains an important consideration in the clinical application of xenotransplantation. Vascularized xenografts create unique immunological niches in which bidirectional transmission of pathogens between donor and recipient may occur. Enhanced replication of many pathogens is stimulated by the immune responses induced by transplantation and by the immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection. Herpesviruses are the prototype viruses that are activated during immunosuppression. Quantitative diagnostic molecular assays have been developed for the known herpesviruses causing infection in pigs. Recent data suggest that some herpesviral infections, such as porcine cytomegalovirus, may be excluded from swine used as source animals by careful breeding, while others will require novel strategies for control. This review focuses on porcine and baboon herpesviruses in pig-to-non-human primate solid organ xenotransplantation including direct effects (tissue damage), indirect effects (coagulopathy, rejection), and possible approaches to these infections.

  9. Koi herpesvirus disease in carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremić Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A disease in the koi carp (Cyprinus carpio koi and the common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio, caused by the herpesvirus and accompanied by a high mortality rate, has spread across numerous fish ponds all over the world since 1998, resulting in massive mortality and significant financial losses. The herpesvirus-like virus, called the koi herpesvirus (KHV has been isolated and identified from the koi and the common carp in the course of the incidences of massive mortalities. The first appearance of a disease with a high mortality in the common and the koi carp caused by the koi herpesvirus (KHV was described in 1998 in Israel and the United States of America (USA. Since that time, a large number of cases of outbreaks of this disease have been confirmed throughout the world, including the USA, Israel, and a large number of European countries. The deaths occurred seasonally, in late spring or early autumn, when the water temperature was from 18-28ºC. The most important factor of the environment that affects the occurrence and gravity of this disease is the water temperature. This disease is currently considered one of the factors that present the biggest threat to populations of the common and the koi carp. Diseased fish are disoriented, their movements uncoordinated, their breathing rapid, gills swollen, and they have local skin lesions. The virus was isolated from tissue of diseased fish and cultivated on a KF-1 (koi fin cells cell line. Electronic microscopy examinations revealed virus identical viral particles of the Herpesviridae family. Analyses of the virion polypeptide and DNA established differences between the KHV and the previously known herpesvirus of the Cyprinida family, Herpesvirus cyprini (CHV, and the virus of the channel catfish (Channel catfish virus - CCV. In the years 2004 and 2005, high mortality was established among one-year and two-year carp fry on three fish ponds. At two ponds, the deaths occurred among one year and two

  10. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgia Guglielmo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug. We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  11. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 antibodies in women from São Paulo, Brazil: association with behavioral factors and Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterino-de-Araujo Adele

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the spread of AIDS, many HIV-infected women have been diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, especially in Africa. Since the discovery of a novel herpesvirus as the causative agent of KS (human herpesvirus 8 - HHV-8 several seroepidemiological studies have been conducted to identify groups at risk for KS. The risk for women in Brazil has not been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched for HHV-8 antibodies in sera obtained from a bank made up of samples from 3 groups of individuals: Group I: 163 HIV-1-infected women attended at an ambulatory clinic in 1994; Group II: 108 children born to HIV-1-infected mothers from 1990 to 1992, their antibodies reflected maternal infection, and Group III: 630 HIV-1-seronegative, healthy women. In-house immunofluorescence and Western-Blot assays based on the BCBL-1 cell line were used to detect anti-latent and anti-lytic HHV-8 antibodies. RESULTS: Group I had an overall frequency of antibodies of 8.6%, with a 1.2% frequency of anti-latent antibodies and an 8.0% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. Similar results were detected in Group II, i.e., no cases with anti-latent antibodies and a 7.4% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. In contrast, prevalences of 1.1% anti-latent antibodies and 0.3% anti-lytic antibodies were observed in Group III. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiologic pattern of HHV-8 in women from São Paulo varies according to behavioral factors, with emphasis on the sexual and blood routes of virus transmission/acquisition. Although HHV-8 anti-lytic antibodies were found in HIV-1-infected women, no case of KS was detected. Protective factors against KS are probably related to gender and/or to antiretroviral therapies introduced in Brazil since 1994.

  12. Herpesvirus saimiri-based vector biodistribution using noninvasive optical imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, P G; Oakley, F; Fernandez, M; Mann, D A; Lemoine, N R; Whitehouse, A

    2005-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is capable of infecting a range of human cell types with high efficiency and the viral genome persists as high copy number, circular, nonintegrated episomes which segregate to progeny upon cell division...

  13. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sq how to do kids infect kids links & resources M.O.V.E. parents for prevention ... go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  14. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sq how to do kids infect kids links & resources M.O.V.E. parents for prevention ... go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  15. Animal herpesviruses and their zoonotic potential for cross-species infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Woźniakowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses of humans and animals cause severe diseases that influence not only the health and epidemiological status but are also economically important in the context of food production. The members of Herpesviridae are host specific agents that also share many properties that potentially make them capable of crossing the species barriers. The objective of presented review paper was to summarize the relationship between herpesviruses of animals and humans and their zoonotic potential. In humans, the most epidemiologically important herpesviruses are represented by Human herepesvirus-1 and Human herpesvirus-2, which are commonly known as herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2, varicella-zooster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, cytomegalovirus (CMV, as well as Human herpesviruses: HHV-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7. However, in terms of the potential to cross the species barrier, there are a few herpesviruses, including B virus disease (CeHV-1, Marek’s disease virus (MDV, Equid herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1 or pseudorabies virus (PRV, which are potentially able to infect different hosts. To summarize, in advantageous conditions the host specific herpesviruses may pose a threat for public health but also may exert a negative impact on the economical aspects of animal production. The most probable of these are zoonotic infections caused by B virus disease; however, close contact between infected animal hosts and humans may lead to transmission and replication of other Herpesviridae members.

  16. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  17. Serological evidence that activation of ubiquitous human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) plays a role in chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, D H

    2016-02-01

    Acute infection with viral pathogens in the herpesviridae family can trigger acute urticaria, and reactivation of herpesviridae is associated with cutaneous urticarial-like syndromes such as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Reactivation of latent herpesviridae has not been studied systematically in chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU). This review proposes that CIU is an inflammatory disorder with autoimmune features (termed 'CVU' for chronic viral urticaria), based on serology consistent with the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpesvirus or -viruses may play a role in CIU. Serology obtained from a cohort of omalizumab (Xolair)-dependent patients with severe CIU was consistent with previous HHV-6 infection, persistent viral gene expression and replication. CIU patients also exhibited serological evidence of increased immune response to HHV-4 (Epstein-Barr virus, or EBV) but not all CIU patients were infected with EBV. These observations, combined with case reports of CIU response to anti-viral therapy, suggest that HHV-6, possibly interacting with HHV-4 in cutaneous tissues, is a candidate for further prospective study as a co-factor in CIU.

  18. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  19. A Simple Proteomics-Based Approach to Identification of Immunodominant Antigens from a Complex Pathogen: Application to the CD4 T Cell Response against Human Herpesvirus 6B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniuska Becerra-Artiles

    Full Text Available Most of humanity is chronically infected with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6, with viral replication controlled at least in part by a poorly characterized CD4 T cell response. Identification of viral epitopes recognized by CD4 T cells is complicated by the large size of the herpesvirus genome and a low frequency of circulating T cells responding to the virus. Here, we present an alternative to classical epitope mapping approaches used to identify major targets of the T cell response to a complex pathogen like HHV-6B. In the approach presented here, extracellular virus preparations or virus-infected cells are fractionated by SDS-PAGE, and eluted fractions are used as source of antigens to study cytokine responses in direct ex vivo T cell activation studies. Fractions inducing significant cytokine responses are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify viral proteins, and a subset of peptides from these proteins corresponding to predicted HLA-DR binders is tested for IFN-γ production in seropositive donors with diverse HLA haplotypes. Ten HHV-6B viral proteins were identified as immunodominant antigens. The epitope-specific response to HHV-6B virus was complex and variable between individuals. We identified 107 peptides, each recognized by at least one donor, with each donor having a distinctive footprint. Fourteen peptides showed responses in the majority of donors. Responses to these epitopes were validated using in vitro expanded cells and naturally expressed viral proteins. Predicted peptide binding affinities for the eight HLA-DRB1 alleles investigated here correlated only modestly with the observed CD4 T cell responses. Overall, the response to the virus was dominated by peptides from the major capsid protein U57 and major antigenic protein U11, but responses to other proteins including glycoprotein H (U48 and tegument proteins U54 and U14 also were observed. These results provide a means to follow and potentially modulate the CD4 T-cell immune

  20. Human herpesvirus 6B U19 protein is a PML-regulated transcriptional activator that localizes to nuclear foci in a PML-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) contains an IE-B domain spanning open reading frames U16/17-U19, based on homology with human cytomegalovirus. Here, the protein product, U19, of the HHV-6B U19 gene is identified as a 47 kDa transcriptional activator. HHV-6B infection or overexpression of U19...... transactivated the RANTES promoter. Mutational analysis of the promoter indicated that transactivation was not critically dependent on the promoter sites CRE, NF-kappaB, ISRE or NF-IL6. ND10 are nuclear substructures that are involved in several cellular regulatory pathways, including those controlling gene...... structure, U19 also localized to the centre of ND10. Knockdown of PML by small interfering RNA did not prevent U19 localization to ND10-like foci, but instead led to a fourfold increase in U19-induced transcription from the RANTES promoter. Generation of four truncated U19 proteins indicated that the N...

  1. Proteomic characterization of murid herpesvirus 4 extracellular virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vidick

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesvirinae, such as the human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and the Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV are highly prevalent pathogens that have been associated with several neoplastic diseases. As EBV and KSHV are host-range specific and replicate poorly in vitro, animal counterparts such as Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 have been widely used as models. In this study, we used MuHV-4 in order to improve the knowledge about proteins that compose gammaherpesviruses virions. To this end, MuHV-4 extracellular virions were isolated and structural proteins were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. These analyses allowed the identification of 31 structural proteins encoded by the MuHV-4 genome which were classified as capsid (8, envelope (9, tegument (13 and unclassified (1 structural proteins. In addition, we estimated the relative abundance of the identified proteins in MuHV-4 virions by using exponentially modified protein abundance index analyses. In parallel, several host proteins were found in purified MuHV-4 virions including Annexin A2. Although Annexin A2 has previously been detected in different virions from various families, its role in the virion remains controversial. Interestingly, despite its relatively high abundance in virions, Annexin A2 was not essential for the growth of MuHV-4 in vitro. Altogether, these results extend previous work aimed at determining the composition of gammaherpesvirus virions and provide novel insights for understanding MuHV-4 biology.

  2. A human herpesvirus miRNA attenuates interferon signaling and contributes to maintenance of viral latency by targeting IKKε

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguang Liang; Yuan Gao; Xianzhi Lin; Zhiheng He; Qinglan Zhao; Qiang Deng; Ke Lan

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferon(IFN)signaling is the principal response mediating antiviral innate immunity. IFN transcription is dependent upon the activation of transcription factors IRF3/IRF7 and NF-KB. Many viral proteins have been shown as being capable of interfering with IFN signaling to facilitate evasion from the host innate immune response.Here, we report that a viral miRNA, miR-K12-11, encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV)is critical for the modulation of IFN signaling and acts through targeting 1-kappa-B kinase epsilon(IKKε). Ectopic expression of miR-K12-11 resulted in decreased IKKε expression, while inhibition of miR-K12-11 was found to restore IKKE expression in KSHV-infected cells. Importantly, expression of milk-K12-I1 attenuated IFN signaling by decreasing IKKε-mediated IRF3/IRF7 phosphorylation and by inhibiting the activation of IKKE-dependent IFN stimulating genes(ISGs), allowing miR-K12-11 suppression of antiviral immunity. Our data suggest that IKKE targeting by miR-K12-11 is an important strategy utilized by KSHV to modulate IFN signaling during the KSHV lifecycle, especially in latency. We also demonstrated that IKKE was able to enhance KSHV reactivation synergistically with the treatment of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Moreover, inhibition of miR-K12-11enhanced KSHV reactivation induced by vesicular stomatitis virus infection. Taken together, our findings also suggest that miR-K12-11 can contribute to maintenance of KSHV latency by targeting IKKE.

  3. Herpesvirus Genome Integration into Telomeric Repeats of Host Cell Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that numerous viruses integrate their genetic material into host cell chromosomes. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been shown to integrate their genomes into host telomeres of latently infected cells. This is unusual for herpesviruses as most maintain their genomes as circular episomes during the quiescent stage of infection. The genomic DNA of HHV-6, MDV, and several other herpesviruses harbors telomeric repeats (TMRs) that are identical to host telomere sequences (TTAGGG). At least in the case of MDV, viral TMRs facilitate integration into host telomeres. Integration of HHV-6 occurs not only in lymphocytes but also in the germline of some individuals, allowing vertical virus transmission. Although the molecular mechanism of telomere integration is poorly understood, the presence of TMRs in a number of herpesviruses suggests it is their default program for genome maintenance during latency and also allows efficient reactivation.

  4. 人类疱疹病毒8型基因型的研究进展%Advances in the genotyping of human herpesvirus 8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓东; 惠艳

    2009-01-01

    人类疱疹病毒8型广泛存在于各种临床表型的Kaposi肉瘤中,其基因型分布呈现种族与地域特异性.了解Kaposi肉瘤患者中HHV-8基因型特征及分布情况,探讨其与Kaposi肉瘤临床可能的相关性和演变及传播等具有重要意义.并对HHV-8病毒体及其基因组特征,K1和K15基因位点的生物学功能.HHV-8基因型演变呈现地域与种族特异性进行概述.%Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) exists widely in the tissue of various clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS).The distribution of HHV-8 genotype shows a race and geographical specificity.So,it is important to understand the characteristic and distribution of HHV-8 genotype,and to explore the possible relationship of HHV-8 genotype to elinical phenotypes of KS as well as the transmission and evolution of HHV-8.This article gives a review on the race and geographical specificity of evoluation of HHV-8 genotype.

  5. Genotypic analysis on the ORF-K1 gene of human herpesvirus 8 from patients with Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Zhang; Xiongming Pu; Weidong Wu; Ying Jin; Xiujuan Wu

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HH'V-8) is thought to be essential for the development of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). HHV-8 DNA is present virtually in all KS tumor biopsy samples. Genes at both ends of the HHV-8 genome have been shown to vary considerably. Seve nmajor molecular subtypes of HHV-8 were defined based on the amino acid sequence of the open reading frame K1 (ORF-Kl), generally known as A, B, C, D, E, E and Z. Most strains collected worldwide were clustered into two subtypes (A and C). Here, the Kl/VRl region of HHV-8 was amplified by nested PCR in 22 (81.48%) of 27 cases from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, a province in northwest-ern China. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of the KI/VRI amino acid sequence indicated that the majority of these KS patients were infected by subtype C HHV-8 (n = 18, including 15 belonging to the C2 group), and several by subtype A (n = 4, including 3 being the Al group). This is the fast report of subtype A HHV-g in China. Furthermore, the correlations between different forms and lesions of KS and different subtypes of HHV-8 were analyzed. The findings showed that subtype A HHV-8 resulted in significantly more frequent mucosal KS lesions than subtype C. However, there was no obvious correlation between different forms of KS and different subtypes of HHV-8.

  6. Is There a Link between Human Herpesvirus Infection and Toll-like Receptors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea? A Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; Shaarawy, Eman; El-Komy, Mohamed; Fawzy, Marwa; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Moustafa, Nadine; Rashed, Laila; Sayed Amr, Khalda Sayed

    2016-12-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 and 7 are involved in the pathogenesis of pityriasis rosea (PR). Our aim was to evaluate the role of the innate immune response in PR through the detection of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 expression in the skin of affected patients and to detect the possibility of being induced by HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 viral coexistence in these patients. Twenty-four patients with PR and 24 healthy controls were included in this case-control study. Biopsy was obtained from the PR lesion and from the healthy skin of controls for detection of HHV-6 and 7 as well as TLRs 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs and significantly higher viral load of HHV-6 and 7 in PR cases were detected. A significant higher expression of TLR2 and 4 in HHV-7 positive cases and a significant positive correlation between TLR9 and HHV-7 viral load were documented. HHV6 and 7 may also be involved in the pathogenesis of PR via TLR pathways.

  7. Human Herpesvirus-6 U14 Induces Cell-Cycle Arrest in G2/M Phase by Associating with a Cellular Protein, EDD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Mori

    Full Text Available The human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 infection induces cell-cycle arrest. In this study, we found that the HHV-6-encoded U14 protein induced cell-cycle arrest at G2/M phase via an association with the cellular protein EDD, a mediator of DNA-damage signal transduction. In the early phase of HHV-6 infection, U14 colocalized with EDD dots in the nucleus, and similar colocalization was also observed in cells transfected with a U14 expression vector. When the carboxyl-terminal region of U14 was deleted, no association of U14 and EDD was observed, and the percentage of cells in G2/M decreased relative to that in cells expressing wild-type U14, indicating that the C-terminal region of U14 and the U14-EDD association are critical for the cell-cycle arrest induced by U14. These results indicate that U14 is a G2/M checkpoint regulator encoded by HHV-6.

  8. Fatal Human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1 infection in captive marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix penicillata in Brazil: clinical and pathological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata A. Casagrande

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatal Human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1 was diagnosed in 12 captive marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix penicillata from metropolitan region of São Paulo, São Paulo State. Clinical signs were variable among the cases, but most affected marmosets presented signs associated with viral epithelial replication: oral, lingual and facial skin ulcers and hypersalivation, and viral replication in the central nervous system: prostration, seizure and aggressive behavior. Consistent microscopic findings were diffuse mild to severe nonsuppurative necrotizing meningoencephalitis with gliosis, vasculitis and neuronal necrosis. Additionally, in the brain, oral cavity, skin, adrenal gland and myoenteric plexus intranuclear inclusion bodies were present. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of the HHV-1 antigen in association with lesions in the brain, oral and lingual mucosa, facial skin, adrenal gland and myoenteric plexus. HHV-1-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of the brain was carried out and the virus was detected in 7/8 infected marmosets. It is concluded that HHV-1 causes widespread fatal infection in marmosets.

  9. A paradigm linking herpesvirus immediate-early gene expression apoptosis and myalgic encephalomyelitis chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martin Lerner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A Martin Lerner1, Safedin Beqaj21Department of Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, USA; 2DCL Medical Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: There is no accepted science to relate herpesviruses (Epstein–Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and human herpesvirus 6 [HHV6] as causes of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. ME/CFS patients have elevated serum immunoglobulin (IgG serum antibody titers to EBV, HCMV, and HHV6, but there is no herpesvirus DNA-emia, herpesvirus antigenemia, or uniformly elevated IgM serum antibody titers to the complete virions. We propose that herpesvirus EBV, HCMV, and HHV6 immediate-early gene expression in ME/CFS patients leads to host cell dysregulation and host cell apoptosis without lytic herpesvirus replication. Specific antiviral nucleosides, which alleviate ME/CFS, namely valacyclovir for EBV ME/CFS and valganciclovir for HCMV/HHV6 ME/CFS, inhibit herpesvirus DNA polymerases and/or thymidine kinase functions, thus inhibiting lytic virus replication. New host cell recruitment thus ceases. In the absence of new herpesvirus, nonpermissive herpesvirus replication stops, and ME/CFS recovery ensues.Keywords: ME/CFS, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, HHV6, abortive replication

  10. Application of Herpesvirus Saimiri as an Alternative Gene Therapy Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Toptan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus saimiri is the prototype rhadinovirus and is closely related to human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Herpesvirus saimiri strains of subgroup C transduce a broad spectrum of cancer cells and primary cells including human T lymphocytes very efficiently and enable stable transgene expression. Herpesvirus saimiri as a gene therapy vector is favorable because of its large packaging capacity, extensive cell tropism, and long-termed persistence as non-integrating episomes and thus exhibits numerous advantages over commonly used viral vectors. In order to use Herpesvirus saimiri as a secure and versatile gene therapy vehicle, it should be easily manipulated and modified. The recent advances in molecular cloning of large genomic fragments such as virus genomes as bacterial artificial chromosomes facilitated the functional studies and manipulation of herpesviruses using the recombination system of bacteria. Among these, red-recombination based and ldquo;en passant and rdquo; mutagenesis method enables seamless genome modification such as deletion, insertion and point mutation very easily and efficiently. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(1.000: 41-51

  11. Herpesvirus telomeric repeats facilitate genomic integration into host telomeres and mobilization of viral DNA during reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Jarosinski, Keith W; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-03-14

    Some herpesviruses, particularly lymphotropic viruses such as Marek's disease virus (MDV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), integrate their DNA into host chromosomes. MDV and HHV-6, among other herpesviruses, harbor telomeric repeats (TMRs) identical to host telomeres at either end of their linear genomes. Using MDV as a natural virus-host model, we show that herpesvirus TMRs facilitate viral genome integration into host telomeres and that integration is important for establishment of latency and lymphoma formation. Integration into host telomeres also aids in reactivation from the quiescent state of infection. Our results and the presence of TMRs in many herpesviruses suggest that integration mediated by viral TMRs is a conserved mechanism, which ensures faithful virus genome maintenance in host cells during cell division and allows efficient mobilization of dormant viral genomes. This finding is of particular importance as reactivation is critical for virus spread between susceptible individuals and is necessary for continued herpesvirus evolution and survival.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated malignant lymphoma in eastern Denmark diagnosed from 1990-1996: clinical features, histopathology, and association with Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Penkowa, M; Kirk, O;

    2000-01-01

    The clinicopathological features of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lymphoma were investigated in a retrospective study of 85 adult patients in eastern Denmark diagnosed during the period 1990-1996. The possible pathogenetic role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 8......%) and including 20 of 23 evaluable patients with CNS lymphoma (87%). EBV RNA was demonstrated by in situ hybridization in 51 of 65 evaluable tumours (79%) and in 14 of 16 cases (88%) with CNS-lymphoma. Three cases showed a T-cell phenotype. The presence of HHV-8 DNA was analysed by PCR in 32 cases. A strong band...... results provide further evidence that EBV plays a major role in the pathogenesis of large cell AIDS-related lymphoma, whereas HHV-8 does not appear to contribute significantly to the development of solid lymphomas in this group of patients....

  13. Reg gene family and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Zhang; Liu-Song Ding; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg or REG) family, within the superfamily of C-type lectin, is mainly involved in the liver,pancreatic, gastric and intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation. Considerable attention has focused on Reg family and its structurally related molecules. Over the last 15 years, 17 members of the Reg family have been cloned and sequenced. They have been considered as members of a conserved protein family sharing structural and some functional properties being involved in injury, inflammation,diabetes and carcinogenesis. We previously identified Reg Ⅳ as a strong candidate for a gene that was highly expressed in colorectal adenoma when compared to normal mucosa based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH),reverse Northern blot, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)and Northern blot. In situ hybridization results further support that overexpression of Reg Ⅳ may be an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. We suggest that detection of Reg Ⅳ overexpression might be useful in the early diagnosis of carcinomatous transformation of adenoma.This review summarizes the roles of Reg family in diseases in the literature as well as our recent results of Reg Ⅳ in colorectal cancer. The biological properties of Reg family and its possible roles in human diseases are discussed. We particularly focus on the roles of Reg family as sensitive reactants of tissue injury, prognostic indicators of tumor survival and early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. In addition to our current understanding of Reg gene functions, we postulate that there might be relationships between Reg family and microsatellite instability, apoptosis and cancer with a poor prognosis. Investigation of the correlation between tumor Reg expression and survival rate, and analysis of the Reg gene status in human maliganancies, are required to elucidate the biologic consequences of Reg gene expression, the implications for Reg gene regulation of cell growth, tumorigenesis

  14. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma Herpesvírus humano tipo 8 (HHV-8 e a etiopatogênese do sarcoma de Kaposi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Carneiro Leão

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on human herpesvirus 8 with particular attention to the aspects related to the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors searched original research and review articles on specific aspects of human herpesvirus 8 infection, including virology, epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis, natural history, therapy, and Kaposi's sarcoma etiopathogenesis. The relevant material was evaluated and reviewed. RESULTS: Human herpesvirus 8 is a recently discovered DNA virus that is present throughout the world but with major geographic variation. In the Western world, the virus, transmitted mainly by means of sexual contact, is strongly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma and more controversially with multiple myeloma and other non-proliferative disorders. There is no specific effective treatment, but HIV protease inhibitors may play an indirect role in the clearance of human herpesvirus 8 DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA is present in saliva, but there are as yet no documented cases of nosocomial transmission to health care workers. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 among health care workers is probably similar to that in the general population. CONCLUSION: Human herpesvirus 8 appears to be, at least in Western Europe and United States, restricted to a population at risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8 certainly has the means to overcome cellular control and immune responses and thus predispose carriers to malignancy, particularly Kaposi's sarcoma. The wide diffusion of Human herpesvirus 8 in classic Kaposi's sarcoma areas appears to represent an important factor in the high incidence of the disease. However, additional co-factors are likely to play a role in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente artigo foi revisar a literatura recente em rela

  15. Bovine herpesvirus 1 interferes with TAP-dependent peptide transport and intracellular trafficking of MHC class I molecules in human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppers-Lalic, D.; Rychlowski, M.; Leeuwen, D.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Ressing, M.E.; Neefjes, J.J.; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, K.; Wiertz, E.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), the cause of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in cattle, establishes a lifelong infection, despite the presence of antiviral immunity in the host. BoHV-1 has been shown to elude the host immune system, but the viral gene products

  16. Nuclear Egress of Herpesviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard J.Roller

    2008-01-01

    Herpesviruses assemble and fill their capsids in the infected cell nucleus,and must then move this enormous macromolecular assembly across the nuclear membrane and into the cytoplasm.Doing so is a complex,multi-step process that involves envelopment of the capsid at the inner nuclear membrane and de-envelopment by fusion with the outer nuclear membrane.This process is orchestrated by viral proteins,but requires the modification of cellular structures and mechanisms including the nuclear lamina.In this review I summarize recent research on the mechanism of nuclear envelopment and the viral and cellular systems involved in its execution.

  17. Equine herpesvirus 1 myeloencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2014-12-01

    Equine myeloencephalopathy (EHM), an uncommon manifestation of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) infection, can cause devastating losses on individual farms, boarding stables, veterinary hospitals, and show and racing venues. An improved understanding of EHM has emerged from experimental studies and from data collected during field outbreaks at riding schools, racetracks, horse shows, and veterinary hospitals throughout North America and Europe. These outbreaks have highlighted the contagious nature of EHV-1 and have prompted a reevaluation of diagnostic procedures, treatment modalities, preventative measures, and biosecurity protocols for this disease. This article focuses on recent data related to the cause, epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunity, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of EHV-1 infection with emphasis on EHM.

  18. The peptide derived from the Ig-like domain of human herpesvirus 8 K1 protein induces death in hematological cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniluk Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of lymphomas, many lymphomas exhibit resistance to cell death, suggesting a defective Fas signaling, which remains poorly understood. We previously reported that cells expressing the K1 protein of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 resist death through the complex formation of the Ig-like domain of K1 with Fas. Recently, we investigated whether peptides derived from the Ig-like domain of the K1 protein may affect cell death. Methods K1 positive and negative cell lines were incubated with the K1-derived peptides, and cell death (apoptotic and necrotic was assessed by flow cytometry and LDH assay. Activation of caspases was assessed by fluorometric assay and flow cytometry. Fas receptor-independent, peptide-mediated cell killing was tested in the Fas-resistant Daudi cell line and Jurkat cell clones deficient in caspase-8 and FADD functionality. Activation of TNF receptors I and II was blocked by pre-incubation with corresponding blocking antibodies. The effect of the K1 peptide in vivo was tested in a mouse xenograft model. Results We observed that the peptide S20-3 enhanced cell death in K1-positive BJAB cells and HHV-8 positive primary effusion lymphoma (PEL cell lines. Similar effects of this peptide were observed in B-cell lymphoma and T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells without K1 expression but not in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A single intratumoral injection of the S20-3 peptide decreased the growth of Jurkat xenografts in SCID mice. The mechanism of tumor cell death induced by the S20-3 peptide was associated with activation of caspases, but this activity was only partially inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD. Furthermore, the K1 peptide also killed Fas-resistant Daudi cells, and this killing effect was inhibited by pre-incubation of cells with antibodies blocking TNFRI. Conclusion Taken together, these findings indicate that the S20

  19. Herpesvirus pan encodes a functional homologue of BHRF1, the Epstein-Barr virus v-Bcl-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Tracey

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latently infects about 90% of the human population and is associated with benign and malignant diseases of lymphoid and epithelial origin. BHRF1, an early lytic cycle antigen, is an apoptosis suppressing member of the Bcl-2 family. In vitro studies imply that BHRF1 is dispensable for both virus replication and transformation. However, the fact that BHRF1 is highly conserved not only in all EBV isolates studied to date but also in the analogous viruses Herpesvirus papio and Herpesvirus pan that infect baboons and chimpanzees respectively, suggests BHRF1 may play an important role in vivo. Results Herpesvirus papio BHRF1 has been shown to function in an analogous manner to EBV BHRF1 in response to DNA damaging agents in human keratinocytes. In this study we show that the heterologous expression of the previously uncharacterised Herpesvirus pan BHRF1 in the human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Ramos-BL provides similar anti-apoptotic functions to that of EBV BHRF1 in response to apoptosis triggered by serum withdrawal, etoposide treatment and ultraviolet (UV radiation. We also map the amino acid changes onto the recently solved structure of the EBV BHRF1 and reveal that these changes are unlikely to alter the 3D structure of the protein. Conclusions These findings show that the functional conservation of BHRF1 extends to a lymphoid background, suggesting that the primate virus proteins interact with cellular proteins that are themselves highly conserved across the higher primates. Further weight is added to this suggestion when we show that the difference in amino acid sequences map to regions on the 3D structure of EBV BHRF1 that are unlikely to change the conformation of the protein.

  20. HERPESVIRUS INFECTIONS: MYTHS AND REALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarenko VD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available millennia, and its main symptoms described by Hippocrates more. But our time HVI remains mysterious and before the end of the unknown. Among the issues are not sufficiently clarified latency of infection and persistence of herpes viruses, the causes of the frequent occurrence of the disease in the form of subclinical forms, high infection rate of the world population, and others. Note that virologists and clinicians are showing in the last 20 years to the HVI, is associated with a variety of everincreasing role Herpesviridae in infectious pathology of human and social importance of diseases caused by them. It is now known 8 herpesviruses pathogenic for humans. Because of the difference in a number of biological properties, the nature of replication in cell cultures, the clinical picture and the pathogenesis of diseases caused by all herpesviruses are distributed according to the recommendations of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, in three subfamilies (α, β, γ. Activators of herpes simplex virus can be endogenous and exogenous factors: reduction of immunoreactivity of the organism (immunodeficiency, interferon failure, physical and emotional stress, overheating or overcooling, hormonal disorders, ultraviolet irradiation, corticosteroids treatment, cytotoxic drugs. It is important to understand that the HVI is a disease of the whole body with lesions in varying degrees, all organs and systems (immune, hematopoietic, lymphatic, CNS, which is responsible for the homeostasis of the human body. These data give reason to believe HVI systemic disease, mainly affecting a particular organ. However, more is still not widely used etiopathogenetical and "topical" diagnosis, indicating the loss of any one body. Due to the fact that the clinical forms of HVI are characterized by marked polymorphism, the timely establishment of the etiologic diagnosis is a difficult task and is based on the use of specific molecular genetic, virological

  1. Human herpesvirus 6A infection in CD46 transgenic mice: viral persistence in the brain and increased production of proinflammatory chemokines via Toll-like receptor 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Joséphine M; Jégou, Jean-François; Welsch, Jérémy C; Horvat, Branka

    2014-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is widely spread in the human population and has been associated with several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis. To develop a small-animal model of HHV-6 infection, we analyzed the susceptibility of several lines of transgenic mice expressing human CD46, identified as a receptor for HHV-6. We showed that HHV-6A (GS) infection results in the expression of viral transcripts in primary brain glial cultures from CD46-expressing mice, while HHV-6B (Z29) infection was inefficient. HHV-6A DNA persisted for up to 9 months in the brain of CD46-expressing mice but not in the nontransgenic littermates, whereas HHV-6B DNA levels decreased rapidly after infection in all mice. Persistence in the brain was observed with infectious but not heat-inactivated HHV-6A. Immunohistological studies revealed the presence of infiltrating lymphocytes in periventricular areas of the brain of HHV-6A-infected mice. Furthermore, HHV-6A stimulated the production of a panel of proinflammatory chemokines in primary brain glial cultures, including CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL10, and induced the expression of CCL5 in the brains of HHV-6A-infected mice. HHV-6A-induced production of chemokines in the primary glial cultures was dependent on the stimulation of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Finally, HHV-6A induced signaling through human TLR9 as well, extending observations from the murine model to human infection. Altogether, this study presents a first murine model for HHV-6A-induced brain infection and suggests a role for TLR9 in the HHV-6A-initiated production of proinflammatory chemokines in the brain, opening novel perspectives for the study of virus-associated neuropathology. HHV-6 infection has been related to neuroinflammatory diseases; however, the lack of a suitable small-animal infection model has considerably hampered further studies of HHV-6-induced neuropathogenesis. In this study, we have characterized a new model for HHV-6 infection in mice

  2. Alpha Interferon Inhibits Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) Reactivation in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells and Reduces HHV-8 Load in Cultured Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, Paolo; Carlini, Francesca; Stürzl, Michael; Rimessi, Paola; Superti, Fabiana; Franco, Marina; Melucci-Vigo, Gianna; Cafaro, Aurelio; Goletti, Delia; Sgadari, Cecilia; Butto’, Stefano; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Barresi, Caterina; Tinari, Antonella; Bonaccorsi, Angela; Capobianchi, Maria R.; Giuliani, Massimo; di Carlo, Aldo; Andreoni, Massimo; Rezza, Giovanni; Ensoli, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Since regression of KS can be achieved by treatment of the patients with alpha interferon (IFN-α), we analyzed the effects of IFN-α or anti-IFN-α antibodies (Ab) on HHV-8 latently infected primary effusion lymphoma-derived cell lines (BCBL-1 and BC-1) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with all forms of KS and from at-risk subjects. IFN-α inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the amplification of HHV-8 DNA in BCBL-1 cells induced to lytic infection with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA). This effect was associated with the inhibition of the expression of HHV-8 nut-1 and kaposin genes that are induced early and several hours, respectively, after TPA treatment. In addition, IFN-α inhibited virus production and/or release from BCBL-1 cells. Inhibition of nut-1 and kaposin genes by IFN-α was also observed in BC-1 cells induced with n-butyrate. Conversely, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab to TPA-induced BCBL-1 cells resulted in a larger number of mature enveloped particles and in a more extensive cytopathic effect due to the neutralization of the endogenous IFN produced by these cells. IFN was also produced by cultured PBMC from HHV-8-infected individuals, and this was associated with a loss of viral DNA during culture. However, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab or anti-type I IFN receptor Ab promoted the maintenance of HHV-8 DNA in these cells that was associated with the detection of the latency-associated kaposin RNA. Finally, the addition of IFN-α reduced the HHV-8 load in PBMC. Thus, IFN-α appears to have inhibitory effects on HHV-8 persistent infection of PBMC. These results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting the expression of angiogenic factors that are key to KS development, IFN-α may induce KS regression by reducing the HHV-8 load and/or inhibiting virus reactivation. PMID:10196299

  3. The association between fructosamine-3 kinase 900C/G polymorphism, transferrin polymorphism and human herpesvirus-8 infection in diabetics living in South Kivu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikomola, Justin C; Vandepoele, Karl; Katchunga, Philippe B; Kishabongo, Antoine S; Padalko, Elizaveta Y; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Delanghe, Joris R

    2016-11-01

    Prevalences of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) infection and diabetes mellitus are very common in certain parts of Africa, containing iron-rich soils. We hypothesized that some genetic factors could have a link with susceptibility to HHV-8 infection. We focused on ferroportin Q248H mutation (rs11568350), transferrin (TF) polymorphism and fructosamine-3 kinase (FN3K) 900C/G polymorphism (rs1056534). The study population consisted of 210 type 2 diabetic adults and 125 healthy controls recruited in Bukavu (South Kivu). In the whole study population (diabetics+healthy controls), ferroportin Q248H mutation was detected in 47 subjects (14.0%) with 43 heterozygotes and 4 homozygotes. TF phenotype frequencies were 88.1% (CC), 10.4% (CD) and 1.5% (BC). Genotype frequencies of FN3K 900C/G polymorphism were respectively 9,3% (CC), 43.3% (GC) and 47.4% (GG). Prevalence of HHV8-infection in the study population was 77.3%. HHV-8 infection rate and HHV-8 IgG antibody titer were significantly higher in diabetics then in controls (p<0.0001). Significant differences were observed in HHV-8 infection rate and in HHV-8 IgG antibody titer according to FN3K rs1056534 (p<0.05 and p<0.05, respectively) and TF polymorphism (p<0.05 and p=0.005, respectively). No significant differences in HHV-8 infection rate and in HHV-8 IgG antibody titer were observed in the ferroportin Q248H mutation carriers (rs11568350) in comparison with ferroportin wild type. In a multiple regression analysis, FN3K rs1056534, TF polymorphism and presence of diabetes mellitus were predictors for HHV-8 infection. In contrast to these findings, ferroportin Q248H mutation (rs11568350) did not influence the susceptibility for an HHV-8 infection in sub-Saharan Africans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. MHC2TA mRNA levels and human herpesvirus 6 in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta along two-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez-Mozo Maria Inmaculada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previous studies we found that MHC2TA +1614 genotype frequency was very different when MS patients with and without human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 in serum samples were compared; a different clinical behavior was also described. The purpose of the study was: 1. To evaluate if MHC2TA expression in MS patients was influenced by interferon beta (IFN-beta treatment. 2. To study MHC2TA expression in MS patients with and without minor allele C. 3. To analyze the relation between MHC2TA mRNA levels and HHV-6 active infection in MS patients. Methods Blood and serum samples of 154 MS patients were collected in five programmed visits: basal (prior to beginning IFN-beta treatment, six, twelve, eighteen and twenty-four months later. HHV-6 in serum and MHC2TA mRNA levels were evaluated by PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against IFN-beta were analyzed by the cytopathic effect assay. Results We found that MHC2TA mRNA levels were significantly lower among MS patients with HHV-6 active infection at the basal visit (without treatment than in those MS patients without HHV-6 active infection at the basal visit (p = 0.012; in all the positive samples we only found variant A. Furthermore, 58/99 (58.6% MS patients without HHV-6 along the five programmed visits and an increase of MHC2TA expression after two-years of IFN-beta treatment were clinical responders vs. 5/21 (23.8% among those MS patients with HHV-6 and a decrease of MHC2TA mRNA levels along the two-years with IFN-beta treatment (p = 0.004; no differences were found between patients with and without NAbs. Conclusions MHC2TA mRNA levels could be decreased by the active replication of HHV-6; the absence of HHV-6 in serum and the increase of MHC2TA expression could be further studied as markers of good clinical response to IFN-beta treatment.

