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Sample records for human head model

  1. Texturing of Surface of 3D Human Head Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an algorithm of texturing of the surface of 3Dhuman head model. The proposed algorithm generates a textureconsequently of several camera frames of the input video sequence. Thetexture values from the camera frames are mapped on the surface of the3D human head model using perspective projection, scan line and 3Dmotion estimation. To decrease the number of camera frames a filling ofempty places by a simple interpolation method has been done in thetexture plane.

  2. Biomechanical Modeling of the Human Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-03

    captures the available experiment data. Model parameters are estimated for each identified material system via optimization by minimizing the error ...estimating the constitutive model param- eters by minimizing the error between the model predictions and the experimental data set. This process is...brain injury (TBI) with as much as 70 percent of those injuries coming from blast, which is the primary cause of mild TBI (mTBI) [1]. The exact injury

  3. Research study on neck injury lessening with active head restraint using human body FE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the active head restraint system in reducing neck injury risk of car occupants in low-speed rear impacts. A human body FE model "THUMS" was used to simulate head and neck kinematics of the occupant and to evaluate loading to the neck. Joint capsule strain was calculated to predict neck injury risk as well as NIC. The validity of the model was confirmed comparing its mechanical responses to those in human subjects in the literatures. Seat FE models were also prepared representing one with a fixed head restraint and the other one with an active head restraint system. The active head restraint system was designed to move the head restraint forward and upward when the lower unit was lower unit was loaded by the pelvis. Rear impact simulations were performed assuming a triangular acceleration pulse at a delta-V of 25 km/h. The model reproduced similar head and neck motions to those measured in the human volunteer test, except for active muscular responses. The calculated joint capsule strain also showed a good match with those of PMHS tests in the literature. A rear-impact simulation was conducted using the model with the fixed head restraint. The result revealed that NIC was strongly correlated with the relative acceleration between the head and the torso and that its maximum peak appeared when the head contacted the head restraint. It was also found that joint capsule strain grew in later timing synchronizing with the relative displacement. Another simulation with the active head restraint system showed that both NIC and joint capsule strain were lowered owing to the forward and upward motion of the head restraint. A close investigation of the vertebral motion indicated that the active head restraint reduced the magnitude of shear deformation in the facet joint, which contributed to the strain growth in the fixed head restraint case. Rear-impact simulations were conducted using a human body FE model, THUMS

  4. HEADING RECOVERY FROM OPTIC FLOW: COMPARING PERFORMANCE OF HUMANS AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Foulkes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human observers can perceive their direction of heading with a precision of about a degree. Several computational models of the processes underpinning the perception of heading have been proposed. In the present study we set out to assess which of four candidate models best captured human performance; the four models we selected reflected key differences in terms of approach and methods to modelling optic flow processing to recover movement parameters. We first generated a performance profile for human observers by measuring how performance changed as we systematically manipulated both the quantity (number of dots in the stimulus per frame and quality (amount of 2D directional noise of the flow field information. We then generated comparable performance profiles for the four candidate models. Models varied markedly in terms of both their performance and similarity to human data. To formally assess the match between the models and human performance we regressed the output of each of the four models against human performance data. We were able to rule out two models that produced very different performance profiles to human observers. The remaining two shared some similarities with human performance profiles in terms of the magnitude and pattern of thresholds. However none of the models tested could capture all aspect of the human data.

  5. Effect of SAR on human head modeling inside cylindrical enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, T Anita Jones; Ravichandran, C S

    2013-09-01

    This study intends to discuss enclosed a realistic approach to determine and analyze the effects of radio frequency on human exposure inside a cylindrical enclosure. A scenario in which a mobile phone with inverted-F antenna (IFA) operating in the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) band (900 MHz) is used inside a cylindrical enclosure. Metallic enclosures are known to have resonance and reflection effects, thereby increasing electric field strength and hence resulting in a change of the human exposure to electromagnetic absorptions. So, this study examines and compares the levels of absorption in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) values under various conditions. In this study, a human phantom with dielectric properties is designed and its interaction is studied with IFA inside fully enclosed cylindrical enclosures. The results show that SAR values are increased inside cylindrical enclosures compared with those in free space. The method of computation uses method of moments. Simulations are done in FEKO software.

  6. Viscoelastic computational modeling of the human head-neck system: Eigenfrequencies and time-dependent analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, E; Gizzi, A; Cherubini, C; Nestola, M G C; Filippi, S

    2018-01-01

    A subject-specific 3-dimensional viscoelastic finite element model of the human head-neck system is presented and investigated based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance biomedical images. Ad hoc imaging processing tools are developed for the reconstruction of the simulation domain geometry and the internal distribution of bone and soft tissues. Material viscoelastic properties are characterized point-wise through an image-based interpolating function used then for assigning the constitutive prescriptions of a heterogenous viscoelastic continuum model. The numerical study is conducted both for modal and time-dependent analyses, compared with similar studies and validated against experimental evidences. Spatiotemporal analyses are performed upon different exponential swept-sine wave-localized stimulations. The modeling approach proposes a generalized, patient-specific investigation of sound wave transmission and attenuation within the human head-neck system comprising skull and brain tissues. Model extensions and applications are finally discussed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. SAR in human head model due to resonant wireless power transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guoqiang; Li, Yanhong; Song, Xianjin

    2016-04-29

    Efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between transmitter and the receiver has been achieved based on the magnetic resonant coupling method. The influence of electromagnetic field on the human body due to resonant wireless power transfer system (RWPT) should be taken into account during the design process of the system. To analyze the transfer performance of the RWPT system and the change rules of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head model due to the RWPT system. The circuit-field coupling method for a RWPT system with consideration of the displacement current was presented. The relationship between the spiral coil parameters and transfer performance was studied. The SAR in the human head model was calculated under two different exposure conditions. A system with output power higher than 10 W at 0.2 m distance operating at a frequency of approximately 1 MHz was designed. The FEM simulation results show the peak SAR value is below the safety limit which appeared when the human head model is in front of the transmitter. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results, which verified the validity of the analysis and design.

  8. Levels of detail analysis of microwave scattering from human head models for brain stroke detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Munawar Qureshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have presented a microwave scattering analysis from multiple human head models. This study incorporates different levels of detail in the human head models and its effect on microwave scattering phenomenon. Two levels of detail are taken into account; (i Simplified ellipse shaped head model (ii Anatomically realistic head model, implemented using 2-D geometry. In addition, heterogenic and frequency-dispersive behavior of the brain tissues has also been incorporated in our head models. It is identified during this study that the microwave scattering phenomenon changes significantly once the complexity of head model is increased by incorporating more details using magnetic resonance imaging database. It is also found out that the microwave scattering results match in both types of head model (i.e., geometrically simple and anatomically realistic, once the measurements are made in the structurally simplified regions. However, the results diverge considerably in the complex areas of brain due to the arbitrary shape interface of tissue layers in the anatomically realistic head model. After incorporating various levels of detail, the solution of subject microwave scattering problem and the measurement of transmitted and backscattered signals were obtained using finite element method. Mesh convergence analysis was also performed to achieve error free results with a minimum number of mesh elements and a lesser degree of freedom in the fast computational time. The results were promising and the E-Field values converged for both simple and complex geometrical models. However, the E-Field difference between both types of head model at the same reference point differentiated a lot in terms of magnitude. At complex location, a high difference value of 0.04236 V/m was measured compared to the simple location, where it turned out to be 0.00197 V/m. This study also contributes to provide a comparison analysis between the direct and iterative

  9. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM or finite element model (FEM created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa. BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  10. Head and neck resonance in a rhesus monkey - a comparison with results from a human model

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    Tinniswood, Adam; Gandhi, Om P.

    1999-03-01

    The use of primates for examining the effects of electromagnetic radiation on behavioural patterns is well established. Rats have also been used for this purpose. However, the monkey is of greater interest as its physiological make-up is somewhat closer to that of the human. Since the behavioural effects are likely to occur at lower field strengths for resonant absorption conditions for the head and neck, the need for determination of resonance frequencies for this region is obvious. Numerical techniques are ideal for the prediction of coupling to each of the organs, and accurate anatomically based models can be used to pinpoint the conditions for maximum absorption in the head in order to focus the experiments. In this paper we use two models, one of a human male and the other of a rhesus monkey, and find the mass-averaged power absorption spectra for both. The frequencies at which highest absorption (i.e. resonance) occurs in both the whole body and the head and neck region are determined. The results from these two models are compared for both E-polarization and k-polarization, and are shown to obey basic electromagnetic scaling principles.

  11. Modular use of human body models of varying levels of complexity: Validation of head kinematics.

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    Decker, William; Koya, Bharath; Davis, Matthew L; Gayzik, F Scott

    2017-05-29

    The significant computational resources required to execute detailed human body finite-element models has motivated the development of faster running, simplified models (e.g., GHBMC M50-OS). Previous studies have demonstrated the ability to modularly incorporate the validated GHBMC M50-O brain model into the simplified model (GHBMC M50-OS+B), which allows for localized analysis of the brain in a fraction of the computation time required for the detailed model. The objective of this study is to validate the head and neck kinematics of the GHBMC M50-O and M50-OS (detailed and simplified versions of the same model) against human volunteer test data in frontal and lateral loading. Furthermore, the effect of modular insertion of the detailed brain model into the M50-OS is quantified. Data from the Navy Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL) human volunteer studies, including a 15g frontal, 8g frontal, and 7g lateral impact, were reconstructed and simulated using LS-DYNA. A five-point restraint system was used for all simulations, and initial positions of the models were matched with volunteer data using settling and positioning techniques. Both the frontal and lateral simulations were run with the M50-O, M50-OS, and M50-OS+B with active musculature for a total of nine runs. Normalized run times for the various models used in this study were 8.4 min/ms for the M50-O, 0.26 min/ms for the M50-OS, and 0.97 min/ms for the M50-OS+B, a 32- and 9-fold reduction in run time, respectively. Corridors were reanalyzed for head and T1 kinematics from the NBDL studies. Qualitative evaluation of head rotational accelerations and linear resultant acceleration, as well as linear resultant T1 acceleration, showed reasonable results between all models and the experimental data. Objective evaluation of the results for head center of gravity (CG) accelerations was completed via ISO TS 18571, and indicated scores of 0.673 (M50-O), 0.638 (M50-OS), and 0.656 (M50-OS+B) for the 15g frontal impact

  12. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

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    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Numerical model (switchable/dual model) of the human head for rigid body and finite elements applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology for the development and validation of a numerical model of the human head using generic procedures is presented. All steps required, starting with the model generation, model validation and applications will be discussed. The proposed model may be considered as a dual one due to its capabilities to switch from deformable to a rigid body according to the application's requirements. The first step is to generate the numerical model of the human head using geometry files or medical images. The required stiffness and damping for the elastic connection used for the rigid body model are identified by performing a natural frequency analysis. The presented applications for model validation are related to impact analysis. The first case is related to Nahum's (Nahum and Smith 1970) experiments pressure data being evaluated and a pressure map generated using the results from discrete elements. For the second case, the relative displacement between the brain and the skull is evaluated according to Hardy's (Hardy WH, Foster CD, Mason, MJ, Yang KH, King A, Tashman S. 2001.Investigation of head injury mechanisms using neutral density technology and high-speed biplanar X-ray. Stapp Car Crash J. 45:337-368, SAE Paper 2001-22-0016) experiments. The main objective is to validate the rigid model as a quick and versatile tool for acquiring the input data for specific brain analyses.

  14. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    Full Text Available Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data to image the vasculature, and iii diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  15. Power deposition in the head and neck of an anatomically based human body model for plane wave exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinniswood, A D; Furse, C M; Gandhi, O P

    1998-08-01

    At certain frequencies, when the human head becomes a resonant structure, the power absorbed by the head and neck, when the body is exposed to a vertically polarized plane wave propagating from front to back, becomes significantly larger than would ordinarily be expected from its shadow cross section. This has possible implications in the study of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields. Additionally the frequencies at which these resonances occur are not readily predicted by simple approximations of the head in isolation. In order to determine these resonant conditions an anatomically based model of the whole human body has been used, with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm to accurately determine field propagation, specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions and power absorption in both the whole body and the head region (head and neck). This paper shows that resonant frequencies can be determined using two methods. The first is by use of the accurate anatomically based model (with heterogeneous tissue properties) and secondly using a model built from parallelepiped sections (for the torso and legs), an ellipsoid for the head and a cylinder for the neck. This approximation to the human body is built from homogeneous tissue the equivalent of two-thirds the conductivity and dielectric constant of that of muscle. An IBM SP-2 supercomputer together with a parallel FDTD code has been used to accommodate the large problem size. We find resonant frequencies for the head and neck at 207 MHz and 193 MHz for the isolated and grounded conditions, with absorption cross sections that are respectively 3.27 and 2.62 times the shadow cross section.

  16. Monte Carlo based modeling of indocyanine green bolus tracking in the adult human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2011-02-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is increasingly being investigated in critical care settings to assess cerebral hemodynamics, because of its potential for guiding therapy during the recovery period following brain injury. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be quantified by NIRS using indocyanine green (ICG) as an intravascular tracer. However, extracting accurate measurements from complex tissue geometries, such as the human head, is challenging and has hindered the clinical applications. With the development of fast Monte Carlo simulations that can take into account a priori anatomical information (e.g. near-infrared light propagation in tissue from MRI or CT imaging data), it is now possible to investigate signal contamination arising from the extracerebral layers, which can confound NIRS-CBF measurements. Here, we present a theoretical model that combines Monte Carlo simulations of broadband time-resolved near-infrared measurements with indicator-dilution theory to model time-dependent changes in light propagation following ICG bolus injection. Broadband, time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy measurements were simulated for three source-detector positions. Individual simulations required 56 seconds for 5x108 photons, and a set of simulations consisting of baseline measurements at 40 wavelengths, and single-wavelength measurements at 160 time-points required on average 3.4 hours. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, the propagation of errors associated with varying both the scalp blood flow and the scalp thickness was investigated. For each simulation the data were analyzed using four independent approaches-simple-subtraction blood flow index (ΔBFISS), time-resolved variance time-to-peak (ΔTTPTR), and absolute and relative CBF with depth-resolved NIRS (CBFDR and ΔCBFDR)-to assess cerebral hemodynamics.

  17. Impact of head modeling and sensor types in localizing human gamma-band oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2014-01-01

    An effective mechanism in neuronal communication is oscillatory neuronal synchronization. The neuronal gamma-band (30-100 Hz) synchronization is associated with attention which is induced by a certain visual stimuli. Numerous studies have shown that the gamma-band activity is observed in the visual cortex. However, impact of different head modeling techniques and sensor types to localize gamma-band activity have not yet been reported. To do this, the brain activity was recorded using 306 magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensors, consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 pairs of planar gradiometers (one measuring the derivative of the magnetic field along the latitude and the other along the longitude), and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head models with a single-shell and overlapping spheres (local sphere) have been used as a forward model for calculating the external magnetic fields generated from the gamma-band activity. For each sensor type, the subject-specific frequency range of the gamma-band activity was obtained from the spectral analysis. The identified frequency range of interest with the highest gamma-band activity is then localized using a spatial-filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). The source analysis for all the subjects revealed that the gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed sources close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to the other gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the latitude. However, using the magnetometer sensors, it was not possible to localize the sources in the region of interest. When comparing the two head models, the local-sphere model helps in localizing the source more focally as compared to the single-shell head model.

  18. Modelling and assessment of the electric field strength caused by mobile phone to the human head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckus Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Electromagnetic field exposure is the one of the most important physical agents that actively affects live organisms and environment. Active use of mobile phones influences the increase of electromagnetic field radiation. The aim of the study was to measure and assess the electric field strength caused by mobile phones to the human head. Methods. In this paper the software “COMSOL Multiphysics” was used to establish the electric field strength created by mobile phones around the head. Results. The second generation (2G Global System for Mobile (GSM phones that operate in the frequency band of 900 MHz and reach the power of 2 W have a stronger electric field than (2G GSM mobile phones that operate in the higher frequency band of 1,800 MHz and reach the power up to 1 W during conversation. The third generation of (3G UMTS smart phones that effectively use high (2,100 MHz radio frequency band emit the smallest electric field strength values during conversation. The highest electric field strength created by mobile phones is around the ear, i.e. the mobile phone location. The strength of mobile phone electric field on the phantom head decreases exponentially while moving sidewards from the center of the effect zone (the ear, and constitutes 1-12% of the artificial head’s surface. Conclusion. The highest electric field strength values of mobile phones are associated with their higher power, bigger specific energy absorption rate (SAR and lower frequency of mobile phone. The stronger electric field emitted by the more powerful mobile phones takes a higher percentage of the head surface. The highest electric field strength created by mobile phones is distributed over the user ear.

  19. Comparison of multibody and finite element human body models in pedestrian accidents with the focus on head kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlstedt, Madelen; Halldin, Peter; Kleiven, Svein

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the difference in head kinematics between the TNO and THUMS models in pedestrian accident situations. The TNO pedestrian model (version 7.4.2) and the THUMS pedestrian model (version 1.4) were compared in one experiment setup and 14 different accident scenarios where the vehicle velocity, leg posture, pedestrian velocity, and pedestrian's initial orientation were altered. In all simulations, the pedestrian model was impacted by a sedan. The head trajectory, head rotation, and head impact velocity were compared, as was the trend when various different parameters were altered. The multibody model had a larger head wrap-around distance for all accident scenarios. The maximum differences of the head's center of gravity between the models in the global x-, y-, and z-directions at impact were 13.9, 5.8, and 5.6 cm, respectively. The maximum difference between the models in head rotation around the head's inferior-superior axis at head impact was 36°. The head impact velocity differed up to 2.4 m/s between the models. The 2 models showed similar trends for the head trajectory when the various parameters were altered. There are differences in kinematics between the THUMS and TNO pedestrian models. However, these model differences are of the same magnitude as those induced by other uncertainties in the accident reconstructions, such as initial leg posture and pedestrian velocity.

  20. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg. The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant.

  1. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model ...

  2. Modelling and validation of diffuse reflectance of the adult human head for fNIRS: scalp sub-layers definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Vega, Javier; Montero-Hernández, Samuel; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos G.; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe

    2017-11-01

    Accurate estimation of brain haemodynamics parameters such as cerebral blood flow and volume as well as oxygen consumption i.e. metabolic rate of oxygen, with funcional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) requires precise characterization of light propagation through head tissues. An anatomically realistic forward model of the human adult head with unprecedented detailed specification of the 5 scalp sublayers to account for blood irrigation in the connective tissue layer is introduced. The full model consists of 9 layers, accounts for optical properties ranging from 750nm to 950nm and has a voxel size of 0.5mm. The whole model is validated comparing the predicted remitted spectra, using Monte Carlo simulations of radiation propagation with 108 photons, against continuous wave (CW) broadband fNIRS experimental data. As the true oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during acquisition are unknown, a genetic algorithm searched for the vector of parameters that generates a modelled spectrum that optimally fits the experimental spectrum. Differences between experimental and model predicted spectra was quantified using the Root mean square error (RMSE). RMSE was 0.071 +/- 0.004, 0.108 +/- 0.018 and 0.235+/-0.015 at 1, 2 and 3cm interoptode distance respectively. The parameter vector of absolute concentrations of haemoglobin species in scalp and cortex retrieved with the genetic algorithm was within histologically plausible ranges. The new model capability to estimate the contribution of the scalp blood flow shall permit incorporating this information to the regularization of the inverse problem for a cleaner reconstruction of brain hemodynamics.

