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Sample records for human hematopoietic malignancies

  1. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many age-related HSC changes and might pave the way for HSC malignant transformation and subsequent leukemia development, the incidence of which increases exponentially with age. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key epigenetic regulators of HSC cellular fate decisions and are often found to be misregulated in human hematopoietic malignancies. In this review, we speculate that PcG proteins balance HSC aging against the risk of developing cancer, since a disturbance in PcG genes and proteins affects several important cellular processes such as cell fate decisions, senescence, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair.

  2. Hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogenceic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the impact of the time to hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT) . Methods 173 patients with hematological malignancies treated with allo-HSCT (excluding umbilical cord blood transplantation)

  3. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  4. Characterizing the human hematopoietic CDome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Mike Stein; Simon, Christian; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2014-01-01

    , we seek to give a preliminary characterization of the "human hematopoietic CDome." We encountered severe gaps in the knowledge of CD protein expression, mostly resulting from incomplete and unstructured data generation, which we argue inhibit both basic research as well as therapies seeking to target...

  5. Hematopoietic malignancies associated with viral and alcoholic hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lesley A; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Warren, Joan L; Landgren, Ola; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Berndt, Sonja I; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Wheeler, William; Engels, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been associated with hematopoietic malignancies, but data for many subtypes are limited. From the U.S. SEER-Medicare database, we selected 61,464 cases (≥67 years) with hematopoietic malignancies and 122,531 population-based controls, frequency-matched by gender, age and year (1993–2002). Logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence of HCV, HBV and alcoholic hepatitis in cases and controls, adjusted for matching factors, race, duration of Medicare coverage, and number of physician claims. HCV, HBV, and alcoholic hepatitis were reported in 195 (0.3%), 111 (0.2%) and 404 (0.7%) cases and 264 (0.2%), 242 (0.2%) and 798 (0.7%) controls, respectively. HCV was associated with increased risk of diffuse large B-cell (OR 1.52, 95%CI 1.05–2.18), Burkitt (OR 5.21, 95%CI 1.62–16.8), follicular (OR 1.88, 95%CI 1.17–3.02), and marginal zone lymphomas (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.22–3.95), and acute myeloid leukemia (OR 1.54, 95%CI 1.00–2.37). In contrast, HBV was unrelated to any hematopoietic malignancies. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with decreased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but increased risk of Burkitt lymphoma. In summary, HCV, but not other causes of hepatitis, was associated with elevated risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia. HCV may induce lymphoproliferative malignancies through chronic immune stimulation. PMID:18957521

  6. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

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    Sironen, R.K. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Pathology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tammi, M.; Tammi, R. [Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Auvinen, P.K. [Department of Oncology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Anttila, M. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kosma, V-M., E-mail: Veli-Matti.Kosma@uef.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Pathology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  8. WT1 Peptide Cancer Vaccine for Patients with Hematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Oka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is expressed at a high level in hematopoietic malignancies including acute leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as in various kinds of solid cancers. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, which could specifically lyse WT1-expressing tumor cells with HLA class I restriction, were generated in vitro. It was also demonstrated that mice immunized with the WT1 peptide rejected challenges by WT1-expressing cancer cells and survived with no signs of autoaggression to normal organs that physiologically expressed WT1. Furthermore, we and others detected IgM and IgG WT1 antibodies in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, indicating that the WT1 protein was highly immunogenic, and that immunoglobulin class-switch-inducing, WT1-specific, cellular immune responses were elicited in these patients. CD8+ WT1-specific CTLs were also detected in peripheral blood or tumor-draining lymph nodes of cancer patients. These results provided us with the rationale for elicitation of CTL responses targeting the WT1 product for cancer immunotherapy. On the basis of these findings, we performed a phase I clinical trial of a WT1 peptide cancer vaccine for the patients with malignant neoplasms. These results strongly suggested that the WT1 peptide cancer vaccine had efficacy in the clinical setting because clinical responses, including reduction of leukemic blast cells or regression of tumor masses, were observed after the WT1 vaccination in patients with hematopoietic malignancies or solid cancers. The power of a tumor-associated-antigen (TAA-derived cancer vaccine may be enhanced in combination with stronger adjuvants, helper peptide, molecular-target-based drugs, or some chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, which has been revealed to suppress regulartory T-cell function. In contrast, reduction of WT1 peptide dose may be needed for the treatment of patients with hematological stem cell diseases

  9. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  11. Generation of mature hematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarrati, Padma Priya; Suknuntha, Kran

    2012-06-01

    A number of malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders are associated with the abnormal production of mature blood cells or primitive hematopoietic precursors. Their capacity for continuous self-renewal without loss of pluripotency and the ability to differentiate into adult cell types from all three primitive germ layers make human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) attractive complementary cell sources for large-scale production of transfusable mature blood cell components in cell replacement therapies. The generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem/precursor cells from iPSCs by the regulated manipulation of various factors involved in reprograming to ensure complete pluripotency, and developing innovative differentiation strategies for generating unlimited supply of clinically safe, transplantable, HLA-matched cells from hiPSCs to outnumber the inadequate source of hematopoietic stem cells obtained from cord blood, bone marrow and peripheral blood, would have a major impact on the field of regenerative and personalized medicine leading to translation of these results from bench to bedside.

  12. [Latent infection of human herpes virus in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Song, Yu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    Up to date, eight types of human herpes viruses have been identified, all of which are ubiquitous, and usually establish latent infection in the host after primary infection. Since most of the herpes viruses are maintained in an asymptomatic form, they are often neglected. However, under some circumstances, these herpes viruses can cause fatal or severe diseases. Furthermore, the association of herpes viruses with hematopoietic malignancies is attracting researchers' attention. With the extensive development of hematopoietic stem cell and organ transplantation, reports regarding transplantation failure and complication caused by infection of human herpes virus has been increasing. Cytokine storm was firstly suggested as the mechanism of graft-versus-host diseases. In recent years, which has also been applied in the pathogenesis research of inflammation, and is supposed to play an important role in severe virus infection. In this paper, through discussing the possible role of latent infection of human herpes virus in the failure or complication of bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in refractory leukemia, the function and significance of latent infection of human herpes virus and the cytokine storm it caused were investigated.

  13. F1t3 RECEPTOR EXPRESSION ON THE SURFACE OF MALIGNANT HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS AND RESPONSES TO F1t3 LIGAND STIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the F1t3 receptor expression on the surface of malignant hematopoietic cells, the effect of TNFa and dexamethasone (DXM) on its expression and the responses of those cells to recombinant human F1t3 ligand (rhFL). Methods: Eighteen malignant hematopoietic cell lines were determined for the F1t3 receptor expression by flow cytometric analysis. The effect of rhFL on the proliferation of malignant hematopoietic cells in vitro was measured using MTT assay. Results: The expressions of F1t3 receptor on the surface of Raji, Daudi, HL-60, 8266 and XG-6 cells were detected by flow cytometric analysis. Following incubation with 20 ng/ml TNFa for 24h, the number of F1t3 receptor positive cells decreased in Raji and 8266, increased in HL-60 and XG-6, and no difference in Daudi cells. After incubation with 10-6 mol/L DXM for 24h, the number of F1t3 receptor positive cells decreased in all the 5 F1t3 receptor positive cell lines. rhFL stimulated the proliferation of HL-60 and Raji cells. Conclusion: For most of the malignant hematopoietic cells, there was neither the expression of F1t3 receptor nor the response to rhFL. DXM may be useful to reduce the effect of FL on the proliferation of some F1t3 receptor positive malignant hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  15. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many age-

  16. NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Sheryl M; Slape, Christopher I; Aplan, Peter D

    2011-12-08

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically encode a fusion protein that retains the amino terminus of NUP98; in this context, it is important to note that several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal portion of NUP98 exhibits transcription activation potential. Approximately half of the NUP98 fusion partners encode homeodomain proteins, and at least 5 NUP98 fusions involve known histone-modifying genes. Several of the NUP98 fusions, including NUP98-homeobox (HOX)A9, NUP98-HOXD13, and NUP98-JARID1A, have been used to generate animal models of both lymphoid and myeloid malignancy; these models typically up-regulate HOXA cluster genes, including HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA9, and HOXA10. In addition, several of the NUP98 fusion proteins have been shown to inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic precursors and to increase self-renewal of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, providing a potential mechanism for malignant transformation.

  17. TET2 deficiency inhibits mesoderm and hematopoietic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Thierry; da Costa Reis Monte Mor, Barbara; Lenglet, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Ten-Eleven-Translocation 2 (TET2) belongs to the TET protein family that catalyzes the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and plays a central role in normal and malignant adult hematopoiesis. Yet, the role of TET2 in human hematopoietic development remains largely unknown...

  18. IL-18 single nucleotide polymorphisms in hematologic malignancies with HLA matched sibling donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小矜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of interleukin-18(IL-18)single nucleotide polymorphisms on outcomes of hematologic malignancies with HLA-matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT).Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-18 promoter was detected by PCR-sequence-specific primer analysis(PCR-SSP)in 93 recipients and their HLA matched sibling donors.Hematopoietic reconstitution,

  19. Analysis of efficacy and prognosis of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from different donors in treatment of hematologic malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余正平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT) from unrelated donors and that from related donors in treatment of hematologic malignancies. Methods

  20. Ceruloplasmin in human malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty,Prabir Kishore

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available The ceruloplasmin concentration was determined in 145 cancer patients prior to and after treatment with different radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic regimes. The ceruloplasmin concentration was observed to be higher in patients with malignancies than in healthy controls. There was a positive correlation of the values with the clinical condition of the patients. The ceruloplasmin concentration was noted to stop increasing and subsequently fall in patients who responded to therapy, and, in contrast, to remain high or become higher in those who did not respond to therapy. The diagnostic and prognostic value of ceruloplasmin determination is discussed.

  1. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; Pmarrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; Ptransplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  2. Ubiquitous expression of MAKORIN-2 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells and its growth promoting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Yiu Lee

    Full Text Available Makorin-2 (MKRN2 is a highly conserved protein and yet its functions are largely unknown. We investigated the expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, and leukemia cell lines. We also attempted to delineate the role of MKRN2 in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells and K562 cell line by over-expression and inhibition of MKRN2 through lentivirus transduction and shRNA nucleofection, respectively. Our results provided the first evidence on the ubiquitous expression of MKRN2 in normal hematopoietic cells, embryonic stem cell lines, primary leukemia and leukemic cell lines of myeloid, lymphoid, erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. The expression levels of MKRN2 were generally higher in primary leukemia samples compared with those in age-matched normal BM cells. In all leukemia subtypes, there was no significant correlation between expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1. sh-MKRN2-silenced CD34+ cells had a significantly lower proliferation capacity and decreased levels of the early stem/progenitor subpopulation (CFU-GEMM compared with control cultures. Over-expression of MKRN2 in K562 cells increased cell proliferation. Our results indicated possible roles of MKRN2 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

  3. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B; Blume, Karl G; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R; Forman, Stephen J; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A; McSweeney, Peter A; Wade, James C; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Maloney, David G; Storb, Rainer

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m(2); n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT.

  4. Isolated trisomy 2 in bone marrows of patients with suspected hematopoietic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aypar, Umut; Reichard, Kaaren K; Waltman, Lindsey A; Van Dyke, Daniel L

    2014-04-01

    Isolated trisomy 2 in hematopoietic malignancies is rare, having been reported in only eight cases. Of these cases, the majority are older males. The underlying hematologic malignancies range from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The molecular pathogenesis and prognostic significance of isolated trisomy 2 remains unknown. Herein, we report 11 cases of isolated trisomy 2 in hematologic disorders seen in the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory from 1996-2012. The majority were older males between the ages of 63-93 years. The underlying bone marrow pathologic diagnoses ranged from no diagnostic features of malignancy to AML. Our data suggest that isolated trisomy 2 could represent an age-related phenomenon since all 11 cases were age 63 and over. It appears that isolated trisomy 2 harbors little prognostic significance and that, instead, the prognostic significance is driven by the underlying pathologic diagnosis. For example, whereas 3 of the cases with AML survived only 7-10 weeks post-bone marrow biopsy, 1 of the cases without diagnostic features of malignancy survived 10 additional years. Therefore, trisomy 2 as a sole abnormality should not be considered as definitive evidence for a myeloid neoplasm in the absence of diagnostic morphologic criteria.

  5. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emerg

  6. Donor NK cell licensing in control of malignancy in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jacek; Kościńska, Katarzyna; Mika-Witkowska, Renata; Rogatko-Koroś, Marta; Mizia, Sylwia; Jaskuła, Emilia; Polak, Małgorzata; Mordak-Domagała, Monika; Lange, Janusz; Gronkowska, Anna; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław Wiktor; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Markiewicz, Mirosław; Dzierżak-Mietła, Monika; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowska-Adamska, Barbara; Szczepiński, Andrzej; Hałaburda, Kazimierz; Hellmann, Andrzej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Gil, Lidia; Czyż, Anna; Wachowiak, Jacek; Barańska, Małgorzata; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Drabko, Katarzyna; Goździk, Jolanta; Wysoczańska, Barbara; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Graczyk-Pol, Elżbieta; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Marosz-Rudnicka, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Dziopa, Joanna; Szlendak, Urszula; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lange, And Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Among cancers treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT), some are sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell reactivity, described as the "missing self" recognition effect. However, this model disregarded the NK cell licensing effect, which highly increases the NK cell reactivity against tumor and is dependent on the coexpression of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (iKIR) and its corresponding HLA Class I ligand. We assessed clinical data, HLA and donor iKIR genotyping in 283 patients with myelo- and lymphoproliferative malignancies who underwent HSCT from unrelated donors. We found dramatically reduced overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and time to progression (TTP) among patients with malignant diseases with the lack of HLA ligand cognate with this iKIR involved in NK cell licensing in corresponding donor (events 83.3% vs. 39.8%, P = 0.0010; 91.6% vs. 47.7%, P = 0.00010; and 30.0% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.013, for OS, PFS, and TTP, respectively). The extremely adverse PFS have withstand the correction when patient group was restricted to HLA mismatched donor-recipient pairs. The incidence of aGvHD was comparable in two groups of patients. In malignant patients after HSCT the missing HLA ligand for iKIR involved in NK cell licensing in corresponding donor ("missing licensing proof") induced extremely adverse survival of the patients due to the progression of malignancy and not to the aGvHD. Avoiding the selection of HSCT donors with the "missing licensing proof" in the malignant patient is strongly advisable.

  7. Low antigenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eun-Mi Kim1, Nicholas Zavazava1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; 2Immunology Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAAbstract: Human embryonic stem (hES cells are essential for improved understanding of diseases and our ability to probe new therapies for use in humans. Currently, bone marrow cells and cord blood cells are used for transplantation into patients with hematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiencies and in some cases for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, due to the high immunogenicity of these hematopoietic cells, toxic regimens of drugs are required for preconditioning and prevention of rejection. Here, we investigated the efficiency of deriving hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs from the hES cell line H13, after co-culturing with the murine stromal cell line OP9. We show that HPCs derived from the H13 ES cells poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and no detectable class II antigens (HLA-DR. These characteristics make hES cell-derived hematopoietic cells (HPCs ideal candidates for transplantation across MHC barriers under minimal immunosuppression.Keywords: human embryonic stem cells, H13, hematopoiesis, OP9 stromal cells, immunogenicity

  8. Characterizing human herpes virus 6 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Anthony J; Gulbis, Alison; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Howell, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs in approximately 50% of patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant, however, the significance of human herpes virus 6 reactivation remains uncertain. A retrospective study was conducted analyzing clinical data of patients testing positive for human herpes virus 6 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant from 1 January 1998 to 1 October 2011. Data retrieved were used to describe the clinical course and outcome of human herpes virus 6 positive hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Sixty patients were identified who tested positive for human herpes virus 6 by polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. A high proportion of patients were identified in this cohort with acute myeloid leukemia (28.3%), active disease (65%), transplanted with a matched unrelated donor (30%), ≥ 1 antigen mismatched (28.3%) matched unrelated donor, or an umbilical cord graft (25%), and those who received antithymocyte globulin (42.4%). Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients were treated for human herpes virus 6 with foscarnet alone or in combination with intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 18 (30%) did not require treatment survival at Day 100 was 73.3%. This study suggests human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs shortly after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (median of 25 days (interquartile range, 20-31.75) after hematopoietic stem cell transplant). Many potential risk factors are described in this report. Treatment of human herpes virus 6 predominately consisted of foscarnet with or without intravenous immunoglobulin; however, treatment of human herpes virus 6 was not always warranted. Furthermore, the effect of treatment on patient outcomes is uncertain. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Malignant lymphatic and hematopoietic neoplasms mortality in Serbia, 1991-2010: a joinpoint regression analysis.

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    Milena Ilic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limited data on mortality from malignant lymphatic and hematopoietic neoplasms have been published for Serbia. METHODS: The study covered population of Serbia during the 1991-2010 period. Mortality trends were assessed using the joinpoint regression analysis. RESULTS: Trend for overall death rates from malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms significantly decreased: by -2.16% per year from 1991 through 1998, and then significantly increased by +2.20% per year for the 1998-2010 period. The growth during the entire period was on average +0.8% per year (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3. Mortality was higher among males than among females in all age groups. According to the comparability test, mortality trends from malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms in men and women were parallel (final selected model failed to reject parallelism, P = 0.232. Among younger Serbian population (0-44 years old in both sexes: trends significantly declined in males for the entire period, while in females 15-44 years of age mortality rates significantly declined only from 2003 onwards. Mortality trend significantly increased in elderly in both genders (by +1.7% in males and +1.5% in females in the 60-69 age group, and +3.8% in males and +3.6% in females in the 70+ age group. According to the comparability test, mortality trend for Hodgkin's lymphoma differed significantly from mortality trends for all other types of malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Unfavourable mortality trend in Serbia requires targeted intervention for risk factors control, early diagnosis and modern therapy.

  10. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Fernández, Agustín F; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Suárez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mangas, Cristina; Pérez-García, Vicente; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Ferrero, Cecilia; Assenov, Yassen; Bock, Christoph; Menendez, Pablo; Carrera, Ana Clara; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Fraga, Mario F

    2012-01-01

    Global mechanisms defining the gene expression programs specific for hematopoiesis are still not fully understood. Here, we show that promoter DNA demethylation is associated with the activation of hematopoietic-specific genes. Using genome-wide promoter methylation arrays, we identified 694 hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss of methylation in hematopoietic can be associated with gene expression. The association between promoter methylation and gene expression was studied for many hematopoietic-specific genes including CD45, CD34, CD28, CD19, the T cell receptor (TCR), the MHC class II gene HLA-DR, perforin 1 and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and results indicated that DNA demethylation was not always sufficient for gene activation. Promoter demethylation occurred either early during embryonic development or later on during hematopoietic differentiation. Analysis of the genome-wide promoter methylation status of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34(+) HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34(+) HSPCs confirmed the role of DNA methylation in regulating the expression of genes of the hemato-immune system, and indicated that promoter methylation of these genes may be associated to stemness. Together, these data suggest that promoter DNA demethylation might play a role in the tissue/cell-specific genome-wide gene regulation within the hematopoietic compartment.

  11. Kinetics of engraftment in patients with hematologic malignancies given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Frédéric; Baker, Jennifer E; Storb, Rainer; Gooley, Theodore A; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Maris, Michael B; Maloney, David G; Heimfeld, Shelly; Oparin, Dmitrij; Zellmer, Eustacia; Radich, Jerald P; Grumet, F Carl; Blume, Karl G; Chauncey, Thomas R; Little, Marie-Térèse

    2004-10-15

    We analyzed the kinetics of donor engraftment among various peripheral blood cell subpopulations and their relationship to outcomes among 120 patients with hematologic malignancies given hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) with or without added fludarabine. While patients rapidly developed high degrees of donor engraftment, most remained mixed donor/host chimeras for up to 180 days after HCT. Patients given preceding chemotherapies and those given granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell (G-PBMC) grafts had the highest degrees of donor chimerism. Low donor T-cell (P = .003) and natural killer (NK) cell (P = .004) chimerism levels on day 14 were associated with increased probabilities of graft rejection. High T-cell chimerism on day 28 was associated with an increased probability of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (P = .02). Of 93 patients with measurable malignant disease at transplantation, 41 achieved complete remissions a median of 199 days after HCT; 19 of the 41 were mixed T-cell chimeras when complete remissions were achieved. Earlier establishment of donor NK-cell chimerism was associated with improved progression-free survival (P = .02). Measuring the levels of peripheral blood cell subset donor chimerisms provided useful information on HCT outcomes and might allow early therapeutic interventions to prevent graft rejection or disease progression.

  12. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  13. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  14. Hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerke, Claudia; Grauer, Matthias; Niebuhr, Nina I; Riedt, Tamara; Kanz, Lothar; Park, In-Hyun; Daley, George Q

    2009-09-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells. Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g., circumventing the use of retroviral technology and oncoproteins), and on methods for differentiation into transplantable tissues of interest. In mouse ESC, we have previously shown that the embryonic morphogens BMP4 and Wnt3a direct blood formation via activation of Cdx and Hox genes. Ectopic expression of Cdx4 and HoxB4 enables the generation of mouse ESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) capable of multilineage reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice. Here, we explore hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated in our laboratory. Our data show robust differentiation of iPS cells to mesoderm and to blood lineages, as shown by generation of CD34(+)CD45(+) cells, hematopoietic colony activity, and gene expression data, and suggest conservation of blood patterning pathways between mouse and human hematopoietic development.

  15. Cognitive function in the acute course of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Kindermann, F; Mehnert, A; Scherwath, A; Schirmer, L; Schleimer, B; Zander, A R; Koch, U

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess cognitive performance in patients with hematological malignancies before, and 3 months after, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). A consecutive sample of 39 patients was assessed before admission with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) questionnaires; 19 of these patients were retested around 100 days post HSCT. Test results were compared with normative data and revealed minimal differences at both time points in the level of group-means. One parameter - simple reaction time - was significantly worse (prolonged) at second measurement after HSCT. According to the definition of an impairment score (more than three impaired functions), 26% of patients were classified as impaired before as well as after HSCT. Neuropsychological test results did not vary systematically according to medical variables such as extent of pretreatment, graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and kind of conditioning protocol. As a dimension of HRQoL, self-rated cognitive function was in the normal range before and after HSCT. Significant correlations between HRQoL and neuropsychological parameters were related to symptom scales. This study showed impairments of neuropsychological performance for a subgroup of patients before and after allogeneic HSCT. Systematic effects of conditioning, medical variables or self-rated HRQoL could not be observed.

  16. A retrospective cohort study of cause-specific mortality and incidence of hematopoietic malignancies in Chinese benzene-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linet, Martha S; Yin, Song-Nian; Gilbert, Ethel S; Dores, Graça M; Hayes, Richard B; Vermeulen, Roel; Tian, Hao-Yuan; Lan, Qing; Portengen, Lutzen; Ji, Bu-Tian; Li, Gui-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Benzene exposure has been causally linked with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but inconsistently associated with other hematopoietic, lymphoproliferative and related disorders (HLD) or solid tumors in humans. Many neoplasms have been described in experimental animals exposed to benzene. We used Poisson regression to estimate adjusted relative risks (RR) and the likelihood ratio statistic to derive confidence intervals for cause-specific mortality and HLD incidence in 73,789 benzene-exposed compared with 34,504 unexposed workers in a retrospective cohort study in 12 cities in China. Follow-up and outcome assessment was based on factory, medical and other records. Benzene-exposed workers experienced increased risks for all-cause mortality (RR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.2) due to excesses of all neoplasms (RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.4), respiratory diseases (RR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.3) and diseases of blood forming organs (RR = ∞, 95% CI = 3.4, ∞). Lung cancer mortality was significantly elevated (RR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.9) with similar RRs for males and females, based on three-fold more cases than in our previous follow-up. Significantly elevated incidence of all myeloid disorders reflected excesses of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 6.6) and chronic myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 0.8, 11), and increases of all lymphoid disorders included excesses of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (RR = 3.9, 95%CI = 1.5, 13) and all lymphoid leukemia (RR = 5.4, 95%CI = 1.0, 99). The 28-year follow-up of Chinese benzene-exposed workers demonstrated increased risks of a broad range of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms, lung cancer, and respiratory diseases and suggested possible associations with other malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  17. Colistin is relatively safe in hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbuch, D; Horwitz, E; Strahilevitz, J; Stepensky, P; Goldschmidt, N; Gatt, M E; Shapira, M Y; Resnick, I B; Engelhard, D

    2013-10-01

    Colistin is increasingly used as the last-resort treatment option against infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative pathogens, but its nephrotoxicity is of concern, especially in severely ill patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the toxicity of colistin therapy in adults and children with hematological malignancies (HM) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Data on HSCT recipients and HM patients, treated with intravenous colistin (2.5-5 mg/kg/day in children and 3-6 million international units (IU) in adults, adjusted to renal function) during the period 2008-2011 in our center, were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the RIFLE criteria (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage kidney disease). Twenty-nine children and adults received 38 courses of intravenous colistin (2.5-5 mg/kg/day in children and 3-6 × 10(6) IU in adults, adjusted to renal function) [allogeneic HSCT (22 courses) and HM (16 courses)] for 3-28 days (median 10 days) for empirical therapy for nosocomial clinical sepsis (28) or local infection (6), and bacteremia with MDR Gram-negative rods (4). Nephrotoxicity was observed at the end of 4 (10.5%) courses. In 32 (84%) courses, nephrotoxic medications were concomitantly administered. Two patients had convulsions, probably unrelated to colistin. Seven patients (18%) died while on colistin therapy. No death was attributed to an adverse effect of colistin. Treatment with intravenous colistin, with dosage adjusted to renal function, was relatively safe for HM/HSCT patients, even with concomitantly administered nephrotoxic medications. Concern about nephrotoxicity should not justify a delay in initiating empirical colistin treatment in situations where infection with MDR Gram-negative rods is likely.

  18. Related and unrelated nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, George E; Maris, Michael; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Malone, David G; Feinstein, Lyle; Niederweiser, Dietger; Shizuru, Judith A; McSweeney, Peter A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Agura, Edward; Little, Marie-Trse; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Hegenbart, Ute; Pulsipher, Michael A; Bruno, Benedetto; Forman, Stephen; Woolfrey, Ann E; Radich, Jerald P; Blume, Karl G; Storb, Rainer

    2002-08-01

    Patients with advanced hematological malignancies ineligible for conventional myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) due to advanced age or medical contraindications were enrolled in multi-center study to investigate the safety and efficacy of nonmyeloablative HSCT using a 2 Gy total body irradi ation (TBI)-based regimen. A total of 192 patients (median age 55) were treated with HLA-matched sibling peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts, and 63 patients (median age 53) received a 10 of 10 HLA-antigen matched unrelated donor (URD) HSCT (PBSC graft, n = 48; marrow graft, n = 15). Diagnoses included multiple myeloma (n = 61), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 55), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 31), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 31), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 28), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 24), Hodgkin Disease (n = 14). The conditioning regimen was fludarabine 30 mg/m2/d x 3 days and 2 Gy TBI. Ninety-five related HSCT patients received 2 Gy TBI without fludarabine. Postgrafting immunosuppression was combined mycophenolate mofetil an cyclosporine. Transplants were well tolerated with a median of 0 days of hospitalization in the first 60 days for eligible patients. For related HSCT recipients, median follow-up was 289 (100-1,188) days. Nonfatal graft rejection occurred in 6.8%. Of those with sustained engraftment, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurred in 49% (33% grade II, 11% grade III, 5% grade IV). Day-100 non-relapse mortality was 6%. Overall, 59% (114/192) of patients were alive. The relapse/disease progression mortality was 18%, and non-relapse mortality was 22%. The projecte 2-year survival and progression-free survival were 50% and 40%. For the URD HSCT recipients, median follow-up was 190 (100-468) days. Graft rejection occurred in 27% (17/63) of patients, mostly in recipients of marrow grafts (9/15). Acute GVHD occurred in 63% (50% grade II, 13% grade III) of 46 engrafted patients. Chronic GVHD requiring therapy occurred

  19. Development of a novel adenovirus-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features for malignant hematopoietic cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, F; Lu, Z; Li, Z; Zuo, H; Zhang, Q; Li, Q; Wang, H; Wang, L-S

    2013-08-01

    To improve the expression levels of transgenes in malignant hematopoietic cells, we developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP that contains a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon and chimeric fibers of Ad5 and Ad11p. Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP infected >95% of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells and 23.65% of HL-60 cells, and led to moderate Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) transgene expression intensity. The infection efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary human leukemia cells ranged from 9.34-89.63% (median, 28.58%) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100, compared with only 3.37-44.54% (median, 10.42%) in cells infected by Ad5/F11p-GFP. Importantly, Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP led to a significantly higher transgene expression level in primary leukemia cells, as indicated by the relative fluorescence intensity, compared to cells infected with Ad5/F11p-GFP. The increased expression of EGFP in Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP-infected cells was associated with the accumulation of abundant subgenomic mRNA. Additionally, infection of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells by Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP was significantly inhibited by blocking CD46 receptor; however, other factors may affect the gene-transfer efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary leukemia cells. In conclusion, we successfully developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features, which represents a promising vector for gene modifications during the production of cell-based vaccines for leukemia patients.

  20. Review on Haploidentical Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Fabricius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HSCT is typically the preferred curative therapy for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia, but its use has been reduced as a consequence of limited donor availability in the form of either matched-related donors (MRD or matched-unrelated donors (MUD. Alternative options such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB transplantation and haploidentical HSCT have been increasingly studied in the past few decades to overcome these obstacles. A human leukocyte antigen- (HLA- haploidentical donor is a recipient’s relative who shares an exact haplotype with the recipient but is mismatched for HLA genes on the unshared haplotype. These dissimilarities pose several challenges to the outcomes of the patient receiving such a type of HSCT, including higher rates of bidirectional alloreactivity and graft failure. In the past 5 years, however, several nonrandomized studies have shown promising results in terms of graft success and decreased rates of alloreactivity, in part due to newer grafting techniques and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD prophylaxis. We present here a summary and review of the latest results of these studies as well as a brief discussion on the advantages and challenges of haploidentical HSCT.

  1. Hematopoietic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011370 The efficacy and safety of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for post-transplant hematologic malignancies relapse. CHEN Yuhong(陳育紅),et al.Instit Hematol,People’s Hosp,Peking Univ,Beijing 100044. Abstract:Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the relapsed hematologic malignancies.Methods The data of 25 relapsed patients received the second allogeneic transplantation as a salvage therapy

  2. Origin of the hematopoietic system in the human embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Emmanuelle; El Omar, Reine; Tavian, Manuela

    2016-11-01

    The continuous generation of blood cells throughout life relies on the existence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) generated during embryogenesis. Given the importance of HSC transplantation in cell-based therapeutic approaches, considerable efforts have been made toward understanding the developmental origins of embryonic HSC. Adult-type HSC are first generated in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region between days 27 and 40 of human embryonic development, but an elusive blood-forming potential is present earlier in the underlying splanchnopleura. It is relatively well accepted that the HSC emerge in the AGM through a hemogenic endothelium, but the direct precursor of this cell type remains to be clearly identified. This review is intended to summarize the recent advances made to understand the origins of hematopoietic stem cells in the early human embryo. In addition, we discuss in detail the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) as a novel marker of human HSC and of prehematopoietic precursors inside the embryo. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Hematopoietic and nature killer cell development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhenya; Knorr, David A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key effectors of the innate immune system, protecting the host from a variety of infections, as well as malignant cells. Recent advances in the field of NK cell biology have led to a better understanding of how NK cells develop. This progress has directly translated to improved outcomes in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants to treat potentially lethal malignancies. However, key differences between mouse and human NK cell development and biology limits the use of rodents to attain a more in depth understanding of NK cell development. Therefore, a readily accessible and genetically tractable cell source to study human NK cell development is warranted. Our lab has pioneered the development of lymphocytes, specifically NK cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This chapter describes a reliable method to generate NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs using murine stromal cell lines. Additionally, we include an updated approach using a spin-embryoid body (spin-EB) differentiation system that allows for human NK cell development completely defined in vitro conditions.

  4. Twelve Cases of Malignant Hematopathy Treated by Combined Therapy of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation andChinese Herbal Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞荣喜; 周郁鸿; 朱宁希; 沈建平; 胡致平; 罗秀素; 林圣云; 沈一平; 陈均法; 孙洁

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with Chinese herbal medicine in treating malignant hematopathy.Methods: Allo-bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) or allo-peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT), with conditioning regimen of 60  Co total body irradiation + Cyclophosphamide (TBI+Cy) or busulfan + cyclophosphamide (Bu+Cy), was used to treat 4 cases of chronic granu locytic leukemia (CGL, 3 of chronic phase and 1 of accelerating phase) and one case of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). And auto-BMT or auto-PBSCT, with conditioning regimen of my leran + cytosino arabinoside +cyclophosphamide (MAC) or MAC+VP16, was used to tr eat 7 cases of hematopathy, including 5 cases of ANLL (3 of CR 1 and 2 of CR 2) and 2 cases of malignant lymphoma (1 of the first occurrence and 1 of relapse). Chinese herbal medicine was given orally to all the 12 patients after transplantation according to TCM Syndrome Differentiation. Results: All patients were successfully engrafted. Within the median follow-up period of 18 (4-70) months, 1 patient (8.3%) died a transplantation-related death, 3 ( 25.0% ) relapsed and 8 (66.7%) survived free of original disease. Conclusion: Auto-BMT or auto-PBSCT in CR 1 stage of acute leukemia could reduce the relapse rate, when there was no matched bone marow donor; allo-BMT or allo-PBSCT in chronic stage could result in long-term disease-free survival of patients; Chinese herbal medicine administration in patients of malignant hematopathy after transplantation might reduce the complications and plays certain rol e in promoting recovery of hematopoietic function.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) marks hematopoietic stem cells in human embryonic, fetal, and adult hematopoietic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokubaitis, Vanta J.; Sinka, Lidia; Driessen, Rebecca; Whitty, Genevieve; Haylock, David N.; Bertoncello, Ivan; Smith, Ian; Peault, Bruno; Tavian, Manuela; Simmons, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that mAb BB9 reacts with a subset of CD34(+) human BM cells with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) characteristics. Here we map B89 expression throughout hernatopoietic development and show that the earliest definitive HSCs that arise at the ventral wall of the aorta and surrou

  6. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  7. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  8. Regulatory functions of TRAIL in hematopoietic progenitors: human umbilical cord blood and murine bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, K; Stein, J; Pearl-Yafe, M; Kaplan, O; Yaniv, I; Askenasy, N

    2010-07-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) signaling pathway has selective toxicity to malignant cells. The TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 are expressed at low levels in human umbilical cord blood cells (3-15%) and are upregulated by incubation with the cognate ligand, triggering apoptosis in 70-80% of receptor-positive cells (P<0.001). Apoptosis is not induced in hematopoietic progenitors, as determined from sustained severe combined immunodeficiency reconstituting potential and clonogenic activity. Furthermore, elimination of dead cells after incubation with TRAIL for 72 h results in a threefold enrichment in myeloid progenitors. Exposure to TRAIL in semisolid cultures showed synergistic activity of DR4 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in recruiting lineage-negative (lin(-)) and CD34(+) progenitors and in promoting the formation of large colonies. In murine bone marrow, approximately 30% of lin(-) cells express TRAIL-R2 (the only murine receptor), and the receptor is upregulated after transplantation in cycling and differentiating donor cells that home to the host marrow. However, this receptor is almost ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive (lin(-)SCA-1(+)c-kit(+)) progenitors, and stimulates the clonogenic activity of lin(-) cells (P<0.001), suggesting a tropic function after transplantation. It is concluded that TRAIL does not trigger apoptosis in hematopoietic progenitors, and upregulation of its cognate receptors under stress conditions mediates tropic signaling that supports recovery from hypoplasia.

  9. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an...

  10. Diagnostic strategies for invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Wingard, John R

    2013-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) frequently occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies (HMs) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Early diagnosis of IFI in these patients facilitates prompt institution of therapy and leads to improved clinical outcomes. This article reviews widely used methodologies for diagnosing IFIs in patients with HM and HSCT recipients. Advantages and limitations of radiologic studies; microbiologic and histopathologic techniques; fungal biomarker assays, including those for galactomannan antigen and β-(1-3)-D-glucan; and molecular assays that are available to establish an early diagnosis of clinically relevant invasive fungal infections are discussed. Recommendations are provided regarding effective use of these methodologies in clinical practice.

  11. Expression from second-generation feline immunodeficiency virus vectors is impaired in human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Mary A; Case, Scott S; Carbonaro, Denise A; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Petersen, Denise; Sabo, Kathleen M; Curran, Michael A; Engel, Barbara C; Margarian, Hovanes; Abkowitz, Janis L; Nolan, Garry P; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M

    2002-11-01

    Vectors based on the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) have been developed as an alternative to those based on another lentivirus, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), because of theoretical safety advantages. We compared the efficiency of gene transfer and expression in human and feline hematopoietic progenitors using second-generation HIV-1 and FIV-based vectors. Vector pairs were tested using either human cytomegalovirus or murine phospho-glycerate kinase (PGK) internal promoters and were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). Vector proviral copy numbers were similar in human and feline hematopoietic primary cells and cell lines transduced by HIV-1 or FIV vectors, demonstrating that both vectors are able to transfer genes efficiently to these cell types. HIV-1 vectors were well expressed in human primary hematopoietic cells and cell lines. However, transgene expression from FIV vectors was almost undetectable in human hematopoietic cells. In contrast, the FIV vector was expressed well in primary hematopoietic feline cells and human non-hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that low transgene expression from the FIV vector is a phenomenon specific to human hematopoietic cells. Northern blot analysis demonstrated decreased vector transcript levels in human CEM cells transduced with FIV relative to cells transduced with HIV-1, despite high vector copy numbers. No evidence of vector transcript instability was seen in studies of transduced CEM cells treated with actinomycin D. We conclude that FIV vectors can transfer genes into human hematopoietic cells as effectively as HIV-1 vectors, but that unknown elements in the current FIV backbone inhibit expression from FIV vectors in human hematopoietic cells.

  12. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

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    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

  13. Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Can Survive In Vitro for Several Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ishigaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis could be achieved using the cells differentiated from primate embryonic stem (ES cells. Thus, we speculated that hematopoietic stem cells differentiated from ES cells could sustain long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether human hematopoietic stem cells could similarly sustain long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis in the same culture system. Although the results varied between experiments, presumably due to differences in the quality of each hematopoietic stem cell sample, long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis was observed to last up to nine months. Furthermore, an in vivo analysis in which cultured cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice indicated that even after several months of culture, hematopoietic stem cells were still present in the cultured cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show that human hematopoietic stem cells can survive in vitro for several months.

  14. GLO1 Overexpression in Human Malignant Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Warner B; Cabello, Christopher M; Uchida, Koji; Bause, Alexandra S; Wondrak, Georg T

    2010-01-01

    Glyoxalase I [lactoylglutathione lyase (EC 4.4.1.5) encoded by GLO1] is a ubiquitous cellular defense enzyme involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic byproduct of glycolysis. Accumulative evidence suggests an important role of GLO1 expression in protection against methylglyoxal-dependent protein adduction and cellular damage associated with diabetes, cancer, and chronological aging. Based on the hypothesis that GLO1 upregulation may play a functional role in glycolytic adaptations of cancer cells, we examined GLO1 expression status in human melanoma tissue. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a cDNA tissue array containing 40 human melanoma tissues (stages III and IV) and 13 healthy controls revealed pronounced upregulation of GLO1 expression at the mRNA level. Immunohistochemical analysis of a melanoma tissue microarray confirmed upregulation of glyoxalase 1 protein levels in malignant melanoma tissue versus healthy human skin. Consistent with an essential role of GLO1 in melanoma cell defense against methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, siRNA interference targeting GLO1-expression (siGLO1) sensitized A375 and G361 human metastatic melanoma cells towards the antiproliferative, apoptogenic, and oxidative stress-inducing activity of exogenous methylglyoxal. Protein adduction by methylglyoxal was increased in siGLO1-transfected cells as revealed by immunodetection using a monoclonal antibody directed against the major methylglyoxal-derived epitope argpyrimidine that detected a single band of methylglyoxal-adducted protein in human LOX, G361, and A375 total cell lysates. Using 2D-proteomics followed by mass spectrometry the methylglyoxal-adducted protein was identified as heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27; HSPB1). Taken together, our data suggest a function of GLO1 in the regulation of detoxification and target-adduction by the glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal in malignant melanoma. PMID:20093988

  15. Effect of Deep Space Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Bennett, Paula; Swider, Cezary R.; Sutherland, Betsy M.; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    Astronaut flight crews on long-term missions in deep space will be exposed to a unique radiation environment as a result of exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This environment consists predominantly of high energy protons, helium and high charge, high energy (HZE) atomic nuclei from iron predominantly, but all other elements as well. The effect of such particles, alone, or in combination, on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) has not been well studied but is clearly of interest since blood forming cells are known to be sensitive to radiation, and irreversible damage to these cells could quickly compromise a mission due to loss of marrow function. To better understand the effects of GCR and SPE on human stem/progenitor cell function, we have exposed partially purified CD34+ normal human marrow cells to protons, radioactive Fe, and Ti, alone, and in combination at varying doses up to 70cGy, and down to 1, 2, and 4 particle hits per nucleus. We then examined the effects of these radiations on HSPC function, as assessed by the ability to form CFU-GEMM, and LTCIC colonies in semi-solid culture medium. At the highest doses (50 and 70cGy), all radiation types tested significantly diminished the ability of CD34+ cells to form such colonies. The number of CFU-GEMM in irradiated samples was 70-90

  16. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  17. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Fen; Wu, Mengyao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), provide a new cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical toxicity screening. Understanding of the onset and the sequential process of hematopoietic cells from differentiated hPSCs will enable the achievement of personalized medicine and provide an in vitro platform for studying of human hematopoietic development and disease. During embryogenesis, hemogenic endothelial cells, a specified subset of endothelial cells in embryonic endothelium, are the primary source of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this review, we discuss current status in the generation of multipotent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from hPSCs via hemogenic endothelial cells. We also review the achievements in direct reprogramming from non-hematopoietic cells to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further characterization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs will improve our understanding of blood development and expedite the development of hPSC-derived blood products for therapeutic purpose.

  18. Brief Report: Efficient Generation of Hematopoietic Precursors and Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S.; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K.; Firth, Amy L.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Berggren, W. Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    2012-01-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD341 and CD45+/CD341/CD38− hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD341) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability. PMID:21544903

  19. Brief report: efficient generation of hematopoietic precursors and progenitors from human pluripotent stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K; Firth, Amy L; Brennand, Kristen J; Berggren, W Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2011-07-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD34+ and CD45+/CD34+/CD38- hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD34+) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability.

  20. Cholesteryl esters in human malignant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M R; Bottura, G; Lucchi, P; Reggiani, A; Trinchero, A; Tugnoli, V

    2003-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CholE) were detected in human malignant neoplasms by means of in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of the total lipid extracts obtained from cerebral tumors revealed appreciable amount of esterified cholesterol in high grade gliomas such as glioblastomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, characterized by prominent neovascularity. The finding that no CholE were detected in the healthy brain and in low grade and benign tumors supports a possible correlation between this class of lipids and histological vascular proliferation. Compared with high grade gliomas, renal cell carcinomas show higher levels of CholE, absent in the healthy renal parenchyma and in benign oncocytomas. In nefro-carcinomas, cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and prominent vascularization contribute to the increased levels of CholE present mainly as oleate. CholE are discussed as potential biochemical markers of cancer and as a target for new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  2. Longitudinal Changes in Body Mass and Composition in Survivors of Childhood Hematologic Malignancies After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Yang, Jie; Kaste, Sue C.; Hartford, Christine M.; Motosue, Megan S.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Triplett, Brandon M.; Shook, David R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To measure longitudinal changes in body mass and composition in survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients and Methods Body mass index (BMI) was analyzed in 179 survivors by category (underweight, healthy-weight, overweight, and obese) and by z score. Fat and lean body mass measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was analyzed as z scores. Results Over a median 6.6 years of follow-up, BMI z scores diminished significantly (0.32 pre-HSCT v −0.60 at 10 years post-HSCT; P < .001). Mean z scores for fat mass stayed within population norms, but those for lean mass remained below normal levels and diminished significantly over time (P = .018). Pre-HSCT BMI category and/or z score were strongly predictive of post-HSCT BMI (P < .001) and of fat and lean mass z scores (both P < .001). Survivors with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease were more likely than others to have low BMI (P = .004) and low lean mass (P < .001) post-HSCT. Older age at HSCT (P = .015) and T-cell–depleted graft (P = .018) were predictive of lower post-HSCT BMI. Female patients had higher body fat (P = .002) and lower lean mass (P = .013) z scores than male patients, and black patients had higher fat mass z scores than white patients (P = .026). Conclusion BMI declines significantly after allogeneic HSCT for childhood hematologic malignancies, reflecting primarily a substantial decrease in lean mass but not fat mass. Monitoring and preservation of BMI and lean mass are vital, especially in those with the identified risk factors. PMID:23032628

  3. The kinetics of hematopoietic niche cytokines and their influence on mobilization efficacy and timing in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigielska-Kaplon, Anna; Krawczynska, Anna; Czemerska, Magdalena; Pluta, Agnieszka; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Robak, Marta; Grzybowska-Izydorczyk, Olga; Szmigielska, Katarzyna; Robak, Tadeusz; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2015-08-01

    The bone marrow niche functions are modulated by complicated cytokines network. The aim of our study was to evaluate the levels of VCAM-1, VEGF, MMP-9 and SDF during mobilization of CD34+ cells in patients with hematological malignancies. Thirty four patients were enrolled to the study (19F, 15 M) at median age of 57 years. The group consisted of patients with multiple myeloma (26) and lymphoma (8). The mobilization procedures comprised chemotherapy and then G-CSF. Blood samples were collected before chemotherapy (N = 34) and on the day of the first apheresis (N = 26). Cytokines were evaluated with ELISA assay. We observed significant increase in VCAM-1 levels during mobilization. On contrary, VEGF and SDF levels decreased during mobilization procedure. The levels of MMP-9 were stable during mobilization. We divided patients according to baseline cytokines levels below and above median into "low" and "high" expressors. The group of VEGF "low" expressors had longer median time of G-CSF treatment before first apheresis than 'high' expressors. Baseline VEGF levels correlated adversely with duration of G-CSF treatment before first apheresis. Patients were also divided according to median cytokines levels at apheresis into "low" and "high" expressors. "High" VCAM-1 expressors had higher CD34+in peripheral blood as well as higher CD34+numbers collected during first apheresis than "low" expressors. In conclusion, the levels of niche cytokines change significantly during mobilization in patients with hematopoietic malignancies. Baseline VEGF can influence timing of mobilization. Higher VCAM-1 corresponds with higher mobilization efficacy.

  4. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Girmenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  5. Improved Outcomes of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Infantile Malignant Osteopetrosis Using Fludarabine-Based Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsheh, Juma; Drozdinsky, Genady; Simanovsky, Natalia; Lamdan, Ron; Erlich, Odeya; Gorelik, Natan; Or, Reuven; Weintraub, Michael; Stepensky, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for infantile malignant osteopetrosis (IMO), but is associated with a high incidence of adverse outcomes. In this study, we present our experience with HSCT for IMO patients comparing different types of conditioning regimens. Thirty-eight patients with IMO (aged from 1 month to 6 years, median 0.66 years) who underwent allogeneic HSCT from 1983 in our hospital were included in this retrospective study. Fludarabine-based conditioning regimens were used in 26 patients and 12 patients were transplanted using other conditioning regimens. The overall survival after conditioning with fludarabine was 96% (25/26) versus 58% (7/12) for the alternative regimens (P = 0.004), with significantly fewer adverse effects including hypercalcemia and veno-occlusive disease of liver. All patients who survive are clinically well. We conclude that fludarabine-based conditioning regimens are safe and effective in patients with IMO, improving morbidity and mortality related to HSCT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic cells maintain core epigenetic machinery of the polycomb group/Trithorax Group complexes distinctly from functional adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, Angelique; Lee, Jung Bok; Graham, Monica; Guezguez, Borhane; Bhatia, Mickie

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have a number of potential utilities, including the modeling of hematological disorders in vitro, whereas the use for cell replacement therapies has proved to be a loftier goal. This is due to the failure of differentiated hematopoietic cells, derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), to functionally recapitulate the in vivo properties of bona fide adult hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). To better understand the limitations of differentiation programming at the molecular level, we have utilized differential gene expression analysis of highly purified cells that are enriched for hematopoietic repopulating activity across embryonic, fetal, and adult human samples, including in vivo explants of human HSPCs 8-weeks post-transplantation. We reveal that hESC-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells (eHPCs) fail to express critical transcription factors which are known to govern self-renewal and myeloid/lymphoid development and instead retain the expression of Polycomb Group (PcG) and Trithorax Group (TrxG) factors which are more prevalent in embryonic cell types that include EZH1 and ASH1L, respectively. These molecular profiles indicate that the differential expression of the core epigenetic machinery comprising PcGs/TrxGs in eHPCs may serve as previously unexplored molecular targets that direct hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs toward functional HSPCs in humans.