  5. Quantitative analysis of human herpesvirus-6 genome in blood and bone marrow samples from Tunisian patients with acute leukemia: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Nefzi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious etiology in lymphoproliferative diseases has always been suspected. The pathogenic roles of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 in acute leukemia have been of great interest. Discordant results to establish a link between HHV-6 activation and the genesis of acute leukemia have been observed. The objective of this study was to evaluate a possible association between HHV-6 infection and acute leukemia in children and adults, with a longitudinal follow-up at diagnosis, aplasia, remission and relapse. Methods HHV-6 load was quantified by a quantitative real-time PCR in the blood and bone marrow samples from 37 children and 36 adults with acute leukemia: 33 B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, 6 T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL, 34 acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Results HHV-6 was detected in 15%, 8%, 30% and 28% of the blood samples at diagnosis, aplasia, remission and relapse, respectively. The median viral loads were 138, 244, 112 and 78 copies/million cells at diagnosis, aplasia, remission and relapse, respectively. In the bone marrow samples, HHV-6 was detected in 5%, 20% and 23% of the samples at diagnosis, remission and relapse, respectively. The median viral loads were 34, 109 and 32 copies/million cells at diagnosis, remission and relapse, respectively. According to the type of leukemia at diagnosis, HHV-6 was detected in 19% of the blood samples and in 7% of the bone marrow samples (with median viral loads at 206 and 79 copies/million cells, respectively from patients with B-ALL. For patients with AML, HHV-6 was present in 8% of the blood samples and in 4% of the bone marrow samples (with median viral loads at 68 and 12 copies/million cells, respectively. HHV-6 was more prevalent in the blood samples from children than from adults (25% and 9%, respectively and for the bone marrow (11% and 0%, respectively. All typable HHV-6 were HHV-6B species. No link was shown between neither the clinical symptoms nor the

  6. Quantification of viral genome in cord blood donors by real time PCR to investigate human herpesvirus type 8 active infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golchin, Neda; Kheirandish, Maryam; Sharifi, Zohreh; Samiee, Shahram; Kokhaei, Parviz; Pourpak, Zahra

    2015-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is one of the most important sources of hematopoietic stem cells which can be used for transplantation. The transplanted CB stem cells might cause infections in recipients. The aim of this study is to evaluate Human Herpes Virus8 (HHV8) as a Rhadinovirus among CB samples in order to assess safety of cord blood stem cells transplantation. To assess this aim, we surveyed 800 cord blood specimens by Real Time PCR.The overall HHV8 incidence in cord blood mononuclear cells was 1.38% and none of them was in lytic phase of HHV8. The authors suggest further HHV8 study on CB samples for transplantation.

  7. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and the Control of Herpesvirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baranek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Type-I interferons (IFN-I are cytokines essential for vertebrate antiviral defense, including against herpesviruses. IFN-I have potent direct antiviral activities and also mediate a multiplicity of immunoregulatory functions, which can either promote or dampen antiviral adaptive immune responses. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs are the professional producers of IFN-I in response to many viruses, including all of the herpesviruses tested. There is strong evidence that pDCs could play a major role in the initial orchestration of both innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. Depending on their activation pattern, pDC responses may be either protective or detrimental to the host. Here, we summarize and discuss current knowledge regarding pDC implication in the physiopathology of mouse and human herpesvirus infections, and we discuss how pDC functions could be manipulated in immunotherapeutic settings to promote health over disease.

  8. Human herpesvirus 8 open reading frame 26 and open reading frame 65 sequences from multiple myeloma patients: a shared pattern not found in Kaposi's sarcoma or primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H J; Sjak-Shie, N N; Vescio, R A; Kaminsky, M; Mikail, A; Pold, M; Parker, K; Beksac, M; Belson, D; Moss, T J; Wu, C H; Zhou, J; Zhang, L; Chen, G; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    2000-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), multicentric Castleman's disease, and recently multiple myeloma (MM). DNA sequence analyses of HHV-8 suggest that multiple HHV-8 strains exist. We extracted DNA from 24 patients with MM and 3 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and compared HHV-8 open reading frames (ORFs) 26 and 65 sequences with those derived from patients with KS, PEL, and two HHV-8-positive PEL cell lines KS-1 and BC-1. ORF26 sequence data suggest that MM patients are consistently carriers of HHV-8 strain subtype C3. All MM patients also consistently revealed either a single bp deletion or substitution at position 112197 in ORF65. This unique alteration is not present in patients with KS or PEL or in PEL cell lines. It occurs in the portion of ORF65 that is known to be responsible for a serological response to HHV-8.

  9. Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 sequentially shapes the NK cell repertoire during the course of asymptomatic infection and Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dupuy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of innate immunity to immunosurveillance of the oncogenic Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV8 has not been studied in depth. We investigated NK cell phenotype and function in 70 HHV8-infected subjects, either asymptomatic carriers or having developed Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Our results revealed substantial alterations of the NK cell receptor repertoire in healthy HHV8 carriers, with reduced expression of NKp30, NKp46 and CD161 receptors. In addition, down-modulation of the activating NKG2D receptor, associated with impaired NK-cell lytic capacity, was observed in patients with active KS. Resolution of KS after treatment was accompanied with restoration of NKG2D levels and NK cell activity. HHV8-latently infected endothelial cells overexpressed ligands of several NK cell receptors, including NKG2D ligands. The strong expression of NKG2D ligands by tumor cells was confirmed in situ by immunohistochemical staining of KS biopsies. However, no tumor-infiltrating NK cells were detected, suggesting a defect in NK cell homing or survival in the KS microenvironment. Among the known KS-derived immunoregulatory factors, we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 as a critical element responsible for the down-modulation of NKG2D expression on resting NK cells. Moreover, PGE2 prevented up-regulation of the NKG2D and NKp30 receptors on IL-15-activated NK cells, and inhibited the IL-15-induced proliferation and survival of NK cells. Altogether, our observations are consistent with distinct immunoevasion mechanisms that allow HHV8 to escape NK cell responses stepwise, first at early stages of infection to facilitate the maintenance of viral latency, and later to promote tumor cell growth through suppression of NKG2D-mediated functions. Importantly, our results provide additional support to the use of PGE2 inhibitors as an attractive approach to treat aggressive KS, as they could restore activation and survival of tumoricidal NK cells.

  10. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  11. A novel herpesvirus associated with respiratory disease in Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, H L; Phalen, D N

    2012-12-01

    A novel herpesvirus infection in nine Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii, formerly Neophema bourkii) housed in an outdoor aviary comprised of multiple species of birds was diagnosed based on histopathology, electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical signs in the parrots included anorexia, ruffled feathers, depression, loss of weight and respiratory distress. The most common gross lesions were moderately congested and oedematous lungs and a mild fibrinous exudate in the air sacs and lumen of the trachea. Histological examination revealed mild to severe bronchopneumonia and airsacculitis with syncytial cells containing eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in most birds. Other less frequent changes included tracheitis, syringitis, sinusitis, rhinitis, otitis media and conjunctivitis. Attempts to culture the virus in chicken embryos and chicken embryo liver cells were unsuccessful. Examination by transmission electron microscopy of syncytial cells from the lungs of two birds revealed intranuclear virus particles typical of the family Herpesviridae. DNA from a novel herpesvirus was amplified from lung tissue by PCR using degenerate primers derived from conserved avian herpesvirus sequences. The virus belongs in the genus Iltovirus of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily. It is not closely related to Psittacid herpesvirus 1 that causes Pacheco's disease but does group phylogenetically with a clade of herpesviruses that cause respiratory disease in a number of avian species. The proposed name for this herpesvirus is Psittacid herpesvirus 3.

  12. The relationship between two kinds of human herpesviruses and experimental gingivitis%两种人类疱疹病毒与实验性龈炎的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亦兵; 孟焕新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus-type 1 (EBV-1) in GCF and saliva during experimental gingivitis in Chinese young subjects and to evaluate the effect of the virus in the initial stage of gingival inflammation.Methods GCF of 14 and 45 and saliva without stimulating in 11 Chinese young males with healthy gingiva were collected at baseline (day 0),day 7,14 and 21 after stopping oral hygiene and day7 after reestablishing oral hygiene(day 28).DNA of HCMV and EBV-1 were detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) at the times mentioned above.Results HCMV was detected in GCF of 4 subjects at baseline,4 subjects at day 7,3 subjects at day 14 and 2 subjects at day 21 while the subjects were different.At day 28 HCMV could not be detected.EBV-1 was not detectable in GCF during the experimental gingivitis.HCMV was detected in saliva in 4 subjects and EBV-1 was in 3 subjects.And there is no relationship between the detection of the herpesviruses and the clinical parameters as well.Conclusion We suggest that HCMV and EBV-1 are not the important factors during the initial stage of gingival inflammation.%目的 检测人类巨细胞病毒(human cytomegalovirus,HCMV)和Epstein-Barr病毒-1型(Epstein-Barr virus-type1,EBV-1))在实验性龈炎过程中龈沟液(gingival crevicular fluid,GCF)和唾液中的检出变化,探讨病毒在牙龈炎症发生发展过程中的作用.方法 选取11名牙龈健康,无全身疾病的年轻男性受试者,在停止口腔卫生措施后21天内(第0、7、14、21天)和恢复口腔卫生措施一周后(第28天)收集14,45两颗牙的GCF以及受试者的唾液,使用巢式PCR技术检测HCMV和EBV-1在不同时间点的检出情况.结果 GCF中HCMV在基线、7、14 d和21 d时分别有4个、4个、3个和2个受试者检出,但检出的受试者在该过程中不一致,第28天时无受试者检出;EBV-1在GCF中均未检出.在唾液中,实验过程中不同时间点共仅有4名和3

  13. Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3: An Archetype of Fish Alloherpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Rakus, Krzysztof; Jazowiecka-Rakus, Joanna; Vancsok, Catherine; Morvan, Léa; Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Stone, David M; Way, Keith; van Beurden, Steven J; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The order Herpesvirales encompasses viruses that share structural, genetic, and biological properties. However, members of this order infect hosts ranging from molluscs to humans. It is currently divided into three phylogenetically related families. The Alloherpesviridae family contains viruses infecting fish and amphibians. There are 12 alloherpesviruses described to date, 10 of which infect fish. Over the last decade, cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) infecting common and koi carp has emerged as the archetype of fish alloherpesviruses. Since its first description in the late 1990s, this virus has induced important economic losses in common and koi carp worldwide. It has also had negative environmental implications by affecting wild carp populations. These negative impacts and the importance of the host species have stimulated studies aimed at developing diagnostic and prophylactic tools. Unexpectedly, the data generated by these applied studies have stimulated interest in CyHV-3 as a model for fundamental research. This review intends to provide a complete overview of the knowledge currently available on CyHV-3.

  14. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  15. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  16. Genome organization of herpesvirus aotus type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Herpesvirus aotus type 2, a virus commonly found in owl monkeys without overt disease, has a similar genome structure to the oncogenic herpesviruses of nonhuman primates (herpesvirus saimiri, herpesvirus ateles). Virion DNA of herpesvirus aotus type 2 (M-DNA) has an unique 110-kilobase-pair region of low G + C content (40.2%, L-DNA), inserted between stretches of repetitive H-DNA (68.7% G + C, about 41 kilobase pairs per molecule) that are variable in length. A minority of virions contain def...

  17. The role of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramolelli, Silvia; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an unusual vascular tumour caused by an oncogenic-herpesvirus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8). KS lesions are characterized by an abundant inflammatory infiltrate, the presence of KSHV-infected endothelial cells that show signs of aberrant differentiation, as well as faulty angiogenesis/ vascularization. Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of these histological features of KS, with an emphasis on the viral proteins that are responsible for their development.

  18. Kinetics of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Staskus, Katherine; Gradoville, Lyndle; Grogan, Elizabeth; Haase, Ashley; Miller, George

    1999-01-01

    Herpesvirus gene expression can be classified into four distinct kinetic stages: latent, immediate early, early, and late. Here we characterize the kinetic class of a group of 16 Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 genes in a cultured primary effusion cell line and examine the expression of a subset of these genes in KS biopsies. Expression of two latent genes, LANA and vFLIP, was constitutive and was not induced by chemicals that induce the lytic cycle in prima...

  19. Herpesviruses and breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pietrasanta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV and cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections are conditions during which breastfeeding may be temporarily contraindicated, but expressed breast milk should always be given to the infant. CMV infection acquired through breast milk rarely causes disease in healthy term newborns; an increased risk of CMV disease has been documented in preterm infants. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP does not regard maternal CMV seropositivity as a contraindication to breastfeeding; according to the AAP, in newborns weighing less than 1500 g, the decision should be taken after weighing the benefits of breast milk against the risk of transmission of infection. The real efficacy of the different methods of inactivating CMV in breast milk should be compared in controlled clinical trials, rigorously examining the negative consequences that each of these methods can have on the immunological and nutritional properties of the milk itself, with a view to establish the best risk-benefit ratio of these strategies before they are recommended for use in clinical practice.

  20. Pathology of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi eFukumoto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8 is a human herpesvirus, classified as a gamma-herpesvirus. KSHV is detected in Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and some cases of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD. Similar to other herpes viruses, there are two phases of infection, latent and lytic. In KSHV-associated malignancies such as KS and PEL, KSHV latently infects almost all tumor cells. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that each tumor cell contains one copy of KSHV in KS lesions. The oncogenesis by KSHV has remained unclear. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated malignancies through inhibition of apoptosis and maintenance of latency. Because all KSHV-infected cells express LANA-1, LANA-1 immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for diagnosis of KSHV infection. KSHV encodes some homologs of cellular proteins including cell-cycle regulators, cytokines and chemokines, such as cyclin D, G-protein coupled protein, interleukin-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 and -2. These viral proteins mimic or disrupt host cytokine signals, resulting in microenvironments amenable to tumor growth. Lytic infection is frequently seen in MCD tissues, suggesting a different pathogenesis from KS and lymphoma.

  1. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  2. Comparing Families of Suicide Attempters, Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    separation, divorce and other mental and social pathologies.[4]. Acquired ... parent-child relationships and childhood adversities such as abuse, violence, wrong ..... families are not satisfied with the quality of their family content and indicators ... Sohrabi F, Rasouli F. A survey of style and meta‑marital sexual relationships ...

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus contains G protein-coupled receptor and cyclin D homologs which are expressed in Kaposi's sarcoma and malignant lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A new human herpesvirus was recently identified in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV] or human herpesvirus 8), as well as in primary effusion (body cavity-based) lymphomas (PELs). A 12.3-kb-long KSHV clone was obtained from a PEL genomic library. Sequencing of this clone revealed extensive homology and colinearity with the right end of the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genome and more limited homology to the left end of the Epstein-Barr virus genome. Fou...

  4. Analysis of the Pathogenetic Basis for Shedding and Transmission of Ovine Gamma Herpesvirus 2

    OpenAIRE

    Hüssy, Daniela; Janett, Fredi; Albini, Sarah; Stäuber, Norbert; Thun, Rico; Ackermann, Mathias

    2002-01-01

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), a member of the viral subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae, shares numerous similarities with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). Both viruses are apathogenic in their healthy original host, may cause lymphoprolipherative diseases, cannot routinely be propagated in cell culture, and may be sexually transmitted. However, the pathways of sexual transmission of these viruses, as well as the underlying pathogenetic dynamics, are not well understood. Organs from naturally OvHV-2-inf...

  5. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1997. Marek's disease herpesvirus: oncogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, P M

    1997-12-29

    There are a number of neoplasias for which a herpesvirus is an essential part of the aetiology. Of these, Marek's disease is the most common and provides excellent opportunities for the study of a herpesvirus-induced tumour both experimentally and under natural conditions in the field. Marek's disease is caused by an alpha herpesvirus; it differs from the other oncogenic herpesviruses which are gamma herpesviruses. It is a ubiquitous virus in poultry populations of the world and is highly cell-associated and contagious, yet only a proportion of infected fowl develop tumours. Evidence is presented to suggest that at least one of the reasons for a wide variation in the incidence of the disease is a temporal interplay between virulent viruses and viruses of low or no virulence. The viral genes associated with the oncogenicity of Marek's disease virus (MDV) are discussed and it is concluded that it is likely that several genes are involved. Finally, a brief history of vaccination to control Marek's disease is given and mode of action discussed. It is concluded that the mechanism of protection is mainly through an antiviral cell mediated immune response, resulting in a lowered challenge virus burden. Marek's disease viruses over the past 40 years have been evolving greater oncogenicity, some of which are not adequately controlled by the vaccines that are currently available. It is suggested that for MDV to produce tumours, there is a need for the cytolytic infection phase and that infection must be with an MDV which possesses a functional gC, ICP4 for maintaining latency which allows the expression of at least the 1.8 kb family, pp38, meq, and possibly pp14 genes, for maintaining the tumour state and possibly initiating this state. Intervention in this process reduces the chance of tumour formation and incidence in a population which can occur through natural or man-mediated infection with non-pathogenic MDVs.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Koi Herpesvirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurita, J.; Yuasa, K.; Ito, T.; Sano, M.; Hedrick, R.P.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Sunarto, A.; Kholidin, E.B.; Chou, H.Y.; Tung, M.C.; Pena, de la L.; Lio-Po, G.; Tu, C.; Way, K.; Iida, T.

    2009-01-01

    Three regions of koi herpesvirus (KHV) genomic DNA were compared for 34 samples from Japan, six from Indonesia, two from Taiwan, one from the Philippines, 13 from the Netherlands, one from the UK, one from the USA and one from Israel. The analyzed genomic regions included known PCR-detection targets

  7. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  8. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

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  9. Human Capital Development: A Family Objective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Verna

    1995-01-01

    Examines the concept of human capital as an economic construct. Suggests that human capital contributes to economic development, as do physical capital or natural resources, in that its development reinforces individuals' future economic output. Suggests that this perspective may prove useful for human service professionals because funding…

  10. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  11. Detection of integrated herpesvirus genomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used to visualize nucleotide sequences in interphase cells or on metaphase chromosomes using specific probes that are complementary to the respective targets. Besides its broad application in cytogenetics and cancer research, FISH facilitates the localization of virus genomes in infected cells. Some herpesviruses, including human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Marek's disease virus (MDV), have been shown to integrate their genetic material into host chromosomes, which allows transmission of HHV-6 via the germ line and is required for efficient MDV-induced tumor formation. We describe here the detection by FISH of integrated herpesvirus genomes in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells.

  12. Detection of novel strains of cyprinid herpesvirus closely related to koi herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelsma, Marc Y.; Way, Keith; Dodge, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) or koi herpesvirus (KHV) is a devastating virus of carp. Using generic primers for the DNA polymerase and the major capsid protein genes of cyprinid herpesviruses, nucleotide sequences divergent from previously described CyHV-3 were obtained. At least 3 novel groups...

  13. Host entry by gamma-herpesviruses--lessons from animal viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Laurent; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-12-01

    The oncogenicity of gamma-herpesviruses (γHVs) motivates efforts to control them and their persistence makes early events key targets for intervention. Human γHVs are often assumed to enter naive hosts orally and infect B cells directly. However, neither assumption is supported by direct evidence, and vaccination with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gp350, to block virion binding to B cells, failed to reduce infection rates. Thus, there is a need to re-evaluate assumptions about γHV host entry. Given the difficulty of analysing early human infections, potentially much can be learned from animal models. Genomic comparisons argue that γHVs colonized mammals long before humans speciation, and so that human γHVs are unlikely to differ dramatically in behaviour from those of other mammals. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), which like EBV and the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) persists in memory B cells, enters new hosts via olfactory neurons and exploits myeloid cells to spread. Integrating these data with existing knowledge of human and veterinary γHVs suggests a new model of host entry, with potentially important implications for infection control.

  14. Herpesviruses 6, 7 and 8 in HIV- and non-HIV-associated periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, A; Contreras, A; Navazesh, M; Nowzari, H; Slots, J

    2000-10-01

    Human herpesviruses, especially cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus type-1, occur with higher frequency in subgingival specimens from periodontitis lesions than from healthy/gingivitis sites. Little or no information is available on the relationship between herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and periodontal disease. This study determined the periodontal occurrence of HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in 21 HIV-seropositive and 14 HIV-negative adults affected by periodontitis. Gingival biopsy specimens and paper-point samples of subgingival plaque were collected from sites showing 5 mm or more in probing depth. Nested polymerase chain reaction methodology was employed in herpesvirus identification. In the HIV-seropositive periodontitis group, 90% of gingival biopsies and 62% of subgingival plaque samples revealed at least one of the test viruses. HHV-6 occurred in 71%, HHV-7 in 67% and HHV-8 in 24% of gingival biopsies. In the HIV-negative adult periodontitis group, 43% of gingival biopsies showed at least 1 of the test viruses, with HHV-6 present in 21% and H HV-7 in 29% of gingival biopsies and with no detection of HHV-8. The combined occurrence of the 3 test herpesviruses was significantly higher in HIV-seropositive than in HIV-negative adult periodontitis patients (p = 0.008). The human periodontium might constitute a site of infection or reservoir for HHV-6, -7, -8.

  15. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advice of the physician who cares for your child. All medical advice and information should be considered to be incomplete without a physical exam, which is not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  16. A game of survival: herpesvirus strategies of autophagy manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Miszczak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are a very “clever” group of pathogens and well known for disrupting multiple processes in host cells. One of them is autophagy, a conserved mechanism that relies on degradation of intracellular structures in lysosomes. Autophagy can be triggered in response to viral infections and its aim is to digest viral particles, thereby limiting virus replication and spread. Induction of autophagy during viral infections is mediated by different regulatory pathways, but the biggest participation belongs to PKR and eIF2alpha. In this review we focused on the herpesvirus interactions with autophagic machinery. The Herpesviridae family presents various strategies to manipulate autophagy induction or suppression of that process may depend on cell type and stage of infection. Research carried out in the past 10 years has demonstrated the impact of herpesviruses on autophagy not only during productive infections, but in latency infections also.

  17. 非对称PCR-FP技术同步检测HSV-1/-2、CMV和EBV%Simultaneous detection of four major human herpesviruses by asymmetric PCR-fluorescence polarization assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菊; 吴中亮; 李丁; 王香玲; 梁平; 郭宴海; 李宏伟; 颜真

    2009-01-01

    目的 应用非对称PCR-荧光偏振(FP)技术建立一种同步检测全血中4种主要疱疹病毒(单纯疱疹病毒1/2型,巨细胞病毒、EB病毒)的新方法.方法 以人疱疹病毒属通用引物行非对称PCR,扩增从179例样本中抽提的DNA.PCR扩增产物与特异性单纯疱疹病毒1/2型(HSV-1/2)、巨细胞病毒(CMV)和EB病毒(EBV)寡核苷酸探针混合物温育杂交,荧光偏振检测技术检测杂交液荧光偏振值,据荧光偏振值判断病毒感染类型,并以DNA序列测定结果为参照.结果 与DNA序列测定的阳性检测符合率为100%,但DNA序列测定检测均未检出多重混合感染.非对称PCR-FP方法对HSV-1/-2检测的灵敏度达到1.0×10~3拷贝/ml,时EBV和cMV检测的灵敏度达到2.0×10~3拷贝/ml.结论 本法对于4种主要疱疹病毒感染的筛查及预防、预后判断具重要价值.%Objective To establish a novel method to detect four major human herpesvirus simultaneously by fluorescence polarization (FP) assay based on asymmetric PCR. Methods A consensus primer system in human herpesvirus was used in an asymmetric PCR. The probes of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1/-2) ,cytomegalovirus (CMV) ,and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) labeled with different fluorophores were hybridized respectively with target amplicons. The infection was determined by the increased FP value. The DNA extracted from 179 samples was subjected to FP and sequence assay to evaluate the feasibility of this method. Results The mini-mum detection level of FP assay was 10 genome copies for HSV -1/ -2 , 20 genome copies for both EBV and CMV. FP assay could detect co-infections more effectively than sequence assay. Conclusions A practical method was developed for the simultaneous detection of the four major human herpesviruses by FP assay based on an asymmetric PCR.

  18. Overexpression and purification of U24 from human herpesvirus type-6 in E. coli: unconventional use of oxidizing environments with a maltose binding protein-hexahistine dual tag to enhance membrane protein yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Suzana K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining membrane proteins in sufficient quantity for biophysical study and biotechnological applications has been a difficult task. Use of the maltose binding protein/hexahistidine dual tag system with E.coli as an expression host is emerging as a high throughput method to enhance membrane protein yield, solubility, and purity, but fails to be effective for certain proteins. Optimizing the variables in this system to fine-tune for efficiency can ultimately be a daunting task. To identify factors critical to success in this expression system, we have selected to study U24, a novel membrane protein from Human Herpesvirus type-6 with potent immunosuppressive ability and a possible role in the pathogenesis of the disease multiple sclerosis. Results We expressed full-length U24 as a C-terminal fusion to a maltose binding protein/hexahistidine tag and examined the effects of temperature, growth medium type, cell strain type, oxidizing vs. reducing conditions and periplasmic vs. cytoplasmic expression location. Temperature appeared to have the greatest effect on yield; at 37°C full-length protein was either poorly expressed (periplasm or degraded (cytoplasm whereas at 18°C, expression was improved especially in the periplasm of C41(DE3 cells and in the cytoplasm of oxidizing Δtrx/Δgor mutant strains, Origami 2 and SHuffle. Expression of the fusion protein in these strains were estimated to be 3.2, 5.3 and 4.3 times greater, respectively, compared to commonly-used BL21(DE3 cells. We found that U24 is isolated with an intramolecular disulfide bond under these conditions, and we probed whether this disulfide bond was critical to high yield expression of full-length protein. Expression analysis of a C21SC37S cysteine-free mutant U24 demonstrated that this disulfide was not critical for full-length protein expression, but it is more likely that strained metabolic conditions favour factors which promote protein expression. This

  19. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Davison, A.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas temporal gene expression in mammalian herpesviruses has been studied extensively, little is known about gene expression in fish herpesviruses. Here we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a fish herpesvirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1, in cell culture, studied during the

  20. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Piedade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, and the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV. In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus UL7, a homologue of the SLAM-family receptor CD229, impairs cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Pablo; Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Albà, M Mar; Robertson, Kevin; Ghazal, Peter; Angulo, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the β-herpesvirus prototype, has evolved a wide spectrum of mechanisms to counteract host immunity. Among them, HCMV uses cellular captured genes encoding molecules capable of interfering with the original host function or of fulfilling new immunomodulatory tasks. Here, we report on UL7, a novel HCMV heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein, containing an Ig-like domain that exhibits remarkable amino acid similarity to CD229, a cell-surface molecule of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family involved in leukocyte activation. The UL7 Ig-like domain, which is well-preserved in all HCMV strains, structurally resembles the SLAM-family N-terminal Ig-variable domain responsible for the homophilic and heterophilic interactions that trigger signalling. UL7 is transcribed with early-late kinetics during the lytic infectious cycle. Using a mAb generated against the viral protein, we show that it is constitutively shed, through its mucine-like stalk, from the cell-surface. Production of soluble UL7 is enhanced by PMA and reduced by a broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor. Although UL7 does not hold the ability to interact with CD229 or other SLAM-family members, it shares with them the capacity to mediate adhesion to leukocytes, specifically to monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UL7 expression attenuates the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-8 and IL-6 in DCs and myeloid cell lines. Thus, the ability of UL7 to interfere with cellular proinflammatory responses may contribute to viral persistence. These results enhance our understanding of those HCMV-encoded molecules involved in sustaining the balance between HCMV and the host immune system.

  2. A Luciferase Gene Driven by an Alphaherpesviral Promoter Also Responds to Immediate Early Antigens of the Betaherpesvirus HCMV, Allowing Comparative Analyses of Different Human Herpesviruses in One Reporter Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schubert, Axel; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian; Lieber, Diana

    2017-01-01

    comparative analyses of different human herpesviruses. PMID:28060895

  3. Neurological disorder in cattle associated with bovine herpesvirus 4

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A nested PCR assay was used to diagnose bovine encephalitis through herpesviruses including bovine herpesvirus 5 (BHV-5), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), Aujeszky's disease virus (SHV-1), and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OHV-2) in 14 fragments of central nervous system (CNS) from cattle that died with neurological signs. In addition, as some samples of bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) have been isolated from neural tissue, it was also tested by nested PCR. The cases of encephalitis occurred in isolati...

  4. Update of human and mouse forkhead box (FOX gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The forkhead box (FOX proteins are transcription factors that play complex and important roles in processes from development and organogenesis to regulation of metabolism and the immune system. There are 50 FOX genes in the human genome and 44 in the mouse, divided into 19 subfamilies. All human FOX genes have close mouse orthologues, with one exception: the mouse has a single Foxd4, whereas the human gene has undergone a recent duplication to a total of seven (FOXD4 and FOXD4L1 → FOXD4L6. Evolutionarily ancient family members can be found as far back as the fungi and metazoans. The DNA-binding domain, the forkhead domain, is an example of the winged-helix domain, and is very well conserved across the FOX family and across species, with a few notable exceptions in which divergence has created new functionality. Mutations in FOX genes have been implicated in at least four familial human diseases, and differential expression may play a role in a number of other pathologies -- ranging from metabolic disorders to autoimmunity. Furthermore, FOX genes are differentially expressed in a large number of cancers; their role can be either as an oncogene or tumour suppressor, depending on the family member and cell type. Although some drugs that target FOX gene expression or activity, notably proteasome inhibitors, appear to work well, much more basic research is needed to unlock the complex interplay of upstream and downstream interactions with FOX family transcription factors.

  5. Identification and localization of the structural proteins of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beurden Steven J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many of the known fish herpesviruses have important aquaculture species as their natural host, and may cause serious disease and mortality. Anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV-1 causes a hemorrhagic disease in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Despite their importance, fundamental molecular knowledge on fish herpesviruses is still limited. In this study we describe the identification and localization of the structural proteins of AngHV-1. Purified virions were fractionated into a capsid-tegument and an envelope fraction, and premature capsids were isolated from infected cells. Proteins were extracted by different methods and identified by mass spectrometry. A total of 40 structural proteins were identified, of which 7 could be assigned to the capsid, 11 to the envelope, and 22 to the tegument. The identification and localization of these proteins allowed functional predictions. Our findings include the identification of the putative capsid triplex protein 1, the predominant tegument protein, and the major antigenic envelope proteins. Eighteen of the 40 AngHV-1 structural proteins had sequence homologues in related Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3. Conservation of fish herpesvirus structural genes seemed to be high for the capsid proteins, limited for the tegument proteins, and low for the envelope proteins. The identification and localization of the structural proteins of AngHV-1 in this study adds to the fundamental knowledge of members of the Alloherpesviridae family, especially of the Cyprinivirus genus.