  3. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

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    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully

  4. Mechanical properties and anthropometry of the human infant head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Michael T; Luck, Jason F; Dibb, Alan; Van Ee, Chris A; Nightingale, Roger W; Myers, Barry S

    2004-11-01

    The adult head has been studied extensively and computationally modeled for impact, however there have been few studies that attempt to quantify the mechanical properties of the pediatric skull. Likewise, little documentation of pediatric anthropometry exists. We hypothesize that the properties of the human pediatric skull differ from the human adult skull and exhibit viscoelastic structural properties. Quasi-static and dynamic compression tests were performed using the whole head of three human neonate specimens (ages 1 to 11 days old). Whole head compression tests were performed in a MTS servo-hydraulic actuator. Testing was conducted using nondestructive quasi-static, and constant velocity protocols in the anterior-posterior and right-left directions. In addition, the pediatric head specimens were dropped from 15cm and 30cm and impact force-time histories were measured for five different locations: vertex, occiput, forehead, right and left parietal region. The compression stiffness values increased with an increase in velocity but were not significantly different between the anterior-posterior and right-left directions. Peak head acceleration during the head impact tests did not significantly vary between the five different impact locations. A three parameter model that included damping represented the pediatric head impact data more accurately than a simple mass-spring system. The compressive and impact stiffness of the pediatric heads were significantly more compliant than published adult values. Also, infant head dimensions, center of gravity and moment of inertia (Iyy) were determined. The CRABI 6-month dummy impact response was similar to the infant cadaver for impacts to the vertex, occiput, and forehead but dramatically stiffer in lateral impacts. These pediatric head anthropomorphic, compression, and impact data will provide a basis to validate whole head models and compare with ATD performance in similar exposures.

  5. Systematic biases in human heading estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F Cuturi

    Full Text Available Heading estimation is vital to everyday navigation and locomotion. Despite extensive behavioral and physiological research on both visual and vestibular heading estimation over more than two decades, the accuracy of heading estimation has not yet been systematically evaluated. Therefore human visual and vestibular heading estimation was assessed in the horizontal plane using a motion platform and stereo visual display. Heading angle was overestimated during forward movements and underestimated during backward movements in response to both visual and vestibular stimuli, indicating an overall multimodal bias toward lateral directions. Lateral biases are consistent with the overrepresentation of lateral preferred directions observed in neural populations that carry visual and vestibular heading information, including MSTd and otolith afferent populations. Due to this overrepresentation, population vector decoding yields patterns of bias remarkably similar to those observed behaviorally. Lateral biases are inconsistent with standard bayesian accounts which predict that estimates should be biased toward the most common straight forward heading direction. Nevertheless, lateral biases may be functionally relevant. They effectively constitute a perceptual scale expansion around straight ahead which could allow for more precise estimation and provide a high gain feedback signal to facilitate maintenance of straight-forward heading during everyday navigation and locomotion.

  6. Effect of head model on Monte Carlo modeling of spatial sensitivity distribution for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling Light propagation within human head to deduce spatial sensitivity distribution (SSD is important for Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS/imaging (NIRI and diffuse correlation tomography. Lots of head models have been used on this issue, including layered head model, artificial simplified head model, MRI slices described head model, and visible human head model. Hereinto, visible Chinese human (VCH head model is considered to be a most faithful presentation of anatomical structure, and has been highlighted to be employed in modeling light propagation. However, it is not practical for all researchers to use VCH head models and actually increasing number of people are using magnet resonance imaging (MRI head models. Here, all the above head models were simulated and compared, and we focused on the effect of using different head models on predictions of SSD. Our results were in line with the previous reports on the effect of cerebral cortex folding geometry. Moreover, the influence on SSD increases with the fidelity of head models. And surprisingly, the SSD percentages in scalp and gray matter (region of interest in MRI head model were found to be 80% and 125% higher than in VCH head model. MRI head models induced nonignorable discrepancy in SSD estimation when compared with VCH head model. This study, as we believe, is the first to focus on comparison among full serials of head model on estimating SSD, and provided quantitative evidence for MRI head model users to calibrate their SSD estimation.

  7. Automatic classification of human sperm head morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Heutte, Laurent; Petitjean, Caroline; Härtel, Steffen; Hitschfeld, Nancy

    2017-05-01

    Infertility is a problem that affects up to 15% of couples worldwide with emotional and physiological implications and semen analysis is the first step in the evaluation of an infertile couple. Indeed the morphology of human sperm cells is considered to be a clinical tool dedicated to the fertility prognosis and serves, mainly, for making decisions regarding the options of assisted reproduction technologies. Therefore, a complete analysis of not only normal sperm but also abnormal sperm turns out to be critical in this context. This paper sets out to develop, implement and calibrate a novel methodology to characterize and classify sperm heads towards morphological sperm analysis. Our work is aimed at focusing on a depth analysis of abnormal sperm heads for fertility diagnosis, prognosis, reproductive toxicology, basic research or public health studies. We introduce a morphological characterization for human sperm heads based on shape measures. We also present a pipeline for sperm head classification, according to the last Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen of the World Health Organization (WHO). In this sense, we propose a two-stage classification scheme that permits to classify sperm heads among five different classes (one class for normal sperm heads and four classes for abnormal sperm heads) combining an ensemble strategy for feature selection and a cascade approach with several support vector machines dedicated to the verification of each class. We use Fisher's exact test to demonstrate that there is no statistically significant differences between our results and those achieved by domain experts. Experimental evaluation shows that our two-stage classification scheme outperforms some state-of-the-art monolithic classifiers, exhibiting 58% of average accuracy. More interestingly, on the subset of data for which there is a total agreement between experts for the label of the samples, our system is able to provide 73% of average

  8. Coordinates of Human Visual and Inertial Heading Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Thomas Crane

    Full Text Available Heading estimation involves both inertial and visual cues. Inertial motion is sensed by the labyrinth, somatic sensation by the body, and optic flow by the retina. Because the eye and head are mobile these stimuli are sensed relative to different reference frames and it remains unclear if a perception occurs in a common reference frame. Recent neurophysiologic evidence has suggested the reference frames remain separate even at higher levels of processing but has not addressed the resulting perception. Seven human subjects experienced a 2s, 16 cm/s translation and/or a visual stimulus corresponding with this translation. For each condition 72 stimuli (360° in 5° increments were delivered in random order. After each stimulus the subject identified the perceived heading using a mechanical dial. Some trial blocks included interleaved conditions in which the influence of ±28° of gaze and/or head position were examined. The observations were fit using a two degree-of-freedom population vector decoder (PVD model which considered the relative sensitivity to lateral motion and coordinate system offset. For visual stimuli gaze shifts caused shifts in perceived head estimates in the direction opposite the gaze shift in all subjects. These perceptual shifts averaged 13 ± 2° for eye only gaze shifts and 17 ± 2° for eye-head gaze shifts. This finding indicates visual headings are biased towards retina coordinates. Similar gaze and head direction shifts prior to inertial headings had no significant influence on heading direction. Thus inertial headings are perceived in body-centered coordinates. Combined visual and inertial stimuli yielded intermediate results.

  9. Walking Ahead: The Headed Social Force Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Francesco; Fontanelli, Daniele; Garulli, Andrea; Giannitrapani, Antonio; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Human motion models are finding an increasing number of novel applications in many different fields, such as building design, computer graphics and robot motion planning. The Social Force Model is one of the most popular alternatives to describe the motion of pedestrians. By resorting to a physical analogy, individuals are assimilated to point-wise particles subject to social forces which drive their dynamics. Such a model implicitly assumes that humans move isotropically. On the contrary, empirical evidence shows that people do have a preferred direction of motion, walking forward most of the time. Lateral motions are observed only in specific circumstances, such as when navigating in overcrowded environments or avoiding unexpected obstacles. In this paper, the Headed Social Force Model is introduced in order to improve the realism of the trajectories generated by the classical Social Force Model. The key feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of the pedestrians' heading into the dynamic model used to describe the motion of each individual. The force and torque representing the model inputs are computed as suitable functions of the force terms resulting from the traditional Social Force Model. Moreover, a new force contribution is introduced in order to model the behavior of people walking together as a single group. The proposed model features high versatility, being able to reproduce both the unicycle-like trajectories typical of people moving in open spaces and the point-wise motion patterns occurring in high density scenarios. Extensive numerical simulations show an increased regularity of the resulting trajectories and confirm a general improvement of the model realism.

  10. Walking Ahead: The Headed Social Force Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Farina

    Full Text Available Human motion models are finding an increasing number of novel applications in many different fields, such as building design, computer graphics and robot motion planning. The Social Force Model is one of the most popular alternatives to describe the motion of pedestrians. By resorting to a physical analogy, individuals are assimilated to point-wise particles subject to social forces which drive their dynamics. Such a model implicitly assumes that humans move isotropically. On the contrary, empirical evidence shows that people do have a preferred direction of motion, walking forward most of the time. Lateral motions are observed only in specific circumstances, such as when navigating in overcrowded environments or avoiding unexpected obstacles. In this paper, the Headed Social Force Model is introduced in order to improve the realism of the trajectories generated by the classical Social Force Model. The key feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of the pedestrians' heading into the dynamic model used to describe the motion of each individual. The force and torque representing the model inputs are computed as suitable functions of the force terms resulting from the traditional Social Force Model. Moreover, a new force contribution is introduced in order to model the behavior of people walking together as a single group. The proposed model features high versatility, being able to reproduce both the unicycle-like trajectories typical of people moving in open spaces and the point-wise motion patterns occurring in high density scenarios. Extensive numerical simulations show an increased regularity of the resulting trajectories and confirm a general improvement of the model realism.

  11. Using an Empirical Model of Human Turning Motion to Aid Heading Estimation in a Personal Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Thomas

    With the adoption of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in smart phones, soldier equipment, and emergency responder navigation systems users have realized the usefulness of low cost Personal Navigation Systems. The state-of-the-art Personal Navigation System is a unit that fuses information based on external references with a low cost IMU. Due to the size, weight, power, and cost constraints imposed on a pedestrian navigation systems as well as current IMU performance limitations, the gyroscopes used to determine heading exhibit significant drift limiting the performance of the navigation system. In this thesis biomechanical signals are used to predict the onset of pedestrian turning motion. Experimental data from eight subjects captured in a gait laboratory using a Vicon motion tracking unit is used for validation. The analysis of experimental data shows the heading computed by turn prediction augmented integration is more accurate than open loop gyro integration alone.

  12. A comprehensive three-dimensional dynamic model of the human head and trunk for estimating lumbar and cervical joint torques and forces from upper body kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vette, Albert H; Yoshida, Takashi; Thrasher, T Adam; Masani, K; Popovic, Milos R

    2012-06-01

    Linked-segment representations of human body dynamics have been used extensively in biomechanics, ergonomics, and rehabilitation research to systemize thinking, make predictions, and suggest novel experiments. In the scope of upper body biomechanics, these models play an even more essential role as the human spine dynamics are difficult to study in vivo. No study exists to date, however, that specifically disseminates the technical details of a comprehensive three-dimensional model of the upper body for the purpose of estimating spinal joint torques and forces for a wide range of scenarios. Consequently, researchers are still bound to develop and implement their own models. Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a dynamic model of the upper body that can comprehensively estimate spinal joint torques and forces from upper body kinematics. The proposed three-dimensional model focuses on the actions of the lumbar and cervical vertebrae and consists of five lumbar segments (L1 to L5), the thorax, six cervical segments (C2 to C7), and the head. Additionally, the model: (1) is flexible regarding the kinematic nature of the spinal joints (free, constrained, or fixed); (2) incorporates all geometric and mass-inertia parameters from a single, high-resolution source; and (3) can be feasibly implemented via different inverse dynamics formulations. To demonstrate its practicality, the model was finally employed to estimate the lumbar and cervical joint torques during perturbed sitting using experimental motion data. Considering the growing importance of mathematical predictions, the developed model should become an important resource for researchers in different fields. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Realistic Avatar Eye and Head Animation Using a Neurobiological Model of Visual Attention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Itti, L; Dhavale, N; Pighin, F

    2003-01-01

    We describe a neurobiological model of visual attention and eye/head movements in primates, and its application to the automatic animation of a realistic virtual human head watching an unconstrained...

  14. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Model-Based Real-Time Head Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ström Jacob

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats real-time tracking of a human head using an analysis by synthesis approach. The work is based on the Structure from Motion (SfM algorithm from Azarbayejani and Pentland (1995. We will analyze the convergence properties of the SfM algorithm for planar objects, and extend it to handle new points. The extended algorithm is then used for head tracking. The system tracks feature points in the image using a texture mapped three-dimensional model of the head. The texture is updated adaptively so that points in the ear region can be tracked when the user′s head is rotated far, allowing out-of-plane rotation of up to without losing track. The covariance of the - and the -coordinates are estimated and forwarded to the Kalman filter, making the tracker robust to occlusion. The system automatically detects tracking failure and reinitializes the algorithm using information gathered in the original initialization process.

  16. Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Anne-Sylvie Catherin has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department with effect from 1 August 2009. Mrs Catherin is a lawyer specialized in International Administration and joined CERN in 1996 as legal advisor within the Office of the HR Department Head. After having been promoted to the position of Group Leader responsible for social and statutory conditions in 2000, Mrs Catherin was appointed Deputy of the Head of the Human Resources Department and Group Leader responsible for Strategy, Management and Development from 2005 to date. Since 2005, she has also served as a member of CCP and TREF. In the execution of her mandate as Deputy HR Department Head, Mrs Catherin closely assisted the HR Department Head in the organization of the Department and in devising new HR policies and strategies. She played an instrumental role in the last five-yearly review and in the revision of the Staff Rules and Regulations.

  17. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam.

  18. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam liner.

  19. A dictionary learning approach for human sperm heads classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Fariba; Monadjemi, S Amirhassan; Alirezaie, Javad; Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad Reza

    2017-12-01

    To diagnose infertility in men, semen analysis is conducted in which sperm morphology is one of the factors that are evaluated. Since manual assessment of sperm morphology is time-consuming and subjective, automatic classification methods are being developed. Automatic classification of sperm heads is a complicated task due to the intra-class differences and inter-class similarities of class objects. In this research, a Dictionary Learning (DL) technique is utilized to construct a dictionary of sperm head shapes. This dictionary is used to classify the sperm heads into four different classes. Square patches are extracted from the sperm head images. Columnized patches from each class of sperm are used to learn class-specific dictionaries. The patches from a test image are reconstructed using each class-specific dictionary and the overall reconstruction error for each class is used to select the best matching class. Average accuracy, precision, recall, and F-score are used to evaluate the classification method. The method is evaluated using two publicly available datasets of human sperm head shapes. The proposed DL based method achieved an average accuracy of 92.2% on the HuSHeM dataset, and an average recall of 62% on the SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS dataset. The results show a significant improvement compared to a previously published shape-feature-based method. We have achieved high-performance results. In addition, our proposed approach offers a more balanced classifier in which all four classes are recognized with high precision and recall. In this paper, we use a Dictionary Learning approach in classifying human sperm heads. It is shown that the Dictionary Learning method is far more effective in classifying human sperm heads than classifiers using shape-based features. Also, a dataset of human sperm head shapes is introduced to facilitate future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. TU-G-204-06: Correlation Between Texture Analysis-Based Model Observer and Human Observer in Diagnosis of Ischemic Infarct in Non-Contrast Head CT of Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B; Fujita, A; Buch, K; Sakai, O [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between texture analysis-based model observer and human observer in the task of diagnosis of ischemic infarct in non-contrast head CT of adults. Methods: Non-contrast head CTs of five patients (2 M, 3 F; 58–83 y) with ischemic infarcts were retro-reconstructed using FBP and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) of various levels (10–100%). Six neuro -radiologists reviewed each image and scored image quality for diagnosing acute infarcts by a 9-point Likert scale in a blinded test. These scores were averaged across the observers to produce the average human observer responses. The chief neuro-radiologist placed multiple ROIs over the infarcts. These ROIs were entered into a texture analysis software package. Forty-two features per image, including 11 GLRL, 5 GLCM, 4 GLGM, 9 Laws, and 13 2-D features, were computed and averaged over the images per dataset. The Fisher-coefficient (ratio of between-class variance to in-class variance) was calculated for each feature to identify the most discriminating features from each matrix that separate the different confidence scores most efficiently. The 15 features with the highest Fisher -coefficient were entered into linear multivariate regression for iterative modeling. Results: Multivariate regression analysis resulted in the best prediction model of the confidence scores after three iterations (df=11, F=11.7, p-value<0.0001). The model predicted scores and human observers were highly correlated (R=0.88, R-sq=0.77). The root-mean-square and maximal residual were 0.21 and 0.44, respectively. The residual scatter plot appeared random, symmetric, and unbiased. Conclusion: For diagnosis of ischemic infarct in non-contrast head CT in adults, the predicted image quality scores from texture analysis-based model observer was highly correlated with that of human observers for various noise levels. Texture-based model observer can characterize image quality of low contrast

  1. The dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 enhances sensitivity to cetuximab in EGFR-resistant human head and neck cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, V; Rosa, R; D'Amato, C; Formisano, L; Marciano, R; Nappi, L; Raimondo, L; Di Mauro, C; Servetto, A; Fusciello, C; Veneziani, B M; De Placido, S; Bianco, R

    2014-06-10

    Cetuximab is the only targeted agent approved for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), but low response rates and disease progression are frequently reported. As the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways have an important role in the pathogenesis of HNSCC, we investigated their involvement in cetuximab resistance. Different human squamous cancer cell lines sensitive or resistant to cetuximab were tested for the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PF-05212384 (PKI-587), alone and in combination, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with PKI-587 enhances sensitivity to cetuximab in vitro, even in the condition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) resistance. The combination of the two drugs inhibits cells survival, impairs the activation of signalling pathways and induces apoptosis. Interestingly, although significant inhibition of proliferation is observed in all cell lines treated with PKI-587 in combination with cetuximab, activation of apoptosis is evident in sensitive but not in resistant cell lines, in which autophagy is pre-eminent. In nude mice xenografted with resistant Kyse30 cells, the combined treatment significantly reduces tumour growth and prolongs mice survival. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition has an important role in the rescue of cetuximab resistance. Different mechanisms of cell death are induced by combined treatment depending on basal anti-EGFR responsiveness.

  2. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  3. Human volunteer head-Tl response for oblique impact conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Cappon, H.J.; Ratingen, M.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The development of modern smart restraint systems requires access to human surrogates with a biofidelic performance, which includes details on timing and local deformations. Therefore volunteer head neck responses for oblique impacts from the Naval BioDynamics Laboratory are re-analysed using a

  4. Enrico Chiaveri, new Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Enrico Chiaveri has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department of with effect from 1st April 2005. A senior physicist, Dr Chiaveri joined CERN in 1973. During his career, he has performed various management roles, including that of Deputy Leader of the SPS/LEP Division, and has acquired extensive experience in human resources matters. Over the transition period up to 1st August 2005 he will gradually relinquish his current functions as Group Leader within the AB Department.

  5. Creating Ultra Dense Point Correspondence Over the Entire Human Head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Marstal, Kasper Korsholm; Laugesen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    While the acquisition and analysis of 3D faces has been an active area of research for decades, it is still a complex and demanding task to accurately model the entire head and ears. Having accurate models would for example enable virtual design of hearing devices. In this paper, we describe a co...

  6. Measurement Evaluation of EMF Effect by Mobile Phone on Human Head Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Psenakova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of electromagnetic field (EMF with environment and with tissue of human beings is still under discussion and many research teams are investigating it. One of electromagnetic devices is mobile phone. There are many simulations and measurements on models or phantoms of human body to biological effect of EMF acquirement. This paper deals with laboratory measurement evaluation of EMF effect by mobile phone on human head phantom.

  7. Targeting ADAM12 in human disease: head, body or tail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J; Wewer, U M

    2009-01-01

    properties. This functional trinity is reflected in the structure of ADAM12, which can be divided into head, body, and tail. The head of the protein (consisting of the pro and catalytic domains) mediates processing of growth factors and cytokines and has been implicated in epidermal growth factor (EGF......) and insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling. The body of the protein (consisting of the disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF-like domains) is involved in contacts with the extracellular matrix and other cells through interactions with integrins and syndecans. Finally, the tail of the protein (consisting...... the possible approaches to targeting ADAM12 in human disease....