  7. Value of bioimpedance analysis and anthropometry for complication prediction in children with malignant and non-malignant diseases after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Tseytlin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is widely used in the treatment of malignant and autoimmune diseases. Various complications often develop during the post-transplantation period that can significantly impair the clinical outcomes, so the ability to predict therisk of severe complications is of great practical importance. Predictive value of some anthropometric indices and bioimpedance analysis(BIA measured before conditioning to assess the risks of serious complications and graft hypofunction in the early post-transplant period(100 days were analyzed. Anthropometry and BIA used in a comprehensive assessment of nutritional status in order to optimize the nutritional support of these patients. 101 patients were examined before conditioning and at different times during the early post-transplant period: 50 children (5–17 years of age were examined using BIA and anthropometry, 61 children (6 months – 4 years of age – using only anthropometry without BIA due to age restrictions. The prognostic value of the phase angle (FA, ratio of the active cell mass to lean body mass (ACM/LBM and shoulder muscle circumference (SMC was shown. Thus, in patients with FA ≤ 4, ACM/LBM < 0.45 and SMC ≤ 10th percentile before conditioning risk of severe complications during early post-transplant period was significantly higher (p < 0.05. Also, in patients with FA ≤ 4 and ACM/LBM < 0.45 a significantly higher risk of graft hypofunction developing was observed (p < 0.05.

  8. Human and murine amniotic fluid c-Kit+Lin- cells display hematopoietic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditadi, Andrea; de Coppi, Paolo; Picone, Olivier; Gautreau, Laetitia; Smati, Rim; Six, Emmanuelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Ezine, Sophie; Frydman, René; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2009-04-23

    We have isolated c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells from both human and murine amniotic fluid (AF) and investigated their hematopoietic potential. In vitro, the c-Kit(+)Lin(-) population in both species displayed a multilineage hematopoietic potential, as demonstrated by the generation of erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. In vivo, cells belonging to all 3 hematopoietic lineages were found after primary and secondary transplantation of murine c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells into immunocompromised hosts, thus demonstrating the ability of these cells to self-renew. Gene expression analysis of c-Kit(+) cells isolated from murine AF confirmed these results. The presence of cells with similar characteristics in the surrounding amnion indicates the possible origin of AF c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells. This is the first report showing that cells isolated from the AF do have hematopoietic potential; our results support the idea that AF may be a new source of stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  9. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  10. A Genetic Screen Reveals an Unexpected Role for Yorkie Signaling in JAK/STAT-Dependent Hematopoietic Malignancies in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Abigail M.; Bailetti, Alessandro A.; Rodkin, Elizabeth; De, Atish; Bach, Erika A.

    2017-01-01

    A gain-of-function mutation in the tyrosine kinase JAK2 (JAK2V617F) causes human myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). These patients present with high numbers of myeloid lineage cells and have numerous complications. Since current MPN therapies are not curative, there is a need to find new regulators and targets of Janus kinase/Signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling that may represent additional clinical interventions . Drosophila melanogaster offers a low complexity model to study MPNs as JAK/STAT signaling is simplified with only one JAK [Hopscotch (Hop)] and one STAT (Stat92E). hopTumorous-lethal (Tum-l) is a gain-of-function mutation that causes dramatic expansion of myeloid cells, which then form lethal melanotic tumors. Through an F1 deficiency (Df) screen, we identified 11 suppressors and 35 enhancers of melanotic tumors in hopTum-l animals. Dfs that uncover the Hippo (Hpo) pathway genes expanded (ex) and warts (wts) strongly enhanced the hopTum-l tumor burden, as did mutations in ex, wts, and other Hpo pathway genes. Target genes of the Hpo pathway effector Yorkie (Yki) were significantly upregulated in hopTum-l blood cells, indicating that Yki signaling was increased. Ectopic hematopoietic activation of Yki in otherwise wild-type animals increased hemocyte proliferation but did not induce melanotic tumors. However, hematopoietic depletion of Yki significantly reduced the hopTum-l tumor burden, demonstrating that Yki is required for melanotic tumors in this background. These results support a model in which elevated Yki signaling increases the number of hemocytes, which become melanotic tumors as a result of elevated JAK/STAT signaling. PMID:28620086

  11. Human herpesvirus 6 in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Masao

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenetic roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 in lymphoproliferative diseases have been of continued interest. Many molecular studies have tried to establish a pathogenic role for HHV-6 in lymphoid malignancies. However, whether HHV-6 plays a role in these pathologies remains unclear, as positive polymerase chain reaction results for HHV-6 in those studies may reflect latent infection or reactivation rather than presence of HHV-6 in neoplastic cells. A small number of studies have investigated HHV-6 antigen expression in pathologic specimens. As a result, the lack of HHV-6 antigen expression on neoplastic cells argues against any major pathogenic role of HHV-6. The role of HHV-6 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has also been of interest but remains controversial, with 2 studies documenting higher levels of HHV-6 antibody in ALL patients, and another 2 large-scale studies finding no significant differences in HHV-6 seroprevalences between ALL patients and controls. Alternatively, HHV-6 is increasingly recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen. HHV-6 reactivation is common among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and is linked to various clinical manifestations. In particular, HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be significant, life-threatening complication. Most HHV-6 encephalitis develops in patients receiving transplant from an unrelated donor, particularly cord blood, typically around the time of engraftment. Symptoms are characterized by short-term memory loss and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Prognosis for HHV-6 encephalitis is poor, but appropriate prophylactic measures have not been established. Establishment of preventive strategies against HHV-6 encephalitis represents an important challenge for physicians involved with SCT.

  12. Characterization of hematopoietic GATA transcription factor expression in mouse and human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheenstra, Maaike R; Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Li, Eveline; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key initiators and regulators of the immune response. The development of the DC lineage and their subsets requires an orchestrated regulation of their transcriptional program. Gata1, a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic cell lineages, has been recently reported to be required for mouse DC development and function. In humans, GATA1 is involved in the lineage separation between monocyte-derived DCs and Langerhans cells (LC) and loss of GATA1 results in differentiation arrest at the monocyte stage. The hematopoietic GATA factors (i.e. Gata1, Gata2, Gata3) are known to regulate each other's expression and to function consecutively throughout lineage commitment (so-called GATA switch). In humans, mutations in GATA2 are causative of MonoMAC disease, a human immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by loss of DCs, monocytes, B and NK cells. However, additional data on the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in the DC lineage is missing. In this study, we have characterized the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in murine and human DCs and their expression dynamics upon TLR stimulation. We found that all hematopoietic GATA factors are expressed in DCs, but identified species-specific differences in the relative expression of each GATA factor, and how their expression fluctuates upon stimulation.

  13. Differential requirements for hematopoietic commitment between human and rhesus embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Deepika; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Wolf, Don P; Slukvin, Igor; Thomson, James A; Shaaban, Aimen F

    2007-02-01

    Progress toward clinical application of ESC-derived hematopoietic cellular transplantation will require rigorous evaluation in a large animal allogeneic model. However, in contrast to human ESCs (hESCs), efforts to induce conclusive hematopoietic differentiation from rhesus macaque ESCs (rESCs) have been unsuccessful. Characterizing these poorly understood functional differences will facilitate progress in this area and likely clarify the critical steps involved in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. To accomplish this goal, we compared the hematopoietic differentiation of hESCs with that of rESCs in both EB culture and stroma coculture. Initially, undifferentiated rESCs and hESCs were adapted to growth on Matrigel without a change in their phenotype or karyotype. Subsequent differentiation of rESCs in OP9 stroma led to the development of CD34(+)CD45(-) cells that gave rise to endothelial cell networks in methylcellulose culture. In the same conditions, hESCs exhibited convincing hematopoietic differentiation. In cytokine-supplemented EB culture, rESCs demonstrated improved hematopoietic differentiation with higher levels of CD34(+) and detectable levels of CD45(+) cells. However, these levels remained dramatically lower than those for hESCs in identical culture conditions. Subsequent plating of cytokine-supplemented rhesus EBs in methylcellulose culture led to the formation of mixed colonies of erythroid, myeloid, and endothelial cells, confirming the existence of bipotential hematoendothelial progenitors in the cytokine-supplemented EB cultures. Evaluation of four different rESC lines confirmed the validity of these disparities. Although rESCs have the potential for hematopoietic differentiation, they exhibit a pause at the hemangioblast stage of hematopoietic development in culture conditions developed for hESCs.

  14. Fetal stromal niches enhance human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic differentiation and globin switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, King Yiu; Fong, Benny Shu Pan; Tsang, Kam Sze; Lau, Tze Kin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Lam, Audrey Carmen; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Wang, Chi Chiu; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Li, Chi Kong; Li, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis during mammalian embryonic development has been perceived as a migratory phenomenon, from the yolk sac blood island to the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), and subsequently, the fetal bone marrow. In this study, we investigated the effects of primary stromal cells from fetal hematopoietic niches and their conditioned media (CM), applied singly or in sequential orders, on induction of human embryonic stem cells, H1, H9, and H14 lines, to hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrated that stromal support of FL, AGM + FL, and AGM + FL + fetal bone marrow significantly increased the proliferation of embryoid bodies (EB) at day 18 of hematopoietic induction in the presence of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, and Flt-3 ligand. AGM + FL also increased hematopoietic colony-forming unit (CFU) formation. CM did not enhance EB proliferation but CM of FL and AGM + FL significantly increased the density of total CFU and early erythroid (burst-forming unit) progenitors. Increased commitment to the hematopoietic lineage was demonstrated by enhanced expressions of CD45, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globins in CFU at day 32, compared with EB at day 18. CM of FL significantly increased these globin expressions, indicating enhanced switches from embryonic to fetal and adult erythropoiesis. Over 50% and 10% of cells derived from CFU expressed CD45 and beta-globin proteins, respectively. Expressions of hematopoietic regulatory genes (Bmi-1, β-Catenin, Hox B4, GATA-1) were increased in EB or CFU cultures supported by FL or sequential CM. Our study has provided a strategy for derivation of hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells under the influence of primary hematopoietic niches and CM, particularly the FL.

  15. ABNORMAL PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To survey the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the pathogenesis of several hematopoietic malignancies. Methods: By reviewing the published laboratory and clinical studies on PTK-related oncoproteins and their causative role in some leukemias and lymphomas. Results: Protein tyrosine kinases are key participants in signal transduction pathways that regulate cellular growth, activation and differentiations. Aberrant PTK activity resulting from gene mutation (often accompanying chromosome translocation) plays an etiologic role in several clonal hematopoietic malignancies. For example, the PTK product of the BCR-ABL fusion gene resulting from the t (9; 22) translocation exhibits several fold higher tyrosine kinase activity than the product of the ABL gene. Evidence suggests that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein alone is sufficient to case chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other Ph positive acute leukemia. PTK over-activity resulting from chromosomal translocations creating TEL-ABL, TEL-JAK2 and TEL-PDGFR( fusion proteins plays an important role in the pathogenesis of other types of leukemia. Another example occurs in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Experimental and clinical evidences indicate that translocations involving ALK gene on chromosome 2p23, most commonly resulting in an NPM-ALK fusion oncogene, result in constitutive activation of ALK and cause ALCL. This group of lymphomas is now named ALK positive lymphoma or ALKoma. Conclusion: Genetic lesions creating aberrant fusion proteins that result in excessive PTK activity are increasingly being recognized as central to the pathogenesis of hemotopoietic malignancies. These chimeric PTK molecules represent attractive disease-specific targets against which new classes therapeutic agents are being developed.

  16. Intercellular crosstalk in human malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořánková, Barbora; Szabo, Pavol; Kodet, Ondřej; Strnad, Hynek; Kolář, Michal; Lacina, Lukáš; Krejčí, Eliška; Naňka, Ondřej; Šedo, Aleksi; Smetana, Karel

    2017-05-01

    Incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing globally. While the initial stages of tumors can be easily treated by a simple surgery, the therapy of advanced stages is rather limited. Melanoma cells spread rapidly through the body of a patient to form multiple metastases. Consequently, the survival rate is poor. Therefore, emphasis in melanoma research is given on early diagnosis and development of novel and more potent therapeutic options. The malignant melanoma is arising from melanocytes, cells protecting mitotically active keratinocytes against damage caused by UV light irradiation. The melanocytes originate in the neural crest and consequently migrate to the epidermis. The relationship between the melanoma cells, the melanocytes, and neural crest stem cells manifests when the melanoma cells are implanted to an early embryo: they use similar migratory routes as the normal neural crest cells. Moreover, malignant potential of these melanoma cells is overdriven in this experimental model, probably due to microenvironmental reprogramming. This observation demonstrates the crucial role of the microenvironment in melanoma biology. Indeed, malignant tumors in general represent complex ecosystems, where multiple cell types influence the growth of genetically mutated cancer cells. This concept is directly applicable to the malignant melanoma. Our review article focuses on possible strategies to modify the intercellular crosstalk in melanoma that can be employed for therapeutic purposes.

  17. Effects of endotoxin on proliferation of human hematopoietic cell precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Rinehart, John J.; Keville, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    In examining the effects of corticosteroids on hematopoiesis in vitro, we observed that results were highly dependent on the lot of commercial fetal calf serum (FCS) utilized. We hypothesized that this variability correlated with the picogram (pg) level of endotoxin contaminating the FCS. Randomly obtained commercial lots of FCS contained 0.39 to 187 pg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Standard FCS concentrations in hematopoietic precursor proliferation assays (granulocyte-marcrophage colony f...

  18. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitors for studies of dendritic cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of distinct dendritic cell (DC) function and differentiation pathways is important in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. This includes infectious and neoplastic diseases, vaccination and immunotherapy, allograft rejection, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitor cells provide a valuable model for studies on DC biology and may help uncover new means to manipulate DC differentiation and function in therapeutic settings. Here, a detailed protocol for the isolation of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from human cord blood is described. The isolated cell population consists of approximately 85% CD34+ CD45+ hematopoietic progenitor cells that in response to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expand and differentiate into CD11c+ HLA-DR+ DC-expressing CD1a.

  19. Chromosomal patterns in human malignant astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J A; Bello, M J; de Campos, J M; Kusak, M E; Ramos, C; Benitez, J

    1987-12-01

    Cytogenetic analysis by direct and/or in vitro preparations was performed on 34 malignant astrocytomas. Thirty tumors showed near-diploid chromosome numbers, whereas, tritetraploid chromosome complements were present in four tumors. The most frequent chromosomal changes implied numerical deviations by a gain of chromosomes #7, #19, and #20, and by losses of #10, #22, and Y. Structural rearrangements were present in stem- or side lines of 24 tumors. Although no common chromosomal rearrangement seems to exist among those tumors, chromosomes #1, #6, #7, and #9 were predominantly involved. Polysomy and structural rearrangements of chromosome #7 could be related to the overexpression of epidermal growth factor gene, previously observed in some malignant gliomas.

  20. The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and ...

  1. Nucleofection, an efficient nonviral method to transfer genes into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levetzow, G. von; Spanholtz, J.; Beckmann, J.; Fischer, J.; Kogler, G.; Wernet, P.; Punzel, M.; Giebel, B.

    2006-01-01

    The targeted manipulation of the genetic program of single cells as well as of complete organisms has strongly enhanced our understanding of cellular and developmental processes and should also help to increase our knowledge of primary human stem cells, e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), within

  2. Identification of a novel population of human cord blood cells with hematopoietic and chondrocytic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen E JAY; Anne ROULEAU; T Michael UNDERHILL; Mickie BHATIA

    2004-01-01

    With the exception of mature erythrocytes, cells within the human hematopoietic system are characterized by the cell surface expression of the pan-leukocyte receptor CD45. Here, we identify a novel subset among mononuclear cord blood cells depleted of lineage commitment markers (Lin-) that are devoid of CD45 expression. Surprisingly, functional examination of Lin-CD45- cells also lacking cell surface CD34 revealed they were capable of multipotential hematopoietic progenitor capacity. Co-culture with mouse embryonic limb bud cells demonstrated that Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were capable of contributing to cartilage nodules and differentiating into human chondrocytes. BMP-4, a mesodermal factor known to promote chondrogenesis, significantly augmented Lin-CD45-CD34- differentiation into chondrocytes.Moreover, unlike CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells, Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were unable to proliferate or survive in liquid cultures, whereas single Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were able to chimerize the inner cell mass (ICM) of murine blastocysts and proliferate in this embryonic environment. Our study identifies a novel population of Lin-CD45-CD34-cells capable of commitment into both hematopoietic and chondrocytic lineages, suggesting that human cord blood may provide a more ubiquitous source of tissue with broader developmental potential than previously appreciated.

  3. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  4. Intercellular network structure and regulatory motifs in the human hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, Weijia; Laurenti, Elisa; Turinsky, Andrei L; Wodak, Shoshana J; Bader, Gary D; Dick, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2014-07-15

    The hematopoietic system is a distributed tissue that consists of functionally distinct cell types continuously produced through hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation. Combining genomic and phenotypic data with high-content experiments, we have built a directional cell-cell communication network between 12 cell types isolated from human umbilical cord blood. Network structure analysis revealed that ligand production is cell type dependent, whereas ligand binding is promiscuous. Consequently, additional control strategies such as cell frequency modulation and compartmentalization were needed to achieve specificity in HSC fate regulation. Incorporating the in vitro effects (quiescence, self-renewal, proliferation, or differentiation) of 27 HSC binding ligands into the topology of the cell-cell communication network allowed coding of cell type-dependent feedback regulation of HSC fate. Pathway enrichment analysis identified intracellular regulatory motifs enriched in these cell type- and ligand-coupled responses. This study uncovers cellular mechanisms of hematopoietic cell feedback in HSC fate regulation, provides insight into the design principles of the human hematopoietic system, and serves as a foundation for the analysis of intercellular regulation in multicellular systems.

  5. Different Motile Behaviors of Human Hematopoietic Stem versus Progenitor Cells at the Osteoblastic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in our understanding of interactions between mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and their niche, little is known about communication between human HSCs and the microenvironment. Using a xenotransplantation model and intravital imaging, we demonstrate that human HSCs display distinct motile behaviors to their hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC counterparts, and the same pattern can be found between mouse HSCs and HPCs. HSCs become significantly less motile after transplantation, while progenitor cells remain motile. We show that human HSCs take longer to find their niche than previously expected and suggest that the niche be defined as the position where HSCs stop moving. Intravital imaging is the only technique to determine where in the bone marrow stem cells stop moving, and future analyses should focus on the environment surrounding the HSC at this point.

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  7. Phase I study of temozolomide in combination with thiotepa and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in patients with malignant brain tumors with minimal residual disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, G; Cervone, K A; Philips, P C; Belasco, J B; Finlay, J L; Gardner, S L

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence of malignant brain tumors results in a poor prognosis with limited treatment options. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AHCR) has been used in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors and has shown improved outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy. Temozolomide is standard therapy for glioblastoma and has also shown activity in patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET), particularly those with recurrent disease. Temozolomide was administered twice daily on days -10 to -6, followed by thiotepa 300 mg/m(2) per day and carboplatin dosed using the Calvert formula or body surface area on days -5 to -3, with AHCR day 0. Twenty-seven patients aged 3-46 years were enrolled. Diagnoses included high-grade glioma (n=12); medulloblastoma/PNET (n=9); central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumor (n=4); ependymoma (n=1) and spinal cord PNET (n=1). Temozolomide doses ranged from 100 mg/m(2) per day to 400 mg/m(2) per day. There were no toxic deaths. Prolonged survival was noted in several patients including those with recurrent high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma and CNS germ cell tumor. Increased doses of temozolomide are feasible with AHCR. A phase II study using temozolomide, carboplatin and thiotepa with AHCR for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors is being conducted through the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium.

  8. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these "humanized models" is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow for optimal development of human immune systems. However, there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells, and innate immune cells.

  9. Functional analysis of human hematopoietic stem cell gene expression using zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig E Eckfeldt

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although several reports have characterized the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transcriptome, the roles of HSC-specific genes in hematopoiesis remain elusive. To identify candidate regulators of HSC fate decisions, we compared the transcriptome of human umbilical cord blood and bone marrow (CD34+(CD33-(CD38-Rho(lo(c-kit+ cells, enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with (CD34+(CD33-(CD38-Rho(hi cells, enriched in committed progenitors. We identified 277 differentially expressed transcripts conserved in these ontogenically distinct cell sources. We next performed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO-based functional screen in zebrafish to determine the hematopoietic function of 61 genes that had no previously known function in HSC biology and for which a likely zebrafish ortholog could be identified. MO knock down of 14/61 (23% of the differentially expressed transcripts resulted in hematopoietic defects in developing zebrafish embryos, as demonstrated by altered levels of circulating blood cells at 30 and 48 h postfertilization and subsequently confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for erythroid-specific hbae1 and myeloid-specific lcp1 transcripts. Recapitulating the knockdown phenotype using a second MO of independent sequence, absence of the phenotype using a mismatched MO sequence, and rescue of the phenotype by cDNA-based overexpression of the targeted transcript for zebrafish spry4 confirmed the specificity of MO targeting in this system. Further characterization of the spry4-deficient zebrafish embryos demonstrated that hematopoietic defects were not due to more widespread defects in the mesodermal development, and therefore represented primary defects in HSC specification, proliferation, and/or differentiation. Overall, this high-throughput screen for the functional validation of differentially expressed genes using a zebrafish model of hematopoiesis represents a major step toward obtaining meaningful information from global

  10. HCG variants, the growth factors which drive human malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Laurence A

    2012-01-01

    The term human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) refers to a group of 5 molecules, each sharing the common amino acid sequence but each differing in meric structure and carbohydrate side chain structure. The 5 molecules are each produced by separate cells and each having separate biological functions. hCG and sulfated hCG are hormones produced by placental syncytiotrophoblast cells and pituitary gonadotrope cells. Hyperglycosylated hCG is an autocrine produced by placental cytotrophoblast cells. Hyperglycosylated hCG drives malignancy in placental cancers, and in testicular and ovarian germ cell malignancies. hCGβ and hyperglycosylated hCGβ are autocrines produce by most advanced malignancies. These molecules, particularly the malignancy promoters are presented in this review on hCG and cancer. hCGβ and hyperglycosylated hCGβ are critical to the growth and invasion, or malignancy of most advanced cancers. In many ways, while hCG may appear like a nothing, a hormone associated with pregnancy, it is not, and may be at the center of cancer research. PMID:22206043

  11. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  12. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tong, Hoang; Brindley, Paul J; Meyer, Christian G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-02-01

    Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Background and future considerations for human cord blood hematopoietic cell transplantation, including economic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Farag, Sherif

    2013-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) has been used since 1988 as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. CB has both advantages and disadvantages when compared with other tissue sources of HSCs such as bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, which are also being used in the setting of HCT. This short review focuses on some historical information, as well as current efforts that are being assessed to enhance the efficacy of CB HCT. Also of importance are the costs of CB, and the feasibility and economics of using such to be identified, and newly confirmed improvements worldwide for the greatest number of patients. In this context, simple methods that would not necessarily entail the need for selected cell-processing facilities to ex vivo expand or improve the CB graft's functional activity may be of interest, with one such possibility being the use of an orally active inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidylpeptidase 4, alone or in combination with other new and innovative approaches for improving HSC engraftment and in vivo repopulating capability of CB.

  14. THE PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF TREATMENT OFADVANCED AND RECURRENT MALIGNANT LYMPHOMA BY BEAC REGIMEN SUPPORTED WITH AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄慧强; 姜文奇; 何友兼; 孙晓非; 刘冬耕; 徐瑞华; 张力; 周中梅; 林桐榆; 李宇红; 管忠震

    2002-01-01

    Objective: High dose chemotherapy supported by autologous hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (AHSCT) has developed dramaticly in recent years and become the most effective approach to improve radical treatment for the chemo-sensitive lymphoma. The purposes of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preparative regimen BEAC and hematopoietic reconsti- tution after high dose chemotherapy in Chinese patients with advanced and recurrent lymphoma. Methods: After confirmed complete or partial remission from conventional chemotherapy, 24 patients with advanced or recurrent lymphoma including 1 recurrent HD and 23 NHL, 16 male and 8 female with median age of 29 (13(50) years, were enrolled into this study and treated by BEAC regimen (CTX 3600(4000 mg/m2, VP-16 1200 mg/m2. BCNU 300 mg/m2 and Ara-C 1500(2000 mg/m2). 3 patients were supported by ABMT and 21 by APBSCT. Mobilization regimen for APBSCT was CTX 3500 mg/m2 + G-CSF 3.5(5 (g/kg + Dexamethasone 10 mg. Autologous hematopoietic stem cells was re-infused 24(48 h after completion of high dose chemotherapy. Results: MNC 1.3 (1.0(1.7) (108/kg and MNC 1.8 (1.0(4.4) (108, CFU-GM 5.1 (1.9(9.6) (105/kg plus CD34 + cells 2.9 (1.9(8.7) (106/kg were re-infused in the ABMT group and APBSCT group respectively. All patients obtained prompt and sustained hematopoietic reconstitution. ANC (0.5 (109/L and Pt (2.0 (109/L were at day 9 (6(17) and day 10 (0(31) respectively. 16 patients were alive with median 21 (2(69) months follow-up till end of May, 2001. 1, 2 and 3 years survival rate were 60.5%, 50.1% and 50.1%, respectively. Non-hematologic toxicity was mild and tolerable. Conclusions: High dose chemotherapy supported by AHSCT in the treatment of previously-untreated poor- prognostic and recurrent lymphoma was a safe and effective modality. Further investigation was warranted.

  15. No effect of HLA-C mismatch after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated donors and T-cell depletion in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Isabelle; Uhlin, Michael; Schaffer, Marie; Sundin, Mikael; Hauzenberger, Dan; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas

    2017-08-01

    HLA-C mismatch in unrelated donor's hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been associated with poor patient outcome. However, the impact of HLA-C mismatch in the context of HSCT combined with in vivo T-cell depletion remains unclear. We therefore performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of the clinical outcome on patients with hematological malignancies treated with allo-HSCT, who underwent T-cell depletion. The majority of the patients (n=276) received a HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1-matched graft that were either also HLA-C matched (n=260), or patients with the permissive HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatch (n=16), while the remaining patients (n=95) received a HLA-C-mismatched graft (excluding HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatches). We did not observe any significant differences between the HLA-C-matched patients (including the permissive HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatch) and the HLA-C-mismatched patients regarding cumulative proportion surviving, graft failure, relapse-free survival, relapse, or acute graft-versus-host disease. Our data suggest that in the context of high dose T lymphocyte-depleting agents, HLA-C matching is not essential for patients with hematological malignancies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA stimulate human hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation into eosinophils: the role of nuclear factor-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano-Almendras, Carmen P.; Essaghir, Ahmed; Schoemans, Hélène; Varis, Inci; Noël, Laura A.; Velghe, Amélie I.; Latinne, Dominique; Knoops, Laurent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    Background ETV6-PDGFRB (also called TEL-PDGFRB) and FIP1L1-PDGFRA are receptor-tyrosine kinase fusion genes that cause chronic myeloid malignancies associated with hypereosinophilia. The aim of this work was to gain insight into the mechanisms whereby fusion genes affect human hematopoietic cells and in particular the eosinophil lineage. Design and Methods We introduced ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA into human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood. Results Cells transduced with these oncogenes formed hematopoietic colonies even in the absence of cytokines. Both oncogenes also stimulated the proliferation of cells in liquid culture and their differentiation into eosinophils. This model thus recapitulated key features of the myeloid neoplasms induced by ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA. We next showed that both fusion genes activated the transcription factors STAT1, STAT3, STAT5 and nuclear factor-κB. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibition blocked nuclear factor-κB activation in transduced progenitor cells and patients’ cells. Nuclear factor-κB was also activated in the human FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive leukemia cell line EOL1, the proliferation of which was blocked by borte-zomib and the IκB kinase inhibitor BMS-345541. A mutant IκB that prevents nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB inhibited cell growth and the expression of eosinophil markers, such as the interleukin-5 receptor and eosinophil peroxidase, in progenitors transduced with ETV6-PDGFRB. In addition, several potential regulators of this process, including HES6, MYC and FOXO3 were identified using expression microarrays. Conclusions We show that human CD34+ cells expressing PDGFR fusion oncogenes proliferate autonomously and differentiate towards the eosinophil lineage in a process that requires nuclear factor-κB. These results suggest new treatment possibilities for imatinib-resistant myeloid neoplasms associated with PDGFR mutations. PMID:22271894

  17. Raman spectroscopic identification of normal and malignant human stomach cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jipeng Yang; Jianyu Guo; Liangping Wu; Zhenrong Sun; Weiying Cai; Zugeng Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Micro-Raman spectroscopy is employed to identify the normal and malignant human stomach cells. For the cancer cell, the reduced intensity of the Raman peak at 1250 cm-1 indicates that the protein secondary structure transforms from β-sheet or disordered structures to α-helical, while the increased intensity of the symmetric PO2 stretching vibration mode at 1094 cm-1 shows the increased DNA content.

  18. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  19. Differential expression of CD150 (SLAM) family receptors by human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Romero, Xavier; Marin, Pedro; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-containing grafts are most commonly used to treat various blood diseases, including leukemias and autoimmune disorders. CD150 (SLAM) family receptors have recently been shown to be differentially expressed by mouse HSC and progenitor cells. Members of the CD150 family are key regulators of leukocyte activation and differentiation. The goal of the present study is to analyze the expression patterns of the CD150 receptors CD48, CD84, CD150 (SLAM), CD229 (Ly9), and CD244 (2B4) on the different sources of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of CD150 receptors was analyzed on human mobilized peripheral blood CD133(+)-isolated cells and CD34(+) bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord blood (CB) cells using multicolor flow cytometry. CD244 was present on most CD133(+)Lin(-)-mobilized cells and CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells, including virtually all CD38(-)Lin(-) primitive progenitor cells. CD48 had a restricted expression pattern on CD133(+)Lin(-)CD38(-) cells, while its levels were significantly higher in CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells. In addition, CD84 was present on a significant number of CD133(+)Lin(-) cells, but only on a small fraction of CD133(+)Lin(-)CD38(-) peripheral blood mobilized cells. In contrast, CD84 was expressed on practically all CD34(+)Lin(-) BM cells. No CD150 expression was observed in mobilized peripheral blood CD133(+)Lin(-) or CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells. Furthermore, only a small fraction of CD34(+)Lin(-) BM and CB cells expressed CD229. Our results show that CD150 family molecules are present on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and that their expression patterns differ between humans and mice.

  20. Sleeping Beauty-Mediated Drug Resistance Gene Transfer in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Olson, Erik R.; McIvor, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system can insert sequences into mammalian chromosomes, supporting long-term expression of both reporter and therapeutic genes. Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an ideal therapeutic gene transfer target as they are used in therapy for a variety of hematologic and metabolic conditions. As successful SB-mediated gene transfer into human CD34+ HPCs has been reported by several laboratories, we sought to extend these studies to the introduction of a therapeutic gene conferring resistance to methotrexate (MTX), potentially providing a chemoprotective effect after engraftment. SB-mediated transposition of hematopoietic progenitors, using a transposon encoding an L22Y variant dihydrofolate reductase fused to green fluorescent protein, conferred resistance to methotrexate and dipyridamole, a nucleoside transport inhibitor that tightens MTX selection conditions, as assessed by in vitro hematopoietic colony formation. Transposition of individual transgenes was confirmed by sequence analysis of transposon–chromosome junctions recovered by linear amplification-mediated PCR. These studies demonstrate the potential of SB-mediated transposition of HPCs for expression of drug resistance genes for selective and chemoprotective applications. PMID:26176276

  1. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-02-21

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications.

  2. Hematopoietic Development from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells.Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g. circ...

  3. MEDIASTINAL GERM-CELL TUMOR WITH SECONDARY NONGERM CELL MALIGNANCY, AND EXTENSIVE HEMATOPOIETIC ACTIVITY - PATHOLOGY, DNA-PLOIDY, AND KARYOTYPING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERHUIS, JW; VANDENBERG, E; DEJONG, B; TIMENS, W; CASTEDO, SMMJ; RAMMELOO, RHU; SLEIJFER, DT

    1991-01-01

    We report on a malignant germ cell tumor located in the anterior mediastinum. After chemotherapy the tumor was classified as residual teratoma with sarcomatous components. There was extensive hematopoiesis in the tumor tissue. The tumor cells had a modal chromosome number of 76; the only structural

  4. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Pierre; Faes-Van't Hull, Eveline; Kaiser, Stefan; Kapp, Ursula; Leyvraz, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Steady-state hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transplantation rely on the unique potential of stem cells to undergo both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Fetal liver (FL) represents a promising alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but limited by the total cell number obtained in a typical harvest. We reported that human FL nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) repopulating cells (SRCs) could be expanded under simple stroma-free culture conditions. Here, we sought to further characterize FL HSC/SRCs phenotypically and functionally before and following culture. Unexpanded or cultured FL cell suspensions were separated into various subpopulations. These were tested for long-term culture potential and for in vivo repopulating function following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. We found that upon culture of human FL cells, a tight association between classical stem cell phenotypes, such as CD34(+) /CD38(-) and/or side population, and NOD/SCID repopulating function was lost, as observed with other sources. Although SRC activity before and following culture consistently correlated with the presence of a CD34(+) cell population, we provide evidence that, contrary to umbilical cord blood and adult sources, stem cells present in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) FL populations can sustain long-term hematopoietic cultures. Furthermore, upon additional culture, CD34-depleted cell suspensions, devoid of SRCs, regenerated a population of CD34(+) cells possessing SRC function. Our studies suggest that compared to neonatal and adult sources, the phenotypical characteristics of putative human FL HSCs may be less strictly defined, and reinforce the accumulated evidence that human FL represents a unique, valuable alternative and highly proliferative source of HSCs for clinical applications.

  5. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Relan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. METHODS: Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. RESULTS: Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. CONCLUSION: These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of

  6. Assessment of human multi-potent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell potential using a single in vitro screening system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Calvo

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells are responsible for the generation of the entire blood system through life. This characteristic relies on their ability to self renew and on their multi-potentiality. Thus quantification of the number of hematopoietic stem cells in a given cell population requires to show both properties in the studied cell populations. Although xenografts models that support human hematopoietic stem cells have been described, such in vivo experimental systems remain restrictive for high throughput screening purposes for example. In this work we developed a conditional tetracycline inducible system controlling the expression of the human NOTCH ligand Delta-like 1 in the murine stromal MS5 cells. We cultured hematopoietic immature cells enriched in progenitor/stem cells in contact with MS5 cells that conditionally express Delta-like 1, in conditions designed to generate multipotential lineage differentiation. We show that upon induction or repression of DL1 expression during co-culture, human immature CD34(+CD38(-/low(CD45RA(-CD90(+ cells can express their B, T, NK, granulo/monocytic and erythroid potentials in a single well, and at the single cell level. We also document the interference of low NOTCH activation with human B and myelo/erythroid lymphoid differentiation. This system represents a novel tool to precisely quantify human hematopoietic immature cells with both lymphoid and myeloid potentials.

  7. Effect of dioxin on normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertenghi-Deliliers, G.; Soligo, D. [Univ. degli Studi, Milan (Italy). Dipt. die Ematologia, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS; Fracchiolla, N.S. [Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ematologia; Servida, F. [Fondazione Matarelli, Milan (Italy); Bertazzi, P.A. [Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Medicina del Lavoro

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) arises from chlorination of phenolic substrates or from partial combustion of organic materials in the presence of chlorine sources. TCDD has a large number of biological effects such as long-lasting skin disease, cardiovascular disease, diabete and cancer. TCDD is the prototypical agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a member of the erb-A family that also includes the receptors for steroids, thyroid hormones, peroxisome proliferators and retinoids. When bound to dioxin, the AhR can bind to DNA and alter the expression of some genes including cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of escalating doses of TCDD on human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells from the leukapheresis of normal donors stimulated with G-CSF as well as the human myeloid leukemic cell lines HL60 (promyelocytic leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia). The possible specific modulation of gene expression induced by the TCDD exposure was then tested by means of microarray analyses.

  8. Generation of Immunodeficient Mice Bearing Human Immune Systems by the Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasgur, Suheyla; Aryee, Ken Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice are being used as recipients of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for in vivo analyses of human immune system development and function. The development of several stocks of immunodeficient Prkdc (scid) (scid), or recombination activating 1 or 2 gene (Rag1 or Rag2) knockout mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the IL2 receptor gamma chain (IL2rγ), has greatly facilitated the engraftment of human HSC and enhanced the development of functional human immune systems. These "humanized" mice are being used to study human hematopoiesis, human-specific immune therapies, human-specific pathogens, and human immune system homeostasis and function. The establishment of these model systems is technically challenging, and levels of human immune system development reported in the literature are variable between laboratories. The use of standard protocols for optimal engraftment of HSC and for monitoring the development of the human immune systems would enable more direct comparisons between humanized mice generated in different laboratories. Here we describe a standard protocol for the engraftment of human HSC into 21-day-old NOD-scid IL2rγ (NSG) mice using an intravenous injection approach. The multiparameter flow cytometry used to monitor human immune system development and the kinetics of development are described.

  9. Fluorophore-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticle labeling and analysis of engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Dustin J; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enables dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined...... culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores...... or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34(+) cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles...

  10. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  11. Increasing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Yield to Develop Mice with Human Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Biancotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are unique in their capacity to give rise to all mature cells of the immune system. For years, HSC transplantation has been used for treatment of genetic and neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic and immune systems. The sourcing of HSCs from human umbilical cord blood has salient advantages over isolation from mobilized peripheral blood. However, poor sample yield has prompted development of methodologies to expand HSCs ex vivo. Cytokines, trophic factors, and small molecules have been variously used to promote survival and proliferation of HSCs in culture, whilst strategies to lower the concentration of inhibitors in the culture media have recently been applied to promote HSC expansion. In this paper, we outline strategies to expand HSCs in vitro, and to improve engraftment and reconstitution of human immune systems in immunocompromised mice. To the extent that these “humanized” mice are representative of the endogenous human immune system, they will be invaluable tools for both basic science and translational medicine.

  12. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)], E-mail: m.digioacchino@unich.it; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas [Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Martino, Simone [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Esposito, Diana L. [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mariani-Costantini, Renato [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure.

  13. Cocaine exposure impairs multilineage hematopoiesis of human hematopoietic progenitor cells mediated by the sigma-1 receptor [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christopher C; Schwartz, Brandon H; Dixit, Dhaval; Zack, Jerome A; Vatakis, Dimitrios N

    2015-03-02

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine is a significant source of fetal and neonatal developmental defects. While cocaine associated neurological and cardiac pathologies are well-documented, it is apparent that cocaine use has far more diverse physiological effects. It is known that in some cell types, the sigma-1 receptor mediates many of cocaine's cellular effects. Here we present a novel and concise investigation into the mechanism that underlies cocaine associated hematopoietic pathology. Indeed, this is the first examination of the effects of cocaine on hematopoiesis. We show that cocaine impairs multilineage hematopoiesis from human progenitors from multiple donors and tissue types. We go on to present the first demonstration of the expression of the sigma-1 receptor in human CD34 + human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these cocaine-induced hematopoietic defects can be reversed through sigma-1 receptor blockade.

  14. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  15. Efficacy of oral cryotherapy on oral mucositis prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT.PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN use, and length of hospital stay.Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99 and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25. In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively. However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively.Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of alemtuzumab after haploidentical HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using in vivo alemtuzumab with or without CD52-positive malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kumi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Nakahara, Fumio; Shoda, Eriko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Imai, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takuro; Asai, Takashi; Izutsu, Koji; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2006-11-01

    We recently reported that the addition of in vivo alemtuzumab to the conditioning regimen enables 2- or 3-locus-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without an excessive risk of graft rejection or graft-versus-host disease. In a later series of patients, however, one patient with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia with large residual tumors at transplantation developed graft rejection. While the peak alemtuzumab concentration in the previous patients without graft rejection was higher than 5 micro g/ml, the peak alemtuzumab concentration in this patient was only 1.44 micro g/ml. We considered that alemtuzumab was bound to the large residual tumors, which resulted in a low blood concentration of alemtuzumab. Therefore, it is important to debulk tumors before the conditioning regimen for patients with refractory CD52-positive hematological malignancies, or the dose of alemtuzumab should be adjusted by monitoring the blood concentration, when alemtuzumab is used for in vivo T-cell depletion in 2- or 3-locus-mismatched transplantation.

  17. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  18. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  19. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of docetaxel combined with melphalan and carboplatin, with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support, in patients with advanced refractory malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Yago; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Bearman, Scott I; McSweeney, Peter A; Cagnoni, Pablo J; Matthes, Steve; Gustafson, Dan; Long, Michael; Barón, Anna E; Jones, Roy B

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the maximal tolerated dose (MTD), extramedullary toxicities, and pharmacokinetics of docetaxel combined with high-dose melphalan and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support. Fifty-nine patients with advanced refractory malignancy (32 breast cancer, 10 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 6 germ cell tumors, 4 Hodgkin disease, 4 ovarian cancer, 2 sarcoma, and 1 unknown primary adenocarcinoma) with a median of 3 prior chemotherapy regimens and a median of 3 organs involved were enrolled. Treatment included docetaxel (150-550 mg/m2 infused over 2 hours on day -6), melphalan (150-165 mg/m2 infused over 15 minutes from day -5 to -3), and carboplatin (1000-1300 mg/m2 as a 72-hour continuous infusion from day -5). Five patients died from direct regimen-related organ toxicity (2 capillary leak syndrome, 2 enterocolitis, and 1 hepatic toxicity), and 1 additional patient died from pulmonary aspergillosis. The docetaxel MTD was defined as 400 mg/m 2 , combined with melphalan (150 mg/m2 ) and carboplatin (1000 mg/m2 ). The MTD cohort was expanded to enroll a total of 26 patients, 1 of whom died from toxic enterocolitis. The remaining 25 patients presented the following extramedullary toxicity profile, which was manageable and largely reversible: stomatitis, myoarthralgias, peripheral neuropathy, gastrointestinal and cutaneous toxicities, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Docetaxel exhibited linear pharmacokinetics in the dose range tested (150-550 mg/m2 ). Pharmacodynamic correlations were noted between the docetaxel area under the curve and peripheral neuropathy or stomatitis. The response rate among 38 patients with measurable disease was 95%, with 47% complete responses. At a median follow-up of 26 months (range, 7-72 months), the 3-year event-free survival and overall survival were 26% and 36%, respectively. In conclusion, a 4-fold dose escalation of docetaxel, combined with melphalan and

  20. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  1. TGFβ inhibition enhances the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human ES cell-derived hemogenic endothelial cells using a stepwise strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyan Wang; Liying Du; Yang Gao; Ming Yin; Mingxiao Ding; Hongkui Deng; Xuming Tang; Xiaomeng Sun; Zhenchuan Miao; Yaxin Lv; Yanlei Yang; Huidan Zhang; Pengbo Zhang; Yang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic hematopoiesis is a complex process.Elucidating the mechanism regulating hematopoietic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells would allow us to establish a strategy to efficiently generate hematopoietic cells.However,the mechanism governing the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)remains unknown.Here,on the basis of the emergence of CD43+ hematopoietic cells from hemogenic endothelial (HE) cells,we demonstrated that VEGF was essential and sufficient,and that bFGF was synergistic with VEGF to specify the HE cells and the subsequent transition into CD43+ hematopoietic cells.Significantly,we identified TGFβ as a novel signal to regulate hematopoietic development,as the TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542 significantly promoted the transition from HE cells into CD43+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) during hESC differentiation.By defining these critical signaling factors during hematopoietic differentiation,we can efficiently generate HPCs from hESCs.Our strategy could offer an in vitro model to study early human hematopoietic development.

  2. Comparison of Human Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Different Strains of Immunodeficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ashley I; Muench, Marcus O

    2017-01-15

    Immunodeficient mice play a critical role in hematology research as in vivo models of hematopoiesis and immunology. Multiple strains have been developed, but hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune reconstitution have not been methodically compared among them. Four mouse strains were transplanted with human fetal bone marrow or adult peripheral blood CD34(+) cells: NSG, NSG-3GS, hSCF-Tg-NSG, and hSIRPα-DKO. Hematopoietic engraftment in the bone marrow, blood, spleen, and liver was evaluated by flow cytometry 12 weeks after transplant. The highest levels of human engraftment were observed in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow, whereas peripheral blood cell chimerism was notably less. The highest levels of tissue engraftment were in hSCF-Tg-NSG mice, but NSG mice exhibited the highest blood leukocyte engraftment. hSCF-Tg-NSG mice also exhibited the highest levels of CD133(+)CD34(++) stem cells. hSIRPα-DKO engrafted poorly and exhibited poor breeding. Myelopoiesis was greatest in NSG-3GS mice, followed by hSCF-Tg-NSG and NSG mice, whereas B cell engraftment exhibited the opposite pattern. Engraftment of CD3(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD161(+) T cells, and CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was greatest in NSG-3GS mice. Mast cell engraftment was highest in hSCF-Tg-NSG mice, but was also elevated in spleen and livers of NSG-3GS mice. Basophils were most abundant in NSG-3GS mice. Overall, hSCF-Tg-NSG mice are the best recipient mice for studies requiring high levels of human hematopoiesis, stem cell engraftment, and an intermediate level of myelopoiesis, whereas NSG and NSG-3GS mice offer select advantages in the engraftment of certain blood cell lineages.

  3. The role of human papilloma virus in urological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Borena, Wegene; Pichler, Renate

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx. However, the role of HPV infection in urological tumors is not yet clarified. HPV appears not to play a major causative role in renal and testicular carcinogenesis. However, HPV infection should be kept in mind regarding cases of prostate cancer, as well as in a sub-group of patients with bladder cancer with squamous differentiation. Concerning the role of HPV in penile cancer incidence, it is a recognized risk factor proven in a large number of studies. This short review provides an update regarding recent literature on HPV in urological malignancies, thereby, also discussing possible limitations on HPV detection in urological cancer.

  4. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Conditioning Regimens with Fludarabine/melphalan or Fludarabine/busulfan for Patients with Hematological Malignancies: A Single-center Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Wataru; Andou, Taiki; Itabashi, Megumi; Koyama, Satoshi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Hagihara, Maki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujisawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fludarabine plus melphalan (FM) and fludarabine plus busulfan (FB) are two major conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent allo-HSCT after a conditioning regimen consisting of FM or FB with/without total body irradiation for hematological malignancies between 2005 and 2014. Results There were 41 patients who met the criteria. The median follow-up time for the survivors was 3 years. Thirty-two patients received allo-HSCT after the FM regimen and nine patients received allo-HSCT after the FB regimen. Patients who received FB were older than those who received FM (p=0.041). There was no significant difference in the 3-year overall survival between patients who had received FB and those who had received FM (29.6% vs. 56.5%, p=0.267). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was significantly higher in patients who had received FB than that in patients who had received FM (66.7% vs. 17.8%, p=0.004), and FB was an independent prognostic factor for relapse by a multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 9.8; 95% confidential interval, 2.5-39.3; p=0.001). When we restricted the evaluation to patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, the 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was also significantly higher in patients who had received FB than that in patients who had received FM (75.0% vs. 16.1%, p=0.004). Conclusion The results suggest that FM may provide better disease control than FB.