  6. Establishment and clinical application of a new real time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of human herpesvirus-6A and human herpesvirus-6B%人疱疹病毒6型荧光定量分型方法的建立和临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡美婷; 吴亦栋; 吴秀静; 尚世强

    2009-01-01

    Objective Human herpesvirus 6(HHV-6)isolates are classified into two variants,HHV-6A and HHV-6B,based on distinct genetic,antigenic and biological characteristics.HHV-6 has been associated with encephalitis in children recently.This study aireed to estabhsh a real time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of the two subtypes of HHV-6,and apply this new assay to children with suspected encephalitis,then analyze the relationship between the infeetion with HHV-6 and encephalitis in children.Method The universal primers and variant-specific TaqMan probes were designed based on the highly conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase gene(U38)of HHV-6.The 5'end of the probes for HHV-6A and HHV-6B was labeled with the fluoreseein reporter tetrachloro-6-carboxyfluorescein and 6-earboxyfluorescein(6-FAM),separately,while the 3'end were quenched with 6-carboxy-tetramethyl-rhedamine.The real time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of HHV-6A and HHV-6B was established.Then,the plasmids of HHV-6A and -6B which were diluted by a 10-fold series from 109 to 10°copies/μl,together with controls were used for testing both sensitivity and specificity of the real time PCR assay.The cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) specimens from 445 cases of suspected encephalitis were tested with this real time PCR and positive samples were then sequenced.Result Both HHV6A(strain ZJ-159)and HHV-6B (strain GS)were positive on the real time PCR assay.There were no cross-reaction with herpes simplex virus type 1,type 2(HSV-1,HSV-2),varicella-zoster virus(YZV),cytomegalovirus(CMV),EpsteinBarr virus(EBV),hepatitis B virus,Staphylococcus aureus,Mycoplasma pneumoniae and human DNA.A linear regression curve was obtained when plotting Ct values against the log10 of the viral DNA input for both subtypes of HHV-6.The sensitivity threshold was 10 copies/μl for the real time PCR.HHV-6 positive rate by the real time PCR assay was 4.72%(21/445),including 4 ca8es with HHV-6A infection,16 cases of HHV-6B infeedon and l case

  7. Global Mapping of O-Glycosylation of Varicella Zoster Virus, Human Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J;

    2016-01-01

    of the herpesvirus family: varicella zoster virus, human cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. We identified a large number of O-glycosites distributed on most envelope proteins in all viruses and further demonstrated conserved patterns of O-glycans on distinct homologous proteins. Because glycosylation is highly...

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Herpesviruses Limits Productive and Latent Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diemen, Ferdy R.; Kruse, Elisabeth M.; Hooykaas, Marjolein J G; Bruggeling, Carlijn E.; Schürch, Anita C.; van Ham, Petra M.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect the majority of the human population and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 causes cold sores and herpes simplex keratitis, whereas HSV-2 is responsible for genital herpes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common viral cause

  9. Targeting herpesvirus reliance of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Kledal, Thomas N

    2006-01-01

    the infection. However, since both virus and host exist, the organisms struggle must reach an ecological equilibrium. Among the best-studied interactions between viruses and the host immune system are those between herpesviruses and their hosts. Herpesviruses are known to devote a significant part...... of their large genomes on immuno-modulatory genes, some encoding chemokines or chemokine receptors. These genes, which may be dispensable for viral replication in vitro, are highly important for viral growth in vivo, for viral dissemination and disease progression. Indeed, all beta and gamma-herpesviruses have...

  10. LIMBIC ENCEPHALITIS OF HERPESVIRUS ETIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Simonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the literature data and our personal observations in the article discusses the types of variants of the course of nervous system caused by herpesviruses. In the description of a clinical case demonstrated a classic example of limbic encephalitis infectious etiology. The study involved 36 children with various neurological and infectious diseases: 19 children with the diagnosis - convulsions, 8 children with the diagnosis — epilepsy, 5 children with acute viral encephalitis, 3 children with neuropathies. It was established that in the genesis of diseases such as epilepsy, convulsive syndrome, limbic encephalitis, neuropathy peripheral nerves leading role belongs to of herpes virus infection, in which the dominant role belongs HHV-6 infection. Pathogenetically proved the impact of the virus on the receptor apparatus of glia with the disorder of the functional state of mitochondria of these cells. According to our own observations provided data that result in persistence of HHV-6 variant-in mono or in combination with other herpesviruses growing threat of epilepsy and other neurological disorders. 

  11. Latent herpesvirus infection arms NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas W; Keppel, Catherine R; Schneider, Stephanie E; Reese, Tiffany A; Coder, James; Payton, Jacqueline E; Ley, Timothy J; Virgin, Herbert W; Fehniger, Todd A

    2010-06-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells were identified by their ability to kill target cells without previous sensitization. However, without an antecedent "arming" event, NK cells can recognize, but are not equipped to kill, target cells. How NK cells become armed in vivo in healthy hosts is unclear. Because latent herpesviruses are highly prevalent and alter multiple aspects of host immunity, we hypothesized that latent herpesvirus infection would arm NK cells. Here we show that NK cells from mice latently infected with Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) were armed as evidenced by increased granzyme B protein expression, cytotoxicity, and interferon-gamma production. NK-cell arming occurred rapidly in the latently infected host and did not require acute viral infection. Furthermore, NK cells armed by latent infection protected the host against a lethal lymphoma challenge. Thus, the immune environment created by latent herpesvirus infection provides a mechanism whereby host NK-cell function is enhanced in vivo.

  12. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation.

  13. Herpesvirus-Associated Acute Urticaria: An Age Matched Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareri, Arianna; Adler, Stuart P.; Nigro, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute and recurrent acute urticaria are often associated with multiple factors including infections and recent data suggest a role for herpesviruses. Objective To test the null hypothesis, that is, there is no association of herpesvirus infections with urticaria. Methods Thirty-seven patients between one month and 15 years of age were age matched to 37 controls who were healthy or had mild acute respiratory infections but without urticaria. Patients and controls were followed for 1 to 6 years. Diagnostic studies included DNA detection by real-time PCR for herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6). Tests for other infections included adenovirus, parvovirus B 19, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, Group A streptococci, rotavirus, and parasites. Results Specific infections were diagnosed in 26 of 37 cases and among 9 of 37 control children (P=0.0002). Single or concomitant herpesvirus infections occurred in 24 cases and in 4 controls (65% vs 11 %, p=0.0003). Cases had 10 HHV-6 infections, 8 CMV infections, 5 EBV infections, and 4 HSV-1 infections. Conclusion Herpesvirus infections are associated with acute or recurrent acute urticaria. PMID:24386470

  14. Off-the-Shelf Virus-Specific T Cells to Treat BK Virus, Human Herpesvirus 6, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Naik, Swati; Leung, Kathryn; Martinez, Caridad A; Ramos, Carlos A; Carrum, George; Sasa, Ghadir; Lulla, Premal; Watanabe, Ayumi; Kuvalekar, Manik; Gee, Adrian P; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Grilley, Bambi J; Krance, Robert A; Gottschalk, Stephen; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Leen, Ann M; Omer, Bilal

    2017-08-07

    Purpose Improvement of cure rates for patients treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) will require efforts to decrease treatment-related mortality from severe viral infections. Adoptively transferred virus-specific T cells (VSTs) generated from eligible, third-party donors could provide broad antiviral protection to recipients of HSCT as an immediately available off-the-shelf product. Patient and Methods We generated a bank of VSTs that recognized five common viral pathogens: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus (BKV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). The VSTs were administered to 38 patients with 45 infections in a phase II clinical trial. Results A single infusion produced a cumulative complete or partial response rate of 92% (95% CI, 78.1% to 98.3%) overall and the following rates by virus: 100% for BKV (n = 16), 94% for CMV (n = 17), 71% for AdV (n = 7), 100% for EBV (n = 2), and 67% for HHV-6 (n = 3). Clinical benefit was achieved in 31 patients treated for one infection and in seven patients treated for multiple coincident infections. Thirteen of 14 patients treated for BKV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis experienced complete resolution of gross hematuria by week 6. Infusions were safe, and only two occurrences of de novo graft-versus host disease (grade 1) were observed. VST tracking by epitope profiling revealed persistence of functional VSTs of third-party origin for up to 12 weeks. Conclusion The use of banked VSTs is a feasible, safe, and effective approach to treat severe and drug-refractory infections after HSCT, including infections from two viruses (BKV and HHV-6) that had never been targeted previously with an off-the-shelf product. Furthermore, the multispecificity of the VSTs ensures extensive antiviral coverage, which facilitates the treatment of patients with multiple infections.

  15. The human PDI family: Versatility packed into a single fold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Ellgaard, Lars

    2007-01-01

    in promoting oxidative protein folding in the ER has been extended in recent years to include roles in other processes such as ER-associated degradation (ERAD), trafficking, calcium homeostasis, antigen presentation and virus entry. Some of these functions are performed by non-catalytic members of the family...... that lack the active-site cysteines. Regardless of their function, all human PDIs contain at least one domain of approximately 100 amino acid residues with structural homology to thioredoxin. As we learn more about the individual proteins of the family, a complex picture is emerging that emphasizes as much...... their differences as their similarities, and underlines the versatility of the thioredoxin fold. Here, we primarily explore the diversity of cellular functions described for the human PDIs. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-3...

  16. Update of human and mouse matrix metalloproteinase families

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson Brian C; Nebert Daniel W; Vasiliou Vasilis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc proteases that degrade most of the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs also have a number of non-traditional roles in processing factors related to cell growth/proliferation, inflammation and more. There are 23 human MMPs and 23 mouse MMPs, most of which share orthology among most vertebrates; other examples have been found in invertebrates and plants. MMPs are named in order of discovery, but also have been grouped...

  17. Recent advances in the study of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis; Avey; Brittany; Brewers; Fanxiu; Zhu

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over twenty years since a novel herpesviral genome was identified in Kaposi’s sarcoma biopsies. Since then, the cumulative research effort by molecular biologists, virologists, clinicians, and epidemiologists alike has led to the extensive characterization of this tumor virus, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)), and its associated diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of KSHV biology and pathogenesis, with a particular emphasis on new and exciting advances in the field of epigenetics. We also discuss the development and practicality of various cell culture and animal model systems to study KSHV replication and pathogenesis.

  18. Characterization of phocid herpesvirus-1 and -2 as putative alpha- and gamma-herpesviruses of North American and European pinnipeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Harder (Timm); M. Harder; H. Vos; K. Kulonen; S. Kennedy-Stoskopf; B. Liess; M.J.G. Appel (Max); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo study the relationships between herpesvirus recently isolated from different pinniped species, antigenic and genetic analyses were performed. First, herpesviruses isolated from North American harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), a Californian sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and a Europea

  19. Scattered Families : Transnational family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands in the light of the human rights based protection of the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P.H.A.M

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands, within and across borders. While family life constitutes a foundation in the lives of human beings, the disruption of the family through external causes has a huge impact on the people involved. In the case of refugees, many of

  20. Scattered Families : Transnational family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands in the light of the human rights based protection of the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P.H.A.M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165624647

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands, within and across borders. While family life constitutes a foundation in the lives of human beings, the disruption of the family through external causes has a huge impact on the people involved. In the case of refugees, many of

  1. Attitudes about human papillomavirus vaccine among family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedesel, J M; Rosenthal, S L; Zimet, G D; Bernstein, D I; Huang, B; Lan, D; Kahn, J A

    2005-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines will soon be available for clinical use, and the effectiveness of vaccine delivery programs will depend largely upon whether providers recommend the vaccine. The objectives of this study were to examine family physicians' attitudes about HPV immunization and to identify predictors of intention to recommend immunization. Cross-sectional survey instrument assessing provider and practice characteristics, knowledge about HPV, attitudes about HPV vaccination, and intention to administer two hypothetical HPV vaccines. Surveys were mailed to a national random sample of 1,000 American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) members. Intention to administer two hypothetical HPV vaccines (a cervical cancer/genital wart vaccine and a cervical cancer vaccine) to boys and girls of different ages. One hundred fifty-five surveys (15.5%) were returned and 145 were used in the final sample. Participants reported higher intention to recommend both hypothetical HPV vaccines to girls vs. boys (P HPV, belief that organizations such as the AAFP would endorse vaccination, and fewer perceived barriers to vaccination. Female gender, knowledge about HPV, and attitudes about vaccination were independently associated with family physicians' intention to recommend HPV vaccines. Vaccination initiatives directed toward family physicians should focus on modifiable predictors of intention to vaccinate, such as HPV knowledge and attitudes about vaccination.

  2. Human Sexuality Education in Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D; Zaid, Samantha J

    2017-02-20

    Given the likelihood that marriage and family therapists will encounter clients with sexual concerns, it is important to know how graduate training programs are preparing future clinicians to work with this domain of life. Sixty-nine marriage and family therapy (MFT) program directors completed an online survey to examine how sexual health education is integrated into graduate training programs. Findings indicate that while the majority of program directors value sexuality curriculum, and most programs require at least one course in this area, there are barriers to privileging sex topics in MFT graduate programs. Barriers include few MFT faculties with expertise in human sexuality and marginalized sexual health topics. Implications for training MFT graduate students and their work with future clients are discussed.

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF75 is essential for viral lytic replication and plays a critical role in the antagonization of ND10-instituted intrinsic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Full

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components are restriction factors that inhibit herpesviral replication. Effector proteins of different herpesviruses can antagonize this restriction by a variety of strategies, including degradation or relocalization of ND10 proteins. We investigated the interplay of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV infection and cellular defense by nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components. Knock-down experiments in primary human cells show that KSHV-infection is restricted by the ND10 components PML and Sp100, but not by ATRX. After KSHV infection, ATRX is efficiently depleted and Daxx is dispersed from ND10, indicating that these two ND10 components can be antagonized by KSHV. We then identified the ORF75 tegument protein of KSHV as the viral factor that induces the disappearance of ATRX and relocalization of Daxx. ORF75 belongs to a viral protein family (viral FGARATs that has homologous proteins in all gamma-herpesviruses. Isolated expression of ORF75 in primary cells induces a relocalization of PML and dispersal of Sp100, indicating that this viral effector protein is able to influence multiple ND10 components. Moreover, by constructing a KSHV mutant harboring a stop codon at the beginning of ORF75, we could demonstrate that ORF75 is absolutely essential for viral replication and the initiation of viral immediate-early gene expression. Using recombinant viruses either carrying Flag- or YFP-tagged variants of ORF75, we could further corroborate the role of ORF75 in the antagonization of ND10-mediated intrinsic immunity, and show that it is independent of the PML antagonist vIRF3. Members of the viral FGARAT family target different ND10 components, suggesting that the ND10 targets of viral FGARAT proteins have diversified during evolution. We assume that overcoming ND10 intrinsic defense constitutes a critical event in the replication of all herpesviruses; on the other hand, restriction of herpesviral replication by ND10

  4. Genetic characterization of human herpesvirus type 1: Full-length genome sequence of strain obtained from an encephalitis case from India

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    Vijay P Bondre

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the full-length genome sequence generated from an Indian HSV-1 isolate shared close genetic relationship with the American KOS and Chinese CR38 strains which belonged to the Asian genetic lineage. Recombination analysis of Indian isolate demonstrated multiple recombination crossover points throughout the genome. This full-length genome sequence amplified from the Indian isolate would be helpful to study HSV evolution, genetic basis of differential pathogenesis, host-virus interactions and viral factors contributing towards differential clinical outcome in human infections.

  5. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  6. Meeting the family: promoting humanism in gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Sheila M; O'Donoghue, Dan; Vannatta, Jerry B; Thompson, Britta M

    2012-01-01

    Human dissection commonly occurs early in the undergraduate medical school curriculum, thus presenting an immediate opportunity for educators to teach and encourage humanistic qualities of respect, empathy, and compassion. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of the Donor Luncheon, a unique program in which medical students meet the families of the anatomical donor prior to dissection in the anatomy course at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Students were randomized into groups of 8 to attend the luncheon and either met with family of the donor or attended the luncheon with no donor family present. A questionnaire measured students' attitudes at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and at the conclusion of the anatomy course. Factor analysis revealed 5 scales. Analysis revealed statistically significant differences across time for Donor as Person, Dissection Process, and Donor as Patient and statistically significant differences between groups for Donor as Person and Donor as Patient. These results suggest that this program can provide students with the opportunity to maintain more humanistic attitudes at the beginning of their medical education career.

  7. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT.

  8. Kinetics of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R; Lin, S F; Staskus, K; Gradoville, L; Grogan, E; Haase, A; Miller, G

    1999-03-01

    Herpesvirus gene expression can be classified into four distinct kinetic stages: latent, immediate early, early, and late. Here we characterize the kinetic class of a group of 16 Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 genes in a cultured primary effusion cell line and examine the expression of a subset of these genes in KS biopsies. Expression of two latent genes, LANA and vFLIP, was constitutive and was not induced by chemicals that induce the lytic cycle in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines. An immediate-early gene, Rta (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]), was induced within 4 h of the addition of n-butyrate, and its 3.6-kb mRNA was resistant to inhibition by cycloheximide. Early genes, including K3 and K5 that are homologues of the "immediate-early" gene of bovine herpesvirus 4, K8 that is a positional homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, vMIP II, vIL-6, and polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, appeared 8 to 13 h after chemical induction. A second group of early genes that were slightly delayed in their appearance included viral DHFR, thymidylate synthase, vMIP I, G protein-coupled receptor, K12, vBcl2, and a lytic transcript that overlapped LANA. The transcript of sVCA (ORF65), a late gene whose expression was abolished by Phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of KSHV DNA replication, did not appear until 30 h after induction. Single-cell assays indicated that the induction of lytic cycle transcripts resulted from the recruitment of additional cells into the lytic cycle. In situ hybridization of KS biopsies showed that about 3% of spindle-shaped tumor cells expressed Rta, ORF K8, vIL-6, vMIP I, vBcl-2, PAN RNA, and sVCA. Our study shows that several KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular cytokines, chemokines, and antiapoptotic factors are expressed during the viral lytic cycle in PEL cell lines and in KS biopsies. The lytic cycle of KSHV, probably under the initial control of the KSHV/Rta gene, may directly contribute to tumor

  9. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene;

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding pro...

  10. Binding of cellular export factor REF/Aly by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is not required for efficient KSHV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is expressed early during lytic KSHV replication, enhances expression of many KSHV genes, and is essential for virus production. ORF57 is a member of a family of proteins conserved among all human and many animal herpesviruses that are multifunctional regulators of gene expression and act posttranscriptionally to increase accumulation of their target mRNAs. The mechanism of ORF57 action is complex and may involve effects on mRNA transcription, stability, and export. ORF57 directly binds to REF/Aly, a cellular RNA-binding protein component of the TREX complex that mediates RNA transcription and export. We analyzed the effects of an ORF57 mutation known to abrogate REF/Aly binding and demonstrate that the REF-binding mutant is impaired in activation of viral mRNAs and noncoding RNAs confined to the nucleus. Although the inability to bind REF leads to decreased ORF57 activity in enhancing gene expression, there is no demonstrable effect on nuclear export of viral mRNA or the ability of ORF57 to support KSHV replication and virus production. These data indicate that REF/Aly-ORF57 interaction is not essential for KSHV lytic replication but may contribute to target RNA stability independent of effects on RNA export, suggesting a novel role for REF/Aly in viral RNA metabolism.

  11. Characterization of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Lymphomas by DNA Microarray Analysis

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    Keiji Ueda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among herpesviruses, γ-herpesviruses are supposed to have typical oncogenic activities. Two human γ-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, are putative etiologic agents for Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and some cases of gastric cancers, and Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL especially in AIDS setting for the latter case, respectively. Since such two viruses mentioned above are highly species specific, it has been quite difficult to prove their oncogenic activities in animal models. Nevertheless, the viral oncogenesis is epidemiologically and/or in vitro experimentally evident. This time, we investigated gene expression profiles of KSHV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, EBV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, and T-cell leukemia cell lines. Both KSHV and EBV cause a B-cell-originated lymphoma, but the gene expression profiles were typically classified. Furthermore, KSHV could govern gene expression profiles, although PELs are usually coinfected with KSHV and EBV.

  12. Enhancement of the antiviral activity against caprine herpesvirus type 1 of Acyclovir in association with Mizoribine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Michele; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Lucente, Maria Stella; Losurdo, Michele; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Trerotoli, Paolo; Casalino, Elisabetta; Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabriella; Tempesta, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats is responsible for genital lesions resembling the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in humans (HHV-2). The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) is able to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was evaluated. ACV (100μg/ml) displayed an antiviral effect on CpHV-1 replication. This inhibitory effect was higher when ACV (100μg/ml) was used in association with MIZ (20μg/ml). Other combinations of ACV and MIZ in various concentrations were not as effective as ACV 100μg/ml/MIZ 20μg/ml. These findings suggest that the association of ACV and MIZ is potentially useful for treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

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    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  14. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR) with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Arndt, Sina; Trapp, Sascha; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Jarosinski, Keith W

    2011-10-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR) on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV) as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5) by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1) that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2) that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates against virus

  15. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  16. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

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    Tracy Stokol

    Full Text Available Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V. Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM. A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis

  17. A Structural Basis for BRD2/4-Mediated Host Chromatin Interaction and Oligomer Assembly of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Murine Gammaherpesvirus LANA Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausze, Joern; Richter, Ulrike; Adler, Heiko; Fedorov, Roman; Pietrek, Marcel; Rückert, Jessica; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a lifelong latent infection and causes several malignancies in humans. Murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a related γ2-herpesvirus frequently used as a model to study the biology of γ-herpesviruses in vivo. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) and the MHV68 mLANA (orf73) protein are required for latent viral replication and persistence. Latent episomal KSHV genomes and kLANA form nuclear microdomains, termed ‘LANA speckles’, which also contain cellular chromatin proteins, including BRD2 and BRD4, members of the BRD/BET family of chromatin modulators. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA binding domains (CTD) of kLANA and MHV-68 mLANA. While these structures share the overall fold with the EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus, they differ substantially in their surface characteristics. Opposite to the DNA binding site, both kLANA and mLANA CTD contain a characteristic lysine-rich positively charged surface patch, which appears to be a unique feature of γ2-herpesviral LANA proteins. Importantly, kLANA and mLANA CTD dimers undergo higher order oligomerization. Using NMR spectroscopy we identified a specific binding site for the ET domains of BRD2/4 on kLANA. Functional studies employing multiple kLANA mutants indicate that the oligomerization of native kLANA CTD dimers, the characteristic basic patch and the ET binding site on the kLANA surface are required for the formation of kLANA ‘nuclear speckles’ and latent replication. Similarly, the basic patch on mLANA contributes to the establishment of MHV-68 latency in spleen cells in vivo. In summary, our data provide a structural basis for the formation of higher order LANA oligomers, which is required for nuclear speckle formation, latent replication and viral persistence. PMID:24146614

  18. Equine Multinodular Pulmonary Fibrosis in association with asinine herpesvirus type 5 and equine herpesvirus type 5: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A standardbred gelding with a history of 10 days pyrexia and lethargy was referred to the Equine Hospital at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala, Sweden. The horse had tachypnea with increased respiratory effort and was in thin body condition. Laboratory findings included leukocytosis, hyperfibrinogenemia and hypoxemia. Thoracic radiographs showed signs of pneumonia with a multifocal nodular pattern, which in combination with lung biopsy findings indicated Equine Multinodular Pulmonary Fibrosis (EMPF). EMPF is a recently described disease in adult horses with clinical signs of fever, weight loss and respiratory problems. The pathological findings include loss of functional pulmonary parenchyma due to extensive nodular interstitial fibrosis which has been related to infection with the equine herpesvirus type 5 (EHV-5). In this case, lung biopsy and tracheal wash samples tested positive for both asinine herpesvirus type 5 (AHV-5) and EHV-5 using PCR assays. The horse failed to respond to treatment and was euthanized for humane reasons. Postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of EMPF. This case suggests that not only EHV-5 alone should be considered in association with the development of this disease. PMID:23009194

  19. Equine Multinodular Pulmonary Fibrosis in association with asinine herpesvirus type 5 and equine herpesvirus type 5: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Back Helena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A standardbred gelding with a history of 10 days pyrexia and lethargy was referred to the Equine Hospital at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala, Sweden. The horse had tachypnea with increased respiratory effort and was in thin body condition. Laboratory findings included leukocytosis, hyperfibrinogenemia and hypoxemia. Thoracic radiographs showed signs of pneumonia with a multifocal nodular pattern, which in combination with lung biopsy findings indicated Equine Multinodular Pulmonary Fibrosis (EMPF. EMPF is a recently described disease in adult horses with clinical signs of fever, weight loss and respiratory problems. The pathological findings include loss of functional pulmonary parenchyma due to extensive nodular interstitial fibrosis which has been related to infection with the equine herpesvirus type 5 (EHV-5. In this case, lung biopsy and tracheal wash samples tested positive for both asinine herpesvirus type 5 (AHV-5 and EHV-5 using PCR assays. The horse failed to respond to treatment and was euthanized for humane reasons. Postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of EMPF. This case suggests that not only EHV-5 alone should be considered in association with the development of this disease.

  20. The genome of turkey herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, C L; Tulman, E R; Lu, Z; Zsak, L; Rock, D L; Kutish, G F

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the first complete genomic sequence of Marek's disease virus serotype 3 (MDV3), also known as turkey herpesvirus (HVT). The 159,160-bp genome encodes an estimated 99 putative proteins and resembles alphaherpesviruses in genomic organization and gene content. HVT is very similar to MDV1 and MDV2 within the unique long (UL) and unique short (US) genomic regions, where homologous genes share a high degree of colinearity and their proteins share a high level of amino acid identity. Within the UL region, HVT contains 57 genes with homologues found in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), six genes with homologues found only in MDV, and two genes (HVT068 and HVT070 genes) which are unique to HVT. The HVT US region is 2.2 kb shorter than that of MDV1 (Md5 strain) due to the absence of an MDV093 (SORF4) homologue and to differences at the UL/short repeat (RS) boundary. HVT lacks a homologue of MDV087, a protein encoded at the UL/RS boundary of MDV1 (Md5), and it contains two homologues of MDV096 (glycoprotein E) in the RS. HVT RS are 1,039 bp longer than those in MDV1, and with the exception of an ICP4 gene homologue, the gene content is different from that of MDV1. Six unique genes, including a homologue of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2, are found in the RS. This is the first reported Bcl-2 homologue in an alphaherpesvirus. HVT long repeats (RL) are 7,407 bp shorter than those in MDV1 and do not contain homologues of MDV1 genes with functions involving virulence, oncogenicity, and immune evasion. HVT lacks homologues of MDV1 oncoprotein MEQ, CxC chemokine, oncogenicity-associated phosphoprotein pp24, and conserved domains of phosphoprotein pp38. These significant genomic differences in and adjacent to RS and RL regions likely account for the differences in host range, virulence, and oncogenicity between nonpathogenic HVT and highly pathogenic MDV1.

  1. Modelling familial dysautonomia in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gabsang; Studer, Lorenz

    2011-08-12

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable promise as a novel tool for modelling human disease and for drug discovery. While the generation of disease-specific iPS cells has become routine, realizing the potential of iPS cells in disease modelling poses challenges at multiple fronts. Such challenges include selecting a suitable disease target, directing the fate of iPS cells into symptom-relevant cell populations, identifying disease-related phenotypes and showing reversibility of such phenotypes using genetic or pharmacological approaches. Finally, the system needs to be scalable for use in modern drug discovery. Here, we will discuss these points in the context of modelling familial dysautonomia (FD, Riley-Day syndrome, hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III (HSAN-III)), a rare genetic disorder in the peripheral nervous system. We have demonstrated three disease-specific phenotypes in FD-iPS-derived cells that can be partially rescued by treating cells with the plant hormone kinetin. Here, we will discuss how to use FD-iPS cells further in high throughput drug discovery assays, in modelling disease severity and in performing mechanistic studies aimed at understanding disease pathogenesis. FD is a rare disease but represents an important testing ground for exploring the potential of iPS cell technology in modelling and treating human disease.

  2. 人疱疹病毒8型ORF75基因亚型与Kaposi肉瘤的相关性研究%Study on the ORF75 subtypes of human herpesvirus-8 in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春雷; 普雄明; 吴卫东; 张德志; 吴秀娟

    2009-01-01

    Objective To profile the subtypes of open reading frame 75(ORF75)of human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma,and to evaluate their relationship with clinical phenotypes and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma.Methods Twenty-five paraffin-embeded tissue specimens of Kaposi's sarcoma were collected in the Department of Dermatology.People's Hospiml of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.DNA was extracted from these specimens.and nested-PCR was performed to amplify HHV-8 DNA followed bv bi-directional sequencing.Phylogenetic analysis was carried out by using the software DNASTAR,Clustal W program and PHYLIP package so as to identify the ORF75 subtyoe of HHV-8.Results HHV-8 DNA was detected in 21(84%)out of the 25 samples,and 7 cases of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma were all positive for HHV-8.Among the 21 patients carrying HHV-8 DNA,18 were positive for subtype A ORF75.3 for subtype C ORF75.The ORF75 subtypes had no significant correlation with the presence of mucosal lesions or clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma.Conclusions The majority of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang are infected with HHV-8 of ORF 75 subtype A and C.The ORF75 subtypes of HHV-8 have no correlation with the presence of mucosal lesions or clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma.%目的 探讨人类疱疹病毒8型(HHV-8)ORF75基因亚型,与Kaposi肉瘤不同临床分型及侵袭性的相关性.方法 对25例新疆Kaposi肉瘤石蜡包埋组织进行HHV-8 DNA抽提、扩增及双向测序,使用Clustal W软件和PHYLIP软件包对测序结果进行发生学分析,从而确定HHV-8 ORF75基因哑型.结果 25例Kaposi肉瘤中,21例HHV-8阳性,阳性率为84%,其中7例AIDS相关型Kaposi肉瘤患者HHV-8均阳性.21例HHV-8阳性患者中,18例为HHV-8 ORF75 A亚型,3例为C亚型;不同亚型间Kaposi肉瘤患者有无黏膜损害及临床分型的分布差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 新疆Kaposi肉瘤患者感染HHV-8 ORF75

  3. Three novel herpesviruses of endangered Clemmys and Glyptemys turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Newton, Alisa L; Chang, Tylis Y; Zarate, Brian; Whitlock, Alison L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The rich diversity of the world's reptiles is at risk due to significant population declines of broad taxonomic and geographic scope. Significant factors attributed to these declines include habitat loss, pollution, unsustainable collection and infectious disease. To investigate the presence and significance of a potential pathogen on populations of critically endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as well sympatric endangered wood (G. insculpta) and endangered spotted (Clemmys guttata) turtles in the northeastern United States, choanal and cloacal swabs collected from 230 turtles from 19 sites in 5 states were screened for herpesvirus by polymerase chain reaction. We found a high incidence of herpesvirus infection in bog turtles (51.5%; 105/204) and smaller numbers of positive wood (5) and spotted (1) turtles. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed three previously uncharacterized alphaherpesviruses. Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 was the predominant herpesvirus detected and was found exclusively in bog turtles in all states sampled. Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 was found only in wood turtles. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was found in a small number of bog turtles and a single spotted turtle from one state. Based on these findings, Glyptemys herpesvirus 1 appears to be a common infection in the study population, whereas Glyptemys herpesvirus 2 and Emydid herpesvirus 2 were not as frequently detected. Emydid herpesvirus 2 was the only virus detected in more than one species. Herpesviruses are most often associated with subclinical or mild infections in their natural hosts, and no sampled turtles showed overt signs of disease at sampling. However, infection of host-adapted viruses in closely related species can result in significant disease. The pathogenic potential of these viruses, particularly Emydid herpesvirus 2, in sympatric chelonians warrants additional study in order to better understand the relationship of these viruses with their endangered hosts.

  4. Interference with the Autophagic Process as a Viral Strategy to Escape from the Immune Control: Lesson from Gamma Herpesviruses

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    Roberta Santarelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarized the most recent findings on the role of autophagy in antiviral immune response. We described how viruses have developed strategies to subvert the autophagic process. A particular attention has been given to Epstein-Barr and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated Herpesvirus, viruses studied for many years in our laboratory. These two viruses belong to γ-Herpesvirus subfamily and are associated with several human cancers. Besides the effects on the immune response, we have described how autophagy subversion by viruses may also concur to the enhancement of their replication and to viral tumorigenesis.

  5. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Janna M; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2016-09-29

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area.

  6. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus: mechanisms of oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Thomas F; Cesarman, Ethel

    2015-10-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV8) causes three human malignancies, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS), an endothelial tumor, as well as Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) and the plasma cell variant of Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD), two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. All three cancers occur primarily in the context of immune deficiency and/or HIV infection, but their pathogenesis differs. KS most likely results from the combined effects of an endotheliotropic virus with angiogenic properties and inflammatory stimuli and thus represents an interesting example of a cancer that arises in an inflammatory context. Viral and cellular angiogenic and inflammatory factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCD. In contrast, PEL represents an autonomously growing malignancy that is, however, still dependent on the continuous presence of KSHV and the action of several KSHV proteins.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Herpesviruses Limits Productive and Latent Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdy R van Diemen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect the majority of the human population and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 causes cold sores and herpes simplex keratitis, whereas HSV-2 is responsible for genital herpes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most common viral cause of congenital defects and is responsible for serious disease in immuno-compromised individuals. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a broad range of malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin's disease, and post-transplant lymphomas. Herpesviruses persist in their host for life by establishing a latent infection that is interrupted by periodic reactivation events during which replication occurs. Current antiviral drug treatments target the clinical manifestations of this productive stage, but they are ineffective at eliminating these viruses from the infected host. Here, we set out to combat both productive and latent herpesvirus infections by exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target viral genetic elements important for virus fitness. We show effective abrogation of HCMV and HSV-1 replication by targeting gRNAs to essential viral genes. Simultaneous targeting of HSV-1 with multiple gRNAs completely abolished the production of infectious particles from human cells. Using the same approach, EBV can be almost completely cleared from latently infected EBV-transformed human tumor cells. Our studies indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be effectively targeted to herpesvirus genomes as a potent prophylactic and therapeutic anti-viral strategy that may be used to impair viral replication and clear latent virus infection.

  8. LACK OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HERPESVIRUS DETECTION IN SALIVA AND GINGIVITIS IN HIV‑INFECTED CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    OTERO, Renata A.; Flávia N.N. NASCIMENTO; SOUZA,Ivete P.R.; SILVA,Raquel C.; LIMA,Rodrigo S.; ROBAINA,Tatiana F.; CÂMARA, Fernando P.; Santos, Norma; CASTRO,Gloria F.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the detection of human herpesviruses (HHVs) in the saliva of HIV-infected and healthy control children, and to evaluate associations between viral infection and gingivitis and immunodeficiency. Saliva samples were collected from 48 HIV-infected and 48 healthy control children. Clinical and laboratory data were collected during dental visits and from medical records. A trained dentist determined gingival indices and extension of gingivitis. Saliva samples...

  9. Herpesvirus delivery to the murine respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cindy S E; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2014-09-01

    Herpesvirus transmission is sporadic, and infection may be asymptomatic or present only with secondary lesions after dissemination. Consequently host entry remains ill-understood. Experimental infections can be informative, but depend on inoculations that are inherently artificial and so need validation. Mice are a widely used experimental host. Alert mice inhale readily small (5 μl) liquid volumes, and Indian ink, luciferase or radiolabel delivered thus distributed to the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Murid Herpesvirus-4 or Herpes simplex virus type 1 delivered thus infected only the nose, arguing that host entry is nasal rather than oral. Marker or virus delivery to the lung depended on general anesthesia and a large inoculum volume (30 μl), and so needs further validation of physiological relevance. While lungs could be infected at lower doses than the upper respiratory tract, tracking experiments showed that nasal inocula pass mostly into the oropharynx, even when restricted to 1 μl. Thus, the relative inefficiency of experimental upper respiratory tract infection was attributable to limited liquid retention in this site. Nonetheless low volume intranasal delivery to alert mice provides a convenient way to model experimentally an apparently natural mode of herpesvirus host entry.