  8. Effects of External Loads on Human Head Movement Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M. H.; Choi, O. M.

    1984-01-01

    The central and reflexive control strategies underlying movements were elucidated by studying the effects of external loads on human head movement control systems. Some experimental results are presented on dynamic changes weigh the addition of aviation helmet (SPH4) and lead weights (6 kg). Intended time-optimal movements, their dynamics and electromyographic activity of neck muscles in normal movements, and also in movements made with external weights applied to the head were measured. It was observed that, when the external loads were added, the subject went through complex adapting processes and the head movement trajectory and its derivatives reached steady conditions only after transient adapting period. The steady adapted state was reached after 15 to 20 seconds (i.e., 5 to 6 movements).

  9. Cavitation/boundary effects in a simple head impact model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusholtz, G S; Wylie, B; Glascoe, L G

    1995-07-01

    An experimental and numerical analysis of the impact response of a simple model of the human head is presented. A water-filled 14-cm diameter cylinder was struck by a 10 kg free flying mass. Rigid-body acceleration-time-history and the pressure at the fluid-cylinder interface were monitored during the impact event. Comparisons between the experimental results and the results of a computational model were made. The computational model used is a two-dimensional finite difference code simulating the physical experiment. The code incorporates a thin layer of air and the potential for vaporization along the inside of the cylinder. The study indicates that during a severe impact to the human head, the stresses generated within the brain can result in cavitation on the far side of impact followed by a sudden cavity collapse which can be quite violent. The study identifies how a skull-brain interface and cavitation can potentially affect the internal pressure response of the brain when subjected to a sudden impact.

  10. Development of a Finite Element Head Model for the Study of Impact Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP, brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices.

  11. Development of a finite element head model for the study of impact head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Tse, Kwong-Ming; Chen, Ning; Tan, Long-Bin; Zheng, Qing-Qian; Yang, Hui-Min; Hu, Min; Pan, Gang; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE) human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP), brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices.

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage alters scalp potential distribution in bioimpedance cerebral monitoring: Preliminary results from FEM simulation on a realistic head model and human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Seyed Reza; Seoane, Fernando; Kamalian, Shervin; Rosenthal, Eric S; Lev, Michael H; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Current diagnostic neuroimaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is limited to fixed scanners requiring patient transport and extensive infrastructure support. ICH diagnosis would therefore benefit from a portable diagnostic technology, such as electrical bioimpedance (EBI). Through simulations and patient observation, the authors assessed the influence of unilateral ICH hematomas on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions in order to establish the feasibility of EBI technology as a potential tool for early diagnosis. Finite element method (FEM) simulations and experimental left-right hemispheric scalp potential differences of healthy and damaged brains were compared with respect to the asymmetry caused by ICH lesions on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. In numerical simulations, this asymmetry was measured at 25 kHz and visualized on the scalp as the normalized potential difference between the healthy and ICH damaged models. Proof-of-concept simulations were extended in a pilot study of experimental scalp potential measurements recorded between 0 and 50 kHz with the authors' custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer. Mean left-right scalp potential differences recorded from the frontal, central, and parietal brain regions of ten healthy control and six patients suffering from acute/subacute ICH were compared. The observed differences were measured at the 5% level of significance using the two-sample Welch t-test. The 3D-anatomically accurate FEM simulations showed that the normalized scalp potential difference between the damaged and healthy brain models is zero everywhere on the head surface, except in the vicinity of the lesion, where it can vary up to 5%. The authors' preliminary experimental results also confirmed that the left-right scalp potential difference in patients with ICH (e.g., 64 mV) is significantly larger than in healthy subjects (e.g., 20.8 mV; P potential distributions. Pilot clinical observations with the authors

  13. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happee, Riender; de Bruijn, Edo; Forbes, Patrick A; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2017-06-14

    The human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization, and investigated modulation of the stabilization strategy with the frequency content of trunk perturbations and the presence of visual feedback. We developed a multisegment cervical spine model where reflex gains (VCR and CCR) and neck muscle co-contraction were estimated by fitting the model to the response of young healthy subjects, seated and exposed to anterior-posterior trunk motion, with frequency content from 0.3 up to 1, 2, 4 and 8Hz, with and without visual feedback. The VCR contributed to head-in-space stabilization with a strong reduction of head rotation (1Hz). The CCR contributed to head-on-trunk stabilization with a reduction of head rotation and head translation relative to the trunk (strategies employed during low bandwidth perturbations most effectively reduced head rotation and head relative displacement up to 3Hz while control strategies employed during high bandwidth perturbations reduced head global translation between 1 and 4Hz. This indicates a shift from minimizing head-on-trunk rotation and translation during low bandwidth perturbations to minimizing head-in-space translation during high bandwidth perturbations. Presence of visual feedback had limited effects suggesting increased usage of vestibular feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Probabilistic Mapping of Human Visual Attention from Head Pose Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Veronese

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective interaction between a human and a robot requires the bidirectional perception and interpretation of actions and behavior. While actions can be identified as a directly observable activity, this might not be sufficient to deduce actions in a scene. For example, orienting our face toward a book might suggest the action toward “reading.” For a human observer, this deduction requires the direction of gaze, the object identified as a book and the intersection between gaze and book. With this in mind, we aim to estimate and map human visual attention as directed to a scene, and assess how this relates to the detection of objects and their related actions. In particular, we consider human head pose as measurement to infer the attention of a human engaged in a task and study which prior knowledge should be included in such a detection system. In a user study, we show the successful detection of attention to objects in a typical office task scenario (i.e., reading, working with a computer, studying an object. Our system requires a single external RGB camera for head pose measurements and a pre-recorded 3D point cloud of the environment.

  15. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  16. Finite Element Approach for the Study of Thermoregulation in Human Head Exposed to Cold Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M. A.; Saxena, V. P.

    2009-07-01

    The temperature of outer parts of human head exposed to cold environment shows large variations. In this paper a theoretical model has been envisaged for the comprehensive analysis of thermoregulation in human head which is taken as a divided heterogeneous medium surrounded by natural tissue layers. The model incorporates biochemical reactions concerning heat generation, blood circulation and other biophysical activities. The model obtained in terms of partial differential equations has been treated with the help of finite element method. This results in the estimation of temperature distribution under the influence of (i) atmospheric conditions (ii) cerebral blood circulation with fluctuating flow in scalp. This study leads to the estimation of risk factor analysis in cold environment.

  17. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  18. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  19. MODEL OF VILLAGE HEAD ELECTION ARRANGEMENT IN VILLAGE GOVERNANCE LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekar Anggun Gading Pinilih

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the right model in the arrangement of village head elections after the stipulation of Law No. 6 year 2014 on Village. This research is a normative law research by laws, historical, and conceptual approach. The result shows that a direct and simultaneous election model shall be the solution for the next Village Head Election. Simultaneous election model is designed since it is philosophically considered to make efficiency of the Village Head Elections, in terms of efficiency of budget, time and effort. The principle of this policy is an attempt to create a more equitable simultaneous democratization to minimize the chances of cheating. Since if the elections were not held simultaneously, it would give chance to the outsider to involve. The simultaneous election requires a coherent policy. This coherence will produce an effective synchronization of all types of elections implementation in Indonesia. Keywords: head of village, model, election, arrangement

  20. Head Injury, from Men to Model

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, Willem Aart

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn well developed countries, injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults. In less developed countries the incidence of injury is high and rapidly increasing, but the relative mortality due to injuries is overshadowed by other causes, such as infections and malnutrition. In the United States of America each year approximately 1.000.000 people are treated and released from hospital emergency departments because of head injury. About 80% of patients receivi...

  1. Multi-view interaction modelling of human collaboration processes : A business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuit, M.; Wortmann, J.C.; Szirbik, N.; Roodenburg, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process

  2. Changing head model extent affects finite element predictions of transcranial direct current stimulation distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Schwartz, Benjamin; Sadleir, Rosalind J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In this study, we determined efficient head model sizes relative to predicted current densities in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Approach. Efficiency measures were defined based on a finite element (FE) simulations performed using nine human head models derived from a single MRI data set, having extents varying from 60%-100% of the original axial range. Eleven tissue types, including anisotropic white matter, and three electrode montages (T7-T8, F3-right supraorbital, Cz-Oz) were used in the models. Main results. Reducing head volume extent from 100% to 60%, that is, varying the model’s axial range from between the apex and C3 vertebra to one encompassing only apex to the superior cerebellum, was found to decrease the total modeling time by up to half. Differences between current density predictions in each model were quantified by using a relative difference measure (RDM). Our simulation results showed that {RDM} was the least affected (a maximum of 10% error) for head volumes modeled from the apex to the base of the skull (60%-75% volume). Significance. This finding suggested that the bone could act as a bioelectricity boundary and thus performing FE simulations of tDCS on the human head with models extending beyond the inferior skull may not be necessary in most cases to obtain reasonable precision in current density results.

  3. Using Topic Models to Interpret MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, David; Karimi, Sarvnaz; Cavedon, Lawrence

    We consider the task of interpreting and understanding a taxonomy of classification terms applied to documents in a collection. In particular, we show how unsupervised topic models are useful for interpreting and understanding MeSH, the Medical Subject Headings applied to articles in MEDLINE. We introduce the resampled author model, which captures some of the advantages of both the topic model and the author-topic model. We demonstrate how topic models complement and add to the information conveyed in a traditional listing and description of a subject heading hierarchy.

  4. Modeling transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameter tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Revil, André

    2014-01-01

    We present transient streaming potential data collected during falling-head permeameter tests performed on samples of two sands with different physical and chemical properties. The objective of the work is to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K) and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient (Cl ) of the sand samples. A semi-empirical model based on the falling-head permeameter flow model and electrokinetic coupling is used to analyze the streaming potential data and to estimate K and Cl . The values of K estimated from head data are used to validate the streaming potential method. Estimates of K from streaming potential data closely match those obtained from the associated head data, with less than 10% deviation. The electrokinetic coupling coefficient was estimated from streaming potential vs. (1) time and (2) head data for both sands. The results indicate that, within limits of experimental error, the values of Cl estimated by the two methods are essentially the same. The results of this work demonstrate that a temporal record of the streaming potential response in falling-head permeameter tests can be used to estimate both K and Cl . They further indicate the potential for using transient streaming potential data as a proxy for hydraulic head in hydrogeology applications. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  5. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  6. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Allie K. [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wise-Draper, Trisha M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  7. Modeling and nonlinear heading control for sailing yachts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Lin; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the development and testing of a model-based heading controller for a sailing yacht. Using Fossen's compact notation for marine vehicles, we first describe a nonlinear 4-DOF dynamic model for a sailing yacht, including roll. Starting from this model, we then design...

  8. Modeling and nonlinear heading control for sailing yachts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Lin; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the development and testing of a model-based heading controller for a sailing yacht. Using Fossen’s compact notation for marine vehicles, we first describe a nonlinear four-degree-of-freedom (DOF) dynamic model for a sailing yacht, including roll. Our model also...

  9. Evaluation of a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major cause of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is interruption of a blood supply to the proximal femur. In order to evaluate blood circulation and pathogenetic alterations, a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model was examined to address whether ligature of the femoral neck (vasculature deprivation induces a reduction of blood circulation in the femoral head, and whether transphyseal vessels exist for communications between the epiphysis and the metaphysis. We also tested the hypothesis that the vessels surrounding the femoral neck and the ligamentum teres represent the primary source of blood flow to the femoral head. Methods Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in Yorkshire pigs by transecting the ligamentum teres and placing two ligatures around the femoral neck. After heparinized saline infusion and microfil perfusion via the abdominal aorta, blood circulation in the femoral head was evaluated by optical and CT imaging. Results An angiogram of the microfil casted sample allowed identification of the major blood vessels to the proximal femur including the iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral, deep femoral and circumflex arteries. Optical imaging in the femoral neck showed that a microfil stained vessel network was visible in control sections but less noticeable in necrotic sections. CT images showed a lack of microfil staining in the epiphysis. Furthermore, no transphyseal vessels were observed to link the epiphysis to the metaphysis. Conclusion Optical and CT imaging analyses revealed that in this present pig model the ligatures around the femoral neck were the primary cause of induction of avascular osteonecrosis. Since the vessels surrounding the femoral neck are comprised of the branches of the medial and the lateral femoral circumflex vessels, together with the extracapsular arterial ring and the lateral epiphyseal arteries, augmentation of blood circulation in those arteries will improve

  10. Inverse Modelling to Obtain Head Movement Controller Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, S. H.; Hannaford, B.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally obtained dynamics of time-optimal, horizontal head rotations have previously been simulated by a sixth order, nonlinear model driven by rectangular control signals. Electromyography (EMG) recordings have spects which differ in detail from the theoretical rectangular pulsed control signal. Control signals for time-optimal as well as sub-optimal horizontal head rotations were obtained by means of an inverse modelling procedures. With experimentally measured dynamical data serving as the input, this procedure inverts the model to produce the neurological control signals driving muscles and plant. The relationships between these controller signals, and EMG records should contribute to the understanding of the neurological control of movements.

  11. A head model with anatomical structure for facial modelling and animation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaehler, Kolja

    2003-01-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a virtual head model with anatomical structure. The model is animated in a physical-based manner by use of muscle contractions that in turn cause skin deformations; the simulation is efficient enough to achieve real-time frame rates on current PC hardware. Construction of head models is eased in my approach by deriving new models from a prototype, employing a deformation method that reshapes the complete virtual head structure. Without additional modeling task...

  12. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions Using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, V Carol; Crandall, Jeff R; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-08-15

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of 14 existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degrees-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions substantially over predict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  13. Assessment of thermal effects in a model of the human head implanted with a wireless active microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma creating a filtering bleb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, F.; Guarnieri, F. A.

    2017-05-01

    A 3D anatomical computational model is developed to assess thermal effects due to exposure to the electromagnetic field required to power a new investigational active implantable microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma. Such a device, located in the temporal superior eye quadrant, produces a filtering bleb, which is included in the geometry of the model, together with the relevant ocular structures. The electromagnetic field source—a planar coil—as well as the microvalve antenna and casing are also included. Exposure to the electromagnetic field source of an implanted and a non-implanted subject are simulated by solving a magnetic potential formulation, using the finite element method. The maximum SAR10 is reached in the eyebrow and remains within the limits suggested by the IEEE and ICNIRP standards. The anterior chamber, filtering bleb, iris and ciliary body are the ocular structures where more absorption occurs. The temperature rise distribution is also obtained by solving the bioheat equation with the finite element method. The numerical results are compared with the in vivo measurements obtained from four rabbits implanted with the microvalve and exposed to the electromagnetic field source.

  14. An FDTD model of scattering from meteor head plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Close, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of scattering of radar waves from meteor head plasma. The model treats the meteor head plasma as a cold, collisional, and magnetized plasma, and solves Maxwell's equations and the Langevin equation simultaneously and self-consistently in and around the plasma. We use this model to investigate scattering of radar waves from a meteor head (the "head echo") under a range of plasma densities, meteor scale sizes, and wave frequencies. In this way we relate the radar cross section (RCS) to these variable parameters. We find that computed RCS disagrees with previous analytical theory at certain meteor sizes and densities, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. We find that the calculated meteor head RCS is monotonically related to the "overdense area" of the meteor, defined as the cross-section area of the part of the meteor where the plasma frequency exceeds the wave frequency. These results provides a physical measure of the meteor size and density that can be inferred from measured RCS values from ground-based radars. Meteoroid mass can then be inferred from the meteor plasma distribution using established methods.

  15. Human Papillomavirus Genome Integration and Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinatti, L M; Walline, H M; Carey, T E

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a critical review of human papillomavirus (HPV) integration into the host genome in oral/oropharyngeal cancer, reviewed the literature for HPV-induced cancers, and obtained current data for HPV-related oral and oropharyngeal cancers. In addition, we performed studies to identify HPV integration sites and the relationship of integration to viral-host fusion transcripts and whether integration is required for HPV-associated oncogenesis. Viral integration of HPV into the host genome is not required for the viral life cycle and might not be necessary for cellular transformation, yet HPV integration is frequently reported in cervical and head and neck cancer specimens. Studies of large numbers of early cervical lesions revealed frequent viral integration into gene-poor regions of the host genome with comparatively rare integration into cellular genes, suggesting that integration is a stochastic event and that site of integration may be largely a function of chance. However, more recent studies of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) suggest that integration may represent an additional oncogenic mechanism through direct effects on cancer-related gene expression and generation of hybrid viral-host fusion transcripts. In HNSCC cell lines as well as primary tumors, integration into cancer-related genes leading to gene disruption has been reported. The studies have shown that integration-induced altered gene expression may be associated with tumor recurrence. Evidence from several studies indicates that viral integration into genic regions is accompanied by local amplification, increased expression in some cases, interruption of gene expression, and likely additional oncogenic effects. Similarly, reported examples of viral integration near microRNAs suggest that altered expression of these regulatory molecules may also contribute to oncogenesis. Future work is indicated to identify the mechanisms of these events on cancer cell behavior.

  16. Patient Specific Modeling of Head-Up Tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Nakeya; Wright, Andrew; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Short term cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) experiments involve complex cardiovascular regulation in order to maintain blood pressure at homeostatic levels. This manuscript presents a patient specific compartmental model developed to predict dynamic changes in heart rate and arterial...

  17. Computer model of catalytic combustion/Stirling engine heater head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    The basic Acurex HET code was modified to analyze specific problems for Stirling engine heater head applications. Specifically, the code can model: an adiabatic catalytic monolith reactor, an externally cooled catalytic cylindrical reactor/flat plate reactor, a coannular tube radiatively cooled reactor, and a monolithic reactor radiating to upstream and downstream heat exchangers.

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia for Head & Neck Cancer in Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Wang, Luning; Cheng, Rui; Mao, Leidong; Arnold, Robert D.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Chen, Zhuo G.; Platt, Simon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle induced hyperthermia is applied for treatment of head and neck cancer using a mouse xenograft model of human head and neck cancer (Tu212 cell line). A hyperthermia system for heating iron oxide nanoparticles was developed by using alternating magnetic fields. Both theoretical simulation and experimental studies were performed to verify the thermotherapy effect. Experimental results showed that the temperature of the tumor center has dramatically elevated from around the room temperature to about 40oC within the first 5-10 minutes. Pathological studies demonstrate epithelial tumor cell destruction associated with the hyperthermia treatment. PMID:22287991

  19. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimpf Paul H

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1 Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2 the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3 the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1, as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents

  20. Of lice and math: using models to understand and control populations of head lice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fabiana Laguna

    Full Text Available In this paper we use detailed data about the biology of the head louse (pediculus humanus capitis to build a model of the evolution of head lice colonies. Using theory and computer simulations, we show that the model can be used to assess the impact of the various strategies usually applied to eradicate head lice, both conscious (treatments and unconscious (grooming. In the case of treatments, we study the difference in performance that arises when they are applied in systematic and non-systematic ways. Using some reasonable simplifying assumptions (as random mixing of human groups and the same mobility for all life stages of head lice other than eggs we model the contagion of pediculosis using only one additional parameter. It is shown that this parameter can be tuned to obtain collective infestations whose characteristics are compatible with what is given in the literature on real infestations. We analyze two scenarios: One where group members begin treatment when a similar number of lice are present in each head, and another where there is one individual who starts treatment with a much larger threshold ("superspreader". For both cases we assess the impact of several collective strategies of treatment.

  1. Of lice and math: using models to understand and control populations of head lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, María Fabiana; Laguna, Mara Fabiana; Risau-Gusman, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we use detailed data about the biology of the head louse (pediculus humanus capitis) to build a model of the evolution of head lice colonies. Using theory and computer simulations, we show that the model can be used to assess the impact of the various strategies usually applied to eradicate head lice, both conscious (treatments) and unconscious (grooming). In the case of treatments, we study the difference in performance that arises when they are applied in systematic and non-systematic ways. Using some reasonable simplifying assumptions (as random mixing of human groups and the same mobility for all life stages of head lice other than eggs) we model the contagion of pediculosis using only one additional parameter. It is shown that this parameter can be tuned to obtain collective infestations whose characteristics are compatible with what is given in the literature on real infestations. We analyze two scenarios: One where group members begin treatment when a similar number of lice are present in each head, and another where there is one individual who starts treatment with a much larger threshold ("superspreader"). For both cases we assess the impact of several collective strategies of treatment.