  5. Role of Donor Activating KIR-HLA Ligand-Mediated NK Cell Education Status in Control of Malignancy in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jacek; Kościńska, Katarzyna; Mika-Witkowska, Renata; Rogatko-Koroś, Marta; Mizia, Sylwia; Jaskuła, Emilia; Polak, Małgorzata; Mordak-Domagała, Monika; Lange, Janusz; Gronkowska, Anna; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław Wiktor; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Markiewicz, Mirosław; Dzierżak-Mietła, Monika; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowska-Adamska, Barbara; Szczepiński, Andrzej; Hałaburda, Kazimierz; Hellmann, Andrzej; Czyż, Anna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Wachowiak, Jacek; Barańska, Małgorzata; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Drabko, Katarzyna; Goździk, Jolanta; Wysoczańska, Barbara; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Graczyk-Pol, Elżbieta; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Marosz-Rudnicka, Anna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Dziopa, Joanna; Szlendak, Urszula; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lange, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Some cancers treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are sensitive to natural killer cell (NK) reactivity. NK function depends on activating and inhibitory receptors and is modified by NK education/licensing effect and mediated by coexpression of inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and its corresponding HLA I ligand. We assessed activating KIR (aKIR)-based HLA I-dependent education capacity in donor NKs in 285 patients with hematological malignancies after HSCT from unrelated donors. We found significantly adverse progression-free survival (PFS) and time to progression (TTP) in patients who received transplant from donors with NKs educated by C1:KIR2DS2/3, C2:KIR2DS1, or Bw4:KIR3DS1 pairs (for PFS: hazard ratio [HR], 1.70; P = .0020, Pcorr = .0039; HR, 1.54; P = .020, Pcorr = .039; HR, 1.51; P = .020, Pcorr = .040; and for TTP: HR, 1.82; P = .049, Pcorr = .096; HR, 1.72; P = .096, Pcorr = .18; and HR, 1.65; P = .11, Pcorr = .20, respectively). Reduced PFS and TTP were significantly dependent on the number of aKIR-based education systems in donors (HR, 1.36; P = .00031, Pcorr = .00062; and HR, 1.43; P = .019, Pcorr = .038). Furthermore, the PFS and TTP were strongly adverse in patients with missing HLA ligand cognate with educating aKIR-HLA pair in donor (HR, 3.25; P = .00022, Pcorr = .00045; and HR, 3.82; P = .027, Pcorr = .054). Together, these data suggest important qualitative and quantitative role of donor NK education via aKIR-cognate HLA ligand pairs in the outcome of HSCT. Avoiding the selection of transplant donors with high numbers of aKIR-HLA-based education systems, especially for recipients with missing cognate ligand, is advisable.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Is Important for Latent Infection of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humby, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides latently in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). During latency, only a subset of HCMV genes is transcribed, including one of the four virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), US28. Although US28 is a multifunctional lytic protein, its function during latency has remained undefined. We generated a panel of US28 recombinant viruses in the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-derived clinical HCMV strain TB40/E-mCherry. We deleted the entire US28 open reading frame (ORF), deleted all four of the viral GPCR ORFs, or deleted three of the HCMV GPCRs but not the US28 wild-type protein. Using these recombinant viruses, we assessed the requirement for US28 during latency in the Kasumi-3 in vitro latency model system and in primary ex vivo-cultured CD34+ HPCs. Our data suggest that US28 is required for latency as infection with viruses lacking the US28 ORF alone or in combination with the remaining HCMV-encoded GPCR results in transcription from the major immediate early promoter, the production of extracellular virions, and the production of infectious virus capable of infecting naive fibroblasts. The other HCMV GPCRs are not required for this phenotype as a virus expressing only US28 but not the remaining virus-encoded GPCRs is phenotypically similar to that of wild-type latent infection. Finally, we found that US28 copurifies with mature virions and is expressed in HPCs upon virus entry although its expression at the time of infection does not complement the US28 deletion latency phenotype. This work suggests that US28 protein functions to promote a latent state within hematopoietic progenitor cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that, once acquired, remains with its host for life. HCMV remains latent, or quiescent, in cells of the hematopoietic compartment and upon immune challenge can reactivate to cause disease. HCMV-encoded US28 is one of several genes expressed during

  7. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells give rise to distinct T cell lineages in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Jeff E; Venkatasubrahmanyam, Shivkumar; Burt, Trevor D; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Rivera, Jose M; Galkina, Sofiya A; Weinberg, Kenneth; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McCune, Joseph M

    2010-12-17

    Although the mammalian immune system is generally thought to develop in a linear fashion, findings in avian and murine species argue instead for the developmentally ordered appearance (or "layering") of distinct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that give rise to distinct lymphocyte lineages at different stages of development. Here we provide evidence of an analogous layered immune system in humans. Our results suggest that fetal and adult T cells are distinct populations that arise from different populations of HSCs that are present at different stages of development. We also provide evidence that the fetal T cell lineage is biased toward immune tolerance. These observations offer a mechanistic explanation for the tolerogenic properties of the developing fetus and for variable degrees of immune responsiveness at birth.

  8. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  9. Human and rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem cells cannot be purified based only on SLAM family markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Andre; Savona, Michael; Wiggins, Michael; Anderson, Stephanie; Ichwan, Brian; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Morrison, Sean J; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2011-02-03

    Various combinations of antibodies directed to cell surface markers have been used to isolate human and rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These protocols result in poor enrichment or require multiple complex steps. Recently, a simple phenotype for HSCs based on cell surface markers from the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors has been reported in the mouse. We examined the possibility of using the SLAM markers to facilitate the isolation of highly enriched populations of HSCs in humans and rhesus macaques. We isolated SLAM (CD150(+)CD48(-)) and non-SLAM (not CD150(+)CD48(-)) cells from human umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells as well as from human and rhesus macaque mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells and compared their ability to form colonies in vitro and reconstitute immune-deficient (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency/interleukin-2 γc receptor(null), NSG) mice. We found that the CD34(+) SLAM population contributed equally or less to colony formation in vitro and to long-term reconstitution in NSG mice compared with the CD34(+) non-SLAM population. Thus, SLAM family markers do not permit the same degree of HSC enrichment in humans and rhesus macaques as in mice.

  10. 造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病的研究与分析%Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treating hematological malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴必嘉; 龚峻梅; 郭天剑; 陈万红; 李娜

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, with the continuous development of hematology and related fields of basic and clinical research, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has become an effective means of treatment for hematologicmalignancies, or even the only way to cure certain blood diseases.OBJECTIVE: According to the literature retrieval results, to comparatively analyze the literatures on the hematopoieticstem cell transplantation for treating hematological malignancies in SCI database and to explore the future developmenttendency of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treating hematological malignancies.METHODS: A retrieval was performed for the literature of the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treatinghematological malignancies, using key words of “hematopoietic stem cell, transplantation, acute myelogenous leukemia,non-hodgkin lymphoma, chronic myelocytic leukemia” between 2001-01 and 2010-12 in SCI database. The retrievalresults were analyzed, and the trends were described in words and graphics.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The overall literatures of the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treatinghematological malignancies had an upward trend from 2001 to 2010. United States published more literature than othercountries, which play an important role in the field of the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treatinghematological malignancies. Most of literatures were published from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Thispaper provides a valuable reference for researchers to understand the overview and present situation of this field.%背景:近年来,随着血液学及相关领域基础和临床研究的不断发展,造血干细胞移植已成为治疗恶性血液病的有效手段,甚至是治愈某些血液病的惟一方法.目的:对造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病SCI数据库文献资料进行多层次对比分析.方法:通过计算机检索SCI数据库2001/2010有关造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液

  11. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, enhances human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/primitive progenitor cell expansion and promotes multi-lineage hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has emerged as promising therapy, but is challenged by scarcity of stem cells. Eltrombopag is a non-peptide, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist, which selectively activates c-Mpl in humans and chimpanzees. We investigated eltrombopag’s effects on human UCB hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) expansion, and its effects on hematopoiesis in vivo. Eltrombopag selectively augmented the expansion of human CD45+, CD34+, ...

  12. Gene Editing of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells: Promise and Potential Hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyung-Rok; Natanson, Hannah; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2016-08-02

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have great therapeutic potential because of their ability to both self-renew and differentiate. It has been proposed that, given their unique properties, a small number of genetically modified HSPCs could accomplish lifelong, corrective reconstitution of the entire hematopoietic system in patients with various hematologic disorders. Scientists have demonstrated that gene addition therapies-targeted to HSPCs and using integrating retroviral vectors-possess clear clinical benefits in multiple diseases, among them immunodeficiencies, storage disorders, and hemoglobinopathies. Scientists attempting to develop clinically relevant gene therapy protocols have, however, encountered a number of unexpected hurdles because of their incomplete knowledge of target cells, genomic control, and gene transfer technologies. Targeted gene-editing technologies using engineered nucleases such as ZFN, TALEN, and/or CRISPR/Cas9 RGEN show great clinical promise, allowing for the site-specific correction of disease-causing mutations-a process with important applications in autosomal dominant or dominant-negative genetic disorders. The relative simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, in particular, has sparked an exponential increase in the scientific community's interest in and use of these gene-editing technologies. In this minireview, we discuss the specific applications of gene-editing technologies in human HSPCs, as informed by prior experience with gene addition strategies. HSPCs are desirable but challenging targets; the specific mechanisms these cells evolved to protect themselves from DNA damage render them potentially more susceptible to oncogenesis, especially given their ability to self-renew and their long-term proliferative potential. We further review scientists' experience with gene-editing technologies to date, focusing on strategies to move these techniques toward implementation in safe and effective clinical trials.

  13. Knockdown of HSPA9 induces TP53-dependent apoptosis in human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuoen; Krysiak, Kilannin; Shirai, Cara Lunn; Kim, Sanghyun; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common adult myeloid blood cancers in the US. Patients have increased apoptosis in their bone marrow cells leading to low peripheral blood counts. The full complement of gene mutations that contribute to increased apoptosis in MDS remains unknown. Up to 25% of MDS patients harbor and acquired interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 5 [del(5q)], creating haploinsufficiency for a large set of genes including HSPA9. Knockdown of HSPA9 in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells significantly inhibits growth and increases apoptosis. We show here that HSPA9 knockdown is associated with increased TP53 expression and activity, resulting in increased expression of target genes BAX and p21. HSPA9 protein interacts with TP53 in CD34+ cells and knockdown of HSPA9 increases nuclear TP53 levels, providing a possible mechanism for regulation of TP53 by HSPA9 haploinsufficiency in hematopoietic cells. Concurrent knockdown of TP53 and HSPA9 rescued the increased apoptosis observed in CD34+ cells following knockdown of HSPA9. Reduction of HSPA9 below 50% results in severe inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that del(5q) cells may be preferentially sensitive to further reductions of HSPA9 below 50%, thus providing a genetic vulnerability to del(5q) cells. Treatment of bone marrow cells with MKT-077, an HSPA9 inhibitor, induced apoptosis in a higher percentage of cells from MDS patients with del(5q) compared to non-del(5q) MDS patients and normal donor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that reduced levels of HSPA9 may contribute to TP53 activation and increased apoptosis observed in del(5q)-associated MDS.

  14. Expression of cassini, a murine gamma-satellite sequence conserved in evolution, is regulated in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arutyunyan Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells treated with drugs can become drug-tolerant if co-cultured with protective stromal mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Results We performed transcriptional profiling on these stromal fibroblasts to investigate if they were affected by the presence of drug-treated ALL cells. These mitotically inactivated MEFs showed few changes in gene expression, but a family of sequences of which transcription is significantly increased was identified. A sequence related to this family, which we named cassini, was selected for further characterization. We found that cassini was highly upregulated in drug-treated ALL cells. Analysis of RNAs from different normal mouse tissues showed that cassini expression is highest in spleen and thymus, and can be further enhanced in these organs by exposure of mice to bacterial endotoxin. Heat shock, but not other types of stress, significantly induced the transcription of this locus in ALL cells. Transient overexpression of cassini in human 293 embryonic kidney cells did not increase the cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs but provided some protection. Database searches revealed that sequences highly homologous to cassini are present in rodents, apicomplexans, flatworms and primates, indicating that they are conserved in evolution. Moreover, CASSINI RNA was induced in human ALL cells treated with vincristine. Surprisingly, cassini belongs to the previously reported murine family of γ-satellite/major satellite DNA sequences, which were not known to be present in other species. Conclusions Our results show that the transcription of at least one member of these sequences is regulated, suggesting that this has a function in normal and transformed immune cells. Expression of these sequences may protect cells when they are exposed to specific stress stimuli.

  15. Expression of cassini, a murine gamma-satellite sequence conserved in evolution, is regulated in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; Yi, Sun-ju; Fei, Fei; Lim, Min; Groffen, Paula; Feldhahn, Niklas; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-08-23

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with drugs can become drug-tolerant if co-cultured with protective stromal mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We performed transcriptional profiling on these stromal fibroblasts to investigate if they were affected by the presence of drug-treated ALL cells. These mitotically inactivated MEFs showed few changes in gene expression, but a family of sequences of which transcription is significantly increased was identified. A sequence related to this family, which we named cassini, was selected for further characterization. We found that cassini was highly upregulated in drug-treated ALL cells. Analysis of RNAs from different normal mouse tissues showed that cassini expression is highest in spleen and thymus, and can be further enhanced in these organs by exposure of mice to bacterial endotoxin. Heat shock, but not other types of stress, significantly induced the transcription of this locus in ALL cells. Transient overexpression of cassini in human 293 embryonic kidney cells did not increase the cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs but provided some protection. Database searches revealed that sequences highly homologous to cassini are present in rodents, apicomplexans, flatworms and primates, indicating that they are conserved in evolution. Moreover, CASSINI RNA was induced in human ALL cells treated with vincristine. Surprisingly, cassini belongs to the previously reported murine family of γ-satellite/major satellite DNA sequences, which were not known to be present in other species. Our results show that the transcription of at least one member of these sequences is regulated, suggesting that this has a function in normal and transformed immune cells. Expression of these sequences may protect cells when they are exposed to specific stress stimuli.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy as a Counter-Measure for Human Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Roach, A.-N.; Ramsahai, S.; Kim, B. C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Riley, D. A.; Gonda, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exploration of deep space depends, in part, on our ability to counter severe/invasive disorders that astronauts experience in space environments. The known symptoms include hematological/cardiac abnormalities,bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, we have advanced a hypothesis that ome of the space-caused disorders maybe amenable to hematopoietis stem cell therapy(HSCT) so as to maintain promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia beta-thaiassemia) as well as spaceflight (hindlimb unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, in the case of HSCT for muscle loss, the beta-galactosidese marked HSCs were detected in the hindlimbs of unloaded mouse following transplantation by -X-gal wholemaunt staining procedure. Histochemicaland physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. HSCT for immunodeficiency was investigated ising beta-galactosidese gene-tagged Escherichia coli as the infectious agent. Results of the X-gal staining procedure indicated the rapeutic role of the HSCT. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  17. Hydroquinone induces DNA hypomethylation-independent overexpression of retroelements in human leukemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Anastasia; Rota, Federica; Ragni, Enrico; Favero, Chiara; Motta, Valeria; Lazzari, Lorenza; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-06-10

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important benzene-derived metabolite associated with acute myelogenous leukemia risk. Although altered DNA methylation has been reported in both benzene-exposed human subjects and HQ-exposed cultured cells, the inventory of benzene metabolite effects on the epigenome is only starting to be established. In this study, we used a monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from cord blood to investigate the effects of HQ treatment on the expression of the three most important families of retrotransposons in the human genome: LINE-1, Alu and Endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), that are normally subjected to tight epigenetic silencing. We found a clear tendency towards increased retrotransposon expression in response to HQ exposure, more pronounced in the case of LINE-1 and HERV. Such a partial loss of silencing, however, was generally not associated with HQ-induced DNA hypomethylation. On the other hand, retroelement derepression was also observed in the same cells in response to the hypomethylating agent decitabine. These observations suggest the existence of different types of epigenetic switches operating at human retroelements, and point to retroelement activation in response to benzene-derived metabolites as a novel factor deserving attention in benzene carcinogenesis studies.

  18. A human ESC model for MLL-AF4 leukemic fusion gene reveals an impaired early hematopoietic-endothelial specification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clara Bueno; Agustin F Femández; Mario F Fraga; Inmaculada Moreno-Gimeno; Deborah Burks; Maria del Carmen Plaza-Calonge; Juan C Rodríguez-Manzaneque; Pablo Menendez; Rosa Montes; Gustavo J Melen; Verónica Ramos-Mejia; Pedro J Real; Verónica Ayllón; Laura Sanchez; Gertrudis Ligero; Iván Gutierrez-Aranda

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-AF4 fusion gene is a hallmark genomic aberration in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in inants.Although it is well established that MLL-AF4 arises prenatally during human development,its effects on hematopoieric development in utero remain unexplored.We have created a human-specific cellular system to study early hemato-endothelial development in MLL-AF4-expressing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Functional studies,clonal analysis and gene expression profiling reveal that expression of MLL-AF4 in hESCs has a phenotypic,functional and gene expression impact.MLL-AF4 acts as a global transcriptional activator and a positive regulator of homeobox gene expression in hESCs.Functionally,MLL-AF4 enhances the specification of hemogenic precursors from hESCs but strongly impairs further hematopoietic commitment in favor of an endothelial cell fate.MLL-AF4 hESCs are transcriptionally primed to differentiate towards hemogenic precursors prone to endothelial maturation,as reflected by the marked upregulation of master genes associated to vascular-endothelial functions and early hematopoiesis.Furthermore,we report that MLL-AF4 expression is not sufficient to transform hESC-derived hematopoietic cells.This work illustrates how hESCs may provide unique insights into human development and further our understanding of how leukemic fusion genes,known to arise prenatally,regulate human embryonic hematopoietic specification.

  19. ABO血型不合异基因造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病%ABO-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for treating malignant hematologic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵晓雁; 欧阳建; 陈兵; 许景艳; 杨永公; 周敏

    2008-01-01

    合患者移植后成分输血过程未出现溶血反应,移植后也均未发生迟发性溶血反应.结论:ABO血型不合不影响造血干细胞移植的效果,且较为安全.%BACKGROUND:ABO-incompatibility between donor and recipient is not a barrier for Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation even though it is well established that major ABO incompatibility may lead to prolonged destruction of donor-derived erythrocytos and prolonged transfusioil requirements.OBJECTIVE:To explore the effect of ABO.incompatible on clinical characteristics in allogeneic-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.DESIGN:A retrospective observation.SETTING:Department of Hematology.the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School.PARTICIPANTS:Fourteen patients(11 males and 3 feiliales,aged 15-60 years old)with malignant hematologic diseases who received ABO-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School from May 2002 to September 2007 Were recruited for this study.Of the 14 patients,7 were human leukocyte antigen(HLA).matched,and the other 7 were HLA-half-matched.Controls were 11 patients who received ABO-compatibility bone marrow transplantation during the same period.Written informed consents for receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were obtained from each reciplent.The donors were sibling sister,sibling brother.son and mother,and they all agreed to provide marrow for transplantation.T1lis experiment was given an approval by the Ethics Committees of the hospital.METHODS:Regimen conditioning:HLA-matched transplantation regimen conditioning consisted of busulfan(Bu)and cyclophosphamide(Cy).HLA-half-matched transplantation regimen conditioning adopted GIAC program from Beijing People's Hospital.The GIAC program consisted of 4 parts:G:granulocyte colony-stimulating factors used for donors;I:stronger immunosuppressive regimen

  20. Knockdown of HPRT for selection of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Choudhary

    Full Text Available The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC using 6-thioguanine (6TG. Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45(+ cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection.

  1. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  2. Involvement of NANOG upregulation in malignant progression of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Shimakage, Misuzu; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Yutsudo, Masuo; Watari, Akihiro

    2013-03-01

    Previously, we isolated cell lines that display various degrees of transformed phenotypes from a single-cell population of human diploid fibroblasts (RB) containing a large deletion (13q14-22) in one copy of chromosome 13. They included a cell line transfected with SV40 early genes (RBSV), an immortalized cell line (RBI), an anchorage-independent cell line (RBS), and a tumorigenic cell line (RBT). Here, we analyzed gene expression profiles in these cell lines and showed that expression of some fibroblast-specified or mesenchyme-specified genes were downregulated, and those of stem cell-specified genes, including NANOG, were upregulated during malignant progression. When NANOG expression was knocked down with a short hairpin NANOG expression vector (shNANOG vector) in the RBS and RBT cells, the anchorage independency and tumorigenicity were repressed. We next examined various cancer cell lines for NANOG expression and showed that some cancer cell lines expressed a high level of normal and/or variant NANOG proteins. Overexpression of NANOG mRNA in lung adenocarcinoma was also shown by in situ hybridization. All these data indicate the involvement of NANOG in tumorigenesis.

  3. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  4. Function of Jam-B/Jam-C interaction in homing and mobilization of human and mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Bardin, Florence; Frontera, Vincent; Bidaut, Ghislain; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Ralf H; Chabannon, Christian; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules Jam-b and Jam-c interact together at interendothelial junctions and have been involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, and leukocyte migration. More recently, Jam-c has been found to be expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in mouse. Conversely, we have reported that Jam-b is present on bone marrow stromal cells and that Jam-b-deficient mice have defects in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell pool. In this study, we have addressed whether interaction between Jam-b and Jam-c participates to HSPC mobilization or hematopoietic reconstitution after irradiation. We show that a blocking monoclonal antibody directed against Jam-c inhibits hematopoietic reconstitution, progenitor homing to the bone marrow, and induces HSPC mobilization in a Jam-b dependent manner. In the latter setting, antibody treatment over a period of 3 days does not alter hematopoietic differentiation nor induce leukocytosis. Results are translated to human hematopoietic system in which a functional adhesive interaction between JAM-B and JAM-C is found between human HSPC and mesenchymal stem cells. Such an interaction does not occur between HSPC and human endothelial cells or osteoblasts. It is further shown that anti-JAM-C blocking antibody interferes with CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor homing in mouse bone marrow suggesting that monoclonal antibodies inhibiting JAM-B/JAM-C interaction may represent valuable therapeutic tools to improve stem cell mobilization protocols.

  5. [Human herpesvirus-6-associated diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Masao

    2016-03-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 belongs to the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily of human herpesviruses. Primary HHV-6 infection commonly causes exanthem subitum. Like other herpesviruses, HHV-6 is capable of persisting in the host after the primary infection. Under conditions of immunosuppression, latent HHV-6 can be reactivated. Between 30% and 70% of patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) experience HHV-6 reactivation at 2-4 weeks after transplantation. Accumulating evidence indicates that HHV-6 is an actual cause of encephalitis after allo-HCT. Risk factors for HHV-6 encephalitis include cord blood transplantation and an inflammatory milieu, which occurs in the early period after allo-HCT. Although HHV-6 encephalitis is associated with a poor prognosis, no validated treatments or preventative measures have as yet been established. HHV-6 reactivation may also cause myelitis, bone marrow suppression, lung disease, hepatitis, delirium, and graft-versus-host disease. However, such associations have not been consistently demonstrated and causality remains uncertain. This review updates the latest information regarding the clinical syndrome accompanying HHV-6 reactivation, with a particular focus on HHV-6 encephalitis, in the form of a series of questions and answers.

  6. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  7. 地西他滨治疗恶性血液系统疾病的研究进展%Research Progress of Decitabine in the Treatment of Hematopoietic Malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌琳; 吴华; 冯付超; 王璐; 袁颐婕

    2015-01-01

    地西他滨是一种去甲基化药物,为DNA甲基转移酶抑制剂,由于其独特的作用机制和较好的临床疗效,被用于治疗各型骨髓增生异常综合征、急性髓性白血病等恶性血液疾病。本文就地西他滨在各种恶性血液疾病的研究进展作一综述。%Decitabine is a kind of hypomethylation drug. It can inhibit the methyltransferase. Because of its unique mechanism and good clinical curative effect, decitabine is used for the treatment of many malignant blood diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and so on. Here we summarized the research progress on decitabine for hematopoietic malignancies.

  8. In Vitro Generation of Human XCR1(+) Dendritic Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells which play a key role in orchestrating immune defenses. Most of the information gained on human DC biology was derived from studies conducted with DCs generated in vitro from peripheral blood CD14(+) monocytes (MoDCs) or from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. Recent advances in the field revealed that these types of in vitro-derived DCs strikingly differ from the DC subsets that are naturally present in human lymphoid organs, in terms of global gene expression, of specialization in the sensing of different types of danger signals, and of the ability to polarize T lymphocytes toward different functions. Major efforts are being made to better characterize the biology and the functions of lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets in humans, as an essential step for designing innovative DC-based vaccines against infections or cancers. However, this line of research is hampered by the low frequency of certain DC subsets in most tissues, their fragility, and the complexity of the procedures necessary for their purification. Hence, there is a need for robust procedures allowing large-scale in vitro generation of human DC subsets, under conditions allowing their genetic or pharmacological manipulation, to decipher their functions and their molecular regulation. Human CD141(+)CLEC9A(+)XCR1(+) DCs constitute a very interesting DC subset for the design of immunotherapeutic treatments against infections by intracellular pathogens or against cancer, because these cells resemble mouse professional cross-presenting CD8α(+)Clec9a(+)Xcr1(+) DCs. Human XCR1(+) DCs have indeed been reported by several teams to be more efficient than other human DC subsets for cross-presentation, in particular of cell-associated antigens but also of soluble antigens especially when delivered into late endosomes or lysosomes. However, human XCR1(+) DCs are the rarest and perhaps the most fragile of the human DC

  9. Stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Weissmann, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2010-08-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by a number of clinically significant conditions arising in the hematopoietic system that include: diminution and decreased competence of the adaptive immune system, elevated incidence of certain autoimmune diseases, increased hematological malignancies, and elevated incidence of age-associated anemia. As with most tissues, the aged hematopoietic system also exhibits a reduced capacity to regenerate and return to normal homeostasis after injury or stress. Evidence suggests age-dependent functional alterations within the hematopoietic stem cell compartment significantly contribute to many of these pathophysiologies. Recent developments have shed light on how aging of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment contributes to hematopoietic decline through diverse mechanisms.

  10. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; González, Marcos; Cobaleda, César; Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tum...

  11. The thrombopoietin receptor, c-Mpl, is a selective surface marker for human hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr William G

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombopoietin (TPO, the primary cytokine regulating megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation, exerts significant influence on other hematopoietic lineages as well, including erythroid, granulocytic and lymphoid lineages. We previously demonstrated that the receptor for TPO, c-mpl, is expressed by a subset of human adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/PC that are enriched for long-term multilineage repopulating ability in the SCID-hu Bone in vivo model of human hematopoiesis. Methods Here, we employ flow cytometry and an anti-c-mpl monoclonal antibody to comprehensively define the surface expression pattern of c-mpl in four differentiation stages of human CD34+ HSC/PC (I: CD34+38--, II: CD34+38dim, III: CD34+38+, IV: CD34dim38+ for the major sources of human HSC: fetal liver (FL, umbilical cord blood (UCB, adult bone marrow (ABM, and cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSC. We use a surrogate in vivo model of human thymopoiesis, SCID-hu Thy/Liv, to compare the capacity of c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl-- CD34+38--/dim HSC/PC for thymocyte reconstitution. Results For all tissue sources, the percentage of c-mpl+ cells was significantly highest in stage I HSC/PC (FL 72 ± 10%, UCB 67 ± 19%, ABM 82 ± 16%, mPBSC 71 ± 15%, and decreased significantly through stages II, III, and IV ((FL 3 ± 3%, UCB 8 ± 13%, ABM 0.6 ± 0.6%, mPBSC 0.2 ± 0.1% [ANOVA: P I, decreasing through stage IV [ANOVA: P + cells [P = 0.89] or intensity of c-mpl expression [P = 0.21]. Primary Thy/Liv grafts injected with CD34+38--/dimc-mpl+ cells showed slightly higher levels of donor HLA+ thymocyte reconstitution vs. CD34+38--/dimc-mpl---injected grafts and non-injected controls (c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl--: CD2+ 6.8 ± 4.5% vs. 2.8 ± 3.3%, CD4+8-- 54 ± 35% vs. 31 ± 29%, CD4--8+ 29 ± 19% vs. 18 ± 14%. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the TPO receptor, c-mpl, participates in the regulation of primitive human HSC

  12. Dissection of the transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells by the oncogene NUP98-HOXA9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R Yassin

    Full Text Available NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of a group of oncoproteins associated with acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 fused to the homeodomain of HOXA9 and is believed to act as an aberrant transcription factor that binds DNA through the homeodomain. Here we show that NUP98-HOXA9 can regulate transcription without binding to DNA. In order to determine the relative contributions of the NUP98 and HOXA9 portions to the transforming ability of NUP98-HOXA9, the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on primary human CD34+ cells were dissected and compared to those of wild-type HOXA9. In contrast to previous findings in mouse cells, HOXA9 had only mild effects on the differentiation and proliferation of primary human hematopoietic cells. The ability of NUP98-HOXA9 to disrupt the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells was found to depend primarily on the NUP98 portion, whereas induction of long-term proliferation required both the NUP98 moiety and an intact homeodomain. Using oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human CD34+ cells, a group of genes was identified whose dysregulation by NUP98-HOXA9 is attributable primarily to the NUP98 portion. These include RAP1A, HEY1, and PTGS2 (COX-2. Their functions may reflect the contribution of the NUP98 moiety of NUP98-HOXA9 to leukemic transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on gene transcription and cell transformation are mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms: one that involves promoter binding through the homeodomain with direct transcriptional activation, and another that depends predominantly on the NUP98 moiety and does not involve direct DNA binding.

  13. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Fontán, Lorena; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Segura, Victor; Aznar, M Angela; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I; Abollo-Jimenez, Fernando; Bertolo, Cristina; Peñuelas, Ivan; Garcia-Criado, Francisco J; García-Cenador, María B; Tousseyn, Thomas; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; McPhail, Ellen D; Lossos, Izidore S; Du, Ming-Qing; Flores, Teresa; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M; Gonzalez, Marcos; Salar, Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Conde, Eulogio; Siebert, Reiner; Sagaert, Xavier; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2012-06-26

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tumors recapitulating the principal clinical, biological, and molecular genetic features of MALT lymphoma. Deletion of p53 gene accelerated tumor onset and induced transformation of MALT lymphoma to activated B-cell diffuse large-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Treatment of MALT1-induced lymphomas with a specific inhibitor of MALT1 proteolytic activity decreased cell viability, indicating that endogenous Malt1 signaling was required for tumor cell survival. Our study shows that human-like lymphomas can be modeled in mice by targeting MALT1 expression to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the oncogenic role of MALT1 in lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, this work establishes a molecular link between MALT lymphoma and ABC-DLBCL, and provides mouse models to test MALT1 inhibitors. Finally, our results suggest that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of human mature B-cell lymphomas.

  14. Generation of hematopoietic humanized mice in the newborn BALB/c-Rag2null Il2rγnull mouse model: a multivariable optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Julie; Weiss, Nicholas; Freed, Brian M; Torres, Raul M; Pelanda, Roberta

    2011-07-01

    Hematopoietic humanized mice generated via transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs) into immunodeficient mice are a valuable tool for studying development and function of the human immune system. This study was performed to generate a protocol that improves development and quality of humanized mice in the BALB/c-Rag2(null)Il2rγ(null) strain, testing route of injection, in vitro culture and freezing of hHSCs, types of cytokines in the culture, and co-injection of lineage-depleted CD34(-) cells. Specific hHSC culturing conditions and the addition of support cells were found to increase the frequency, and human hematopoietic chimerism, of humanized mice. The optimized protocol resulted in BALB/c-Rag2(null)Il2rγ(null) humanized mice displaying more consistent human hematopoietic and lymphoid engraftment. Thus, hematopoietic humanized mice generated on a BALB/c immunodeficient background represent a useful model to study the human immune system.

  15. Impaired Pten expression in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Bradtmöller

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST are aggressive sarcomas that develop in about 10% of patients with the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Molecular alterations contributing to MPNST formation have only partially been resolved. Here we examined the role of Pten, a key regulator of the Pi3k/Akt/mTOR pathway, in human MPNST and benign neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry showed that Pten expression was significantly lower in MPNST (n=16 than in neurofibromas (n=16 and normal nervous tissue. To elucidate potential mechanisms for Pten down-regulation or Akt/mTOR activation in MPNST we performed further experiments. Mutation analysis revealed absence of somatic mutations in PTEN (n=31 and PIK3CA (n=38. However, we found frequent PTEN promotor methylation in primary MPNST (11/26 and MPNST cell lines (7/8 but not in benign nerve sheath tumours. PTEN methylation was significantly associated with early metastasis. Moreover, we detected an inverse correlation of Pten-regulating miR-21 and Pten protein levels in MPNST cell lines. The examination of NF1-/- and NF1+/+Schwann cells and fibroblasts showed that Pten expression is not regulated by NF1. To determine the significance of Pten status for treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin we treated 5 MPNST cell lines with rapamycin. All cell lines were sensitive to rapamycin without a significant correlation to Pten levels. When rapamycin was combined with simvastatin a synergistic anti-proliferative effect was achieved. Taken together we show frequent loss/reduction of Pten expression in MPNST and provide evidence for the involvement of multiple Pten regulating mechanisms.

  16. Idiotype vaccines for human B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoges, S; de Cerio, A Lopez-Diaz; Soria, E; Villanueva, H; Pastor, F; Bendandi, M

    2010-01-01

    After twenty years of use in humans, customized idiotypic vaccination yet remains a non-approved, experimental therapeutic option for patients with lymphoma and myeloma. Potentially applicable to all B-cell malignancies whose cells express a clonal immunoglobulin or its epitopes on their surface, this treatment is designed to prevent disease recurrence or progression. Mostly used in follicular lymphoma patients so far, idiotype vaccines have clearly shown biological efficacy, clinical efficacy and clinical benefit in this setting, although no study aiming at regulatory approval of the procedure has been able to meet its main clinical endpoints. In mantle cell lymphoma, only biological efficacy has been proven for idiotypic vaccination, while in multiple myeloma a limited number of studies support the notion of biological and perhaps even clinical efficacy, although no credible evidence of clinical benefit has still emerged. Idiotype vaccines have been produced and administered in a number of substantially different manners. Therefore, the results of most clinical trials cannot be easily compared, and even less pooled together in meaningful meta-analyses. A more creative and yet scientifically sound way to design clinical trials of customized active immunotherapies will be key to the future development of idiotype vaccines, particularly considering that we currently lack any clinical or biological indicator to possibly predict which patients are more likely to respond to idiotypic vaccination from an immunologic point of view. This review aims at summarizing the multifaceted success achieved by idiotype vaccines, as well as at outlining the challenges awaiting them in the near future: how to improve feasibility, immunogenicity and efficacy, as well as how to confirm benefit and gain regulatory approval.

  17. Vectofusin-1, a new viral entry enhancer, strongly promotes lentiviral transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-05-07

    Gene transfer into hCD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34(+) cell-based gene therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e90; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.17; published online 7 May 2013.

  18. Role of human papillomavirus and its detection in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions: updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Mamta; Sundaram, Shanthy; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2009-06-25

    Head and neck malignancies are characterized by a multiphasic and multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most common risk factors for head and neck malignancy. Other factors, including DNA viruses, especially human papilloma virus (HPV), may also play a role in the initiation or development of these lesions. The pathways of HPV transmission in the head and neck mucosal lesions include oral-genital contact, more than one sexual partner and perinatal transmission of HPV to the neonatal child. The increase in prevalence of HPV infection in these lesions may be due to wider acceptance of oral sex among teenagers and adults as this is perceived to be a form of safe sex. The prevalence of HPV in benign lesions as well as malignancies has been assessed by many techniques. Among these, the polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive method. Review of literature reveals that HPV may be a risk factor for malignancies, but not in all cases. For confirmation of the role of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, large population studies are necessary in an assortment of clinical settings. Prophylactic vaccination against high-risk HPV types eventually may prevent a significant number of cervical carcinomas. Of the two vaccines currently available, Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, while the other vaccine, Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) protects against HPV types 16 and 18 only. However, the HPV vaccine has, to the best of our knowledge, not been tried in head and neck carcinoma. The role of HPV in etiopathogenesis, prevalence in benign and malignant lesions of this area and vaccination strategies are briefly reviewed here.

  19. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  20. CD34(-) cells at the apex of the human hematopoietic stem cell hierarchy have distinctive cellular and molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Currie, Erin; Palmer, Hector G; Foster, Katie E; Taussig, David C; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In addition to well-characterized CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) hierarchy contains a rare CD34(-) population with severe combined immunodeficiency-repopulating capacity. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of these CD34(-) cells or their relationship to the CD34(+) populations. Here, we show that the self-renewing Lin(-)CD34(-)CD38(-)CD93(hi) population contains cells that not only function as HSCs, but can also be placed above the CD34(+) populations in the hematopoietic hierarchy. These cells have an active Notch pathway, in which signaling through Delta4 is crucial for maintenance of the primitive state, and combined signals from Jagged1 and TGF-β are important in controlling its quiescence. They are also refractory to proliferative signals and show a repressed canonical Wnt pathway, in part regulated by Notch. Overall, therefore, CD34(-) cells represent an immature and quiescent human HSC population maintained through a distinctive network of cellular signaling interactions.

  1. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Support Viability of Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells but not the "Stemness" of Their Progeny in Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Yu A; Volgina, N E; Balashova, E E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-08-01

    Cell-cell interactions and the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells to support the expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells were studied in co-culture of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and nucleated umbilical cord blood cells. It was found that hematopoietic stem cells from the umbilical cord blood are capable to adhere to mesenchymal stromal cells and proliferate during 3-4 weeks in co-culture. However, despite the formation of hematopoietic foci and accumulation of CD34(+) and CD133(+) cells in the adherent cell fraction, the ability of newly generated blood cells to form colonies in semi-solid culture medium was appreciably reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells display a weak capability to support the "stemness" of hematopoietic stem cell progeny despite long-term maintenance of their viability and proliferation.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alpharetroviral Integration in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer vectors derived from gamma-retroviruses or lentiviruses are currently used for the gene therapy of genetic or acquired diseases. Retroviral vectors display a non-random integration pattern in the human genome, targeting either regulatory regions (gamma-retroviruses or the transcribed portion of expressed genes (lentiviruses, and have the potential to deregulate gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. A recently developed alternative vector system derives from the avian sarcoma-leukosis alpha-retrovirus (ASLV and shows favorable safety features compared to both gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors in preclinical models. We performed a high-throughput analysis of the integration pattern of self-inactivating (SIN alpha-retroviral vectors in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs and compared it to previously reported gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors integration profiles obtained in the same experimental setting. Compared to gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors, the SIN-ASLV vector maintains a preference for open chromatin regions, but shows no bias for transcriptional regulatory elements or transcription units, as defined by genomic annotations and epigenetic markers (H3K4me1 and H3K4me3 histone modifications. Importantly, SIN-ASLV integrations do not cluster in hot spots and target potentially dangerous genomic loci, such as the EVI2A/B, RUNX1 and LMO2 proto-oncogenes at a virtually random frequency. These characteristics predict a safer profile for ASLV-derived vectors for clinical applications.

  3. Expression of TRPC6 in benign and malignant human prostate tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Yue; Yong Wang; Jian-Ying Xiao; Ping Wang; Chang-Shan Ren

    2009-01-01

    ancer cell lines. In summary, TRPC6 is detected in benign and malignant human prostate tissues and prostate cancer cell lines and is associated with the histological grade, Gleason score and extraprostatic extension of prostate cancer.

  4. Other hematopoietic disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008475 The significance of dynamic detection of WT1 expression on patients of hematologic malignancy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. JIN Song(金松), et al. Instit Hematol, People’s Hosp, Peking Univ, Beijing 100044, Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(7):578-581. Objective To evaluate preliminarily the significance of dynamic detection of Wilms’ tumor gene (WT1) expression level on monitoring minimal

  5. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  6. Modeling deterministic effects in hematopoietic system caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation in large human cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, Igor V; Veremeyeva, Galina A; Dimov, Georgy P; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Akleyev, Alexander V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2010-09-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system for humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation allows for quantitative description of the initial hematopoiesis inhibition and subsequent increase in the risks of late stochastic effects such as leukemia. This model describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the three blood cell types (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets). The model parameters are estimated from the results of other experiments. They include the steady-state numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines for an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood cell line, parameters describing the proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity in respect to cell death and non-lethal cell damages. The dynamic model of hematopoiesis is applied to the data on a subcohort of the Techa River residents with hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950-1956 (which totals to about 3,500 exposed individuals). Among well-described effects observed in these data are the slope values of the dose-effect curves describing the hematopoietic inhibition and the dose rate patterns of the fractions of cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). The model has been further generalized by inclusion of the component describing the risk of late stochastic effects. The risks of the development of late effects (such as leukemia) in population groups with specific patterns of early reactions in hematopoiesis (such as leukopenia induced by ionizing radiation) are investigated using simulation studies and compared to data.

  7. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  8. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-08-11

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100-300 mul). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for stem cell production at the clinical level. The controlled stirring inside the wells of a standard 96-well plate is provided by buoyancy-driven thermoconvection. The temperature and velocity fields within the culture volume are determined with numerical simulations. The numerical results are verified with experimental velocity measurements using microparticle image velocimetry (muPIV) and are used to define feasible experimental conditions for stem cell cultures. To test the bioreactor array's functionality, human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells were cultured for 7 days at five different stirring conditions (0.24-0.58 mums) in six repeated experiments. Cells were characterized in terms of proliferation, and flow cytometry measurements of viability and CD34 expression. The microliter-bioreactor array demonstrates its ability to support HSC cultures under stirred conditions without adversely affecting the cell behavior. Because of the highly controlled operative conditions, it can be used to explore culture conditions where the mass transport of endogenous and exogenous growth factors is selectively enhanced, and cell suspension provided. While the bioreactor array was developed for culturing HSCs, its application can be extended to other cell types.

  9. Detection of Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants and Hematological Malignancies Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Nested PCR and Mycological Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Mirhendi, Hossein; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kordbacheh, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis (PA) is one of the most serious complications in immunocompromised patients, in particular among hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) and patients with hematological malignancies. The current study aimed to evaluate the incidence of PA and utility of molecular methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, four methods including direct examination, culture, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR were performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens in Tehran, Iran. During 16 months, 46 BAL specimens were obtained from individuals with allogeneic HSCT (n = 18) and patients with hematological malignancies (n = 28). Direct wet mounts with 20% potassium hydroxide (KOH) and culture on mycological media were performed. The molecular detection of Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus was done by amplifying the conserved sequences of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) ribosomal DNA by nested-PCR and the β-tubulin gene by TaqMan real-time PCR. Seven (15.2%) out of 46 specimens were positive in direct examination and showed branched septate hyphae; 11 (23.9%) had positive culture including eight (72.7%) A. flavus and three (27.3%) A. fumigatus; 22 (47.8%) had positive nested-PCR and eight (17.4%) had positive real-time PCR. The incidence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in these patients included proven IPA in 1 (2.2%), probable IPA in 10 (21.7%), possible IPA in 19 (41.3%) and not IPA in 16 cases (34.8%). The incidence of IPA in allogeneic HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies was relatively high and A. flavus was the most common cause of PA. As molecular methods had higher sensitivity, it may be useful as screening methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, or to determine when empirical antifungal therapy can be withheld.

  10. Giving AXL the axe: targeting AXL in human malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Carl M; Balaji, Kavitha; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2017-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL, activated by a complex interaction between its ligand growth arrest-specific protein 6 and phosphatidylserine, regulates various vital cellular processes, including proliferation, survival, motility, and immunologic response. Although not implicated as an oncogenic driver itself, AXL, a member of the TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is overexpressed in several haematologic and solid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukaemia, non-small cell lung cancer, gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas, and breast and prostate cancers. In the context of malignancy, evidence suggests that AXL overexpression drives wide-ranging processes, including epithelial to mesenchymal transition, tumour angiogenesis, resistance to chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and decreased antitumor immune response. As a result, AXL is an attractive candidate not only as a prognostic biomarker in malignancy but also as a target for anticancer therapies. Several AXL inhibitors are currently in preclinical and clinical development. This article reviews the structure, regulation, and function of AXL; the role of AXL in the tumour microenvironment; the development of AXL as a therapeutic target; and areas of ongoing and future investigation. PMID:28072762

  11. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  12. Total Body Irradiation in the "Hematopoietic" Dose Range Induces Substantial Intestinal Injury in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junru; Shao, Lijian; Hendrickson, Howard P; Liu, Liya; Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Seng, John; Pouliot, Mylene; Authier, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Allaben, William; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The non-human primate has been a useful model for studies of human acute radiation syndrome (ARS). However, to date structural changes in various parts of the intestine after total body irradiation (TBI) have not been systematically studied in this model. Here we report on our current study of TBI-induced intestinal structural injury in the non-human primate after doses typically associated with hematopoietic ARS. Twenty-four non-human primates were divided into three groups: sham-irradiated control group; and total body cobalt-60 (60Co) 6.7 Gy gamma-irradiated group; and total body 60Co 7.4 Gy gamma-irradiated group. After animals were euthanized at day 4, 7 and 12 postirradiation, sections of small intestine (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and ileum) were collected and fixed in 10% formalin. The intestinal mucosal surface length, villus height and crypt depths were assessed by computer-assisted image analysis. Plasma citrulline levels were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total bone marrow cells were counted and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometer. Histopathologically, all segments exhibited conspicuous disappearance of plicae circulares and prominent atrophy of crypts and villi. Intestinal mucosal surface length was significantly decreased in all intestinal segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P 0.05). Crypt depth was also significantly reduced in all segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P irradiation, consistent with intestinal mucosal injury. Both 6.7 and 7.4 Gy TBI reduced total number of bone marrow cells. And further analysis showed that the number and function of CD45(+)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitors in bone marrow decreased significantly. In summary, TBI in the hematopoietic ARS dose range induces substantial intestinal injury in all segments of the small bowel. These findings underscore the importance of maintaining the

  13. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2016-09-17

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  14. CHIP: A new modulator of human malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhe; Li, Guanqiao; Shao, Qianqian; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-05-17

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is known as a chaperone-associated E3 for a variety of protein substrates. It acts as a link between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Involved in the process of protein clearance, CHIP plays a critical role in maintaining protein homeostasis in diverse conditions. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of CHIP and summarize recent advances in CHIP biology, with a focus on CHIP in the setting of malignancies.

  15. CHIP: A new modulator of human malignant disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qianqian; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is known as a chaperone-associated E3 for a variety of protein substrates. It acts as a link between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin–proteasome system. Involved in the process of protein clearance, CHIP plays a critical role in maintaining protein homeostasis in diverse conditions. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of CHIP and summarize recent advances in CHIP biology, with a focus on CHIP in the setting of malignancies. PMID:27007160

  16. The in vivo study of myeloprotection by GST-π gene transfected human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xingsheng; Yu Chenghao; Kong Yawei; Jiang Jie; Dong Ruiying; Cui Baoxia; Wang Lijie; Jiang Sen

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of GST-π gene transfer into human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells on their drug resistance against anti-tumor drugs in vivo.Methods:GST-π gene transfection into human cord blood CD34+ cells was carried out using a retrovirus vector PLJ-GST-π with the aid of fibronectin.Successful gene transfer was confirmed by in vitro colony assay and RT-PCR.GST-π gene transduced human cord blood CD34+ cells were then engrafted into 4-week-old total body irradiated NOD/Scid mice and carboplatin was intraperitoneally administered sequentially at 4 weeks interval 4 weeks after engraftment.Results:Peripheral blood(PB) WBC was significantly higher in GST-π mice than control mice after 2 course of carboplatin.Retroviral GST-π expression in bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells of recipient mice was detected by RT-PCR 16 weeks after Xenotransplantation.Conclusion:The transfection of GST-π gene could confer,to some extent,resistance to cord blood stem cells against carboplatin in vivo.

  17. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  18. β-Catenin-independent activation of TCF1/LEF1 in human hematopoietic tumor cells through interaction with ATF2 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Grumolato

    Full Text Available The role of Wnt signaling in embryonic development and stem cell maintenance is well established and aberrations leading to the constitutive up-regulation of this pathway are frequent in several types of human cancers. Upon ligand-mediated activation, Wnt receptors promote the stabilization of β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF family of transcription factors to regulate the expression of Wnt target genes. When not bound to β-catenin, the TCF/LEF proteins are believed to act as transcriptional repressors. Using a specific lentiviral reporter, we identified hematopoietic tumor cells displaying constitutive TCF/LEF transcriptional activation in the absence of β-catenin stabilization. Suppression of TCF/LEF activity in these cells mediated by an inducible dominant-negative TCF4 (DN-TCF4 inhibited both cell growth and the expression of Wnt target genes. Further, expression of TCF1 and LEF1, but not TCF4, stimulated TCF/LEF reporter activity in certain human cell lines independently of β-catenin. By a complementary approach in vivo, TCF1 mutants, which lacked the ability to bind to β-catenin, induced Xenopus embryo axis duplication, a hallmark of Wnt activation, and the expression of the Wnt target gene Xnr3. Through generation of different TCF1-TCF4 fusion proteins, we identified three distinct TCF1 domains that participate in the β-catenin-independent activity of this transcription factor. TCF1 and LEF1 physically interacted and functionally synergized with members of the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2 family of transcription factors. Moreover, knockdown of ATF2 expression in lymphoma cells phenocopied the inhibitory effects of DN-TCF4 on the expression of target genes associated with the Wnt pathway and on cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that, through interaction with ATF2 factors, TCF1/LEF1 promote the growth of hematopoietic malignancies in the

  19. The human protooncogene product p33pim is expressed during fetal hematopoiesis and in diverse leukemias.

    OpenAIRE

    Amson, R; Sigaux, F; Przedborski, S; Flandrin, G; Givol, D; Telerman, A

    1989-01-01

    We measured the human pim-1 protooncogene (PIM) expression during fetal development and in hematopoietic malignancies. Our data indicate that during human fetal hematopoiesis the 33-kDa pim product, p33pim, is highly expressed in the liver and spleen. In contrast, at the adult stage it is only slightly expressed in circulating granulocytes. Out of 70 hematopoietic malignancies analyzed, 51 patients and 19 cell lines, p33pim was overexpressed in approximately 30% of the samples, particularly i...