  10. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing.

  11. Detection of human herpesvirus type 7 infection in patients with drug eruptions%药疹患者人类疱疹病毒7型感染的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洋; 陈官芝; 朱桂芝; 汤占利; 陈宏泉; 郭小燕

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of human herpesvirus type 7 (HHV-7) in the development of drug eruptions.Methods Venous blood samples were collected from 35 patients with mild drug eruptions at acute stage,15 patients with severe drug eruptions at both acute stage and remission stage,as well as 50 healthy human controls.PCR was performed to detect HHV-7 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs),and enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the titer of anti-HHV-7 IgM antibody in serum.Statistical analysis was carried out by t test,one way analysis of variance,Chi-square test and q test.Results The detection rate of HHV-7 DNA was significantly higher in these patients with drug eruptions than in the healthy controls (82.00% (41/50) vs.62.00% (31/50),x2 =4.96,P < 0.05),different among patients with severe drug eruptions (93.33% (14/15)),patients with mild drug eruptions (77.14% (27/35)) and the healthy controls (x2 =6.32,P < 0.05),higher in the patients with severe drug eruptions than in the healthy controls (q =3.50,P < 0.05),but not significantly different between the patients with severe drug eruptions at acute stage and those at remission stage (73.33%(11/15),P > 0.05).The anti-HHV-7 IgM antibody titer was significantly increased in the patients with drug eruptions compared with the healthy controls ((69.319 0 ± 25.289 7) ng/L vs.(59.785 3 ± 22.438 2) ng/L,t =1.99,P < 0.05),but no significant difference was observed among the patients with severe drug eruptions (74.340 7 ±31.411 2) ng/L),patients with mild drug eruptions ((65.479 1 ± 21.326 1) ng/L) and healthy controls (P > 0.05) or between HHV-7 DNA-positive patients ((63.748 1 ± 27.239 1) ng/L) and-negative patients ((65.580 2 ± 36.258 4) ng/L,P > 0.05).Conclusions Active HHV-7 infection exists in patients with drug eruptions,and may be associated with the development and aggravation of this entity.%目的 探讨人类疱疹病毒7型(HHV-7)感染在

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of the latent nuclear antigen-1 of the human herpesvirus type 8 to differentiate cutaneous epidemic Kaposi sarcoma and its histological simulators Detecção imuno-histoquímica do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvirus tipo 8 para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi epidêmico cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fonseca Pereira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common neoplasia diagnosed in AIDS patients and the expression of the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen-1 has been useful for its histological diagnosis. The aim of this study is to confirm that immunohistochemistry is a valuable tool for differentiating KS from its simulators in skin biopsies of HIV patients. Immunohistochemical and histological analyses were performed in 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and 60 of its histological simulators. Positivity was present in the 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and no staining was observed in the 60 simulators analyzed, resulting in sensibility and specificity of 100%. HHV-8 immunohistochemical detection is an effective tool for diagnosing Kaposi's sarcoma, especially in early lesions in which neoplastic features are not evident. It also contributes to its histological differential diagnosis.O sarcoma de Kaposi é a neoplasia mais diagnosticada em pacientes com SIDA e a expressão do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvírus humano tipo-8 (HHV-8 tem se mostrado útil no seu diagnóstico histológico. O objetivo deste estudo é confirmar que o método imuno-histoquímico é uma ferramenta útil para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos em pacientes HIV positivos. Análise histológica e imuno-histoquímica foram realizadas em 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo e 60 casos de seus simuladores histológicos. Positividade à imuno-histoquímica para o antígeno nuclear latente 1 do HHV-8 foi observada nos 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi e nenhuma reação foi detectada nos 60 simuladores analisados, resultando em 100% de sensibilidade e especificidade. A detecção do HHV-8 por imuno-histoquímica é uma ferramenta útil para o diagnóstico de sarcoma de Kaposi, especialmente na lesão inicial cujo caráter neoplásico não é evidente, e contribui para seu diagnóstico diferencial histológico.

  13. Isolation of a herpesvirus from an American kestrel with inclusion body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, L N; Kocan, A A; Kocan, K M

    1979-01-01

    A herpesvirus was isolated from the liver of a captive-bred American kestrel (Falco sparverius) which had died of inclusion body disease. Initial isolation was achieved in chicken embryo fibroblasts after three blind passages. Cell-adapted virus produced a distinct rounding of CEF cells within 24 to 48 h. Biologic and serologic tests suggested that the kestrel virus is similar to falcon herpesvirus and pigeon herpesvirus and is at least partially related to owl herpesvirus. However, serologic tests indicated that the kestrel herpesvirus is neither related to infectious laryngotracheitis virus nor to a herpesvirus from a psittacine bird; (Eupsittula canicularis) with Pacheco's parrot disease. This is the first report on the recovery of a herpesvirus similar to falcon herpesvirus from an American kestrel with naturally-occurring inclusion body disease, and on the serologic comparison between falcon herpesvirus and a psittacine herpesvirus.

  14. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species.

  15. Immunohistochemical approach to the pathogenesis of clinical cases of Bovine Herpesvirus type 5 infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Tereza C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meningoencephalitis by Herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5 in cattle has some features that are similar to those of herpetic encephalitis in humans and other animal species. Human Herpesvirus 3 (commonly known as Varicella-zoster virus 1, herpes simplex viruses (HSV, and equid Herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1 induce an intense inflammatory, vascular and cellular response. In spite of the many reports describing the histological lesions associated with natural and experimental infections, the immunopathological mechanisms for the development of neurological disorder have not been established. A total of twenty calf brains were selected from the Veterinary School, University of São Paulo State, Araçatuba, Brazil, after confirmation of BoHV-5 infection by virus isolation as well as by a molecular approach. The first part of the study characterized the microscopic lesions associated with the brain areas in the central nervous system (CNS that tested positive in a viral US9 gene hybridization assay. The frontal cortex (Fc, parietal cortex (Pc, thalamus (T and mesencephalon (M were studied. Secondly, distinct pathogenesis mechanisms that take place in acute cases were investigated by an immunohistochemistry assay. This study found the frontal cortex to be the main region where intense oxidative stress phenomena (AOP-1 and synaptic protein expression (SNAP-25 were closely related to inflammatory cuffs, satellitosis and gliosis, which represent the most frequently observed neurological lesions. Moreover, MMP-9 expression was shown to be localized in the leptomeninges, in the parenchyma and around mononuclear infiltrates (p

  16. Absence of frequent herpesvirus transmission in a nonhuman primate predator-prey system in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sripriya; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Metzger, Sonja; Nowak, Kathrin; De Nys, Helene; Boesch, Christophe; Wittig, Roman; Jarvis, Michael A; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Emergence of viruses into the human population by transmission from nonhuman primates (NHPs) represents a serious potential threat to human health that is primarily associated with the increased bushmeat trade. Transmission of RNA viruses across primate species appears to be relatively frequent. In contrast, DNA viruses appear to be largely host specific, suggesting low transmission potential. Herein, we use a primate predator-prey system to study the risk of herpesvirus transmission between different primate species in the wild. The system was comprised of western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and their primary (western red colobus, Piliocolobus badius badius) and secondary (black-and-white colobus, Colobus polykomos) prey monkey species. NHP species were frequently observed to be coinfected with multiple beta- and gammaherpesviruses (including new cytomegalo- and rhadinoviruses). However, despite frequent exposure of chimpanzees to blood, organs, and bones of their herpesvirus-infected monkey prey, there was no evidence for cross-species herpesvirus transmission. These findings suggest that interspecies transmission of NHP beta- and gammaherpesviruses is, at most, a rare event in the wild.

  17. Jewish Family and Children's Services: a pioneering human service organization (1850-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and Sonoma Counties is a pioneering nonprofit human service organization that has delivered services for 157 years. Over the course of its history, the organization has transformed itself from an all-volunteer agency delivering aid to immigrant families during the Gold Rush era to a $30 million nonprofit human service organization offering a full-range of services to adults, children, and families. The history of Jewish Family and Children's Services sheds light on the importance of strong leadership, strategic planning, external relationships, and strong donor support.

  18. Current status of herpesvirus identification in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel dos Santos Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Some viruses of the Herpesviridae family are frequently the etiologic agents of oral lesions associated with HIV. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1, HSV-2, Varicella Zoster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus type 6, type 7 and type 8 (HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children/adolescents and verify the association between viral subtypes and clinical factors. METHODS: The cells of oral mucosa were collected from 50 HIV infected children/adolescents, 3-13 years old (mean age 8.66. The majority (66% of selected were girls, and they were all outpatients at the pediatric AIDS clinic of a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Nested-PCR was used to identify the viral types. RESULTS: Absence of immunosuppression was observed in 66% of the children. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was used by 72.1% of selected and moderate viral load was observed in 56% of the children/adolescents. Viral types were found in 86% of the children and the subtypes were: HSV-1 (4%, HSV-2 (2%, VZV (4%, EBV (0%, HCMV (24%, HHV6 (18%, HHV-7 (68%, HHV8 (0%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of HAART has helped to reduce oral lesions, especially with herpes virus infections. The health professionals who work with these patients should be aware of such lesions because of their predictive value and the herpes virus can be found circulating in the oral cavity without causing lesions.

  19. The family and the ontogenesis of human life: An appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem of auto-transcendence still baffles philosophers and scholars of ... role of the family, in a man's journey on earth beginning from his origins through his ... fundamental features of man, namely: Facticity, existentiality and falleness.

  20. Language, Mind, Practice: Families of Recursive Thinking in Human Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Marika

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, Chomsky, Hauser, and Fitch asserted that recursion may be the one aspect of the human language faculty that makes human language unique in the narrow sense--unique to language and unique to human beings. They also argue somewhat more quietly (as do Pinker and Jackendoff 2005) that recursion may be possible outside of language: navigation,…

  1. Language, Mind, Practice: Families of Recursive Thinking in Human Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Marika

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, Chomsky, Hauser, and Fitch asserted that recursion may be the one aspect of the human language faculty that makes human language unique in the narrow sense--unique to language and unique to human beings. They also argue somewhat more quietly (as do Pinker and Jackendoff 2005) that recursion may be possible outside of language: navigation,…

  2. Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3 : An Archetype of Fish Alloherpesviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Rakus, Krzysztof; Jazowiecka-Rakus, Joanna; Vancsok, Catherine; Morvan, Léa; Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Stone, David M; Way, Keith; van Beurden, Steven J; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The order Herpesvirales encompasses viruses that share structural, genetic, and biological properties. However, members of this order infect hosts ranging from molluscs to humans. It is currently divided into three phylogenetically related families. The Alloherpesviridae family contains viruses infe

  3. p53 Family: Role of Protein Isoforms in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TP53, TP63, and TP73 genes comprise the p53 family. Each gene produces protein isoforms through multiple mechanisms including extensive alternative mRNA splicing. Accumulating evidence shows that these isoforms play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes in normal cells. Their abnormal expression contributes to tumorigenesis and has a profound effect on tumor response to curative therapy. This paper is an overview of isoform diversity in the p53 family and its role in cancer.

  4. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 hijacks MAVS and IKKbeta to initiate lytic replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS-IKKbeta pathway is activated to restrict viral replication. Manipulation of immune signaling events by pathogens has been an outstanding theme of host-pathogen interaction. Here we report that the loss of MAVS or IKKbeta impaired the lytic replication of gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68, a model herpesvirus for human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. gammaHV68 infection activated IKKbeta in a MAVS-dependent manner; however, IKKbeta phosphorylated and promoted the transcriptional activation of the gammaHV68 replication and transcription activator (RTA. Mutational analyses identified IKKbeta phosphorylation sites, through which RTA-mediated transcription was increased by IKKbeta, within the transactivation domain of RTA. Moreover, the lytic replication of recombinant gammaHV68 carrying mutations within the IKKbeta phosphorylation sites was greatly impaired. These findings support the conclusion that gammaHV68 hijacks the antiviral MAVS-IKKbeta pathway to promote viral transcription and lytic infection, representing an example whereby viral replication is coupled to host immune activation.

  5. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  6. The right to family unification : between migration control and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Mark Arnoldus Karel

    2015-01-01

    The central question in this book is whether there is a human right to family unification. This book identifies the key elements of the right to family unification. By investigating different sources of international, European and domestic law, it assesses whether and how the different legal systems

  7. Human capital in family businesses: an exploratory analysis in Spanish firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Carrasco Hernández

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze how family firms identify, develop and protect their human capital. From an exploratoryperspective based on the resource-based view, the key human resource practices are examined in a sample of 433Spanish companies. Specifically, we examine the orientation and idiosyncrasies that family firms confer to the selection andpromotion mechanism, to the training and developing practices, to the design of compensation and executive paymentsand, finally, to the process of succession

  8. Discovery of herpesviruses in Canadian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Chimoné S; van de Rakt, Karen; Fahlman, Åsa; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen; Neuhaus, Peter; Popko, Richard; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank

    2017-02-01

    Herpesviruses (HVs) have a wide range of hosts in the animal kingdom. The result of infection with HVs can vary from asymptomatic to fatal diseases depending on subtype, strain, and host. To date, little is known about HVs naturally circulating in wildlife species and the impact of these viruses on other species. In our study, we used genetic and comparative approaches to increase our understanding of circulating HVs in Canadian wildlife. Using nested polymerase chain reaction targeting a conserved region of the HV DNA polymerase gene, we analyzed material derived from wildlife of western and northern Canada collected between February 2009 and Sept 2014. For classification of new virus sequences, we compared our viral sequences with published sequences in GenBank to identify conserved residues and motifs that are unique to each subfamily, alongside phylogenetic analysis. All alphaherpesviruses shared a conserved tryptophan (W856) and tyrosine (Y880), betaherpesviruses all shared a serine (S836), and gammaherpesviruses had a conserved glutamic acid (E835). Most of our wildlife HV sequences grouped together with HVs from taxonomically related host species. From Martes americana, we detected previously uncharacterized alpha- and beta-herpesviruses.

  9. Expansion of the protein repertoire in newly explored environments: human gut microbiome specific protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Ellrott

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbes that inhabit particular environments must be able to perform molecular functions that provide them with a competitive advantage to thrive in those environments. As most molecular functions are performed by proteins and are conserved between related proteins, we can expect that organisms successful in a given environmental niche would contain protein families that are specific for functions that are important in that environment. For instance, the human gut is rich in polysaccharides from the diet or secreted by the host, and is dominated by Bacteroides, whose genomes contain highly expanded repertoire of protein families involved in carbohydrate metabolism. To identify other protein families that are specific to this environment, we investigated the distribution of protein families in the currently available human gut genomic and metagenomic data. Using an automated procedure, we identified a group of protein families strongly overrepresented in the human gut. These not only include many families described previously but also, interestingly, a large group of previously unrecognized protein families, which suggests that we still have much to discover about this environment. The identification and analysis of these families could provide us with new information about an environment critical to our health and well being.

  10. HUMANIZATION VISIT FAMILY IN AN ADULT ICU SOUTHEAST OF MATO GROSSO

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    Vagner Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a pilot project, using the theoretical and philosophical Leininger. The project will be developed in a municipality hospital in southeastern of Mato Grosso, in the period between January and March 2012, in order to humanize the family visits of the internal customers of Adult Intensive Care Unit. To carry out the project activities will use the listing of the original guidelines proposed by the Paulista School of Medicine of sectors closed to visitors. The need to intervene in this dynamic, customer-service family, there was a lack of humane view of the team with the family, sometimes for not recognizing the family as a therapeutic tool in intensive care. Thus, neglecting the health of the family, who likewise, need special care, intensive care.

  11. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  12. THE ROLE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN OPHTHALMIC PATHOLOGY HERPESVIRUS

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    Kashpur NV,

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal was to establish a place of herpesviruses (HSV1, HSV2, HHV6, SMV, VZV, EBV in the etiological structure of the eye’s diseases. The study involved 35 patients diagnosed with recurrent keratitis (15 patients and viral uveitis (n = 20. Was carried out virological examination, including a study using fluorescent antibody scrapings from the cornea and conjunctiva for the presence of herpesvirus antigen in leukocytes and determination of the blood antigens of viruses with the calculation of the fluorescence index (FI. Set of different herpesvirus persistence in leukocytes of blood in 95% of patients with viral uveitis and 32% of patients with keratitis. In the each second patient with viral uveitis (10 detected association of three or more herpesvirus antigens in blood leukocytes. Most often these associations are found antigens of viruses EBV, SMV, and HHV6.

  13. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  14. Genetically diverse herpesviruses in South American Atlantic coast seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Cíntia Maria; Shivaprasad, H. L.; Uhart, Marcela; Musso, Cesar Meyer; Rago, María Virginia; Silva-Filho, Rodolfo Pinho; Canabarro, Paula Lima; Craig, María Isabel; Olivera, Valeria; Pereda, Ariel; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Different herpesviruses have been associated with respiratory and enteric disease and mortality among seabirds and waterfowl. In 2011, a respiratory disease outbreak affected 58.3% (98/168) of the Magellanic penguins undergoing rehabilitation due to an oil spill off the southern Brazilian coast. Etiology was attributed to a novel herpesvirus identified by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and molecular studies with partial DNA sequencing. Since migration, rehabilitation and translocation may facilitate the spread of pathogens between populations and trigger the onset of clinical disease in animals with latent infections, investigation of herpesvirus occurrence in asymptomatic seabirds was performed. Samples from free-ranging seabirds were collected in Argentinian Patagonia (Magellanic penguins) and the Abrolhos Archipelago in Brazil (Brown boobies, Masked boobies, Red-billed tropicbirds, White-tailed tropicbirds and South American tern). Furthermore, asymptomatic seabirds housed at the facility where the outbreak occurred were also sampled. In total, 354 samples from eight seabird species were analyzed by PCR for herpesvirus. Four different sequences of herpesviruses were identified, one in Yellow-nosed Albatross, one in Boobies and Tropicbirds and two in Magellanic penguins. Magellanic penguin herpesvirus 1 was identified during the penguin outbreak at the rehabilitation facility in Brazil, while Magellanic penguin herpesvirus 2 was recovered from free-ranging penguins at four reproduction sites in Argentina. Phylogenic analysis of the herpesviruses sequences tentatively identified suggested that the one found in Suliformes and the one associated with the outbreak are related to sequences of viruses that have previously caused seabird die-offs. These findings reinforce the necessity for seabird disease surveillance programs overall, and particularly highlight the importance of quarantine, good hygiene, stress management and pre

  15. Genome Sequences of Equid Herpesviruses 2 and 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Kerr, Karen; Stewart, James P.; Studdert, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the genome of equid herpesvirus 2 (EHV2) strain 86/67 and sequenced the genomes of EHV2 strain G9/92 and equid herpesvirus 5 (EHV5) strain 2-141/67. The most prominent genetic differences are the dissimilar locations of the interleukin-10 (IL-10)-like genes and the presence of an OX-2-like gene in EHV5 only. PMID:25767243

  16. The research of human herpesvirus 8 in Kaposi sarcoma patient's various samples of Xinjiang Uyghur nationality%新疆维吾尔族及哈萨克族经典型卡波氏肉瘤患者多种样本中人类疱疹病毒8型的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓东; 陈婧弘; 王慧; 张巧巧; 惠艳

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨新疆经典型卡波氏肉瘤(Kaposi's sarcoma,KS)患者多种样本中人类疱疹病毒8型(Human Herpesvirus-8,HHV-8)的病毒感染情况.方法 对8例新疆地区经典型的Kaposi肉瘤患者冰冻肉瘤、血液、尿液、唾液标本进行基因组DNA抽提,PCR法扩增HHV-8 ORF26基因片段.结果 HHV-8 ORF26基因检测情况和8例新疆经典型Kaposi肉瘤组织、血液、尿液和唾液中均有HHV-8感染.结论 HHV-8感染是新疆经典型KS发病的主导因素,HHV-8感染可能与KS患者多器官损害的疾病.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

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    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  18. Impact of human bocavirus on children and their families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Niesters, Hubert G M; Tremolati, Elena; Sabatini, Caterina; Porta, Alessandro; Fossali, Emilio; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Principi, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the prevalence and clinical features of the illnesses associated with human bocavirus (hBoV) in children with acute disease. We prospectively enrolled all subjects aged less than 15 years attending an emergency room in Milan, Italy, on Wednesdays and Sundays bet

  19. Impact of human bocavirus on children and their families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Esposito (Susanna); S. Bosis (Samantha); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); E. Tremolati (Elena); C. Sabatini (Caterina); A. Porta (Alessandro); E. Fossali (Emilio); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); N. Principi (Nicola)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study was planned to investigate the prevalence and clinical features of the illnesses associated with human bocavirus (hBoV) in children with acute disease. We prospectively enrolled all subjects aged less than 15 years attending an emergency room in Milan, Italy, on Wednesdays and

  20. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence

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    Franceline Juillard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has an etiologic role in Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA. LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA’s role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease.

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection of Neurons in HIV-Positive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, For Yue; Sawyer, Ashley; Kwon, Eun Hee; Mudenda, Victor; Langford, Dianne; Zhou, You; West, John; Wood, Charles

    2017-06-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi sarcoma (KS), one of the leading cancers in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in Zambia. KSHV was detected in the human central nervous system (CNS) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, but tissue location and cell tropism for KSHV infection has not been established. Given the neurotropism exhibited by other herpesviruses and the frequent coinfection of HIV-positive individuals by KSHV, we sought to determine whether the central nervous system (CNS) can be infected by KSHV in HIV-positive Zambian individuals. Postmortem brain tissue specimens were collected from individuals coinfected with KSHV and HIV. PCR and Southern blots were performed on DNA extracted from the brain tissue specimens to verify KSHV infection. Immunohistochemical analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy were used to localize and identify KSHV-infected cells. Tropism was further established by in vitro infection of primary human neurons with rKSHV.219. KSHV DNA was detected in the CNS from 4 of 11 HIV-positive individuals. Immunohistochemical analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy demonstrated that KSHV infected neurons and oligodendrocytes in parenchymal brain tissues. KSHV infection of neurons was confirmed by in vitro infection of primary human neurons with rKSHV.219. Our study showed that KSHV infects human CNS-resident cells, primarily neurons, in HIV-positive Zambian individuals.

  2.  Human carcinoembryonic antygen family proteins, structure and function

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    Hanna Czepczyńska-Krężel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  The CEA related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM contain variable and constant immunoglobulin-like domains and are classified as a member of the immunoglobulin supergene family, IgSF. The seven CEACAM (CD66 antigens (CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM4, CEA, CEACAM6, CEACAM7 and CEACAM8 differ in the number of Ig-like domains, sugar content, presence of isoforms, tissue distribution and form of membrane attachment (transmembrane region or GPI anchor. CEACAMs with a transmembrane region possess a cytoplasmic domain with or without the immunoreceptor motifs. The structural diversity of CEACAMs results in their multifunctionality, especially displayed in calcium independent homo- and heterotypic adhesion interactions. The scientific data, collected mainly for CEA, strongly confirm involvement of this molecule in colorectal cancer. Recent research also indicates that CEACAMs play an important role in signal transduction, recognition and binding of pathogenic bacteria belonging to Neisseria and Escherichia genera.

  3. Human and animal vaccination delivery to remote nomadic families, Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Esther; Bechir, Mahamat; Ahmed, Mahamat Abdoulaye; Wyss, Kaspar; Randolph, Thomas F; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2007-03-01

    Vaccination services for people and livestock often fail to achieve sufficient coverages in Africa's remote rural settings because of financial, logistic, and service delivery constraints. In Chad from 2000 through 2005, we demonstrated the feasibility of combining vaccination programs for nomadic pastoralists and their livestock. Sharing of transport logistics and equipment between physicians and veterinarians reduced total costs. Joint delivery of human and animal health services is adapted to and highly valued by hard-to-reach pastoralists. In intervention zones, for the first time approximately 10% of nomadic children (> 1-11 months of age) were fully immunized annually and more children and women were vaccinated per day during joint vaccination rounds than during vaccination of persons only and not their livestock (130 vs. 100, p < 0.001). By optimizing use of limited logistical and human resources, public health and veterinary services both become more effective, especially at the district level.

  4. Modelling familial dysautonomia in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gabsang; Studer, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable promise as a novel tool for modelling human disease and for drug discovery. While the generation of disease-specific iPS cells has become routine, realizing the potential of iPS cells in disease modelling poses challenges at multiple fronts. Such challenges include selecting a suitable disease target, directing the fate of iPS cells into symptom-relevant cell populations, identifying disease-related phenotypes and showing reversibility of...

  5. Signal integration: a framework for understanding the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the human EGFR family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, H. Michael; Brdlik, Cathleen M.; Schreiber, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The human EGFR (HER) family is essential for communication between many epithelial cancer cell types and the tumor microenvironment. Therapeutics targeting the HER family have demonstrated clinical success in the treatment of diverse epithelial cancers. Here we propose that the success of HER family–targeted monoclonal antibodies in cancer results from their ability to interfere with HER family consolidation of signals initiated by a multitude of other receptor systems. Ligand/receptor systems that initiate these signals include cytokine receptors, chemokine receptors, TLRs, GPCRs, and integrins. We further extrapolate that improvements in cancer therapeutics targeting the HER family are likely to incorporate mechanisms that block or reverse stromal support of malignant progression by isolating the HER family from autocrine and stromal influences. PMID:18982164

  6. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

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    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  7. mRNA related to insulin family in human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, M.A.; D' Agostino, J.B.; Frazier, M.L.; Besch, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that human term placenta contains mRNA displaying sequence homology to a rat preproinsulin I cDNA clone (p119). When placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA was analyzed for homology to p119 by RNA/DNA blot hybridization, prominent hybridization was observed which was found by densitometric analysis to be three-fold higher than control. To further characterize this insulin-like message, a cDNA library was generated (approx.7000 transformants) using normal term cesarean-sectioned tissue to prepare placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA templates. Five hundred transformants were initially screened by colony hybridization using a /sup 32/P-labeled rat preproinsulin I cDNA as probe. Of the ten initial positives obtained, three were found to be true positives based on Southern hybridization analyses of the recombinant plasmids. Using Taq I digested pBr322 as a size marker, the cDNAs were found to be approximately 300 bp in length. Preliminary DNA sequencing using the Sanger dideoxy chain termination method has revealed that one of these clones displays significant homology to the 5' region of human insulin-like growth factors I and II.

  8. Family Aggregation of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1-Associated Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Verdonck, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that produces a persistent infection. Two transmission routes (from mother to child and via sexual intercourse) favor familial clustering of HTLV-1. It is yet unknown why most HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic while about 10% of them develop complications. HTLV-1 associated diseases were originally described as sporadic entities, but familial presentations have been reported. To explore what is known about family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases we undertook a systematic review. We aimed at answering whether, when, and where family aggregation of HTLV-1-associated diseases was reported, which relatives were affected and which hypotheses were proposed to explain aggregation. We searched MEDLINE, abstract books of HTLV conferences and reference lists of selected papers. Search terms used referred to HTLV-1 infection, and HTLV-1-associated diseases, and family studies. HTLV-1-associated diseases considered are adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-1-associated uveitis, and infective dermatitis. Seventy-four records reported HTLV-1-associated diseases in more than one member of the same family and were included. Most reports came from HTLV-1-endemic countries, mainly Japan (n = 30) and Brazil (n = 10). These reports described a total of 270 families in which more than one relative had HTLV-1-associated diseases. In most families, different family members suffered from the same disease (n = 223). The diseases most frequently reported were ATLL (115 families) and HAM/TSP (102 families). Most families (n = 144) included two to four affected individuals. The proportion of ATLL patients with family history of ATLL ranged from 2 to 26%. The proportion of HAM/TSP patients with family history of HAM/TSP ranged from 1 to 48%. The predominant cluster types for ATLL were clusters of siblings and parent-child pairs and for HAM/TSP, an affected

  9. Comparative Study on Sequence–Structure–Function Relationship of the Human Short-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases Protein Family

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Nu Thi Ngoc; Le, Ly

    2014-01-01

    Human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) protein family has been the subject of recent studies for its critical role in human metabolism. Studies also found that single nucleotide polymorphisms of the SDR protein family were responsible for a variety of genetic diseases, including type II diabetes. This study reports the effect of sequence variation on the structural and functional integrities of human SDR protein family using phylogenetics and correlated mutation analysis tools. Ou...

  10. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  11. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population.

  12. Human subtelomeric WASH genes encode a new subclass of the WASP family.

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    Elena V Linardopoulou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Subtelomeres are duplication-rich, structurally variable regions of the human genome situated just proximal of telomeres. We report here that the most terminally located human subtelomeric genes encode a previously unrecognized third subclass of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein family, whose known members reorganize the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular stimuli. This new subclass, which we call WASH, is evolutionarily conserved in species as diverged as Entamoeba. We demonstrate that WASH is essential in Drosophila. WASH is widely expressed in human tissues, and human WASH protein colocalizes with actin in filopodia and lamellipodia. The VCA domain of human WASH promotes actin polymerization by the Arp2/3 complex in vitro. WASH duplicated to multiple chromosomal ends during primate evolution, with highest copy number reached in humans, whose WASH repertoires vary. Thus, human subtelomeres are not genetic junkyards, and WASH's location in these dynamic regions could have advantageous as well as pathologic consequences.

  13. Situational Analysis of Human Resources in Family Physician Program: Survey from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhor, Rohollah; Azmal, Mohammad; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Eslamian, Maryam; Tabatabaee, Seyed Saeed; Jafari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family physician is the increasing efforts to promote physician and other human resources in the health care systems. Goal: Investigate Human resources situation of the family physician program in six pilot cities in Khuzestan province in the southwest of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to examine the family physician program in 2011. In this study, 15 healthcare teams in six pilot cities in Iran were assessed. Data was compiled from family physician officer document in vice treatment of Ahwaz University of medical sciences. National instructions of family physician was used to identify current gaps. Results: The survey findings indicated that there is a doctor’s shortage about 36% in the health team that deployed in the first level of referral system. Also on the team, the 34% shortage of nurses and 60% shortages of nutrition personnel are seen. Specialists with offices in cities of second referral level, there have not welcomed the program. Conclusions: It seems that to facilitate patient access to physicians under contract with family physician program and the referral system in level two and level three, adopting arrangements to attract specialists and improving their maintenance is necessary. PMID:25126016

  14. The equine herpesvirus 1 gene 63 RING finger protein partially complements Vmw110, its herpes simplex virus type 1 counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R; Orr, A; Elliott, M

    1995-09-01

    All alpha herpesviruses of known DNA sequence have been found to encode a protein with similarities to immediate early protein Vmw110 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The conserved portion of this family of proteins is a characteristic zinc binding module, known as a RING finger or C3HC4 domain. Examples of RING finger domains occur in many other proteins of diverse evolutionary origin and function. Recently, the solution structure of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) RING finger protein, encoded by gene 63, has been solved. To investigate whether this structure could be considered to be a paradigm of herpesvirus RING domains, we have constructed a recombinant HSV-1 which expresses the EHV-1 gene 63 protein (EHVg63) in place of Vmw110. Comparison of the growth properties of the recombinant with those of wild-type and Vmw110-defective viruses indicates that EHVg63 is able to fulfil partially, but not completely, the roles of Vmw110 during virus growth in tissue culture.

  15. The exonuclease and host shutoff functions of the SOX protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are genetically separable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaunsinger, Britt; Chavez, Leonard; Ganem, Don

    2005-06-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) SOX protein, encoded by ORF37, promotes shutoff of host cell gene expression during lytic viral replication by dramatically impairing mRNA accumulation. SOX is the KSHV homolog of the alkaline exonuclease of other herpesviruses, which has been shown to function as a DNase involved in processing and packaging the viral genome. Although the exonuclease activity of these proteins is widely conserved across all herpesviruses, the host shutoff activity observed for KSHV SOX is not. We show here that SOX expression sharply reduces the half-life of target mRNAs. Extensive mutational analysis reveals that the DNase and host shutoff activities of SOX are genetically separable. Lesions affecting the DNase activity cluster in conserved regions of the protein, but residues critical for mRNA degradation are not conserved across the viral family. Additionally, we present evidence suggesting that the two different functions of SOX occur within distinct cellular compartments-DNase activity in the nucleus and host shutoff activity in the cytoplasm.

  16. DDX11L: a novel transcript family emerging from human subtelomeric regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Urso Michele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes exhibit an extraordinary plasticity. To date, due to the high GC content and to the presence of telomeric repeats, the subtelomeric sequences are underrepresented in the genomic libraries and consequently their sequences are incomplete in the finished human genome sequence, and still much remains to be learned about subtelomere organization, evolution and function. Indeed, only in recent years, several studies have disclosed, within human subtelomeres, novel gene family members. Results During a project aimed to analyze genes located in the telomeric region of the long arm of the human X chromosome, we have identified a novel transcript family, DDX11L, members of which map to 1pter, 2q13/14.1, 2qter, 3qter, 6pter, 9pter/9qter, 11pter, 12pter, 15qter, 16pter, 17pter, 19pter, 20pter/20qter, Xpter/Xqter and Yqter. Furthermore, we partially sequenced the underrepresented subtelomeres of human chromosomes showing a common evolutionary origin. Conclusion Our data indicate that an ancestral gene, originated as a rearranged portion of the primate DDX11 gene, and propagated along many subtelomeric locations, is emerging within subtelomeres of human chromosomes, defining a novel gene family. These findings support the possibility that the high plasticity of these regions, sites of DNA exchange among different chromosomes, could trigger the emergence of new genes.

  17. Problems and Solutions in Human Resources Management of Family Business: A Research in Konya City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa CETIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The constant progress of the socio-economic development in our time has triggered competition worldwide which makes industrial and commercial establishments divert to human resources in order to distinguish themselves and survive. Family businesses both in Turkey and other countries, therefore, apply to HRM so as to overcome such problems deriving from their structures. This study tackles the family business that faces the problems in HRM and finds the solution to these problems. Studies show that companies who efficiently benefit from the principles of human resources have made remarkable headway. Additionally the family businesses which benefit from HRM and functions can solve the structural problems and catch the successful and institutionalized line.

  18. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  19. The contribution of animals to human well-being: a veterinary family practice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that humans can benefit both physically and emotionally from a relationship with companion animals, a phenomenon known as the human-animal bond (HAB). This has not only increased the demand for veterinary services to meet the needs of these non-human family members and their owners, but it has also transformed the nature of those services from reactive medicine and surgery to proactive prevention and wellness. The emotional component of the HAB requires the veterinarian to have a solid understanding of the nature of the attachment between client and pet, and an ability to educate the client about proper care of the animal in order to optimize the relationship. Paying attention to the relationship between client and patient also positions the veterinary family practitioner to refer the client to appropriate community resources for physical, emotional, or other needs of the client that may become apparent during the veterinarian-client interaction. By achieving physical and mental health objectives for patients and collaborating with human health care services, the veterinary family practitioner contributes to the well-being of both patient and client. This new face of veterinary family practice requires research and education in fields that have not traditionally been a part of veterinary training.