  2. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenzhi Wang

    Full Text Available Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  3. Blood flow and microdialysis in the human femoral head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    ischemia and measure changes in blood flow. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 9 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty for primary osteoarthrosis, two MD catheters were inserted into the femoral head through two drill holes after the blood flow had been visualized by LD. Then primary samples were collected...... with the femoral head in situ; thereafter, the head was removed and samples were collected over the following 4 hours ex vivo. The variables obtained by MD were concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol in extracellular fluid. RESULTS: The results showed development of ischemia...

  4. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Næss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM. We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  5. Detection of bacterial pathogens including potential new species in human head lice from Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzougaghene, Nadia; Fenollar, Florence; Sangaré, Abdoul Karim; Sissoko, Mahamadou S; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    In poor African countries, where no medical and biological facilities are available, the identification of potential emerging pathogens of concern at an early stage is challenging. Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, have a short life, feed only on human blood and do not transmit pathogens to their progeny. They are, therefore, a perfect tool for the xenodiagnosis of current or recent human infection. This study assessed the occurrence of bacterial pathogens from head lice collected in two rural villages from Mali, where a high frequency of head lice infestation had previously been reported, using molecular methods. Results show that all 600 head lice, collected from 117 individuals, belonged to clade E, specific to West Africa. Bartonella quintana, the causative agent of trench fever, was identified in three of the 600 (0.5%) head lice studied. Our study also shows, for the first time, the presence of the DNA of two pathogenic bacteria, namely Coxiella burnetii (5.1%) and Rickettsia aeschlimannii (0.6%), detected in human head lice, as well as the DNA of potential new species from the Anaplasma and Ehrlichia genera of unknown pathogenicity. The finding of several Malian head lice infected with B. quintana, C. burnetii, R. aeschlimannii, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia is alarming and highlights the need for active survey programs to define the public health consequences of the detection of these emerging bacterial pathogens in human head lice.

  6. Head Pose Estimation Using Multilinear Subspace Analysis for Robot Human Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Tonislav; Matthies, Larry; Vasilescu, M. Alex O.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile robots, operating in unconstrained indoor and outdoor environments, would benefit in many ways from perception of the human awareness around them. Knowledge of people's head pose and gaze directions would enable the robot to deduce which people are aware of the its presence, and to predict future motions of the people for better path planning. To make such inferences, requires estimating head pose on facial images that are combination of multiple varying factors, such as identity, appearance, head pose, and illumination. By applying multilinear algebra, the algebra of higher-order tensors, we can separate these factors and estimate head pose regardless of subject's identity or image conditions. Furthermore, we can automatically handle uncertainty in the size of the face and its location. We demonstrate a pipeline of on-the-move detection of pedestrians with a robot stereo vision system, segmentation of the head, and head pose estimation in cluttered urban street scenes.

  7. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  8. Human body and head characteristics as a communication medium for Body Area Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifle, Yonatan; Hun-Seok Kim; Yoo, Jerald

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth investigation of the Body Channel Communication (BCC) under the environment set according to the IEEE 802.15.6 Body Area Network (BAN) standard is conducted to observe and characterize the human body as a communication medium. A thorough measurement of the human head as part of the human channel is also carried out. Human forehead, head to limb, and ear to ear channel is characterized. The channel gain of the human head follows the same bandpass profile of the human torso and limbs with the maximum channel gain occurring at 35MHz. The human body channel gain distribution histogram at given frequencies, while all the other parameters are held constant, exhibits a maximum variation of 2.2dB in the channel gain at the center frequency of the bandpass channel gain profile.

  9. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhen-ge Lei,1,* Xiao-hua Ren,2,* Sha-sha Wang,3 Xin-hua Liang,3,4 Ya-ling Tang3,5 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated to Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 2Department of Stomatology, Sichuan Medical Science Academy and Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, 3State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 5Department of Oral Pathology, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mouse models can closely mimic human oral squamous epithelial carcinogenesis, greatly expand the in vivo research possibilities, and play a critical role in the development of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. With the development of the recent research on the contribution of immunity/inflammation to cancer initiation and progression, mouse models have been divided into two categories, namely, immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models. And thus, this paper will review these two kinds of models applied in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to provide a platform to understand the complicated histological, molecular, and genetic changes of oral squamous epithelial tumorigenesis. Keywords: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, mouse models, immunocompromised models, immunocompetent models, transgenic models

  11. Influence of head models on EEG simulations and inverse source localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haueisen Jens

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., CSF and gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the scalp potentials and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with four different human head models. Methods Four finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1 Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2 the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissue-type model, (3 the Model 3 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivities of gray matter and CSF were set equal to the white matter, i.e., a nine tissue-type model, (4 the Model 4 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. How model complexity influences the EEG source localizations was also studied with the above four finite element models of the head. The lead fields and scalp potentials due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all four models. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. The inverse analysis was performed by adding uncorrelated Gaussian noise to the scalp potentials to achieve a signal to noise ratio (SNR of -10 to 30 dB. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model, as expected, performed the best. The Model 3, which did not have the CSF layer, performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The scalp potentials were also most affected by the lack of CSF geometry in the Model 3. The MLEs for the Model 4 were also

  12. 3D Dynamic Modeling of the Head-Neck Complex for Fast Eye and Head Orientation Movements Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D dynamic computer model for the movement of the head-neck complex is presented. It incorporates anatomically correct information about the diverse elements forming the system. The skeleton is considered as a set of interconnected rigid 3D bodies following the Newton-Euler laws of movement. The muscles are modeled using Enderle's linear model, which shows equivalent dynamic characteristics to Loeb's virtual muscle model. The soft tissues, namely, the ligaments, intervertebral disks, and facet joints, are modeled considering their physiological roles and dynamics. In contrast with other head and neck models developed for safety research, the model is aimed to study the neural control of the complex during fast eye and head movements, such as saccades and gaze shifts. In particular, the time-optimal hypothesis and the feedback control ones are discussed.

  13. Original Research Human papillomavirus in head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNC Project–Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi. 2. Department of Surgery, Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. 3. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. 4. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina, ...

  14. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. USA 97, 9886–9891. Viswanathan H. and Wilson J. A. 2004 Alcohol—the neglected factor in head and neck cancer. Clin. Otolaryngol. 29, 295–300. Vogel U., Hedayati M., Dybdahl M., Grossman L. and Nexo B. A.. 2001 Polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XPD, correlations with risk of basal cell carcinoma revisited.

  15. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair ...

  16. The role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Christel Braemer; Buchwald, Christian von

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing awareness of a subset of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC), i.e. HPV-positive HNSCC. These cancers seem to differ somewhat from HPV-negative HNSCC. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC tend to be younger and have a lower intake of ...

  17. Analysis of SAR distribution in human head of antenna used in wireless power transform based on magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Feixiang; Wei, Zhiqiang; Cong, Yanping; Chi, Haokun; Yin, Bo; Sun, Mingui

    2017-07-20

    In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer antenna system was designed for human head implantable devices. The antenna system used the structure of three plates and four coils and operated at low frequencies to transfer power via near field. In order to verify the electromagnetic radiation safety on the human head, the electromagnetic intensity and specific absorption rate (SAR) were studied by finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. A three-layer model of human head including skin, bone and brain tissues was constructed. The transmitting and receiving antenna were set outside and inside the model. The local and average SAR were simulated at the resonance frequency of 18.67 MHz in two situations, in one scenario both transmitting and receiving coil worked, while in the other scenario only the transmitting coil worked. The results showed that the maximum of 10 g SAR average value of human thoracic were 0.142 W/kg and 0.148 W/kg, respectively, both were lower than the international safety standards for human body of the ICNIRP and FCC, which verified the safety of the human body in wireless power transmission based on magnetic coupling resonance.

  18. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R. (Riender); de Bruijn, E. (Edo); Forbes, P.A. (Patrick A.); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans C.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization,

  19. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; de Bruijn, E.; Forbes, P.A.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2017-01-01

    The human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization, and

  20. Antenna Design and SAR Analysis on Human Head Phantom Simulation for Future Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Felipe Pablo; Bandeira, Joseph Paul; Morisaki, Jorge J; Krishna Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, James; Rizkalla, Maher E

    2017-09-01

    The rapid development of a variety of devices that emit Radiofrequency Electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) has sparked growing interest in their interaction with biological systems and the beneficial effects on human health. As a result, investigations have been driven by the potential for therapeutic applications, as well as concern for any possible negative health implications of these EM energies [1-4]. Recent results have indicated specific tuning of experimental and clinical RF exposure may lead to their clinical application toward beneficial health outcomes [5]. In the current study, a mathematical and computer simulation model to analyze a specific RF-EMF exposure on a human head model was developed. Impetus for this research was derived from results of our previous experiments which revealed that Repeated Electromagnetic Field Stimulation (REMFS) decreased the toxic levels of beta amyloid (Aβ) in neuronal cells, thereby suggesting a new potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Throughout development of the proposed device, experimental variables such as the EM frequency range, specific absorption rate (SAR), penetration depth, and innate properties of different tissues have been carefully considered. RF-EMF exposure to the human head phantom was performed utilizing a Yagi-Uda antenna type possessing high gain (in the order of 10 dbs) at a frequency of 64 MHz and SAR of 0.6 W/Kg. In order to maximize the EM power transmission in one direction, directors were placed in front of the driven element and reflectors were placed behind the driven element. So as to strategically direct the EM field into the center of the brain tissue, while providing field linearity, our analysis considered the field distribution for one versus four antennas. Within the provided dimensions of a typical human brain, results of the Bioheat equation within COMSOL Multiphysics version 5.2a software demonstrated less than a 1 m˚K increase from the

  1. Arrestant Effect of Human Scalp Components on Head Louse (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Insaurralde, Isabel; Ceferino Toloza, Ariel; Gonzalez-Audino, Paola; Inés Picollo, María

    2017-03-01

    Relevant evidence has shown that parasites process host-related information using chemical, visual, tactile, or auditory cues. However, the cues that are involved in the host-parasite interaction between Pediculus humanus capitis (De Geer 1767) and humans have not been identified yet. In this work, we studied the effect of human scalp components on the behavior of adult head lice. Filter paper segments were rubbed on volunteers' scalps and then placed in the experimental arena, where adult head lice were individually tested. The movement of the insects was recorded for each arena using the software EthoVision. Average movement parameters were calculated for the treatments in the bioassays such as total distance, velocity, number of times a head louse crossed between zones of the arena, and time in each zone of the arena. We found that scalp components induced head lice to decrease average locomotor activity and to remain arrested on the treated paper. The effect of the ageing of human scalp samples in the response of head lice was not statistically significant (i.e., human scalp samples of 4, 18, 40, and 60 h of ageing did not elicit a significant change in head louse behavior). When we analyzed the effect of the sex in the response of head lice to human scalp samples, males demonstrated significant differences. Our results showed for the first time the effect of host components conditioning head lice behavior. We discuss the role of these components in the dynamic of head lice infestation. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. 3D head model classification using optimized EGI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Wong, Hau-san; Ma, Bo

    2006-02-01

    With the general availability of 3D digitizers and scanners, 3D graphical models have been used widely in a variety of applications. This has led to the development of search engines for 3D models. Especially, 3D head model classification and retrieval have received more and more attention in view of their many potential applications in criminal identifications, computer animation, movie industry and medical industry. This paper addresses the 3D head model classification problem using 2D subspace analysis methods such as 2D principal component analysis (2D PCA[3]) and 2D fisher discriminant analysis (2DLDA[5]). It takes advantage of the fact that the histogram is a 2D image, and we can extract the most useful information from these 2D images to get a good result accordingingly. As a result, there are two main advantages: First, we can perform less calculation to obtain the same rate of classification; second, we can reduce the dimensionality more than PCA to obtain a higher efficiency.

  3. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  4. A Modified Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Dummy Head Model for Lateral Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rafukka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid III six-year-old (6YO child dummy head model was developed and validated for frontal impact assessment according to the specifications contained in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 572.122, Subpart N by Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC. This work is aimed at improving biofidelity of the head for frontal impact and also extending its application to lateral impact assessment by modifying the head skin viscoelastic properties and validating the head response using the scaled nine-year-old (9YO child cadaver head response recently published in the literature. The modified head model was validated for two drop heights for frontal, right, and left parietal impact locations. Peak resultant acceleration of the modified head model appeared to have good correlation with scaled 9YO child cadaver head response for frontal impact on dropping from 302 mm height and fair correlation with 12.3% difference for 151 mm drop height. Right parietal peak resultant acceleration values correlate well with scaled 9YO head experimental data for 153 mm drop height, while fair correlation with 16.4% difference was noticed for 302 mm drop height. Left parietal, however, shows low biofidelity for the two drop heights as the difference in head acceleration response was within 30%. The modified head model could therefore be used to estimate injuries in vehicle crash for head parietal impact locations which cannot be measured by the current hybrid III dummy head model.

  5. The Effect of Head Model Simplification on Beamformer Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Neugebauer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Beamformers are a widely-used tool in brain analysis with magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG. For the construction of the beamformer filters realistic head volume conductor modeling is necessary for accurately computing the EEG and MEG leadfields, i.e., for solving the EEG and MEG forward problem. In this work, we investigate the influence of including realistic head tissue compartments into a finite element method (FEM model on the beamformer's localization ability. Specifically, we investigate the effect of including cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter distinction, as well as segmenting the skull bone into compacta and spongiosa, and modeling white matter anisotropy. We simulate an interictal epileptic measurement with white sensor noise. Beamformer filters are constructed with unit gain, unit array gain, and unit noise gain constraint. Beamformer source positions are determined by evaluating power and excess sample kurtosis (g2 of the source-waveforms at all source space nodes. For both modalities, we see a strong effect of modeling the cerebrospinal fluid and white and gray matter. Depending on the source position, both effects can each be in the magnitude of centimeters, rendering their modeling necessary for successful localization. Precise skull modeling mainly effected the EEG up to a few millimeters, while both modalities could profit from modeling white matter anisotropy to a smaller extent of 5–10 mm. The unit noise gain or neural activity index beamformer behaves similarly to the array gain beamformer when noise strength is sufficiently high. Variance localization seems more robust against modeling errors than kurtosis.

  6. Evaluation of Head Response to Blast Using Sagittal and Transverse Finite Element Head Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    prediction and evaluation of protection, MASc Thesis, Waterloo, Canada, 2010. [23] Hallquist J.O., LS-DYNA Theory Manual, Livermore, CA, 2006. [24] Visible...Human Project, U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH [25] Greer A., Numerical modeling for the prediction of primary blast injury to the lung, MASc

  7. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  8. HYDROïD humanoid robot head with perception and emotion capabilities :Modeling, Design and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer eAlfayad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the HYDROïD humanoid robot project, this paper describes the modeling and design of an electrically actuated head mechanism. Perception and emotion capabilities are considered in the design process. Since HYDROïD humanoid robot is hydraulically actuated, the choice of electrical actuation for the head mechanism addressed in this paper is justified. Considering perception and emotion capabilities leads to a total number of 15 degrees of freedom for the head mechanism which are split on four main sub-mechanisms: the neck, the mouth, the eyes and the eyebrows. Biological data and kinematics performances of human head are taken as inputs of the design process. A new solution of uncoupled eyes is developed to possibly address the master-slave process that links the human eyes as well as vergence capabilities. Modeling each sub-system is carried out in order to get equations of motion, their frequency responses and their transfer functions. The neck pitch rotation is given as a study example. Then, the head mechanism performances are presented through a comparison between model and experimental results validating the hardware capabilities. Finally, the head mechanism is integrated on the HYDROïD upper-body. An object tracking experiment coupled with emotional expressions is carried out to validate the synchronization of the eye rotations with the body motions.

  9. A Novel Cellular Handset Design for an Enhanced Antenna Performance and a Reduced SAR in the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah I. Al-Mously

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel cellular handset design with a bottom-mounted short loaded-whip antenna. This new handset design is modeled and simulated using a finite difference time-domain (FDTD-based platform SEMCAD. The proposed handset is based on a current commercially available bar-phone type with a curvature shape, keypad positioned above the screen, and top-mounted antenna. The specific absorption rates (SARs are determined computationally in the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM and anatomically correct model of a human head when exposed to the EM-field radiation of the proposed cellular handset and the handset with top-mounted antenna. The two cellular handsets are simulated to operate at both GSM standards, 900 MHz as well as 1800 MHz, having different antenna dimensions and intput power of 0.6 W and 0.125 W, respectively. The proposed human hand holding the two handset models is a semirealistic hand model consists of three tissues: skin, muscle, and bone. The simulations are conducted with handset positions based on the IEEE standard 1528-2003. The results show that the proposed handset has a significant improvement of antenna efficiency when it is hand-held close to head, as compared with the handset of top-mounted antenna. Also, the results show that a significant reduction of the induced SAR in the human head-tissues can be achieved with the proposed handset.

  10. Mechanics of blast loading on the head models in the study of traumatic brain injury using experimental and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganpule, S; Alai, A; Plougonven, E; Chandra, N

    2013-06-01

    Blast waves generated by improvised explosive devices can cause mild, moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in soldiers and civilians. To understand the interactions of blast waves on the head and brain and to identify the mechanisms of injury, compression-driven air shock tubes are extensively used in laboratory settings to simulate the field conditions. The overall goal of this effort is to understand the mechanics of blast wave-head interactions as the blast wave traverses the head/brain continuum. Toward this goal, surrogate head model is subjected to well-controlled blast wave profile in the shock tube environment, and the results are analyzed using combined experimental and numerical approaches. The validated numerical models are then used to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of stresses and pressure in the human skull and brain. By detailing the results from a series of careful experiments and numerical simulations, this paper demonstrates that: (1) Geometry of the head governs the flow dynamics around the head which in turn determines the net mechanical load on the head. (2) Biomechanical loading of the brain is governed by direct wave transmission, structural deformations, and wave reflections from tissue-material interfaces. (3) Deformation and stress analysis of the skull and brain show that skull flexure and tissue cavitation are possible mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  11. Eye-head stabilization mechanism for a humanoid robot tested on human inertial data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannucci, Lorenzo; Falotico, Egidio; Tolu, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Two main classes of reflexes relying on the vestibular system are involved in the stabilization of the human gaze: the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes the head in space and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which stabilizes the visual axis to minimize retinal image motion. Together...... torso disturbance acquired on human subject performing various locomotion tasks confirm the effectiveness of our approach....