  20. Myelotoxicity of trichothecenes and apoptosis: an in vitro study on human cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dréan, G; Auffret, M; Batina, P; Arnold, F; Sibiril, Y; Arzur, D; Parent-Massin, D

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that hematological disorders associated with trichothecenes intoxication in humans could result from hematopoiesis inhibition. The most frequent and potent trichothecene mycotoxins are T-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON), respectively. Apoptosis induction by these two toxins was investigated in vitro on human hematopoietic progenitors (CD34+ cells). Hoechst coloration, DNA fragmentation and annexin-V/PI labeling in flow cytometry showed that T-2 toxin, in contrast to DON, induced apoptosis in CD34+ cells. T-2 toxin effect was dose- and time-dependent with a significant increase of apoptotic cells as early as 3h after incubation at 10(-7) M and a maximum reached at 12 h. This observation evidenced the high sensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors to T-2 toxin. The inhibition of T-2 toxin-induced apoptosis by a pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk) suggested the involvement of caspases. The proportional increase of caspase-3 specific activity (DEVDase) with T-2 toxin concentration confirmed its role in the process. After incubation of CD34+ cells with T-2 toxin, in conditions that induced apoptosis, clonal expansion of granulo-monocytes, erythrocytes and megakaryocytes precursors was dose-dependently inhibited. The hematological effects observed in T-2 toxin mycotoxicosis could then be assigned to hematopoiesis inhibition by apoptosis. Different mechanisms that need to be further elucidated are involved in DON myelotoxicity.

  1. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C.; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D.; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100–300 μl). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for ste...

  2. Stroma-conditioned media improve expansion of human primitive hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, D A; Blokland, E A; Ploemacher, R E

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported that stroma-dependent cultures support proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In order to investigate the effect of soluble stromal factors, we developed short-term serum-low liquid cultures in which the effect of stroma-conditioned media (SCM) from the murine FBMD-1, and human L87/4 and L88/5 cell lines was studied on the maintenance and expansion of various human HSC subsets in CD34-positive selected mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from autologous transplants of lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients. The human cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay was employed to determine the frequencies of both the CAFC weeks 2 to 4 as tentative indicators of progenitor and transiently repopulating HSC, and the more primitive CAFC weeks 6 to 8 as indicators of long-term repopulating HSC. In 7-day liquid cultures containing interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF) and IL-6, we recovered 3.0-fold more colony-forming cells (CFC) and 1.7- to 1.9-fold more CAFC weeks 2 and 4. The absolute number of primitive CAFC weeks 6 and 8 were only maintained (1.1- to 1.4-fold) in these liquid cultures. This modest expansion was significantly improved by the addition of SCM from the FBMD-1, L87/4 or L88/5 cell lines. Output CFC numbers were 6.8-, 5.8- and 9.9-fold higher, respectively, than the input values, while absolute CAFC week 2 to 4 numbers were 4.5-, 10.2- and 10.2-fold expanded, respectively. The addition of SCM also improved expansion of the more primitive CAFC week 6 to 8 stem cell subsets by 2.2-, 4.5- and 4.9-fold, respectively. The addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), IL-1beta, IL-11 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha to cultures containing IL-3, SCF and IL-6 could not explain the SCM effect and in all these combinations SCM addition further increased the recovery of HSC subsets. Similarly, addition of anti-cytokine antibodies (ie alpha-G-CSF, alpha-GM-CSF, alpha

  3. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Schweizer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types.

  4. Intra-hematopoietic cell fusion as a source of somatic variation in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Amy M; Grompe, Markus; Kurre, Peter

    2012-06-15

    Cell fusion plays a well-recognized, physiological role during development. Bone-marrow-derived hematopoietic cells have been shown to fuse with non-hematopoietic cells in a wide variety of tissues. Some organs appear to resolve the changes in ploidy status, generating functional and mitotically-competent events. However, cell fusion exclusively involving hematopoietic cells has not been reported. Indeed, genomic copy number variation in highly replicative hematopoietic cells is widely considered a hallmark of malignant transformation. Here we show that cell fusion occurs between cells of the hematopoietic system under injury as well as non-injury conditions. Experiments reveal the acquisition of genetic markers in fusion products, their tractable maintenance during hematopoietic differentiation and long-term persistence after serial transplantation. Fusion events were identified in clonogenic progenitors as well as differentiated myeloid and lymphoid cells. These observations provide a new experimental model for the study of non-pathogenic somatic diversity in the hematopoietic system.

  5. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lidiia Astakhova; Mtakai Ngara; Olga Babich; Aleksandr Prosekov; Lyudmila Asyakina; Lyubov Dyshlyuk; Tore Midtvedt; Xiaoying Zhou; Ingemar Ernberg; Liudmila Matskova

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell l...

  6. The Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) and Potential Regulators in Normal, Benign and Malignant Human Breast Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    James Ryan; Curran, Catherine E.; Emer Hennessy; John Newell; Morris, John C.; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. METHODS: Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10) were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ), oestrogen (ERα), t...

  7. Asiatic acid attenuates malignancy of human metastatic ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Human metastatic ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 was treated with various concentrations of asiatic acid for 24 and ... cancer [5], breast cancer [6], melanoma [7], ..... in human keloid fibroblasts via PPAR-gamma activation. Int J Biol ...

  8. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of focal vertebral bone marrow lesions: initial experience of the differentiation of nodular hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow from malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Jae Ho [Ajou University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Nam-Su [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jinwoo [Philips Healthcare, Department of Clinical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Young [Ajou University Medical Center, Regional Clinical Trial Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the ability of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters to differentiate nodular hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow (HHBM) from malignant vertebral bone marrow lesions (VBMLs). A total of 33 patients with 58 VBMLs, including 9 nodular HHBM lesions, 39 bone metastases, and 10 myelomas, were retrospectively assessed. All diagnoses were confirmed either pathologically or via image assessment. IVIM diffusion-weighted MRI with 11 b values (from 0 to 800 s/mm{sup 2}) were obtained using a 3.0-T MR imager. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion fraction (f), and pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*) were calculated. ADC and IVIM parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performances of ADC, D, f, and D* in terms of VBML characterization. The diagnostic performance of morphological MR sequences was also assessed for comparison. The ADC and D values of nodular HHBM were significantly lower than those of malignant VBML (both p values < 0.001), whereas the f value was significantly higher (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in D* between the two groups (p = 0.688). On ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for D was 1.000, which was significantly larger than that for ADC (AUC = 0.902). Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to differentiate between nodular HHBM and malignant VBML. The D value was significantly lower for nodular HHBM, and afforded a better diagnostic performance than the ADC, f, and D* values in terms of such differentiation. (orig.)

  9. Large-Scale Hematopoietic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Provides Granulocytes or Macrophages for Cell Replacement Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Lachmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types, whereas granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and macrophage CSF (M-CSF represent critical cytokines in myeloid differentiation. When this was investigated in a pluripotent-stem-cell-based hematopoietic differentiation model, IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF exposure resulted in the continuous generation of myeloid cells from an intermediate myeloid-cell-forming complex containing CD34+ clonogenic progenitor cells for more than 2 months. Whereas IL-3/G-CSF directed differentiation toward CD45+CD11b+CD15+CD16+CD66b+ granulocytic cells of various differentiation stages up to a segmented morphology displaying the capacity of cytokine-directed migration, respiratory burst response, and neutrophil-extracellular-trap formation, exposure to IL-3/M-CSF resulted in CD45+CD11b+CD14+CD163+CD68+ monocyte/macrophage-type cells capable of phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Hence, we show here that myeloid specification of human pluripotent stem cells by IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF allows for prolonged and large-scale production of myeloid cells, and thus is suited for cell-fate and disease-modeling studies as well as gene- and cell-therapy applications.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and female lower genital tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, L; Sun, X W; Wright, T C

    1999-02-01

    The risk of lower genital tract neoplasia is increased in women infected with HIV. This has been best demonstrated in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions, but has also been observed in vulvar and perianal intraepithelial lesions in some studies. Alterations in the prevalence and natural history of human papillomavirus infections of the lower genital tract appear to account for much of the increase. HIV-infected women are approximately four times more likely to be infected with human papillomavirus (including infection with high oncogenic risk human papillomavirus types) than are HIV-uninfected women, and these infections are more likely to be persistent. Human papilomavirus-associated lesions may be more difficult to treat in HIV-infected women. These data highlight the need to develop effective cervical cancer prevention programs for HIV-infected women.

  11. Patient-Derived Xenograft Establishment from Human Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Licun; Allo, Ghassan; John, Thomas; Li, Ming; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Opitz, Isabelle; Anraku, Masaki; Yun, Zhihong; Pintilie, Melania; Pitcher, Bethany; Liu, Geoffrey; Feld, Ron; Johnston, Michael R; de Perrot, Marc; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but aggressive disease with few therapeutic options. The tumor-stromal interface is important in MPM, but this is lost in cell lines, the main model used for preclinical studies. We sought to characterize MPM patient-derived xenografts (PDX) to determine their suitability as preclinical models and whether tumors that engraft reflect a more aggressive biological phenotype.Experimental Design: Fresh tumors were harvested from extrapleural pneumonectomy, decortication, or biopsy samples of 50 MPM patients and implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice and serially passaged for up to five generations. We correlated selected mesothelioma biomarkers between PDX and patient tumors, and PDX establishment with the clinical pathologic features of the patients, including their survival. DNA of nine PDXs was profiled using the OncoScan FFPE Express platform. Ten PDXs were treated with cisplatin and pemetrexed.Results: A PDX was formed in 20 of 50 (40%) tumors implanted. Histologically, PDX models closely resembled the parent tumor. PDX models formed despite preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In multivariable analysis, patients whose tumors formed a PDX had significantly poorer survival when the model was adjusted for preoperative treatment (HR, 2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.52; P = 0.028). Among 10 models treated with cisplatin, seven demonstrated growth inhibition. Genomic abnormalities seen in nine PDX models were similar to that previously reported.Conclusions: Patients whose tumors form PDX models have poorer clinical outcomes. MPM PDX tumors closely resemble the genotype and phenotype of parent tumors, making them valuable models for preclinical studies. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 1060-7. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Nonredundant and locus-specific gene repression functions of PRC1 paralog family members in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Vincent; Rozenveld-Geugien, Marjan; Bonardi, Francesco; Malanga, Donatella; van Gosliga, Djoke; Heyink, Anne Margriet; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Morrone, Giovanni; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is a key factor in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic stem cell self-renewal and functions in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). In humans, each of the 5 subunits of PRC1 has paralog family members of which many reside in

  13. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), which is known to be expressed predominately on memory and activated T lymphocytes, is a receptor for both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible protein 10 (gamma IP-10) and monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig). We report the novel finding that CXCR3 is also...... expressed on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not on freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors. Freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors expressed low levels of CXCR3 messenger RNA, but this expression was highly up...... for the physiologic and pathophysiologic events of differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors into lymphoid and myeloid stem cells, subsequently immune and inflammatory cells. These processes include transmigration, relocation, differentiation, and maturation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. (Blood...

  14. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker for se...

  15. Simple mucin-type carbohydrates in normal and malignant human endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Mandel, U; Svenstrup, B

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, and T, are tumor-associated antigens of adenocarcinomas. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the expression of Tn, sialosyl-Tn (s-Tn), T, and sialosyl-T (s-T) antigens in normal nonsecretory, early gestational, and malignant human end...

  16. Sequential transcriptome analysis of human liver cancer indicates late stage acquisition of malignant traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Jens U; Seo, Daekwan; Andersen, Jesper Bøje;

    2014-01-01

    Human hepatocarcinogenesis is as a multi-step process starting from dysplastic lesions to early carcinomas (eHCC) that ultimately progress to HCC (pHCC). However, the sequential molecular alterations driving malignant transformation of the pre-neoplastic lesions are not clearly defined. This lack...

  17. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D.; Cost, Gregory J.; Mendel, Matthew C.; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L.; Joglekar, Alok V.; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R.; Cooper, Aaron R.; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By codelivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34+ cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers. PMID:25733580

  18. Stable transgene expression in primitive human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Holt, Nathalia G; Hollis, Roger P; Ge, Shundi; Cannon, Paula M; Crooks, Gay M; Kohn, Donald B

    2009-12-01

    types with eGFP expression. More importantly, secondary transplantation studies demonstrated that the integrated transgene was stably expressed in more primitive CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term repopulating capability. This study demonstrates that an improved HSB gene transfer system can stably integrate genes into primitive human HSCs while maintaining the pluripotency of the stem cells, which shows promise for further advancement of non-virus-based gene therapy using hematopoietic stem cells.

  19. Human pluripotent stem cells differentiated in fully defined medium generate hematopoietic CD34- and CD34+ progenitors with distinct characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicha, Laurie; Feki, Anis; Boni, Alessandro; Irion, Olivier; Hovatta, Outi; Jaconi, Marisa

    2011-02-25

    Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells in vitro provides a powerful means to investigate early developmental fates, including hematopoiesis. In particular, the use of a fully defined medium (FDM) would avoid biases induced by unidentified factors contained in serum, and would also allow key molecular mediators involved in such a process to be identified. Our goal was to induce in vitro, the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into morphologically and phenotypically mature leukocytes and erythrocytes, in the complete absence of serum and feeder cells. ESC and iPSC were sequentially induced in liquid cultures for 4 days with bone morphogenic protein-4, and for 4 days with FLT3-ligand, stem cell factor, thrombopoietin and vascular endothelium growth factor. Cell differentiation status was investigated by both mRNA expression and FACS expression profiles. Cells were further sorted and assayed for their hematopoietic properties in colony-forming unit (CFU) assays. In liquid cultures, cells progressively down-modulated Oct-4 expression while a sizeable cell fraction expressed CD34 de novo. SCL/Tal1 and Runx1 transcripts were exclusively detected in CD34(+) cells. In clonal assays, both ESC and iPSC-derived cells generated CFU, albeit with a 150-fold lower efficacy than cord blood (CB) CD34(+) cells. ESC-derived CD34(+) cells generated myeloid and fully hemoglobinized erythroid cells whereas CD34(-) cells almost exclusively generated small erythroid colonies. Both ESC and iPSC-derived erythroid cells expressed embryonic and fetal globins but were unable to synthesize adult β-globin in contrast with CB cells, suggesting that they had differentiated from primitive rather than from definitive hematopoietic progenitors. Short-term, animal protein-free culture conditions are sufficient to sustain the differentiation of human ESC and iPSC into primitive hematopoietic progenitors, which, in turn, produce more mature

  20. Human pluripotent stem cells differentiated in fully defined medium generate hematopoietic CD34- and CD34+ progenitors with distinct characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Chicha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells in vitro provides a powerful means to investigate early developmental fates, including hematopoiesis. In particular, the use of a fully defined medium (FDM would avoid biases induced by unidentified factors contained in serum, and would also allow key molecular mediators involved in such a process to be identified. Our goal was to induce in vitro, the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESC and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC into morphologically and phenotypically mature leukocytes and erythrocytes, in the complete absence of serum and feeder cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ESC and iPSC were sequentially induced in liquid cultures for 4 days with bone morphogenic protein-4, and for 4 days with FLT3-ligand, stem cell factor, thrombopoietin and vascular endothelium growth factor. Cell differentiation status was investigated by both mRNA expression and FACS expression profiles. Cells were further sorted and assayed for their hematopoietic properties in colony-forming unit (CFU assays. In liquid cultures, cells progressively down-modulated Oct-4 expression while a sizeable cell fraction expressed CD34 de novo. SCL/Tal1 and Runx1 transcripts were exclusively detected in CD34(+ cells. In clonal assays, both ESC and iPSC-derived cells generated CFU, albeit with a 150-fold lower efficacy than cord blood (CB CD34(+ cells. ESC-derived CD34(+ cells generated myeloid and fully hemoglobinized erythroid cells whereas CD34(- cells almost exclusively generated small erythroid colonies. Both ESC and iPSC-derived erythroid cells expressed embryonic and fetal globins but were unable to synthesize adult β-globin in contrast with CB cells, suggesting that they had differentiated from primitive rather than from definitive hematopoietic progenitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Short-term, animal protein-free culture conditions are sufficient to sustain the differentiation of human ESC and i

  1. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from human umbilical cord ameliorate cisplatin-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Rokaya H; Rashed, Laila A; Ismaail, Alaa E; Madkour, Naglaa K; Elwakeel, Sherien H

    2014-01-01

    Injury to a target organ can be sensed by bone marrow stem cells that migrate to the site of damage, undergo differentiation, and promote structural and functional repair. This remarkable stem cell capacity prompted an investigation of the potential of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells to cure acute renal failure. On the basis of the recent demonstration that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can differentiate into renal cells, the current study tested the hypothesis that HSCs can contribute to the regeneration of renal tubular epithelial cells after renal injury. HSCs from human umbilical cord blood which isolated and purified by magnetic activated cell sorting were transplanted intraperitoneal into acute renal failure (ARF) rats which was established by a single dose of cisplatin 5 mg/kg for five days. The Study was carried on 48 male white albino rats, of average weight 120-150 gm. The animals were divided into 4 groups, Group one Served as control and received normal saline throughout the experiments. Group two (model control) received a single dose of cisplatin. Group three and four male-albino rats with induced ARF received interapritoneally (HSCs) at two week and four week respectively. Injection of a single dose of cisplatin resulted in a significant increase in serum creatinine and urea levels, histo-pathological examination of kidney tissue from cisplatin showed severe nephrotoxicity in which 50-75% of glomeruli and renal tubules exhibited massive degenerative change. Four weeks after HSC transplantation, Serum creatinine and urea nitrogen decreased 3.5 times and 2.1 times as well as HGF, IGF-1, VEGF and P53 using quantitative real-time PCR increased 4.3 times, 3.2, 2.4 and 4.2 times compared to ARF groups, respectively. The proliferation of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells (500.083±35.167) was higher than that in the cisplatin groups (58.612±15.743). In addition, the transplanted umbilical cord hematopoietic stem cells UC-HSCs could

  2. Malignant Transformation of Hymenolepis nana in a Human Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bhatnagar, Julu; Agudelo, Carlos A; Hidron, Alicia; Eberhard, Mark L; Mathison, Blaine A; Frace, Michael A; Ito, Akira; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Rollin, Dominique C; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Pham, Cau D; Jones, Tara L; Greer, Patricia W; Vélez Hoyos, Alejandro; Olson, Peter D; Diazgranados, Lucy R; Zaki, Sherif R

    2015-11-05

    Neoplasms occur naturally in invertebrates but are not known to develop in tapeworms. We observed nests of monomorphic, undifferentiated cells in samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies in a man infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The morphologic features and invasive behavior of the cells were characteristic of cancer, but their small size suggested a nonhuman origin. A polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay targeting eukaryotes identified Hymenolepis nana DNA. Although the cells were unrecognizable as tapeworm tissue, immunohistochemical staining and probe hybridization labeled the cells in situ. Comparative deep sequencing identified H. nana structural genomic variants that are compatible with mutations described in cancer. Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links infection and cancer.

  3. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  4. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-11-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. CCND1-CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico; Waskow, Claudia

    2015-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1-CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1-CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1-CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. © 2015 Mende et al.

  6. Proliferation of normal and malignant human epithelial cells post irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.B.; O' Brien, A.; Hennessy, T. (Saint James Hospital, Dublin (Ireland). Radiobiological Research Group Dublin Inst. of Tech. (Ireland). Physics Dept.)

    1991-01-01

    Fragments of human oesophageal mucosa, urothelium, squamous and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and carcinoma of the bladder have been plated in culture and irradiated. The cells growing from the explanted tissues have then been studied for four weeks post irradiation to assess the overall rate of growth from the irradiated explants and the fraction of profilerating cells. Th results show that when using cell number as an endpoint it is possible to derive growth curves from this type of data which permit a doubling time to be obtained for the cell population surviving different doses. In an attempt to determine the proliferating fraction of the cell population, cultures were labelled at appropriate intervals with tritiated thymidine and were also stained with Ki-67 antiproliferating antigen. The results show an interesting relationship between the dose response obtained for cell labelling with tritiated thymidine and area of cellular outgrowth. Ki-67 staining when used carefully and analysed as described was a useful indicator of proliferating cells. The results provid a means of determining the post irradiation growth potential of fragments of tissue from human organs and may be important for determined overall response of the tumour bulk to proposed treatment. (orig.).

  7. Uric acid as a novel biomarker for bone-marrow function and incipient hematopoietic reconstitution after aplasia in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Sebastian P; Eyb, Vicky; Mirza, Nora; Naumann, Aline; Peter, Andreas; Löffler, Markus W; Faul, Christoph; Vogel, Wichard; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Kanz, Lothar; Heni, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Prolonged aplasia and graft failure (GF) represent life-threatening complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) requiring suitable biomarkers for early detection and differentiation between GF and poor graft function (PGF). Uric acid (UA) is a strong immunological danger signal. Laboratory results were analyzed from patients undergoing either allogeneic or autologous HCT or induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia (n = 50 per group, n = 150 total). During therapy, UA levels declined from normal values to hypouricemic values (all p aplasia, UA levels remained low and started steadily increasing (defined as >two consecutive days, median one 2-day increase) at a median of 1 day before rising leukocytes in allogeneic HCT (p = 0.01) and together with leukocytes in autologous HCT (median one 2-day increase). During induction chemotherapy, a UA increase was also observed alongside rising leukocytes/neutrophils but also several times during aplasia (median 3 increases). Most HCT patients had no detectable leukocytes during aplasia, while some leukocytes remained detectable after induction therapy. No increase in UA levels was observed without concomitant or subsequent rise of leukocytes. Changes in UA serum levels can indicate incipient or remaining immunological activity after HCT or induction therapy. They may, therefore, help to differentiate between PGF and GF.

  8. Cellular morphological parameters of the human urinary bladder (malignant and normal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad; Keshtkar, Asghar; Lawford, Pat

    2007-06-01

    The normal and malignant cellular morphological parameters (intra- and extracellular spaces of the human urinary bladder) were obtained from analysis of digital images of bladder histology sections. Then these cellular morphological parameters were compared with the same parameters obtained from the literature for the bladder tissue. However, the limited quantitative data about these parameters available in the literature for bladder cell sizes and other geometrical parameters such as extra-cellular space does not provide a scientific basis to construct accurate structural models of normal and malignant bladder tissue. Therefore, there is usually no quantitative discussion of cell sizes in literature but the measured data in this work can provide a reasonable estimation of expected morphological parameter changes of bladder tissue with pathology. To produce this quantitative information, and also, to build a suitable models in another study using electrical properties of the tissue, 10 digital images of histological sections of normal, and six sections from malignant areas of the human urinary bladder, were chosen randomly (ex vivo). Finally, the measured data showed that there is a significant difference between the cell dimensions (in basal and intermediate layers) of normal and malignant bladder tissues.

  9. Optimization of a flow cytometric method for the simultaneous measurement of cell surface antigen, DNA content, and in vitro BrdUrd incorporation into normal and malignant hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, M; Thomsen, M; Høyer, M; Hokland, P

    1998-05-01

    We have designed an assay for the simultaneous measurement of cell surface phenotype, S-phase fraction, and DNA content by single laser instrumentation for the purpose of determining the labeling index (LI), duration of S-phase (Ts), and the potential doubling time (Tpot) of leukocyte subpopulations. The procedure was optimized with regard to: mode of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation, selection of suitable leukocyte differentiation antigens (LDAs) as well as PE-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against myeloid cells, overnight permeabilization and fixation (paraformaldehyde 1% and 0.05% Nonidet P40), DNase I treatment (250 Kunitz units), concentration of FITC-conjugated anti-BrdUrd MoAb (dilution 1:5), and DNA staining with 7-amino-actinomycin (7-AAD) (10 microg/ml). We validated this assay by measuring LI, Ts, and Tpot repeatedly in four leukemic cell lines and found these to be stable (coefficients of variation (CV): 0.06, 0.13, and 0.08, respectively). Finally, we employed the assay on different leukocyte preparations from normal donors (including purified CD34 + cells) and patients with malignant myeloid disorders, and we concluded that it will yield valuable data regarding the cell cycle kinetics of subsets of leukocytes in heterogeneous mixtures of hematopoietic cells.

  10. The balance of positive and negative effects of TGF-β signaling regulates the development of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hao; Xie, Yin-Liang; Gao, Yong-Xing; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Zack Z

    2013-10-15

    Derived from mesoderm precursors, hemangioblasts are bipotential common progenitors of hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. The regulatory events controlling hematopoietic and endothelial lineage specification are largely unknown, especially in humans. In this study, we establish a serum-free and feeder-free system with a high-efficient embryoid body (EB) generation to investigate the signals that direct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Consistent with previous studies, the CD34(+)CD31(+)VE-cadherin(+) (VEC(+)) cells derived from hPSCs contain hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors. In the presence of hematopoietic and endothelial growth factors, some of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) cells give rise to blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), which have been used to characterize bipotential hemangioblasts. We found that the level of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) 1 protein is increased during hPSC differentiation, and that TGF-β signaling has the double-edged effect on hematopoietic and endothelial lineage differentiation in hPSCs. An addition of TGF-β to hPSC differentiation before mesoderm induction promotes the development of mesoderm and the generation of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) cells. An addition of TGF-β inhibitor, SB431542, before mesoderm induction downregulates the expression of mesodermal markers and reduces the number of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) progenitor cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β signaling after mesoderm induction increases CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) progenitors and BL-CFCs. These data provide evidence that a balance of positive and negative effects of TGF-β signaling at the appropriate timing is critical, and potential means to improve hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis from hPSCs.

  11. New drugs and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies: do they have a role in bridging, consolidating or conditioning transplantation treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, Francesca; Giaccone, Luisa; Onida, Francesco; Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara; Montefusco, Vittorio; Mussetti, Alberto; Mordini, Nicola; Maino, Elena; Greco, Raffaella; Peccatori, Jacopo; Festuccia, Moreno; Zaja, Francesco; Volpetti, Stefano; Risitano, Antonio; Bassan, Renato; Corradini, Paolo; Ciceri, Fabio; Fanin, Renato; Baccarani, Michele; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bonifazi, Francesca; Bruno, Benedetto

    2017-07-01

    Novel targeted therapies and monoclonal antibodies can be combined with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) at different time-points: 1) before the transplant to reduce tumour burden, 2) as part of the conditioning in place of or in addition to conventional agents 3) after the transplant to allow long-term disease control. Areas covered: This review focuses on the current integration of new drugs with allo-SCT for the treatment of major hematological malignancies for which allo-SCT has been a widely-adopted therapy. Expert opinion: After having been used as single agent salvage treatments in relapsed patients after allo-SCT or in combination with donor lymphocyte infusions, many new drugs have also been safely employed before allo-SCT as a bridge to transplantation or after it as planned consolidation/maintenance. This era of new drugs has opened new important opportunities to 'smartly' combine 'targeted drugs and cell therapies' in new treatment paradigms that may lead to higher cure rates or longer disease control in patients with hematological malignancies.

  12. Nanomelatonin triggers superior anticancer functionality in a human malignant glioblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sanjeev Kumar; Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Dev, Atul; Kaundal, Babita; Choudhury, Subhasree Roy; Karmakar, Surajit

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin (MEL) has promising medicinal value as an anticancer agent in a variety of malignancies, but there are difficulties in achieving a therapeutic dose due to its short half-life, low bioavailability, poor solubility and extensive first-pass metabolism. In this study chitosan/tripolyphosphate (TPP) nanoparticles were prepared by an ionic gelation method to overcome the therapeutic challenges of melatonin and to improve its anticancer efficacy. Characterization of the melatonin-loaded chitosan (MEL-CS) nanoformulation was performed using transmission and scanning electron microscopies, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. In vitro release, cellular uptake and efficacy studies were tested for their enhanced anticancer potential in human U87MG glioblastoma cells. Confocal studies revealed higher cellular uptake of MEL-CS nanoparticles and enhanced anticancer efficacy in human malignant glioblastoma cancer cells than in healthy non-malignant human HEK293T cells in mono- and co-culture models. Our study has shown for the first time that MEL-CS nanocomposites are therapeutically more effective as compared to free MEL at inducing functional anticancer efficacy in the human brain tumour U87MG cell line.

  13. In vitro large scale production of human mature red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells by coculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiafei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Ruoyong; Wang, Yunfang; Nan, Xue; He, Lijuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models of human erythropoiesis are useful in studying the mechanisms of erythroid differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe an erythroid liquid culture system starting from cord blood derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs were cultured for more than 50 days in erythroid differentiation conditions and resulted in a more than 10(9)-fold expansion within 50 days under optimal conditions. Homogeneous erythroid cells were characterized by cell morphology, flow cytometry, and hematopoietic colony assays. Furthermore, terminal erythroid maturation was improved by cosculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells. Cocultured erythroid cells underwent multiple maturation events, including decrease in size, increase in glycophorin A expression, and nuclear condensation. This process resulted in extrusion of the pycnotic nuclei in up to 80% of the cells. Importantly, they possessed the capacity to express the adult definitive β -globin chain upon further maturation. We also show that the oxygen equilibrium curves of the cord blood-differentiated red blood cells (RBCs) are comparable to normal RBCs. The large number and purity of erythroid cells and RBCs produced from cord blood make this method useful for fundamental research in erythroid development, and they also provide a basis for future production of available RBCs for transfusion.

  14. HSV-sr39TK positron emission tomography and suicide gene elimination of human hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny in humanized mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschweng, Eric H.; McCracken, Melissa N.; Kaufman, Michael L.; Ho, Michelle; Hollis, Roger P.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Saini, Navdeep; Koya, Richard C.; Chodon, Thinle; Ribas, Antoni; Witte, Owen N.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    Engineering immunity against cancer by the adoptive transfer of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) modified to express antigen-specific T-cell-receptors (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) generates a continual supply of effector T-cells, potentially providing superior anti-cancer efficacy compared with the infusion of terminally differentiated T-cells. Here we demonstrate the in vivo generation of functional effector T-cells from CD34-enriched human peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) modified with a lentiviral vector designed for clinical use encoding a TCR recognizing the cancer/testes antigen NY-ESO-1, co-expressing the PET/suicide gene sr39TK. Ex vivo analysis of T-cells showed antigen- and HLA-restricted effector function against melanoma. Robust engraftment of gene-modified human cells was demonstrated with PET reporter imaging in hematopoietic niches such as femurs, humeri, vertebrae, and the thymus. Safety was demonstrated by the in vivo ablation of PET signal, NY-ESO-1-TCR bearing cells, and integrated lentiviral vector genomes upon treatment with ganciclovir (GCV), but not with vehicle control. Our study provides support for the efficacy and safety of gene-modified HSCs as a therapeutic modality for engineered cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25038231

  15. Targeted disruption of the CCR5 gene in human hematopoietic stem cells stimulated by peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifman, Erica B; Bindra, Ranjit; Leif, Jean; del Campo, Jacob; Rogers, Faye A; Uchil, Pradeep; Kutsch, Olaf; Shultz, Leonard D; Kumar, Priti; Greiner, Dale L; Glazer, Peter M

    2011-09-23

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) bind duplex DNA in a sequence-specific manner, creating triplex structures that can provoke DNA repair and produce genome modification. CCR5 encodes a chemokine receptor required for HIV-1 entry into human cells, and individuals carrying mutations in this gene are resistant to HIV-1 infection. Transfection of human cells with PNAs targeted to the CCR5 gene, plus donor DNAs designed to introduce stop codons mimicking the naturally occurring CCR5-delta32 mutation, produced 2.46% targeted gene modification. CCR5 modification was confirmed at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels and was shown to confer resistance to infection with HIV-1. Targeting of CCR5 was achieved in human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with subsequent engraftment into mice and persistence of the gene modification more than four months posttransplantation. This work suggests a therapeutic strategy for CCR5 knockout in HSCs from HIV-1-infected individuals, rendering cells resistant to HIV-1 and preserving immune system function.

  16. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuu-Yuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways.

  17. Nonirradiated NOD,B6.SCID Il2rγ−/− KitW41/W41 (NBSGW Mice Support Multilineage Engraftment of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. McIntosh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a newly derived mouse model that supports engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the absence of irradiation. We cross the NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG strain with the C57BL/6J-KitW-41J/J (C57BL/6.KitW41 strain and engraft, without irradiation, the resulting NBSGW strain with human cord blood CD34+ cells. At 12-weeks postengraftment in NBSGW mice, we observe human cell chimerism in marrow (97% ± 0.4%, peripheral blood (61% ± 2%, and spleen (94% ± 2% at levels observed with irradiation in NSG mice. We also detected a significant number of glycophorin-A-positive expressing cells in the developing NBSGW marrow. Further, the observed levels of human hematopoietic chimerism mimic those reported for both irradiated NSG and NSG-transgenic strains. This mouse model permits HSC engraftment while avoiding the complicating hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and neurological side effects associated with irradiation and allows investigators without access to radiation to pursue engraftment studies with human HSCs.

  18. THE ANALYSIS OF STATISTICAL DATA ON MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN P APILLOMAVIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kostin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study of statistical data for the first time in Russia the analysis of the morbidity and mortality of patients with malignant neoplasms that may be associated with human papilloma virus (HPV is performed: cervical cancer (cervical cancer, cancer of the vulva and vagina, cancer of penis, cancer of the rectum, anal canal and rectosigmoid junction cancer, cancer of the pharynx and larynx.

  19. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs.

  20. Flow cytometric detection of some activation and proliferation markers in human hematopoietic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Kusenda, J; Babusíková, O

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous surface marker/DNA, cytoplasmic/DNA or nuclear/DNA staining was used to study proliferation of hematopoietic cell lines (MOLT4, BJAB, P3HR1). Different fixation/permeabilization methods (paraformaldehyde with metanol or Tween 20 or saponin, buffered formaldehyde-acetone) were used providing optimal results of the double stainings. There was a significant increase of S phase and proliferation index (PI) of CD71+ and Ki67+ MOLT4 cells in comparison with their negative counterparts. This indicates their close connection with proliferation. Unlike that, the correlation between the expression of CD38 and S phase or PI was not significant either in MOLT4 or in P3HRI cells. For cytoplasmic markers CD3 (in MOLT4 cells) and CD22 (in BJAB cells) statistically significant (cCD3) and not significant (cCD22) correlation was demonstrated between their expression and S phase or PI. Molecular equivalents of soluble fluorescein values for CD71 were always higher than for CD38. The density of these cell surface markers in addition to the percentage of their expression is of considerable significance for their evaluation as activation or proliferation markers.

  1. Human peripheral blood-born hematosphere as a niche for hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Hur; Eun Ju Lee; Hyun-Jai Cho; Hyun-Jae Kang; Byung-Hee Oh; Young-Bae Park; Hyo-Soo Kim; Jonghanne Park; Sang Eun Lee; Chang-Hwan Yoon; Jae Hee Jang; Ji Min Yang; Tae-Kyu Lee; Jae-Il Choi; Han-Mo Yang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from the adult peripheral blood has been widely used in the treatment of various hematological diseases [1].However,the small number of circulating HSPC is the major limitation and necessitates additional interventions such as G-CSF mobilization and leukapheresis.There have been several attempts to overcome the limitation with ex vivo expansion of HSPC.These strategies are largely based on supplementation of one or more "stem cell niche components"such as supporting-cells,growth factors,extracellular matrix (ECM) or physicochemical microenvironment in the bone marrow [2].Spheroid culture methods of stem ceils from different tissues have been successfully used for expansion of cardiac and neural stem cells.These spheres sensitize target stem cells to growth factors and provide sufficient cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix contacts,mimicking the in vivo stem cell niche [3,4].Here we asked whether spheroid culture of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) would potentiate the expansion of circulating blood HSPC.

  2. The softening of human bladder cancer cells happens at an early stage of the malignancy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Ramos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have demonstrated that alterations in the deformability of cancerous cells are strongly linked to the actin cytoskeleton. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM, it is possible to determine such changes in a quantitative way in order to distinguish cancerous from non-malignant cells. In the work presented here, the elastic properties of human bladder cells were determined by means of AFM. The measurements show that non-malignant bladder HCV29 cells are stiffer (higher Young’s modulus than cancerous cells (HTB-9, HT1376, and T24 cell lines. However, independently of the histological grade of the studied bladder cancer cells, all cancerous cells possess a similar level of the deformability of about a few kilopascals, significantly lower than non-malignant cells. This underlines the diagnostic character of stiffness that can be used as a biomarker of bladder cancer. Similar stiffness levels, observed for cancerous cells, cannot be fully explained by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton since it is different in all malignant cells. Our results underline that it is neither the spatial organization of the actin filaments nor the presence of stress fibers, but the overall density and their 3D-organization in a probing volume play the dominant role in controlling the elastic response of the cancerous cell to an external force.

  3. Fourier component imaging of water resonance in the human breast provides markers for malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medved, Milica; Newstead, Gillian M.; Fan, Xiaobing; Du, Yiping P.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Zamora, Marta A.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that voxels with inhomogeneously broadened water resonances, as revealed by high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI, correlate with underlying tumor pathology findings, and thus carry diagnostically useful information. Thirty-four women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were imaged at 1.5 T, using high-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. Fourier component images (FCIs) of the off-peak spectral signal were generated, and clusters of voxels with significant inhomogeneous broadening (broadened clusters) were identified and correlated to biopsy results. Inhomogeneously broadened clusters were found significantly more frequently in malignant than in benign lesions. A larger percentage of broadened cluster voxels were found inside the malignant versus benign lesions. The high statistical significance for separation of benign and malignant lesions was robust over a large range of post-processing parameters, with a maximum ROC area under curve of 0.83. In the human breast, an inhomogeneously broadened water resonance can serve as a correlate marker for malignancy and is likely to reflect the underlying anatomy or physiology.

  4. TRPM7 channel inhibition mediates midazolam-induced proliferation loss in human malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingkao; Dou, Yunling; Zheng, Xiaoke; Leng, Tiandong; Lu, Xiaofang; Ouyang, Ying; Sun, Huawei; Xing, Fan; Mai, Jialuo; Gu, Jiayu; Lu, Bingzheng; Yan, Guangmei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Wenbo

    2016-11-01

    The melastatin-like transient receptor potential 7 (TRPM7) has been implicated in proliferation or apoptosis of some cancers, indicating the potential of TRPM7 as an anti-anaplastic target. Here, we identified the characteristic TRPM7 channel currents in human malignant glioma MGR2 cells, which could be blocked by a pharmacologic inhibitor Gd(3+). We mined the clinical sample data from Oncomine Database and found that human malignant glioma tissues expressed higher TRPM7 mRNA than normal brain ones. Importantly, we identified a widely used clinical anesthetic midazolam as a TRPM7 inhibitor. Midazolam treatment for seconds suppressed the TRPM7 currents and calcium influx, and treatment for 48 h inhibited the TRPM7 expression. The inhibitory effect on TRPM7 accounts for the proliferation loss and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest induced by midazolam. Our data demonstrates that midazolam represses proliferation of human malignant glioma cells through inhibiting TRPM7 currents, which may be further potentiated by suppressing the expression of TRPM7. Our result indicates midazolam as a pharmacologic lead compound with brain-blood barrier permeability for targeting TRPM7 in the glioma.

  5. A novel role for fibronectin type I domain in the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness through binding to follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Forissier, Stéphanie; Bartholin, Laurent; Martel, Sylvie; Jeanpierre, Sandrine; Bachelard, Elodie; Rimokh, Ruth

    2006-02-15

    FLRG and follistatin belong to the family of follistatin proteins involved in the regulation of various biological effects, such as hematopoiesis, mediated by their binding to activin and BMP, both members of the TGFbeta family. To further characterize the function of FLRG, we searched for other possible functional partners using a yeast two-hybrid screen. We identified human fibronectin as a new partner for both FLRG and follistatin. We also demonstrated that their physical interaction is mediated by type I motifs of fibronectin and follistatin domains. We then analyzed the biological consequences of these protein interactions on the regulation of hematopoiesis. For the first time, we associated a biological effect with the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness of both the type I motifs of fibronectin and the follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin. Indeed, we observed a significant and specific dose-dependent increase of cell adhesion to fibronectin in the presence of FLRG or follistatin, using either a human hematopoietic cell line or primary cells. In particular, we observed a significantly increased adhesion of immature hematopoietic precursors (CFC, LTC-IC). Altogether these results highlight a new mechanism by which FLRG and follistatin regulate human hematopoiesis.

  6. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A., E-mail: rschulz@nd.edu

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  7. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  8. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, Martijn H; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W; de Haas, Edwin F E; Bystrykh, Leonid V; van Rood, Jon J; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2015-11-03

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(-/-) xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events.

  9. Long-term reproducible expression in human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells with a UCOE-based lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraja Dighe

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC targeted gene transfer is an attractive treatment option for a number of hematopoietic disorders caused by single gene defects. However, extensive methylation of promoter sequences results in silencing of therapeutic gene expression. The choice of an appropriate promoter is therefore crucial for reproducible, stable and long-term transgene expression in clinical gene therapy. Recent studies suggest efficient and stable expression of transgenes from the ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE derived from the human HNRPA2B1-CBX3 locus can be achieved in murine HSC. Here, we compared the use of HNRPA2B1-CBX3 UCOE (A2UCOE-mediated transgene regulation to two other frequently used promoters namely EF1α and PGK in human fetal liver-derived HSC (hflHSC. Efficient transduction of hflHSC with a lentiviral vector containing an HNRPA2B1-CBX3 UCOE-eGFP (A2UCOE-eGFP cassette was achieved at higher levels than that obtained with umbilical cord blood derived HSC (3.1x; p<0.001. While hflHSC were readily transduced with all three test vectors (A2UCOE-eGFP, PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP, only the A2-UCOE construct demonstrated sustained transgene expression in vitro over 24 days (p<0.001. In contrast, within 10 days in culture a rapid decline in transgene expression in both PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP transduced hflHSC was seen. Subsequently, injection of transduced cells into immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/Il2rg-/- demonstrated sustained eGFP expression for the A2UCOE-eGFP group up to 10 months post transplantation whereas PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP transduced hflHSC showed a 5.1 and 22.2 fold reduction respectively over the same time period. We conclude that the A2UCOE allows a more efficient and stable expression in hflHSC to be achieved than either the PGK or EF1α promoters and at lower vector copy number per cell.

  10. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Abdelaziz, Hussein [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Hara, Toshifumi [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Higuchi, Masaya [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Tanaka, Yuetsu [Department of Immunology, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, Ryukyu University, Okinawa (Japan); Ohara, Yoshiro [Department of Microbiology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa (Japan); Funato, Noriko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Fujii, Masahiro [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Nakamura, Masataka, E-mail: naka.gene@tmd.ac.jp [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  11. The potent oncogene NPM-ALK mediates malignant transformation of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Roy, Darshan; Xiong, Qun-Bin; Jiang, Shuguang; Medvec, Andrew; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Watt, Christopher; Tomczak, Ewa; Kalos, Michael; Riley, James L; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-01

    With this study we have demonstrated that in vitro transduction of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes with NPM-ALK results in their malignant transformation. The transformed cells become immortalized and display morphology and immunophenotype characteristic of patient-derived anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. These unique features, which are strictly dependent on NPM-ALK activity and expression, include perpetual cell growth, proliferation, and survival; activation of the key signal transduction pathways STAT3 and mTORC1; and expression of CD30 (the hallmark of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma) and of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and cell-surface protein PD-L1/CD274. Implantation of NPM-ALK-transformed CD4(+) T lymphocytes into immunodeficient mice resulted in formation of tumors indistinguishable from patients' anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. Our findings demonstrate that the key aspects of human carcinogenesis closely recapitulating the features of the native tumors can be faithfully reproduced in vitro when an appropriate oncogene is used to transform its natural target cells; this in turn points to the fundamental role in malignant cell transformation of potent oncogenes expressed in the relevant target cells. Such transformed cells should permit study of the early stages of carcinogenesis, and in particular the initial oncogene-host cell interactions. This experimental design could also be useful for studies of the effects of early therapeutic intervention and likely also the mechanisms of malignant progression.

  12. Effects of oral iron chelator deferasirox on human malignant lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Gwon; Kim, Jung-Lim; Park, Joohee; Lee, Soonwook; Park, Seh Jong; Kim, Jun Suk

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron is essential for cell proliferation and viability. It has been reported that iron depletion by a chelator inhibits proliferation of some cancer cells. Deferasirox is a new oral iron chelator, and a few reports have described its effects on lymphoma cells. The goal of this study was to determine the anticancer effects of deferasirox in malignant lymphoma cell lines. Methods Three human malignant lymphoma cell lines (NCI H28:N78, Ramos, and Jiyoye) were treated with deferasirox at final concentrations of 20, 50, or 100 µM. Cell proliferation was evaluated by an MTT assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the relative activity of various apoptotic pathways. The role of caspase in deferasirox-induced apoptosis was investigated using a luminescent assay. Results The MTT assay showed that deferasirox had dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on all 3 cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed that the sub-G1 portion increased in all 3 cell lines as the concentration of deferasirox increased. Early apoptosis was also confirmed in the treated cells by Annexin V and PI staining. Western blotting showed an increase in the cleavage of PARP, caspase 3/7, and caspase 9 in deferasirox-treated groups. Conclusion We demonstrated that deferasirox, a new oral iron-chelating agent, induced early apoptosis in human malignant lymphoma cells, and this apoptotic effect is dependent on the caspase-3/caspase-9 pathway. PMID:23071474

  13. Persistent exposure to Mycoplasma induces malignant transformation of human prostate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Namiki

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and molecular studies suggest infection and inflammation initiate certain cancers, including those of the prostate. The American Cancer Society, estimates that approximately 20% of all worldwide cancers are caused by infection. Mycoplasma, a genus of bacteria that lack a cell wall, are among the few prokaryotes that can grow in close relationship with mammalian cells, often without any apparent pathology, for extended periods of time. In this study, the capacity of Mycoplasma genitalium, a prevalent sexually transmitted infection, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, a mycoplasma found at unusually high frequency among patients with AIDS, to induce a malignant phenotype in benign human prostate cells (BPH-1 was evaluated using a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. After 19 weeks of culture, infected BPH-1 cells achieved anchorage-independent growth and increased migration and invasion. Malignant transformation of infected BPH-1 cells was confirmed by the formation of xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Associated with these changes was an increase in karyotypic entropy, evident by the accumulation of chromosomal aberrations and polysomy. This is the first report describing the capacity of M. genitalium or M. hyorhinis infection to lead to the malignant transformation of benign human epithelial cells and may serve as a model to further study the relationship between prostatitis and prostatic carcinogenesis.

  14. Detection of telomerase activity in malignant neoplasms and nonmalignantepithelial tissues of human esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah Min Yang; Tian Jiao Wang; Bao Yu Li; Yuan Huan Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the expression of telomerase activity in malignant esophageal neoplasms and normal humanesophageal epithelia.METHODS Telomerase activity was assayed by the telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP)method. All the neoplasms and epithelia of esophagus were confirmed by routine pathological diagnosis.RESULTS Telomerase activity was assayed in 18 normal esophageal epithelial tissues and in 35 malignantneoplasms of esophagus, including 27 cases of esophageal carcinoma and 8 cases of cardiac carcinoma.Telomerase activity was detected in most of malignant neoplasms of esophagus (91.4%, 32/35) and in allthe normal esophageal epithelial tissues except one (18/19).CONCLUSION The results suggest that in addition to contributing to proliferation of immortal blast cellsand neoplastic cells, telomerase activity may also play a similar role in regeneration of normal epithelia ofhuman esophagus. The potential use of telomerase activity as a diagnostic marker in human esophagealneoplasm might not be suitable.

  15. Retroviral vector insertion sites associated with dominant hematopoietic clones mark "stemness" pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustikova, Olga S; Geiger, Hartmut; Li, Zhixiong; Brugman, Martijn H; Chambers, Stuart M; Shaw, Chad A; Pike-Overzet, Karin; de Ridder, Dick; Staal, Frank J T; von Keudell, Gottfried; Cornils, Kerstin; Nattamai, Kalpana Jekumar; Modlich, Ute; Wagemaker, Gerard; Goodell, Margaret A; Fehse, Boris; Baum, Christopher

    2007-03-01

    Evidence from model organisms and clinical trials reveals that the random insertion of retrovirus-based vectors in the genome of long-term repopulating hematopoietic cells may increase self-renewal or initiate malignant transformation. Clonal dominance of nonmalignant cells is a particularly interesting phenotype as it may be caused by the dysregulation of genes that affect self-renewal and competitive fitness. We have accumulated 280 retrovirus vector insertion sites (RVISs) from murine long-term studies resulting in benign or malignant clonal dominance. RVISs (22.5%) are located in or near (up to 100 kb [kilobase]) to known proto-oncogenes, 49.6% in signaling genes, and 27.9% in other or unknown genes. The resulting insertional dominance database (IDDb) shows substantial overlaps with the transcriptome of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and the retrovirus-tagged cancer gene database (RTCGD). RVISs preferentially marked genes with high expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and Gene Ontology revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with cell-cycle control, apoptosis signaling, and transcriptional regulation, including major "stemness" pathways. The IDDb forms a powerful resource for the identification of genes that stimulate or transform hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and is an important reference for vector biosafety studies in human gene therapy.