  20. The suppression of apoptosis by α-herpesvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Cheng, An-Chun; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Ma-Feng; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Chen, Xiao-Yue

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis, an important innate immune mechanism that eliminates pathogen-infected cells, is primarily triggered by two signalling pathways: the death receptor pathway and the mitochondria-mediated pathway. However, many viruses have evolved various strategies to suppress apoptosis by encoding anti-apoptotic factors or regulating apoptotic signalling pathways, which promote viral propagation and evasion of the host defence. During its life cycle, α-herpesvirus utilizes an elegant multifarious anti-apoptotic strategy to suppress programmed cell death. This progress article primarily focuses on the current understanding of the apoptosis-inhibition mechanisms of α-herpesvirus anti-apoptotic genes and their expression products and discusses future directions, including how the anti-apoptotic function of herpesvirus could be targeted therapeutically. PMID:28406478

  1. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3.

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    Francesco C Origgi

    Full Text Available We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3, one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1 the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2 the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This

  2. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

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    Rucha Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05 and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001. Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05 and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05 in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites.

  3. The family myth: its deconstruction and replacement with a balanced humanized narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kradin, Richard

    2009-04-01

    According to Carl Jung the mythopoeic activities of the collective unconscious contribute to the trajectory of personal individuation (Segal 1998). The 'family myth' represents an imaginal narrative that emphasizes the importance of the family's founders, its collective values, and its position with respect to 'outsiders'. Sigmund Freud identified the importance of the Oedipal myth as the basis of nuclear family dynamics (Rudnytsky 1992); however, the 'myth of the family' represents in reality a 'family of myths', each emphasizing different elements of potential interpersonal dynamics. But whereas some myths foster the child's optimal separation from parental influence and promote the process of individuation, others tend to hinder development. One potentially deleterious form of the family myth tends to serve the narcissistic wishes of parents in their bid to maintain influence over the child by fostering the archetypal features of their role. The children who are the targets of the myth are thwarted in their psychological development by virtue of the fact that they are denied the opportunity to humanize their archetypal projections onto their parent(s). The result is a persistence of childlike attitude with respect to people and situations that they encounter outside the nuclear family. The persistent constellation of the child archetype is evidenced by features of the puer aeternus, with deficits in the ability to work, form stable adult relationships, and create a separate nuclear family. The significance of this type of family myth in the inappropriate preservation of puerile attitudes is examined and the desire of the offending parent(s) to promote their own immortality is explored. The contribution of the myth to the transference and transference resistance is explicated and suggestions are offered with respect to how to approach this critical issue in analysis.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a novel member of human β-1,4-galactosyltransferase gene family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玉新; 余龙; 张琪; 江萤; 戴方彦; 陈驰原; 屠强; 毕安定; 许月芳; 赵寿元

    1999-01-01

    By using the EST strategy for identifying novel members belonging to homologous gene families, a novel full-length cDNA encoding a protein significantly homologous to UDP-Gal: N-acetylglucosamine β-1, 4-galactosyltransferase (GAlT) was isolated from a human testis cDNA library. A nucleotide sequence of 2 173 bp long was determined to contain an open reading frame of 1032 nucleotides (344 amino acids). In view of the homology to members of the galactosyltransferase gene family and especially the closest relationship to Gallus gallus GalT type I (CK I), the predicted product of the novel cDNA was designated as human β-1, 4-galactosyltransferase homolog I (HumGT-H1). Its mRNA is present in different degrees in 16 tissues examined. Southern analysis of human genomic DNA revealed its locus on chromosome 3.

  5. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.

  6. Pathogenesis and Associated Diseases of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-ding WANG

    2007-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the primary etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and muticentric Castleman's disease. In common with the other herpesviruses, KSHV exhibits both latent and lytic life cycles, both of which are characterized by distinct gene expression profiles and programs. KSHV encodes proteins which play essential roles in the inhibition of host adaptive and innate immunity, the inhibition of apoptosis, and the regulation of the cell cycle. KSHV also encodes several proteins which have transforming and intrcellular signalling activity.

  7. THE POSSIBILITIES OF MODERN DIAGNOSTICS OF HERPESVIRUS INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Bokovoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical history, clinical and laboratory data were studied in 828 children aged from 2 months to 14 years. All of them had different clinical forms of herpesvirus infections (HVI. The combination of the information allows to form the etiologic diagnosis timely and to evaluate the activity of the current infection. Given the polymorphism of clinical symptoms of HVI, it was very important to determine herpesvirus genomes in three media (blood, saliva, urine by PCR, and high titers of G-antibodies (439 u for CMV and 212.3 u for HHV-6. 

  8. THE IMPACT OF PERSISTENT HERPESVIRUS INFECTION ON IMMUNITY AND VACCINATION RESPONSE

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    Volyanskiy AYu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we summarize current knowledge on the ability of latent herpesviruses to modulate the immunity and response to vaccination. Nearly all humans are latently infected with multiple herpesviruses but little is known about virus-host interactions. Meanwhile, the study of the immune response to Epshtein-Barr virus (EBV and сytomegalovirus (CMV has revealed significant regulatory effects on the immune system. During the primary infection a human cytomegalovirus is predominately found in peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. However, the virus can not be replicated in these cells. CMV induces the survival and differentiation of infected monocytes into long-lived macrophages capable of supporting viral replication and the release of virions, which infect CD34+ myeloid progenitor cells. CMV latently persists in myeloid progenitor cells and monocytes and reactivates during their differentiation into macrophages. CMV-infected monocytes exhibit a unique reprogramming of their differentiation and secret both pro-inflammatory M1- and anti-inflammatory M2-associated cytokines. But cytomegalovirus induced macrophage phenotype skewed towards pro-inflammatory M1 type. MV has profound effects on the composition and function of both T cells and NK cells. CMV constantly reactivates during differentiation of monocytes into macrophages. Consequently, persons with latent CMV infection have substantially increased numbers and proportions of CD8+ T cells that lead to exhaustion and an early onset of immunosenescence. Also, it has been shown that the latent CMV virus infection markedly increases the proportion of NK cells expressing the activating NKG2C receptor. So, it has been proposed that CMV alters the composition of T cell and NK cell subsets and accelerates immune aging. Given the capacity of CMV to alter a macrophage, as well as NK and T cell responses it is reasonable to hypothesize that latent infection would alter the

  9. Evolutionary divergence and functions of the human acyl-CoA thioesterase gene (ACOT family

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    Brocker Chad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The acyl-CoA thioesterase gene (ACOT family encodes enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of acyl-CoA thioester compounds, also known as activated fatty acids, to their corresponding non-esterified (free fatty acid and coenzyme A (CoASH. These enzymes play a very important role in lipid metabolism by maintaining cellular levels and proper ratios of free and activated fatty acids, as well as CoASH. Within the acyl-CoA family there are two distinct subgroups, type I and type II. Despite catalysing the same reaction, the two groups are not structurally similar and do not share sequence homology, strongly suggesting convergent evolution. This suggestion is further supported if one compares the human with the mouse and rat ACOT gene families. To date, four human type I ACOTs have been identified which belong to the α/β-hydrolase fold enzyme superfamily. Type II ACOTs fall into the 'hot dog' fold superfamily. There are currently six human type II genes; however, two homologous proteins, thioesterase superfamily members 4 (THEM4 and 5 (THEM5 share common type II structural features and, in the case of THEM4, acyl-CoA thioesterase activity -- suggesting that the family may be larger than previously realised. Although recent studies have greatly expanded the current understanding of these proteins and their physiological importance, there are a number of members whose functions are relatively unexplored and which warrant further investigation.

  10. Human embryonic stem cells express elevated levels of multiple pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family members.

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    David T Madden

    Full Text Available Two of the greatest challenges in regenerative medicine today remain (1 the ability to culture human embryonic stem cells (hESCs at a scale sufficient to satisfy clinical demand and (2 the ability to eliminate teratoma-forming cells from preparations of cells with clinically desirable phenotypes. Understanding the pathways governing apoptosis in hESCs may provide a means to address these issues. Limiting apoptosis could aid scaling efforts, whereas triggering selective apoptosis in hESCs could eliminate unwanted teratoma-forming cells. We focus here on the BCL-2 family of proteins, which regulate mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. We used quantitative PCR to compare the steady-state expression profile of all human BCL-2 family members in hESCs with that of human primary cells from various origins and two cancer lines. Our findings indicate that hESCs express elevated levels of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only BCL-2 family members NOXA, BIK, BIM, BMF and PUMA when compared with differentiated cells and cancer cells. However, compensatory expression of pro-survival BCL-2 family members in hESCs was not observed, suggesting a possible explanation for the elevated rates of apoptosis observed in proliferating hESC cultures, as well as a mechanism that could be exploited to limit hESC-derived neoplasms.

  11. Subset-directed antiviral treatment of 142 herpesvirus patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martin Lerner

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A Martin Lerner1, Safedin Beqaj2, James T Fitzgerald3, Ken Gill4, Carol Gill4, James Edington41Department of Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak; 2Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit; 3Department of Medical Education, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; 4The Dr A Martin Lerner Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Foundation, Beverly Hills, Michigan, USAPurpose: We hypothesized that chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS may be caused by single or multiple Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6 infection. To determine if CFS life-altering fatigue and associated findings including muscle aches, tachycardia at rest, chest aches, left ventricular dysfunction, syncope, and elevated herpesvirus serum antibody titers are reversed by long-term subset-directed valacyclovir and/or valganciclovir.Patients and methods: Data were collected at physician visits every 4–6 weeks from 142 CFS patients at one clinic from 2001 to 2007. To be included in this study, patients had to be followed for at least six months. The data captured included over 7000 patient visits and over 35,000 fields of information. Severity of fatigue was monitored by a validated Energy Index Point Score® (EIPS®. Baseline and follow-up serum antibody titers to EBV, HCMV, and HHV6, as well as coinfections with Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophila, Babesia microti, and antistreptolysin O, 24-hour ECG Holter monitors, 2D echocardiograms, cardiac dynamic studies, symptoms, and toxicity were captured and monitored. International criteria for CFS plus a specifically designed CFS diagnostic panel were used.Results and conclusions: The Group A herpesvirus CFS patients (no coinfections returned to a near-normal to normal life (P = 0.0001. The long-term EIPS value increased (primary endpoint, P < 0.0001 with subset-directed long-term valacyclovir and/or valganciclovir therapy. Secondary endpoints (cardiac, immunologic

  12. Kinetics of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Staskus, Katherine; Gradoville, Lyndle; Grogan, Elizabeth; Haase, Ashley; Miller, George

    1999-01-01

    Herpesvirus gene expression can be classified into four distinct kinetic stages: latent, immediate early, early, and late. Here we characterize the kinetic class of a group of 16 Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 genes in a cultured primary effusion cell line and examine the expression of a subset of these genes in KS biopsies. Expression of two latent genes, LANA and vFLIP, was constitutive and was not induced by chemicals that induce the lytic cycle in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines. An immediate-early gene, Rta (open reading frame 50 [ORF50]), was induced within 4 h of the addition of n-butyrate, and its 3.6-kb mRNA was resistant to inhibition by cycloheximide. Early genes, including K3 and K5 that are homologues of the “immediate-early” gene of bovine herpesvirus 4, K8 that is a positional homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, vMIP II, vIL-6, and polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, appeared 8 to 13 h after chemical induction. A second group of early genes that were slightly delayed in their appearance included viral DHFR, thymidylate synthase, vMIP I, G protein-coupled receptor, K12, vBcl2, and a lytic transcript that overlapped LANA. The transcript of sVCA (ORF65), a late gene whose expression was abolished by Phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of KSHV DNA replication, did not appear until 30 h after induction. Single-cell assays indicated that the induction of lytic cycle transcripts resulted from the recruitment of additional cells into the lytic cycle. In situ hybridization of KS biopsies showed that about 3% of spindle-shaped tumor cells expressed Rta, ORF K8, vIL-6, vMIP I, vBcl-2, PAN RNA, and sVCA. Our study shows that several KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular cytokines, chemokines, and antiapoptotic factors are expressed during the viral lytic cycle in PEL cell lines and in KS biopsies. The lytic cycle of KSHV, probably under the initial control of the KSHV/Rta gene, may directly contribute to tumor

  13. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  14. Dynamics of Virus Shedding and In Situ Confirmation of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian Green Turtles With Fibropapillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T M; Dagenais, J; Balazs, G H; Schettle, N; Ackermann, M

    2015-11-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Dynamics of virus shedding and in situ confirmation of chelonid herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian green turtles with Fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Schettle, Nelli; Ackermann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5.

  16. The juspuniendi at the roman home and the humanization of the family relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Garcé García y Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The family is one of the legal institutions that has most evolved through the time. Its historical tracking allows not only the comprehension of its transformation as an institute, but much of the general process of humanization of the Law. The family evolution is due to the modification in kinship systems. Gradually, blood links have been incorporated as a basic element and has been developed a legal regulation that aims parity inside the home. Under the growing influence of Christianity, the Roman law was attenuating the disciplinary powers of the paterfamilias, in particular the right to freely arrange the death of the wife and children without the intervention of judges (jus vitae necisque. In this historical context, this paper summarizes the development of private jus puniendi and the ethical and legal progress associated to the transformation of the family.

  17. The human fatty acid-binding protein family: Evolutionary divergences and functions

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    Smathers Rebecca L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP family and are involved in reversibly binding intracellular hydrophobic ligands and trafficking them throughout cellular compartments, including the peroxisomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. FABPs are small, structurally conserved cytosolic proteins consisting of a water-filled, interior-binding pocket surrounded by ten anti-parallel beta sheets, forming a beta barrel. At the superior surface, two alpha-helices cap the pocket and are thought to regulate binding. FABPs have broad specificity, including the ability to bind long-chain (C16-C20 fatty acids, eicosanoids, bile salts and peroxisome proliferators. FABPs demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation and are present in a spectrum of species including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. The human genome consists of nine putatively functional protein-coding FABP genes. The most recently identified family member, FABP12, has been less studied.

  18. Human Capital of Family and Social Mobility in Rural Areas-Evidence from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-hua; YU Mei-lian; WU Fang-wei; CHEN Wei

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on the impact of family’s human capital on social mobility in China’s rural community. Empirical research is conducted based on data from surveying a typical rural community in the past 20 yr. The study indicates that social mobility in rural area is active in the past 20 yr, and the human capital of family, represented by primary labor’s education level, has played an essential role in mobility of low social class. Meanwhile, socio-economic development and the change of supply and demand in labor market dims the signaling role of degree education, but the impact of occupational training is increasingly remarkable. Therefore, the change from sole degree education to multi-leveled education including occupational education and training is a main way for China’s rural families in low class to realize social mobility.

  19. The impact of herpesviruses on reproductive performance in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The thesis addresses the largely-undefined influence of the equine herpesviruses (EHVs) and in particular EHV-1 and -4 on reproductive performance in horse-breeding systems. These pathogens cause significant losses to the international equine breeding industry primarily through infectious abortion a

  20. Advances in development and evaluation of bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Kaashoek, M.J.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    This review deals with conventional and modern bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccines. Conventional vaccines are widely used to prevent clinical signs of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis. The use of conventional vaccines, however, does not appear to have resulted in reduction of the prevalence of

  1. Advances in development and evaluation of bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Kaashoek, M.J.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    This review deals with conventional and modern bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccines. Conventional vaccines are widely used to prevent clinical signs of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis. The use of conventional vaccines, however, does not appear to have resulted in reduction of the prevalence of inf

  2. The impact of herpesviruses on reproductive performance in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The thesis addresses the largely-undefined influence of the equine herpesviruses (EHVs) and in particular EHV-1 and -4 on reproductive performance in horse-breeding systems. These pathogens cause significant losses to the international equine breeding industry primarily through infectious abortion

  3. Multiplexed colorimetric detection of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus and Bartonella DNA using gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Matthew; Jiang, Li; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an infectious cancer occurring most commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients and in endemic regions, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where KS is among the top four most prevalent cancers. The cause of KS is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that while routinely diagnosed in developed nations, provides challenges to developing world medical providers and point-of-care detection. A major challenge in the diagnosis of KS is the existence of a number of other diseases with similar clinical presentation and histopathological features, requiring the detection of KSHV in a biopsy sample. In this work we develop an answer to this challenge by creating a multiplexed one-pot detection system for KSHV DNA and DNA from a frequently confounding disease, bacillary angiomatosis. Gold and silver nanoparticle aggregation reactions are tuned for each target and a multi-color change system is developed capable of detecting both targets down to levels between 1 nM and 2 nM. The system developed here could later be integrated with microfluidic sample processing to create a final device capable of solving the two major challenges in point-of-care KS detection.

  4. CD1d expression and invariant NKT cell responses in herpesvirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusung eTan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a highly conserved subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that express a canonical, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR and surface markers shared with the natural killer cell lineage. iNKT cells recognize exogenous and endogenous glycolipid antigens restricted by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules, and are highly responsive to the prototypical agonist, α-galactosylceramide. Upon activation, iNKT cells rapidly coordinate signaling between innate and adaptive immune cells through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, leading to the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Because of their potent immunoregulatory properties, iNKT cells have been extensively studied and are known to play a pivotal role in mediating immune responses against microbial pathogens including viruses. Here, we review evidence that herpesviruses manipulate CD1d expression to escape iNKT cell surveillance and establish lifelong latency in humans. Collectively, published findings suggest that iNKT cells play critical roles in anti-herpesvirus immune responses and could be harnessed therapeutically to limit viral infection and viral-associated disease.

  5. Human Infestation with Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae) in a Family Referred with Pruritus and Skin Lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Abdigoudarzi; Mahmoud S Mirafzali; Hamid Belgheiszadeh

    2014-01-01

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae is one of the most economically important ectoparasites in hens and some species of mammals worldwide. Cases of human infestation have been reported worldwide. In this study we report infestation in three members of a family referred with pruritus and allergic dermatitis rash. They have collected very small animals and carried them to the laboratory which later was confirmed as D. gallinae. They claimed that they had been bitten with this ectoparasit...

  6. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  7. Human Infestation with Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae in a Family Referred with Pruritus and Skin Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdigoudarzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae is one of the most economically important ectoparasites in hens and some species of mammals worldwide. Cases of human infestation have been reported worldwide. In this study we report infestation in three members of a family referred with pruritus and allergic dermatitis rash. They have collected very small animals and carried them to the laboratory which later was confirmed as D. gallinae. They claimed that they had been bitten with this ectoparasite. This is the first case report of human infestation owing to D. gallinae from Iran.

  8. Human Infestation with Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae) in a Family Referred with Pruritus and Skin Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdigoudarzi, Mohammad; Mirafzali, Mahmoud S; Belgheiszadeh, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae is one of the most economically important ectoparasites in hens and some species of mammals worldwide. Cases of human infestation have been reported worldwide. In this study we report infestation in three members of a family referred with pruritus and allergic dermatitis rash. They have collected very small animals and carried them to the laboratory which later was confirmed as D. gallinae. They claimed that they had been bitten with this ectoparasite. This is the first case report of human infestation owing to D. gallinae from Iran.

  9. Human and rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem cells cannot be purified based only on SLAM family markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Andre; Savona, Michael; Wiggins, Michael; Anderson, Stephanie; Ichwan, Brian; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Morrison, Sean J; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2011-02-03

    Various combinations of antibodies directed to cell surface markers have been used to isolate human and rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These protocols result in poor enrichment or require multiple complex steps. Recently, a simple phenotype for HSCs based on cell surface markers from the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors has been reported in the mouse. We examined the possibility of using the SLAM markers to facilitate the isolation of highly enriched populations of HSCs in humans and rhesus macaques. We isolated SLAM (CD150(+)CD48(-)) and non-SLAM (not CD150(+)CD48(-)) cells from human umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells as well as from human and rhesus macaque mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells and compared their ability to form colonies in vitro and reconstitute immune-deficient (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency/interleukin-2 γc receptor(null), NSG) mice. We found that the CD34(+) SLAM population contributed equally or less to colony formation in vitro and to long-term reconstitution in NSG mice compared with the CD34(+) non-SLAM population. Thus, SLAM family markers do not permit the same degree of HSC enrichment in humans and rhesus macaques as in mice.

  10. Human capital identification process: linkage for family medicine and community medicine to mobilize the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasugarn, Chanuantong; Thongbunjob, Krid

    2012-06-01

    Community diagnosis and approach has shifted from a professional focus to a community focus. The information system has also been developed to reflect socio-cultural information. This new system has been established throughout the country and is being recorded in the computer system. However these data still lack human capital information to promote community mobilization. The present study aims to develop a process which reflects human capital from the insider and outsider points of view and which builds on the existing work system of primary care service, family medicine, and community medicine. The present study applies the participatory action research design with mixed methods including community grand-tour, household survey socio-metric questionnaire and focus group discussion in order to gather insider view of human capital. A key instrument developed in the present study is the socio-metric questionnaire which was designed according to the community grand tour and household survey results. The findings indicate that the process is feasible and the insider point of view given a longer evidence based list of the human capital. The model enhanced a closer relationship between professional and community people and suggested the realistic community mobilizer name list. Human capital identification process is feasible and should be recommended to integrate in the existing work process of the health staff in family and community practice.

  11. Herpesvirus saimiri encodes a new cytokine, IL-17, which binds to a novel cytokine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhengbin; Fanslow, William C; Seldin, Michael F; Rousseau, Anne-Marie; Painter, Sally L; Comeau, Michael R; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Spriggs, Melanie K

    2011-11-01

    Herpesvirus Saimiri gene 13 (HVS13) exhibits 57% identity with the predicted sequence of a T cell-derived molecule termed CTLA8. Recombinant HVS13 and CTLA8 stimulate transcriptional factor NF-kappaB activity and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion in fibroblasts, and costimulate T cell proliferation. An HVS13.Fc fusion protein was used to isolate a cDNA encoding a novel receptor that also binds CTLA8. This receptor is unrelated to previously identified cytokine receptor families. A recombinant soluble receptor inhibited T cell proliferation and IL-2 production induced by PHA, concanavalin A (conA), and anti-TCR MAb. These results define CTLA8 and HVS13 as novel cytokines that bind to a novel cytokine receptor. We propose to call these molecules IL-17, vIL-17, and IL-17R, respectively.

  12. Development of a polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Anguillid herpesvirus DNA in eels based on the herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Pritz-Verschuren, S.B.E.; Kerkhoff, S.; Botter, A.; Willemsen, M.; Nieuwstadt, A.; Haenen, O.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Anguillid herpesvirus (AnHV, also known as Herpesvirus anguillae or HVA) is found in both Japanese and European eels. Based on restriction enzyme analysis a small number of differences were found between AnHV isolated from Japanese eels and from European eels. The total genome size of both is about

  13. Differential expression of CD150 (SLAM) family receptors by human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Romero, Xavier; Marin, Pedro; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-containing grafts are most commonly used to treat various blood diseases, including leukemias and autoimmune disorders. CD150 (SLAM) family receptors have recently been shown to be differentially expressed by mouse HSC and progenitor cells. Members of the CD150 family are key regulators of leukocyte activation and differentiation. The goal of the present study is to analyze the expression patterns of the CD150 receptors CD48, CD84, CD150 (SLAM), CD229 (Ly9), and CD244 (2B4) on the different sources of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of CD150 receptors was analyzed on human mobilized peripheral blood CD133(+)-isolated cells and CD34(+) bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord blood (CB) cells using multicolor flow cytometry. CD244 was present on most CD133(+)Lin(-)-mobilized cells and CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells, including virtually all CD38(-)Lin(-) primitive progenitor cells. CD48 had a restricted expression pattern on CD133(+)Lin(-)CD38(-) cells, while its levels were significantly higher in CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells. In addition, CD84 was present on a significant number of CD133(+)Lin(-) cells, but only on a small fraction of CD133(+)Lin(-)CD38(-) peripheral blood mobilized cells. In contrast, CD84 was expressed on practically all CD34(+)Lin(-) BM cells. No CD150 expression was observed in mobilized peripheral blood CD133(+)Lin(-) or CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells. Furthermore, only a small fraction of CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells expressed CD229. Our results show that CD150 family molecules are present on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and that their expression patterns differ between humans and mice.

  14. SLAM family predicting the initiation potential of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia in NOD/SCID mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Na; ZHOU Jian-feng; HUANG Liang; XIAO Fei; LIU Jin-ping; WANG Di; GENG Zhe; WANG Jin; MA Shu-yan; SHU Li-li; CHEN Tai-ping

    2011-01-01

    Background The SLAM family recently has been reported to show an important biological role in lymphocyte development and immunological function, and it is efficient to highly purify hematopoietic stem cells using a simple combination of SLAM family members. To elucidate the presence of this family on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL),as well as its relationship with the leukemia-initiating potential, we analyzed the expression pattern of this family members on human ALL progenitor cells, combined with serial xenotransplantation assay.Methods Expression analysis was carried out by flow cytometry. We combined the expression pattern of human CD150,CD244 and CD48 with serial xenotransplantation of B-ALL progenitor cells to indicate their relationship.Results CD48 and CD244 were expressed on most B-ALL progenitor cells, the percentage being (93.08±6.46)% and (63.37±29.31)%, respectively. Interestingly, the proportion of CD150+ cells declined obviously in engrafted cases ((24.94±7.32)%) compared with non-engrafted cases ((77.54±5.93)%, P <0.01), which indicated that only blast cells with low percentage of CD150+ population were able to reconstitute leukemia into primary, secondary and tertiary NOD/SCID mice.Conclusions SLAM family members are present on B-ALL progenitor cells and the leukemia-initiating potential of leukemic blasts is correlated negatively with the proportion of CD150+ cells, the percentage of which can serve as a useful predictor for engraftment success of B-ALL to immune deficient mice.

  15. A shared promoter region suggests a common ancestor for the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG gene families and the murine CYPT family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin A; Nielsen, John E; Retelska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    Many testis-specific genes from the sex chromosomes are subject to rapid evolution, which can make it difficult to identify murine genes in the human genome. The murine CYPT gene family includes 15 members, but orthologs were undetectable in the human genome. However, using refined homology search...... with the murine SPANX gene and the CYPT family may share a common ancestor. Finally, we present evidence that VCX/Y and SPANX may be paralogs with a similar protein structure consisting of C terminal acidic repeats of variable lengths....

  16. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Two herpesviruses associated with disease in wild Atlantic loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Brian A; Wellehan, James F X; Foley, Allen M; Coberley, Sadie S; Herbst, Lawrence H; Manire, Charles A; Garner, Michael M; Brookins, Milagros D; Childress, April L; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2008-01-01

    Herpesviruses are associated with lung-eye-trachea disease and gray patch disease in maricultured green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and with fibropapillomatosis in wild sea turtles of several species. With the exception fibropapillomatosis, no other diseases of wild sea turtles of any species have been associated with herpesviral infection. In the present study, six necropsied Atlantic loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) had gross and histological evidence of viral infection, including oral, respiratory, cutaneous, and genital lesions characterized by necrosis, ulceration, syncytial cell formation, and intranuclear inclusion bodies. Nested polymerase chain reaction targeting a conserved region of the herpesvirus DNA-dependent-DNA polymerase gene yielded two unique herpesviral sequences referred to as loggerhead genital-respiratory herpesvirus and loggerhead orocutaneous herpesvirus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these viruses are related to and are monophyletic with other chelonian herpesviruses within the subfamily alpha-herpesvirinae. We propose the genus Chelonivirus for this monophyletic group of chelonian herpesviruses.

  18. Data Resources for Biodemographic Studies on Familial Clustering of Human Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The main cause that hampered many previous biodemographic studies of human longevity is the lack of appropriate data. At the same time, many existing data resources (millions of genealogical records are under-utilized, because their very existence is not widely known, let alone the quality and scientific value of these data sets are not yet validated. The purpose of this work is to review the data resources that could be used in familial studies of human longevity. This is an extended and supplemented version of the previous study made by the authors upon the request of the National Institute on Aging (1998 NIH Professional Service Contract. The review describes: (1 data resources developed for biodemographic studies, (2 data collected in the projects on historical demography, (3 data resources for long lived individuals and their families, (4 publicly available computerized genealogical data resources, (5 published genealogical and family history data. The review also contains the description of databases developed by the participants of the Research Workshops "Genes, Genealogies, and Longevity" organized by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.

  19. Parent-offspring conflict theory: an evolutionary framework for understanding conflict within human families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlomer, Gabriel L; Del Giudice, Marco; Ellis, Bruce J

    2011-07-01

    Decades of research demonstrate that conflict shapes and permeates a broad range of family processes. In the current article, we argue that greater insight, integration of knowledge, and empirical achievement in the study of family conflict can be realized by utilizing a powerful theory from evolutionary biology that is barely known within psychology: parent-offspring conflict theory (POCT). In the current article, we articulate POCT for psychological scientists, extend its scope by connecting it to the broader framework of life history theory, and draw out its implications for understanding conflict within human families. We specifically apply POCT to 2 instances of early mother-offspring interaction (prenatal conflict and weaning conflict); discuss the effects of genetic relatedness on behavioral conflict between parents, children, and their siblings; review the emerging literature on parent-offspring conflict over the choice of mates and spouses; and examine parent-offspring conflict from the perspective of imprinted genes. This review demonstrates the utility of POCT, not only for explaining what is known about conflict within families but also for generating novel hypotheses, suggesting new lines of research, and moving us toward the "big picture" by integrating across biological and psychological domains of knowledge.

  20. Incidence and relationship of human cytomegalovirus infection and human herpesvirus 6 infection in pediatric patients after hemopoietic stem cell transplantation%儿童造血干细胞移植患者人巨细胞病毒与疱疹病毒6型感染及相互关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕典一; 秦茂权; 王燕; 高立伟; 谢正德

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the incidence of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus 6(HHV-6) infection in pediatric patients with hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT),and to explore the relationship between CMV and HHV-6 infection in pediatric patients with HSCT.Methods Pediatric patients with HSCT in hemotology center of Beijing Children's Hospital were enrolled into this study from June 2007 to October 2009. Peripheral blood were collected every week after HSCT, and Fluorescent quantitation PCR and conventional PCR were used to detect CMV DNA load in serum and HHV-6 DNA in peripheral blood respectively. Genetic typing was conducted on HHV-6. Results Fifty two pediatric patients with HSCT were enrolled into this study, and six hundreds and thirty six specimens were collected totally. CMV DNA was detected in fifty two specimens from twenty cases. The median time was 56days after HSCT. The incidence of CMV infection was 38.5% (20/52)in all HSCT patients and 47. 6% (20/42) in allogene HSCT patients. The incidence of late CMV infection was 22.2% (6/27)in allogene HSCT.Three patients died of C MV infection,and two died of CMV interstitial pneumonia. HHV-6 DNA was detected in thirty three specimens from fourteen cases. The median time was 23 days after HSCT. The incidence of HHV-6 infection was 26.9% ( 14/52 ) in all HSCT patients and 31% ( 13/42 ) in allogene HSCT patients. The genotype of HHV6 was all type B. HHV-6 DNA was positive in six of twenty cases with CMV infection. The%目的 了解儿童造血干细胞移植患者术后人巨细胞病毒与疱疹病毒6型的感染情况以及相互关系.方法 患者为2007年6月至2009年10月间北京儿童医院血液病中心的造血干细胞移植的患儿,患儿术后每周采集外周静脉血,分别应用荧光定量PCR和常规PCR检测患者血清中CMV DNA载量及外周全血中HHV-6,并对HHV-6进行分型.结果 共52例造血干细胞移植患者,636份标本.20例造血干细胞移植患者共52

  1. γ-Herpesvirus load as surrogate marker of early death in HIV-1 lymphoma patients submitted to high dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pratesi

    Full Text Available Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT is a feasible procedure for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 lymphoma patients, whose underlying disease and intrinsic HIV-1- and ASCT-associated immunodeficiency might increase the risk for γ-herpesvirus load persistence and/or reactivation. We evaluated this hypothesis by investigating the levels of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV- and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-DNA levels in the peripheral blood of 22 HIV-1-associated lymphoma patients during ASCT, highlighting their relationship with γ-herpesvirus lymphoma status, immunological parameters, and clinical events. EBV-DNA was detected in the pre-treatment plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 12 (median 12,135 copies/mL and 18 patients (median 417 copies/10(6 PBMCs, respectively; the values in the two compartments were correlated (r = 0.77, p = 0.0001. Only EBV-positive lymphomas showed detectable levels of plasma EBV-DNA. After debulking chemotherapy, plasma EBV-DNA was associated with lymphoma chemosensitivity (p = 0.03 and a significant higher mortality risk by multivariate Cox analysis adjusted for EBV-lymphoma status (HR, 10.46, 95% CI, 1.11-98.32, p = 0.04. After infusion, EBV-DNA was detectable in five EBV-positive lymphoma patients who died within six months. KSHV-DNA load was positive in only one patient, who died from primary effusion lymphoma. Fluctuations in levels of KSHV-DNA reflected the patient's therapy and evolution of his underlying lymphoma. Other γ-herpesvirus-associated malignancies, such as multicentric Castleman disease and Kaposi sarcoma, or end-organ complications after salvage treatment were not found. Overall, these findings suggest a prognostic and predictive value of EBV-DNA and KSHV-DNA, the monitoring of which could be a simple, complementary tool for the management of γ-herpesvirus-positive lymphomas in HIV-1 patients submitted to ASCT.

  2. Herpesvirus-Associated Central Nervous System Diseases after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesv...

  3. Human Herpesvirus 7 Glycoprotein B (gB) , gH, gL, gO Can Mediate Cell Fusion%人类疱疹病毒7型糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO介导细胞融合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建; 姚堃; 窦洁; 秦健; 许文嵘; 陈云; 尹全章; 周锋

    2007-01-01

    人类疱疹病毒7型(HHV-7)的感染依赖于包膜糖蛋白在病毒生命周期的多个阶段发挥功能.这些蛋白质可以介导病毒吸附,病毒包膜和宿主细胞膜融合以及病毒在细胞间的接触传播.将表达HHV-7糖蛋白的293T细胞与HHV-7易感的SupT1细胞共培养,检测虫荧光素酶报告基因的表达,以鉴定介导膜融合的HHV-7糖蛋白.研究发现,HHV-7糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO能介导293T细胞与SupT1细胞的融合,且融合可被抗CD4单抗所抑制.结果表明,糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO对于HHV-7引发的膜融合是必需的,其中某个蛋白质或所形成的蛋白质复合物可能是CD4的配体.%Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) infection is dependent on the functions of structural glycoproteins at multiple stages of the viral life cycle. These proteins mediate the initial attachment and fusion events that occur between the viral envelope and a host cell membrane, as well as cell to cell spread of the virus. To characterize the HHV-7 glycoproteins that can mediate cell fusion, a cell-based fusion assay was used. 293T cells expressing the HHV-7 glycoproteins of interest along with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the T7 promoter were cocultivated with SupT1 cells transfected with T7 RNA polymerase. HHV-7 glycoproteins gB, gH, gL and gO can mediate the fusion of 293T cells with SupT1 cells, and the fusion can be inhibited by anti-CD4 mAbs. Thus, the coexpression of HHV-7 gB, gO, gH and gL is sufficient and necessary for HHV-7 induced membrane fusion, and one of these glycoproteins or protein complex formed by these glycoproteins might be the ligand(s) of CD4 molecule.