  12. Neural constraints on eye motion in human eye-head saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misslisch, H; Tweed, D; Vilis, T

    1998-02-01

    We examined two ways in which the neural control system for eye-head saccades constrains the motion of the eye in the head. The first constraint involves Listing's law, which holds ocular torsion at zero during head-fixed saccades. During eye-head saccades, does this law govern the eye's motion in space or in the head? Our subjects, instructed to saccade between space-fixed targets with the head held still in different positions, systematically violated Listing's law of the eye in space in a way that approximately, but not perfectly, preserved Listing's law of the eye in head. This finding implies that the brain does not compute desired eye position based on the desired gaze direction alone but also considers head position. The second constraint we studied was saturation, the process where desired-eye-position commands in the brain are "clipped" to keep them within an effective oculomotor range (EOMR), which is smaller than the mechanical range of eye motion. We studied the adaptability of the EOMR by asking subjects to make head-only saccades. As predicted by current eye-head models, subjects failed to hold their eyes still in their orbits. Unexpectedly, though, the range of eye-in-head motion in the horizontal-vertical plane was on average 31% smaller in area than during normal eye-head saccades, suggesting that the EOMR had been reduced by effort of will. Larger reductions were possible with altered visual input: when subjects donned pinhole glasses, the EOMR immediately shrank by 80%. But even with its reduced EOMR, the eye still moved into the "blind" region beyond the pinhole aperture during eye-head saccades. Then, as the head movement brought the saccade target toward the pinhole, the eyes reversed their motion, anticipating or roughly matching the target's motion even though it was still outside the pinhole and therefore invisible. This finding shows that the backward rotation of the eye is timed by internal computations, not by vision. When subjects wore

  13. Epilepsy after head injury in dogs: a natural model of posttraumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Sonja; Tipold, Andrea; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    In humans, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of acquired (symptomatic) epilepsy, but as yet there is no treatment to prevent the development of epilepsy after TBI. Animal models of posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) are important to characterize epileptogenic mechanisms of TBI and to identify clinically effective antiepileptogenic treatments. The prevalence and phenomenology of naturally occurring canine epilepsy are similar to those in human epilepsy. However, the risk of epilepsy after TBI has not been systemically studied in dogs. We therefore performed a large retrospective study in 1,000 dogs referred to our clinical department over a period of 11.5 years with the aim to determine the incidence of early and late seizures after head trauma in this species. Two strategies were used: in group I (n = 392), we evaluated whether dogs referred for the treatment of a head trauma (group Ia) or other trauma (group Ib) developed seizures after the trauma, whereas in group II (n = 608) we evaluated whether dogs referred for the treatment of recurrent epileptic seizures had a history of head trauma. Data for this study were obtained from our clinical database, questionnaires sent to the dogs' owners, and owner interviews. In group Ia, 6.6% of the dogs developed PTE, which was significantly different from group Ib (1.9%), indicating that head trauma increased the risk of developing epilepsy by a factor of 3.4. The risk of PTE increased with severity of TBI; 14.3% of the dogs with skull fracture developed PTE. In group II, 15.5% of the dogs with epilepsy had a history of head injury, which was significantly higher than the incidence of PTE determined for group Ia. Our study indicates that head trauma in dogs is associated with a significant risk of developing epilepsy. Therefore, dogs with severe TBI are an interesting natural model of PTE that provides a novel translational platform for studies on human PTE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013

  14. Alexander's law during high-acceleration head rotations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Evangelos; Heimberger, Joachim; Sklavos, Sokratis; Anastasopoulos, Dimitri

    2011-03-30

    Alexander's law states that the amplitude of the spontaneous nystagmus grows with increasing gaze in the direction of the fast phase. Using the search-coil method we employed head impulses at various eye-in-orbit azimuth angles to test (i) whether the normal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in the behaviorally relevant high-frequency range has intrinsic properties that could account for Alexander's law and (ii) whether such properties can also be shown in patients with unilateral vestibulopathy. We showed that the gain of the VOR remained unaffected by eye-in-orbit position in contols and in patients, both on ipsilesional and contralesional stimuli. These findings suggest that eye-in-orbit position does not directly modulate the activity in VOR pathways, neither during unbalanced but reciprocal (in controls), nor during unbalanced and nonreciprocal natural vestibular stimulation (in patients).

  15. Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program's service model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( N = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program's comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children's pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Policy implications for Head Start are discussed.

  16. Human head orientation and eye visibility as indicators of attention for goats (Capra hircus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nawroth

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Animals domesticated for working closely with humans (e.g. dogs have been shown to be remarkable in adjusting their behaviour to human attentional stance. However, there is little evidence for this form of information perception in species domesticated for production rather than companionship. We tested domestic ungulates (goats for their ability to differentiate attentional states of humans. In the first experiment, we investigated the effect of body and head orientation of one human experimenter on approach behaviour by goats. Test subjects (N = 24 significantly changed their behaviour when the experimenter turned its back to the subjects, but did not take into account head orientation alone. In the second experiment, goats (N = 24 could choose to approach one of two experimenters, while only one was paying attention to them. Goats preferred to approach humans that oriented their body and head towards the subject, whereas head orientation alone had no effect on choice behaviour. In the third experiment, goats (N = 32 were transferred to a separate test arena and were rewarded for approaching two experimenters providing a food reward during training trials. In subsequent probe test trials, goats had to choose between the two experimenters differing in their attentional states. Like in Experiments 1 and 2, goats did not show a preference for the attentive person when the inattentive person turned her head away from the subject. In this last experiment, goats preferred to approach the attentive person compared to a person who closed their eyes or covered the whole face with a blind. However, goats showed no preference when one person covered only the eyes. Our results show that animals bred for production rather than companionship show differences in their approach and choice behaviour depending on human attentive state. However, our results contrast with previous findings regarding the use of the head orientation to attribute attention and show

  17. Computational human body models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Computational human body models are widely used for automotive crashsafety research and design and as such have significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic injuries and fatalities. Currently crash simulations are mainly performed using models based on crash-dummies. However crash dummies

  18. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  19. Covariation between human pelvis shape, stature, and head size alleviates the obstetric dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2015-05-05

    Compared with other primates, childbirth is remarkably difficult in humans because the head of a human neonate is large relative to the birth-relevant dimensions of the maternal pelvis. It seems puzzling that females have not evolved wider pelvises despite the high maternal mortality and morbidity risk connected to childbirth. Despite this seeming lack of change in average pelvic morphology, we show that humans have evolved a complex link between pelvis shape, stature, and head circumference that was not recognized before. The identified covariance patterns contribute to ameliorate the "obstetric dilemma." Females with a large head, who are likely to give birth to neonates with a large head, possess birth canals that are shaped to better accommodate large-headed neonates. Short females with an increased risk of cephalopelvic mismatch possess a rounder inlet, which is beneficial for obstetrics. We suggest that these covariances have evolved by the strong correlational selection resulting from childbirth. Although males are not subject to obstetric selection, they also show part of these association patterns, indicating a genetic-developmental origin of integration.

  20. Deformable human body model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  1. A Cardiovascular Mathematical Model of Graded Head-Up Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Einly; Chan, Gregory S. H.; Dokos, Socrates; Ng, Siew C.; Latif, Lydia A.; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Karunanithi, Mohan; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2013-01-01

    A lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system has been developed and optimized using experimental data obtained from 13 healthy subjects during graded head-up tilt (HUT) from the supine position to . The model includes descriptions of the left and right heart, direct ventricular interaction through the septum and pericardium, the systemic and pulmonary circulations, nonlinear pressure volume relationship of the lower body compartment, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, as well as autoregulatory mechanisms. A number of important features, including the separate effects of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, and autoregulation in the lower body, as well as diastolic ventricular interaction through the pericardium have been included and tested for their significance. Furthermore, the individual effect of parameter associated with heart failure, including LV and RV contractility, baseline systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, total blood volume, LV diastolic stiffness and reflex gain on HUT response have also been investigated. Our fitted model compares favorably with our experimental measurements and published literature at a range of tilt angles, in terms of both global and regional hemodynamic variables. Compared to the normal condition, a simulated congestive heart failure condition produced a blunted response to HUT with regards to the percentage changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, end diastolic volume and effector response (i.e., heart contractility, venous unstressed volume, systemic vascular resistance and heart rate) with progressive tilting. PMID:24204817

  2. A cardiovascular mathematical model of graded head-up tilt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einly Lim

    Full Text Available A lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system has been developed and optimized using experimental data obtained from 13 healthy subjects during graded head-up tilt (HUT from the supine position to [Formula: see text]. The model includes descriptions of the left and right heart, direct ventricular interaction through the septum and pericardium, the systemic and pulmonary circulations, nonlinear pressure volume relationship of the lower body compartment, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, as well as autoregulatory mechanisms. A number of important features, including the separate effects of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, and autoregulation in the lower body, as well as diastolic ventricular interaction through the pericardium have been included and tested for their significance. Furthermore, the individual effect of parameter associated with heart failure, including LV and RV contractility, baseline systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, total blood volume, LV diastolic stiffness and reflex gain on HUT response have also been investigated. Our fitted model compares favorably with our experimental measurements and published literature at a range of tilt angles, in terms of both global and regional hemodynamic variables. Compared to the normal condition, a simulated congestive heart failure condition produced a blunted response to HUT with regards to the percentage changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, end diastolic volume and effector response (i.e., heart contractility, venous unstressed volume, systemic vascular resistance and heart rate with progressive tilting.

  3. The six degrees of freedom motion of the human head, spine, and pelvis in a frontal impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valdes, F J; Riley, P O; Lessley, D J; Arbogast, K B; Seacrist, T; Balasubramanian, S; Maltese, M; Kent, R

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the in situ 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics of the head, 3 vertebrae (T1, T8, and L2), and the pelvis in a 40 km/h frontal impact. Three postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) were exposed to a deceleration of 15 g over 125 ms and the motion of selected anatomical structures (head, T1, T8, L2, and pelvis) was tracked at 1000 Hz using an optoelectric stereophotogrammetric system. Displacements of the analyzed structures are reported in the sagittal and the transverse planes. Rotations of the structures are described using the finite helical axis of the motion. Anterior displacements were 530.5 ± 39.4 mm (head), 434.7 ± 20.0 mm (T1), 353.3 ± 29.6 mm (T8), 219.9 ± 19.3 mm (L2), and 78.9 ± 22.1 mm (pelvis). The ratio between peak anterior and lateral displacement was up to 19 percent (T1) and 26 percent (head). Magnitudes of the rotation of the head (69.9 ± 1.5°), lumbar (66.5 ± 9.1°), and pelvis (63.8 ± 11.8°) were greater than that of the thoracic vertebrae (T1: 49.1 ± 7.8°; T8: 47.7 ± 6.3°). Thoracic vertebrae exhibited a complex rotation behavior caused by the asymmetric loading of the shoulder belt. Rotation of the lumbar vertebra and pelvis occurred primarily within the sagittal plane (flexion). Despite the predominance of the sagittal motion of the occupant in a pure (12 o'clock) frontal impact, the asymmetry of belt loading induced other relevant displacements and rotations of the head and thoracic spine. Attempts to model occupant kinematics in a frontal impact should consider these results to biofidelically describe the interaction of the torso with the belt.

  4. A Study Of EMR And SAR Distribution In Human Head Phantom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    power of 0.32W for both simulations were well below the limit of 1.6 W/kg of ICNIRP standard and FCC/IEEE standard of 2W/kg. Keywords: Electromagnetic radiation (EMR), Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), Electromagnetic simulation software (FEKO emss), Radio frequency field, human head, mobile phone, mobile phone ...

  5. Penerapan Strategi Numbered Head Together dalam Setting Model Pembelajaran STAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mifta Fausan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the increase of motivation and biology student learning outcomes through the implementation of Numbered Head Together (NHT strategies in setting Student Teams Achievement Division (STAD learning model based Lesson Study (LS. Subjects in this study were students of class X IS 1 MAN 3 Malang. Implementation this study consisted of two cycles and each cycle consisted of three meetings. The data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis of qualitative and quantitative descriptive statistics. The research instrument used is the observation sheet, test, monitoring LS sheets and questionnaires. The results of this study indicate that through the implementation of NHT strategy in setting STAD learning model based LS can improve motivation and learning outcomes biology students. Students' motivation in the first cycle of 69% and increased in the second cycle of 86%. While the cognitive learning, classical completeness in the first cycle of 74% and increased in the second cycle to 93%. Affective learning outcomes of students in the first cycle by 93% and increased in the second cycle to 100%. Furthermore, psychomotor learning outcomes of students also increased from 74% in the first cycle to 93% in the second cycle.

  6. Measuring Blast-Related Intracranial Pressure Within the Human Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    4 Pressure sensors Commercially available sensors from Endevco (models 8515C and 8530C), FISO Technologies (FOP-MIV model) and PCB...monitoring of the ambient overpressure at the target was provided by a pressure probe that contained two Endevco sensors placed frontally and sideon with...pressure sensor measuring the static component of the shock wave in air along the tube; (B) pressure sensor using Endevco sensor to measure static and

  7. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  8. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E; Northrup, Nicole C; Dobbin, Kevin K; Shin, Dong M; Zhao, Shaying

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling), and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  9. Muecas: a multi-sensor robotic head for affective human robot interaction and imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Felipe; Moreno, Jose; Bustos, Pablo; Núñez, Pedro

    2014-04-28

    This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, including eyes, eyebrows, mouth and neck, and has been designed and built entirely by IADeX (Engineering, Automation and Design of Extremadura) and RoboLab. A detailed description of its kinematics is provided along with the design of the most complex controllers. Muecas can be directly controlled by FACS (Facial Action Coding System), the de facto standard for facial expression recognition and synthesis. This feature facilitates its use by third party platforms and encourages the development of imitation and of goal-based systems. Imitation systems learn from the user, while goal-based ones use planning techniques to drive the user towards a final desired state. To show the flexibility and reliability of the robotic head, the paper presents a software architecture that is able to detect, recognize, classify and generate facial expressions in real time using FACS. This system has been implemented using the robotics framework, RoboComp, which provides hardware-independent access to the sensors in the head. Finally, the paper presents experimental results showing the real-time functioning of the whole system, including recognition and imitation of human facial expressions.

  10. Muecas: A Multi-Sensor Robotic Head for Affective Human Robot Interaction and Imitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, including eyes, eyebrows, mouth and neck, and has been designed and built entirely by IADeX (Engineering, Automation and Design of Extremadura and RoboLab. A detailed description of its kinematics is provided along with the design of the most complex controllers. Muecas can be directly controlled by FACS (Facial Action Coding System, the de facto standard for facial expression recognition and synthesis. This feature facilitates its use by third party platforms and encourages the development of imitation and of goal-based systems. Imitation systems learn from the user, while goal-based ones use planning techniques to drive the user towards a final desired state. To show the flexibility and reliability of the robotic head, the paper presents a software architecture that is able to detect, recognize, classify and generate facial expressions in real time using FACS. This system has been implemented using the robotics framework, RoboComp, which provides hardware-independent access to the sensors in the head. Finally, the paper presents experimental results showing the real-time functioning of the whole system, including recognition and imitation of human facial expressions.

  11. Application of Richards\\'s growth model to Brown-headed Parrot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of Richards\\'s growth model to Brown-headed Parrot Poicephalus cryptoxanthus nestlings. ... Stuart Taylor, Michael R Perrin. Abstract. We generated a generalised growth curve for the Brown-headed Parrot Poicephalus cryptoxanthus. The growth model correlated well with the data from captive-bred chicks and ...

  12. A Statistical Model of Head Asymmetry in Infants with Deformational Plagiocephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanche, Stéphanie; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2007-01-01

    of each infant's head, and again employed to estimate the improvement of asym- metry after the helmet therapy. A statistical model of head asymmetry was developed (PCA). The main modes of variation were in good agreement with clinical observations, and the model provided an excellent and instructive...... quantitative description of the asymmetry present in the dataset....

  13. Human Papillomavirus Status and the Risk of Cerebrovascular Events Following Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Daniel; Seidelmann, Sara B; Janjua, Sumbal A; Emami, Hamed; Staziaki, Pedro V; Hallett, Travis R; Szilveszter, Bálint; Lu, Michael T; Cambria, Richard P; Hoffmann, Udo; Chan, Annie W; Wirth, Lori J; Neilan, Tomas G

    2017-08-30

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment for head and neck cancer; however, it is associated with inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, and cerebrovascular events (CVEs; stroke or transient ischemic attack). Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in nearly half of head and neck cancers and is associated with inflammation and atherosclerosis. Whether HPV confers an increased risk of CVEs after RT is unknown. Using an institutional database, we identified all consecutive patients treated with RT from 2002 to 2012 for head and neck cancer who were tested for HPV. The outcome of interest was the composite of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack, and the association between HPV and CVEs was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models, competing risk analysis, and inverse probability weighting. Overall, 326 participants who underwent RT for head and neck cancer were tested for HPV (age 59±12 years, 75% were male, 9% had diabetes mellitus, 45% had hypertension, and 61% were smokers), of which 191 (59%) were tumor HPV positive. Traditional risk factors for CVEs were similar between HPV-positive and -negative patients. Over a median follow-up of 3.4 years, there were 18 ischemic strokes and 5 transient ischemic attacks (event rate of 1.8% per year). The annual event rate was higher in the HPV-positive patients compared with the HPV-negative patients (2.6% versus 0.9%, P=0.002). In a multivariable model, HPV-positive status was associated with a >4 times increased risk of CVEs (hazard ratio: 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-13.2; P=0.008). In this study, HPV-positive status is associated with an increased risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack following RT for head and neck cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Human eye-head gaze shifts preserve their accuracy and spatiotemporal trajectory profiles despite long-duration torque perturbations that assist or oppose head motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Mathieu; Galiana, Henrietta L; Guitton, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Humans routinely use coordinated eye-head gaze saccades to rapidly and accurately redirect the line of sight (Land MF. Vis Neurosci 26: 51-62, 2009). With a fixed body, the gaze control system combines visual, vestibular, and neck proprioceptive sensory information and coordinates two moving platforms, the eyes and head. Classic engineering tools have investigated the structure of motor systems by testing their ability to compensate for perturbations. When a reaching movement of the hand is subjected to an unexpected force field of random direction and strength, the trajectory is deviated and its final position is inaccurate. Here, we found that the gaze control system behaves differently. We perturbed horizontal gaze shifts with long-duration torques applied to the head that unpredictably either assisted or opposed head motion and very significantly altered the intended head trajectory. We found, as others have with brief head perturbations, that gaze accuracy was preserved. Unexpectedly, we found also that the eye compensated well--with saccadic and rollback movements--for long-duration head perturbations such that resulting gaze trajectories remained close to that when the head was not perturbed. However, the ocular compensation was best when torques assisted, compared with opposed, head motion. If the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) is suppressed during gaze shifts, as currently thought, what caused invariant gaze trajectories and accuracy, early eye-direction reversals, and asymmetric compensations? We propose three mechanisms: a gaze feedback loop that generates a gaze-position error signal; a vestibular-to-oculomotor signal that dissociates self-generated from passively imposed head motion; and a saturation element that limits orbital eye excursion.

  15. A Kinematic Model for 3-D Head-Free Gaze-Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi eDaemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rotations of the line of sight are mainly implemented by coordinated motion of the eyes and head. Here, we propose a model for the kinematics of three-dimensional (3-D head-unrestrained gaze-shifts. The model was designed to account for major principles in the known behavior, such as gaze accuracy, spatiotemporal coordination of saccades with vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, relative eye and head contributions, the non-commutativity of rotations, and Listing’s and Fick constraints for the eyes and head respectively. The internal design of the model was inspired by known and hypothesized elements of gaze control physiology. Inputs included retinocentric location of the visual target and internal representations of initial 3-D eye and head orientation, whereas outputs were 3-D displacements of eye relative to the head and head relative to shoulder. Internal transformations decomposed the 2-D gaze command into 3-D eye and head commands with the use of three coordinated circuits: 1 a saccade generator, 2 a head rotation generator, 3 a VOR predictor. Simulations illustrate that the model can implement: 1 the correct 3-D reference frame transformations to generate accurate gaze shifts (despite variability in other parameters, 2 the experimentally verified constraints on static eye and head orientations during fixation, and 3 the experimentally observed 3-D trajectories of eye and head motion during gaze-shifts. We then use this model to simulate how 2-D eye-head coordination strategies interact with 3-D constraints to influence 3-D orientations of the eye-in-space, and the implications of this for spatial vision.

  16. The population of coloured fibres in human head hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R; Oliver, S

    2004-01-01

    In 2002 a population study of textile fibres in human hair was carried out using 26 volunteers in Cambridgeshire, UK. Over 12,000 fibres were recovered from a variety of hair lengths using low adhesive tape and classified according to colour, generic type and fibre length. The results of the study showed that the most common fibre colours were black/grey (48%), blue (29.1%) and red (12.7%), the least common being green, orange/brown and yellow which each accounted for less than 5% of the total. Natural fibres (mainly cotton) were predominant (72.3%) and man-made fibres were considerably less frequent. When colour and generic type were classified together, the most common combinations were black and blue cottons. The least common were the man-made fibre/colour combinations with the most frequent of these accounting for less than 7% of the sample. Fibre loads carried by long hair were found to be significantly less than that carried by short hair. The results of this study are in accordance with previous fibre population studies using other types of recipient surfaces and are likely to be influenced by factors such as seasonal and geographical variation.