  16. Feasibility and Outcome of Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplant High-Dose Cyclophosphamide for Children and Adolescents with Hematologic Malignancies: An AIEOP-GITMO Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Massimo; Lanino, Edoardo; Cesaro, Simone; Zecca, Marco; Vassallo, Elena; Faraci, Maura; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Barat, Veronica; Prete, Arcangelo; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-05-01

    Post-transplant high-dose cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is a novel approach to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and rejection in patients given haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thirty-three patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies and lacking a match-related or -unrelated donor were treated with PTCy haploidentical HSCT in 5 Italian AIEOP centers. Nineteen patients had a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen (57%), and 14 patients received a full myeloablative conditioning regimen (43%). No patients received serotherapy; GVHD prophylaxis was based on PTCy (50 mg/kg on days +3 and +4) combined with mycophenolate plus tacrolimus or cyclosporine A. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was achieved on days +17 (range, 14 to 37) and +27 (range, 16 to 71). One patient had autologous reconstitution for anti-HLA antibodies. Acute GVHD grades II to IV and III to IV and chronic GVHD developed in 22% (95% CI, 11 to 42), 3% (95% CI, 0 to 21), and 4% (95% CI, 0 to 27) of cases, respectively. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72% (95% CI, 56 to 88), progression-free survival rate was 61% (95% CI, 43 to 80), cumulative incidence of relapse was 24% (95% CI, 13 to 44), and transplant-related mortality was 9% (95% CI, 3 to 26). The univariate analysis for risk of relapse incidence showed how 3 significant variables, mother as donor (P = .02), donor gender as female (P = .04), and patient gender as female (P = .02), were significantly associated with a lower risk of relapse. Disease progression was the main cause of death. PTCy is a safe procedure also for children and adolescents who have already received several lines of chemotherapy. Among the different diseases, a trend for better 1-year rates of overall survival was obtained for nonacute leukemia patients.

  17. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Martina; Baaske, Kai; Gläser, Katharina; Hintzsche, Henning; Stopper, Helga; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg-1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM), 1950 MHz (UMTS) and 2535 MHz (LTE). The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  18. Creation of zebularine-resistant human cytidine deaminase mutants to enhance the chemoprotection of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hongmei; Qiu, Songbo; Beard, Brian C; Black, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    Human cytidine deaminase (hCDA) is a biomedically important enzyme able to inactivate cytidine nucleoside analogs such as the antileukemic agent cytosine arabinoside (AraC) and thereby limit antineoplastic efficacy. Potent inhibitors of hCDA have been developed, e.g. zebularine, that when administered in combination with AraC enhance antineoplastic activity. Tandem hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and combination chemotherapy (zebularine and AraC) could exhibit robust antineoplastic potency, but AraC-based chemotherapy regimens lead to pronounced myelosuppression due to relatively low hCDA activity in HSCs, and this approach could exacerbate this effect. To circumvent the pronounced myelosuppression of zebularine and AraC combination therapy while maintaining antineoplastic potency, zebularine-resistant hCDA variants could be used to gene-modify HSCs prior to transplantation. To achieve this, our approach was to isolate hCDA variants through random mutagenesis in conjunction with selection for hCDA activity and resistance to zebularine in an Escherichia coli genetic complementation system. Here, we report the identification of nine novel variants from a pool of 1.6 × 10(6) transformants that conferred significant zebularine resistance relative to wild-type hCDA2. Several variants revealed significantly higher Ki values toward zebularine when compared with wild-type hCDA values and, as such, are candidates for further exploration for gene-modified HSC transplantation approaches.

  19. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rohland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg−1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM, 1950 MHz (UMTS and 2535 MHz (LTE. The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  20. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ryan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. METHODS: Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10 were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ, oestrogen (ERα, thyroid hormones (THRα, THRβ, and also phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K. Breast cancer cells were treated with Retinoic acid (ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually and in combination followed by analysis of changes in NIS expression. RESULTS: The lowest levels of NIS were detected in normal tissue (Mean(SEM 0.70(0.12 Log(10 Relative Quantity (RQ with significantly higher levels observed in fibroadenoma (1.69(0.21 Log(10RQ, p<0.005 and malignant breast tissue (1.18(0.07 Log(10RQ, p<0.05. Significant positive correlations were observed between human NIS and ERα (r = 0.22, p<0.05 and RARα (r = 0.29, p<0.005, with the strongest relationship observed between NIS and RARβ (r = 0.38, p<0.0001. An inverse relationship between NIS and PI3K expression was also observed (r =  0.21, p<0.05. In vitro, ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually stimulated significant increases in NIS expression (range 6-16 fold, while ATRA and Thyroxine combined caused the greatest increase (range 16-26 fold. CONCLUSION: Although NIS expression is significantly higher in malignant compared to normal breast tissue, the highest level was detected in fibroadenoma. The data presented supports a role for retinoic acid and estradiol in mammary NIS regulation in vivo, and also highlights potential thyroidal regulation of mammary NIS mediated by thyroid hormones.

  1. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  2. Non-hematopoietic PAR-2 is essential for matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression and potentiation of ras-mediated squamous cell carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, K U; Friis, S; Konkel, J E

    2015-01-01

    data suggest that dual induction of PAR-2-NFκB inflammatory signaling and PI3K-Akt-mTor survival/proliferative signaling underlies the transforming potential of matriptase and may contribute to pro-tumorigenic signaling in human epithelial carcinogenesis.Oncogene advance online publication, 27 January...

  3. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, enhances human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/primitive progenitor cell expansion and promotes multi-lineage hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongliang; Tsai, Ying; Nowak, Irena; Liesveld, Jane; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2012-09-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has emerged as a promising therapy, but it is challenged by scarcity of stem cells. Eltrombopag is a non-peptide, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist, which selectively activates c-Mpl in humans and chimpanzees. We investigated eltrombopag's effects on human UCB hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) expansion, and its effects on hematopoiesis in vivo. Eltrombopag selectively augmented the expansion of human CD45+, CD34+, and CD41+ cells in bone marrow compartment without effects on mouse bone marrow cells in the NOD/SCID mice xenotransplant model. Consequently, eltrombopag increased peripheral human platelets and white blood cells. We further examined effects in the STAT and AKT signaling pathways in serum-free cultures. Eltrombopag expanded human CD34+ CD38-, CD34+, and CD41+ cells. Both eltrombopag and recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) induced phosphorylation of STAT5 of CD34+ CD41-, CD34- CD41+, and CD34- CD41- cells. rhTPO preferentially induced pSTAT3, pAKT, and more pSTAT5 in CD34- C41+ cells, while eltrombopag had no effects on pSTAT3. In conclusion, eltrombopag enhanced expansion of HSCs/HPCs of human UCB in vivo and in vitro, and promoted multi-lineage hematopoiesis through the expansion of bone marrow HSCs/HPCs of human UCB in vivo. Eltrombopag differed somewhat from rhTPO in the signal transduction pathways by favoring earlier HSC/HPC populations.

  4. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH/uniparental disomy (UPD that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  5. Differential expression of two fibroblast growth factor-receptor genes is associated with malignant progression in human astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, F.; Saya, H.; Bruner, J.M.; Morrison, R.S. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-18

    Malignant astrocytomas, which are highly invasive, vascular neoplasms, compose the majority of nervous system tumors in humans. Elevated expression of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in astrocytomas has implicated the FGF family of mitogens in the initiation and progression of astrocyte-derived tumors. In this study, the authors demonstrated that human astrocytomas undergo parallel changes in FGF-receptor (FGFR) expression during their progression from a benign to a malignant phenotype. FGFR type 2 (BEK) expression was abundant in normal white matter and in all low-grade astrocytomas but was not seen in malignant astrocytomas. Conversely, FGFR type 1 (FLG) expression was absent or barely detectable in normal white matter but was significantly elevated in malignant astrocytomas. Malignant astrocytomas also expressed an alternatively spliced form of FGFR-1 (FGFR-1[beta]) containing two immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops, whereas normal human adult and fetal brains expressed a receptor form (FGFR-1[alpha]) containing three immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops. Intermediate grades of astrocytic tumors exhibited a gradual loss of FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-1[beta] as they progressed from benign to malignant phenotype. These results suggest that differential expression and alternative splicing of FGFRs may be critical in the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors.

  6. A curated transcriptome dataset collection to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbuba Rahman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Compendia of large-scale datasets made available in public repositories provide an opportunity to identify and fill gaps in biomedical knowledge. But first, these data need to be made readily accessible to research investigators for interpretation. Here we make available a collection of transcriptome datasets to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life. Thirty two datasets were retrieved from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO and loaded in a custom web application called the Gene Expression Browser (GXB, which was designed for interactive query and visualization of integrated large-scale data. Quality control checks were performed. Multiple sample groupings and gene rank lists were created allowing users to reveal age-related differences in transcriptome profiles, changes in the gene expression of neonatal hematopoietic cells to a variety of immune stimulators and modulators, as well as during cell differentiation. Available demographic, clinical, and cell phenotypic information can be overlaid with the gene expression data and used to sort samples. Web links to customized graphical views can be generated and subsequently inserted in manuscripts to report novel findings. GXB also enables browsing of a single gene across projects, thereby providing new perspectives on age- and developmental stage-specific expression of a given gene across the human hematopoietic system. This dataset collection is available at: http://developmentalimmunology.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list.

  7. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sato Department of Urology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan Abstract: The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. Keywords: drug repositioning, novel treatment

  8. Association of human papilloma virus with atypical and malignant oral papillary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Christina; Xu, Jing; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Xin; Muhanna, Nidal; Irish, Jonathan; Leong, Iona; McComb, Richard John; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Bradley, Grace

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to examine atypical and malignant papillary oral lesions for low- and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and to correlate HPV infection with clinical and pathologic features. Sections of 28 atypical papillary lesions (APLs) and 14 malignant papillary lesions (MPLs) were examined for HPV by in situ hybridization and for p16 and MIB-1 by immunohistochemistry; 24 conventional papillomas were studied for comparison. Low-risk HPV was found in 10 of 66 cases, including 9 APLs and 1 papilloma. All low-risk HPV-positive cases showed suprabasilar MIB-1 staining, and the agreement was statistically significant (P < .0001). Diffuse p16 staining combined with high-risk HPV was not seen in any of the cases. A subset of HPV(-) APLs progressed to carcinoma. Oral papillary lesions are a heterogeneous group. Low-risk HPV infection is associated with a subset of APLs with a benign clinical course. Potentially malignant APLs and MPLs are not associated with low- or high-risk HPV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Malignancies and infection due to the human immunodeficiency virus. Are these emerging diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Ortega, M E

    2017-09-02

    Since the start of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, tumour disease among patients has been significant. The collection of malignancies can be divided primarily into 2 groups: those associated with HIV (all of which are related to viral diseases) and those not associated with HIV (only some of which are associated with viral diseases). The origin of these malignancies is multifactorial, and the main causes that have led to an increase in tumour disease are immunosuppression, coinfection with oncogenic viruses and life prolongation secondary to the use of antiretroviral therapy. Establishing the general characteristics of the undiagnosed AIDS tumours is difficult, mainly because they are a highly heterogeneous group formed by malignancies of a diverse nature. The treatments do not differ from those used in the general population, although the management can be more difficult due to the late diagnosis, drug interactions and associated comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Noriko [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miura, Yasuo, E-mail: ym58f5@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yao, Hisayuki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Sumie [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hirai, Hideyo [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ichinohe, Tatsuo [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Maekawa, Taira [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. - Highlights: • Human BM-MSCs in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) support hematopoiesis. • Adhesion- and chemotaxis-associated gene signatures are altered in e-MSCs. • Expression of CXCL12 and VCAM1 is remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. • e-MSCs are at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells. • Osteoinductive treatment

  11. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  12. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Human C1q Deficiency: The Karolinska Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Richard F; Hagelberg, Stefan; Schiller, Bodil; Ringdén, Olle; Truedsson, Lennart; Åhlin, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Human C1q deficiency is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and increased susceptibility to severe bacterial infections. These patients require extensive medical therapy and some develop treatment-resistant disease. Because C1q is produced by monocytes, it has been speculated that allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) may cure this disorder. We have so far treated 5 patients with C1q deficiency. In 3 cases, SLE symptoms remained relatively mild after the start of medical therapy, but 2 patients developed treatment-resistant SLE, and we decided to pursue treatment with allo-HSCT. For this purpose, we chose a conditioning regimen composed of treosulfan (14 g/m) and fludarabine (30 mg/m) started on day -6 and given for 3 and 5 consecutive days, respectively. Thymoglobulin was given at a cumulative dose of 8 mg/kg, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis was composed of cyclosporine and methotrexate. A 9-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl with refractory SLE restored C1q production after allo-HSCT. This resulted in normal functional properties of the classical complement pathway followed by reduced severity of SLE symptoms. The boy developed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease, which resolved after treatment with rituximab and donor lymphocyte infusion. Unfortunately, donor lymphocyte infusion induced severe cortisone-resistant gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease, and the patient died from multiple organ failure 4 months after transplantation. The girl is doing well 33 months after transplantation, and clinically, all signs of SLE have resolved. Allo-HSCT can cure SLE in human C1q deficiency and should be considered early in subjects resistant to medical therapy.

  13. Siltuximab (CNTO 328: a promising option for human malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Runzhe Chen, Baoan Chen Department of Hematology and Oncology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Siltuximab (CNTO 328 is a promising antibody-drug conjugate targeting cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6. It is highly binding to IL-6 and thus neutralizing IL-6 bioactivity and promoting death of tumor cell. In this review, we mainly focus on the mechanisms, clinical studies, and adverse effect of siltuximab in the treatment of human malignancies. We also provide our recommendations for siltuximab treatment in the future. Keywords: interleukin-6, Castleman’s disease, clinical trials

  14. Testing of the radiosensitivity of human malignant tumor cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, M.; Neumeister, K.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Chirurgische Klinik; Bezirkskrankenhaus Karl-Marx-Stadt (German Democratic Republic); Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik)

    1984-01-01

    Primary cell cultures of human malignant tumors were irradiated with X-ray doses of 1-30 Gy. Their radiosensitivity has been examined for 3 weeks postirradiation concerning morphological aspects. The investigations were carried out on 43 tumors of different histology. In 26 cases the results of the radiosensitivity test in the tumor cell culture were compared with the results of the radiotherapy of the adequate patients, 6-8 years postirradiation. In 17 patients the in vitro results correlated with the conventional clinical experience as to the radiosensitivity of the corresponding tumor.

  15. Cadmium Malignantly Transforms Normal Human Breast Epithelial Cells into a Basal-like Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer has recently been linked to cadmium exposure. Although not uniformly supported, it is hypothesized that cadmium acts as a metalloestrogenic carcinogen via the estrogen receptor (ER). Thus, we studied the effects of chronic exposure to cadmium on the normal human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, which is ER-negative but can convert to ER-positive during malignant transformation. Methods Cells were continuously exposed to low-level cadmium (2.5 μM) and checked in vi...

  16. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of the glucose transporters Glut-1 and Glut-3 in human malignant melanomas and benign melanocytic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parente Paola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reported data indicate that cancer cells have increased rates of glucose metabolism, as determined by 18FDG-PET imaging in patients with malignancies. The results of many studies have demonstrated that the expression of glucose transporters, especially Glut-1, is increased in a variety of malignancies. This study was undertaken to assess the differential expression of Glut-1 and Glut-3 by benign and malignant melanocytic lesions. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for Glut-1 and Glut-3 was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections prepared from melanocytic nevi (12 cases, Spitz nevi (12 cases and primary cutaneous malignant melanomas (20 cases. Results We observed immunoreactivity for Glut-1 in all melanocytic nevi, 9 of the 12 Spitz nevi and in 9 of the 20 malignant melanomas, whereas Glut-3 was expressed in all the melanocytic lesions, both benign and malignant. Conclusion These findings indicate that the glucose transporters Glut-1 and Glut-3 play a role in the glucose metabolism of melanocytic cells. Glut-1 was present in the majority of benign nevi, whereas its expression was downregulated in 55% of malignant melanomas. Our results suggest that glucose transporter Glut-1 expression can significantly discriminate between human malignant melanoma and benign melanocytic nevi, and support the idea that additional mechanisms other than Glut-1 may contribute to glucose uptake in melanomas.

  18. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abusamra, Dina

    2016-12-01

    The human bone marrow vasculature constitutively expresses both E-selectin and P-selectin where they interact with the cell-surface glycan moiety, sialyl Lewis x, on circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step. Although several E-selectin glycoprotein ligands (E-selLs) have been identified, the importance of each E-selL on human HSPCs is debatable and requires additional methodologies to advance their specific involvement. The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E

  19. 同胞相合异基因造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病的疗效%Matched Sibling Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Malignant Hematopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱大发; 黄贵年; 许晓军; 郭子文; 何慧清; 任志娟; 林淑华; 宋奎; 牛晓敏; 黎伟超

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨同胞相合异基因造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病的临床疗效.方法 将26例恶性血液病患者按移植前疾病状态分为2组:高危组11例和标危组15例.2组患者均采用外周血同胞相合异基因造血干细胞移植.预处理方案:高危组采用全身照射+环磷酰胺,标危组采用白消安+环磷酰胺;移植物抗宿主病的预防:2组均采用环孢素A+短程甲氨蝶呤,或加霉酚酸脂.观察2组患者造血重建和急、慢性移植物抗宿主病、巨细胞病毒活动性感染/巨细胞病毒病、移植复发及移植相关死亡及无病生存等情况.结果 2组患者移植后均获得造血重建,均为完全供体嵌合型.2组患者移植后14例发生急性移植物抗宿主病(aGVHD),累积发病率为53.8%(14/26).9例发生慢性移植物抗宿主病(cGVHD),累积发病率为45.0%(9/20).2组患者移植后有20例(76.9%)出现巨细胞病毒血症,无一例患者发生巨细胞病毒病.标危组复发率与高危组比较差异无统计学意义(6.7%vs 18.2%,P>0.05).标危组移植相关病死率与高危组比较差异有统计学意义(13.3%vs 54.5%,P<0.05).高危组和标危组患者1、3年累积无病生存率分别为30.3%、85.1%和15.2%、68.1%(均P<0.05).结论 移植前疾病状态是影响移植疗效的重要因素,移植物抗宿主病的发生对移植后疾病的复发及生活质量有重要的影响.%Objective To explore the clinical curative effect of matched sibling allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(HSCT) on malignant hematopathy. Methods Twenty-six patients with malignant hematopathy were divided into two groups according to primary disease situation before transplantation: high-risk group (11 cases) and standard-risk group (15 cases). Matched sibling allogeneic HSCT were performed in all patients. Total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide were used as conditioning therapy in high-risk group and busulphan plus cyclophosphamide were used in

  20. Two types of human malignant melanoma cell lines revealed by expression patterns of mitochondrial and survival-apoptosis genes: implications for malignant melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, David M; Zhang, Qiuyang; Wang, Xuexi; He, Ping; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Zhao, Jianxiong; Rennert, Owen M; Su, Yan A

    2009-05-01

    Human malignant melanoma has poor prognosis because of resistance to apoptosis and therapy. We describe identification of the expression profile of 1,037 mitochondria-focused genes and 84 survival-apoptosis genes in 21 malignant melanoma cell lines and 3 normal melanocyte controls using recently developed hMitChip3 cDNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of 1,037 informative genes, and 84 survival-apoptosis genes, classified these malignant melanoma cell lines into type A (n = 12) and type B (n = 9). Three hundred fifty-five of 1,037 (34.2%) genes displayed significant (P ≤ 0.030; false discovery rate ≤ 3.68%) differences (± ≥ 2.0-fold) in average expression, with 197 genes higher and 158 genes lower in type A than in type B. Of 84 genes with known survival-apoptosis functions, 38 (45.2%) displayed the significant (P genes expressed at higher levels in type A than in type B, whereas the different set of antiapoptotic (PSEN1, PPP2CA, API5, PPP2R1B, PPP2R1A, and FIS1), antioxidant (HSPD1, GSS, SOD1, ATOX1, and CAT), and proapoptotic (ENDOG, BAK1, CASP2, CASP4, PDCD5, HTRA2, SEPT4, TNFSF10, and PRODH) genes expressed at lower levels in type A than in type B. Microarray data were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. These results showed the presence of two types of malignant melanoma, each with a specific set of dysregulated survival-apoptosis genes, which may prove useful for development of new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention and novel diagnostic biomarkers for treatment and prognosis of malignant melanoma.

  1. Widespread p53 overexpression in human malignant tumors. An immunohistochemical study using methacarn-fixed, embedded tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, P. L.; Gown, A. M.; Kramp, S. G.; Coltrera, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear protein believed to play an important role, through mutation and overexpression, in the progression of human malignant tumors. The authors employed a monoclonal antibody, 1801, and investigated overexpression of p53 in a series of 255 malignant and benign tumors, using deparaffinized sections of methacarn-fixed tissue. Overall, immunohistochemically detected p53 overexpression was found in 39% of malignant tumors, with considerable variation within individual tumor types (34% of breast carcinomas, 92% of ovarian carcinomas, 33% of soft tissue sarcomas). Homogenous, heterogenous, and focal immunostaining patterns were noted. With rare exceptions, no immunostaining of any benign tumors was noted. No immunostaining was found in adjacent, benign tissues, or in a series of fetal tissues. This is the first demonstration of widespread p53 overexpression in alcohol-fixed, embedded tissue and confirms the major role played by p53 in human malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1731521

  2. ETM study of electroporation influence on cell morphology in human malignant melanoma and human primary gingival fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nina Skolucka; Malgorzata Daczewska; Jolanta Saczko; Agnieszka Chwilkowska; Anna Choromanska; Malgorzata Kotulska; Iwona Kaminska; Julita Kulbacka

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To estimate electroporation (EP) influence on malignant and normal cells.Methods:Two cell lines including human malignant melanoma (Me-45) and normal human gingival fibroblast (HGFs) were used. EP parameters were the following:250,1000,1750,2500 V/cm;50 μs by5 impulses for every case. The viability of cells after EP was estimated byMTT assay. The ultrastructural analysis was observed by transmission electron microscope (ZeissEM900). Results:In the current study we observed the intracellular effect followingEP on Me-45 and HGF cells. At the conditions applied, we did not observe any significant damage of mitochondrial activity in both cell lines treated byEP. Conversely, we showed thatEP in some conditions can stimulate cells to proliferation. Some changes induced byEP were only visible in electron microscopy. In fibroblast cells we observed significant changes in lower parameters ofEP (250 and1000 V/cm). After applying higher electric field intensities (2500 V/cm) we detected many vacuoles, myelin-like bodies and swallowed endoplasmic reticulum. In melanoma cells such strong pathological modifications afterEP were not observed, in comparison with control cells. The ultrastructure of both treated cell lines was changed according to the applied parameters ofEP.Conclusions:We can claim thatEP conditions are cell line dependent. In terms of the intracellular morphology, human fibroblasts are more sensitive to electric field as compared with melanoma cells. Optimal conditions should be determined for each cell line. Summarizing our study, we can conclude thatEP is not an invasive method for human normal and malignant cells. This technique can be safely applied in chemotherapy for delivering drugs into tumor cells.

  3. ETM study of electroporation influence on cell morphology in human malignant melanoma and human primary gingival fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolucka, Nina; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Chwilkowska, Agnieszka; Choromanska, Anna; Kotulska, Malgorzata; Kaminska, Iwona; Kulbacka, Julita

    2011-04-01

    To estimate electroporation (EP) influence on malignant and normal cells. Two cell lines including human malignant melanoma (Me-45) and normal human gingival fibroblast (HGFs) were used. EP parameters were the following: 250, 1 000, 1 750, 2 500 V/cm; 50 µs by 5 impulses for every case. The viability of cells after EP was estimated by MTT assay. The ultrastructural analysis was observed by transmission electron microscope (Zeiss EM 900). In the current study we observed the intracellular effect following EP on Me-45 and HGF cells. At the conditions applied, we did not observe any significant damage of mitochondrial activity in both cell lines treated by EP. Conversely, we showed that EP in some conditions can stimulate cells to proliferation. Some changes induced by EP were only visible in electron microscopy. In fibroblast cells we observed significant changes in lower parameters of EP (250 and 1 000 V/cm). After applying higher electric field intensities (2 500 V/cm) we detected many vacuoles, myelin-like bodies and swallowed endoplasmic reticulum. In melanoma cells such strong pathological modifications after EP were not observed, in comparison with control cells. The ultrastructure of both treated cell lines was changed according to the applied parameters of EP. We can claim that EP conditions are cell line dependent. In terms of the intracellular morphology, human fibroblasts are more sensitive to electric field as compared with melanoma cells. Optimal conditions should be determined for each cell line. Summarizing our study, we can conclude that EP is not an invasive method for human normal and malignant cells. This technique can be safely applied in chemotherapy for delivering drugs into tumor cells.

  4. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  5. Generation of functional platelets from human embryonic stem cells in vitro via ES-sacs, VEGF-promoted structures that concentrate hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Naoya; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Usui, Joichi; Tsukui, Hiroko; Sawaguchi, Akira; Hiroyama, Takashi; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could potentially represent an alternative source for blood transfusion therapies and a promising tool for studying the ontogeny of hematopoiesis. When we cultured hESCs on either C3H10T1/2 or OP-9 cells to facilitate hematopoiesis, we found that exogenous administration of vascular endothelial growth factor promoted the emergence of sac-like structures, which we named embryonic stem cell-derived sacs (ES-sacs). These ES-sacs consisted of multiple cysts demarcated by cellular monolayers that retained some of the properties of endothelial cells. The spherical cells inside ES-sacs expressed primarily CD34, along with VE-cadherin, CD31, CD41a, and CD45, and were able to form hematopoietic colonies in semisolid culture and to differentiate into mature megakaryocytes by day 24 in the presence of thrombopoietin. Apparently, ES-sacs provide a suitable environment for hematopoietic progenitors. Relatively large numbers of mature megakaryocytes could be induced from the hematopoietic progenitors within ES-sacs, which were then able to release platelets that displayed integrin alpha IIb beta 3 activation and spreading in response to ADP or thrombin. This novel protocol thus provides a means of generating platelets from hESCs, which could serve as the basis for efficient production of platelets for clinical transfusion and studies of thrombopoiesis.

  6. Relation between enzymatic activities and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoni, P; Giardini, R; Raineri, M; Pozzi, M R; Lucchini, R; Vezzoni, M A; Clerici, L; Besana, C; Rugarli, C; Rilke, F

    1985-08-01

    The relationship between the intracellular levels of DNA polymerase alpha (DP-alpha), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas was investigated. Twelve non-neoplastic lymph nodes and 88 malignant lymphomas were examined. For non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) the low or high grade of malignancy was established according to three classifications: the Rappaport, the Kiel and the Working Formulation for Clinical Usage, with the latter also recognizing an intermediate grade group. Non-neoplastic lymph nodes had significantly lower levels of all the three enzymes than those found in high-grade malignant NHL (the P value ranged from less than 0.02 to less than 0.001). Hodgkin's disease, a slowly evolving neoplasia, showed lower levels of DP-alpha (P less than 0.001) and ADA (P less than 0.001), but not of LDH, than high-grade NHL. Among NHL, whatever classification was used, the low-grade malignant lymphomas had significantly lower levels than the high-grade ones for all the three enzymes (P less than 0.005 or P less than 0.001). The intermediate-grade group of the Working Formulation differed from the high-grade group for DP-alpha (P less than 0.01) and ADA (P less than 0.02) but not for LDH. It differed from the low-grade group only for ADA (P less than 0.005). Lymphoblastic and Burkitt's lymphomas were the groups with the highest levels of the three enzymes. Among low-grade lymphomas very low values were found in the histological entities defined as DLWD in the Rappaport classification, CLL and lymphoplasmacytoid immunocytoma in the Kiel classification and small lymphocytic (group A) in the WF. The levels of all enzymes in these histotypes were always significantly different from the other low-grade histotypes, and from the intermediate-grade ones of the WF. In the Kiel classification polymorphous lymphoplasmacytoid lymphoma, recently recognized as a group with a quite aggressive clinical course, was

  7. Human hematopoietic cells express two forms of the cytokine receptor common γ—chain(γc)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIYUFANG; MARYHILL; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the γ-chain of the IL-2 receptor is shared by the receptors for IL-4,IL-7,IL-9,IL-13,and IL-15,and it is therefore also referred to as the common γ-chain (γc).Mutations of γc result in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome in humans,indicating that γc is essential for normal development and function of the immune system.We demonstrate that human hematopoietic cells express two γc transcripts differing in their carboxyl terminal coding region.One transcript is the previously reported sequence (γc-long), whereas the newly identified sequence exhibits a deletion of 72 nucleotides close to the 3'-end of the open reading frame (γc-short).This alteration predicts a loss of 24 amino acids including a conserved tyrosine residue which is shared by several members of the cytokine receptor family.The presencfe of these two distinct forms of γc transcripts was demonstrated by sequencing of reversely transcribed and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplified mRNA,restriction diestion of the RT-PCR products,RNAse protection,and Northern blotting from human cell lines and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.Furthermore,the two variants were present in peripheral blood lymphocytes from both female and male donors,which rules out allelic variants since γc is a single copy gene located on the X chromosome.A truncation mutant at a site near the observed changes in γc-short has been reported by others to alter biochemical events activated by cytokines.This combined with the loss of a potential SH2 “docking” site in γc-short suggests that γ-long and γc-short may link to different signaling pathways and may play an important role in detenmining the cellular response to IL-2,IL-4,IL-7,IL-9,IL-13,IL-15.

  8. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-05-22

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation in the hematopoietic cells during their development. To refine therapies for leukemia, this study sought to improve the homing of healthy donor HSPCs for better transplantation and to find new candidates for differentiating and blocking proliferation in leukemic cells. Characterizing the molecular effectors mediating cell migration forms the basis for improving clinical transplantation of HSPCs. E-selectin/ligand interactions play a critical role in the homing of HSPCs to the BM, however, the identity of E-selectin ligands remains elusive. We aimed to use mass spectrometry (MS) to fully analyze the E-selectin ligands expressed on HSPCs. Immunoprecipitation studies coupled with MS confirmed the expression of three known E-selectin ligands, the hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, and revealed the presence of many interesting candidates on HSPCs-like cell line and on primary human BM CD34+ cells. The MS dataset represents a rich resource for further characterization of E-selectin ligands, which will lead to improvement of HSPCs transplantation. 4 Understanding the critical pathways underlying the initiation and maintenance of leukemia plays a key role in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ligation of the glycoprotein, CD44, using monoclonal antibodies or its natural ligand, hyaluronic acid, drives the differentiation of immature leukemic cells towards mature terminally differentiated cells, inhibits their proliferation and in some case induces their apoptosis. The aim of this study is to characterize the phosphoproteome of AML cells in response to CD44-induced differentiation. This will afford novel insights into the

  9. Assessment and Improvement of Gene Transfer into Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Breems (Dimitri)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe application of somatic gene transfer as a potential treatment in human disease has progressed from speculation to reality in a short time [4,20,21,84,85,87,105,117,174]. In May 1989 the first clinical marker gene protocol took place [145], followed by the first gene therapy protocol

  10. Withania somnifera Root Extract Has Potent Cytotoxic Effect against Human Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Babli; Singh, Shruti; Thakur, Suman S

    2015-01-01

    In Ayurveda, Withania somnifera is commonly known as Ashwagandha, its roots are specifically used in medicinal and clinical applications. It possesses numerous therapeutic actions which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, hypnotic and narcotic. Extracts from this plant have been reported for its anticancer properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time, the cytotoxic effect of Withania root extract on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. The crude extract of Withania was tested for cytotoxicity against A375 cells by MTT assay. Cell morphology of treated A375 cells was visualized through phase contrast as well as fluorescence microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to check DNA fragmentation of the crude extract treated cells. Crude extract of Withania root has the potency to reduce viable cell count in dose as well as time dependent manner. Morphological change of the A375 cells was also observed in treated groups in comparison to untreated or vehicle treated control. Apoptotic body and nuclear blebbing were observed in DAPI stained treated cells under fluorescence microscope. A ladder of fragmented DNA was noticed in treated cells. Thus it might be said that the crude water extract of Withania somnifera has potent cytotoxic effect on human malignant melanoma A375 cells.

  11. A phase I trial of recombinant human thrombopoietin in patients with delayed platelet recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R A; Kurzrock, R; DiPersio, J; Vose, J; Linker, C; Maharaj, D; Nademanee, A P; Negrin, R; Nimer, S; Shulman, H; Ashby, M; Jones, D; Appelbaum, F R; Champlin, R

    2000-01-01

    Delayed platelet recovery is a significant complication after both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). A multicenter, phase I dose-escalation study of recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) was conducted to assess its safety and to obtain preliminary data on its efficacy in patients with persistent severe thrombocytopenia (35 days after HSCT. Thirty-eight patients, 37 of whom were evaluable, were enrolled in the study from April 1996 through January 1997. rhTPO was administered at doses of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 microg/kg as a single dose (group A) or in multiple doses every 3 days for a total of 5 doses (group B). No significant adverse effects were observed. Ten patients had recovery of platelet counts during the 28-day study period; 3 of these 10 had an increase in marrow megakaryocyte content 7 days after completing treatment with rhTPO. When all baseline marrows were compared with samples after rhTPO treatment, there was no difference in marrow megakaryocyte content (P = 0.49). This study design could not answer the question of whether the recoveries of platelet counts observed in some patients were spontaneous or influenced by rhTPO treatment; nonetheless, the authors found no correlation between the dose of rhTPO and the recovery of platelet counts. Increases in serum TPO levels were dose-dependent and remained significantly elevated for up to 72 hours after treatment. To evaluate response, further studies of treatment strategies with rhTPO in patients with delayed platelet recovery are required.

  12. Genetic modification of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic cells with human coagulation factor IX-expressing plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Mohammad Reza; Azadbakhsh, Azadeh Sadat; Farokhi, Farrah; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Sam, Sohrab; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Haddad-Mashadrizeh, Aliakbar; Delirezh, Nowruz; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2016-05-01

    Ex-vivo gene therapy of hemophilias requires suitable bioreactors for secretion of hFIX into the circulation and stem cells hold great potentials in this regard. Viral vectors are widely manipulated and used to transfer hFIX gene into stem cells. However, little attention has been paid to the manipulation of hFIX transgene itself. Concurrently, the efficacy of such a therapeutic approach depends on determination of which vectors give maximal transgene expression. With this in mind, TF-1 (primary hematopoietic lineage) and rat-bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected with five hFIX-expressing plasmids containing different combinations of two human β-globin (hBG) introns inside the hFIX-cDNA and Kozak element and hFIX expression was evaluated by different methods. In BMSCs and TF-1 cells, the highest hFIX level was obtained from the intron-less and hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids respectively. The highest hFIX activity was obtained from the cells that carrying the hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids. BMSCs were able to produce higher hFIX by 1.4 to 4.7-fold increase with activity by 2.4 to 4.4-fold increase compared to TF-1 cells transfected with the same constructs. BMSCs and TF-1 cells could be effectively bioengineered without the use of viral vectors and hFIX minigene containing hBG introns could represent a particular interest in stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilias.

  13. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  14. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  15. Hematopoietic differentiation from human ESCs as a model for developmental studies and future clinical translations. Invited review following the FEBS Anniversary Prize received on 5 July 2009 at the 34th FEBS Congress in Prague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Ledran, Maria H; Lako, Majlinda

    2010-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells are excellent models for the study of embryonic hematopoiesis in vitro, aiding the design of new differentiation models that may be applicable to cell-replacement therapies. Adult and fetal hematopoietic stem cells are currently being used in biomedical applications; however, the latest advances in regenerative medicine and stem cell biology suggest that hESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells are an outstanding tool for enhancing immunotherapy and treatments for blood disorders and cancer, for example. In this review, we compare various methods used for inducing in vitro hematopoietic differentiation from hESCs, based on co-culture with stromal cells or formation of embryoid bodies, and analyse their ability to give rise to hematopoietic precursors, with emphasis on their engraftment potential as a measure of their functionality in vivo.

  16. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  17. Lamins regulate cell trafficking and lineage maturation of adult human hematopoietic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R.; Swift, Joe; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Discher, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing human blood cell types, nuclear diversity is visually striking but unexplained: quasi-spherical nuclei in stem/progenitor cells and T cells contrast with multilobed nuclei in neutrophils, giant nuclei in megakaryocytes, and anuclear erythrocytes. We hypothesized broad roles for the major nuclear structure proteins—lamins—and developed mass spectrometry-calibrated intracellular flow cytometry to quantify lamin-A:B ratios. This ratio controls both nuclear viscoelasticity and cell traf...

  18. Characterization of phosphodiesterase 2A in human malignant melanoma PMP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroshi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Okumura, Kenya; Inui, Madoka; Tagawa, Toshiro

    2013-04-01

    The prognosis for malignant melanoma is poor; therefore, new diagnostic methods and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is one of 21 phosphodiesterases, which are divided into 11 families (PDE1-PDE11). PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), and its binding to cGMP enhances the hydrolysis of cAMP. We previously reported the expression of PDE1, PDE3 and PDE5 in human malignant melanoma cells. However, the expression of PDE2 in these cells has not been investigated. Herein, we examined the expression of PDE2A and its role in human oral malignant melanoma PMP cells. Sequencing of RT-PCR products revealed that PDE2A2 was the only variant expressed in PMP cells. Four point mutations were detected; one missense mutation at nucleotide position 734 (from C to T) resulted in the substitution of threonine with isoleucine at amino acid position 214. The other three were silent mutations. An in vitro migration assay and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay revealed that suppressing PDE2 activity with its specific inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), had no impact on cell motility or apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of EHNA, assessed using a trypan blue exclusion assay, was negligible. On the other hand, assessment of cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation and cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry revealed that EHNA treatment inhibited DNA synthesis and increased the percentage of G2/M-arrested cells. Furthermore, cyclin A mRNA expression was downregulated, while cyclin E mRNA expression was upregulated in EHNA-treated cells. Our results demonstrated that the PDE2A2 variant carrying point mutations is expressed in PMP cells and may affect cell cycle progression by modulating cyclin A expression. Thus, PDE2A2 is a possible new molecular target for the treatment of malignant melanoma.

  19. Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-12-01

    Stathmin 1 is a microtubule destabilizer that plays an important role in cell cycle progression, segregation of chromosomes, clonogenicity, cell motility and survival. Stathmin 1 overexpression has been reported in malignant hematopoietic cells and Stathmin 1 inhibition reduces the highly proliferative potential of leukemia cell lines. However, during the differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells, Stathmin 1 expression decreases in parallel to decreases in the proliferative potential of early hematopoietic progenitors. The scope of the present review is to survey the current knowledge and highlight future perspectives for Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with regard to the expression, function and clinical implications of this protein.

  20. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  1. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  2. Mechanism of Ascorbic Acid-induced Reversion Against Malignant Phenotype in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YA-XUAN SUN; QIU-SHENG ZHENG; GANG LI; DE-AN GUO; ZI-REN WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To find out the mechanisms of redifferentiation and reversion of malignant human gastric cancer cells induced by ascorbic acid. Methods Human gastric cancer cells grown in the laboratory were used. The Trypan blue dye exclusion method was used to determine the cell doubling time. The electrophoresis rate and colonogenic potential were the indices used to measure the rate of redifferentiation. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured using the thiobarbituric acid(TBA) method. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the content of H2O2 were evaluated by spectrophotography. Results Six mmol/L ascorbic acid was used as a positive control. Human gastric cancer cells were treated with 75 μm hydrogen peroxide, which alleviated many of the malignant characteristics. For example, the cell surface charge obviously decreased and the electrophoresis rate dropped from 2.21 to 1.10 μm·s-1·V-1·cm-1. The colonogenic potential, a measure of cell differentiation, decreased 90.2%. After treatment with ascorbic acid, there was a concentration- and time-dependent increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). However, the activity of catalase (CAT) resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease. SOD and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) exhibited some effects, but there were statistically significant differences between the SOD and AT group and the H2O2 group. Conclusions Ascorbic acid induces growth inhibition and redifferentiation of human gastric cancer cells through the production of hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Evaluation of the efficiency of human immune system reconstitution in NSG mice and NSG mice containing a human HLA.A2 transgene using hematopoietic stem cells purified from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, John; Vuyyuru, Raja; Siglin, Amanda; Root, Michael; Manser, Tim

    2015-07-01

    Severely immunodeficient mice such as the NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) (NSG) strain can be engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), resulting in chimeric mice containing many components of the human immune system (Human Immune System mice or HIS mice). HIS mice can both support the replication of and recapitulate much of the immunological response to a variety of pathogens, including ones with strict human tropism, such as HIV-1. In an effort to develop a better mouse model for human infectious pathogen infection and possible immune resolution, we compared the human immune system reconstitution of NSG mice following injection with human CD34(+) HSCs purified from either fetal liver (FL) or umbilical cord blood (UCB). We analyzed reconstitution in standard NSG mice as well as a derivative of these mice containing an HLA.A2 encoding transgene (NSG.A2). HSCs from both sources effectively reconstituted hematopoietic lineages when injected into NSG mice. In marked contrast, total CD45(+) human hematopoietic cells in NSG.A2 mice were well reconstituted by HSCs from UCB but very poorly by HSCs purified from FL. Moreover, the reconstitution of T cell lineages in NSG.A2 mice by HSCs from UCB was inferior to that obtained using NSG mice. We also found that FL CD34(+) HSCs contain a much higher percentage of cells with a phenotype consistent with primitive progenitors than UCB HSCs. We discuss possible explanations for the influence of the HLA.A2 transgene on hematopoietic reconstitution using the two sources of HSCs.

  4. The Non-Coding RNA Llme23 Drives the Malignant Property of Human Melanoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Fang Wu; Guang-Hong Tan; Cheng-Chuan Ma; Ling Li

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the notion that increased RNA-binding ability of polypyrimidine tract-binding (PTB) proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF) and aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with mouse and human tumors.To identify the PSF-binding IncRNA involved in human oncogenesis,we screened a nuclear RNA repertoire of human melanoma cell line,YUSAC,through RNA-SELEX affinity chromatography.A previously unreported lncRNA,termed as Lime23,was found to bind immobilized PSF resin.The specific binding of Llme23 to both recombinant and native PSF protein was confirmed in vitro and in vivo.The expression of PSF-binding Llme23 is exclusively detected in human melanoma lines.Knocking down Lime23 remarkably suppressed the malignant property of YUSAC cells,accompanied by the repressed expression of proto-oncogene Rab23.These results may indicate that Llme23 can function as an oncogenic RNA and directly associate the PSF-binding IncRNA with human melanoma.

  5. Human study of the herbal preparation(HemoHIM) on enhancement of immune and hematopoietic functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-Nam; Jeon, Sun-Hee [Eulji Univ. Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    This study was aimed to evaluate the human efficacy of the herbal preparation(HemoHIM) on the immune and hematopoiesis enhancement in sub-healthy volunteers. It was conducted as a double-blind, placebo-controlled human study. The sub-healthy volunteers with peripheral White Blood Cell (WBC) counts below 5000/μl were recruited and randomly allocated to 3 groups and administered with HemoHIM 6g/day, HemoHIM 12g/day, or placebo throughout the test. Peripheral blood was collected 4 times before or after the administration and analyzed for the hematological and serum biochemical values, immune cell activities, antioxidant status of plasma. The data of 38 volunteers were finally included in the analysis. Although there were no statistical significances, a trend was observed that the dose and duration of HemoHIM administration was correlated to the increased number of immune cells (white blood cells and lymphocytes). NK cell activity was increased significantly in the male group administered with HemoHIM 6g/day. The cytokines involved in immune activation (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6) were significantly increased or showed the trends of increases in HemoHIM administered groups, while IL-4 involved in allergy and asthma was not changed or showed the trends of decreases in HemoHIM administered groups. On the other hand, the antioxidant biomarkers such as total GSH, MDA, and TAS, were not affected by HemoHIM administration. The toxicological safety of HemoHIM administration was confirmed by the serum biochemical analysis of liver and kidney function markers and the questionnaire of HemoHIM administration and the consultation with the doctor, which showed no side effects of HemoHIM administration. The results of this study may provide the basic data for further clinical study on HemoHIM.

  6. Successful clinical treatment and functional immunological normalization of human MALT1 deficiency following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, Jacob; McDonald, Rachel; Fung, Shan-Yu; Del Bel, Kate L; Roden, Juliana; Senger, Christof; Schultz, Kirk R; McKinnon, Margaret L; Davis, Jeffrey; Turvey, Stuart E

    2016-07-01

    MALT1 mutations impair normal NF-κB activation and paracaspase activity to cause a novel combined immunodeficiency. The clinical and immunological phenotype of MALT1 deficiency can be successfully treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following reduced intensity conditioning.

  7. Oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in immature hematopoietic cells fail to recapitulate the transcriptional changes observed in human AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, N; Porse, B T

    2014-01-01

    in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor (HSPCs) cells transduced with oncogenic fusion genes are regarded as promising in vitromodels of their corresponding AML subtypes. Here, we critically assessed the potential of such in vitro models using an integrative bioinformatics approach...

  8. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Martijn H.; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W.; de Haas, Edwin F. E.; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; van Rood, Jon J.; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E.; Staal, Frank J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Att

  9. Modeled current distribution inside the normal and malignant human urothelium using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad; Keshtkar, Asghar

    2008-02-01

    When the tissue is changing from normal to abnormal, the distribution of tissue liquids between intra and extra cellular space will be changed and then the measured conductivity and impedivity will also be changed. Therefore, it will cause a different current distribution inside the human bladder tissue in normal and malignant cases. By knowing the amount of electrical impedance inside the bladder tissue and the morphological parameters of the different layers of this tissue, the current distribution inside the bladder tissue (surface fluid, superficial urothelium, intermediate urothelium, basal urothelium, basement membrane, and connective tissue) was modelled and calculated in different frequencies using the finite element analysis. The model results showed that very little of the current actually flows through the urothelium and much of the injected current flows through the connective tissue beneath the urothelium (in normal cases). However, most of the current flows through the surface fluid in the low frequency range in normal tissue. Furthermore, for the high frequencies, the tight junctions are short-circuited, so the current penetrates deeper, flowing through the connective tissue beneath the urothelium, while, in the malignant cases, at least 50% of the injected current flows beneath transformed urothelium across the frequency range modelled.

  10. Global Variation of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Selected Genes Involved in Cervical Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, R S Akram; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the cervix is ranked second among the top 5 cancers affecting women globally. Parallel to other cancers, it is also a complex disease involving numerous factors such as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection followed by the activity of oncogenes and environmental factors. The incidence rate of the disease remains high in developing countries due to lack of awareness, followed by mass screening programs, various socioeconomic issues, and low usage of preventive vaccines. Over the past 3 decades, extensive research has taken place in cervical malignancy to elucidate the role of host genes in the pathogenesis of the disease, yet it remains one of the most prevalent diseases. It is imperative that recent genome-wide techniques be used to determine whether carcinogenesis of oncogenes is associated with cervical cancer at the molecular level and to translate that knowledge into developing diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The aim of this study was to discuss HPV predominance with their genotype distribution worldwide, and in India, as well as to discuss the newly identified oncogenes related to cervical cancer in current scenario. Using data from various databases and robust technologies, oncogenes associated with cervical malignancies were identified and are explained in concise manner. Due to the advent of recent technologies, new candidate genes are explored and can be used as precise biomarkers for screening and developing drug targets. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective growth inhibition of a human malignant melanoma cell line by sesame oil in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D E; Salerno, J W

    1992-06-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient and comprehensive system of natural medicine, recommends regular topical application to the skin of sesame oil, above all other oils, as a health-promoting procedure. We examined the effect of sesame oil and several other vegetable oils and their major component fatty acids on the proliferation rate of human normal and malignant melanocytes growing at similar rates in serum-free media. We found that sesame and safflower oils, both of which contain large amounts of linoleate in triglyceride form, selectively inhibited malignant melanoma growth over normal melanocytes whereas coconut, olive and mineral oils, which contain little or no linoleate as triglyceride, did not. These oils were tested at a range of 10-300 micrograms/ml. We found that of the fatty acids tested, only linoleic acid was selectively inhibitory while palmitic and oleic were not. These fatty acids were tested in the range of 3-100 micrograms/ml. These results suggest that certain vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid, such as the sesame oil, recommended for topical use by Ayurveda, may contain selective antineoplastic properties which are similar to those demonstrated for essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites. This suggests that whole vegetable oils may have potential clinical usefulness.