  4. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  5. Expanding human immunodeficiency virus testing and counseling to reach tuberculosis clients' partners and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay-Quirk, C; Date, A; Bachanas, P; Baggaley, R; Getahun, H; Nelson, L; Granich, R

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have shown important increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and counseling (HTC), diagnosis, and coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients. Expansion of HTC for partners and families are critical next steps to increase earlier HIV diagnoses and access to ART, and to achieve international goals for reduced TB and HIV-related morbidity, mortality, transmission and costs. TB and HIV programs should develop and evaluate feasible and effective strategies to increase access to HTC among the partners and families of TB patients, and ensure that newly diagnosed people living with HIV and HIV-infected TB patients who complete anti-tuberculosis treatment are successfully linked to ongoing HIV clinical care.

  6. Changes in human gut flora with age: an Indian familial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marathe Nachiket

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut micro flora plays vital role in health status of the host. The majority of microbes residing in the gut have a profound influence on human physiology and nutrition. Different human ethnic groups vary in genetic makeup as well as the environmental conditions they live in. The gut flora changes with genetic makeup and environmental factors and hence it is necessary to understand the composition of gut flora of different ethnic groups. Indian population is different in physiology from western population (YY paradox and thus the gut flora in Indian population is likely to differ from the extensively studied gut flora in western population. In this study we have investigated the gut flora of two Indian families, each with three individuals belonging to successive generations and living under the same roof. Results Denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed age-dependant variation in gut microflora amongst the individuals within a family. Different bacterial genera were dominant in the individual of varying age in clone library analysis. Obligate anaerobes isolated from individuals within a family showed age related differences in isolation pattern, with 27% (6 out of 22 of the isolates being potential novel species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. In qPCR a consistent decrease in Firmicutes number and increase in Bacteroidetes number with increasing age was observed in our subjects, this pattern of change in Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratio with age is different than previously reported in European population. Conclusion There is change in gut flora with age amongst the individuals within a family. The isolation of high percent of novel bacterial species and the pattern of change in Firmicutes /Bacteroidetes ratio with age suggests that the composition of gut flora in Indian individuals may be different than the western population. Thus, further extensive study is needed to define the gut flora in Indian

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano (Toronto); (Colorado)

    2011-12-14

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure:function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform

  8. Identification and characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 11 promotor activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Open reading frame 11 (ORF11) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus belongs to a herpesviral homologous protein family shared by some members of the gamma- herpesvirus subfamily. Little is known about this ORF11 homologous protein family. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, ORF11, located adjacent and in the opposite orientation to a well-characterized viral IL-6 gene. Northern blot analysis reveals that ORF11 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle with delayed-early transcription kinetics. We have determined the 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated region of the unspliced ORF11 transcript and identified both the transcription start site and the transcription termination site. Core promoter region, representing ORF11 promoter activity, was mapped to a 159nt fragment 5{prime} most proximal to the transcription start site. A functional TATA box was identified in the core promoter region. Interestingly, we found that ORF11 transcriptional activation is not responsive to Rta, the KSHV lytic switch protein. We also discovered that part of the ORF11 promoter region, the 209nt fragment upstream of the transcription start site, was repressed by phorbol esters. Our data help to understand transcription regulation of ORF11 and to elucidate roles of ORF11 in KSHV pathogenesis and life cycle.

  9. The gamma-2-herpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 causes apoptotic infection in permissive cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, M T; Perri, D; Medici, M A; Foti, M; Orlandella, B M; Mastino, A

    2000-11-10

    Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of apoptosis in infected cells is associated with several viral infections. The gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) has been shown to harbor genes with antiapoptotic potentialities. However, here we have demonstrated that productive infection of adherent, permissive cell lines by BHV-4 resulted in a cytopathic effect characterized by induction of apoptosis. This phenomenon was confirmed using different techniques to detect apoptosis and using different virus strains and cell targets. Apoptosis induced by BHV-4 was inhibited by (1) treatment with doses of heparin, which completely inhibited virus attachment and infectivity; (2) UV treatment, which completely abrogated infectivity; and (3) treatment with a dose of phosphonoacetic acid, which blocked virus replication. Virus-induced apoptosis was associated with a down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and was reduced by Z-VAD-FMK, but not by Z-DEVD-FMK (caspase-3-specific) caspase inhibitors. Inhibition of apoptosis by Z-VAD-FMK treatment during infection did not modify virus yield. Therefore, despite the presence of antiapoptotic genes in its genoma, BHV-4 could complete its cycle of productive infection while inducing apoptosis of infected cells. This finding might have implications for the pathobiology of BHV-4 and other gammaherpesviruses in vivo. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Central nervous system disease and genital disease in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are associated with different herpesviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. van Elk; M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); P.R.W.A. van Run (Peter); De Jong, A. (Anton); S. Getu (Sarah); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHerpesvirus infection causes disease of variable severity in many species, including cetaceans. However, little is known about herpesvirus infection in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), despite being widespread in temperate coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, we

  11. Subcellular localization of the five members of the human steroid 5α-reductase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Scaglione

    2017-06-01

    We report the cloning and transient expression in HeLa cells of the five members of the human steroid 5α-reductase family as both N- and C-terminus green fluorescent protein tagged protein constructs. Following the intrinsic fluorescence of the tag, we have determined that the subcellular localization of these enzymes is in the endoplasmic reticulum, upon expression in HeLa cells. The presence of the tag at either end of the polypeptide chain can affect protein expression and, in the case of trans enoyl-CoA reductase, it induces the formation of protein aggregates.

  12. The Human Laminin Receptor is a Member of the Integrin Family of Cell Adhesion Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlsen, Kurt R.; Dillner, Lena; Engvall, Eva; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1988-09-01

    A receptor for the adhesive basement membrane protein, laminin, was isolated from human glioblastoma cells by affinity chromatography on laminin. This receptor has a heterodimeric structure similar to that of receptors for other extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. Incorporation of the laminin receptor into liposomal membranes makes it possible for liposomes to attach to surfaces coated with laminin. The receptor liposomes also attached to some extent to surfaces coated with fibronectin, but not with other matrix proteins. These properties identify the laminin receptor as a member of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors.

  13. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  14. A simple method for purification of herpesvirus DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Normann, Preben

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and reliable method for purification of herpesvirus DNA from cell cultures is described. The method is based on the isolation of virus particles and/or nucleocapsids by differential centrifugation and exploits the solubilizing and denaturing capabilities of cesium trifluoroacetate during ...... isopycnic centrifugation, so that phenol/chloroform extractions can be omitted. The method was used for the purification of DNA from several members of the Alfaherpesvirinae subfamily.......A rapid and reliable method for purification of herpesvirus DNA from cell cultures is described. The method is based on the isolation of virus particles and/or nucleocapsids by differential centrifugation and exploits the solubilizing and denaturing capabilities of cesium trifluoroacetate during...

  15. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozalo, Alfonso S.; Montoya, Enrique J.; Weller, Richard E.

    2008-08-16

    Abstract Dyscoria was observed in a female owl monkey and her two offspring. A third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two males paired with the female died, one of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all three animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly, H. simplex or H. saimiri-1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing animals into breeding or research colonies that were previously kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is observed in nonhuman primates.

  16. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalo, Alfonso S; Montoya, Enrique J; Weller, Richard E

    2008-07-01

    "Dyscoria was noted in a female owl monkey and 2 of her offspring. The third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two male monkeys paired with the female died, 1 of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all 3 animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by ELISA. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly H. simplex or H. saimiri 1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing into breeding or research colonies animals that previously were kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is noted in nonhuman primates."

  17. Refinement of herpesvirus B-capsid structure on parallel supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z H; Chiu, W; Haskell, K; Spears, H; Jakana, J; Rixon, F J; Scott, L R

    1998-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral reconstruction are used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the 1250-A-diameter herpesvirus B-capsid. The centers and orientations of particles in focal pairs of 400-kV, spot-scan micrographs are determined and iteratively refined by common-lines-based local and global refinement procedures. We describe the rationale behind choosing shared-memory multiprocessor computers for executing the global refinement, which is the most computationally intensive step in the reconstruction procedure. This refinement has been implemented on three different shared-memory supercomputers. The speedup and efficiency are evaluated by using test data sets with different numbers of particles and processors. Using this parallel refinement program, we refine the herpesvirus B-capsid from 355-particle images to 13-A resolution. The map shows new structural features and interactions of the protein subunits in the three distinct morphological units: penton, hexon, and triplex of this T = 16 icosahedral particle.

  18. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  19. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Paul E; Newson, Lesley; Schank, Jeffrey C; Richerson, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  20. Simulating the evolution of the human family: cooperative breeding increases in harsh environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Smaldino

    Full Text Available Verbal and mathematical models that consider the costs and benefits of behavioral strategies have been useful in explaining animal behavior and are often used as the basis of evolutionary explanations of human behavior. In most cases, however, these models do not account for the effects that group structure and cultural traditions within a human population have on the costs and benefits of its members' decisions. Nor do they consider the likelihood that cultural as well as genetic traits will be subject to natural selection. In this paper, we present an agent-based model that incorporates some key aspects of human social structure and life history. We investigate the evolution of a population under conditions of different environmental harshness and in which selection can occur at the level of the group as well as the level of the individual. We focus on the evolution of a socially learned characteristic related to individuals' willingness to contribute to raising the offspring of others within their family group. We find that environmental harshness increases the frequency of individuals who make such contributions. However, under the conditions we stipulate, we also find that environmental variability can allow groups to survive with lower frequencies of helpers. The model presented here is inevitably a simplified representation of a human population, but it provides a basis for future modeling work toward evolutionary explanations of human behavior that consider the influence of both genetic and cultural transmission of behavior.

  1. A Plea for the traditional family: Situating marriage within John Paul II's realist, or personalist, perspective of human freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Michele M

    2014-11-01

    This article is an attempt to defend the rights of the traditional family: not simply against the redefinition of marriage, but more fundamentally against a re-conceptualization of human freedom and human rights. To this end, it contrasts what Saint John Paul II calls an individualistic understanding of freedom and a personalistic notion of the same in order to argue that human freedom is called by the Creator to be in service of, and not in opposition to, the good of the human family. From this perspective-that of the social doctrine of the Catholic Church-it argues for the harmony between natural marriage and the respect of fundamental human rights, and it presents the social dimension of marriage as fundamental with respect to the legal and social protection of the family.

  2. Bovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the...

  3. The concept of milk kinship in Islam: issues raised when offering preterm infants of Muslim families donor human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khuffash, Afif; Unger, Sharon

    2012-05-01

    Research has documented health benefits associated with donor human milk (DHM). Offering DHM to people of the Muslim faith raises important religious concerns for these families. Knowledge of these beliefs and an understanding of the rationale for these beliefs enable the health care team to establish rapport and build a foundation of trust with patients and their families, thereby paving the way to developing a treatment plan that is in the best interest of the patients without compromising care. This article describes the issues and a rationale for them and provides physicians caring for preterm infants of Muslim families with information to facilitate advocating DHM to those families.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Solid Lymphoma Involving the Heart and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Andrews

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The disorders most strongly linked to KSHV are multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD, primary effusion lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We report an unusual case of KSHV-associated lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient manifesting with myocardial and central nervous system involvement. We discuss this case in the context of increasing array of KSHV-associated lymphomas. In the HIV-infected patient with a mass lesion, a history of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and prolonged immunosuppression should alert clinicians as to the possibility of KSHV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, in order to establish a timely diagnosis.

  5. Prevalence of Herpesvirus 8 Infection in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ingianni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a possible relationship between the presence of type 2 diabetes (DM2 and the Human Herpesvirus 8 infection (HHV-8 has been evaluated. The presence of HHV-8 DNA was monitored by nested PCR and Southern blotting in peripheral blood leucocytes of DM2 patients admitted to the Diabetology and Metabolic Disease Service of the “S. Giovanni di Dio” Hospital (Cagliari, Italy; healthy blood donor subjects were examined as controls. The results suggest that the frequency of HHV-8 DNA detection is more elevated in DM2 patients (23.7% than in healthy control subjects (12%, p<0.05. The association of HHV-8 infection with some other frequent complicating pathologies of DM2 patients was also evaluated. The possible role of HHV-8 in DM2 disease and related intercurrent pathologies is critically discussed.

  6. Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Upregulates Survivin Expression in KSHV-Associated B-Lymphoma Cells and Contributes to Their Proliferation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C.; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; KUMAR, Pankaj; Xiao, Bingyi; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-01-01

    Survivin is a master regulator of cell proliferation and cell viability and is highly expressed in most human tumors. The molecular network linked to survivin expression in tumors has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a multifunctional protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that is found in Kaposi's sarcoma tumors, upregulates survivin expression and increases the proliferation of KSHV-infected B cells. An...

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV entry into target cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan eChakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus infection of target cells is a complex process involving multiple host cell surface molecules (receptors and multiple viral envelope glycoproteins. Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV-8 infects a variety of in vivo target cells such as endothelial cells, B cells, monocytes, epithelial cells, and keratinocytes. KSHV also infects a diversity of in vitro target cells and establishes in vitro latency in many of these cell types. KSHV interactions with the host cell surface molecules and its mode of entry in the various target cells are critical for the understanding of KSHV pathogenesis. KSHV is the first herpesvirus shown to interact with adherent target cell integrins and this interaction initiates the host cell pre-existing signal pathways that are utilized for successful infection. This chapter discusses the various aspects of the early stage of KSHV infection of target cells, receptors used and issues that need to be clarified and future directions. The various signaling events triggered by KSHV infection and the potential role of signaling events in the different stages of infection are summarized providing the framework and starting point for further detailed studies essential to fully comprehend the pathogenesis of KSHV.

  8. Structure and sequence of the saimiriine herpesvirus 1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Shaun; Severini, Alberto; Black, Darla; Walker, Matthew; Eberle, R

    2011-02-05

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the squirrel monkey α-herpesvirus saimiriine herpesvirus 1 (HVS1). Unlike the simplexviruses of other primate species, only the unique short region of the HVS1 genome is bounded by inverted repeats. While all Old World simian simplexviruses characterized to date lack the herpes simplex virus RL1 (γ34.5) gene, HVS1 has an RL1 gene. HVS1 lacks several genes that are present in other primate simplexviruses (US8.5, US10-12, UL43/43.5 and UL49A). Although the overall genome structure appears more like that of varicelloviruses, the encoded HVS1 proteins are most closely related to homologous proteins of the primate simplexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that HVS1 is a simplexvirus. Limited comparison of two HVS1 strains revealed a very low degree of sequence variation more typical of varicelloviruses. HVS1 is thus unique among the primate α-herpesviruses in that its genome has properties of both simplexviruses and varicelloviruses.

  9. Humanization in the Intensive Care: perception of family and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, Flavia Feron; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino; Costa, Márcia Rosa da

    2017-01-01

    Understanding perceptions of family members and healthcare professionals about humanization at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) to direct it to an educational action. Exploratory descriptive and qualitative study conducted in an ICU level 3 of a public hospital in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, with fourteen subjects, eight family members and six healthcare professionals. Data collection carried out through semi-structured interviews and focus group. Content Analysis was used. Emerged categories were: welcoming; communication; ethical and sensible professionalism; unfavorable aspects; perception on humanization; and religiosity/spirituality. Although the subjects have expressed their perceptions about humanization in different ways, both groups pointed out the same needs and priorities to improve humanization in Intensive Care. From the results, we created a reflective manual of humanizing assistance practices for professionals, a board to facilitate communication of these professionals with patients and a guideline book for family members. Compreender as percepções de familiares e profissionais de saúde sobre humanização na Unidade Terapia Intensiva (UTI) para direcionar a uma ação educativa. Estudo exploratório-descritivo qualitativo, realizado em uma UTI nível III de um hospital público de Porto Alegre/RS com 14 sujeitos, sendo oito familiares e seis profissionais de saúde. Coleta de dados realizada por meio de: entrevistas semiestruturadas e grupo focal. Utilizou-se Análise de Conteúdo. As categorias emergidas foram: acolhida; comunicação; profissionalismo ético e sensível; aspectos desfavoráveis; percepção sobre humanização; e religiosidade/espiritualidade. Apesar dos sujeitos expressarem de maneiras distintas suas percepções sobre humanização, os dois grupos comparados elencaram iguais necessidades e prioridades para o aprimoramento da humanização na Terapia Intensiva. A partir dos resultados, criou-se um Manual Reflexivo de pr

  10. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kathryn; Vaz, Paola K.; Gilkerson, James R.; Baker, Rupert; Whiteley, Pam; Ficorilli, Nino; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Portas, Timothy; Skogvold, Kim; Anderson, Garry A.; Devlin, Joanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis), a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius). In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses) were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 22.6–32.2%), but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1–63.7%) in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2) were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1–55.9%) of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0–99.0%) in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1–297.8). Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research. PMID:26222660

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Herpesvirus Infection in Populations of Australian Marsupials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Stalder

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses have been reported in several marsupial species, but molecular classification has been limited to four herpesviruses in macropodids, a gammaherpesvirus in two antechinus species (Antechinus flavipes and Antechinus agilis, a gammaherpesvirus in a potoroid, the eastern bettong (Bettongia gaimardi and two gammaherpesviruses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus. In this study we examined a range of Australian marsupials for the presence of herpesviruses using molecular and serological techniques, and also assessed risk factors associated with herpesvirus infection. Our study population included 99 koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus, 96 eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus, 50 Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii and 33 common wombats (Vombatus ursinius. In total, six novel herpesviruses (one alphaherpesvirus and five gammaherpesviruses were identified in various host species. The overall prevalence of detection of herpesvirus DNA in our study population was 27.2% (95% confidence interval (CI of 22.6-32.2%, but this varied between species and reached as high as 45.4% (95% CI 28.1-63.7% in common wombats. Serum antibodies to two closely related macropodid herpesviruses (macropodid herpesvirus 1 and 2 were detected in 44.3% (95% CI 33.1-55.9% of animals tested. This also varied between species and was as high as 92% (95% CI 74.0-99.0% in eastern grey kangaroos. A number of epidemiological variables were identified as positive predictors for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the marsupial samples evaluated. The most striking association was observed in koalas, where the presence of Chlamydia pecorum DNA was strongly associated with the presence of herpesvirus DNA (Odds Ratio = 60, 95% CI 12.1-297.8. Our results demonstrate the common presence of herpesviruses in Australian marsupials and provide directions for future research.

  12. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus (HPV B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  13. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Samin; Arabi, Nahid; Yazdi, Mohammad Kaji; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Zohrehbandian, Farahnaz

    2015-09-01

    Human parvovirus (HPV) B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  14. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

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    Duangtum, Natapol [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Limjindaporn, Thawornchai, E-mail: limjindaporn@yahoo.com [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  15. Do positive affectivity and boundary preferences matter for work-family enrichment? A study of human service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNall, Laurel A; Scott, Lindsay D; Nicklin, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    More individuals than ever are managing work and family roles, but relatively little research has been done exploring whether boundary preferences help individuals benefit from multiple role memberships. Drawing on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) work-family enrichment theory, along with Boundary Theory (Ashforth, Kreiner, & Fugate, 2000) and Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 2002), we explore the impact of personal characteristics as enablers of work-family enrichment, and in turn, work outcomes relevant to human service workers: turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. In a 2-wave study of 161 human service employees, we found that individuals high in positive affectivity were more likely to experience both work-to-family and family to-work enrichment, whereas those with preferences toward integration were more likely to experience work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment). In turn, work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment) was related to lower turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. Enrichment served as a mediating mechanism for only some of the hypothesized relationships. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  16. RANAVIRUS EPIZOOTIC IN CAPTIVE EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) WITH CONCURRENT HERPESVIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA INFECTION: MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Richard R; Allender, Matthew C; Crawford, LaTasha K; Wack, Allison N; Murphy, Kevin J; Mankowski, Joseph L; Bronson, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) and FV3-like viruses are members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) and are becoming recognized as significant pathogens of eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) in North America. In July 2011, 5 turtles from a group of 27 in Maryland, USA, presented dead or lethargic with what was later diagnosed as fibrinonecrotic stomatitis and cloacitis. The presence of FV3-like virus and herpesvirus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the tested index cases. The remaining 22 animals were isolated, segregated by severity of clinical signs, and treated with nutritional support, fluid therapy, ambient temperature management, antibiotics, and antiviral therapy. Oral swabs were tested serially for FV3-like virus by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and tested at day 0 for herpesvirus and Mycoplasma sp. by conventional PCR. With oral swabs, 77% of the 22 turtles were FV3-like virus positive; however, qPCR on tissues taken during necropsy revealed the true prevalence was 86%. FV3-like virus prevalence and the median number of viral copies being shed significantly declined during the outbreak. The prevalence of herpesvirus and Mycoplasma sp. by PCR of oral swabs at day 0 was 55% and 68%, respectively. The 58% survival rate was higher than previously reported in captive eastern box turtles for a ranavirus epizootic. All surviving turtles brumated normally and emerged the following year with no clinical signs during subsequent monitoring. The immediate initiation of treatment and intensive supportive care were considered the most important contributing factors to the successful outcome in this outbreak.

  17. A Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection and Quantification of Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus (EEDV; Salmonid Herpesvirus 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, Gavin W; Barbash, Patricia A; Coll, John A

    2016-03-01

    Epizootic epitheliotropic disease virus (EEDV; salmonid herpesvirus [SalHV3]; family Alloherpesviridae) causes a systemic disease of juvenile and yearling Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. No cell lines are currently available for the culture and propagation of EEDV, so primary diagnosis is limited to PCR and electron microscopy. To better understand the pervasiveness of EEDV (carrier or latent state of infection) in domesticated and wild Lake Trout populations, we developed a sensitive TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect the presence of the EEDV terminase gene in Lake Trout tissues. This assay was able to detect a linear standard curve over nine logs of plasmid dilution and was sensitive enough to detect single-digit copies of EEDV. The efficiency of the PCR assay was 99.4 ± 0.06% (mean ± SD), with a 95% confidence limit of 0.0296 (R(2) = 0.994). Methods were successfully applied to collect preliminary data from a number of species and water bodies in the states of Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont, indicating that EEDV is more common in wild fish than previously known. In addition, through the development of this qPCR assay, we detected EEDV in a new salmonid species, the Cisco Coregonus artedi. The qPCR assay was unexpectedly able to detect two additional herpesviruses, the Atlantic Salmon papillomatosis virus (ASPV; SalHV4) and the Namaycush herpesvirus (NamHV; SalHV5), which both share high sequence identity with the EEDV terminase gene. With these unexpected findings, we subsequently designed three primer sets to confirm initial TaqMan qPCR assay positives and to differentiate among EEDV, ASPV, and NamHV by detecting the glycoprotein genes via SYBR Green qPCR. Received April 20, 2015; accepted November 10, 2015.

  18. Analysis of the pathogenetic basis for shedding and transmission of ovine gamma herpesvirus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüssy, Daniela; Janett, Fredi; Albini, Sarah; Stäuber, Norbert; Thun, Rico; Ackermann, Mathias

    2002-12-01

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), a member of the viral subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae, shares numerous similarities with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). Both viruses are apathogenic in their healthy original host, may cause lymphoprolipherative diseases, cannot routinely be propagated in cell culture, and may be sexually transmitted. However, the pathways of sexual transmission of these viruses, as well as the underlying pathogenetic dynamics, are not well understood. Organs from naturally OvHV-2-infected, as well as OvHV-2-free, sheep were quantitatively analyzed for OvHV-2 by the DNA amplification techniques. The dynamics of OvHV-2 multiplication and excretion were monitored after experimental infections and, most importantly, subsequent to vasectomy. The OvHV-2 DNA load in various tissues and internal organs was not merely reflecting the viral DNA load in the bloodstream, which suggested compartmentalization of OvHV-2. Moreover, OvHV-2 DNA was detected at several portals for virus shedding, i.e., the respiratory, alimentary, and urogenital tracts. Transient OvHV-2 excretion was detected in ejaculates of experimentally infected rams. Upon vasectomy, OvHV-2 DNA reappeared in the ejaculatory plasma, but the titers did not decline after reaching a peak. Spiking and fractionation experiments revealed an inhibitory activity, associated with the spermatozoa, which was able to suppress detection of viral DNA but which was no longer present in samples from vasectomized animals. Therefore, epidemiological studies on viruses that may be transmitted by the ejaculatory pathway and for whose tracing nucleic acid amplification methods are used, i.e., OvHV-2, HHV-8, and the human immunodeficiency virus, should include vasectomized males.

  19. Reactivation of Latent Infection of Human Herpesvirus 8 in BC-3 Cells from Primary Effusion Lymphoma by Recombinant CytokinesSimilar to that Produced by HIV-1-infected T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢春; 曾怡; 黄丽

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study and confirm that recombinant cytokines similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T cells induced lytic cycle replication of human pervirus 8(HHV-8) in BC-3 cells,another cell line from primary effusion lymphoma(PEL).Methods:The persistent stimulation of BC-3 was conducted by several cytokines known to be produced by HIV-1-infected T cells and important in grouth and proliferation of Kaposi's sarcoma(KS) cells in vitro,such as the inter feron-γ(IFN-γ),the hepatocyte grouth factor /scatter factor (HGF/SF),the Oncostain M(OSM),and the tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)which is not produced by HIV-1-infeted T cells.Treated and antrented BC-3 cells were collected at the 3rd and 7th day of persistent stimulation,respeclively.Immunohistochemical(IHC) staining. Northern blot,quantitative PCR(real-time PCR) and electron microscopy(EM) were carried out to detect the expression of immumogenic protein ORF59,messenger RNA(mRNA) of minor capsid protein ORF26,and the presence of viral particles of HHV-8 from treated and untreated BC-3 cells.Results:It showed that IFN-γ,HGF/SF/OSM,and TNF-α were found to induce an increase in mRNA expression of ORF26 when added individually to BC-3 cells.Particularly,ORF26 expression stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α respectively,increased 6.1 and 2.5-fold(from,real-time PCR results) at the 7th day when compared with untreated BC-3 cells.Meanwhile ,about 20% of IFN-γ stimulated BC-3 cells expressed ORF59 at the 7th day as compared with 1.5% of untreated BC-3 cells when IHC staining was employed.In addition,viral particles of HHV-8 were readily idelified in BC-3 cells stimulated with IFN-γ at the 7th day with EM analysis.Conclusion:TNF-α and recombinant cytokines being similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T Cells could really induce HHV-8 lytic cycle replication in BC-3 cells,another cell line of PEL.

  20. PCR detection of multiple human herpesvirus DNA in saliva from HIV-infected individuals in Teresina, State of Piauí, Brazil Detecção por PCR do DNA de vários herpesvírus humanos na saliva de indivíduos infectados pelo HIV em Teresina, Estado do Piauí, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Silene Sousa Carvalho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human herpesviruses are frequently associated with orofacial diseases in humans (HSV-1, EBV, CMV and HHV-8, some can also cause systemic disease (CMV and HHV-8. The transmission of these viruses occurs by contact with infected secretions, especially saliva. Human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with an increased risk of HHVs and related diseases. METHODS: This work aimed to detect HSV-1, EBV, CMV and HHV-8 DNA in saliva of HIV-infected patients from Teresina, northeast Brazil, by PCR and compare these findings with age and sex matched HIV-seronegative individuals. RESULTS: No difference in prevalence was verified between HHV detection in the saliva of HIV-seropositive individuals and controls. The individual frequencies of these viruses in these two populations were different. HIV seropositivity correlated positively with the presence of CMV (OR: 18.2, p= 0.00032 and EBV (OR: 3.44, p= 0.0081. No association between CD4 counts and the prevalence of HHVs in the saliva was observed; however, a strong association was determined between seropositivity and the presence of multiple HHV DNAs in saliva (OR: 4.83, p = 0.0028. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the asymptomatic salivary shedding of HHVs is a common event between HIV-seropositive and seronegative individuals from Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, and, especially for HIV-seropositive patients, saliva is a risk factor for the acquisition/transmission of multiple HHVs.INTRODUÇÃO: Alguns herpesvírus humanos são frequentemente associados a doenças orofaciais em humanos. A transmissão destes vírus ocorre através do contato com secreções contaminadas, especialmente a saliva. A infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana é considerada um fator de risco para a aquisição de HHVs e doenças correlatas. MÉTODOS: Este trabalho teve como objetivo detectar por PCR o DNA de HSV-1, EBV, CMV e HHV-8 na saliva de pacientes infectados com HIV em Teresina, nordeste do

  1. Transactivation of Latent Marek's Disease Herpesvirus Genes in QT35, a Quail Fibroblast Cell Line, by Herpesvirus of Turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Kaplan, S. L.; Wakenell, P.; Schat, K. A.

    2000-01-01

    The QT35 cell line was established from a methylcholanthrene-induced tumor in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) (C. Moscovici, M. G. Moscovici, H. Jimenez, M. M. Lai, M. J. Hayman, and P. K. Vogt, Cell 11:95–103, 1977). Two independently maintained sublines of QT35 were found to be positive for Marek's disease virus (MDV)-like genes by Southern blotting and PCR assays. Sequence analysis of fragments of the ICP4, ICP22, ICP27, VP16, meq, pp14, pp38, open reading frame (ORF) L1, and glycoprotein B (gB) genes showed a strong homology with the corresponding fragments of MDV genes. Subsequently, a serotype 1 MDV-like herpesvirus, tentatively name QMDV, was rescued from QT35 cells in chicken kidney cell (CKC) cultures established from 6- to 9-day-old chicks inoculated at 8 days of embryonation with QT35 cells. Transmission electron microscopy failed to show herpesvirus particles in QT35 cells, but typical intranuclear herpesvirus particles were detected in CKCs. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that the following QMDV transcripts were present in QT35 cells: sense and antisense meq, ORF L1, ICP4, and latency-associated transcripts, which are antisense to ICP4. A transcript of approximately 4.5 kb was detected by Northern blotting using total RNA from QT35 cells. Inoculation of QT35 cells with herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT)-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) but not with uninfected CEF resulted in the activation of ICP22, ICP27, VP16, pp38, and gB. In addition, the level of ICP4 mRNA was increased compared to that in QT35 cells. The activation by HVT resulted in the production of pp38 protein. It was not possible to detect if the other activated genes were translated due to the lack of serotype 1-specific monoclonal antibodies. PMID:11024146

  2. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

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    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11 is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR. Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G, and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus.

  3. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  4. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keypour, Maryam; Arman, Soroor; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member. METHODS: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old) with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report), General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28) and Family Assessment Device (FAD), conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0). RESULTS: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40%) and conduct problem (33.3%). There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers’ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms) before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms) in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention). CONCLUSIONS: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS. PMID:22091302

  5. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keypour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report, General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28 and Family Assessment Device (FAD, conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0. Results: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40% and conduct problem (33.3%. There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001. There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers′ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention. Conclusions: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  6. Genomic DNA copy-number alterations of the let-7 family in human cancers.

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    Yanling Wang

    Full Text Available In human cancer, expression of the let-7 family is significantly reduced, and this is associated with shorter survival times in patients. However, the mechanisms leading to let-7 downregulation in cancer are still largely unclear. Since an alteration in copy-number is one of the causes of gene deregulation in cancer, we examined copy number alterations of the let-7 family in 2,969 cancer specimens from a high-resolution SNP array dataset. We found that there was a reduction in the copy number of let-7 genes in a cancer-type specific manner. Importantly, focal deletion of four let-7 family members was found in three cancer types: medulloblastoma (let-7a-2 and let-7e, breast cancer (let-7a-2, and ovarian cancer (let-7a-3/let-7b. For example, the genomic locus harboring let-7a-3/let-7b was deleted in 44% of the specimens from ovarian cancer patients. We also found a positive correlation between the copy number of let-7b and mature let-7b expression in ovarian cancer. Finally, we showed that restoration of let-7b expression dramatically reduced ovarian tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that copy number deletion is an important mechanism leading to the downregulation of expression of specific let-7 family members in medulloblastoma, breast, and ovarian cancers. Restoration of let-7 expression in tumor cells could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Glenna F.; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry.

  8. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Glenna F; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry.

  9. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  10. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  11. Relationship between incidence of multiple human herpesviruses in saliva and CD4 lymphocyte count from HIV type-infected persons%HIV感染者唾液人类疱疹病毒感染与CD4淋巴细胞的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李承文; 史会萍; 祁燕伟; 李榕; 夏志刚; 白劲松; 段开文

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨HIV感染者唾液常见人类疱疹病毒感染情况及其与CD4淋巴细胞计数的关系.方法 利用PCR方法对245例HIV感染者唾液疱疹病毒1~4型即HSV-1、HSV-2、VZV和EBV DNA的存在情况进行检测,并分析检出率与CD4细胞的关系.结果 HIV感染者唾液HSV-1、HSV-2、VZV和EBV检出率分别为29%、3.3%、4.1%和82%.CD4淋巴细胞计数小于200个/μl时患者的唾液中更容易检测到HSV-1、VZV和EBV.CD4淋巴细胞计数与HSV-1和EBV同时存在明显相关(P=0.0001).CD4淋巴细胞计数低于200个/μl的患者比CD4淋巴细胞计数大于400个/μl的患者唾液中同时检测到HSV-1和EBV的几率高,即CD4淋巴细胞计数越低,多种疱疹病毒同时检出几率越高.结论 HIV感染者唾液中人类疱疹病毒1型和4型检出率高,与免疫指标CD4有关.%OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV and EBV in the saliva of human immunodeficiency virus type (HIV) -infected persons, and their correlation with CD4 lymphocyte count. METHODS Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR was used to investigate the presence of salivary HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV and EBV from 245 HIV-seropositive individuals from The Third Affiliated Hospital, Kunming Medical University. CD4 lymphocyte count were also collected. Relationship between incidences of these human herpesviruses and CD4 count was analyzed. RESULTS In the HIV-seropositive person, the most prevalent viral DNA was EBV 82.0% (201/245) , followed by HSV-1 29.0% (71/245), VZV 4.1% (10/245), and HSV-2 3.3% (8/245). When CD4 lymphocyte count less than 200/μl, the saliva of patients more easily detected HSV-1, VZV and EBV. CD4 lymphocyte count and HSV-1 and EBV presence had significantly negative correlated (P = 0.000 1). The detection rate of HSV-1 and EBV in saliva in the group of CD4 lymphocyte count below 200/μl simultaneously was higher than CD4 lymphocyte count over 400/μl. CD4 lymphocyte count

  12. Comprehensive Serology Based on a Peptide ELISA to Assess the Prevalence of Closely Related Equine Herpesviruses in Zoo and Wild Animals.