  17. Physical properties of the human head: mass, center of gravity and moment of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Zhang, Jiangyue; Baisden, Jamie L

    2009-06-19

    This paper presents a synthesis of biomedical investigations of the human head with specific reference to certain aspects of physical properties and development of anthropometry data, leading to the advancement of dummies used in crashworthiness research. As a significant majority of the studies have been summarized as reports, an effort has been made to chronologically review the literature with the above objectives. The first part is devoted to early studies wherein the mass, center of gravity (CG), and moment of inertia (MOI) properties are obtained from human cadaver experiments. Unembalmed and preserved whole-body and isolated head and head-neck experiments are discussed. Acknowledging that the current version of the Hybrid III dummy is the most widely used anthropomorphic test device in motor vehicle crashworthiness research for frontal impact applications for over 30 years, bases for the mass and MOI-related data used in the dummy are discussed. Since the development and federalization of the dummy in the United States, description of methods used to arrive at these properties form a part of the manuscript. Studies subsequent to the development of this dummy including those from the US Military are also discussed. As the head and neck are coupled in any impact, and increasing improvements in technology such as advanced airbags, and pre-tensioners and load limiters in manual seatbelts affect the kinetics of the head-neck complex, the manuscript underscores the need to pursue studies to precisely determine all the physical properties of the head. Because the most critical parameters (locations of CG and occipital condyles (OC), mass, and MOI) have not been determined on a specimen-by-specimen basis in any single study, it is important to gather these data in future experiments. These critical data will be of value for improving occupant safety, designing advanced restraint systems, developing second generation dummies, and assessing the injury mitigating

  18. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  19. Correcting electrode modelling errors in EIT on realistic 3D head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Markus; Avery, James; Malone, Emma; Holder, David; Betcke, Timo

    2015-12-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising medical imaging technique which could aid differentiation of haemorrhagic from ischaemic stroke in an ambulance. One challenge in EIT is the ill-posed nature of the image reconstruction, i.e., that small measurement or modelling errors can result in large image artefacts. It is therefore important that reconstruction algorithms are improved with regard to stability to modelling errors. We identify that wrongly modelled electrode positions constitute one of the biggest sources of image artefacts in head EIT. Therefore, the use of the Fréchet derivative on the electrode boundaries in a realistic three-dimensional head model is investigated, in order to reconstruct electrode movements simultaneously to conductivity changes. We show a fast implementation and analyse the performance of electrode position reconstructions in time-difference and absolute imaging for simulated and experimental voltages. Reconstructing the electrode positions and conductivities simultaneously increased the image quality significantly in the presence of electrode movement.

  20. Continuous wave simulations on the propagation of electromagnetic fields through the human head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloian, Jeffrey M; Noetscher, Gregory M; Makarov, Sergey N; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-06-01

    Characterizing the human head as a propagation medium is vital for the design of both on-body and implanted antennas and radio-frequency sensors. The following problem has been addressed: find the best radio-frequency path through the brain for a given receiver position-on the top of the sinus cavity. Two parameters, transmitter position and radiating frequency, should be optimized simultaneously such that 1) the propagation path through the brain is the longest; and 2) the received power is maximized. To solve this problem, we have performed a systematic and comprehensive study of the electromagnetic fields excited in the head by small on-body magnetic dipoles (small coil antennas). An anatomically accurate high-fidelity head mesh has been generated from the Visible Human Project data. The base radiator was constructed of two orthogonal magnetic dipoles in quadrature, which enables us to create a directive beam into the head. We have found at least one optimum solution. This solution implies that a distinct RF channel may be established in the brain at a certain frequency and transmitter location.

  1. A domestic porcine model for studying the effects of radiation on head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christoph R; Kloss, Frank; Singh, Sarvpreet; Vasiljevic, Danijela; Stigler, Robert; Auberger, Thomas; Wenzel, Volker; Klima, Günter; Lukas, Peter; Lepperdinger, Günter; Gassner, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) of the head and neck region is often accompanied by serious side effects. Research in this area is needed to improve treatment outcomes and ameliorate therapy tolerance. Laboratory rodents are barely matching today's clinical standards in RT research. Yet domestic swine (Sus scrofa domestica) have previously proved suitable for various advanced tests in clinical research and training. We therefore investigated whether S. scrofa domestica is also appropriate for irradiation of the mandible. A common scheme for irradiation treatment of S. scrofa domestica mandibles in a split-mouth design was acquired by applying computed tomography (CT) scanning under sedation. Basing on close anatomic resemblance, a standard treatment plan comprising 2 opposed irradiation fields could be accomplished. RT was carried out in a clinical environment with 2 × 9 Gy. The resulting operating procedure facilitated complication-free sedation, transport, positioning, CT scanning, and effective irradiation. Based on common standards applied for RT in humans, domestic pigs can be employed to progress RT clinical research. Due to their human-like anatomy, physiology, size, and weight, the swine model is expedient for advancing experimental RT of the head and neck area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  3. Environmental Anchoring of Head Direction in a Computational Model of Retrosplenial Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanski, Andrej; Burgess, Neil

    2016-11-16

    Allocentric (world-centered) spatial codes driven by path integration accumulate error unless reset by environmental sensory inputs that are necessarily egocentric (body-centered). Previous models of the head direction system avoided the necessary transformation between egocentric and allocentric reference frames by placing visual cues at infinity. Here we present a model of head direction coding that copes with exclusively proximal cues by making use of a conjunctive representation of head direction and location in retrosplenial cortex. Egocentric landmark bearing of proximal cues, which changes with location, is mapped onto this retrosplenial representation. The model avoids distortions due to parallax, which occur in simple models when a single proximal cue card is used, and can also accommodate multiple cues, suggesting how it can generalize to arbitrary sensory environments. It provides a functional account of the anatomical distribution of head direction cells along Papez' circuit, of place-by-direction coding in retrosplenial cortex, the anatomical connection from the anterior thalamic nuclei to retrosplenial cortex, and the involvement of retrosplenial cortex in navigation. In addition to parallax correction, the same mechanism allows for continuity of head direction coding between connected environments, and shows how a head direction representation can be stabilized by a single within arena cue. We also make predictions for drift during exploration of a new environment, the effects of hippocampal lesions on retrosplenial cells, and on head direction coding in differently shaped environments. The activity of head direction cells signals the direction of an animal's head relative to landmarks in the world. Although driven by internal estimates of head movements, head direction cells must be kept aligned to the external world by sensory inputs, which arrive in the reference frame of the sensory receptors. We present a computational model, which proposes that

  4. Design, Realization and Experiments with a new RF Head Probe Coil for Human Vocal Tract Imaging in an NMR device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibil, J.; Gogola, D.; Dermek, T.; Frollo, I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is nowadays widely used in medicine for diagnostic imaging and in research studies. The modeling of the human vocal tract acoustics has recently attracted considerable interest. This paper describes the design, realization and first MR scan experiments with a new head probe coil for vocal tract imaging in the open-air MRI equipment working in a weak magnetic field up to 0.2 T. The paper also describes an experimental setting for sound recording during the MR imaging.

  5. A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in 'framing' the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwendoline Ixia; Holton, Mark D; Walker, James; Jones, Mark W; Grundy, Ed; Davies, Ian M; Clarke, David; Luckman, Adrian; Russill, Nick; Wilson, Vianney; Plummer, Rosie; Wilson, Rory P

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat) unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer's head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between -80° and 60°, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25° with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between -43° and 0°). Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between -0.00187°/0.1 s and 0.00187°/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between -0.3141°/0.1 s and 0.01263°/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being 'framed' by people in relation to environmental content.

  6. A Success Story: The Evaluation of Four Head Start Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Soledad; Trujillo, Lorenzo A.

    An evaluation was made of four Head Start bilingual/ multicultural curriculum models to assess their effectiveness and impact on children, staff, and parents. Intended as a pre-post design (with 90 children at each of eight Head Start replication sites and with treatment and control groups stratified on the basis of Spanish or English language…

  7. Infinite-impulse-response models of the head-related transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhijit; Colburn, H. Steven

    2004-04-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) measured from human subjects were approximated using infinite-impulse-response (IIR) filter models. Models were restricted to rational transfer functions (plus simple delays) so that specific models are characterized by the locations of poles and zeros in the complex plane. The all-pole case (with no nontrivial zeros) is treated first using the theory of linear prediction. Then the general pole-zero model is derived using a weighted-least-squares (WLS) formulation of the modified least-squares problem proposed by Kalman (1958). Both estimation algorithms are based on solutions of sets of linear equations and result in efficient computational schemes to find low-order model HRTFs. The validity of each of these two low-order models was assessed in psychophysical experiments. Specifically, a four-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm was used to test the discriminability of virtual stimuli constructed from empirical and model HRTFs for corresponding locations. For these experiments, the stimuli were 80 ms, noise tokens generated from a wideband noise generator. Results show that sounds synthesized through model HRTFs were indistinguishable from sounds synthesized from original HRTF measurements for the majority of positions tested. The advantages of the techniques described here are the computational efficiencies achieved for low-order IIR models. Properties of the all-pole and pole-zero estimators are discussed in the context of low-order HRTF representations, and implications for basic and applied contexts are considered.

  8. The Realistic Versus the Spherical Head Model in EEG Dipole Source Analysis in the Presence of Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanrumste, Bart

    2001-01-01

    .... For 27 electrodes, an EEG epoch of one time sample and spatially white Gaussian noise we found that the importance of the realistic head model over the spherical head model reduces by increasing the noise level.

  9. A novel device for head gesture measurement system in combination with eye-controlled human machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Ho, Chien-Wa; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Hung, San-Shan; Shei, Hung-Jung; Yeh, Mau-Shiun

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the design and combination of an eye-controlled and a head-controlled human-machine interface system. This system is a highly effective human-machine interface, detecting head movement by changing positions and numbers of light sources on the head. When the users utilize the head-mounted display to browse a computer screen, the system will catch the images of the user's eyes with CCD cameras, which can also measure the angle and position of the light sources. In the eye-tracking system, the program in the computer will locate each center point of the pupils in the images, and record the information on moving traces and pupil diameters. In the head gesture measurement system, the user wears a double-source eyeglass frame, so the system catches images of the user's head by using a CCD camera in front of the user. The computer program will locate the center point of the head, transferring it to the screen coordinates, and then the user can control the cursor by head motions. We combine the eye-controlled and head-controlled human-machine interface system for the virtual reality applications.

  10. Three-dimensional computer-generated head model reconstructed from cephalograms, facial photographs, and dental cast models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasima, Akihiko; Terajima, Masahiko; Mori, Noriko; Hoshino, Yoshihiro; Tokumori, Kenji; Aoki, Yoshimitu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the human craniofacial structure have been constructed with computed tomography (CT). However, the high cost of CT and the radiation exposure are drawbacks to this method. Attempts to create a 3D reconstruction from lateral and frontal cephalograms have failed because of problems with magnification, distortion, and limitations of landmark identification, among others. We introduce a new method that creates a standard head model for a patient from anatomic measurement points extracted from x-ray images, facial stereo photographs, and dental casts. To obtain precise 3D coordinates from cephalograms, several equations were introduced to compensate for radiographic image magnification and distortion. By comparing the constructed model and 3D-CT images, this method proved to be accurate. It is possible to produce a 3D head model on a personal computer and to view it from any desired angle; this will provide easy-to-understand information for patients and establish a diagnostic or therapeutic method for communication with other health care providers.

  11. Modeling length-tension properties of RCPm muscles during voluntary retraction of the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    Head retraction exercises are one of several commonly used clinical tools that are used to assess and treat patients with head and neck pain and to aid in restoration of a normal neutral head posture. Retraction of the head results in flexion of the occipitoatlantal (OA) joint and stretching of rectus capitis posterior minor (RCPm) muscles. The role that retraction of the head might have in treating head and neck pain patients is currently unknown. RCPm muscles arise from the posterior tubercle of the posterior arch of C1 and insert into the occipital bone inferior to the inferior nuchal line and lateral to the midline. RCPm muscles are the only muscles that attach to the posterior arch of C1. The functional role of RCPm muscles has not been clearly defined. The goal of this project was to develop a three-dimensional, computer-based biomechanical model of the posterior aspect of the OA joint. This model should help clarify why voluntary head retraction exercises seem to contribute to the resolution of head and neck pain and restoration of a normal head posture in some patients. The model documents that length-tension properties of RCPm muscles are significantly affected by variations in the physical properties of the musculotendonous unit. The model suggests that variations in the cross sectional area of RCPm muscles due to pathologies that weaken the muscle, such as muscle atrophy, may reduce the ability of these muscles to generate levels of force that are necessary for the performance of normal, daily activities. The model suggests that the main benefit of the initial phase of head retraction exercises may be to strengthen RCPm muscles through eccentric contractions, and that the main benefit of the final phase of retraction may be to stretch the muscles as the final position is held. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. C. Dohmen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  13. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, Amy J. C.; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  14. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohmen, Amy J. C., E-mail: a.dohmen@nki.nl [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Swartz, Justin E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Willems, Stefan M. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Spijker, René [Medical library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DE (Netherlands); Dutch Cochrane Centre, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Neefjes, Jacques [Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Zuur, Charlotte L. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)

    2015-08-28

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  15. Rotating and translating anthropomorphic head voxel models to establish an horizontal Frankfort plane for dental CBCT Monte Carlo simulations: a dose comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, A.; Zhang, G.; Jacobs, R.; Bogaerts, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2016-12-01

    In order to carry out Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry studies, voxel phantoms, modeling human anatomy, and organ-based segmentation of CT image data sets are applied to simulation frameworks. The resulting voxel phantoms preserve patient CT acquisition geometry; in the case of head voxel models built upon head CT images, the head support with which CT scanners are equipped introduces an inclination to the head, and hence to the head voxel model. In dental cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, patients are always positioned in such a way that the Frankfort line is horizontal, implying that there is no head inclination. The orientation of the head is important, as it influences the distance of critical radiosensitive organs like the thyroid and the esophagus from the x-ray tube. This work aims to propose a procedure to adjust head voxel phantom orientation, and to investigate the impact of head inclination on organ doses in dental CBCT MC dosimetry studies. The female adult ICRP, and three in-house-built paediatric voxel phantoms were in this study. An EGSnrc MC framework was employed to simulate two commonly used protocols; a Morita Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT scanner (FOVs: 60  ×  60 mm2 and 80  ×  80 mm2, standard resolution), and a 3D Teeth protocol (FOV: 100  ×  90 mm2) in a Planmeca Promax 3D MAX scanner. Result analysis revealed large absorbed organ dose differences in radiosensitive organs between the original and the geometrically corrected voxel models of this study, ranging from  -45.6% to 39.3%. Therefore, accurate dental CBCT MC dose calculations require geometrical adjustments to be applied to head voxel models.

  16. Efficacy of visor and helmet for blast protection assessed using a computational head model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Cronin, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Head injury resulting from blast exposure has been identified as a challenge that may be addressed, in part, through improved protective systems. Existing detailed head models validated for blast loading were applied to investigate the influence of helmet visor configuration, liner properties, and shell material stiffness. Response metrics including head acceleration and intracranial pressures (ICPs) generated in brain tissue during primary blast exposure were used to assess and compare helmet configurations. The addition of a visor was found to reduce peak head acceleration and positive ICPs. However, negative ICPs associated with a potential for injury were increased when a visor and a foam liner were present. In general, the foam liner material was found to be more significant in affecting the negative ICP response than positive ICP or acceleration. Shell stiffness was found to have relatively small effects on either metric. A strap suspension system, modeled as an air gap between the head and helmet, was more effective in reducing response metrics compared to a foam liner. In cases with a foam liner, lower-density foam offered a greater reduction of negative ICPs. The models demonstrated the "underwash" effect in cases where no foam liner was present; however, the reflected pressures generated between the helmet and head did not translate to significant ICPs in adjacent tissue, when compared to peak ICPs from initial blast wave interaction. This study demonstrated that the efficacy of head protection can be expressed in terms of load transmission pathways when assessed with a detailed computational model.

  17. Locations of hydraulic-head observations (HOBS) for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the well locations for hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient hydrologic model of the Central Valley flow...

  18. Genetic progression model for head and neck cancer: implications for field cancerization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Califano, J; van der Riet, P; Westra, W; Nawroz, H; Clayman, G; Piantadosi, S; Corio, R; Lee, D; Greenberg, B; Koch, W; Sidransky, D

    1996-01-01

    A genetic progression model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has not yet been elucidated, and the genetic basis for "field cancerization" of the aerodigestive tract has also remained obscure...

  19. A Head in Virtual Reality: Development of A Dynamic Head and Neck Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngan; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in computer and interface technologies have made it possible to create three-dimensional (3D) computerized models of anatomical structures for visualization, manipulation, and interaction in a virtual 3D environment. In the past few decades, a multitude of digital models have been developed to facilitate complex spatial learning of the…

  20. A Novel Instrumented Human Head Surrogate for the Impact Evaluation of Helmets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Petrone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel Human Head Surrogate was obtained from available MRI scans of a 50th percentile male human head. Addictive manufacturing was used to produce the skull, the brain and the skin. All original MRI geometries were partially smoothed and adjusted to provide the best biofidelity compatible with printing and molding technology. The skull was 3D-printed in ABS and ten pressure sensors were placed into it. The brain surrogate was cast from silicon rubber in the 3D-printed plastic molds. Nine tri-axial accelerometers (placed at the tops of the lobes, at the sides of the lobes, in the cerebellum and in the center of mass and a three-axis gyroscope (at the center of mass were inserted into the silicon brain during casting. The cranium, after assembly with brain, was filled with silicon oil mimicking the cerebral fluid. Silicon rubber was cast in additional 3D-printed molds to form the skin surrounding the cranium. The skull base was adapted to be compatible with the Hybrid-III neck and allow the exit of brain sensors cabling. Preliminary experiments were carried out proving the functionality of the surrogate. Results showed how multiple accelerometers and pressure sensors allowed a better comprehension of the head complex motion during impacts.

  1. Human Preferences for Conformation Attributes and Head-And-Neck Positions in Horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina L Caspar

    Full Text Available Human preferences for certain morphological attributes among domestic animals may be entirely individual or, more generally, may reflect evolutionary pressures that favor certain conformation. Artificial selection for attributes, such as short heads and crested necks of horses, may have functional and welfare implications because there is evidence from other species that skull shape co-varies with behaviour. Crested necks can be accentuated by flexion of the neck, a quality that is often manipulated in photographs vendors use when selling horses. Equine head-and-neck positions acquired through rein tension can compromise welfare. Our investigation was designed to identify conformations and postures that people are attracted to when choosing their 'ideal' horse. Participants of an internet survey were asked to rate their preference for horse silhouettes that illustrated three gradations of five variables: facial shape, crest height, ear length, ear position and head-and-neck carriage. There were 1,234 usable responses. The results show that overall preferences are for the intermediate, rather than extreme, morphological choices (p=<0.001. They also indicate that males are 2.5 times less likely to prefer thicker necks rather than the intermediate shape, and 4 times more likely to prefer the thinner neck shape. When compared to the novice participants, experienced participants were 1.9 times more likely to prefer a thicker neck shape than the intermediate neck shape and 2.8 times less likely to prefer a thinner neck shape than the intermediate neck shape. There was overall preference of 93% (n=939 for the category of head carriage 'In front of the vertical'. However, novice participants were 1.8 times more likely to choose 'behind the vertical' than 'in front of the vertical'. Our results suggest that people prefer a natural head carriage, concave facial profile (dished face, larger ears and thicker necks. From these survey data, it seems that some

  2. Human Preferences for Conformation Attributes and Head-And-Neck Positions in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Human preferences for certain morphological attributes among domestic animals may be entirely individual or, more generally, may reflect evolutionary pressures that favor certain conformation. Artificial selection for attributes, such as short heads and crested necks of horses, may have functional and welfare implications because there is evidence from other species that skull shape co-varies with behaviour. Crested necks can be accentuated by flexion of the neck, a quality that is often manipulated in photographs vendors use when selling horses. Equine head-and-neck positions acquired through rein tension can compromise welfare. Our investigation was designed to identify conformations and postures that people are attracted to when choosing their ‘ideal’ horse. Participants of an internet survey were asked to rate their preference for horse silhouettes that illustrated three gradations of five variables: facial shape, crest height, ear length, ear position and head-and-neck carriage. There were 1,234 usable responses. The results show that overall preferences are for the intermediate, rather than extreme, morphological choices (p=necks rather than the intermediate shape, and 4 times more likely to prefer the thinner neck shape. When compared to the novice participants, experienced participants were 1.9 times more likely to prefer a thicker neck shape than the intermediate neck shape and 2.8 times less likely to prefer a thinner neck shape than the intermediate neck shape. There was overall preference of 93% (n=939) for the category of head carriage ‘In front of the vertical’. However, novice participants were 1.8 times more likely to choose ‘behind the vertical’ than ‘in front of the vertical’. Our results suggest that people prefer a natural head carriage, concave facial profile (dished face), larger ears and thicker necks. From these survey data, it seems that some innate preferences may run counter to horse health and welfare. PMID:26126209

  3. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnett, Eric; Palma, Kathleen G; Clayton, Bert; Ballard, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    .... All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival...