  12. Intracellular ionized calcium concentration in muscles from humans with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J R; Alamo, L; Caputo, C; Wikinski, J; Ledezma, D

    1985-06-01

    Ca2+ selective microelectrodes have been used to determine the free myoplasmic [Ca2+] in human skeletal muscle obtained from patients who had developed early signs associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH) during anesthesia. Intercostal muscle biopsies were performed under local anesthesia in four MH patients 15 days to 4 months after developing the MH crisis and in three control subjects. We used only microelectrodes that showed a Nernstian response between pCa3 and pCa7 (30.5 mV per decade at 37 degrees C). Membrane resting potential (V(m)) and calcium potential (V(Ca)) were obtained from superficial fibers. The free cytosolic [Ca2+] was 0.39 +/- 0.1 microM (mean +/- SEM, n = 18) in muscle fibers obtained from malignant hyperthermic patients, whereas in control subjects it was 0.11 +/- 0.02 microM (n = 10). These results suggest that this syndrome might be related to an abnormally high myoplasmic free resting calcium concentration, probably due to a defective function of the plasma membrane or the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Apoptotic effect and mechanisms of AHPN on human skin malignant melanoma cell A375

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Pan; Zhenhui Peng; Shengxiang Xiao; Jianwen Ren; Yan Liu; Xiaoli Li; Zhengxiao Li

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study apoptotic effects of synthetic retinoic acid 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid(AHPN) on human skin malignant melanoma A375 cells in comparison with the natural iigand all-trans-retinoic acid(ATRA) in vitro and the mechanisms related to the actions of AHPN. Methods:MTT assay was used to determine the anti-proliferative effects of AHPN and ATRA on A375 cells. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate the influence of AHPN and ATRA on cell cycle and cell apoptosis. In addition, transfection and luciferase activity assays were employed to explore the mechanisms of how AHPN executes its proapoptotic function. Results:Firstly, AHPN promoted apoptosis and G1 arrest in A375 cells compared with ATRA. Secondly, the activity of NF-kB in A375 cells treated with AHPN increased 2-3 times compared with solvent DMSO treatment. Conelusion:AHPN,in comparison with ATRA, is a more effective alternative for therapy of malignant melanoma. The potentially proapoptotic function of AHPN requires activation of NF-kB.

  14. Survivin 2α: a novel Survivin splice variant expressed in human malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honsey Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin and its alternative splice forms are involved in critical cellular processes, including cell division and programmed cell death. Survivin is expressed in the majority of human cancers, but minimally in differentiated normal tissues. Expression levels correlate with tumor aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Results In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel survivin isoform that we designate survivin 2α. Structurally, the transcript consists of 2 exons: exon 1 and exon 2, as well as a 3' 197 bp region of intron 2. Acquisition of a new in-frame stop codon within intron 2 results in an open reading frame of 225 nucleotides, predicting a truncated 74 amino acid protein. Survivin 2α is expressed at high levels in several malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Functional assays show that survivin 2α attenuates the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation of survivin 2α suggests a physical interaction with survivin. Conclusion We characterized a novel survivin splice variant that we designated survivin 2α. We hypothesize that survivin 2α can alter the anti-apoptotic functions of survivin in malignant cells. Thus survivin 2α may be useful as a therapeutic tool in sensitizing chemoresistant tumor cells to chemotherapy.

  15. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies.

  16. Increased Engraftment of Human Short Term Repopulating Hematopoietic Cells in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull Mice by Lentiviral Expression of NUP98-HOXA10HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Allistair; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Zhao, Huifen; Humphries, Keith; Persons, Derek A

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to expand human hematopoietic stem cells ex-vivo could be beneficial to the fields of clinical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy targeted at hematopoietic stem cells. NUP98-HOXA10HD is a relatively newly discovered fusion gene that in mouse transplant experiments has been shown to increase numbers of hematopoietic stem cells. We evaluated whether this fusion gene could be used to expand engrafting human primitive CD34+ cells in an immunodeficient mouse model. Gene transfer was achieved using a lentiviral based vector. The engraftment of mobilized peripheral blood human CD34+ cells grown in culture for one week after gene transfer was evaluated 3-4 months after transplant and found to be 2-3 fold higher in the NUP98-HOXA10HD groups as compared to controls. These data suggest an expansive effect at least at the short term human repopulating cell level. Further evaluation in long term repopulating models and investment in a NUP98-HOXA10HD protein seems worthy of consideration. Additionally, the results here provide strong impetus to utilize NUP98-HOXA10HD as a tool to search for underlying genes and pathways involved in hematopoietic stem cell expansion that can be enhanced and have an even more potent expansive effect.

  17. Increased Engraftment of Human Short Term Repopulating Hematopoietic Cells in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull Mice by Lentiviral Expression of NUP98-HOXA10HD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allistair Abraham

    Full Text Available Techniques to expand human hematopoietic stem cells ex-vivo could be beneficial to the fields of clinical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy targeted at hematopoietic stem cells. NUP98-HOXA10HD is a relatively newly discovered fusion gene that in mouse transplant experiments has been shown to increase numbers of hematopoietic stem cells. We evaluated whether this fusion gene could be used to expand engrafting human primitive CD34+ cells in an immunodeficient mouse model. Gene transfer was achieved using a lentiviral based vector. The engraftment of mobilized peripheral blood human CD34+ cells grown in culture for one week after gene transfer was evaluated 3-4 months after transplant and found to be 2-3 fold higher in the NUP98-HOXA10HD groups as compared to controls. These data suggest an expansive effect at least at the short term human repopulating cell level. Further evaluation in long term repopulating models and investment in a NUP98-HOXA10HD protein seems worthy of consideration. Additionally, the results here provide strong impetus to utilize NUP98-HOXA10HD as a tool to search for underlying genes and pathways involved in hematopoietic stem cell expansion that can be enhanced and have an even more potent expansive effect.

  18. Microglia recapitulate a hematopoietic master regulator network in the aging human frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-08-01

    Microglia form the immune system of the brain. Previous studies in cell cultures and animal models suggest altered activation states and cellular senescence in the aged brain. Instead, we analyzed 3 transcriptome data sets from the postmortem frontal cortex of 381 control individuals to show that microglia gene markers assemble into a transcriptional module in a gene coexpression network. These markers predominantly represented M1 and M1/M2b activation phenotypes. Expression of genes in this module generally declines over the adult life span. This decrease was more pronounced in microglia surface receptors for microglia and/or neuron crosstalk than in markers for activation state phenotypes. In addition to these receptors for exogenous signals, microglia are controlled by brain-expressed regulatory factors. We identified a subnetwork of transcription factors, including RUNX1, IRF8, PU.1, and TAL1, which are master regulators (MRs) for the age-dependent microglia module. The causal contributions of these MRs on the microglia module were verified using publicly available ChIP-Seq data. Interactions of these key MRs were preserved in a protein-protein interaction network. Importantly, these MRs appear to be essential for regulating microglia homeostasis in the adult human frontal cortex in addition to their crucial roles in hematopoiesis and myeloid cell-fate decisions during embryogenesis.

  19. Microglia recapitulate a hematopoietic master regulator network in the aging human frontal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C.; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia form the immune system of the brain. Previous studies in cell cultures and animal models suggest altered activation states and cellular senescence in the aged brain. Instead, we analyzed 3 transcriptome data sets from the postmortem frontal cortex of 381 control individuals to show that microglia gene markers assemble into a transcriptional module in a gene coexpression network. These markers predominantly represented M1 and M1/M2b activation phenotypes. Expression of genes in this module generally declines over the adult life span. This decrease was more pronounced in microglia surface receptors for microglia and/or neuron crosstalk than in markers for activation state phenotypes. In addition to these receptors for exogenous signals, microglia are controlled by brain-expressed regulatory factors. We identified a subnetwork of transcription factors, including RUNX1, IRF8, PU.1, and TAL1, which are master regulators (MRs) for the age-dependent microglia module. The causal contributions of these MRs on the microglia module were verified using publicly available ChIP-Seq data. Interactions of these key MRs were preserved in a protein-protein interaction network. Importantly, these MRs appear to be essential for regulating microglia homeostasis in the adult human frontal cortex in addition to their crucial roles in hematopoiesis and myeloid cell-fate decisions during embryogenesis. PMID:26002684

  20. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  1. Angiopoietin-like 5 and IGFBP2 stimulate ex vivo expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Iizuka, Satoru; Huynh, HoangDinh; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the basis of bone marrow transplantation and are attractive target cells for hematopoietic gene therapy, but these important clinical applications have been severely hampered by difficulties in ex vivo expansion of HSCs. In particular, the use of cord blood for adult transplantation is greatly limited by the number of HSCs. Previously we identified angiopoietin-like proteins and IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) as new hormones that, together with other factors, can expand mouse bone marrow HSCs in culture. Here, we measure the activity of multipotent human severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) by transplantation into the nonobese diabetic SCID (NOD/SCID) mice; secondary transplantation was performed to evaluate the self-renewal potential of SRCs. A serum-free medium containing SCF, TPO, and FGF-1 or Flt3-L cannot significantly support expansion of the SRCs present in human cord blood CD133+ cells. Addition of either angiopoietin-like 5 or IGF-binding protein 2 to the cultures led to a sizable expansion of HSC numbers, as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation. A serum-free culture containing SCF, TPO, FGF-1, angiopoietin-like 5, and IGFBP2 supports an approximately 20-fold net expansion of repopulating human cord blood HSCs, a number potentially applicable to several clinical processes including HSC transplantation.

  2. Deletion of the LTR enhancer/promoter has no impact on the integration profile of MLV vectors in human hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    Full Text Available Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived gamma-retroviral vectors integrate preferentially near transcriptional regulatory regions in the human genome, and are associated with a significant risk of insertional gene deregulation. Self-inactivating (SIN vectors carry a deletion of the U3 enhancer and promoter in the long terminal repeat (LTR, and show reduced genotoxicity in pre-clinical assays. We report a high-definition analysis of the integration preferences of a SIN MLV vector compared to a wild-type-LTR MLV vector in the genome of CD34(+ human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. We sequenced 13,011 unique SIN-MLV integration sites and compared them to 32,574 previously generated MLV sites in human HSPCs. The SIN-MLV vector recapitulates the integration pattern observed for MLV, with the characteristic clustering of integrations around enhancer and promoter regions associated to H3K4me3 and H3K4me1 histone modifications, specialized chromatin configurations (presence of the H2A.Z histone variant and binding of RNA Pol II. SIN-MLV and MLV integration clusters and hot spots overlap in most cases and are generated at a comparable frequency, indicating that the reduced genotoxicity of SIN-MLV vectors in hematopoietic cells is not due to a modified integration profile.

  3. Non-Lethal Ionizing Radiation Promotes Aging-Like Phenotypic Changes of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Humanized Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshan Wang

    Full Text Available Precise understanding of radiation effects is critical to develop new modalities for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. We previously reported that non-lethal doses of X-ray irradiation induce DNA damage in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs reconstituted in NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγnull (NOG immunodeficient mice and severely compromise their repopulating capacity. In this study, we analyzed in detail the functional changes in human HSPCs in NOG mice following non-lethal radiation. We transplanted cord blood CD34+ HSPCs into NOG mice. At 12 weeks post-transplantation, the recipients were irradiated with 0, 0.5, or 1.0 Gy. At 2 weeks post-irradiation, human CD34+ HSPCs recovered from the primary recipient mice were transplanted into secondary recipients. CD34+ HSPCs from irradiated mice showed severely impaired reconstitution capacity in the secondary recipient mice. Of interest, non-lethal radiation compromised contribution of HSPCs to the peripheral blood cells, particularly to CD19+ B lymphocytes, which resulted in myeloid-biased repopulation. Co-culture of limiting numbers of CD34+ HSPCs with stromal cells revealed that the frequency of B cell-producing CD34+ HSPCs at 2 weeks post-irradiation was reduced more than 10-fold. Furthermore, the key B-cell regulator genes such as IL-7R and EBF1 were downregulated in HSPCs upon 0.5 Gy irradiation. Given that compromised repopulating capacity and myeloid-biased differentiation are representative phenotypes of aged HSCs, our findings indicate that non-lethal ionizing radiation is one of the critical external stresses that promote aging of human HSPCs in the bone marrow niche.

  4. Elevated expression of serine/threonine phosphatase type 5 correlates with malignant proliferation in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Gan, Zhihua; Lin, Shuchen; Hu, Haiyan; Shen, Zan; Min, Daliu

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. However, the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatase type 5 (PP5) in osteosarcoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional role of PP5 in osteosarcoma cells. Firstly, we found that PP5 is widely expressed in several human osteosarcoma cell lines. Then we used lentivirus-delivered siRNA to silence PP5 expression in Saos-2 and U2OS cell lines. Knockdown of endogenous PP5 expression by shRNA-expressing lentivirus significantly decreased the viability and proliferation of the osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, FACS analysis showed that knockdown of PP5 expression induced a significant arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, which was associated with the inhibition of cell proliferation. Therefore, knockdown of PP5 is likely to provide a novel alternative to targeted therapy of osteosarcoma and deserves further investigation.

  5. Growth curves of three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Nielsen, A; Visfeldt, J

    1980-01-01

    Experimental growth data for three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice of BALB/c origin are analyzed statistically in order to investigate whether they can be described according to the Gompertz function. The aim is to set up unequivocal standards for planned therapeutic experiments...... and to develop an essential part of the determination of proliferation parameters for the tumors. The results indicate that the course of tumor growth can be described with good approximation by the Gompertz function. A transformation of this function depicts the growth rectilinearly and appears to be suitable...... mice. For tumors whose growth is described according to the Gompertz function, recording of the growth of the tumor size in two dimensions is sufficient for calculating other relevant growth parameters, if the three linear tumor measurements are proportional throughout the growth period. The initial...

  6. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  7. Recombinant human thrombopoietin promotes platelet engraftment after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ting-ting; Xu, Lan-ping; Liu, Dai-hong; Liu, Kai-yan; Wang, Feng-rong; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-hua; Chen, Yu-hong; Sun, Yu-qian; Ji, Yu; Wang, Jing-zhi; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Delayed platelet engraftment (DPE) is a common complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). This phenomenon is also a predictor of increased treatment-related mortality and poor survival. Therefore, therapies that promote platelet engraftment to prevent DPE are needed. This prospective randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate whether recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO), administered subcutaneously at a daily dose of 15,000 U from the first day after transplantation, promotes platelet engraftment after haploidentical HSCT. The cumulative incidence of platelet engraftment (platelet recovery to ≥20 × 10(9)/L without transfusion support for seven consecutive days) on day 60 post-transplantation was significantly higher in the rhTPO group (n = 60) than in the control group (n = 60) (91.7 ± 3.8 % vs. 74.5 ± 5.8 %, P = 0.041). Additionally, the number of platelet transfusions from day 14 to day 60 was significantly lower in the rhTPO group than in the control group (4 ± 5 vs. 7 ± 9 Units, P = 0.018). No severe adverse effects were observed, with a median follow-up duration of 256 days (range, 48-586 days). The incidences of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, and cytomegalovirus viremia and the probabilities of overall survival and disease-free survival did not differ between the two groups. A multivariate analysis of all patients revealed that regardless of assignment to the rhTPO group or the control group (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.514; 95 % CI (1.024-2.238); P = 0.038), the number of total infused CD34(+) cells (HR = 1.304; 95 % CI (1.148-1.482); P rhTPO promotes platelet engraftment and safely reduces the requirement for platelet transfusion in patients after unmanipulated haploidentical HSCT. This trial was registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ( www.chictr.org ) as ChiCTR-TRC-11001774. http

  8. Preservation of differentiation and clonogenic potential of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during lyophilization and ambient storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya S Buchanan

    Full Text Available Progenitor cell therapies show great promise, but their potential for clinical applications requires improved storage and transportation. Desiccated cells stored at ambient temperature would provide economic and practical advantages over approaches employing cell freezing and subzero temperature storage. The objectives of this study were to assess a method for loading the stabilizing sugar, trehalose, into hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC and to evaluate the effects of subsequent freeze-drying and storage at ambient temperature on differentiation and clonogenic potential. HPC were isolated from human umbilical cord blood and loaded with trehalose using an endogenous cell surface receptor, termed P2Z. Solution containing trehalose-loaded HPC was placed into vials, which were transferred to a tray freeze-dryer and removed during each step of the freeze-drying process to assess differentiation and clonogenic potential. Control groups for these experiments were freshly isolated HPC. Control cells formed 1450+/-230 CFU-GM, 430+/-140 BFU-E, and 50+/-40 CFU-GEMM per 50 microL. Compared to the values for the control cells, there was no statistical difference observed for cells removed at the end of the freezing step or at the end of primary drying. There was a gradual decrease in the number of CFU-GM and BFU-E for cells removed at different temperatures during secondary drying; however, there were no significant differences in the number of CFU-GEMM. To determine storage stability of lyophilized HPC, cells were stored for 4 weeks at 25 degrees C in the dark. Cells reconstituted immediately after lyophilization produced 580+/-90 CFU-GM ( approximately 40%, relative to unprocessed controls p<0.0001, 170+/-70 BFU-E (approximately 40%, p<0.0001, and 41+/-22 CFU-GEMM (approximately 82%, p = 0.4171, and cells reconstituted after 28 days at room temperature produced 513+/-170 CFU-GM (approximately 35%, relative to unprocessed controls, p<0

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in archival samples obtained from patients with cervical pre-malignant and malignant lesions from Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado José CM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV is considered as a necessary, but not sufficient, cause of cervical cancer. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV in a series of pre-malignant and malignant cervical lesion cases, to identify the virus genotypes, and to assess their distribution pattern according to lesion type, age range, and other considered variables. The samples were submitted to histopathological revision examination and analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the presence of HPV DNA, followed by HPV typing by dot blot hybridisation. Findings Of the analysed samples, 53.7% showed pre-malignant cervical lesions, and 46.3% presented with cervical cancer. Most cancer samples (84.1% were classified as invasive carcinoma. The mean age of these cancer patients was 47.3 years. The overall HPV prevalence was 82.4% in patients with pre-malignant lesions and 92.0% in the cancer patients. HPV 16 was the most prevalent type, followed by HPV 18 and 58, including both single and double infections. Double infection was detected in 11.6% of the samples, and the most common combination was HPV 16+18. Conclusions Cervical cancer appears to occur in women in a lower age range in the studied area, compared to the situation in other Brazilian regions. Furthermore, among the patients with CIN 3 and those with cancer, we observed a higher proportion of married women, women with more than one sexual partner, smokers, and individuals with less than an elementary education, relative to their counterparts. Findings The overall HPV prevalence was 82.4% in patients with pre-malignant lesions and 92.0% in the cervical cancer patients from Northeast Brazil. HPV 16 was the most prevalent type, followed by HPV 18 and 58. The most common double infection was HPV 16+18. Cervical cancer appears to occur in women in a lower age range in the Northeast Brazil. Among the patients with CIN 3 and those with cancer, we observed a higher

  10. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James; Curran, Catherine E; Hennessy, Emer; Newell, John; Morris, John C; Kerin, Michael J; Dwyer, Roisin M

    2011-01-19

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10) were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ), oestrogen (ERα), thyroid hormones (THRα, THRβ), and also phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K). Breast cancer cells were treated with Retinoic acid (ATRA), Estradiol and Thyroxine individually and in combination followed by analysis of changes in NIS expression. The lowest levels of NIS were detected in normal tissue (Mean(SEM) 0.70(0.12) Log(10) Relative Quantity (RQ)) with significantly higher levels observed in fibroadenoma (1.69(0.21) Log(10)RQ, phuman NIS and ERα (r = 0.22, pfibroadenoma. The data presented supports a role for retinoic acid and estradiol in mammary NIS regulation in vivo, and also highlights potential thyroidal regulation of mammary NIS mediated by thyroid hormones.

  11. Human Non-Hematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg Bone Marrow Stroma Cells Fulfill Stringent Stem Cell Criteria in Serial Transplantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Li, Hongzhe; Zacharaki, Dimitra; Lim, Hooi Ching

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of non-hematopoietic stromal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs), which play a central role for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise characteristics and potential stem cell properties of defined BMSC populations have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Using standard adherent colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assays, we have previously shown that BMSCs were highly enriched in the nonhematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg fraction of normal adult human bone marrow. In this study, we demonstrate that prospectively isolated CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs expressed high levels of hematopoiesis supporting genes and signature mesenchymal and multipotency genes on a single cell basis. Furthermore, CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs gave rise to non-adherent sphere colonies (mesenspheres) with typical surface marker profile and trilineage in vitro differentiation potential. Importantly, serial transplantations of CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSC-derived mesenspheres (single cell and bulk) into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice showed increased mesensphere numbers and full differentiation potential after both primary and secondary transplantations. In contrast, BMSC self-renewal potential decreased under standard adherent culture conditions. These data therefore indicate that CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs represent a population of primary stem cells with MSC phenotype and sphere-forming capacity that fulfill stringent functional stem cell criteria in vivo in a serial transplantation setting. PMID:27527928

  12. Autophagy Proteins ATG5 and ATG7 Are Essential for the Maintenance of Human CD34(+) Hematopoietic Stem-Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Puerto, Maria Catalina; Folkerts, Hendrik; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Schepers, Koen; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Coffer, Paul J; Vellenga, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves sequestration and lysosomal degradation of cytosolic components such as damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. While autophagy can be considered to be a general cellular housekeeping process, it has become clear that it may also play cell type-dependent functional roles. In this study, we analyzed the functional importance of autophagy in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and how this is regulated during differentiation. Western blot-based analysis of LC3-II and p62 levels, as well as flow cytometry-based autophagic vesicle quantification, demonstrated that umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) /CD38(-) immature hematopoietic progenitors show a higher autophagic flux than CD34(+) /CD38(+) progenitors and more differentiated myeloid and erythroid cells. This high autophagic flux was critical for maintaining stem and progenitor function since knockdown of autophagy genes ATG5 or ATG7 resulted in reduced HSPC frequencies in vitro as well as in vivo. The reduction in HSPCs was not due to impaired differentiation, but at least in part due to reduced cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis. This is accompanied by increased expression of p53, proapoptotic genes BAX and PUMA, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21, as well as increased levels of cleaved caspase-3 and reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our data demonstrate that autophagy is an important regulatory mechanism for human HSCs and their progeny, reducing cellular stress and promoting survival. Stem Cells 2016;34:1651-1663.

  13. Mobilization of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor-enriched CD34+ cells into peripheral blood during stress related to ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Z Ratajczak

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The bone marrow-derived stem/progenitor cells were demonstrated to play an important role in a regeneration of damaged tissue. Based on these observations we asked whether the stroke-related stress triggers mobilization of stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood, which subsequently could contribute to regeneration of damaged organs. To address this issue, the peripheral blood samples were harvested from patients with ischemic stroke during the first 24 hrs as well as after the 48 (2nd day and 144 hrs (6th day since the manifestation of symptoms. In these patients we evaluated the percentage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor-enriched CD34+ cells by employing flow cytometry and the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells for the granulocyto-monocytic (CFU-GM and erythroid (BFU-E-lineages circulating in peripheral blood. We concluded that stress related to ischemic stroke triggers the mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow into peripheral blood. These circulating stem/progenitor cells may play an important role in the process of regeneration of the ischemic tissue.

  14. c-RET molecule in malignant melanoma from oncogenic RET-carrying transgenic mice and human cell lines.

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    Yuichiro Ohshima

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and its incidence worldwide has been increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer. We previously reported that constitutively activated RFP-RET-carrying transgenic mice (RET-mice spontaneously develop malignant melanoma. In this study, we showed that expression levels of intrinsic c-Ret, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf and Gdnf receptor alpha 1 (Gfra1 transcripts in malignant melanomas from RET-transgenic mice were significantly upregulated compared with those in benign melanocytic tumors. These results suggest that not only introduced oncogenic RET but also intrinsic c-Ret/Gdnf are involved in murine melanomagenesis in RET-mice. We then showed that c-RET and GDNF transcript expression levels in human malignant melanoma cell lines (HM3KO and MNT-1 were higher than those in primary cultured normal human epithelial melanocytes (NHEM, while GFRa1 transcript expression levels were comparable among NHEM, HM3KO and MNT-1. We next showed c-RET and GFRa1 protein expression in HM3KO cells and GDNF-mediated increased levels of their phosphorylated c-RET tyrosine kinase and signal transduction molecules (ERK and AKT sited potentially downstream of c-RET. Taken together with the finding of augmented proliferation of HM3KO cells after GDNF stimulation, our results suggest that GDNF-mediated c-RET kinase activation is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma.

  15. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  16. Changes of proliferation kinetics after X-irradiation of a human malignant melanoma grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L

    1984-01-01

    A human malignant melanoma grown in nude mice was exposed to single-dose X-irradiation and the effect on the proliferation kinetics was investigated by two methods. Flow cytometric DNA analysis was performed on tumour tissue obtained by sequential fine-needle aspirations after the treatment to mo......-related increasing proportion of radiation-inactivated tumour cells....

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma expression in human malignant and normal brain, breast and prostate-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, J O; Robbins, M E

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive and gamma -linolenic acid (GLA)-induced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) immunoreactive protein in a panel of human malignant brain (U87MG, T98G); breast (MCF-7, MB MDA-231, MB MDA 435) and prostate (ALVA, DU-145, LNCaP, PC3) cell lines have been compared with those for their normal cell counterparts, the human normal astrocyte (NHA), mammary epithelial (HMEC) and prostate epithelial (PrEC) cells, respectively. Constitutive levels of expression for PPAR gamma protein were significantly higher in the malignant cell lines relative to their normal cells. GLA supplementation did not affect the protein expression in malignant cells but caused 6- and 3-fold increases in normal breast and prostate cells, respectively. Since activation of PPAR gamma protein in some human malignant cell lines has been demonstrated to induce tumour cell death, these findings signal the need to exploit the significantly elevated expression of this protein in the therapy of human cancer. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus antigens in malignant gliomas as targets for adoptive cellular therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eLandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Over the last decade, investigators have reliably identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV proteins, nucleic acids, and virions in most high-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM. This discovery is significant because human cytomegalovirus gene products can be targeted by immune-based therapies.In this review, we describe the current level of understanding regarding the presence and role in pathogenesis of HCMV in GBM. We describe our success detecting and expanding HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill GBM cells and explain how these cells can be used as a platform for enhanced cellular therapies. We discuss alternative approaches that capitalize on HCMV infection to treat patients with HCMV-positive tumors. Adoptive cellular therapy for HCMV-positive GBM has been tried in a small number of patients with some benefit, but we reason why, to date, these approaches generally fail to generate long-term remission or cure. We conjecture how cellular therapy for GBM can be improved and describe the barriers that must be overcome to cure these patients.

  19. The p53 pathway in hematopoiesis: lessons from mouse models, implications for humans

    OpenAIRE

    Pant, Vinod; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Lozano, Guillermina

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway are associated with hematologic malignancies. p53-dependent cell cycle control, senescence, and apoptosis functions are actively involved in maintaining hematopoietic homeostasis under normal and stress conditions. Whereas loss of p53 function promotes leukemia and lymphoma development in humans and mice, increased p53 activity inhibits hematopoietic stem cell function and results in myelodysplasia. Thus, exquisite regulation of p53 activity is ...

  20. Loss of canonical Smad4 signaling promotes KRAS driven malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Leung

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRAS (G12V expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-β resistant (TβR cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-β. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-β sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells.

  1. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  2. Cre/loxP-mediated excision of a neomycin resistance expression unit from an integrated retroviral vector increases long terminal repeat-driven transcription in human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernex, C; Dubreuil, P; Mannoni, P; Bagnis, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses are currently the most attractive vehicles for gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Retroviral vectors often contain an easily selectable marker gene in addition to the gene of interest. However, the presence and selection for expression of the selectable gene often result in a significant reduction of the expression of the gene of interest in the transduced cells. In order to circumvent this problem, we have developed a Cre/loxP recombination system for specific excision of the selectable expression unit from integrated retroviruses. A retroviral vector, containing both a neomycin resistance expression unit flanked by loxP sites and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor cDNA, was used to transduce the human hematopoietic K-562 cell line. Four transduced cell clones were then superinfected with a retrovirus containing a Cre recombinase expression unit. Molecular analyses of 30 doubly transduced subclones showed a strict correlation between cre expression and loxP-flanked selectable cassette excision, thus implying that Cre recombinase activity is very efficient in a retroviral context. Moreover, the excision of the selectable cassette results in a significant increase of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcription driven by the retroviral promoter. PMID:9311833

  3. The New Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for Thalassemia Gene Therapy Combining Two HPFH Activating Elements Corrects Human Thalassemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Stamateris, Evangelos; Panetsos, Fottes; Karagiorga, Markisia; Tsaftaridis, Panagiotis; Graphakos, Stelios

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To address how low titer, variable expression, and gene silencing affect gene therapy vectors for hemoglobinopathies, in a previous study we successfully used the HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin)-2 enhancer in a series of oncoretroviral vectors. On the basis of these data, we generated a novel insulated self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector, termed GGHI, carrying the Aγ-globin gene with the −117 HPFH point mutation and the HPFH-2 enhancer and exhibiting a pancellular pattern of Aγ-globin gene expression in MEL-585 clones. To assess the eventual clinical feasibility of this vector, GGHI was tested on CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells from nonmobilized peripheral blood or bone marrow from 20 patients with β-thalassemia. Our results show that GGHI increased the production of γ-globin by 32.9% as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (p=0.001), with a mean vector copy number per cell of 1.1 and a mean transduction efficiency of 40.3%. Transduced populations also exhibited a lower rate of apoptosis and resulted in improvement of erythropoiesis with a higher percentage of orthochromatic erythroblasts. This is the first report of a locus control region (LCR)-free SIN insulated lentiviral vector that can be used to efficiently produce the anticipated therapeutic levels of γ-globin protein in the erythroid progeny of primary human thalassemic hematopoietic stem cells in vitro. PMID:21875313

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: transfusion issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkök ÇA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Çiğdem Akalın Akkök,1,21Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden Abstract: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT is an intention-to-cure treatment strategy in several malignancies and nonmalignancies. The number of patients receiving AHSCT is increasing due to new indications, and more elderly patients with comorbidities are included in the protocols. Survival of the patients undergoing AHSCT has improved owing to better patient care, including optimization of transfusion support, which has a major contribution. However, transfusion can also be hazardous. Increasing awareness about transfusion and finding the balance between avoiding unnecessary transfusions and transfusing the correct component when needed are the key issues. Myeloablative conditioning results in pancytopenia, and the patients are prone to infections, anemia, and bleeding both before and after transplantation. Until red cell and platelet engraftment, the patients are usually transfusion dependent needing red cell and/or platelet components. Physicians dealing with AHSCT patients should be well informed about the attributes of the blood components they order. Knowledge about transfusion indications, triggers, and how to prevent and manage eventual transfusion complications is also required. The clinical picture can be challenging, and transplantation/treatment-related toxicity/complications can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from a transfusion complication, especially if the latter one took place, for instance, several days or weeks ago. ABO compatibility between the patient and the donor is not a prerequisite when choosing human leukocyte antigen-matched hematopoietic stem cell donor. Consequently, ABO incompatibility exists in ~40% of the cases and brings some immunohematological issues

  5. On the growth rates of human malignant tumors: implications for medical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, S; Mattson, S

    1997-08-01

    Testicular carcinomas, pediatric tumors, and some mesenchymal tumors are examples of rapidly proliferating cell populations, for which the tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) can be counted in days. Cancers from the breast, prostate, and colon are frequently slow-growing, displaying a TVDT of months or years. Irrespective of their growth rates, most human tumors have been found: to start from one single cell, to have a long subclinical period, to grow at constant rates for long periods of time, to start to metastasize often even before the primary is detected, and to have metastases that often grow at approximately the same rate as the primary tumor. The recognition of basic facts in tumor cell kinetics is essential in the evaluation of important present-day strategies in oncology. Among the facts emphasized in this review are: (1) Screening programs. Most tumors are several years old when detectable by present-day diagnostic methods. This makes the term "early detection" questionable. (2) Legal trials. The importance of so-called doctor's delay is often discussed, but the prognostic value of "early" detection is overestimated. (3) Analyses of clinical trials. Such analysis may be differentiated depending on the growth rates of the type of tumor studied. Furthermore, uncritical analysis of survival data may be misleading if the TVDT is not taken into consideration. (4) Analyses of epidemiological data. If causes of malignant tumors in humans are searched for, the time of exposure must be extended far back in the subject's history. (5) Risk estimations by insurance companies. For the majority of human cancers, the 5-year survival rate is not a valid measurement for cure. Thus, basic knowledge of tumor kinetics may have important implications for political health programs, legal trials, medical science, and insurance policies.

  6. Transfection of B7-1 cDNA empowers antigen presentation of blood malignant cells for activation of anti-tumor T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    克晓燕; 贾丽萍; 王晶; 王德炳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To define roles of B7-1 co-stimulation factor expressed in human malignant cell lines in mediating anti-tumor T cell immune responses. Methods Examining human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and B7 expressions on 8 human blood malignancies cell lines by flow cytometry. Transfecting B7-1 gene to B7-1 negative (B7*!-) Raji and B7*!- Jurkat cell lines by liposome, and comparing the potencies of blood malignant cell lines in the induction of T cell activation by examination of T cell cytokine mRNAs before and after transfection using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results High level of HLA Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules were expressed in most human blood malignant cell lines examined, and the co-stimulatory factor B7-2 was also highly expressed. In contrast, another member of B7 family: B7-1 was either not expressed or very limitedly expressed in most of these hematopoietic malignant cell lines. Most importantly, transfection of B7-1 gene to B7*!-. Raji and B7*!-. Jurkat cell lines made these cell lines better antigen presenting cells for stimulation of anti-tumor T cell activation, which was demonstrated by up regulation of expression of T cell cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and INF-γ mRNAs after incubation of these tumor cells with T cells for 24 h. Conclusions B7 co-stimulation plays an important role in anti-tumor immunity. Transfection of B7-1 gene to the human hematopoietic malignant cell lines that are deficient in the B7-1 expression empowers their antigen presentation potency for activation of anti-tumor T cells. Our results suggested that repairing the deficiency of B7-1 co-stimulatory pathway in tumor cells might be a novel immunotherapeutic approach for human hematopoietic malignancies.

  7. RHBDL2 Is a Critical Membrane Protease for Anoikis Resistance in Human Malignant Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lin Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anoikis resistance allows metastatic tumor cells to survive in a homeless environment. Activation of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling is one of the key mechanisms for metastatic tumor cells to resist anoikis, yet the regulation mechanisms of homeless-triggered EGFR activation in metastatic tumor cells remain unclear. Rhomboid-like-2 (RHBDL2, an evolutionally conserved intramembrane serine protease, can cleave the EGF ligand and thus trigger EGFR activation. Herein, we demonstrated that RHBDL2 overexpression in human epithelial cells resulted in promotion of cell proliferation, reduction of cell adhesion, and suppression of anoikis. During long-term suspension cultures, increased RHBDL2 was only detected in aggressive tumor cell lines. Treatment with the rhomboid protease inhibitor or RHBDL2 shRNA increased cleaved caspase 3, a marker of apoptosis. Finally, inhibition of EGFR activation increased the cleaved caspase 3 and attenuated the detachment-induced focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the first time that RHBDL2 is a critical molecule in anoikis resistance of malignant epithelial cells, possibly through the EGFR-mediated signaling. Our study demonstrates RHBDL2 as a new therapeutic target for cancer metastasis.

  8. Biochemical Signatures of Doppel Protein in Human Astrocytomas to Support Prediction in Tumor Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rognoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppel (Dpl is a membrane-bound glycoprotein mainly expressed in the testis of adult healthy people. It is generally absent in the central nervous system, but its coding gene sequence is ectopically expressed in astrocytoma specimens and in derived cell lines. In this paper, we investigated the expression and the biochemical features of Dpl in a panel of 49 astrocytoma specimens of different WHO malignancy grades. As a result, Dpl was expressed in the majority of the investigated specimens (86%, also including low grade samples. Importantly, Dpl exhibited different cellular localizations and altered glycan moieties composition, depending on the tumor grade. Most low-grade astrocytomas (83% showed a membrane-bound Dpl, like human healthy testis tissue, whereas the majority of high-grade astrocytomas (75% displayed a cytosolic Dpl. Deglycosylation studies with N-glycosidase F and/or neuraminidase highlighted defective glycan moieties and an unexpected loss of sialic acid. To find associations between glial tumor progression and Dpl biochemical features, predictive bioinformatics approaches were produced. In particular, Decision tree and Nomogram analysis showed well-defined Dpl-based criteria that separately clustered low-and high-grade astrocytomas. Taken together, these findings show that in astrocytomas, Dpl undergoes different molecular processes that might constitute additional helpful tools to characterize the glial tumor progression.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cartularo

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress.

  10. Various Statistical Methods in Use for Evaluating Human Malignant Gastric Specimens

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    Ventzeslav Enchev

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of certain statistical methods (comparison of means – independent samples t‐test, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, analysis of clusters, etc. included in the SPSS Statistical Package used to classify the patients quantitatively evaluated after a subtotal resection of their stomachs. The group consisted of 40 patients subdivided into two groups: primary neoplasia of the stomach (20 patients, and corresponding lymphogenic deposits in the abdominal perigastric lymph nodes (20 patients. Paraffin‐embedded tissue sections (thickness 4–5µm prepared as consecutive hematoxylin‐eosin‐stained slides were morphometrically measured by a rotation of a graduated eyepiece‐micrometer; thus, we obtained the minor and major axes’ lengths of the elliptic nuclear profiles and the minor and major caliper diameters of the corresponding cellular profiles. These four variables were used to determine the dynamic changes in quantitative features of human gastric lesions when passing from normal histological structures, through hyperplastic processes (chronic gastritis, gastric precancer (ulcers and polyps with or without malignancy till the development of primary carcinomas and their corresponding lymphogeneous metastases. Besides the increased cytomorphometrical measures, we also noted an opportunity to classify the patients according to these data as well as to add to the knowledge of our consultation system for clinical aid and use, recently published in the literature.

  11. Specific expression of human intelectin-1 in malignant pleural mesothelioma and gastrointestinal goblet cells.

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    Kota Washimi

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a fatal tumor. It is often hard to discriminate MPM from metastatic tumors of other types because currently, there are no reliable immunopathological markers for MPM. MPM is differentially diagnosed by some immunohistochemical tests on pathology specimens. In the present study, we investigated the expression of intelectin-1, a new mesothelioma marker, in normal tissues in the whole body and in many cancers, including MPM, by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that in normal tissues, human intelectin-1 was mainly secreted from gastrointestinal goblet cells along with mucus into the intestinal lumen, and it was also expressed, to a lesser extent, in mesothelial cells and urinary epithelial cells. Eighty-eight percent of epithelioid-type MPMs expressed intelectin-1, whereas sarcomatoid-type MPMs, biphasic MPMs, and poorly differentiated MPMs were rarely positive for intelectin-1. Intelectin-1 was not expressed in other cancers, except in mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that intelectin-1 is a better marker for epithelioid-type MPM than other mesothelioma markers because of its specificity and the simplicity of pathological assessment. Pleural intelectin-1 could be a useful diagnostic marker for MPM with applications in histopathological identification of MPM.

  12. Effect of human epididymis protein 4 gene silencing on the malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Shu-li; CUI Heng; CHANG Xiao-hong; YE Xue; CHENG Hong-yan; CHENG Ye-xia; TANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Zu-juan; GAO Li; CHEN Xin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) has been proved to be a promising novel biomarker for the detection of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Compared with CA125, HE4 assay demonstrated an improved ability to discriminate between pelvic mass with malignant and benign disease. Though it is well known that HE4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, however, the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer remains unkown.Methods In this study, we explored the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. We screened nine ovarian cancer cell lines for HE4 expression, and using RNA interference (RNAi), we silenced HE4 gene expression in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of HE4 gene silencing on the transformed phenotype by examining the cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation and transwell migration/invasion in vitro.Results HE4 gene silencing induces G0/G1 arrest and blocks the progression from the G1 to S phase in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 cells. HE4 knockdown also inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SKOV3.ip1 cells in vitro.Conclusion HE4 may be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and promote ovarian cancer migration and invasion.

  13. Leukemia microvesicles affect healthy hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Ramzi, Mani; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Kakoui, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Microvesicles are released by different cell types and shuttle mRNAs and microRNAs which have the possibility to transfer genetic information to a target cell and alter its function. Acute myeloid leukemia is a malignant disorder, and leukemic cells occupy all the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemia microvesicles on healthy umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to find evidence of cell information transferring. Leukemia microvesicles were isolated from acute myeloid leukemia patients and were co-incubated with healthy hematopoietic stem cells. After 7 days, cell count, hematopoietic stem cell-specific cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, colony-forming unit assay, and some microRNA gene expressions were assessed. Data showed a higher number of hematopoietic stem cells after being treated with leukemia microvesicles compared with control (treated with no microvesicles) and normal (treated with normal microvesicles) groups. Also, increased levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a genes were observed in this group, while colony-forming ability was still maintained and high ranges of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD90(+), and CD117(+) phenotypes were observed as stemness signs. Our results suggest that leukemia microvesicles are able to induce some effects on healthy hematopoietic stem cells such as promoting cell survival and some microRNAs deregulation, while stemness is maintained.

  14. Effect of antisense human telomerase RNA on malignant behaviors of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-liang; FANG Dian-chun; YANG Shi-ming; LUO Yuan-hui; LUO Kun-lun; LU Rong; LIU Wei-wen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of antisense human telomerase RNA (ahTR) transfection on the malignant behaviors of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 and its potential role in gene therapy for tumor. Methods: An antisense hTR eukaryotic expression vector containing the sequence of template region of telomere repeats was transfected into gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 with liposome DOTAP. The expressions of hTR RNA and antisense hTR RNA were observed with RT-PCR, telomerase activity with PCR-ELISA. Telomere length was measured with Southern blot. Cell morphology and cellular proliferation capacity were studied with MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptotic state were observed with flow cytometry. Efficiency of clone formation in soft agar and tumorigencity in nude mice were examined and evaluated in ahTR-transfected 7901 cells, and plasmid pCL-neo transfected 7901 cells and parental 7901 cells served as control. Results: An antisense hTR eukaryotic expression vector was transfected into 7901 cells successfully. The telomerase activity in ahTR-transfected 7901 cells was decreased from 100% to about 25%, and telomere length in the cells shortened from 4.08 kb to 3.35 kb at 60 population doublings (PDs). Compared with parental 7901 and pCL-neo transfected 7901 cells, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells displayed some morphological changes, including decreased cell atypia and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio under light microscope. Furthermore, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells displayed growth inhibition, decreased invasive capacity in Borden's chamber invasive model, increased G0/G1 phase rate and apoptotic rate, and restored contact inhibition and density inhibition. Surprisingly, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells lost their capacity of clone formation in soft agar and carcinogensis in nude mice. Conclusion: Antisense hTR transfection can induce 7901 cell differentiation and reverse its malignant phenotype. This study provides an exciting approach for cancer therapy through the

  15. Molecular mechanism of inositol hexaphosphate-mediated apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells.

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    Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2007-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Current therapies are mostly ineffective and new agents need to be explored for controlling this devastating disease. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a phytochemical that is widely found in corns, cereals, nuts, and high fiber-content foods. Previous studies demonstrated anti-cancer properties of IP6 in several in vitro and in vivo tumor models. However, therapeutic efficacy of IP6 has not yet been evaluated in glioblastoma. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism of action of IP6 in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells. The viability of T98G cells decreased following treatment with increasing doses of IP6. T98G cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM IP6 for 24 h showed morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Western blotting indicated changes in expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins resulting in an increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and upregulation of cytosolic levels of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, suggesting involvement of mitochondria-dependent caspase cascade in apoptosis. IP6 downregulated cell survival factors such as baculovirus inhibitor-of-apoptosis repeat containing-2 (BIRC-2) protein and telomerase to promote apoptosis. Upregulation of calpain and caspase-9 occurred in course of apoptosis. Increased activities of calpain and caspase-3 cleaved 270 kD alpha-spectrin at specific sites generating 145 kD spectrin break down product (SBDP) and 120 kD SBDP, respectively. Increased caspase-3 activity also cleaved inhibitor of caspase-3-activated DNase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Collectively, our results demonstrated that IP6 down regulated the survival factors BIRC-2 and telomerase and upregulated calpain and caspase-3 activities for apoptosis in T98G cells.

  16. Cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic use.

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    Watt, Suzanne M; Austin, Eric; Armitage, Sue

    2007-01-01

    To date, more than 25,000 hematopoietic transplants have been carried out across Europe for hematological disorders, the majority being for hematological malignancies. At least 70% of these are autologous transplants, the remaining 30% being allogeneic, which are sourced from related (70% of the allogeneic) or unrelated donors. Peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor is the major source of stem cells for transplantation, being used in approx 95% of autologous transplants and in approx 65% of allogeneic transplants. Other cell sources used for transplantation are bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. One crucial advance in the treatment of these disorders has been the development of the ability to cryopreserve hematopoietic stem cells for future transplantation. For bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, the majority of cryopreserved harvests come from autologous collections that are stored prior to a planned infusion following further treatment of the patient or at the time of a subsequent relapse. Other autologous harvests are stored as backup or "rainy day" harvests, the former specifically being intended to rescue patients who develop graft failure following an allogeneic transplant or who may require this transplant at a later date. Allogeneic bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood are less often cryopreserved than autologous harvests. This is in contrast to umbilical cord blood that may be banked for directed or sibling (related) hematopoietic stem cell transplants, for allogeneic unrelated donations, and for autologous donations. Allogeneic unrelated donations are of particular use for providing a source of hematopoietic stem cells for ethnic minorities, patients with rare human leukocyte antigen types, or where the patient urgently requires a transplant and cannot wait for the weeks to months required to prepare a bone marrow donor. There are currently more than 200,000 banked umbilical cord blood units registered with

  17. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

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    Eleftheria Lakiotaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids, and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins’ expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n=43 and malignant (n=44 lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells’ proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.0010 and p=0.0005, resp.. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p=0.0097 and p=0.0110, resp.. In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p=0.0301. Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p=0.1165, lymphatic (p=0.1989, and vascular invasion (p=0.0555, as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p=0.1165, at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  18. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  19. HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    12.1 Erythrocyte function2003458 A preliminary experience of treatment of severe aplastic anemia with marine anti-human CD3T lymphocyte monoclonal antibody. GUO Chengshan (郭成山), et al. Dept Hematol, 2nd Hosp, Shandong Univ, Jinan 250033. Chin J Intern Med 2003; 42(9): 632 -635.

  20. Systemic delivery of triplex-forming PNA and donor DNA by nanoparticles mediates site-specific genome editing of human hematopoietic cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, N A; Schleifman, E B; Cuthbert, A; Brehm, M; Jackson, A; Cheng, C; Anandalingam, K; Kumar, P; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L; Mark Saltzman, W; Glazer, P M

    2013-06-01

    In vivo delivery is a major barrier to the use of molecular tools for gene modification. Here we demonstrate site-specific gene editing of human cells in vivo in hematopoietic stem cell-engrafted NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)IL2rγ(tm1Wjl) (abbreviated NOD-scid IL2rγ(null)) mice, using biodegradable nanoparticles loaded with triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and single-stranded donor DNA molecules. In vitro screening showed greater efficacy of nanoparticles containing PNAs/DNAs together over PNA-alone or DNA-alone. Intravenous injection of particles containing PNAs/DNAs produced modification of the human CCR5 gene in hematolymphoid cells in the mice, with modification confirmed at the genomic DNA, mRNA and functional levels. Deep sequencing revealed in vivo modification of the CCR5 gene at frequencies of 0.43% in hematopoietic cells in the spleen and 0.05% in the bone marrow: off-target modification in the partially homologous CCR2 gene was two orders of magnitude lower. We also induced specific modification in the β-globin gene using nanoparticles carrying β-globin-targeted PNAs/DNAs, demonstrating this method's versatility. In vivo testing in an enhanced green fluorescent protein-β-globin reporter mouse showed greater activity of nanoparticles containing PNAs/DNAs together over DNA only. Direct in vivo gene modification, such as we demonstrate here, would allow for gene therapy in systemic diseases or in cells that cannot be manipulated ex vivo.

  1. Niche contributions to oncogenesis: Emerging concepts and implications for the hematopoietic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.G.P. Raaijmakers (Marc H.G.P.)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe field of hematopoietic oncology has traditionally focused on the study of hematopoietic cell autonomous genetic events in an effort to understand malignant transformation and develop therapeutics. Although highly rewarding in both aspects, this cell autonomous approach has failed to

  2. Improvement of Thymopoiesis after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation by Cytokines: Translational studies in experimental animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-J. Wils (Evert-Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT) is a powerful treatment modality that is frequently applied as part of treatment of hematological malignancies, aplastic anemia and inborn errors of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A major drawback of alloHSCT is the treatment

  3. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  4. Prognostic significance of the labeling index in non-Hodgkin human malignant lymphomas.