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    Azza Abdelgawad

    Full Text Available Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes respiratory disorders and abortion in equids while EHV-1 regularly causes equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM, a stroke-like syndrome following endothelial cell infection in horses. Both EHV-1 and EHV-9 infections of non-definitive hosts often result in neuronal infection and high case fatality rates. Hence, EHV-1 and EHV-9 are somewhat unusual herpesviruses and lack strict host specificity, and the true extent of their host ranges have remained unclear. In order to determine the seroprevalence of EHV-1 and EHV-9, a sensitive and specific peptide-based ELISA was developed and applied to 428 sera from captive and wild animals representing 30 species in 12 families and five orders. Members of the Equidae, Rhinocerotidae and Bovidae were serologically positive for EHV-1 and EHV-9. The prevalence of EHV-1 in the sampled wild zebra populations was significantly higher than in zoos suggesting captivity may reduce exposure to EHV-1. Furthermore, the seroprevalence for EHV-1 was significantly higher than for EHV-9 in zebras. In contrast, EHV-9 antibody prevalence was high in captive and wild African rhinoceros species suggesting that they may serve as a reservoir or natural host for EHV-9. Thus, EHV-1 and EHV-9 have a broad host range favoring African herbivores and may have acquired novel natural hosts in ecosystems where wild equids are common and are in close contact with other perissodactyls.

  13. Human brain factor 1, a new member of the fork head gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.B.; Wiese, S.; Burfeind, P. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of cDNA clones that cross-hybridized with the fork head domain of the rat HNF-3 gene family revealed 10 cDNAs from human fetal brain and human testis cDNA libraries containing this highly conserved DNA-binding domain. Three of these cDNAs (HFK1, HFK2, and HFK3) were further analyzed. The cDNA HFK1 has a length of 2557 nucleotides and shows strong homology at the nucleotide level (91.2%) to brain factor 1 (BF-1) from rat. The HFK1 cDNA codes for a putative 476 amino acid protein. The homology to BF-1 from rat in the coding region at the amino acid level is 87.5%. The fork head homologous region includes 111 amino acids starting at amino acid 160 and has a 97.5% homology to BF-1. Southern hybridization revealed that HFK1 is highly conserved among mammalian species and possibly birds. Northern analysis with total RNA from human tissues and poly(A)-rich RNA from mouse revealed a 3.2-kb transcript that is present in human and mouse fetal brain and in adult mouse brain. In situ hybridization with sections of mouse embryo and human fetal brain reveals that HFK1 expression is restricted to the neuronal cells in the telencepthalon, with strong expression being observed in the developing dentate gyrus and hippocampus. HFK1 was chromosomally localized by in situ hybridization to 14q12. The cDNA clones HFK2 and HFK3 were analyzed by restriction analysis and sequencing. HFK2 and HFK3 were found to be closely related but different from HFK1. Therefore, it would appear that HFK1, HFK2, HFK3, and BF-1 form a new fork head related subfamily. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Profile of Exosomal and Intracellular microRNA in Gamma-Herpesvirus-Infected Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Shiho; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hamada, Hiromichi; Kuroda, Makoto; Katano, Harutaka

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles released from cells, into which microRNAs (miRNA) are specifically sorted and accumulated. Two gamma-herpesviruses, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein—Barr virus (EBV), encode miRNAs in their genomes and express virus-encoded miRNAs in cells and exosomes. However, there is little information about the detailed distribution of virus-encoded miRNAs in cells and exosomes. In this study, we thus identified virus- and host-encoded miRNAs in exosomes released from KSHV- or EBV-infected lymphoma cell lines and compared them with intracellular miRNAs using a next-generation sequencer. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that 48% of the annotated miRNAs in the exosomes from KSHV-infected cells originated from KSHV. Human mir-10b-5p and mir-143-3p were much more highly concentrated in exosomes than in cells. Exosomes contained more nonexact mature miRNAs that did not exactly match those in miRBase than cells. Among the KSHV-encoded miRNAs, miRK12-3-5p was the most abundant exact mature miRNA in both cells and exosomes that exactly matched those in miRBase. Recently identified EXOmotifs, nucleotide motifs that control the loading of miRNAs into exosomes were frequently found within the sequences of KSHV-encoded miRNAs, and the presence of the EXOmotif CCCT or CCCG was associated with the localization of miRNA in exosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These observations suggest that specific virus-encoded miRNAs are sorted by EXOmotifs and accumulate in exosomes in virus-infected cells. PMID:27611973

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in Brazil

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    S. Ramos-da-Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS became a critical health issue with the emergence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in the 1980s. Four clinical-epidemiological forms of KS have been described: classical KS, endemic KS, iatrogenic KS, and AIDS-associated KS. In 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus type 8 was identified by Chang and colleagues, and has been detected worldwide at frequencies ranging from 80 to 100%. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of KSHV infection in KS lesions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Brazil, as well as to review the current knowledge about KS transmission and detection. For these purposes, DNA from 51 cases of KS was assessed by PCR: 20 (39.2% cases of classical KS, 29 (56.9% of AIDS-associated KS and 2 (3.9% of iatrogenic KS. Most patients were males (7.5:1, M/F, and mean age was 47.9 years (SD = ± 18.7 years. As expected, HIV-positive KS patients were younger than patients with classical KS. On the other hand, patients with AIDS-associated KS have early lesions (patch and plaque compared to classical KS patients (predominantly nodular lesions. This is assumed to be the result of the early diagnose of KS in the HIV-positive setting. KSHV infection was detected by PCR in almost all cases (48/51; 94.1%, irrespectively of the clinical-epidemiological form of KS. These results show that KSHV is associated with all forms of KS in Brazilian patients, a fact that supports the role of this virus in KS pathogenesis.

  16. Modulation of immune system by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus:Lessons from viral evasion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Ra eLee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, a member of the herpesvirus family, has evolved to establish a long-term, latent infection of cells such that while they carry the viral genome gene expression is highly restricted. Latency is a state of cryptic viral infection associated with genomic persistence in their host and this hallmark of KSHV infection leads to several clinical-epidemiological diseases such as Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castelman’s disease (MCD, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL upon immune suppression of infected hosts. In order to sustain an efficient life-long persistency as well as their life cycle, KSHV dedicates a large portion of its genome to encode immunomodulatory proteins that antagonize its host’s immune system. In this review, we will describe our current knowledge of the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV at distinct stages of its viral life cycle to control the host’s immune system.

  17. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and its relationship with herpesvirus in Indian subjects with chronic periodontitis: A cross-sectional study

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    Vinayak M Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen that is commonly harbored in the dental plaque of humans. The aim of this study was to look into the prevalence of P. gingivalis and its association with herpesvirus in Indian subjects. This is probably the first study on the association of this bacterium with herpesvirus in Indians. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consists of 200 subjects, with 100 subjects each in the healthy group and the chronic periodontitis (CP group. Upon plaque collection, one portion of the samples was immediately plated, on culture media that is selective for P. gingivalis. Total colony-forming units (CFU/mL from each plate was recorded. The remaining plaque sample was subjected to DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed using specific primers for Cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV. The data are analyzed using the chi-square test, Spearman's rho correlation coefficient, and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: P. gingivalis was detected in 66% of the subjects with CP and in 40% in the healthy group, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.00023. The correlation of clinical parameters with P. gingivalis showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that higher levels of clinical parameters were associated with higher CFUs of P. gingivalis in culture. The comparison of the presence of P. gingivalis between herpesvirus-negative and -positive cases showed that CMV-positive cases had significantly higher levels of this bacterium. Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the earlier finding of P. gingivalis presence in significantly higher levels in CP subjects and in CMV-positive sites. In addition, there was a positive association of the bacterium with clinical parameters.

  18. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program

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    Everton Faccini Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. METHOD: we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. RESULTS: virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. CONCLUSION: in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types.

  19. Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Human Erythrocytes Involves PATMK, a Member of the Transmembrane Kinase Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMKΔ932). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMKΔ932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection. PMID:18208324

  20. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R Boettner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK, was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932. Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  1. Psychological problems of families and health workers dealing with people infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, M

    1991-03-01

    The psychological problems of the families of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected people, and of the health workers taking care of them, have been addressed in a few empirical studies and in several anecdotal reports and theoretical contributions. Apparently, HIV-1 infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are able to elicit a wide range of emotional reactions, from rejection and refusal to provide care to immersion in the infected person's needs and burnout. Since irrational fears and attitudes play an important role in conditioning these reactions, education may not be sufficient to change behaviour. Counselling sessions and mutual support groups are often the most appropriate contexts where fears and concerns can receive an individually tailored response, and where formal and informal caregivers can be helped to manage stress.

  2. Familial Alzheimer's disease: genetic analysis related to disease heterogeneity, Down syndrome and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, M B; Rapoport, S I

    1989-01-01

    Etiologically heterogeneous subgroups of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exist and need to be distinguished so as to better identify genetic causes of familial cases. Furthermore, the presence of AD neuropathology in Down syndrome (trisomy 21) subjects older than 35 years suggests that AD in some cases is caused by dysregulation of expression of genes on chromosome 21. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in life, and the distribution of AD neuropathology in the post-mortem brain, indicate that AD involves the association neocortices and subcortical regions with which they evolved during evolution of the human brain. Accordingly, understanding the molecular basis of this evolution should elucidate the genetic basis of AD, whereas knowing the genetics of AD should be informative about the genomic changes which promoted brain evolution.

  3. The selective footprints of viral pressures at the human RIG-I-like receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Estelle; Patin, Etienne; Laval, Guillaume; Pajon, Sandra; Fornarino, Simona; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2011-11-15

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs)--RIG-I, IFIH1 (or MDA5) and LGP2--are thought to be key actors in the innate immune system, as they play a major role in sensing RNA viruses in the cytosol of host cells. Despite the increasingly recognized importance of the RLR family in antiviral immunity, no population genetic studies have yet attempted to compare the evolutionary history of its different members in humans. Here, we characterized the levels of naturally occurring genetic variation in the RLRs in a panel of individuals of different ethnic origins, to assess to what extent natural selection has acted on this family of microbial sensors. Our results show that amino acid-altering variation at RIG-I, particularly in the helicase domain, has been under stronger evolutionary constraint than that at IFIH1 and LGP2, reflecting an important role for RIG-I in sensing numerous RNA viruses and/or functional constraints related to the binding of viral substrates. Such evolutionary constraints have been much more relaxed at IFIH1 and LGP2, which appear to have evolved adaptively in specific human populations. Notably, we identified several mutations showing signatures of positive selection, including two non-synonymous polymorphisms in IFIH1 (R460H and R843H) and one in LGP2 (Q425R), suggesting a selective advantage related to the sensing of RNA viruses by IFIH and to the regulatory functions of LGP2. In light of the fact that some of these mutations have been associated with altered risks of developing autoimmune disorders, our study provides an additional example of the evolutionary conflict between infection and autoimmunity.

  4. Identification through bioinformatics of cDNAs encoding human thymic shared Ag-1/stem cell Ag-2. A new member of the human Ly-6 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, M C; Gorman, D M; Ching, E P; Zlotnik, A

    1996-08-01

    The Ly-6 family of cell surface molecules includes many members that have been characterized in the mouse. Until recently, very few Ly-6 family members had been described in the human. A significant development with important implications for novel gene discovery has been the growth of the public Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database. Here we report that, through the application of bioinformatics analysis to the dbEST database, we obtained the sequence of human TSA-1/SCA-2, a new member of the human Ly-6 family. In addition, we identified full-length clones encoding this molecule as well as expression data in various tissues. Sequencing of the clones identified this way confirmed the sequence predicted through bioinformatics. This study constitutes an example of the application of bioinformatics to the analysis of the recently expanded databases for the identification of genes of potential importance in the immune system.

  5. Seeing the other through the screen: movies, humanization of medical education and Family and Community Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo de Araújo Porto Landsberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented technological development observed in the last century and beginning of this one has expanded the horizons of the medical science exponentially, making the content to be envisaged by the colleges practically unfeasible. The incorporation of this knowledge in the curricula took place in detriment to human sciences, formerly included as a routine in the schools of medicine all over the world. Negligence of the humanization of medical education may keep from endowing future physicians with the affective resources necessary to the establishment of a satisfactory physical-patient relationship. This study proposes evaluating the use of motion pictures in the humanization of the way graduates see patients, providing them with capability and empathy toward their patients. Three documentaries that correlate indirectly with themes relative to Family and Community Medicine were selected: worker’s mental and community health. After screening to small groups of students, there was a multidisciplinary discussion covering all the several themes relevant to the medical practice. Finally, questionnaires were applied where the students evaluated the importance of the experience in their education, as well as replied to questions about their contact with arts and personal interests. All the students considered the level of correlation of the motion pictures chosen as a good or excellent medical practice. Questioned on the relevance of the themes covered in their education, 94,1% of them answered good or fine. The same percentage considered the curricular inclusion of methodology also good or fine. It was observed that the students evaluated read less than the national average, and a considerable amount of them is not interested in or has never been to a theater, an art exposition or a dance show. The movies, however, proved to be very popular - confirming its potential as a humanizing teaching resource.

  6. Infection of capuchin monkeys (Cebus albifrons) with Herpesvirus saimiri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, H; Pearson, G R; Wallen, W C; Neubauer, R H; Cicmanec, J L; Orr, T W

    1975-03-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) induced persistent, clinically inapparent infections of long-term duration in capuchin monkeys (Cebus albifrons). The infections were characterized by development of antibody to HVS-associated antigens and recovery of low levels of virus-genome-carrying lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Peripheral lymphocyte counts remained in low-normal to normal ranges and no physical signs of lymphoma were evident. Prednisolone treatment caused immunosuppression in one monkey; this was accompanied by a progressive loss of humoral antibody to HVS-associated antigens, but neoplastic disease did not develop.

  7. Cryo-gamma radiation inactivation of bovine herpesvirus type-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiorgi, C. Fernández; Smolko, E. E.; Lombardo, J. H.

    1999-07-01

    The radioresistance of bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), commonly known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), suspended in free serum Glasgow-MEM medium and frozen at -78°C was studied. The number of surviving virus at a given dose of gamma-radiation was determined by a plaque assay system. D 10 values were calculated before and after removal of cell debris. The D 10 values obtained were 4.72 kGy and 7.31 kGy before and after removal of cell debris, respectively. Our results indicate that the inactivated viral particles could be used for vaccine preparation or diagnostic reagents.

  8. Identification and Function of MicroRNAs Encoded by Herpesviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qing Bai; Xiu-fen Lei; Lin-ding Wang; Shou-jiang Gao

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in eukaryotes,plants and some viruses.It is increasingly clear that miRNAs-encoded by viruses can affect the viral life cycle and host physiology.Viral miRNAs could repress the innate and adaptive host immunity,modulate cellular signaling pathways,and regulate the expression of cellular and viral genes.These functions facilitate viral acute and persistent infections,and have profound effects on the host cell survival and disease progression.Here,we discuss the miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses,and their regulatory roles involved in virus-host interactions.

  9. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  10. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  11. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  12. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

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    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  13. [Community center for human development: program for African-Colombian families based on the participatory action research approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Zorza, Yenny M; Velasquez-Gutierrez, Vilma F

    2016-01-01

    To describe the process of construction of a program of Primary Health Care (PHC) for African-Colombian families in Guapi, Cauca. Participatory action research (PAR). The PHC program is a collective construction between the IAP Group and the Commission for Support and Follow-up (CAS), carried out in four phases: 1. Field preparation; 2. Approximation to the universe of the African-Colombian families of Guapi; 3. Building the program "Center for Human Development: with strength, joy and love we go 'pa'lante' families"; and 4. Evaluation and socialization of results. The collective construction of the program was conducted from the perspective of PHC, PAR and the cultural context, where the experts are the community, health professionals and institutions who have the ability to examine, reflect and participate in the transformation of reality based on their everyday life and view of the world. The starting point involves planning, developing and evaluating actions in healthy environments, relating not only to the physical space, but also to the work with families and community, taking into account needs, perceptions, beliefs, and actions towards health. The "Human Development Center Community" program allows a process of community participation towards achieving healthy environments to improve the health of the African-Colombian population, through the active participation of families, community, institutions and health professionals who, based on reality and knowledge exchange, generate actions directed to health of the large families of Guapi.

  14. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-08-16

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research.

  15. Participatory Assessment of a Matched Savings Program for Human Trafficking Survivors and their Family Members in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cordisco Tsai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of human trafficking often experience considerable financial difficulties upon exiting human trafficking, including pressure to provide financially for their families, challenges securing employment, lack of savings, and familial debt. Few evaluations have been conducted of reintegration support interventions addressing financial vulnerability among trafficking survivors. In this article, we present findings from a participatory assessment of the BARUG program, a matched savings and financial capability program for survivors of human trafficking and their family members in the Philippines. Photovoice was used to understand the experiences of two cohorts of BARUG participants. Survivors collaborated with research team members in conducting thematic analysis of transcripts from the photovoice sessions. Themes included: the positive emotional impact of financial wellness, overcoming the challenges of saving, applying financial management skills in daily decision making, developing a habit of savings, building a future-oriented mindset, receiving guidance and enlightenment, the learning process, and the change process. Findings reinforce the importance of interventions to support trafficked persons and their family members in getting out of debt and accumulating emergency savings, while also providing emotional support to survivors in coping with family financial pressures. The study also highlights the value of using participatory research methods to understand the experiences of trafficked persons. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1702116

  16. Oncogenic intra-p53 family member interactions in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFerraiuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene family members p53, p73 and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologues but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73 and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic gain of function (GOF activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53 with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor (VDR, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response (DDR, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs response, enhanced invasion and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild type p53 (wt-p53 protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73 and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers.

  17. Detection of bovine herpesvirus 2 and bovine herpesvirus 4 DNA in trigeminal ganglia of naturally infected cattle by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F S; Franco, A C; Oliveira, M T; Firpo, R; Strelczuk, G; Fontoura, F E; Kulmann, M I R; Maidana, S; Romera, S A; Spilki, F R; Silva, A D; Hübner, S O; Roehe, P M

    2014-06-25

    Establishment of latent infection within specific tissues in the host is a common biological feature of the herpesviruses. In the case of bovine herpesvirus 2 (BoHV-2), latency is established in neuronal tissues, while bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) latent virus targets on cells of the monocytic lineage. This study was conducted in quest of BoHV-2, BoHV-4 and OvHV-2 DNA in two hundred trigeminal ganglia (TG) specimens, derived from one hundred clinically healthy cattle, majority of them naturally infected with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5). Total DNA extracted from ganglia was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) designed to amplify part of the genes coding for BoHV-2, and BoHV-4 glycoprotein B and, for OvHV-2, the gene coding for phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthase-like protein. BoHV-2 DNA was detected in TG samples of two (2%) and BoHV-4 DNA in nine (9%) of the animals, whereas OvHV-2 DNA could not be detected in any of the TG DNA. The two animals in which BoHV-2 DNA was identified were also co-infected with BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. Within the nine animals in which BoHV-4 DNA was detected, six were also co-infected with BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. This report provides for the first time evidence that viral DNA from BoHV-2 and BoHV-4 can be occasionally detected in TG of naturally infected cattle. Likewise, in this report we provided for the first time evidence that the co-infection of cattle with three distinct bovine herpesviruses might be a naturally occurring phenomenon.

  18. Molecular characterization of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 Indonesian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharam Saepulloh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Different subtypes of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1 have been associated with different clinical conditions of cattle. For that reason subtypes differentiation has become an essential tool for understanding the pathogenesis and epidemiology of BHV infections. In search for a genomic region that would allow a clear distinction between BHV-1.1 and BHV-1.2 of glycoprotein D (gD genes of 8 Indonesian isolates were amplified and sequenced. The amino acid sequence alignments revealed that the levels of genomic similarity ranging from 98.8 to 100% among BHV-1 Indonesian isolates and its results were also similar between BHV-1 Indonesia isolates and BHV-1.1 reference, and 98.4 to 98.8% between BHV-1 Indonesian isolates and BHV-1.2 reference. The isolates could be clearly separated into BHV-1.1 and BHV-1.2 after phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that the Indonesian isolates were characterized as BHV-1.1 as agent caused respiratory tract infections in cattle or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR disease. The results suggest that the phylogenetic analysis performed here can be used as a potential molecular epidemiological tool for herpesviruses.

  19. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  20. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  1. Regulation and autoregulation of the promoter for the latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Joseph H; Orvis, Joshua; Kim, Jong Wook; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Renne, Rolf; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2004-04-16

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 has been established as the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and certain AIDS-associated lymphomas. KSHV establishes latent infection in these tumors, invariably expressing high levels of the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein. LANA is necessary and sufficient to maintain the KSHV episome. It also modulates viral and cellular transcription and has been implicated directly in oncogenesis because of its ability to bind to the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor proteins. Previously, we identified the LANA promoter (LANAp) and showed that it was positively regulated by LANA itself. Here, we present a detailed mutational analysis and define cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors for the core LANAp. We found that a downstream promoter element, TATA box, and GC box/Sp1 site at -29 are all individually required for activity. This architecture places LANAp into the small and unusual group of eukaryotic promoters that contain both the downstream promoter element and TATA element but lack a defined initiation site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LANA regulates its own promoter via its C-terminal domain and does bind to a defined site within the core promoter.

  2. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function ...

  3. Enterovirus and herpesviridae family as etiologic agents of lymphomonocytary meningitis, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luine Rosele Renaud Vidal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Viral meningitis is a common infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS that occurs worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the etiologic agent of lymphomonocytary meningitis in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. During the period of July 2005 to December 2006, 460 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples with lymphomonocytary meningitis were analyzed by PCR methodologies. Fifty nine (12.8% samples were positive. Enteroviruses was present in 49 (83% samples and herpes virus family in 10 (17%, of these 6 (10% herpes simplex virus, 1 (2% Epstein Barr virus, 2 (3% human herpes virus type 6 and 1 (2% mixed infection of enterovirus and Epstein Barr virus. As conclusion enterovirus was the most frequent virus, with circulation during summer and was observed with higher frequency between 4 to 17 years of age. PCR methodology is an important method for rapid detection of RNA enterovirus and DNA herpesvirus in CSF.

  4. Enterovirus and herpesviridae family as etiologic agents of lymphomonocytary meningitis, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Luine Rosele Renaud; Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de; Messias-Reason, Iara José de; Nogueira, Meri Bordignon; Debur, Maria do Carmo; Pessa, Luís Felipe Cavalli; Pereira, Luciane Aparecida; Rotta, Indianara; Takahashi, Gislene Reche de Almeida; Silveira, Clyete Santos da; Araújo, Josianne Maria Reimann; Raboni, Sonia Mara

    2011-06-01

    Viral meningitis is a common infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that occurs worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the etiologic agent of lymphomonocytary meningitis in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. During the period of July 2005 to December 2006, 460 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples with lymphomonocytary meningitis were analyzed by PCR methodologies. Fifty nine (12.8%) samples were positive. Enteroviruses was present in 49 (83%) samples and herpes virus family in 10 (17%), of these 6 (10%) herpes simplex virus, 1 (2%) Epstein Barr virus, 2 (3%) human herpes virus type 6 and 1 (2%) mixed infection of enterovirus and Epstein Barr virus. As conclusion enterovirus was the most frequent virus, with circulation during summer and was observed with higher frequency between 4 to 17 years of age. PCR methodology is an important method for rapid detection of RNA enterovirus and DNA herpesvirus in CSF.

  5. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin

    2011-01-01

    -coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also...

  6. Human tolerogenic dendritic cells produce IL-35 in the absence of other IL-12 family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Karen O; van der Kooij, Sandra W; Vignali, Dario A A; van Kooten, Cees

    2015-06-01

    IL-35 is a cytokine of the IL-12 family, existing as a heterodimer of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. IL-35 has anti-inflammatory properties and is produced by regulatory T cells in humans and mice, where it is required for optimal suppression of immune responses. Distinct from other IL-12 cytokines, the expression of IL-35 has not been described in antigen-presenting cells. In view of the immune-regulatory properties of IL-35, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of IL-12p35 and Ebi3 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs). These tolDCs do not produce IL-12p70 or the homodimer IL-12p40. We demonstrate that tolDCs completely lack transcriptional expression of IL-12p40. However, tolDCs maintain mRNA expression of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. Using intracellular flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, we show that tolDCs produce Ebi3 and IL-12p35, and both can be enhanced upon stimulation with IFN-γ, LPS, or CD40L. tolDCs supernatants have the capacity to suppress T-cell activation. Using IL12A silencing, we demonstrate that IL-12p35 is required for tolDCs to reach their full suppressive potential. Taken together, our results indicate that tolDCs produce IL-35, providing an additional novel mechanism by which tolDCs elicit their tolerogenic potential.

  7. Antiviral Mechanism and biochemical basis of the human APOBEC3 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi eImahashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The human APOBEC3 (A3 family (A, B, C, DE, F, G, and H comprises host defense factors that potently inhibit the replication of diverse retroviruses, retrotransposons, and the other viral pathogens. HIV-1 has a counterstrategy that includes expressing the Vif protein to abrogate A3 antiviral function. Without Vif, A3 proteins, particularly APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F, inhibit HIV-1 replication by blocking reverse transcription and/or integration and hypermutating nascent viral cDNA. The molecular mechanisms of this antiviral activity have been primarily attributed to two biochemical characteristics common to A3 proteins: catalyzing cytidine deamination in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA and a nucleic acid-binding capability that is specific to ssDNA or ssRNA. Recent advances suggest that unique property of A3G dimer/oligomer formations, is also important for the modification of antiviral activity. In this review article we summarize how A3 proteins, particularly A3G, inhibit viral replication based on the biochemical and structural characteristics of the A3G protein.

  8. Prognostic Significance of Apoptosis Related Gene Family bcl-2 in Human Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the prognostic effect of bcl-2 oncogene and its gene family members bax, bcl-x expression in breast cancer patients. Methods: expression of bcl-2, bax proteins in 91 human breast cancer tissue sections were studied by immunohistochemical method. Bcl-x1 mRNA expression in frozen tissues from 16 breast cancer patients were detected using Northern blot method. Results: bcl-2 protein positivity was found in 60/91 (65.9%) patients, and bax positivity 59/91 (64.8%). Bcl-2 and bax expression levels were associated with apoptotic index(AI), histological grade, axillary lymph node metastasis, postoperative local recurrence and metastasis. Bcl-2 expression was related to ER positivity. In univariate analysis for disease free survival (DFS), bcl-2 and bax protein levels, and Al were all found to have prognostic value. The result of Cox's model multivariate analysis showed that bcl-2 protein level was an independent prognostic factor. In 16 frozen breast cancer tissues, 8/16(50%) had higher level of bcl-x1 mRNA, which showed correlation with bcl-2 protein expression and axillary lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: The findings indicate that dysregulated expressions of bcl-2, bax and bcl-x1 apoptosis-related genes, suggestive of serious deregulation of apoptotic process, may contribute to the biologic aggressiveness of breast cancer. Bcl-2 protein is an independent indicator of prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  9. Molecular basis of human transcobalamin II deficiency in an affected family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N.; Seetharam, S.; Seetharam, B. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease leading to cobalamin (Cbl, Vitamin B{sub 12}) deficiency. Patients with this disorder fail to absorb and transport Cbl across cellular membranes and develop Cbl deficiency, symptoms of which include failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, impaired immunodefence and neurological disorders. The molecular basis for this disease is not known. By means of Southern blotting and sequence analysis of TC II, cDNA amplified from fibroblasts of an affected child and his parents, we have identified two mutant TC II alleles. The maternally derived allele had a gross deletion, while the paternally derived allele had a 4-nucleotide ({sup 1023}TCTG) deletion which caused a reading frame shift and generation of a premature termination codon, 146 nucleotides downstream from the deletion. Both these deletions caused markedly reduced levels of TC II mRNA and protein. In addition, these two deletions were unique to this family and were not detected in four other unrelated TC II deficient patients who also exhibited the same (TC II protein/mRNA deficiency) phenotypes. Based on this study we suggest, (1) that the molecular defect in the most common form of human TC II deficiency (lack of immunoprecipitable plasma TC II) is heterogeneous and (2) these mutations cause TC II mRNA and protein deficiency leading to defective plasma transport of Cbl and the development of Cbl deficiency.

  10. Parasitological and Molecular Observations on a Little Family Outbreak of Human Fasciolosis Diagnosed in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Gabrielli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2010, three children who were born in a Romanian cattle farmer family went to Italy to join their mother. One of them was admitted to an Italian pediatric hospital for severe anemia that, when she was in her country, had been treated with blood transfusion. Blood tests and an abdominal ultrasound study triggered the suspicion of biliary parasitosis. The child underwent a cholangiopancreatography that caused the release of parasitic material microscopically identified as Fasciola hepatica. All children and their mother were submitted to coproparasitological analyses, which identified F. hepatica eggs only in the patient and in her twin sister. Parasitic materials recovered and flatworm specimens by us ad hoc obtained from Italian and Romanian cattle were genetically (ITS and COI genes analyzed, and their sequences were compared with those deposited in GenBank. Specimens from children clustered with the Romanian strain examined and showed remarkable genetic differences with flatworm specimens from Italy. Anamnesis, parasite biology, and genetic data strongly suggest that twin sisters became infected in Romania; however, human fasciolosis is an emerging sanitary problem, favored by climate changes and global drivers; therefore, it deserves more attention on behalf of physicians working in both developing and developed countries.

  11. Cholesterol-rich lipid rafts play an important role in the Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Graham; Adamek, Mikołaj; Proepsting, Marcus J; Ulrich, Reiner; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2015-09-30

    The Cyprinus herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a member of the new Alloherpesviridae virus family in the Herpesvirales order. CyHV-3 has been implicated in a large number of disease outbreaks in carp populations causing up to 100% mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the requirement of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in CyHV-3 entry and replication in carp cells. Plasma membrane cholesterol was depleted from common carp brain (CCB) cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Treated and non-treated cells were infected with CyHV-3 and virus binding and infection parameters were assessed using RT-qPCR, immunocytochemistry and virus titration. The effect of cholesterol reduction severely stunted virus entry in vitro, however after cholesterol replenishment virus entry and subsequent replication rates were similar to the control infection. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion did not significantly influence virus binding and the subsequent post-entry replication stage, however had an impact on virus egress. Comparative analysis of the lipid compositions of CyHV-3 and CCB membrane fractions revealed strong similarities between the lipid composition of the CyHV-3 and CCB lipid rafts. The results presented here show that cholesterol-rich lipid rafts are important for the CyHV-3 replication cycle especially during entry and egress.

  12. The Use of Fluorescence Microscopy to Study the Association Between Herpesviruses and Intrinsic Resistance Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. Everett

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic antiviral resistance is a branch of antiviral defence that involves constitutively expressed cellular proteins that act within individual infected cells. In recent years it has been discovered that components of cellular nuclear structures known as ND10 or PML nuclear bodies contribute to intrinsic resistance against a variety of viruses, notably of the herpesvirus family. Several ND10 components are rapidly recruited to sites that are closely associated with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes during the earliest stages of infection, and this property correlates with the efficiency of ND10 mediated restriction of HSV-1 replication. Similar but distinct recruitment of certain DNA damage response proteins also occurs during infection. These recruitment events are inhibited in a normal wild type HSV-1 infection by the viral regulatory protein ICP0. HSV‑1 mutants that do not express ICP0 are highly susceptible to repression through intrinsic resistance factors, but they replicate more efficiently in cells depleted of certain ND10 proteins or in which ND10 component recruitment is inefficient. This article presents the background to this recruitment phenomenon and summaries how it is conveniently studied by fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Herpesvirus-associated central and peripheral nervous system involvement: two clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Popova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses can directly affect the structure of the nervous system, resulting in encephalitis, and also induce immune-mediated disorders of the peripheral nervous system as sensory-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. Patients with immunodeficiency may simultaneously develop two pathological processes, determining the severity of the condition. Parainfectious limbic encephalitis (PILE associated with viruses from the family Herpes viridae is a form of chronic herpes encephalitis, which is characterized by dysfunction of the limbic system and by a long-term course with exacerbations. CIDP is a dysimmune disease leasing to peripheral nervous system involvement, which belongs to a class of myelinopathies. The paper describes two clinical cases of a concurrence of chronic PILE and CIDP in middle-aged men who have symptomatic status epilepticus and iatrogenic complications. It characterizes difficulties in diagnosis and the clinical features of chronic herpes infection involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. The given clinical cases suggest that not only neurologistsand epileptologists, but also resuscitation specialists and ngiosurgeons should be particularly alert to the pathology in question.

  14. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  15. Systemic herpesvirus and morbillivirus co-infection in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, S; González, B; Willoughby, K; Maley, M; Olvera, A; Kennedy, S; Marco, A; Domingo, M

    2012-01-01

    During 2007 a dolphin morbillivirus epizootic affected the western Mediterranean and several striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on the Catalonian coasts. One of those animals had severe lymphoid depletion, necrosis and syncytial formation in lymph nodes and spleen, with large basophilic nuclear inclusions compatible with herpesvirus detected by immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination. Non-suppurative encephalitis with associated morbillivirus antigen and morbillivirus antigen within alveolar macrophages were also observed. A pan-herpesvirus nested polymerase chain reaction amplified a sequence virtually identical to two cetacean herpesvirus sequences previously identified in systemic infections in an Atlantic Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) and in a Mediterranean striped dolphin. The herpesviral infection was probably secondary to the immunosuppression caused by the morbillivirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cetacean co-infected by dolphin morbillivirus and herpesvirus with evidence of lesions attributable to both viruses.

  16. Emydid herpesvirus 1 infection in northern map turtles (Graptemys geographica) and painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Newton, Alisa L; Seimon, Tracie A; Moore, Robert P; McAloose, Denise

    2015-05-01

    A captive, juvenile, female northern map turtle (Graptemys geographica) was found dead following a brief period of weakness and nasal discharge. Postmortem examination identified pneumonia with necrosis and numerous epithelial, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies, consistent with herpesviral pneumonia. Similar intranuclear inclusions were also associated with foci of hepatocellular and splenic necrosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of fresh, frozen liver for the herpesviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene yielded an amplicon with 99.2% similarity to recently described emydid herpesvirus 1 (EmyHV-1). Molecular screening of turtles housed in enclosures that shared a common circulation system with the affected map turtle identified 4 asymptomatic, EmyHV-1 PCR-positive painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and 1 asymptomatic northern map turtle. Herpesvirus transmission between painted and map turtles has been previously suggested, and our report provides the molecular characterization of a herpesvirus in asymptomatic painted turtles that can cause fatal herpesvirus-associated disease in northern map turtles.

  17. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes tumorigenesis by modulating the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Yu, F-X; Kim, Y C; Meng, Z; Naipauer, J; Looney, D J; Liu, X; Gutkind, J S; Mesri, E A; Guan, K-L

    2015-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus and the culprit behind the human disease Kaposi sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-defining malignancy. KSHV encodes a viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) critical for the initiation and progression of KS. In this study, we identified that YAP/TAZ, two homologous oncoproteins inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, are activated in KSHV-infected cells in vitro, KS-like mouse tumors and clinical human KS specimens. The KSHV-encoded vGPCR acts through Gq/11 and G12/13 to inhibit the Hippo pathway kinases Lats1/2, promoting the activation of YAP/TAZ. Furthermore, depletion of YAP/TAZ blocks vGPCR-induced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model. The vGPCR-transformed cells are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of YAP. Our study establishes a pivotal role of the Hippo pathway in mediating the oncogenic activity of KSHV and development of KS, and also suggests a potential of using YAP inhibitors for KS intervention.