  4. Heads of household programme in Argentina: a human rights-based policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina, Jorge; Giordano, Osvaldo; Torres, Alejandra; Cárdenas, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    This study analyses the consultative councils (CC) of the Argentinian conditional cash transfer heads of household programme as an institutional innovation directed to put into practice some of the principles of the human rights' approach for eradicating poverty. Since the main responsibilities assigned to the CCs coincided with some of the main principles of the human rights' approach, the research is focused on how CCs responded in practice. Using a case study methodology we show that even when, in theory, the CCs incorporate some of the principles of the human rights' approach to the programme, they deviated from this purpose due to a persistent phenomenon in the social policy arena in developing countries: political clientelism. Policy recommendations are formulated in order to deal with clientelism in the framework of the human rights' approach.

  5. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  6. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  7. Modeling Human Leukemia Immunotherapy in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The currently available human tumor xenograft models permit modeling of human cancers in vivo, but in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a humanized mouse (hu-mouse model made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue plus hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a leukemia-associated fusion gene MLL-AF9. In addition to normal human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution as seen in non-leukemic hu-mice, these hu-mice showed spontaneous development of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, which was transplantable to secondary recipients with an autologous human immune system. Using this model, we show that lymphopenia markedly improves the antitumor efficacy of recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI, a GVHD-free immunotherapy that induces antitumor responses in association with rejection of donor chimerism in mixed allogeneic chimeras. Our data demonstrate the potential of this leukemic hu-mouse model in modeling leukemia immunotherapy, and suggest that RLI may offer a safe treatment option for leukemia patients with severe lymphopenia.

  8. Crowd modeling framework using fast head detection and shape-aware matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Jie; Loza, Artur; Bhaskar, Harish; Al-Mualla, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    A framework for crowd modeling using a combination of multiple kernel learning (MKL)-based fast head detection and shape-aware matching is proposed. First, the MKL technique is used to train a classifier for head detection using a combination of the histogram of oriented gradient and local binary patterns feature sets. Further, the head detection process is accelerated by implementing the classification procedure only at those spatial locations in the image where the gradient points overlap with moving objects. Such moving objects are determined using an adaptive background subtraction technique. Finally, the crowd is modeled as a deformable shape through connected boundary points (head detection) and matched with the subsequent detection from the next frame in a shape-aware manner. Experimental results obtained from crowded videos show that the proposed framework, while being characterized by a low computation load, performs better than other state-of-art techniques and results in reliable crowd modeling.

  9. A multiscale analysis of blast impact mitigation on the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Daniel Bryan

    The effectiveness of helmets in preventing shrapnel wounds and internal damage due to blast shock waves has been studied. Carbon nanotubes and similar nanostructures have also recently generated heightened interest due to their strength-to-weight ratio and other unique properties. Therefore, to understand and develop a helmet with improved protection, it is necessary to develop computational procedures that will enable the accurate modeling of traumatic head injuries as well as the precise measurement of the mechanical properties of nanostructures and how these characteristics behave when embedded as an advanced composite structure into a helmet. In this study, a multiscale simulation strategy is used to estimate the mechanical characteristics of advanced composite structures with embedded nanostructures. In most of the previous theoretical works, an analysis dedicated to improving the design of the helmet using composite structures was not included due to a lack of understanding of the interactions of the nanostructures with the matrix materials. In this work, the role of the helmet on the over pressurization and impulse experienced by the head during blast shock wave and blunt force trauma due to shrapnel impacts is studied. In addition, the properties of nanocomposite structures are estimated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and then scaled to the macroscopic level using continuum mechanic formulations. This modeling is further developed using Finite Element (FE) analysis to demonstrate the effectiveness of various types of nanostructures in energy absorption. An analysis is carried out on a model of an unprotected head to compare the results to those obtained when protected by a helmet containing different nanostructures. The developed multiscale model is used to improve the composition of helmets and the general understanding of the effects of blast shock wave and shrapnel impacts thereby leading to the mitigation and prevention of traumatic head

  10. Hand effect on head specific absorption rate (SAR) exposed by two realistic phone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.

    2013-04-01

    There have been some reports about possible effect of the hand presence on the head SAR if hand phantom is included in the measurements of the head SAR compliance assessment procedure. The objective of this computational study was to examine the reported effect by using realistic head models and realistic CAD based phone models. A commercially available FDTD based EM solver was used to carry out the computational work. Based on the results of this study considering the SAR values without hand phantom as reference, following conclusions can be made: 1. In general presence of the hand lead to significantly less conservative SAR values in the head for large majority of cases 2. For lower band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~70%. 3. For the upper band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~55%. Based on the results of this study the present SAR compliance protocol where hand phantom is not included leads to more conservative head SAR results compared to the cases where hand is included.

  11. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of nose-to-ceiling head positioning for sphenoid sinus irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, John R; Palmer, James N; Zhao, Kai

    2017-05-01

    After sinus surgery, patients are commonly instructed to irrigate with saline irrigations with their heads over a sink and noses directed inferiorly (nose-to-floor). Although irrigations can penetrate the sinuses in this head position, no study has assessed whether sphenoid sinus penetration can be improved by irrigating with the nose directed superiorly (nose-to-ceiling). The purpose of this study was to use a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of sinus irrigations to assess the difference in sphenoid sinus delivery of irrigations after irrigating in a nose-to-floor vs nose-to-ceiling head position. Bilateral maxillary antrostomies, total ethmoidectomies, wide sphenoidotomies, and a Draf III frontal sinusotomy were performed on a single fresh cadaver head. CFD models were created from postoperative computed tomography maxillofacial scans. CFD modeling software was used to simulate a 120-mL irrigation to the left nasal cavity with the following parameters: flow rate 30 mL/second, angle of irrigation 20 degrees to the nasal floor, and either nose-to-floor or nose-to-ceiling head positioning. In the postoperative CFD models, the sphenoid sinuses were completely penetrated by the irrigation while in a nose-to-ceiling head position. However, no sphenoid sinus penetration occurred in the nose-to-floor position. Other sinuses were similarly penetrated in both head positions, although the ipsilateral maxillary sinus was less penetrated in the nose-to-ceiling position. CFD modeling demonstrated that the nose-to-ceiling head position was superior to the nose-to-floor position in delivering a 120-mL irrigation to the sphenoid sinuses. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  12. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleli Tôrres Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX, of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects.

  13. A 32-Channel Head Coil Array with Circularly Symmetric Geometry for Accelerated Human Brain Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Chu

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to optimize a 32-channel head coil array for accelerated 3T human brain proton MRI using either a Cartesian or a radial k-space trajectory. Coils had curved trapezoidal shapes and were arranged in a circular symmetry (CS geometry. Coils were optimally overlapped to reduce mutual inductance. Low-noise pre-amplifiers were used to further decouple between coils. The SNR and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were compared to results from a head coil array with a soccer-ball (SB geometry. The maximal SNR in the CS array was about 120% (1070 vs. 892 and 62% (303 vs. 488 of the SB array at the periphery and the center of the FOV on a transverse plane, respectively. In one-dimensional 4-fold acceleration, the CS array has higher averaged SNR than the SB array across the whole FOV. Compared to the SB array, the CS array has a smaller g-factor at head periphery in all accelerated acquisitions. Reconstructed images using a radial k-space trajectory show that the CS array has a smaller error than the SB array in 2- to 5-fold accelerations.

  14. Induced magnetic force in human heads exposed to 4 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Wang, Gene-Jack; Goldstein, Rita Z; Caparelli, Elisabeth C; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Tomasi, Dardo

    2010-04-01

    To map the distribution of the magnetic force induced in the human head during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 4 T for a large group of healthy volunteers. The magnetic field distribution in the head of 100 men and 18 women was mapped using phase mapping techniques. Statistical parametric mapping methods using a family-wise error (FWE) corrected threshold P magnetic force. The strength of the magnetic force density in the head was lower than 11.5 +/- 5.3 N/m(3) (right eyeball). The strength of the magnetic force density induced in occipital cortex varied linearly with the x-rotation (pitch) angle. We found that the induced magnetic force is highly significant in the eyeballs, orbitofrontal and temporal cortices, subcallosal gyrus, anterior cingulate as well as midbrain and brainstem (pons), regardless of subjects' age or gender. The maximum induced magnetic force was 6 x 10(5) times weaker than the gravitational force; thus, biological effects of the magnetic force during imaging are not expected to be significant. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The morphology of the human lymphatic vessels in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei-Ren; le Roux, Cara Michelle; Levy, Sidney M; Briggs, Christopher A

    2010-09-01

    Previously little has been written about the morphology of the human lymphatic vessels since Sappey (Sappey [1874] Anatomie, Physiologie, Pathologie des Vaisseaux Lymphatiques, Paris: Adrien Delahaye) over 100 years ago. There needs to be an accurate re-evaluation of scientific observations to aid clinical management. Forty-nine combinations of tissue from the head and neck of 20 unembalmed human cadavers were studied. Six percent hydrogen peroxide was used to find the vessels. They were injected with radio-opaque mixture, dissected, photographed, and radiographed. Final results were transferred to the computer for analysis. Different sized lymphatic valves were found in the precollecting and collecting lymph vessels, the lymphatic trunks, and ducts. The intervals between the valves were of various lengths. Diverse lymphatic ampullae and diverticula were seen in precollecting and collecting lymph vessels. Initial lymph vessels arose from the dermis, the galea, and the mucosal membrane. The vasculature of the direct and indirect precollecting and collecting lymph vessels, lymphatic trunks, and ducts was recorded. The morphology of the human lymphatic vessels in the head and neck has been described and recorded using radiographs and photographs.

  16. Correction for human head motion in helical x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-H.; Sun, T.; Alcheikh, A. R.; Kuncic, Z.; Nuyts, J.; Fulton, R.

    2016-02-01

    Correction for rigid object motion in helical CT can be achieved by reconstructing from a modified source-detector orbit, determined by the object motion during the scan. This ensures that all projections are consistent, but it does not guarantee that the projections are complete in the sense of being sufficient for exact reconstruction. We have previously shown with phantom measurements that motion-corrected helical CT scans can suffer from data-insufficiency, in particular for severe motions and at high pitch. To study whether such data-insufficiency artefacts could also affect the motion-corrected CT images of patients undergoing head CT scans, we used an optical motion tracking system to record the head movements of 10 healthy volunteers while they executed each of the 4 different types of motion (‘no’, slight, moderate and severe) for 60 s. From these data we simulated 354 motion-affected CT scans of a voxelized human head phantom and reconstructed them with and without motion correction. For each simulation, motion-corrected (MC) images were compared with the motion-free reference, by visual inspection and with quantitative similarity metrics. Motion correction improved similarity metrics in all simulations. Of the 270 simulations performed with moderate or less motion, only 2 resulted in visible residual artefacts in the MC images. The maximum range of motion in these simulations would encompass that encountered in the vast majority of clinical scans. With severe motion, residual artefacts were observed in about 60% of the simulations. We also evaluated a new method of mapping local data sufficiency based on the degree to which Tuy’s condition is locally satisfied, and observed that areas with high Tuy values corresponded to the locations of residual artefacts in the MC images. We conclude that our method can provide accurate and artefact-free MC images with most types of head motion likely to be encountered in CT imaging, provided that the motion can

  17. Correction for human head motion in helical x-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Sun, T; Alcheikh, A R; Kuncic, Z; Nuyts, J; Fulton, R

    2016-02-21

    Correction for rigid object motion in helical CT can be achieved by reconstructing from a modified source-detector orbit, determined by the object motion during the scan. This ensures that all projections are consistent, but it does not guarantee that the projections are complete in the sense of being sufficient for exact reconstruction. We have previously shown with phantom measurements that motion-corrected helical CT scans can suffer from data-insufficiency, in particular for severe motions and at high pitch. To study whether such data-insufficiency artefacts could also affect the motion-corrected CT images of patients undergoing head CT scans, we used an optical motion tracking system to record the head movements of 10 healthy volunteers while they executed each of the 4 different types of motion ('no', slight, moderate and severe) for 60 s. From these data we simulated 354 motion-affected CT scans of a voxelized human head phantom and reconstructed them with and without motion correction. For each simulation, motion-corrected (MC) images were compared with the motion-free reference, by visual inspection and with quantitative similarity metrics. Motion correction improved similarity metrics in all simulations. Of the 270 simulations performed with moderate or less motion, only 2 resulted in visible residual artefacts in the MC images. The maximum range of motion in these simulations would encompass that encountered in the vast majority of clinical scans. With severe motion, residual artefacts were observed in about 60% of the simulations. We also evaluated a new method of mapping local data sufficiency based on the degree to which Tuy's condition is locally satisfied, and observed that areas with high Tuy values corresponded to the locations of residual artefacts in the MC images. We conclude that our method can provide accurate and artefact-free MC images with most types of head motion likely to be encountered in CT imaging, provided that the motion can be

  18. Human head lice and pubic lice reveal the presence of several Acinetobacter species in Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana, Nassima; Louni, Meriem; Parola, Philippe; Bitam, Idir

    2017-08-01

    There are two majorspecies of medically important lice that parasitize humans: Phthirus pubis, found in pubic hair, and Pediculus humanus. Pediculus humanus consists of two eco types that live in specific niches on the human host: body lice (Pediculus humanus humanus), found on the human body and clothing, and head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis), found on the scalp. To date, only body lice are known to be vectors of human disease; however, it has recently been reported that the DNA of several bacterial agents has been detected in head lice, raising questions about their role in the transmission of pathogens. This issue caught our attention, in addition to the fact that the pathogenic bacteria associated with P. pubis and P. humanus capitis have never been investigated in Algeria. To investigate this,molecular techniques (real-time PCR) were used to screen for the presence of Acinetobacter spp., Bartonella spp., Borrelia spp. and Rickettsia prowazekii DNA from P. humanus capitis (64 lice) collected from schoolchildren,and P. pubis (4 lice),collected from one adultman living in Algiers. Positive samples for Acinetobacter spp.were identified by sequencing therpoBgene. Conventional PCR targeting the partial Cytb gene was used to determine the phylogenetic clade of the collected lice. Of the 64 samples collected, Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in 17/64 (27%) of head lice, identified as: A. baumannii (14%), A. johnsonii (11%) and A. variabilis (2%). Of the four P. pubissamples, 2(50%) were positive for A. johnsonii. The phylogenetic tree based on the Cytb gene revealed that P. humanus capitis were grouped into clades A and B. In this study, we report andidentify for the first time Acinetobacter spp.in Algerian P. pubis and P. humanus capitis. The detection of the genus Acinetobacter in lice should not be underestimated, especially in P. humanus capitis, which is distributed worldwide. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine if human lice

  19. Localized specific absorption rate in the human head in metal-framed spectacles for 1.5GHz hand-held mobile telephones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Joko, T.; Fujikawa, O. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Enhancements of the localized specific absorption rate (SAR) caused by metal-framed spectacles are analyzed numerically for 1.5 GHz hand-held mobile telephones. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and an anatomically based human head model are employed in the analysis. Enhancements up to 1.2 times for the ten-gram-averaged spatial peak SAR in the head and up to 2.75 times for the one-gram-averaged SAR in the eye are found, whereas there is no significant variation on the absorbed power or averaged SAR in the whole head. The mechanism of localized SAR enhancement is clarified to be due to an induced current on the metal frame. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Eric

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown clinically to cure 82% of patients with only a 10-minute treatment time, repeated once after 7 days. All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival. When the protective wax is disrupted, water loss becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, leading to dehydration and death. A specific pattern of hydrocarbons has been found in all of the head louse cuticular wax studied. Iso-octane effectively removes these hydrocarbons from human head lice’s cuticular wax. Methods A method of head louse cuticle wax extraction and analysis by gas chromatography was developed. Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis were collected from infested patients and subjected to any of three extraction solvents comprising either the test product or one of two solvents introduced as controls. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID was used to determine the presence of hydrocarbons in the three head lice extracts. Results In the study reported herein, the test product isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 (IPM/D5 was shown to perform comparably with iso-octane, effectively extracting the target hydrocarbons from the cuticular wax that coats the human head louse exoskeleton. Conclusions Disruption of the integrity of the insect cuticle by removal of specific hydrocarbons found in the cuticular wax

  1. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Eric; Palma, Kathleen G; Clayton, Bert; Ballard, Timothy

    2012-09-03

    In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown clinically to cure 82% of patients with only a 10-minute treatment time, repeated once after 7 days. All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival. When the protective wax is disrupted, water loss becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, leading to dehydration and death. A specific pattern of hydrocarbons has been found in all of the head louse cuticular wax studied. Iso-octane effectively removes these hydrocarbons from human head lice's cuticular wax. A method of head louse cuticle wax extraction and analysis by gas chromatography was developed. Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) were collected from infested patients and subjected to any of three extraction solvents comprising either the test product or one of two solvents introduced as controls. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID) was used to determine the presence of hydrocarbons in the three head lice extracts. In the study reported herein, the test product isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 (IPM/D5) was shown to perform comparably with iso-octane, effectively extracting the target hydrocarbons from the cuticular wax that coats the human head louse exoskeleton. Disruption of the integrity of the insect cuticle by removal of specific hydrocarbons found in the cuticular wax appears to offer a mechanism for killing lice without the

  2. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  3. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    , which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...

  4. Physical scale modeling of single free head piles under lateral loading in cohesive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Leonardo Salamanca-Medina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the small scale modeling of free head wood piles under horizontal loading in cohesive soils, tested in order to compare the results with analytical models proposed by various authors. Characteristic Load (CLM and P-Y Curves methods were used for the prediction of lateral deflections at the head of the piles and the method proposed by Broms for estimating the ultimate lateral load. These predictions were compared with the results of the physical modeling, obtaining a good approximation between them.