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    Silvestrini, R; Costa, A; Daidone, M G; Rilke, F

    1978-01-01

    The labeling index has been determined in 34 non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas. The kinetic parameter has been analyzed in relation to the different histologic types, according to the Kiel calssification, and a kinetic classification with three main groups at low, intermediate, and high proliferative activity has been proposed. The analysis of the survival of the patients in relation to the labeling index of the malignant lymphoma cell population has shown that the potential proliferative activity has an important prognostic significance.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  7. Canine classical seminoma: a specific malignant type with human classifications is highly correlated with tumor angiogenesis

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    Kim Jong-Hyuk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human seminoma is classified as classical seminoma (SE and spermatocytic seminoma (SS. Human SE is known to be more malignant and metastasizing more frequently than SS. Tumor angiogenesis is highly related with tumor progression and metastasis, with microvessel density (MVD being an important parameter of metastatic potential. Canine seminoma is not yet well-established as SE or SS type including correlation with angiogenesis. We classified canine SE and SS, and then compared them to tumor associated vessels. Methods Twenty-three cases of canine seminomas (2 intratubular, 9 diffuse, and 12 intratubular/diffuse seminomas showing both intratubular and diffuse patterns were classified as SE or SS by immunohistochemistry (IHC using monoclonal antibody against PLAP and by PAS stain. The histopathological data were then compared to see if there was a correlation with SE or SS. Angiogenesis of seminomas were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay using polyclonal antibody against Von Willebrand factor (vWF and by calculating the means of MVD, vessels area and perimeters using computerized image analysis. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS program was used for various statistical analyses. Results The numbers of PLAP+/PAS+ canine SEs were 8/23 (34.8% and PLAP-/PAS- SSs were 15/23 (61.2%. All SE cases (8/8, 100% were intratubular/diffuse types. SS types included 2 intratubular (2/15, 13.3%, 9 diffuse (9/15, 60%, and 4 intratubular/diffuse (4/15, 26.7% types. MVD and vascular parameters in SEs were significantly higher than in SSs, showing the highest value in the intratubular/diffuse type. Seminomas observed with neoplastic cells invasion of vessels presented higher perimeter and area values than seminomas without conformed neoplastic cells invasion. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated a positive relationship between canine SE and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we also showed that a tumor cells invasion of vessels

  8. Canine classical seminoma: a specific malignant type with human classifications is highly correlated with tumor angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Human seminoma is classified as classical seminoma (SE) and spermatocytic seminoma (SS). Human SE is known to be more malignant and metastasizing more frequently than SS. Tumor angiogenesis is highly related with tumor progression and metastasis, with microvessel density (MVD) being an important parameter of metastatic potential. Canine seminoma is not yet well-established as SE or SS type including correlation with angiogenesis. We classified canine SE and SS, and then compared them to tumor associated vessels. Methods Twenty-three cases of canine seminomas (2 intratubular, 9 diffuse, and 12 intratubular/diffuse seminomas showing both intratubular and diffuse patterns) were classified as SE or SS by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using monoclonal antibody against PLAP and by PAS stain. The histopathological data were then compared to see if there was a correlation with SE or SS. Angiogenesis of seminomas were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay using polyclonal antibody against Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and by calculating the means of MVD, vessels area and perimeters using computerized image analysis. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program was used for various statistical analyses. Results The numbers of PLAP+/PAS+ canine SEs were 8/23 (34.8%) and PLAP-/PAS- SSs were 15/23 (61.2%). All SE cases (8/8, 100%) were intratubular/diffuse types. SS types included 2 intratubular (2/15, 13.3%), 9 diffuse (9/15, 60%), and 4 intratubular/diffuse (4/15, 26.7%) types. MVD and vascular parameters in SEs were significantly higher than in SSs, showing the highest value in the intratubular/diffuse type. Seminomas observed with neoplastic cells invasion of vessels presented higher perimeter and area values than seminomas without conformed neoplastic cells invasion. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated a positive relationship between canine SE and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we also showed that a tumor cells invasion of vessels were a correlated

  9. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

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    Yu-Ling Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer.

  10. Distribution of dystrophin- and utrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC/UAPC) in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniente-De Alba, Carmen; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Vivanco-Calixto, Raúl; Galván, Iván J; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Cerecedo, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are defined by their cardinal properties, such as sustained proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and self-renewal, which give rise to a hierarchy of progenitor populations with more restricted potential lineage, ultimately leading to the production of all types of mature blood cells. HSC are anchored by cell adhesion molecules to their specific microenvironment, thus regulating their cell cycle, while cell migration is essentially required for seeding the HSC of the fetal bone marrow (BM) during development as well as in adult BM homeostasis. The dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is a large group of membrane-associated proteins linking the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and exhibiting scaffolding, adhesion, and signaling roles in muscle and non-muscle cells including mature blood cells. Because adhesion and migration are mechanisms that influence the fate of the HSC, we explored the presence and the feasible role of DAPC. In this study, we characterized the pattern expression by immunoblot technique and, by confocal microscopy analysis, the cellular distribution of dystrophin and utrophin gene products, and the dystrophin-associated proteins (α-, β-dystroglycan, α-syntrophin, α-dystrobrevin) in relation to actin filaments in freshly isolated CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the presence of Dp71d/Dp71Δ110m ∼DAPC and Up400/Up140∼DAPC. The subcellular distribution of the two DAPC in actin-based structures suggests their dynamic participation in adhesion and cell migration. In addition, the particular protein pattern expression found in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells might be indicative of their feasible participation during differentiation.

  11. Different glycosylation of cadherins from human bladder non-malignant and cancer cell lines

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    Lityńska Anna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether stage of invasiveness of bladder cancer cell lines contributes to alterations in glycan pattern of their cadherins. Results Human non-malignant epithelial cell of ureter HCV29, v-raf transfected HCV29 line (BC3726 and transitional cell cancers of urine bladder Hu456 and T24 were grown in cell culture. Equal amounts of protein from each cell extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and were blotted on an Immobilon P membrane. Cadherins were immunodetected using anti-pan cadherin mAb and lectin blotting assays were performed, in parallel. N-oligosaccharides were analysed by specific reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA, Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAA, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA. The cadherin from HCV29 cell line possessed bi- and/or 2,4-branched triantennary complex type glycans, some of which were α2,6-sialylated. The cadherin from BC3726 cell line exhibited exclusively high mannose type glycans. Cadherins from Hu456 and T24 cell lines expressed high mannose type glycans as well as β1,6-branched oligosaccharides with poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures and α2,3-linked sialic acid residues. Additionally, the presence of fucose and α2,6-sialic acid residues on the cadherin from T24 cell line was detected. Conclusions These results indicate that N-glycosylation pattern of cadherin from bladder cancer cell line undergoes modification during carcinogenesis.

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Human Malignant Mesothelioma Grown Orthotopically in the Peritoneal Cavity of Nude Mice

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    Mingqian Feng, Jingli Zhang, Miriam Anver, Raffit Hassan, Mitchell Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma (MM causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients. With increasing efforts devoted to developing therapeutics targeting mesothelioma, a xenograft mouse model with in vivo tumor imaging is especially desired for evaluating anti-tumor therapies. In the present study, we fluorescently labeled the NCI-H226 human mesothelioma cell line by a lentiviral vector harboring a luciferase-GFP (Luc/GFP fusion gene driven by the RNA polymerase II promoter. After single-cell cloning by flow cytometry, a clone (named LMB-H226-GL that stably expresses high levels of Luc/GFP was obtained. The in vivo tumorigenicity of Luc/GFP-labeled LMB-H226-GL was determined by using intraperitoneal injections of the cells in nude mice. LMB-H226-GL was found to be able to consistently form solid tumors in the peritoneum of mice. Tumor growth and aggressive progression could be quantitated via in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The model exhibited the pathological hallmarks consistent with the clinical progression of MM in terms of tumor growth and spread inside the peritoneal cavity. To evaluate the in vivo efficacy of drugs targeting mesothelioma, we treated mice with SS1P, a recombinant immunotoxin currently evaluated in Phase II clinical trials for treatment of mesothelioma. All the tumor-bearing mice had a significant response to SS1P treatment. Our results showed that this is a well-suited model for mesothelioma, and may be useful for evaluating other novel agents for mesothelioma treatment in vivo.

  13. Cellular distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 in benign and malignant human prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinicke, Karin; Sotomayor, Paula; Cisterna, Pedro; Delgado, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Godoy, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Over-expression of hexose transporters (Gluts), specifically Glut-1, is a common event in human malignancies. In prostate cancer (CaP), however, expression of Gluts has been characterized poorly. In this study, expression and distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 proteins were characterized using immunohistochemistry in 76 specimens of benign prostate, 10 specimens of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 28 specimens of CaP. In addition, mRNA expression of Glut-2, Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 was analyzed in a set of five specimens of benign prostate and CaP. In benign prostate, Glut-1 localized to the basal cells and to the basolateral membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In HGPIN, Glut-1 was immunohistochemically undetectable. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of the neoplastic epithelial cells. In CaP, Glut-1 and Glut-5, were immunohistochemically undetectable. However, over-expression of GLUT1 was observed in some specimens of highly proliferative intraductal CaP. Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 mRNAs were detected in benign prostate and CaP, however, only Glut-11 mRNA was consistently up-regulated in CaP compared to benign prostate. Low levels of expression of Glut-1 protein in the majority of CaP could explain, at least in part, the limited clinical applicability of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for imaging CaP. Moreover, expression of Glut-5 in HGPIN suggested that fructose could be utilized as potential metabolic substrate in HGPIN. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation/dysregulation of Gluts in CaP could provide insight in the understanding of hexose metabolism in CaP.

  14. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  15. Impact of cyclophosphamide dose of conditioning on the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aplastic anemia from human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takehiko; Koh, Hideo; Onishi, Yasushi; Kako, Shinichi; Onizuka, Makoto; Kanamori, Heiwa; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Iida, Hiroatsu; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakao, Shinji; Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-04-01

    The standard conditioning regimen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for aplastic anemia from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling has been high-dose cyclophosphamide (CY 200 mg/kg). In the present study, results for 203 patients with aplastic anemia aged 16 years or older who underwent allogeneic HSCT from HLA-identical siblings were retrospectively analyzed using the registry database of Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Conditioning regimens were defined as a (1) high-dose CY (200 mg/kg or greater)-based (n = 117); (2) reduced-dose CY (100 mg/kg or greater, but less than 200 mg/kg)-based (n = 38); and (3) low-dose CY (less than 100 mg/kg)-based (n = 48) regimen. Patient age and the proportion of patients receiving fludarabine were significantly higher in the reduced- and low-dose CY groups than the high-dose CY group. Engraftment was comparable among the groups. Five-year overall survival (OS) tended to be higher in the low-dose CY group [93.0 % (95 % CI 85.1-100.0 %)] than the high-dose CY [84.2 % (95 % CI 77.1-91.3 %)] or reduced-dose CY groups [83.8 % (95 % CI 71.8-95.8 %); P = 0.214]. Age-adjusted OS was higher in the low-dose CY group than the high- and reduced-dose CY groups with borderline significance (P = 0.067). These results suggest that CY dose can safely be reduced without increasing graft rejection by adding fludarabine in allogeneic HSCT for aplastic anemia from an HLA-identical sibling.

  16. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood as support for ex vivo expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and for chondrogenic differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN-FUWANG; LI-JUANWANG; YI-FANWU; YINGXIANG; CHUN-GANGXIE; BING-BINGJIA; JENNYHARRINGTON; IANK.MCNIECE

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPC) ar pluripotent, being the precursors for marrow stroma, bone, cartilage, muscle and connective tissues. Although the presence of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in umbilical cord blood (UCB) is well known, that of MSPC has been not fully evaluated. Design and Methods. In this study, we examined the immunophenotype, the supporting function in relation to exvivo expansion of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells and the chondrogenic differentiation of cultured cells with characteristics of MSPC from UCB. When UCB nucleated cells were isolated and 107 cells cultured in IMDM with 20% fetal bovine serum, the mean number of adherent fibroblastlike colonies was 3.5±0.7/106 monuclear cells. Results. UCB-derived MSPC could be expanded for at least 15 passages. In their undifferentiated state, UCB-derived MSPC were CD 13+, CD29+, CD90+, CD105+, CD166+, SH2+,SH3+, SH4+, CD45-, CD34-, and CD14-; they produced stem cell factor, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α.UCB-derived MSPC cultured in chondrogenic media differentiated into chondrogenic cells. UCB-derived MSPC supported the proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ cells from UCB in vitro. Interpretation and Conclusions. UCB-derived MSPC have the potential to support ex vivo expansion of HSPC and chondrogenic differentiation. UCB should not be regarded as medical waste. It can serve as an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells and may provide a unique source of fetal cells for cellular and gene therapy.

  17. Abnormal Expression of Eukaryotic Translation Factors in Malignant Transformed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induced by Crystalline Nickel Sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the oncogenic potential of mouse translation initiation factor 3 (TIF3) and elongation factor-1δ (TEF-1δ) in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cells induced by crystalline nickel sulfide (NiS). Methods Abnormal expressions of human TIF3 and TEF-1δ genes in two kinds of NiS-transformed cells and NiS-tumorigenic cell lines were investigated and analyzed by the reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR), respectively. Results RT-PCR analysis primarily showed that both human TIF3 and TEF-1δ mRNA expressions in two kinds of NiS-transformed cells and NiS-tumorigenic cell lines were increased as compared with controls. FQ-PCR assay showed that the levels of TIF3 expressions in the transformed cells and tumorigenic cells were 3 and 4 times higher respectively, and the elevated expressions of TEF-1δ cDNA copies were 2.7- to 3.5-fold in transformed cells and 4.1- to 5.2-fold in tumorigenic cells when compared with non-transformed cells, indicating that the over-expressions of human TIF3 and TEF-1δ genes were related to malignant degree of the cells induced by nickel. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that there are markedly abnormal expressions of TIF3 and TEF-1δ genes during malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cell lines induced by crystalline NiS. They seem to be the molecular mechanisms potentially responsible for human carcinogensis due to nickel.

  18. Non-cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET): summary of the Milan consensus and state of the art workshop on marrow ablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic cell rescue for malignant brain tumors of childhood and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangusaro, Jason; Massimino, Maura; Rutkowski, Stefan; Gururangan, Sridharan

    2010-04-01

    CNS non-cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) represent <5% of all childhood brain tumors. Despite similar therapies, these patients have had significantly worse outcomes compared to patients with medulloblastoma. Although these tumors have historically been considered analogous to medulloblastoma, there is growing evidence that they are biologically distinct. Since these tumors are relatively rare, there are few large series in the literature. Here we present the international experience treating these patients with a variety of therapies, including marrow ablative chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue.

  19. Failure of effector function of human CD8+ T Cells in NOD/SCID/JAK3⁻/⁻ immunodeficient mice transplanted with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Sato

    Full Text Available Humanized mice, which are generated by transplanting human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells into immunodeficient mice, are expected to be useful for the research on human immune responses. It is reported that antigen-specific T cell responses occur in immunodeficient mice transplanted with both human fetal thymus/liver tissues and CD34+ fetal cells, but it remains unclear whether antigen-specific T cell responses occur in those transplanted with only human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Here we investigated the differentiation and function of human CD8+ T cells reconstituted in NOD/SCID/Jak3⁻/⁻ mice transplanted with human CD34+ HSCs (hNOK mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that human CD8+ T cells generated from the CD34+ HSCs comprised only 3 subtypes, i.e., CD27(highCD28+CD45RA+CCR7+, CD27+CD28+CD45RA⁻CCR7+, and CD27+CD28+CD45RA⁻CCR7⁻and had 3 phenotypes for 3 lytic molecules, i.e., perforin(Per⁻granzymeA(GraA⁻granzymeB(GraB⁻, Per⁻GraA+GraB⁻, and Per(lowGraA+GraB+. These CD8+ T cells failed to produce IFN-γ and to proliferate after stimulation with alloantigens. These results indicate that the antigen-specific T cell response cannot be elicited in mice transplanted with only human CD34+ HSCs, because the T cells fail to develop normally in such mice.

  20. Role of transcription factor Sp1 in the quercetin-mediated inhibitory effect on human malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Kyung-Ae; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Kim, Sang-Bum; Lee, Sang-Han; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Quercetin (Qu) is found in plants, including red onions and in the skins of red apples, and induces the apoptosis of certain malignant cells. However, no report has been issued on the apoptotic effect of Qu on human malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the present study, it was found that MSTO-211H mesothelioma cell viability was reduced and apoptotic cell death was increased by Qu (20-80 µM), which was found to have an IC₅₀ of 58 µM. In addition, Qu increased the sub-G₁ cell population, and was found to interact with specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and significantly suppressed its expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, Qu modulated the levels of Sp1 regulatory genes, such as cyclin D1, myeloid cell leukemia (Mcl)-1 and survivin in MSTO-211H cells. Apoptotic signaling cascades were activated by the cleavage of Bid, caspase-3 and PARP, and by the downregulation of Bcl-xL and the upregulation of Bax in MSTO-211H cells. Our results strongly suggest that Sp1 be considered as a novel molecular target of Qu in human malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  1. Analysis of glycoprotein E-selectin ligANDs on human and mouse marrow cells enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2011-06-09

    Although well recognized that expression of E-selectin on marrow microvessels mediates osteotropism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), our knowledge regarding the cognate E-selectin ligand(s) on HSPCs is incomplete. Flow cytometry using E-selectin-Ig chimera (E-Ig) shows that human marrow cells enriched for HSPCs (CD34+ cells) display greater E-selectin binding than those obtained from mouse (lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ [LSK] cells). To define the relevant glycoprotein E-selectin ligands, lysates from human CD34+ and KG1a cells and from mouse LSK cells were immunoprecipitated using E-Ig and resolved byWestern blot using E-Ig. In both human and mouse cells, E-selectin ligand reactivity was observed at ∼ 120- to 130-kDa region, which contained two E-selectin ligands, the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- 1 glycoform "CLA," and CD43. Human, but not mouse, cells displayed a prominent ∼ 100-kDa band, exclusively comprising the CD44 glycoform "HCELL."E-Ig reactivity was most prominent on CLA in mouse cells and on HCELL in human cells. To further assess HCELL\\'s contribution to E-selectin adherence, complementary studies were performed to silence (via CD44 siRNA) or enforce its expression (via exoglycosylation). Under physiologic shear conditions, CD44/HCELL-silenced human cells showed striking decreases (> 50%) in E-selectin binding. Conversely, enforced HCELL expression of LSK cells profoundly increased E-selectin adherence, yielding > 3-fold more marrow homing in vivo. These data define the key glycoprotein E-selectin ligands of human and mouse HSPCs, unveiling critical species-intrinsic differences in both the identity and activity of these structures. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. The Expression and Action of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55 in Human Malignancies and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henrik Mikesch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55 is physiologically acting as an inhibitor of the complement system, but is also broadly expressed in malignant tumours. Here DAF seems to exert different functions beyond its immunological role such as e.g. promotion of tumorigenesis, decrease of complement mediated tumor cell lysis, autocrine loops for cell rescue and evasion of apoptosis, neoangiogenesis, invasiveness, cell motility, and metastasis via oncogenic tyrosine kinase pathways and specific seven-span transmembrane receptors (CD97 binding. Therefore, DAF has already become a target for therapy. In this paper we review the role of DAF in human malignancies as described in different basic, diagnostic and experimental therapeutic studies.

  3. The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein has a human-specific evolutionary nucleotide DNA change and acts as a regulator of cell viability in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Letizia; Stadler, Michael; Manukjan, Georgi; Scherr, Michaela; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Steinemann, Doris; Ganser, Arnold

    2016-04-01

    The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein belongs to the large family of Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) transcription factors, which are present only in higher vertebrates and epigenetically repress transcription by recruiting chromatin-modifying complexes to the promoter regions of their respective target genes. Although the distinct biological functions of most KRAB-ZNF proteins remain unknown, recent publications indicate their implication in fundamental processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, development, and tumorigenesis. SZF1/ZNF589 was first identified as a gene with SZF1-1 isoform specifically expressed in CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, strongly suggesting a role in epigenetic control of gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the function of SZF1/ZNF589 in hematopoiesis has not yet been elucidated. Our study reveals SZF1/ZNF589 as a gene with a human-specific nucleotide DNA-change, conferring potential species-specific functional properties. Through shRNA-mediated loss-of-function experiments, we found that changes in expression of fundamental apoptosis-controlling genes are induced on SZF1/ZNF589 knockdown, resulting in inhibited growth of hematopoietic cell lines and decreased progenitor potential of primary human bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Moreover, we found that the SZF1/ZNF589 gene is differentially regulated during hypoxia in CD34(+) HSPCs in a cytokine-dependent manner, implicating its possible involvement in the maintenance of the hypoxic physiologic status of hematopoietic stem cells. Our results establish the role of SZF1/ZNF589 as a new functional regulator of the hematopoietic system.

  4. Shape-dependent regulation of proliferation in normal and malignant human cells and its alteration by interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesh, D.A.; Greene, J.J.

    1986-06-01

    The relationship between cell morphology, proliferation, and contact inhibition was studied in normal and malignant human cells which varied in their sensitivity to contact inhibition. Their ability to proliferate was examined under conditions where the cells were constrained into different shapes by plating onto plastic surfaces coated with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) can precisely vary the shape of cells without toxicity. Cell proliferation was quantitated by cell counts and labeling indices were determined by autoradiography. The normal JHU-1 foreskin fibroblasts and IMR-90 lung fibroblasts exhibited contact-inhibited growth with a saturation density of 2.9 X 10(5) and 2.0 X 10(5) cells/cm2, respectively. These cells also exhibited stringent dependency on cell shape with a mitotic index of less than 3% at poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) concentrations at which the cells were rounded versus a labeling index of 75-90% when the cells were flat. The malignant bladder carcinoma line RT-4 exhibited partial contact-inhibited growth. Its dependency on cell shape was less stringent than that of normal cells with a mitotic index of 37-40% when rounded and 79% when flat. The malignant fibrosarcoma line, HT1080, was not contact inhibited and was entirely shape independent with a mitotic index of 70-90% regardless of cell shape. Treatment of HT1080 cells with low concentration of human fibroblast interferon (less than 40 units/ml) restored shape-dependent proliferation while having little effect on normal cells. Subantiproliferative doses of interferon were also shown to restore contact-inhibited proliferation control to malignant cells previously lacking it.

  5. Human CD34+ CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells cultured with growth factors including Angptl5 efficiently engraft adult NOD-SCID Il2rγ-/- (NSG mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Drake

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their stem cell activity. Here, we expanded cord blood CD34(+ CD133(+ cells in a defined medium containing angiopoietin like 5 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and evaluated the cells for stem cell activity in NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/- (NSG mice by multi-lineage engraftment, long term reconstitution, limiting dilution and serial reconstitution. The phenotype of expanded cells was characterized by flow cytometry during the course of expansion and following engraftment in mice. We show that the SCID repopulating activity resides in the CD34(+ CD133(+ fraction of expanded cells and that CD34(+ CD133(+ cell number correlates with SCID repopulating activity before and after culture. The expanded cells mediate long-term hematopoiesis and serial reconstitution in NSG mice. Furthermore, they efficiently reconstitute not only neonate but also adult NSG recipients, generating human blood cell populations similar to those reported in mice reconstituted with uncultured human HSCs. These findings suggest an expansion of long term HSCs in our culture and show that expression of CD34 and CD133 serves as a marker for HSC activity in human cord blood cell cultures. The ability to expand human HSCs in vitro should facilitate clinical use of HSCs and large-scale construction of humanized mice from the same donor for research applications.

  6. Loss of Dnmt3a and endogenous KrasG12D/+ cooperate to regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell functions in leukemogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-I; You, Xiaona; Kong, Guangyao; Ranheim, Erik A.; Wang, Jinyong; Du, Juan; Liu, Yangang; Zhou, Yun; Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS and KRAS mutations are prevalent in human juvenile and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML/CMML). However, additional genetic mutations cooperating with oncogenic RAS in JMML/CMML progression and/or their transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain largely unknown. Here, we tested the potential genetic interaction of DNMT3A mutations and oncogenic RAS mutations in leukemogenesis. We found that Dnmt3a−/− induces multiple hematopoietic phenotypes after a prolonged latency, including T cell expansion in peripheral blood, stress erythropoiesis in spleen, and myeloid malignancies in liver. Dnmt3a−/− significantly promoted JMML/CMML progression and shortened the survival of KrasG12D/+ mice in a cell-autonomous manner. Similarly, downregulating Dnmt3a also promoted myeloid malignancies in NrasG12D/+ mice. Further studies show that Dnmt3a deficiency rescues KrasG12D/+-mediated depletion of hematopoietic stem cells and increases self-renewal of KrasG12D/+ myeloid progenitors. Moreover, ~33% of animals developed an AML-like disease, which is driven by KrasG12D/+; Dnmt3a−/− myeloid progenitors. Consistent with our result, COSMIC database mining demonstrates that the combination of oncogenic RAS and DNMT3A mutations exclusively occurred in patients with JMML, CMML, or AML. Our results suggest that DNMT3A mutations and oncogenic RAS cooperate to regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and promote myeloid malignancies. PMID:25801914

  7. Phase 1 human trial of autologous bone marrow-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Mohamadnejad; Mehrnaz Namiri; Mohamad Bagheri; Seyed Masiha Hashemi; Hossein Ghanaati; Narges Zare Mehrjardi; Saeed Kazemi Ashtiani; Reza Malekzadeh; Hossein Baharvand

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow-enriched CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell Tx through the hepatic artery in patients with decompensated cirrhosis.METHODS: Four patients with decompensated cirrhosis were included. Approximately 200 mL of the bone marrow of the patients was aspirated, and CD34+ stem cells were selected. Between 3 to 10 million CD34+ cells were isolated. The cells were slowly infused through the hepatic artery of the patients.RESULTS: Patient 1 showed marginal improvement in serum albumin and no significant changes in other test results. In patient 2 prothrombin time was decreased;however, her total bilirubin, serum creatinine, and Model of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score worsened at the end of follow up. In patient 3 there was improvement in serum albumin, porthrombin time (PT), and MELD score. Patient 4 developed radiocontrast nephropathy after the procedure, and progressed to type 1 hepatorenal syndrome and died of liver failure a few days later. Because of the major side effects seen in the last patient, the trial was prematurely stopped.CONCLUSION: Infusion of CD34+ stem cells through the hepatic artery is not safe in decompensated cirrhosis.Radiocontrast nephropathy and hepatorenal syndrome could be major side effects. However, this study does not preclude infusion of CD34+ stem cells through other routes.

  8. Acellular bone marrow extracts significantly enhance engraftment levels of human hematopoietic stem cells in mouse xeno-transplantation models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Zibara

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC derived from cord blood (CB, bone marrow (BM, or mobilized peripheral blood (PBSC can differentiate into multiple lineages such as lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid cells and platelets. The local microenvironment is critical to the differentiation of HSCs and to the preservation of their phenotype in vivo. This microenvironment comprises a physical support supplied by the organ matrix as well as tissue specific cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. We investigated the effects of acellular bovine bone marrow extracts (BME on HSC in vitro and in vivo. We observed a significant increase in the number of myeloid and erythroid colonies in CB mononuclear cells (MNC or CB CD34+ cells cultured in methylcellulose media supplemented with BME. Similarly, in xeno-transplantation experiments, pretreatment with BME during ex-vivo culture of HSCs induced a significant increase in HSC engraftment in vivo. Indeed, we observed both an increase in the number of differentiated myeloid, lymphoid and erythroid cells and an acceleration of engraftment. These results were obtained using CB MNCs, BM MNCs or CD34(+ cells, transplanted in immuno-compromised mice (NOD/SCID or NSG. These findings establish the basis for exploring the use of BME in the expansion of CB HSC prior to HSC Transplantation. This study stresses the importance of the mechanical structure and soluble mediators present in the surrounding niche for the proper activity and differentiation of stem cells.

  9. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  10. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    lymphomas (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma). The expression of NAMPT was generally high in the more aggressive malignant lymphomas, with >80% strong expression, whereas the expression in the more indolent follicular lymphoma (FL...

  11. Clinical implications of epigenetic alterations in human thoracic malignancies: epigenetic alterations in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Besides known genetic aberrations, epigenetic alterations have emerged as common hallmarks of many cancer types, including lung cancer. Epigenetics is a process involved in gene regulation, mediated via DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and functional noncoding RNAs, which influences the accessibility of the underlying DNA to transcriptional regulatory factors that activate or repress expression. Studies have shown that epigenetic dysregulation is associated with multiple steps during carcinogenesis. Since epigenetic therapy is now in clinical use in hematopoietic diseases and undergoing trials for lung cancer, a better understanding of epigenetic abnormalities is desired. Recent technologies for high-throughput genome-wide analyses for epigenetic modifications are promising and potent tools for understanding the global dysregulation of cancer epigenetics. In this chapter, studies of epigenetic abnormality and its clinical implication in lung cancers are discussed.

  12. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  13. Chronically ultraviolet-exposed human skin shows a higher mutation frequency of mitochondrial DNA as compared to unexposed skin and the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneburg, M; Gattermann, N; Stege, H; Grewe, M; Vogelsang, K; Ruzicka, T; Krutmann, J

    1997-08-01

    Normal ageing processes are associated with an accumulation of mutations within the mitochondrial (mt) DNA. The most frequent mutation is a 4977 base pair (bp) deletion known as common deletion. In order to test the hypothesis that chronically sun-exposed skin is characterized by an increased mutation frequency of mtDNA, the mutation frequency of the common deletion between skin and another replicating tissue (the hematopoietic system) and chronically sun-exposed versus sun-protected skin was compared in the same individuals. This was done by comparing the amount of mutated mtDNA molecules with the whole mitochondrial genome in the same specimen with a semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction method, thus allowing direct comparison of different tissues. In all skin specimens the common deletion could be observed. In contrast only 3 of 10 blood samples revealed detectable amounts of the common deletion. Comparison of sun-exposed versus sun-protected skin exhibited a higher content of the common deletion in sun-exposed skin in 7 of 10 individuals. Additionally, a hitherto undescribed mtDNA mutation was detected exclusively in human skin. These studies indicate that exposure of human skin to solar radiation leads to an accumulation of mtDNA mutations, possibly via oxidative damage, which may play an important role in photoageing.

  14. Introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors into human hematopoietic progenitors results in exclusion of endogenous T-cell receptor expression.

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    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-05-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1-specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection.

  15. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  16. Native human autoantibodies targeting GIPC1 identify differential expression in malignant tumors of the breast and ovary

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    Yavelsky Victoria

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have been studying the native humoral immune response to cancer and have isolated a library of fully human autoantibodies to a variety of malignancies. We previously described the isolation and characterization of two fully human monoclonal antibodies, 27.F7 and 27.B1, from breast cancer patients that target the protein known as GIPC1, an accessory PDZ-domain binding protein involved in regulation of G-protein signaling. Human monoclonal antibodies, 27.F7 and 27.B1, to GIPC1 demonstrate specific binding to malignant breast cancer tissue with no reactivity with normal breast tissue. Methods The current study employs cELISA, flow cytometry, Western blot analysis as well as immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. Data is analyzed statistically with the Fisher one-tail and two-tail tests for two independent samples. Results By screening several other cancer cell lines with 27.F7 and 27.B1 we found consistently strong staining of other human cancer cell lines including SKOV-3 (an ovarian cancer cell line. To further clarify the association of GIPC1 with breast and ovarian cancer we carefully studied 27.F7 and 27.B1 using immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. An immunohistochemical study of normal ovarian tissue, benign, borderline and malignant ovarian serous tumors, and different types of breast cancer revealed high expression of GIPC1 protein in neoplastic cells. Interestingly, antibodies 27.F7 and 27.B1 demonstrate differential staining of borderline ovarian tumors. Examination of different types of breast cancer demonstrates that the level of GIPC1 expression depends on tumor invasiveness and displays a higher expression than in benign tumors. Conclusion The present pilot study demonstrates that the GIPC1 protein is overexpressed in ovarian and breast cancer, which may provide an important diagnostic and prognostic marker and will constitute the basis for further study of the role that this protein

  17. Epo and other hematopoietic factors

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The growth factors erythropoietin and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor have hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic functions. Both are used clinically in their recombinant forms. Both also have interesting tissue-protective effects in other organs, which are unrelated to their hematopoietic functions. They have clinical hematopoietic uses in neonatal populations and in experimental non-hematopoietic research, and clinical potential as neuroprotective or tissue-protective agents.

  18. Emerging drugs for prevention of graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servais, Sophie; Beguin, Yves; Baron, Frédéric

    2013-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the treatment of choice for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies, severe hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failures or severe primary immunodeficiencies. Graft rejection/failure (GF) is a life-threatening complication following allo-HSCT that is most commonly caused by the reactivity of recipient T cells, natural killer (NK) cells or antibodies against donor grafted hematopoietic cells. The increasing use of allo-HSCT following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and the increasing use of alternative donors (unrelated cord blood and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched donor) have resulted in higher frequency of GF. This review describes the pathogenesis and current prevention and treatment of GF as well as agents in development for GF prevention or treatment. The risk of GF may be reduced in the future by optimizing the conditioning regimens and post-grafting immunosuppression, increasing the number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and/or immune cells transplanted, optimizing HSC homing and better detecting patients at high risk of GF by searching for pre-transplant donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in patients given grafts from HLA-mismatched donors, or by closely monitoring donor T- and/or NK-cell chimerism after allo-HSCT following RIC.

  19. A molecular targeting against nuclear factor-κB, as a chemotherapeutic approach for human malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Sho; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Oida, Kumiko; Jang, Hyosun; Jung, Kyungsook; Amagai, Yosuke; Ahn, Ginae; Okamoto, Noriko; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Chronic inflammation due to the absorption of asbestos is an important cause of mesothelioma. Although the increased prevalence of mesothelioma is a serious problem, the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents remains incomplete. As the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway contributes to malignant transformation of various types of cells, we explored NF-κB activity in three different pathological types of malignant mesothelioma cells, and evaluated the therapeutic potential of a recently reported NF-κB inhibitor, IMD-0354. NF-κB was constantly activated in MSTO-211H, NCI-H28, and NCI-H2052 cells, and the proliferation of these cell lines was inhibited by IMD-0354. D-type cyclins were effectively suppressed in mixed tissue type MSTO-211H, leading to cell cycle arrest at sub G1 /G1 phase. IMD-0354 reduced cyclin D3 in both epithelial tissue type NCI-H28 and sarcomatoid tissue type NCI-H2052. In a sphere formation assay, IMD-0354 effectively decreased the number and diameter of MSTO-211H spheres. Preincubation of MSTO-211H cells with IMD-0354 delayed tumor formation in transplanted immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, administration of IMD-0354 markedly rescued the survival rate of mice that received intrathoracic injections of MSTO-211H cells. These results indicate that a targeted drug against NF-κB might have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of human malignant mesothelioma.

  20. Systemic distribution, subcellular localization and differential expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in benign and malignant human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyi; Mao, Jinghe; Redfield, Samantha; Mo, Yinyuan; Lage, Janice M; Zhou, Xinchun

    2014-10-01

    Five sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PR): S1PR1, S1PR2, S1PR3, S1PR4 and S1PR5 (S1PR1-5) have been shown to be involved in the proliferation and progression of various cancers. However, none of the S1PRs have been systemically investigated. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) for S1PR1-S1PR5 on different tissues, in order to simultaneously determine the systemic distribution, subcellular localization and expression level of all five S1PRs. We constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs) from 384 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks containing 183 benign and 201 malignant tissues from 34 human organs/systems. Then we performed IHC for all five S1PRs simultaneously on these TMA slides. The distribution, subcellular localization and expression of each S1PR were determined for each tissue. The data in benign and malignant tissues from the same organ/tissue were then compared using the Student's t-test. In order to reconfirm the subcellular localization of each S1PR as determined by IHC, immunocytochemistry (ICC) was performed on several malignant cell lines. We found that all five S1PRs are widely distributed in multiple human organs/systems. All S1PRs are expressed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, except S1PR3, whose IHC signals are only seen in the nucleus. Interestingly, the S1PRs are rarely expressed on cellular membranes. Each S1PR is unique in its organ distribution, subcellular localization and expression level in benign and malignant tissues. Among the five S1PRs, S1PR5 has the highest expression level (in either the nucleus or cytoplasm), with S1PR1, 3, 2 and 4 following in descending order. Strong nuclear expression was seen for S1PR1, S1PR3 and S1PR5, whereas S1PR2 and S1PR4 show only weak staining. Four organs/tissues (adrenal gland, liver, brain and colon) show significant differences in IHC scores for the multiple S1PRs (nuclear and/or cytoplasmic), nine (stomach, lymphoid tissues, lung, ovary, cervix, pancreas, skin, soft

  1. Comparative analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Peter R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurolidine (TRD represents an anti-infective substance with anti-neoplastic activity in many malignant cell lines. So far, the knowledge about the cell death inducing mechanisms and pathways activated by TRD is limited. The aim of this study was therefore, to perform a comparative analysis of cell death induction by TRD simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. Materials and methods Five different malignant cell lines (HT29/Colon, Chang Liver/Liver, HT1080/fibrosarcoma, AsPC-1/pancreas and BxPC-3/pancreas were incubated with increasing concentrations of TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM for 6 h and 24 h. Cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed by FACS analysis (Propidiumiodide/AnnexinV staining. Additionally, cells were co-incubated with the caspase Inhibitor z-VAD, the radical scavenger N-Acetylcystein (NAC and the Gluthation depleting agent BSO to examine the contribution of caspase activation and reactive oxygen species in TRD induced cell death. Results All cell lines were susceptible to TRD induced cell death without resistance toward this anti-neoplastic agent. However, the dose response effects were varying largely between different cell lines. The effect of NAC and BSO co-treatment were highly different among cell lines - suggesting a cell line specific involvement of ROS in TRD induced cell death. Furthermore, impact of z-VAD mediated inhibition of caspases was differing strongly among the cell lines. Conclusion This is the first study providing a simultaneous evaluation of the anti-neoplastic action of TRD across several malignant cell lines. The involvement of ROS and caspase activation was highly variable among the five cell lines, although all were susceptible to TRD induced cell death. Our results indicate, that TRD is likely to provide multifaceted cell death mechanisms leading to a cell line specific diversity.

  2. Oncolysis of malignant human melanoma tumors by Coxsackieviruses A13, A15 and A18

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    Barry Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many RNA viruses are displaying great promise in the field of oncolytic virotherapy. Previously, we reported that the picornavirus Coxsackievirus A21 (CVA21 possessed potent oncolytic activity against cultured malignant melanoma cells and melanoma xenografts in mice. In the present study, we demonstrate that three additional Group A Coxsackieviruses; Coxsackievirus A13 (CVA13, Coxsackievirus A15 (CVA15 and Coxsackievirus A18 (CVA18, also have similar oncolytic activity against malignant melanoma. Each of the viruses grew quickly to high titers in cancer cells expressing ICAM-1 and intratumoral injection of preformed subcutaneous SK-Mel-28 xenografts in mice with CVA13, CVA15 and CVA18 resulted in significant tumor volume reduction. As preexisting immunity could potentially hinder oncolytic virotherapy, sera from stage IV melanoma patients and normal controls were tested for levels of protective antibody against the panel of oncolytic Coxsackieviruses. Serum neutralization assays revealed that 3 of 21 subjects possessed low levels of anti-CVA21 antibodies, while protective antibodies for CVA13, CVA15 and CVA18 were not detected in any sample. Serum from individuals who were seropositive for CVA21 failed to exhibit cross-neutralization of CVA13, CVA15 and CVA18. From these studies it can be concluded that the administration of CVA13, CVA15 or CVA18 could be employed as a potential multivalent oncolytic therapy against malignant melanoma.

  3. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

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    Ankita Shukla

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC. Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60% for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER and mismatch repair (MMR. Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels.

  4. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model.

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    Michelle Escobedo-Cousin

    Full Text Available Cord blood (CB is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT. However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT.

  5. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  6. Combination of Intensive Chemotherapy and Anticancer Vaccines in the Treatment of Human Malignancies: The Hematological Experience

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    Knut Liseth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have demonstrated that cancer-specific T cell cytotoxicity can be induced both ex vivo and in vivo, but this therapeutic strategy should probably be used as an integrated part of a cancer treatment regimen. Initial chemotherapy should be administered to reduce the cancer cell burden and disease-induced immune defects. This could be followed by autologous stem cell transplantation that is a safe procedure including both high-dose disease-directed chemotherapy and the possibility for ex vivo enrichment of the immunocompetent graft cells. The most intensive conventional chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation are used especially in the treatment of aggressive hematologic malignancies; both strategies induce T cell defects that may last for several months but cancer-specific T cell reactivity is maintained after both procedures. Enhancement of anticancer T cell cytotoxicity is possible but posttransplant vaccination therapy should probably be combined with optimalisation of immunoregulatory networks. Such combinatory regimens should be suitable for patients with aggressive hematological malignancies and probably also for other cancer patients.

  7. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  8. Elevated expression of DNMT1 is associated with increased expansion and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells co-cultured with human MSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadnejad, Moharram; Amirizadeh, Naser; Mehrasa, Roya; Karkhah, Ahmad; Nikougoftar, Mahin

    2017-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maintenance, proliferation, and apoptosis. DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is considered an essential factor in the maintenance of HSCs in mammalian cells. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the mRNA expression level of DNMT1 during cord blood (CB)-HSC ex vivo expansion with MSCs. Methods Ex vivo cultures of CB-HSCs were performed in three culture conditions for 7 days: cytokines, cytokines with MSCs, and only MSCs. Total and viable cell numbers were counted after 5 and 7 days using trypan blue stain, and the stem cell percentage was then evaluated by flow cytometry. Moreover, in vitro colony-forming unit assay was carried out to detect clonogenic potential of HSCs at days 0 and 7 using MethoCult H4434. Finally, DNMT1 mRNA expression level was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Maximum CB-CD34+ cell expansion was observed on day 7 in all the three cultures. After 7 days, ex vivo expansion of CB-CD34+ cells indicated a significant decrease in DNMT1 expression in the cytokine cultures, whereas in the two co-culture conditions DNMT1 expression was increased. A significant difference between the number of CD34+ and CD34− cells in the cytokine co-culture system was observed. Conclusion These data indicated that an elevated expression of DNMT1 is associated with increased expansion and proliferation of HSCs co-cultured with human MSCs. Hence, DNMT1 may be a potential factor in the maintenance of expanded HSCs co-cultured with human MSCs.

  9. Eicosanoid regulation of hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem and progenitor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, J; Pelus, L M

    2010-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for numerous hematological malignancies. The transplant procedure as performed today takes advantage of HSC trafficking; either egress of HSC from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, that is, mobilization, for acquisition of the hematopoietic graft, and/or trafficking of HSC from the peripheral blood to bone marrow niches in the recipient patient, that is HSC homing. Numerous studies, many of which are reviewed herein, have defined hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms mediated by the 20-carbon lipid family of eicosanoids, and recent evidence strongly supports a role for eicosanoids in regulation of hematopoietic trafficking, adding a new role whereby eicosanoids regulate hematopoiesis. Short-term exposure of HSC to the eicosanoid prostaglandin E(2) increases CXCR4 receptor expression, migration and in vivo homing of HSC. In contrast, cannabinoids reduce hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) CXCR4 expression and induce HPC mobilization when administered in vivo. Leukotrienes have been shown to alter CD34(+) cell adhesion, migration and regulate HSC proliferation, suggesting that eicosanoids have both opposing and complimentary roles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. As numerous FDA approved compounds regulate eicosanoid signaling or biosynthesis, the utility of eicosanoid-based therapeutic strategies to improve hematopoietic transplantation can be rapidly evaluated.

  10. Fluoro-edenite induces fibulin-3 overexpression in non-malignant human mesothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Salemi, Rossella; Marconi, Andrea; Loreto, Carla; Graziano, Adriana C.; Cardile, Venera; Basile, Maria S.; Candido, Saverio; Falzone, Luca; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Fenga, Concettina; Libra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with the development of mesothelioma. In addition to asbestos, other fibers have been identified as risk factors for malignant and non-malignant diseases of the lungs. Among these, fluoro-edenite (FE) was found in patients from Biancavilla (Sicily, Italy) with pleural and lung disease, suggesting its role for tumor expansion. In this context, the identification of early biomarkers useful for the diagnosis of cancer is mandatory. Fibulin-3 represents an important marker for the diagnosis of mesothelioma. However, it remains to be determined whether it is directly associated with exposure to asbestos-like fibers. In the present study, peripheral blood levels of fibulin-3 from 40 asbestos-exposed workers were compared with those detected in 27 street cleaners from Biancavilla. Intriguingly, the results showed that fibulin-3 levels were higher in the group of street cleaners compared with those of the asbestos-exposed workers, suggesting that these workers used the personal protective equipment according to the current regulations. These data suggest that subjects exposed to FE should be monitored for the risk of mesothelioma. FE and volcanic particulates are probably contained within dust inhaled by street cleaners from Biancavilla during their work activities. Based on these criteria, in this study, such fibers were used to treat mesothelial cells (MeT5A) in order to verify whether fibulin-3 levels are affected by these treatments. The results showed that only treatment with FE was associated with fibulin-3 overexpression at both the transcript and protein levels. It was previously demonstrated that mesothelial cells exhibited low levels of p27 following treatment with FE. Notably, p27 downregulation is associated with stathmin upregulation in cancer, conferring an aggressive phenotype of tumor cells. This observation prompted us to perform a computational evaluation demonstrating the activation of stathmin in lung cancer in

  11. Engineering HIV-1-resistant T-cells from short-hairpin RNA-expressing hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in humanized BLT mice.

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    Gene-Errol E Ringpis

    Full Text Available Down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 holds significant potential for long-term protection against HIV-1 in patients. Using the humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (hu-BLT mouse model which allows investigation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC transplant and immune system reconstitution as well as HIV-1 infection, we previously demonstrated stable inhibition of CCR5 expression in systemic lymphoid tissues via transplantation of HSPCs genetically modified by lentiviral vector transduction to express short hairpin RNA (shRNA. However, CCR5 down-regulation will not be effective against existing CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 and emergence of resistant viral strains. As such, combination approaches targeting additional steps in the virus lifecycle are required. We screened a panel of previously published shRNAs targeting highly conserved regions and identified a potent shRNA targeting the R-region of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Here, we report that human CD4(+ T-cells derived from transplanted HSPC engineered to co-express shRNAs targeting CCR5 and HIV-1 LTR are resistant to CCR5- and CXCR4- tropic HIV-1-mediated depletion in vivo. Transduction with the combination vector suppressed CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic viral replication in cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. No obvious cytotoxicity or interferon response was observed. Transplantation of combination vector-transduced HSPC into hu-BLT mice resulted in efficient engraftment and subsequent stable gene marking and CCR5 down-regulation in human CD4(+ T-cells within peripheral blood and systemic lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue, a major site of robust viral replication, for over twelve weeks. CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic HIV-1 infection was effectively inhibited in hu-BLT mouse spleen-derived human CD4(+ T-cells ex vivo. Furthermore, levels of gene-marked CD4(+ T-cells in peripheral blood increased despite systemic infection with either

  12. Construction of Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and the effect on Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, ZHAO-LIANG; YOU, CAI-LIAN; WANG, BIAO; LIN, JIAN-HONG; HU, XUE-FENG; SHAN, XIU-YING; WANG, MEI-SHUI; ZHENG, HOU-BING; ZHANG, YAN-DING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)-small interfering (si)RNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and to observe the interference effects of the nanoparticles on the expression of the Ang2 gene in human malignant melanoma cells. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were constructed and transfected into human malignant melanoma cells in vitro. Red fluorescent protein expression was observed, and the transfection efficiency was analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to assess the inhibition efficiency of Ang2 gene expression. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed, and at a mass ratio of plasmid to magnetic chitosan nanoparticles of 1:100, the transfection efficiency into human malignant melanoma cells was the highest of the ratios assessed, reaching 61.17%. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the magnetic chitosan nanoparticles effectively inhibited Ang2 gene expression in cells, and the inhibition efficiency reached 59.56% (P<0.05). Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed. The in vitro studies showed that the nanoparticles inhibited Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma tumor cells, which laid the foundation and provided experimental evidence for additional future in vivo studies of intervention targeting malignant melanoma tumor growth in nude mice. PMID:27313729

  13. Construction of Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and the effect on Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-Liang; You, Cai-Lian; Wang, Biao; Lin, Jian-Hong; Hu, Xue-Feng; Shan, Xiu-Ying; Wang, Mei-Shui; Zheng, Hou-Bing; Zhang, Yan-Ding

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)-small interfering (si)RNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and to observe the interference effects of the nanoparticles on the expression of the Ang2 gene in human malignant melanoma cells. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were constructed and transfected into human malignant melanoma cells in vitro. Red fluorescent protein expression was observed, and the transfection efficiency was analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to assess the inhibition efficiency of Ang2 gene expression. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed, and at a mass ratio of plasmid to magnetic chitosan nanoparticles of 1:100, the transfection efficiency into human malignant melanoma cells was the highest of the ratios assessed, reaching 61.17%. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the magnetic chitosan nanoparticles effectively inhibited Ang2 gene expression in cells, and the inhibition efficiency reached 59.56% (Pconstructed. The in vitro studies showed that the nanoparticles inhibited Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma tumor cells, which laid the foundation and provided experimental evidence for additional future in vivo studies of intervention targeting malignant melanoma tumor growth in nude mice.