  18. Cancer angiogenesis induced by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is mediated by EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meilan; Zhang, Wei; Bakken, Thomas; Schutten, Melissa; Toth, Zsolt; Jung, Jae U; Gill, Parkash; Cannon, Mark; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2012-07-15

    EZH2 is a component of the epigenetic regulator PRC2 that suppresses gene expression. Elevated expression of EZH2 is common in human cancers and is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we show that EZH2 elevation is associated with epigenetic modifications of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic virus that promotes the development of Kaposi sarcoma and other malignancies that occur in patients with chronic HIV infections. KSHV induction of EZH2 expression was essential for KSHV-induced angiogenesis. High expression of EZH2 was observed in Kaposi sarcoma tumors. In cell culture, latent KSHV infection upregulated the expression of EZH2 in human endothelial cells through the expression of vFLIP and LANA, two KSHV-latent genes that activate the NF-κB pathway. KSHV-mediated upregulation of EZH2 was required for the induction of Ephrin-B2, an essential proangiogenic factor that drives endothelial cell tubule formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that KSHV regulates the host epigenetic modifier EZH2 to promote angiogenesis.

  19. Role of the virion host shutoff protein in neurovirulence of monkey B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Darla; Ritchey, Jerry; Payton, Mark; Eberle, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Monkey B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1; BV) is noted for its extreme neurovirulence in humans. Since the vhs protein encoded by the UL41 gene has been shown to be a neurovirulence factor in the related human herpes simplex viruses, the role of the UL41 gene in BV neurovirulence was investigated. BV mutants were constructed that lacked the entire UL41 ORF (Δ41) or had the RNase active site mutated (Δ41A). Neither mutant shut off host protein synthesis, degraded β-actin mRNA, or prevented an IFN-β response, indicating that the vhs protein and its RNase activity are both necessary for these activities. Replication of both mutants in primary mouse cells was impaired and they exhibited a prolonged disease course in mice. Whereas Δ41 infected mice were euthanized for symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) infection, Δ41A infected mice were euthanized primarily for symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. While neuroinvasiveness was not affected, lesions in the CNS were more limited in size, anatomical distribution, and severity than for wild-type virus. These results indicate that the vhs protein affects the general replicative efficiency of BV in vivo rather than being a specific neurovirulence factor critical for invasion of or preferential replication in the CNS.

  20. Concurrent oral shedding of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, M J; Verstraete, F J M

    2003-04-01

    Oral mucosal salivary samples were collected from 25 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 24 cats with periodontal disease. Viral culture and isolation of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 were performed. Eighty-eight per cent of cats with chronic gingivostomatitis were shedding both viruses, compared to 21% of cats without chronic oral inflammatory disease. Cats with chronic gingivostomatitis are significantly more likely to concurrently shed both feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 than are cats with classical periodontal disease.

  1. Herpesvirus-associated central nervous system diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiqing Wu

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases, 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542 days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD was 6.3% ± 1.9% and 4.1% ± 1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19(+CD20(+ B cells (7/11 and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11 in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases.

  2. Amplification and characterization of herpesvirus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with acute encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A single pair of oligonucleotide primers selected within a highly conserved region of the DNA polymerase gene of the herpesviruses was designed to amplify related viral genomes, i.e., herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus, by the polymerase chain reaction. A simple restriction enzyme analysis of these amplified products allowed accurate characterization of the herpesvirus type. Ninety-nine cerebrospinal fluid samples from 36 patients...

  3. Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro Nuñez, Luis Alonso; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Rasmussen, Isabel; Zepeda Mendoza, Marie Lisandra; Olsen, Morten Tange; Gilbert, M. Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease characterized by cutaneous tumours that has been documented to infect all sea turtle species. Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV) is believed to be the aetiological agent of FP, based principally on consistent PCR-based detection of herpesvirus DNA sequences from FP tumours. We used a recently described PCR-based assay that targets 3 conserved CFPHV genes, to survey 208 green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This included...

  4. Herpesvirus in a captive Australian Krefft's river turtle (Emydura macquarii krefftii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, M L; Raidal, S R; Peters, A

    2015-01-01

    A mature, captive Krefft's river turtle (Emydura macquarii krefftii) was presented with severe proliferative and ulcerative lesions of the skin and shell. The areas were biopsied and histopathological examination demonstrated orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with keratinocytes containing eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions. Molecular diagnostics confirmed the presence of a herpesvirus in the affected tissues. This is the first recorded case of herpesvirus infection in an Australian freshwater turtle species. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Intrinsic and Innate Defenses of Neurons: Détente with the Herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, Lynn W; Leib, David A

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinvasive herpesviruses have evolved to efficiently infect and establish latency in neurons. The nervous system has limited capability to regenerate, so immune responses therein are carefully regulated to be nondestructive, with dependence on atypical intrinsic and innate defenses. In this article we review studies of some of these noncanonical defense pathways and how herpesvirus gene products counter them, highlighting the contributions that primary neuronal in vitro models have made to our understanding of this field. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. A heparan-dependent herpesvirus targets the olfactory neuroepithelium for host entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milho, Ricardo; Frederico, Bruno; Efstathiou, Stacey; Stevenson, Philip G

    2012-01-01

    Herpesviruses are ubiquitous pathogens that cause much disease. The difficulty of clearing their established infections makes host entry an important target for control. However, while herpesviruses have been studied extensively in vitro, how they cross differentiated mucus-covered epithelia in vivo is unclear. To establish general principles we tracked host entry by Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), a lymphotropic rhadinovirus related to the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Spontaneously acquired virions targeted the olfactory neuroepithelium. Like many herpesviruses, MuHV-4 binds to heparan sulfate (HS), and virions unable to bind HS showed poor host entry. While the respiratory epithelium expressed only basolateral HS and was bound poorly by incoming virions, the neuroepithelium also displayed HS on its apical neuronal cilia and was bound strongly. Incoming virions tracked down the neuronal cilia, and either infected neurons or reached the underlying microvilli of the adjacent glial (sustentacular) cells and infected them. Thus the olfactory neuroepithelium provides an important and complex site of HS-dependent herpesvirus uptake.

  7. Identification of a novel herpesvirus associated with a penile proliferative lesion in a beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellehumeur, Christian; Lair, Stéphane; Romero, Carlos H; Provost, Chantale; Nielsen, Ole; Gagnon, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    The carcass of an adult male beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) was found beach cast in 2008 on the shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary at Rivière-Ouelle, Quebec, Canada. The carcass was transported to the Faculté de médecine vétérinaire of the Université de Montréal for postmortem examination. Aspiration pneumonia was the probable cause of death. Necropsy revealed a focal papilloma-like penile lesion, characterized by focal mucosal thickening with disorganization of the epithelial layers and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. A pan-herpesvirus nested PCR assay on frozen tissue from the penile lesion was positive. The PCR product sequencing revealed a partial herpesvirus DNA polymerase (DPOL) gene sequence of 600 nucleotides. Its nearest nucleotide identity was with the partial DPOL gene of an alphaherpesvirus, bovine herpesvirus 5 (79.5% identity). It also shared high identity with several other marine mammal herpesviruses (50.2 to 77.3% identity). This new herpesvirus was tentatively named beluga whale herpesvirus (BWHV). Virus isolation was unsuccessful. The pathogenic potential of BWHV is unknown, but the evaluation of archived tissues suggests that the virus is endemic in the St. Lawrence Estuary beluga population.

  8. Feline herpesvirus 1-associated facial and nasal dermatitis and stomatitis in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, A M; Ginn, P E

    1999-11-01

    Feline herpesvirus-associated dermatitis has rarely been reported. Recently we documented a unique ulcerative and often persistent facial dermatitis or stomatitis syndrome associated with feline herpesvirus 1. We believe this syndrome is relatively common, with the 10 cases in our series diagnosed between 1996 and 1997. The syndrome is associated with epithelial cell necrosis, eosinophilic inflammation, and intraepithelial herpesvirus inclusion bodies. The prevalence of eosinophilic inflammation and low number of inclusion bodies may lead to the misdiagnosis of allergic dermatitis or a lesion within the eosinophilic granuloma complex group of disorders. Feline herpesvirus 1 can be identified in lesional tissue by PCR methodology. Most of our cases developed under circumstances suggesting reactivation of latent herpesvirus infection, and previous glucocorticoid therapy or stress from overcrowding may have played a role in lesion development. Cats with ulcerative dermatitis, especially of the face and nose, and cats with stomatitis should be evaluated for the presence of feline herpesvirus. Treatment options include surgical excision, topical or systemic antibiotic therapy to treat secondary bacterial infection, and oral alpha interferon.

  9. A heparan-dependent herpesvirus targets the olfactory neuroepithelium for host entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Milho

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are ubiquitous pathogens that cause much disease. The difficulty of clearing their established infections makes host entry an important target for control. However, while herpesviruses have been studied extensively in vitro, how they cross differentiated mucus-covered epithelia in vivo is unclear. To establish general principles we tracked host entry by Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4, a lymphotropic rhadinovirus related to the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Spontaneously acquired virions targeted the olfactory neuroepithelium. Like many herpesviruses, MuHV-4 binds to heparan sulfate (HS, and virions unable to bind HS showed poor host entry. While the respiratory epithelium expressed only basolateral HS and was bound poorly by incoming virions, the neuroepithelium also displayed HS on its apical neuronal cilia and was bound strongly. Incoming virions tracked down the neuronal cilia, and either infected neurons or reached the underlying microvilli of the adjacent glial (sustentacular cells and infected them. Thus the olfactory neuroepithelium provides an important and complex site of HS-dependent herpesvirus uptake.

  10. ASSISTED HUMAN REPRODUCTION EMPLOYED AS A MEANS FOR THE FORMATION OF HOMOAFFECTIVE FAMILIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Geala Geslaine; Faculdade Catuaí de Cambé; França, Loreanne Manuella Castro; Universidade Estadual de Londrina; Capelari, Rogério Sato; Faculdade Pitagoras

    2014-01-01

    The 1988 Brazilian Federal Constitution brought about a widening in the concept of the family due to the acknowledgement of new familial entities besides those produced by marriage. Henceforth the family has been defined as a plural institution based on dignity, equality and solidarity, aiming at affection, regardless of sexual choice. After the decision of the Supreme Federal Court in making equivalent the homoaffective stable union to heterosexual marriage, new rights have been guaranteed t...

  11. Central nervous system disease and genital disease in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are associated with different herpesviruses

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; AbstractHerpesvirus infection causes disease of variable severity in many species, including cetaceans. However, little is known about herpesvirus infection in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), despite being widespread in temperate coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, we examined harbor porpoises that stranded alive in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany between 2000 and 2014 for herpesvirus infection and associated disease. Porpoises that died o...

  12. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  13. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  14. Angiogenesis,Kaposi's Sarcoma and Kaposi's Sarcomaassociated Herpesvirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao KANG; Feng-chun Ye; Shou-jiang gao; Lin-ding WANG

    2008-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the uncontrolled growth of blood vessels in tumors,serving to supply nutrients and oxygen,and remove metabolic wastes.Kaposi's sarcoma (KS),a multifocal angioproliferative disorder characterized by spindle cell proliferation,neo-angiogenesis,inflammation,and edema,is associated with infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV).Recent studies indicate that KSHV infection directly promotes angiogenesis and inflammation through an autocrine and paracrine mechanism by inducing pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory cytokines.Many of these cytokines are also expressed in KS lesions,implicating a direct role of KSI-IV in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.Several KSHV genes are involved in KSHV-induced angiogenesis.These studies have provided insights into the pathogenesis of KS,and identified potential therapeutic targets for this malignancy.

  15. Equine herpesvirus-1 myeloencephalopathy: a review of recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; David Wilson, W; Madigan, John E; Ferraro, Gregory L

    2009-06-01

    Equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM), although a relatively uncommon manifestation of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) infection, can cause devastating losses on individual farms or boarding stables. Although outbreaks of EHM have been recognized for centuries in domestic horse populations, many aspects of this disease remained poorly characterized. In recent years, an improved understanding of EHM has emerged from experimental studies and from data collected during field outbreaks at riding schools, racetracks and veterinary hospitals throughout North America and Europe. These outbreaks have highlighted the contagious nature of EHV-1 and have prompted a re-evaluation of diagnostic procedures, treatment modalities, preventative measures and biosecurity protocols for the disease. This review concentrates on these and other selected, clinically relevant aspects of EHM.

  16. Mechanisms of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchun Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV consists of latent and lytic replication phases. During latent infection, only a limited number of KSHV genes are expressed. However, this phase of replication is essential for persistent infection, evasion of host immune response, and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. KSHV reactivation from latency produces a wide range of viral products and infectious virions. The resulting de novo infection and viral lytic products modulate diverse cellular pathways and stromal microenvironment, which promote the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. The mechanisms controlling KSHV latency and reactivation are complex, involving both viral and host factors, and are modulated by diverse environmental factors. Here, we review the cellular and molecular basis of KSHV latency and reactivation with a focus on the most recent advancements in the field.

  17. Esophagitis and enteritis caused by herpesvirus in pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egobol, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The pigeon squabs, aged 5-26 day-old, showed clinical signs of dullness, anorexia, indigestion, reten-tion of feed in crop, progressive emaciation then died. The morbidity rate and mortality rate were 7.14% (50/700. The adult pigeons did not show any signs of disease. From pathological finding, pharyngitis, esophagitis were found with diphtheritic membrane covering necrotic ulcers on the mucosa of pharynx, esophagus and crop. From histopathological findings, esophagitis with epithelial hyperplasia and sloughed, lamina propria mucosa edema with lymphoid cells infiltration were found in duodenum and jejunum. The intranuclear inclusion body, Cowdry type A, was found in epithelial mucosa of esophagus, enterocyte of jejunum and lymphoid cells in spleen. FA test to duck virus enteritis and inoculation to ducklings showed negative results. Electron microscopic study revealed electron dense core sized 146-167 nm., which was identified as herpesvirus.

  18. Herpesviruses and Intermediate Filaments: Close Encounters with the Third Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hertel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments (IF are essential to maintain cellular and nuclear integrity and shape, to manage organelle distribution and motility, to control the trafficking and pH of intracellular vesicles, to prevent stress-induced cell death, and to support the correct distribution of specific proteins. Because of this, IF are likely to be targeted by a variety of pathogens, and may act in favor or against infection progress. As many IF functions remain to be identified, however, little is currently known about these interactions. Herpesviruses can infect a wide variety of cell types, and are thus bound to encounter the different types of IF expressed in each tissue. The analysis of these interrelationships can yield precious insights into how IF proteins work, and into how viruses have evolved to exploit these functions. These interactions, either known or potential, will be the focus of this review.

  19. Melissa officinalis oil affects infectivity of enveloped herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, P; Schuhmacher, A; Astani, A; Reichling, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils of medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel drugs of antimicrobial and antiviral agents, since herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral agents. Melissa officinalis essential oil was phytochemically examined by GC-MS analysis, its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b and citronellal. The antiviral effect of lemon balm oil, the essential oil of Melissa officinalis, on herpes simplex virus was examined. The inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of balm oil for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at high dilutions of 0.0004% and 0.00008% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. At noncytotoxic concentrations of the oil,plaque formation was significantly reduced by 98.8% for HSV-1 and 97.2% for HSV-2, higher concentrations of lemon balm oil abolished viral infectivity nearly completely. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of this essential oil, time-on-addition assays were performed. Both herpesviruses were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with balm oil prior to infection of cells. These results indicate that Melissa oil affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, thus lemon balm oil is capable of exerting a direct antiviral effect on herpesviruses. Considering the lipophilic nature of lemon balm essential oil, which enables it to penetrate the skin, and a high selectivity index, Melissa officinalis oil might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections.

  20. Transmission of caprine herpesvirus 2 in domestic goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Keller, Janice; Knowles, Donald P; Taus, Naomi S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Crawford, Timothy B

    2005-04-25

    Caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2) is a recently recognized gammaherpesvirus that is endemic in domestic goats and has been observed to cause clinical malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in certain species of deer. In this study, transmission of CpHV-2 in goats was examined. A total of 30 kids born to a CpHV-2 positive goat herd were selected and divided into two groups: group 1 (n=16) remained in the positive herd; group 2 (n=14) was separated from the herd at 1 week of age after obtaining colostrum. Peripheral blood samples from each kid were examined regularly by competitive ELISA for MCF viral antibody and by PCR for CpHV-2 DNA. Fifteen out of 16 goats (94%) that remained with the positive herd seroconverted and became PCR-positive for CpHV-2 by 10 months of age. In contrast, all kids (100%) that were separated from the positive herd at 1 week of age remained negative until termination of the experiment at 1 year of age. Additional transmission experiments revealed that all CpHV-2-free adult goats were susceptible to CpHV-2 or ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) infection. The data indicate that the transmission pattern of CpHV-2 in goats is similar to the pattern of OvHV-2 in sheep and that CpHV-2-free goats can be established by early separation of kids from positive herds, which has significant implications for MCF control programs.

  1. A point mutation in a herpesvirus polymerase determines neuropathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Goodman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 leads to respiratory disease, abortion, and neurologic disorders in horses. Molecular epidemiology studies have demonstrated that a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in an amino acid variation of the EHV-1 DNA polymerase (N752/D752 is significantly associated with the neuropathogenic potential of naturally occurring strains. To test the hypothesis that this single amino acid exchange by itself influences neuropathogenicity, we generated recombinant viruses with differing polymerase sequences. Here we show that the N752 mutant virus caused no neurologic signs in the natural host, while the D752 virus was able to cause inflammation of the central nervous system and ataxia. Neurologic disease induced by the D752 virus was concomitant with significantly increased levels of viremia (p = 0.01, but the magnitude of virus shedding from the nasal mucosa was similar between the N752 and D752 viruses. Both viruses replicated with similar kinetics in fibroblasts and epithelial cells, but exhibited differences in leukocyte tropism. Last, we observed a significant increase (p < 0.001 in sensitivity of the N752 mutant to aphidicolin, a drug targeting the viral polymerase. Our results demonstrate that a single amino acid variation in a herpesvirus enzyme can influence neuropathogenic potential without having a major effect on virus shedding from infected animals, which is important for horizontal spread in a population. This observation is very interesting from an evolutionary standpoint and is consistent with data indicating that the N752 DNA pol genotype is predominant in the EHV-1 population, suggesting that decreased viral pathogenicity in the natural host might not be at the expense of less efficient inter-individual transmission.

  2. Efficacy of an aqueous Pelargonium sidoides extract against herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, P; Schneider, S; Stintzing, F C; Carle, R; Reichling, J

    2008-12-01

    The compounds of an aqueous root extract of the African medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides were analysed by LC-MS spectroscopy and the antiviral effect of this extract against herpes simplex virus was examined in cell culture. Besides predominant coumarins, simple phenolic structures as well as flavonoid and catechin derivatives were identified as major constituents in the Pelargonium extract. The inhibitory activity of this extract against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on RC-37 cells using a plaque reduction assay and exhibited high antiviral activity against both herpesviruses in viral suspension tests. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the aqueous Pelargonium sidoides extract for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at 0.00006% and 0.000005% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. At maximum noncytotoxic concentrations of the extract, plaque formation was significantly reduced by more than 99.9% for HSV-1 and HSV-2 and a clear concentration-dependent antiviral activity against HSV could be demonstrated for this extract. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action, the extract was added at different times to the cells or viruses during the infection cycle. Both herpesviruses were significantly inhibited when pretreated with the plant extract or when the extract was added during the adsorption phase, whereas acyclovir demonstrated antiviral activity only intracellularly during replication of HSV. These results indicate that P. sidoides extract affected the virus before penetration into the host cell and reveals a different mode of action when compared to the classical drug acyclovir. Hence this extract is capable of exerting an antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus and might be suitable for topical therapeutic use as antiviral drug both in labial and genital herpes infection.

  3. Tales from the crypt and coral reef: the successes and challenges of identifying new herpesviruses using metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are ubiquitous double-stranded DNA viruses infecting many animals, with the capacity to cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Different herpesviruses have different cell tropisms, and have been detected in a diverse range of tissues and sample types.Metagenomics – encompassing viromics – analyses the nucleic acid of a tissue or other sample in an unbiased manner, making few or no prior assumptions about which viruses may be present in a sample. This approach has successfully discovered a number of novel herpesviruses. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis can identify herpesviruses with high degrees of sequence divergence from known herpesviruses and does not rely upon culturing large quantities of viral material.Metagenomics has had success in two areas of herpesvirus sequencing: firstly, the discovery of novel exogenous and endogenous herpesviruses in primates, bats and cnidarians; and secondly, in characterising large areas of the genomes of herpesviruses previously only known from small fragments, revealing unexpected diversity. This review will discuss the successes and challenges of using metagenomics to identify novel herpesviruses, and future directions within the field.

  4. Ecology of the Family as a Context for Human Development: Research Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the influence of external environments on the functioning of families as contexts for child development. Describes studies on the interaction of genetics and environment, on relationships between the family and hospital care, day care, peers, schools, parental employment and support networks, the community, and major transition life…

  5. Hispanic Families. Critical Issues for Policy and Programs in Human Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Miguel, Ed.

    Historical processes, cultural values and socioeconomic conditions that contribute to the current status of Hispanic families are examined in this book. The eight papers in the collection focus on selected aspects of the diverse roles and impacts of the family in Hispanic communities and explore the implications of these roles and impact for…

  6. DESARROLLO DE UN POXVIRUS RECOMBINANTE QUE EXPRESA LA GLICOPROTEÍNA D DEL HERPESVIRUS BOVINO-1 Development of a Recombinant Poxvirus Expressing Bovine Herpesvirus-1 Glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIÁN RUIZ SÁENZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El herpesvirus bovino-1 (BHV-1 es un virus de genoma DNA perteneciente a la familia Herpesviridae, el cual afecta al bovino en el que provoca un amplio espectro de manifestaciones clínicas y pérdidas económicas. El principal componente inmunogénico de su envoltura es la glicoproteína D (gD, la cual ha sido caracterizada y utilizada como inmunógeno en distintos sistemas de expresión. El objetivo de este trabajo fue generar un poxvirus recombinante (Raccoonpox [RCN] que expresara una versión truncada de la gD del BHV-1 para ser usado como inmunógeno. Para ello, se amplificó el gen que codifica para la versión truncada de la gD, la cual se clonó en el plásmido de transferencia pTK/ IRES/tpa que posee sitios de homología a la timidinakinasa del poxvirus, un sitio interno de entrada al ribosoma (IRES y una señal secretoria (tPA, generando el constructo pTK/gD/IRES/tpa. Para generar el RCN recombinante, se tomaron células BSC-1, se infectaron con una cepa Silvestre del RCN (CDC/V71-I-85A a un índice de multiplicidad de infección de 0,05 y se transfectaron con el constructo pTK/gD/IRES/tpa; generándose diferentes poblaciones virales con y sin el gen de interés. Para seleccionar los virus recombinantes que expresaban el gen de interés, se realizó una selección de recombinantes negativos para timidina kinasa y positivos para la gD por tres rondas de purificación de placas en monocapas de células RAT-2 las cuales son mutantes para timidina kinasa y en presencia de bromodeoxiuridina. Los virus recombinantes se confirmaron por PCR y secuenciación de nucleótidos y se denominaron RCN-gD.Bovine Herpesvirus-1 is a DNA virus belonging to the family Herpesviridae, which affects cattle, causing a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and economic losses. The main immunogenic component is its envelope glycoprotein D (gD, which has been characterized and used as immunogen in different expression systems. The aim of this work was to

  7. The Fundamental Human Right to Marry and to Family Life and their Protection in the Legal Framework of the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Albana Metaj-Stojanova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The right to family life is a fundamental human right, recognized by a series of international and European acts, which not only define and ensure its protection, but also emphasize the social importance of the family unit and the institution of marriage. The right to family life has evolved rapidly, since it was first introduced as an international human right by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR. The family structure and the concept of family life have changed dramatically over the last few decades, influenced by the everchanging social reality of our time and the decline of the institution of marriage. Aside from the traditional European nuclear family composed of two married persons of opposite sex and their marital children, new forms of family structures have arisen. LGTB families are at the centre of the ongoing debate on re-defining marriage and the concept of family life. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of protection accorded to family life and to the right to marry, which has long been recognized as one of the vital personal rights essential to the pursuit of happiness by free men by both, international acts ratified by the Republic of Macedonia and the legal system of the country. The methodology applied is qualitative research and use of the analytical, historical and comparative methods. The paper concludes that in general Republic of Macedonia has a solid legal framework, in compliance with the international law, that protects and promotes the right to family life.

  8. A novel permutation test for case-only analysis identifies epistatic effects on human longevity in the FOXO gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Sørensen, Mette; Kruse, Torben A;

    2013-01-01

    interaction in the regulation and expression of the FOXO gene family could contribute to the human longevity phenotype. Genotype data was collected from 1088 individuals from the Danish 1905 birth cohort aged over 92/93 years with 12 SNPs in the FOXO1a and 15 SNPs in the FOXO3a genes. Our analysis detected....... This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  9. Cisplatin resistance by induction of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 in human bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shirato, Akitomi; KIKUGAWA, TADAHIKO; Miura, Noriyoshi; Tanji, Nozomu; Takemori, Nobuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is currently the most effective anti-tumor agent available against bladder cancer. To clarify the mechanism underlying cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer, the present study examined the role of the aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2) protein on chemoresistance using a human bladder cancer cell line. The function of AKR1C2 in chemoresistance was studied using the human HT1376 bladder cancer cell line and the cisplatin-resistant HT1376-CisR subline. AKR1C2 was expresse...

  10. Human prion disease with a G114V mutation and epidemiological studies in a Chinese family: a case series

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    Ye Jing

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, in which mutations in the PRNP gene predispose to disease by causing the expression of abnormal PrP protein, include familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome and fatal familial insomnia. Case presentation A 47-year-old Han-Chinese woman was hospitalized with a 2-year history of progressive dementia, tiredness, lethargy and mild difficulty in falling asleep. On neurological examination, there was severe apathy, spontaneous myoclonus of the lower limbs, generalized hyperreflexia and bilateral Babinski signs. A missense mutation (T to G was identified at the position of nt 341 in one PRNP allele, leading to a change from glycine (Gly to valine (Val at codon 114. PK-resistant PrPSc was detected in brain tissues by Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. Information on pedigree was collected notably by interviews with family members. A further four suspected patients in five consecutive generations of the family have been identified. One of them was hospitalized for progressive memory impairment at the age of 32. On examination, he had impairment of memory, calculation and comprehension, mild ataxia of the limbs, tremor and a left Babinski sign. He is still alive. Conclusion This family with G114V inherited prion disease is the first to be described in China and represents the second family worldwide in which this mutation has been identified. Three other suspected cases have been retrospectively identified in this family, and a further case with suggestive clinical manifestations has been shown by gene sequencing to have the causal mutation.

  11. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates.

  12. Integrated multi-omics of the human gut microbiome in a case study of familial type 1 diabetes.

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    Heintz-Buschart, Anna; May, Patrick; Laczny, Cédric C; Lebrun, Laura A; Bellora, Camille; Krishna, Abhimanyu; Wampach, Linda; Schneider, Jochen G; Hogan, Angela; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-10-10

    The gastrointestinal microbiome is a complex ecosystem with functions that shape human health. Studying the relationship between taxonomic alterations and functional repercussions linked to disease remains challenging. Here, we present an integrative approach to resolve the taxonomic and functional attributes of gastrointestinal microbiota at the metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic levels. We apply our methods to samples from four families with multiple cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Analysis of intra- and inter-individual variation demonstrates that family membership has a pronounced effect on the structural and functional composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome. In the context of T1DM, consistent taxonomic differences were absent across families, but certain human exocrine pancreatic proteins were found at lower levels. The associated microbial functional signatures were linked to metabolic traits in distinct taxa. The methodologies and results provide a foundation for future large-scale integrated multi-omic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in the context of host-microbe interactions in human health and disease.

  13. Comparative case control study of clinical features and human leukocyte antigen susceptibility between familial and nonfamilial vitiligo

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    Misri Rachita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies worldwide suggest that human leukocyte antigen (HLA region may be involved in the genetic susceptibility of vitiligo but little information is available from India. Aim: To find the HLA associated susceptibility to develop vitiligo in Indian patients and to detect role of HLA in familial vitiligo. Methods: This was a case controlled study which included all patients suffering from vitiligo over a period of one and half years. Clinical details were noted and sera collected from these patients were screened for the presence of HLA class I antibodies. The clinical features and HLA antigens were assessed and comparison was made between patients with familial and nonfamilial vitiligo. Results: Out of 114 patients studied, 84 had family history and 30 had no family history. Patients with family history of vitiligo have higher chances of acquiring vitiligo if first degree relatives are affected compared to if second degree relatives are affected. Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the type, stability, and severity of vitiligo in both the groups. HLA results in both the groups revealed increase in HLA A2, A11, A31, A33, B17, B35, B40, and B44 alleles while HLA A9, B13, and B53 alleles were decreased. Family history was associated with HLA A2, A28, A31, and B44 alleles. Early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years was significantly associated with HLA A2, A11, B17, B35, and B44 alleles. The patients with severe affection (> 10% area showed in significant association with HLA A10 and B8. Conclusion: Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo. There is no correlation of family history with the type of vitiligo, stability of lesions, and areas involved. Severity is not associated with family history. Apart from other alleles, alleles A2, and B44 play a significant role in vitiligo in the Indian patients.

  14. In vitro antiviral activity of Ficus carica latex against caprine herpesvirus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Michele; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Lovero, Angela; Elia, Gabriella; Losurdo, Michele; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tempesta, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The latex of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) has been shown to possess antiviral properties against some human viruses. To determine the ability of F. carica latex (F-latex) to interfere with the infection of caprine herpesvirus-1 (CpHV-1) in vitro, F-latex was resuspended in culture media containing 1% ethanol and was tested for potential antiviral effects against CpHV-1. Titration of CpHV-1 in the presence or in the absence of F-latex was performed on monolayers of Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. Simultaneous addition of F-latex and CpHV-1 to monolayers of MDBK cells resulted in a significant reduction of CpHV-1 titres 3 days post-infection and this effect was comparable to that induced by acyclovir. The study suggests that the F-latex is able to interfere with the replication of CpHV-1 in vitro on MDBK cells and future studies will determine the mechanisms responsible for the observed antiviral activity.

  15. Detection of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus infection among healthy Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jeffrey J; Nofs, Sally A; Zachariah, Arun; Kalaivannan, N; Ling, Paul D

    2014-04-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) can cause fatal hemorrhagic disease in Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephants. Of the seven known EEHV species, EEHV1 is recognized as the most common cause of hemorrhagic disease among Asian elephants in human care worldwide. Recent data collected from ex situ Asian elephants located in multiple North American and European institutions suggest that subclinical EEHV1 infection is common in this population of elephants. Although fatal EEHV1-associated hemorrhagic disease has been reported in range countries, data are lacking regarding the prevalence of subclinical EEHV infections among in situ Asian elephants. We used previously validated EEHV-specific quantitative real-time PCR assays to detect subclinical EEHV infection in three regionally distinct Asian elephant cohorts, totaling 46 in situ elephants in South India, during October and November 2011. Using DNA prepared from trunk washes, we detected EEHV1, EEHV3/4, and EEHV5 at frequencies of 7, 9, and 20% respectively. None of the trunk washes was positive for EEHV2 or 6. At least one EEHV species was detectable in 35% (16/46) of the samples that were screened. These data suggest that subclinical EEHV infection among in situ Asian elephants occurs and that Asian elephants may be natural hosts for EEHV1, EEHV3 or 4, and EEHV5, but not EEHV2 and EEHV6. The methodology described in this study provides a foundation for further studies to determine prevalences of EEHV infection in Asian elephants throughout the world.

  16. Acute phase protein expression during elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 viremia in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jeffrey J; Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L; Ling, Paul D; Herron, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Infection of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) can be associated with rapid, lethal hemorrhagic disease and has been documented in elephant herds in human care and in the wild. Recent reports describe real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays used to monitor clinically ill elephants and also to detect subclinical EEHV1 infection in apparently healthy Asian elephants. Acute phase proteins have been demonstrated to increase with a variety of infectious etiologies in domesticated mammals but have not yet been described in elephants. In addition, the immune response of Asian elephants to EEHV1 infection has not been described. In this study, whole blood and trunk wash samples representing repeated measures from eight elephants were examined for the presence of EEHV1 using a qPCR assay. Elephants were classified into groups, as follows: whole blood negative and positive and trunk wash negative and positive. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (HP) levels were compared between these groups. A significant difference in SAA was observed with nearly a threefold higher mean value during periods of viremia (P=0.011). Higher values of SAA were associated with >10,000 virus genome copies/ml EEHV1 in whole blood. There were no significant differences in HP levels, although some individual animals did exhibit increased levels with infection. These data indicate that an inflammatory process is stimulated during EEHV1 viremia. Acute phase protein quantitation may aid in monitoring the health status of Asian elephants.

  17. Molecular piracy of mammalian interleukin-8 receptor type B by herpesvirus saimiri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, S K; Murphy, P M

    1993-10-05

    Viruses are known to acquire and modify the genes of their hosts to attain a survival advantage in the host environment. Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a T-lymphotropic virus that causes fatal lymphoproliferative diseases in several non-human primates. The gene ECRF3 of HVS was most likely acquired from a primate host. ECRF3 encodes a putative seven-transmembrane-domain receptor that is remotely related (approximately 30% amino acid identity) to the known mammalian alpha and beta chemokine receptors, namely interleukin-8 receptor (IL8R) types A and B and the MIP-1 alpha/RANTES receptor, respectively. Chemokines regulate the trafficking, activation, and, in some cases, proliferation of myeloid and lymphoid cell types. We now show that ECRF3 encodes a functional receptor for the alpha chemokines IL-8, GRO/melanoma growth stimulatory activity (MGSA), and NAP-2 but not for beta chemokines, a specificity identical to that of IL8RB. Paradoxically, IL8RA shares 77% amino acid identity with IL8RB but is not a receptor for GRO/MGSA or NAP-2. This is the first functional characterization of a viral seven-transmembrane-domain receptor. It suggests a novel role for alpha chemokines in the pathogenesis of HVS infection by transmembrane signaling via the product of ECRF3.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

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    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Chen, Yu-Lian; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Jen-Yang; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-03-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1) an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2) a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  20. Herpesvirus-6 encephalitis complicated by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a pediatric recipient of unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, E; Verdeguer, A; Fernández, J M; Cañete, A; Castel, V

    2001-12-01

    A 10-year-old girl with M2 acute myeloid leukemia underwent an unrelated cord blood transplantation in refractory first relapse. On day +13, after 48 hours with fever, she showed a measles-like rash, and on day +15, she began experiencing neurologic symptoms (headache, tremors, weakness, nystagmus, mild confusion, speaking, taste, and behavior disturbances, and focal seizures). She also had amnesia for recent events with disability to learn, mimicking Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Computed tomography of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and electroencephalogram were nonspecific. We found human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA in CSF and cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Treatment with ganciclovir and foscarnet was effective, with total resolution of symptoms.