  14. The Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Cell Proliferation and Cell Death in Human Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Sobolewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well admitted that the link between chronic inflammation and cancer involves cytokines and mediators of inflammatory pathways, which act during the different steps of tumorigenesis. The cyclooxygenases (COXs are a family of enzymes, which catalyze the rate-limiting step of prostaglandin biosynthesis. This family contains three members: ubiquitously expressed COX-1, which is involved in homeostasis; the inducible COX-2 isoform, which is upregulated during both inflammation and cancer; and COX-3, expressed in brain and spinal cord, whose functions remain to be elucidated. COX-2 was described to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis mainly in solid tumors, that is, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers, and, more recently, in hematological malignancies. These findings prompt us to analyze here the effects of a combination of COX-2 inhibitors together with different clinically used therapeutic strategies in order to further improve the efficiency of future anticancer treatments. COX-2 modulation is a promising field investigated by many research groups.

  15. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression.

  16. Up-regulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen G Expression in Primary Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Associated with Host-vs-tumor Immune Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianfeng FANG; Xuxin ZHANG; Jiawen LI

    2008-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is one of the molecules implicated in immunotolerance. To investigate the role of HLA-G in primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), a series of 47 skin melanocytic lesions were immunohistochemicaily evaluated. The correlation between HLA-G expression and CMM clinicohistopahtologicai data and Bcl-2 expression was also analyzed.HLA-G expression was detected in a variety of cell types. No significant difference in HLA-G expression was observed between malignant and non-malignant melanocytic lesions. HLA-G expres- sion was significantly correlated with the inflammatory infiltration and Bel-2 expression, whereas no significant correlation with ulceration, tumor thickness, clinical stage, histopathologicai subtypes were observed. HLA-G expression may be the result of host immune reaction in tumor microenvi- ronment rather than a malignant feature of CMM.

  17. Alcohol metabolism by oral streptococci and interaction with human papillomavirus leads to malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Jin, Ling; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene, ethanol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) are associated with oral and esophageal cancers. However, the mechanism is not fully known. This study examines alcohol metabolism in Streptococcus and its interaction with HPV-16 in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. The acetaldehyde-producing strain Streptococcus gordonii V2016 was analyzed for adh genes and activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Streptococcus attachment to immortalized HPV-16 infected human oral keratinocytes, HOK (HPV/HOK-16B), human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes was studied. Acetaldehyde, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and abnormal proliferation among keratinocytes were also quantified. We found that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB, and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and ethanol, respectively. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable aldehyde dehydrogenase. AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococcus species significantly increased the bacterial attachment to keratinocytes, which was associated with an enhanced expression of furin to facilitate HPV infection and several malignant phenotypes including acetaldehyde adduct formation, abnormal proliferation, and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV-infected oral keratinocytes. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with no functional aldehyde dehydrogenase contributes to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by oral streptococci. Oral Streptococcus species and HPV may cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after ethanol exposure. These results suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted.

  18. Identification of cancer stem cell markers in human malignant mesothelioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro [Division of Clinical Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Aoe, Keisuke; Okabe, Kazunori; Mimura, Yusuke [Departments of Medical Oncology, Yamaguchi-Ube Medical Center, Yamaguchi (Japan); Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Kishimoto, Takumi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Okayama Rosai Hospital, Okayama (Japan); Yamada, Taketo [Department of Pathology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Xu, C. Wilson [Drug Development Program, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Drug Development Program, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed serial transplantation of surgical samples and established new cell lines of malignant mesothelioma. {yields} SP cell and expressions of CD9/CD24/CD26 were often observed in mesothelioma cell lines. {yields} SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony. {yields} The marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mice. -- Abstract: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive and therapy-resistant neoplasm arising from the pleural mesothelial cells and usually associated with long-term asbestos exposure. Recent studies suggest that tumors contain cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their stem cell characteristics are thought to confer therapy-resistance. However, whether MM cell has any stem cell characteristics is not known. To understand the molecular basis of MM, we first performed serial transplantation of surgical samples into NOD/SCID mice and established new cell lines. Next, we performed marker analysis of the MM cell lines and found that many of them contain SP cells and expressed several putative CSC markers such as CD9, CD24, and CD26. Interestingly, expression of CD26 closely correlated with that of CD24 in some cases. Sorting and culture assay revealed that SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. In addition, CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony than negative cells in the stem cell medium. Moreover, these marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mouse transplantation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that SP, CD9, CD24, and CD26 are CSC markers of MM and could be used as novel therapeutic targets.

  19. [Screening of urogenital malignancies by transabdominal ultrasonography in "human dry dock"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, I; Hatano, T; Yanada, S; Tomita, M; Takeuchi, H; Madarame, J; Yoshino, Y; Ohishi, Y; Kawaguchi, Y; Narusawa, T

    1999-10-01

    Transabdominal ultrasonography (US) has been widely accepted as a diagnostic method with which to examine multiple organs simultaneously. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of trans-abdominal US to screen for urogenital malignancies. From 1993 through 1997 109,077 men and 28,023 women underwent abdominal US to screen for abdominal and pelvic diseases as part of a regular health check-up program at the Tokyu Medical Health Center. Twelve renal cell cancers (RCCs), 7 bladder tumors (BTs), 4 prostatic cancers (PCs), and 1 testicular tumor (TT) were detected. All cancers were diagnosed pathologically and treated surgically except for one PC. Surgical pathological examination and conventional imaging revealed that all 12 RCCa and 6 of the 7 BTs were of less advanced stage than pT1N0M0. However, all 3 PCs and the TT were pT3N0-1M0 and pT1N3M0, respectively. The stage and grade of these 12 RCCs were significantly lower than those of 29 symptomatic RCCs. All 12 patients with RCC patients and 6 of the 7 patients with BT had no urological symptom, whereas 3 of the 4 patients with PC and the patient with TT had urogenital symptoms. Microscopic examination of the urine revealed both red blood cells and tumors cells in two of the seven patients with BT. All four patients with PC had serum levels of prostatic-specific antigen greater than 4 ng/ml. These results indicate that screening by transabdominal US as part of regular health check-ups can detect many types of urogenital malignancy. In particular, US is useful for detecting low-grade and low-stage RCCs and superficial BTs but is less sensitive for early-stage PCs and TTs.

  20. Usefulness of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in predicting outcomes for adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William; Deal, Allison; Whitley, Julia; Sharf, Andrew; Serody, Jonathan; Gabriel, Donald; Shea, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The HCT-CI helps to predict non-relapse mortality (NRM) and overall survival (OS) in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. The usefulness of this index in a younger, adolescent and young adult (AYA) population is unclear. We tested the validity of the HCT-CI as a predictor of mortality in a retrospective cohort of 56 AYA recipients between the ages of 16 and 39, using chart abstraction followed by univariable and multivariate analysis. Only pulmonary dysfunction (46%), hepatic dysfunction (27%), infection (20%), and psychiatric disturbance (11%) had frequencies greater than 5% in this population. HCT-CI scores of 0-2 were present in 54%, and scores of >3 in 46%. The cumulative incidence of NRM at 2 years was 32%, with an OS of 46%; the NRM and OS for patients with an HCT-CI of 0-2 were 24% and 62%, whereas the NRM and OS for patients with an HCT-CI >3 were 38% and 28%. Patients with pulmonary dysfunction prior to transplant had a 29% OS at 2 years, compared to a 61% OS among patients without (P = 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference for patients and a worse NRM (P = 0.08). In multivariable analysis, both an HCT-CI score of >3 and any pulmonary dysfunction remained associated with OS (P = 0.01, P = 0.03), but neither with NRM. The HCT-CI appears useful in predicting OS in AYAs, though higher scores may reflect prior treatment, with pulmonary dysfunction particularly prevalent. Prospective studies to further validate and explain these findings are warranted. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Tannic acid binding of cell surfaces in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davina, J H; Lamers, G E; van Haelst, U J; Kenemans, P; Stadhouders, A M

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in tannic acid (TA) binding capacity of cell surface carbohydrates in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix have been studied using electron microscopic visualization in combination with microdensitometric evaluation. While in normal epithelium there is distinct binding in four to five cell layers of the deep intermediate zone, cells of carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer lesions lack TA binding. In moderate dysplasia an intermediate reacting pattern is found. Deep intermediate cells in areas bordering the carcinoma in situ lesions do not show any binding, although their ultrastructure cannot be distinguished from similar cells in normal tissue. The TA deposition within the deep intermediate zone is probably related to the presence here of glycoprotein-containing membrane-coating granules. The finding that TA binding discriminates between cells in normal squamous epithelium and morphologically normal cells in juxtaposition with lesional areas in premalignant and malignant epithelium opens the possibility for a more reliable cytologic diagnosis of cervical epithelial neoplasia.

  2. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Cytokines and Fibroblast Growth factor-2 Stimulate Human Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Tube Co-Assembly in 3D Fibrin Matrices under Serum-Free Defined Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annie O.; Bowers, Stephanie L. K.; Stratman, Amber N.; Davis, George E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel 3D fibrin matrix model using recombinant hematopoietic stem cell cytokines under serum-free defined conditions which promotes the assembly of human endothelial cell (EC) tubes with co-associated pericytes. Individual ECs and pericytes are randomly mixed together and EC tubes form that is accompanied by pericyte recruitment to the EC tube abluminal surface over a 3-5 day period. These morphogenic processes are stimulated by a combination of the hematopoietic stem cell cytokines, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, stromal derived factor-1α, and Flt-3 ligand which are added in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 into the fibrin matrix. In contrast, this tube morphogenic response does not occur under serum-free defined conditions when VEGF and FGF-2 are added together in the fibrin matrices. We recently demonstrated that VEGF and FGF-2 are able to prime EC tube morphogenic responses (i.e. added overnight prior to the morphogenic assay) to hematopoietic stem cell cytokines in collagen matrices and, interestingly, they also prime EC tube morphogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices. EC-pericyte interactions in 3D fibrin matrices leads to marked vascular basement membrane assembly as demonstrated using immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we show that hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and pericytes stimulate EC sprouting in fibrin matrices in a manner dependent on the α5β1 integrin. This novel co-culture system, under serum-free defined conditions, allows for a molecular analysis of EC tube assembly, pericyte recruitment and maturation events in a critical ECM environment (i.e. fibrin matrices) that regulates angiogenic events in postnatal life. PMID:24391990

  4. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes.

  5. Horizontal transmission of malignancy: in-vivo fusion of human lymphomas with hamster stroma produces tumors retaining human genes and lymphoid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Goldenberg

    Full Text Available We report the in-vivo fusion of two Hodgkin lymphomas with golden hamster cheek pouch cells, resulting in serially-transplanted (over 5-6 years GW-532 and GW-584 heterosynkaryon tumor cells displaying both human and hamster DNA (by FISH, lymphoma-like morphology, aggressive metastasis, and retention of 7 human genes (CD74, CXCR4, CD19, CD20, CD71, CD79b, and VIM out of 24 tested by PCR. The prevalence of B-cell restricted genes (CD19, CD20, and CD79b suggests that this uniform population may be the clonal initiating (malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma, despite their not showing translation to their respective proteins by immunohistochemical analysis. This is believed to be the first report of in-vivo cell-cell fusion of human lymphoma and rodent host cells, and may be a method to disclose genes regulating both organoid and metastasis signatures, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of tumor DNA to adjacent stromal cells may be implicated in tumor heterogeneity and progression. The B-cell gene signature of the hybrid xenografts suggests that Hodgkin lymphoma, or its initiating cells, is a B-cell malignancy.

  6. Junín virus infection of human hematopoietic progenitors impairs in vitro proplatelet formation and platelet release via a bystander effect involving type I IFN signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozner, Roberto G; Ure, Agustín E; Jaquenod de Giusti, Carolina; D'Atri, Lina P; Italiano, Joseph E; Torres, Oscar; Romanowski, Victor; Schattner, Mirta; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2010-04-15

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is an endemo-epidemic disease caused by Junín virus (JUNV), a member of the arenaviridae family. Although a recently introduced live attenuated vaccine has proven to be effective, AHF remains a potentially lethal infection. Like in other viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF), AHF patients present with fever and hemorrhagic complications. Although the causes of the bleeding are poorly understood, impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts have been described. Thrombocytopenia is a common feature in VHF syndromes, and it is a major sign for its diagnosis. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanism has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that thrombocytopenia results from a viral-triggered alteration of the megakaryo/thrombopoiesis process. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of JUNV on megakaryopoiesis using an in vitro model of human CD34+ cells stimulated with thrombopoietin. Our results showed that CD34+ cells are infected with JUNV in a restricted fashion. Infection was transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-dependent and the surface expression of TfR1 was higher in infected cultures, suggesting a novel arenaviral dissemination strategy in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Although proliferation, survival, and commitment in JUNV-infected cultures were normal, viral infection impaired thrombopoiesis by decreasing in vitro proplatelet formation, platelet release, and P-selectin externalization via a bystander effect. The decrease in platelet release was also TfR1-dependent, mimicked by poly(I:C), and type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta) was implicated as a key paracrine mediator. Among the relevant molecules studied, only the transcription factor NF-E2 showed a moderate decrease in expression in megakaryocytes from either infected cultures or after type I IFN treatment. Moreover, type I IFN-treated megakaryocytes presented ultrastructural abnormalities resembling the reported thrombocytopenic NF-E2(-/-) mouse

  7. Monitoring of Human Cytomegalovirus and Virus-Specific T-Cell Response in Young Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe; Zelini, Paola; Chiesa, Antonella; Rognoni, Vanina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Zecca, Marco; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients, outcome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results from balance between viral load/replication and pathogen-specific T-cell response. Using a cut-off of 30,000 HCMV DNA copies/ml blood for pre-emptive therapy and cut-offs of 1 and 3 virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells/µl blood for T-cell protection, we conducted in 131 young patients a prospective 3-year study aimed at verifying whether achievement of such immunological cut-offs protects from HCMV disease. In the first three months after transplantation, 55/89 (62%) HCMV-seropositive patients had infection and 36/55 (65%) were treated pre-emptively, whereas only 7/42 (17%) HCMV-seronegative patients developed infection and 3/7 (43%) were treated. After 12 months, 76 HCMV-seropositive and 9 HCMV-seronegative patients (cumulative incidence: 90% and 21%, respectively) displayed protective HCMV-specific immunity. Eighty of these 85 (95%) patients showed spontaneous control of HCMV infection without additional treatment. Five patients after reaching protective T-cell levels needed pre-emptive therapy, because they developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). HSCT recipients reconstituting protective levels of HCMV-specific T-cells in the absence of GvHD are no longer at risk for HCMV disease, at least within 3 years after transplantation. The decision to treat HCMV infection in young HSCT recipients may be taken by combining virological and immunological findings. PMID:22848556

  8. The human minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 as target for stem cell based immunotherapy of cancer : pre-clinical and clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambach, Lothar Wolfgang Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an established curative treatment for hematopoietic malignancies and an investigative immunotherapeutic approach for solid tumors. The curative effect of allogeneic SCT is based on so called graft versus-tumor (GvT)

  9. The classification of benign and malignant human prostate tissue by multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, P.; Smith, I.; Leboldus, L.; Littman, C.; Somorjai, L.; Bezabeh, T. [Institute for Biodiagnostic, National Research Council, Manitoba (Canada)

    1998-04-01

    {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies (360 MHz) were performed on specimens of benign (n = 66) and malignant (n = 21) human prostate tissue from 50 patients and the spectral data were subjected to multivariate analysis, specifically linear-discriminant analysis. On the basis of histopathological assessments, an overall classification accuracy of 96.6 % was achieved, with a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 95.5 % in classifying benign prostatic hyperplasia from prostatic cancer. Resonances due to citrate, glutamate, and taurine were among the six spectral subregions identified by our algorithm as having diagnostic potential. Significantly higher levels of citrate were observed in glandular than in stromal benign prostatic hyperplasia (P < 0.05). This method shows excellent promise for the possibility of in vivo assessment of prostate tissue by magnetic resonance. (author)

  10. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    for the physiologic and pathophysiologic events of differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors into lymphoid and myeloid stem cells, subsequently immune and inflammatory cells. These processes include transmigration, relocation, differentiation, and maturation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. (Blood......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...

  11. Overexpression of karyopherin 2 in human ovarian malignant germ cell tumor correlates with poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to identify a biomarker useful in the diagnosis and therapy of ovarian malignant germ cell tumor (OMGCT. METHODS: The karyopherin 2 (KPNA2 expression in OMGCT and normal ovarian tissue was determined by standard gene microarray assays, and further validated by a quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The correlation between KPNA2 expression in OMGCT and certain clinicopathological features were analyzed. Expression of SALL4, a stem cell marker, was also examined in comparison with KPNA2. RESULTS: KPNA2 was found to be over-expressed by approximately eight-fold in yolk sac tumors and immature teratomas compared to normal ovarian tissue by microarray assays. Overexpression was detected in yolk sac tumors, immature teratomas, dysgerminomas, embryonal carcinomas, mature teratomas with malignant transformation and mixed ovarian germ cell tumors at both the transcription and translation levels. A positive correlation between KPNA2 and SALL4 expression at both the transcription level (R = 0.5120, P = 0.0125, and the translation level (R = 0.6636, P<0.0001, was presented. Extensive expression of KPNA2 was positively associated with pathologic type, recurrence and uncontrolled, ascitic fluid presence, suboptimal cytoreductive surgery necessity, resistance/refraction to initial chemotherapy, HCG level and SALL4 level in OMGCT patients. KPNA2 was found to be an independent factor for 5-year disease-free survival (DFS of OMGCT (P = 0.02. The 5-year overall survival (OS and DFS rate for KPNA2-low expression patients (88% and 79%, n = 48 were significantly higher than the OS and DFS rate for KPNA2-high expression patients (69% and 57.1%, n = 42(P = 0.0151, P = 0.0109, respectively. The 5-year OS and DFS rate for SALL4-low expression patients (84% and 74%, n = 62 was marginally significantly higher than the high expression patients (78.6% and 71.4%, n = 28(P = 0.0519, P = 0.0647, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: KPNA2 is

  12. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  13. Antiproliferative Activity of Double Point Modified Analogs of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 Against Human Malignant Melanoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Piotrowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a lipid soluble steroid hormone with pleiotropic biological properties, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As to these desirable anticancer actions, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamins D and analogs have been reported to inhibit the proliferation and to induce differentiation of a wide variety of cancer cell types, including human malignant melanoma. However, there is a need for novel and more efficacious vitamin D analogs, and how best to design such is still an open issue. A series of double point modified (DPM analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25(OH2D2 induced differentiation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR positive A375 and VDR negative SK-MEL 188b human malignant melanoma cell lines. Surprisingly, the dose of 1,25(OH2D2 required to inhibit the proliferation of the A375 melanoma cell line by was several fold lower than that required in the case of 1,25(OH2D3. To evaluate the impact of the modification in the side chain (additional 22-hydroxyl and in the A-ring (5,6-trans modification, the regular side-chain of vitamin D2 or D3 was retained in the structure of our analogs. As expected, 5,6-trans modification was advantageous to enhancing the anti-proliferative activity of analogs, but not as a single point modification (SPM. Very unexpectedly, the additional 22-hydroxyl in the side-chain reduced significantly the anti-proliferative activity of both the natural and 5,6-trans series analogs. Finally, an induction of pigmentation in melanoma SK-MEL 188b cells was observed to sensitized cells to the effect of vitamin D analogs.

  14. The slippery slope of hematopoietic stem cell aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Bryder, David

    2017-09-21

    The late stages of life are in most species, including humans, associated with a decline in overall organism maintenance/health. This applies also to the hematopoietic system, where aging associates not only to an increased predisposition for hematological malignancies, but also as a strong comorbidity factor for other diseases. Research during the last two decades have proposed that alterations at the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) might be a root cause for the hematological changes observed with age. However, the recent realization that not all HSCs are alike with regards to fundamental stem cell properties such as self-renewal and lineage potential has several implications for HSC aging, which amongst others include the synchrony and the stability of the aging HSC state. To approach HSC aging from a clonal perspective, we recently took advantage of technical developments in cellular barcoding and combined this with the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). This allowed us to selective approach HSCs functionally affected by age. The finding that such iPS cells were capable of fully regenerating multilineage hematopoiesis upon morula/blastocyst complementation provide compelling evidence that many aspects of HSC aging can be reversed, which proposes that a central mechanism underlying HSC aging is a failure to uphold the epigenomes associated with younger age. Here we discuss these findings in the context of the underlying causes that might influence on HSC aging, and the requirements and prospects for restoration of the aging HSC epigenome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, James

    2011-01-01

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro.

  16. Fourier polarimetry of human skin in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A G; Dubolazov, O V; Ushenko, V A; Novakovskaya, O Yu; Olar, O V

    2016-04-20

    The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human tissue has been proposed. The values of statistical parameters (statistical moments of the first to fourth order) characterizing the polarization-inhomogeneous images of skin surface in the Fourier domain have been measured. The diagnostic criteria of pathological processes in human skin and the differentiation of its severity degree have been determined.

  17. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  18. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide is involved in human malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellecco, Valentina; Mancini, Antonio; Ianaro, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Attanasio, Chiara; Cantalupo, Anna; Andria, Barbara; Savoia, Gennaro; Panza, Elisabetta; Di Martino, Antonietta; Cirino, Giuseppe; Bucci, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous gasotransmitter and its mechanism of action involves activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and phosphodiesterase inhibition. As both mechanisms are potentially involved in malignant hyperthermia (MH), in the present study we addressed the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 25 MH-susceptible (MHS) and 56 MH-negative (MHN) individuals have been used to perform the in vitro contracture test (IVCT). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting studies have also been performed. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured in both tissue samples and plasma. In MHS biopsies an increase in cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) occurs, as both mRNA and protein expression compared with MHN biopsies. Hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis is increased in MHS biopsies (0.128±0.12 compared with 0.943±0.13 nmol/mg of protein per min for MHN and MHS biopsies, respectively; Phydrogen sulfide pathway in MH, giving new insight into MH molecular mechanisms. This finding has potential implications for clinical care and could help to define less invasive diagnostic procedures.

  19. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents.

  20. Lis1 regulates asymmetric division in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdahl, Bryan; Ito, Takahiro; Blevins, Allen; Bajaj, Jeevisha; Konuma, Takaaki; Weeks, Joi; Koechlein, Claire S.; Kwon, Hyog Young; Arami, Omead; Rizzieri, David; Broome, H. Elizabeth; Chuah, Charles; Oehler, Vivian G.; Sasik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary; Reya, Tannishtha

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate can be controlled through asymmetric division and segregation of protein determinants. But the regulation of this process in the hematopoietic system is poorly understood. Here we show that the dynein binding protein Lis1 (Pafah1b1) is critically required for blood formation and hematopoietic stem cell function. Conditional deletion of Lis1 in the hematopoietic system led to a severe bloodless phenotype, depletion of the stem cell pool and embryonic lethality. Further, the loss of Lis1 accelerated cell differentiation, in part through defects in spindle positioning and inheritance of cell fate determinants. Finally, deletion of Lis1 blocked propagation of myeloid leukemia and led to a marked improvement in animal survival, suggesting that Lis1 is also required for oncogenic growth. These data identify a key role for Lis1 in hematopoietic stem cells, and mark the directed control of asymmetric division as a critical regulator of normal and malignant hematopoietic development. PMID:24487275

  1. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Miyata

    Full Text Available Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10 under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases, photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical

  2. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Akinori; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Kamiya, Mako; Shimizu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Junichi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Urano, Yasuteru; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous) was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10) under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases), photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical advances are needed

  3. Characteristics of myeloid differentiation and maturation pathway derived from human hematopoietic stem cells exposed to different linear energy transfer radiation types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34(+ cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34(+ cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC, exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D(0 = 0.65 than to X-rays (D(0 = 1.07. Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a(+ erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34(+CD38(- primitive cell fraction and the CD13(+CD14(+/-CD15(- fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell

  4. Characteristics of myeloid differentiation and maturation pathway derived from human hematopoietic stem cells exposed to different linear energy transfer radiation types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzen, Satoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET)- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34(+) cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34(+) cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D(0) = 0.65) than to X-rays (D(0) = 1.07). Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a(+) erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34(+)CD38(-) primitive cell fraction and the CD13(+)CD14(+/-)CD15(-) fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell surface

  5. Expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in normal,premalignant and malignant esophageal tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Fu; Ping Qu; Mo Li; Hai-Mei Tian; Zhen-Hai Zheng; Xin-Wen Zheng; Wei Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between the expression profiles of a plant-associated human cancer antigen and carcinogenesis of esophagus and its significance. METHODS: We analyzed expression of a plant-associated human cancer antigen in biopsy specimens of normal (n=29),mildly hyperplastic (n=29), mildly (n=30), moderately (n=27)and severely dysplastic (n=29) and malignant esophageal (n=30) tissues by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The plant-associated human cancer antigen was mainly confined to the cytoplasm and showed diffuse type of staining. Positive staining was absent or weak in normal (0/30) and mildly hyperplastic tissue samples (2/29), while strong staining was observed in severe dysplasia (23/29) and carcinoma in situ (24/30). There was significant difference of its expression between normal mucosa and severely dysplastic tissues (P<0.001) or carcinoma in situ (P<0.001). Significant difference was also observed between mild dysplasia and severe dysplasia (P<0.001) or carcinomain situ (P<0.001). An overall trend toward increased staining intensity with increasing grade of dysplasia was found. There was a linear correlation between grade of lesions and staining intensity (r=0.794,P<0.001). Samples from esophageal cancer showed no higher levels of expression than those in severely dysplastic lesions (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of this plantassociated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesions is a frequent and early finding in the normal-dysplasiacarcinoma sequence in esophageal carcinogenesis. It might contribute to the carcinogenesis of esophageal cancer. The abnormal expression of this plant-associated human cancer antigen in esophageal lesion tissues may serve as a potential new biomarker for early identification of esophageal cancer.

  6. Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in hematological malignancies: rationale and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, M P; Bancos, S; Sime, P J; Phipps, R P

    2008-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastasis. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies.

  7. The specific role of pRb in p16 (INK4A) -mediated arrest of normal and malignant human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Lee, Won Jae; Bazarov, Irina; Bosire, Moses; Hines, William C; Stankovich, Basha; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W; Yaswen, Paul

    2012-03-01

    RB family proteins pRb, p107 and p130 have similar structures and overlapping functions, enabling cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. pRb, but not p107 or p130, is frequently mutated in human malignancies. In human fibroblasts acutely exposed to oncogenic ras, pRb has a specific role in suppressing DNA replication, and p107 or p130 cannot compensate for the loss of this function; however, a second p53/p21-dependent checkpoint prevents escape from growth arrest. This model of oncogene-induced senescence requires the additional loss of p53/p21 to explain selection for preferential loss of pRb function in human malignancies. We asked whether similar rules apply to the role of pRb in growth arrest of human epithelial cells, the source of most cancers. In two malignant human breast cancer cell lines, we found that individual RB family proteins were sufficient for the establishment of p16-initiated senescence, and that growth arrest in G 1 was not dependent on the presence of functional pRb or p53. However, senescence induction by endogenous p16 was delayed in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells with reduced pRb but not with reduced p107 or p130. Thus, under these circumstances, despite the presence of functional p53, p107 and p130 were unable to completely compensate for pRb in mediating senescence induction. We propose that early inactivation of pRb in pre-malignant breast cells can, by itself, extend proliferative lifespan, allowing acquisition of additional changes necessary for malignant transformation.

  8. Enhancement of human papilloma virus type 16 E7 specific T cell responses by local invasive procedures in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; van Baarle, D; Hoogeboom, BN; Reesink, N; Klip, H; Schuuring, E; Nijhuis, E; Pawlita, M; Bungener, L; de Vries-Idema, J; Nijman, H; Miedema, F; Daemen, T; van der Zee, A

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that local invasive procedures may alter the natural course of (pre)malignant cervical disease. This could be due to partial excision of the lesions, or via induction of cellular immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the local invasive procedures. We studied the influe

  9. Group I PAK inhibitor IPA-3 induces cell death and affects cell adhesivity to fibronectin in human hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kuželová

    Full Text Available P21-activated kinases (PAKs are involved in the regulation of multiple processes including cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. However, the current knowledge about their function is mainly based on results obtained in adherent cell types. We investigated the effect of group I PAK inhibition using the compound IPA-3 in a variety of human leukemic cell lines (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7, K562, CML-T1, HL-60, Karpas-299, Jurkat, HEL as well as in primary blood cells. IPA-3 induced cell death with EC50 ranging from 5 to more than 20 μM. Similar range was found for IPA-3-mediated dephosphorylation of a known PAK downstream effector, cofilin. The cell death was associated with caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. In parallel, 20 μM IPA-3 treatment induced rapid and marked decrease of the cell adhesivity to fibronectin. Per contra, partial reduction of PAK activity using lower dose IPA-3 or siRNA resulted in a slight increase in the cell adhesivity. The changes in the cell adhesivity were also studied using real-time microimpedance measurement and by interference reflection microscopy. Significant differences in the intracellular IPA-3 level among various cell lines were observed indicating that an active mechanism is involved in IPA-3 transport.

  10. Estrogen receptor β exerts tumor repressive functions in human malignant pleural mesothelioma via EGFR inactivation and affects response to gefitinib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Pinton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of estrogen and estrogen receptors in oncogenesis has been investigated in various malignancies. Recently our group identified estrogen receptor beta (ERβ expression as an independent prognostic factor in the progression of human Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MMe, but the underlying mechanism by which ERβ expression in tumors determines clinical outcome remains largely unknown. This study is aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms of ERβ action in MMe cells and disclosing the potential translational implications of these results. METHODS: We modulated ERβ expression in REN and MSTO-211H MMe cell lines and evaluated cell proliferation and EGF receptor (EGFR activation. RESULTS: Our data indicate that ERβ knockdown in ER positive cells confers a more invasive phenotype, increases anchorage independent proliferation and elevates the constitutive activation of EGFR-coupled signal transduction pathways. Conversely, re-expression of ERβ in ER negative cells confers a more epithelioid phenotype, decreases their capacity for anchorage independent growth and down-modulates proliferative signal transduction pathways. We identify a physical interaction between ERβ, EGFR and caveolin 1 that results in an altered internalization and in a selective reduced activation of EGFR-coupled signaling, when ERβ is over-expressed. We also demonstrate that differential expression of ERβ influences MMe tumor cell responsiveness to the therapeutic agent: Gefitinib. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a role for ERβ in the modulation of cell proliferation and EGFR activation and provides a rationale to facilitate the targeting of a subgroup of MMe patients who would benefit most from therapy with Gefitinib alone or in combination with Akt inhibitors.

  11. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib toward highly malignant human liposarcoma cells via suppression of MDR1 expression and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yamei; Wang, Lingxian; Wang, Lu; Wu, Xuefeng; Wu, Xudong [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Gu, Yanhong; Shu, Yongqian [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Sun, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Shen, Yan, E-mail: shenyan@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma with a high risk of relapse. Few therapeutic options are available for the aggressive local or metastatic disease. Here, we report that the clinically used proteasome inhibitor bortezomib exhibits significantly stronger cytotoxicity toward highly malignant human liposarcoma SW872-S cells compared with its parental SW872 cells, which is accompanied by enhanced activation of apoptotic signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of cells with Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP60015 or the translation inhibitor cycloheximide ameliorated this enhanced apoptosis. Bortezomib inhibited MDR1 expression and function more effectively in SW872-S cells than in SW872 cells, indicating that the increased cytotoxicity relies on the degree of proteasome inhibition. Furthermore, the pharmacological or genetic inhibition of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 2, which is highly expressed in SW872-S cells, resulted in partial reversal of cell growth inhibition and increase of MDR1 expression in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. These results show that bortezomib exhibits preferential cytotoxicity toward SW872-S cells possibly via highly expressed SERCA2-associated MDR1 suppression and suggest that bortezomib may serve as a potent agent for treating advanced liposarcoma. - Highlights: • We compare the cytotoxicity of different drugs between SW872-S and SW872 cells. • Highly malignant liposarcoma cells SW872-S show hypersensitivity to bortezomib. • Apoptotic signaling is robustly enhanced in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. • Bortezomib has strong suppression on MDR1 expression and function in SW872-S cells. • Inhibition of SERCA2 protects SW872-S cells from bortezomib.

  12. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  13. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathanson, L. (Health Sciences Center, State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  14. Apoptin induces apoptosis in human transformed and malignant cells but not in normal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane-Oorschot, A.A.A.M. van; Fischer, D.F.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Klein, B.; Zhuang, S.M.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Backendorf, C.; Quax, P.H.A.; Eb, A.J. van der; Noteborn, M.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    The chicken anemia virus protein apoptin induces a p53-independent, Bcl- 2-insensitive type of apoptosis in various human tumor cells. Here, we show that, in vitro, apoptin fails to induce programmed cell death in normal lymphoid, dermal, epidermal, endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. However, whe

  15. Malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Alkul

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Seventy percent of patients with malignant mesothelioma have had exposure to asbestos fibers. Other patients without this exposure have had chronic pleural inflammation or received radiation to the thorax. Occasionally patients present with no obvious exposure history relevant to the development of malignant mesothelioma. This diagnosis needs to be in the differential diagnosis of all patients with unexplained pleural disease.

  16. mad—overexpression down regulates the malignant growth and p53 mediated apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL—7404 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANHUA; YONGHUAXU

    1999-01-01

    Mad protein has been shown as an antagonist of cMyc protein in some cell lines.The effect of Mad protein to the malignant phenotype of human hepatoma BEL-7404 cell line was investigated experimentally.An eukarryotic vector pCDNA Ⅲ containing full ORF fragment of mad cDNA was transfected into targeted cells.Under G418 selection,stable Mad-overexpressed cells were cloned.Studies on the effect of Mad over-expression in cell proliferation and cell cycle revealed that cell morphology of the Mad-overexpressed BEL-7404-M1 cells was significantly different from the parent and control vector transfected cells.DNA synthesis,cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in soft-agar of the madtransfected cells were partially inhibited in comparison to control cells.Flos cytometry analysis indicated that mad over-expression might block more transfectant cells at G0/G1 phase,resulting in the retardation of cell proliferation.RT-PCR detected a marked inhibition of the expression of cdc25A,an important regulator gene of G0/G1 to S phase in cell cycle.It was also found that Mad protein overexpression could greatly suppress p53-mediated apoptosis in BEL-74040M1 cells in the absence of serume.Thus,Mad proteins may function as a negative regulator antagonizing c-Myc activity in the control of cell growth and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7404 cells.

  17. Essential roles of VLA-4 in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yoichi; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2010-05-01

    Integrins are one of the major families of adhesion molecules and make various kinds of biological effects by mediating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Among integrins, VLA-4 is expressed on many types of hematopoietic cells including stem/progenitor cells and it is considered as a critical regulator of adult hematopoiesis. Recent studies revealed that VLA-4 is not necessarily required for the development or maintenance of adult hematopoietic cells. On the other hand, it was proved that VLA-4 is essential for homeostasis of distribution of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mature lymphocytes in the body. The dynamic regulation of VLA-4 function is mediated by its conformational change, which is strictly linked to the interaction between alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains. The study using knockin mice showed that GFFKR sequence, a well-preserved motif in the alpha cytoplasmic domain of VLA-4, is critical for binding of alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains as well as regulation of hematopoietic cell distribution. Small molecules targeting this cytoplasmic interaction or ligand-VLA-4 interaction may become good candidates of new drugs for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have suggested the impact of VLA-4 on chemotherapy sensitivity and prognosis in hematological malignancies, which awaits further investigations.

  18. Malignancies, Particularly B-Cell Lymphomas, Are a Frequent Cause of Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Patients Despite Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Daniel O.; Metzger, Michael; Poeth, Kaitlin; Deng, Kathy; Dharsee, Arif; Rico, Juan Carlos; McGowan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals are affected by diseases at rates above those of their HIV-negative peers despite the increased life expectancy of the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. We followed a cohort of approximately 2000 HIV-1-infected patients for 5 years. The most frequent cause of death in this HIV-1-infected cohort was malignancy, with 39% of all classified deaths due to cancer. Among the cancer deaths, B-cell lymphomas were the most commonly seen malignancy, representing 34% of all cancer deaths. These lymphomas were very aggressive with a median survival of <2 months from time of diagnosis. PMID:26566539

  19. Pleural malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-07-01

    Pleural malignancies, primary or metastatic, portend a grim prognosis. In addition to the serious oncologic implications of a pleural malignancy, these tumors can be highly symptomatic. A malignant pleural effusion can cause dyspnea, secondary to lung compression, or even tension physiology from a hydrothorax under pressure. The need to palliate these effusions is a seemingly straightforward clinical scenario, but with nuances that can result in disastrous complications for the patient if not attended to appropriately. Solid pleural malignancies can cause great pain from chest wall invasion or can cause a myriad of morbid symptoms because of the invasion of thoracic structures, such as the heart, lungs, or esophagus. This article reviews pleural malignancies, the purely palliative treatments, and the treatments that are performed with definitive (curative) intent.

  20. Distinct host cell fates for human malignant melanoma targeted by oncolytic rodent parvoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmers, Ellen M; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The rodent parvoviruses are known to be oncoselective, and lytically infect many transformed human cells. Because current therapeutic regimens for metastatic melanoma have low response rates and have little effect on improving survival, this disease is a prime candidate for novel approaches to therapy, including oncolytic parvoviruses. Screening of low-passage, patient-derived melanoma cell lines for multiplicity-dependent killing by a panel of five rodent parvoviruses identified LuIII as the most melanoma-lytic. This property was mapped to the LuIII capsid gene, and an efficiently melanoma tropic chimeric virus shown to undergo three types of interaction with primary human melanoma cells: (1) complete lysis of cultures infected at very low multiplicities; (2) acute killing resulting from viral protein synthesis and DNA replication, without concomitant expansion of the infection, due to failure to export progeny virions efficiently; or (3) complete resistance that operates at an intracellular step following virion uptake, but preceding viral transcription.

  1. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and car...

  2. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Burger-Calderon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD. HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future.

  3. Clinical observation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for 20 patients with hematologic malignancies%异基因造血干细胞移植治疗恶性血液病20例临床疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘鹏吉; 王季石; 孙志强; 卢英豪; 李梦醒; 赵鹏; 龙正美

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in treatment of hematologic malignancies and observe hematopoietic reconstitution, graft versus host disease (GVHD) occurrence,transplant-related complications and the outcome of disease.Methods 20 patients with hematologic malignancies cured by allo-HSCT were analyzed retrospectively. 15 males and 5 females patients were enrolled, and the median age was 39 (8-59) years. Mobilization of donor’ s stem cells using rhG-CSF program 3 days before transplantation.Conditioning regimen:the patients with HLA-matched used modified Bu/Cy programs,the patients with HLA-mismatched (with 1 to 3 loci mismatched) used the modified Bu/Cy+ ATG program; the patient with T-ALL and the patient with MM used Flu+Bu/Cy program. GVHD prevention programs: mycophenolate mofetil + cyclosporine + short course methotrexate. Results 20 patients were successfully engrafted,the median time of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) > 0.5×109/L was 13 (12-17) days,the median time of Plt > 20×109/L was 16 (12-23) days, and the hematopoietic reconstitution was rapid in those patients who were transplanted by the donors with the collected amount of CDh cells > 2.5× 106/kg (recipient body weigh) or the collected amount of mononuclear cell > 5.0×10s/kg (recipient body weigh).No severe hemolytic reaction occurred in 11 cases of blood group incompatibility between donor and recipient after transplantation,11 cases (55 %) developed acute GVHD (aGVHD):4 cases Ⅰ degree aGVHD,4 cases Ⅱ degree aGVHD,2 cases Ⅲ degree aGVHD,1 case Ⅳ degree aGVHD,all patients were improved after treatment.All patients attained complete remission (CR) after transplantation.Follow-up 6 (2-14) months,1 patient died in 5 months after transplantation because of leukemia relapse, 1 case died in 4 months after transplantation because of self-disabling autoimmune hemolytic cyclosporine, chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and multiple organ failure

  4. Induction of embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to get hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells and to study development mechanisms of hematopoietic cells, the method of inducing embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells was explored by differenciating mouse ES cells and human embryonic cells in three stages. The differentiated cells were identified by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and Wright's staining. The results showed that embryoid bodies (EBs) could form when ES cells were cultured in the medium with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). However, cytokines, such as stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO), interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), erythropoietin (EPO) and granular colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), were not helpful for forming EBs. SCF, TPO and embryonic cell conditional medium were useful for the differentiation of mouse EBs to hematopoietic progenitors. Eighty-six percent of these cells were CD34+ after 6-d culture. Hematopoietic progenitors differentiated to B lymphocytes when they were cocultured with primary bone marrow stroma cells in the DMEM medium with SCF and IL-6. 14 d later, most of the cells were CD34-CD38+. Wright's staining and immunohistochemistry showed that 80% of these cells were plasma-like morphologically and immunoglubolin positive. The study of hematopoietic cells from human embryonic cells showed that human embryonic cell differentiation was very similar to that of mouse ES cells. They could form EBs in the first stage and the CD34 positive cells account for about 48.5% in the second stage.

  5. A GATA4-regulated tumor suppressor network represses formation of malignant human astrocytomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Wolf, Amparo; Munoz, Diana M.; Smith, Christopher J.; Gajadhar, Aaron; Restrepo, Andres; Clarke, Ian D.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Kesari, Santosh; Dirks, Peter B.; McGlade, C. Jane; Stanford, William L.; Aldape, Kenneth; Mischel, Paul S.; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal primary human brain tumor, exhibits multiple molecular aberrations. We report that loss of the transcription factor GATA4, a negative regulator of normal astrocyte proliferation, is a driver in glioma formation and fulfills the hallmarks of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Although GATA4 was expressed in normal brain, loss of GATA4 was observed in 94/163 GBM operative samples and was a negative survival prognostic marker. GATA4 loss occurred through promoter hypermethylation or novel somatic mutations. Loss of GATA4 in normal human astrocytes promoted high-grade astrocytoma formation, in cooperation with other relevant genetic alterations such as activated Ras or loss of TP53. Loss of GATA4 with activated Ras in normal astrocytes promoted a progenitor-like phenotype, formation of neurospheres, and the ability to differentiate into astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Re-expression of GATA4 in human GBM cell lines, primary cultures, and brain tumor–initiating cells suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo through direct activation of the cell cycle inhibitor P21CIP1, independent of TP53. Re-expression of GATA4 also conferred sensitivity of GBM cells to temozolomide, a DNA alkylating agent currently used in GBM therapy. This sensitivity was independent of MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase), the DNA repair enzyme which is often implicated in temozolomide resistance. Instead, GATA4 reduced expression of APNG (alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase), a DNA repair enzyme which is poorly characterized in GBM-mediated temozolomide resistance. Identification and validation of GATA4 as a TSG and its downstream targets in GBM may yield promising novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21464220

  6. Immunohistochemical study on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and high-risk human papilloma virus in the malignant progression of papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2013-10-01

    Papilloma frequently develops as a benign tumor of the head and neck area, but its potential for malignant transformation has yet to be studied. This study aims to provide basic information for papillomas using the immunohistochemical staining of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18. To evaluate the malignant transformation of papillomas, the selected tissue samples were serially diagnosed with pre-cancerous papilloma (with epithelial dysplasia, pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia) or malignant lesion (squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) after the first diagnosis (squamous papilloma, inverted papilloma). The selected tissues were stained with an antibody to MMP-2 and HPV 16-E7, HPV 18-L1. A statistical analysis was performed according to each transformation step. The epithelial layer of papilloma and pre-cancerous papilloma lesions had a similar MMP-2 expression, but that of the malignant lesion had a significantly increased MMP-2 expression. HPV 16 and 18 infection rates were 28.6%, 33.3% and 63.6% in papillomas, pre-cancerous papilloma lesions, and SCC. A relatively high MMP-2 expression and HPV 16 or 18 infection of papillomas may be associated with early events in the multistep processes of malignant transformation of papillomas.

  7. Transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO2 induces mitochondrial apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Onishi

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play an essential role in cellular energy metabolism and apoptosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that decreased mitochondrial biogenesis is associated with cancer progression. In mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α regulates the activities of multiple nuclear receptors and transcription factors involved in mitochondrial proliferation. Previously, we showed that overexpression of PGC-1α leads to mitochondrial proliferation and induces apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO(2 to rat skeletal muscle induces PGC-1α expression and causes an increase in mitochondrial proliferation. In this study, we utilized a murine model of human MFH to determine the effect of transcutaneous CO(2 exposure on PGC-1α expression, mitochondrial proliferation and cellular apoptosis. PGC-1α expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, while mitochondrial proliferation was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and the relative copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA was assessed by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence staining and DNA fragmentation assays were used to examine mitochondrial apoptosis. We also evaluated the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis related proteins, such as caspases, cytochorome c and Bax, by immunoblot analysis. We show that transcutaneous application of CO(2 induces PGC-1α expression, and increases mitochondrial proliferation and apoptosis of tumor cells, significantly reducing tumor volume. Proteins involved in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, including caspase 3 and caspase 9, were elevated in CO(2 treated tumors compared to control. We also observed an enrichment of cytochrome c in the cytoplasmic fraction and Bax protein in the mitochondrial fraction of CO(2 treated tumors, highlighting the involvement of mitochondria in apoptosis

  8. Changes in the human mitochondrial genome after treatment of malignant disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardell, Theresa M.; Ferguson, Elaine; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Taylor, Robert W.; Jackson, Graham; Craft, Alan; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Howell, Neil; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2003-04-09

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the only extrachromosomal DNA in human cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential information for the synthesis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Inherited defects of this genome are an important cause of human disease. In addition, the mitochondrial genome seems to be particularly prone to DNA damage and acquired mutations may have a role in ageing, cancer and neurodegeneration. We wished to determine if radiotherapy and chemotherapy used in the treatment of cancer could induce changes in the mitochondrial genome. Such changes would be an important genetic marker of DNA damage and may explain some of the adverse effects of treatment. We studied samples from patients who had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy for point mutations within the mtDNA control region, and for large-scale deletions. In blood samples from patients, we found a significantly increased number of point mutations compared to the control subjects. In muscle biopsies from 7 of 8 patients whom had received whole body irradiation as well as chemotherapy, the level of a specific mtDNA deletion was significantly greater than in control subjects. Our studies have shown that in patients who have been treated for cancer there is an increased level of mtDNA damage.

  9. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus shale gas drilling flow back water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S.; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation is known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these waste waters, flow back water from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6 weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependant. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show a better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  10. Human malignant melanoma-derived progestagen-associated endometrial protein immunosuppresses T lymphocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Ren

    Full Text Available Progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP is a glycoprotein of the lipocalin family that acts as a negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation. However, the function of tumor-derived PAEP on the human immune system in the tumor microenvironment is unknown. PAEP is highly expressed in intermediate and thick primary melanomas (Breslow's 2.5mm or greater and metastatic melanomas, correlating with its expression in daughter cell lines established in vitro. The current study investigates the role of melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein in regulating T cell function. Upon the enrichment of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each subset was then mixed with either melanoma-derived PAEP protein or PAEP-poor supernatant of gene-silenced tumor cells. IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion of CD4+ T cells significantly decreased with the addition of PAEP-rich supernatant. And the addition of PAEP-positive cell supernatant to activated lymphocytes significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity, while increasing lymphocyte apoptosis. Our result suggests that melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein immunosuppresses the activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity of T lymphocytes, which might partially explain the mechanism of immune tolerance induced by melanoma cells within the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Leten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683 in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1 outliers can be detected earlier, (2 GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3 a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents.

  12. Other hematopoietic disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010371 The incidence and risk factors of late-onset non-infectious pulmonary complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. WU Tao(吴涛),et al.Dept Hematol,Nanfang Hosp,Nanfang Med Univ,Guangzhou 510515.Chin J Hematol 2010;31(4):249-252. Objective To analyze the incidence and the risk factors of late-onset non-infectious

  13. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes. Part 2, Progress report, July 1989--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  14. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, in vitro, supported by ectopic human HOXB4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, Sandra; Carotta, Sebastian; Klump, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can recapitulate many aspects of hematopoiesis, in vitro, and can even generate cells capable of long-term multilineage repopulation after transplantation into recipient mice, when the homeodomain transcription factor HOXB4 is ectopically expressed. Thus, the ES-cell differentiation system is of great value for a detailed understanding of the process of blood formation. Furthermore, it is also promising for future application in hematopoietic cell and gene therapy. Since the arrival of techniques which allow the reprogramming of somatic cells back to an ES cell-like state, the generation of hematopoietic stem cells from patient-specific so-called induced pluripotent stem cells shows great promise for future therapeutic applications. In this chapter, we describe how to cultivate a certain feeder cell-independent mouse embryonic stem cell line, to manipulate these cells by retroviral gene transfer to ectopically express HOXB4, to differentiate these ES cells via embryoid body formation, and to selectively expand the arising, HOXB4-expressing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  15. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes[superscript 1], but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing[superscript 2, 3, 4] to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic ...

  16. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma cells by increasing reactive oxygen species and activating MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Michela; Capasso, Anna; D'Acunto, Cosimo W; Masullo, Milena; Rossi, Adriano G; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-12-27

    The effect of the biologically active prenylated chalcone and potential anticancer agent xanthohumol (1) has been investigated on a