  5. Development of Head Injury Assessment Reference Values Based on NASA Injury Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Melvin, John W.; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Granderson, Bradley; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Patalak, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a new capsule-based, crewed vehicle that will land in the ocean, and the space agency desires to reduce the risk of injury from impact during these landings. Because landing impact occurs for each flight and the crew might need to perform egress tasks, current injury assessment reference values (IARV) were deemed insufficient. Because NASCAR occupant restraint systems are more effective than the systems used to determine the current IARVs and are similar to NASA s proposed restraint system, an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new IARVs that may be more relevant to NASA s context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by completing a detailed analysis of all of the 2002-2008 NASCAR impact data. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to select 4071 impacts from the 4015 recorder files provided (each file could contain multiple impact events). Of the 4071 accepted impacts, 274 were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Humanetics Hybrid-III 50th percentile numerical dummy model in LS-DYNA. Injury had occurred in 32 of the 274 selected impacts, and 27 of those injuries involved the head. A majority of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 242 non-injury impacts were randomly selected and representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of 4071 impacts. Head dynamics data (head translational acceleration, translational change in velocity, rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, HIC-15, HIC-36, and the Head 3ms clip) were filtered according to SAE J211 specifications and then transformed to a log scale. The probability of head injury was estimated using a separate logistic regression analysis for each log-transformed predictor candidate. Using the log transformation constrains the estimated probability of injury to become negligible as IARVs approach

  6. Mathematical model of mechanical parts interconnected electric drives of head and lift in rock digger

    OpenAIRE

    Zavyalov, V. М.; Semykina, I. Yu.

    2007-01-01

    The need for development of new approach to modelling lift and head electric drives of quarry digger in the process of digging has been justified. The differences of the mathematical model suggested from the traditional approach are shown. The disadvantages of existing control systems in digger electric drives are revealed, the method of their removing is proposed.

  7. Novel Profiling Model and Side Effects of Helical Scan Silicon Heads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hozoi, A.; Groenland, J.P.J.; Albertini, J.B.; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Partial erasure of track edges was directly measured from triple-track patterns using a novel model to interpret the output profiles. The model is based on representing the read head as the sum of a reference width, wavelength independent, and two side reading effective widths that are wavelength

  8. Head-to-head comparison of adaptive statistical and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms for submillisievert coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Dominik C; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gräni, Christoph; Studer Bruengger, Annina A; Clerc, Olivier F; Mikulicic, Fran; Messerli, Michael; Stehli, Julia; Possner, Mathias; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Buechel, Ronny R

    2017-02-15

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms allow for a significant reduction in radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We performed a head-to-head comparison of adaptive statistical IR (ASiR) and model-based IR (MBIR) algorithms to assess their impact on quantitative image parameters and diagnostic accuracy for submillisievert CCTA. CCTA datasets of 91 patients were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), increasing contributions of ASiR (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%), and MBIR. Signal and noise were measured in the aortic root to calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In a subgroup of 36 patients, diagnostic accuracy of ASiR 40%, ASiR 100%, and MBIR for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) was compared with invasive coronary angiography. Median radiation dose was 0.21 mSv for CCTA. While increasing levels of ASiR gradually reduced image noise compared with FBP (up to - 48%, P ASiR (-59% compared with ASiR 100%; P ASiR 40% and ASiR 100% resulted in substantially lower diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD as diagnosed by invasive coronary angiography compared with MBIR: sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 37%, 100 and 57%, and 100 and 74% for ASiR 40%, ASiR 100%, and MBIR, respectively. MBIR offers substantial noise reduction with increased SNR, paving the way for implementation of submillisievert CCTA protocols in clinical routine. In contrast, inferior noise reduction by ASiR negatively affects diagnostic accuracy of submillisievert CCTA for CAD detection.

  9. Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program’s service model?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B.; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program’s comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children’s pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Policy implications for Head Start are discussed. PMID:26379369

  10. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  11. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Biodynamics model for operator head injury in stand-up lift trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghi-Moghadam, Mohamad; Sadegh, Ali; Watkins, Charles B; Dunlap, Dan

    2008-08-01

    Biodynamics and injury potential of operators in stand-up rider lift truck accidents have been investigated with a special focus on head injury. An anthropomorphic test device (ATD) model was used as an operator surrogate in computer simulations of off-the-dock (OTD) and tip-over (TO) accidents. The biomechanical model representing the ATD was developed based on rigid body segments, and then combined with a rigid body truck model in the accident simulations. The operator compartment of the truck model was enclosed with a rear door. The computed kinematics are in agreement with the results of previous experimental testing. A 2D finite element model of the head was created to compute head impact decelerations in the sagittal plane. Values of the head injury criterion for the TO cases were computed from the model and shown to compare favourably with experimental values. The results advance the state of knowledge concerning injury potential in TO and OTD accidents and simulation models for such accidents.

  13. Development of New, Low-Head Hydropower Turbine - Modeling & Laboratory Test DE-EE0005426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krouse, Wayne [Hydro Green Energy, Westmont, IL (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Hydro Green Energy, LLC (HGE) will complete the design, fabrication and laboratory testing of a scaled, vertically stackable, low-head hydropower turbine called the Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT). HGE will also complete a summary report that includes the laboratory testing results and analysis of the tests. Project Goals: Design, model and test modular bulb turbine for installation in numerous HGE low-head hydropower projects at non-powered USACE dams. Project Results: The sub-scale prototype was tested successfully at a leading US hydraulic laboratory. Laboratory data results agreed well with predicted results from numerical modeling.

  14. Image quality analysis of high-density diffuse optical tomography incorporating a subject-specific head model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan eZhan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available High-density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT methods have shown significant improvement in localization accuracy and image resolution compared to traditional topographic near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS of the human brain. In this work we provide a comprehensive evaluation of image quality in visual cortex mapping via a simulation study with the use of an anatomical head model derived from MRI data of a human subject. A model of individual head anatomy provides the surface shape and internal structure that allow for the construction of a more realistic physical model for the forward problem, as well as the use of a structural constraint in the inverse problem. The HD-DOT model utilized here incorporates multiple source-detector separations with continuous-wave data with added noise based on experimental results. To evaluate image quality we quantify the localization error and localized volume at half maximum (LVHM throughout a region of interest (ROI within the visual cortex and systematically analyze the use of whole brain tissue spatial constraint within image reconstruction. Our results demonstrate that an image quality with less than 10 mm in localization error and 1000 m3 in LVHM can be obtained up to 13 mm below the scalp surface with a typical unconstrained reconstruction and up to 18 mm deep when a spatial constraint based on the brain tissue is utilized.

  15. Human papillomavirus found in sperm head of young adult males affects the progressive motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea; Zuccarello, Daniela; Pizzol, Damiano; Moretti, Afra; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in a cohort of young adult males. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and Microbiology sections at a university hospital. A cohort of 200 young adult male volunteers (18 years old), 100 with previous sexual intercourse and 100 without previous sexual intercourse. Seminal parameters, sperm culture for HPV and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for HPV detection in the sperm head. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. Results of HPV investigation were compared to sperm parameters and results of FISH analysis. HPV infection was present in sperm cells of 10 subjects among those 100 young adults who already had unprotected intercourse and its presence was associated with reduced sperm motility. Furthermore, infected samples showed that about 25% of sperm had an HPV DNA positivity at the head site, but it is unclear whether it was integrated in the nucleus or not. This is the first report estimating the percentage of HPV-positive sperm in infected subjects and the association between HPV infection and sperm motility. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Productivity Losses Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Using the Human Capital and Friction Cost Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Alison M; Hanly, Paul; Timmons, Aileen; Walsh, Paul M; O'Neill, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Thomas, Audrey Alforque; Gallagher, Pamela; Sharp, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that productivity losses associated with head and neck cancer (HNC) are higher than in other cancers. These studies have only assessed a single aspect of productivity loss, such as temporary absenteeism or premature mortality, and have only used the Human Capital Approach (HCA). The Friction Cost Approach (FCA) is increasingly recommended, although has not previously been used to assess lost production from HNC. The aim of this study was to estimate the lost productivity associated with HNC due to different types of absenteeism and premature mortality, using both the HCA and FCA. Survey data on employment status were collected from 251 HNC survivors in Ireland and combined with population-level survival estimates and national wage data. The cost of temporary and permanent time off work, reduced working hours and premature mortality using both the HCA and FCA were calculated. Estimated total productivity losses per employed person of working age were EUR253,800 using HCA and EUR6800 using FCA. The main driver of HCA costs was premature mortality (38% of total) while for FCA it was temporary time off (73% of total). The productivity losses associated with head and neck cancer are substantial, and return to work assistance could form an important part of rehabilitation. Use of both the HCA and FCA approaches allowed different drivers of productivity losses to be identified, due to the different assumptions of the two methods. For future estimates of productivity losses, the use of both approaches may be pragmatic.

  17. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ATTITUDE AND HEADING REFERENCE SYSTEM WITH BIAXIAL HORIZONTAL PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Sushchenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Operation of attitude and heading reference systems in conditions of autonomy and high accuracy requires usage of gimballed platforms. The goal of the paper is detailed research of such systems kinematics and control moments. As result the full mathematical model of the precision attitude and heading reference system with the biaxial horizontal platform was derived. Methods: Obtaining of the mathematical model is based on the theory of gyros in general and corrected gyro compasses and theory of dynamically tuned gyros in particular. The basic laws of theoretical mechanics including concepts of Euler angles and directional cosines were taken into consideration. Results: The full mathematical model of the attitude and heading reference system is developed. The mathematical models of the vertical gyro and directional gyro as components of the researched system are given.  The simulation results based on the developed models are presented. Conclusions: The mathematical model of the gimballed attitude and heading reference system including the vertical gyro and directional gyro is derived. The detailed expressions for control (correction moments are obtained. The full analysis of the researched system kinematics was carried out. The obtained results can also be useful for design of inertial navigation systems of the wide class.

  18. Realistic Matematic Approach through Numbered Head Together Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihatno, A. C. M. S.; Budiyono; Slamet, I.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the teaching process which is conducted based on teacher center affect the students interaction in the class. It causes students become less interest to participate. That is why teachers should be more creative in designing learning using other types of cooperative learning model. Therefore, this research is aimed to implement NHT with RMA in the teaching process. We utilize NHT since it is a variant of group discussion whose aim is giving a chance to the students to share their ideas related to the teacher’s question. By using NHT in the class, a teacher can give a better understanding about the material which is given with the help of Realistic Mathematics Approach (RMA) which known for its real problem contex. Meanwhile, the researcher assumes instead of selecting teaching model, Adversity Quotient (AQ) of student also influences students’ achievement. This research used the quasi experimental research. The samples is 60 students in junior high school, it was taken by using the stratified cluster random sampling technique. The results show NHT-RMA gives a better learning achievement of mathematics than direct teaching model and NHT-RMA teaching model with categorized as high AQ show different learning achievement from the students with categorized as moderate and low AQ.

  19. A Neural Model of How the Brain Computes Heading from Optic Flow in Realistic Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, N. Andrew; Grossberg, Stephen; Mingolla, Ennio

    2009-01-01

    Visually-based navigation is a key competence during spatial cognition. Animals avoid obstacles and approach goals in novel cluttered environments using optic flow to compute heading with respect to the environment. Most navigation models try either explain data, or to demonstrate navigational competence in real-world environments without regard…

  20. Improving head and neck CTA with hybrid and model-based iterative reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, J. M.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Vos, P. C.; Willemink, MJ; Velthuis, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare image quality of head and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MIR) algorithms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The raw data of 34 studies were

  1. An improved finite element modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid layer in the head impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z; Pan, Christopher S; Wimer, Bryan M; Rosen, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    The finite element (FE) method has been widely used to investigate the mechanism of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), because it is technically difficult to quantify the responses of the brain tissues to the impact in experiments. One of technical challenges to build a FE model of a human head is the modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the brain. In the current study, we propose to use membrane elements to construct the CSF layer. Using the proposed approach, we demonstrate that a head model can be built by using existing meshes available in commercial databases, without using any advanced meshing software tool, and with the sole use of native functions of the FE package Abaqus. The calculated time histories of the intracranial pressures at frontal, posterior fossa, parietal, and occipital positions agree well with the experimental data and the simulations in the literature, indicating that the physical effects of the CSF layer have been accounted for in the proposed modeling approach. The proposed modeling approach would be useful for bioengineers to solve practical problems.

  2. Modelling the Species Distribution of Flat-Headed Cats (Prionailurus planiceps), an Endangered South-East Asian Small Felid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Andrew J.; Hesse, Deike; Mohamed, Azlan; Traeholdt, Carl; Cheyne, Susan M.; Sunarto, Sunarto; Jayasilan, Mohd-Azlan; Ross, Joanna; Shapiro, Aurélie C.; Sebastian, Anthony; Dech, Stefan; Breitenmoser, Christine; Sanderson, Jim; Duckworth, J. W.; Hofer, Heribert

    2010-01-01

    Background The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim), altitude (SRTM) and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World). Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation). In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo), information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations), and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. Conclusion/Significance Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation efforts for

  3. Comparison of a layered slab and an atlas head model for Monte Carlo fitting of time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy data of the adult head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Juliette; Ogden, Tyler M.; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Boas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) estimations of the adult brain baseline optical properties based on a homogeneous model of the head are known to introduce significant contamination from extracerebral layers. More complex models have been proposed and occasionally applied to in vivo data, but their performances have never been characterized on realistic head structures. Here we implement a flexible fitting routine of time-domain NIRS data using graphics processing unit based Monte Carlo simulations. We compare the results for two different geometries: a two-layer slab with variable thickness of the first layer and a template atlas head registered to the subject’s head surface. We characterize the performance of the Monte Carlo approaches for fitting the optical properties from simulated time-resolved data of the adult head. We show that both geometries provide better results than the commonly used homogeneous model, and we quantify the improvement in terms of accuracy, linearity, and cross-talk from extracerebral layers. PMID:24407503

  4. On the consequences of non linear constitutive modelling of brain tissue for injury prediction with numerical head models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrapko, M.; Dommelen, J.A.W. van; Peters, G.W.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influences of constitutive non linearities of brain tissue in numerical head model simulations by comparing the performance of a recently developed non linear constitutive model [10, 11] with a simplified version, based on neo-Hookean elastic

  5. Human motion analysis and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  6. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peadar F; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusion of surrounding outer tissue layers reduced the magnitude of the electric field and activating function by approximately 20% in the region surrounding the electrode. Localized distortions of the electric field were also observed when the electrode was placed close to the skull. Under bipolar conditions the effect of the finite conducting volume was shown to be negligible. The results indicate that, for monopolar stimulation, incorporation of the finite volume and outer tissue layers can alter the magnitude of the electric field and activating function when the electrode is deep within the brain, and may further affect the shape if the electrode is close to the skull.

  7. 3D maxillofacial soft-tissue model in laser scanned head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haidong; Hughes, Steven

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to incorporate thickness data into a soft tissue model in a laser scanned head data base, for use in FEA modeling of the behavior of the soft tissue layer under mechanical loads. Using a magnetic-based, spatial acquisition system (Polhemus) into which is incorporated an ultrasound sensor the position and orientation of tissue thickness vectors are obtained. By combining this with 3D high resolution head shape data from our laser scanner, a model of the head complete with soft tissue thickness is to be developed. We have implemented an initial version of software for the integration of laser scanning and facial soft tissue thickness measurement. The package displays facial images and performs basic imaging processing. The co-ordinate systems of the two methods are matched with the help of markers fixed on known head landmarks and a 3D digitiser (Polhemus). The computed source locations can be instantly superimposed on the facial images during the analysis.

  8. Modeling karst spring hydrograph recession based on head drop at sinkholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangquan; Goldscheider, Nico; Field, Malcolm S.

    2016-11-01

    Spring discharge often responds to rainfall with a rapid increase followed by a slower recession, and the mode of recession is often exponential-like. We propose a new model of the response of spring discharge to rainfall based on the square law for turbulent conduit flow. The new non-exponential model is compared against the exponential model under specific constraints. A hydrograph of St. Marks River in Florida is used to illustrate that when the change in ;sinkhole head; (defined as the hydraulic head at the upstream end of the karst conduit connected to the spring) is relatively small, the solution of the new model is close to that of the exponential model, which extends the validity and application of the exponential solution. When the change in sinkhole head is very large, the solutions from the two models clearly differ from each other. Limitations of the non-exponential model are analyzed by simulation of a hydrograph observed downstream of Wakulla Springs. It is concluded that both solutions are applicable when spring response is smaller than or comparable to the base flow, but are nonphysical when the response is much larger than the base discharge.

  9. Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus Antibodies and Risk of Subsequent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Johansson, Mattias; Waterboer, Tim; Kaaks, Rudolf; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Drogen, Dagmar; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J. Ramón; González, Carlos A.; Sánchez, Maria José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Travis, Ruth C.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Laurell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Manjer, Jonas; Ekström, Johanna; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ferrari, Pietro; Byrnes, Graham; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Hildesheim, Allan; Boeing, Heiner; Pawlita, Michael; Brennan, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection is causing an increasing number of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate whether HPV antibodies are associated with head and neck cancer risk when measured in prediagnostic sera. Methods We identified 638 participants with incident head and neck cancers (patients; 180 oral cancers, 135 oropharynx cancers, and 247 hypopharynx/larynx cancers) and 300 patients with esophageal cancers as well as 1,599 comparable controls from within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Prediagnostic plasma samples from patients (collected, on average, 6 years before diagnosis) and control participants were analyzed for antibodies against multiple proteins of HPV16 as well as HPV6, HPV11, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, and HPV52. Odds ratios (ORs) of cancer and 95% CIs were calculated, adjusting for potential confounders. All-cause mortality was evaluated among patients using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present in prediagnostic samples for 34.8% of patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 0.6% of controls (OR, 274; 95% CI, 110 to 681) but was not associated with other cancer sites. The increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer among HPV16 E6 seropositive participants was independent of time between blood collection and diagnosis and was observed more than 10 years before diagnosis. The all-cause mortality ratio among patients with oropharyngeal cancer was 0.30 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.67), for patients who were HPV16 E6 seropositive compared with seronegative. Conclusion HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present more than 10 years before diagnosis of oropharyngeal cancers. PMID:23775966

  10. BabyMEG: A whole-head pediatric magnetoencephalography system for human brain development research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti; Pratt, Kevin; Mascarenas, Anthony; Miller, Paul; Han, Menglai; Robles, Jose; Cavallini, Anders; Power, Bill; Sieng, Kosal; Sun, Limin; Lew, Seok; Doshi, Chiran; Ahtam, Banu; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Grant, Ellen; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Paulson, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    We developed a 375-channel, whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system ("BabyMEG") for studying the electrophysiological development of human brain during the first years of life. The helmet accommodates heads up to 95% of 36-month old boys in the USA. The unique two-layer sensor array consists of: (1) 270 magnetometers (10 mm diameter, ˜15 mm coil-to-coil spacing) in the inner layer, (2) thirty-five three-axis magnetometers (20 mm × 20 mm) in the outer layer 4 cm away from the inner layer. Additionally, there are three three-axis reference magnetometers. With the help of a remotely operated position adjustment mechanism, the sensor array can be positioned to provide a uniform short spacing (mean 8.5 mm) between the sensor array and room temperature surface of the dewar. The sensors are connected to superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4.2 K with median sensitivity levels of 7.5 fT/√Hz for the inner and 4 fT/√Hz for the outer layer sensors. SQUID outputs are digitized by a 24-bit acquisition system. A closed-cycle helium recycler provides maintenance-free continuous operation, eliminating the need for helium, with no interruption needed during MEG measurements. BabyMEG with the recycler has been fully operational from March, 2015. Ongoing spontaneous brain activity can be monitored in real time without interference from external magnetic noise sources including the recycler, using a combination of a lightly shielded two-layer magnetically shielded room, an external active shielding, a signal-space projection method, and a synthetic gradiometer approach. Evoked responses in the cortex can be clearly detected without averaging. These new design features and capabilities represent several advances in MEG, increasing the utility of this technique in basic neuroscience as well as in clinical research and patient studies.

  11. Development and validation of a physical model to investigate the biomechanics of infant head impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Darwall, D; Khalid, G; Prabhu, R; Kemp, A; Arthurs, Owen J; Theobald, P

    2017-07-01

    Head injury in childhood is the single most common cause of death or permanent disability from injury. However, despite its frequency and significance, there is little understanding of the response of a child's head to injurious loading. This is a significant limitation when making early diagnoses, informing clinical and/or forensic management or injury prevention strategies. With respect to impact vulnerability, current understanding is predominantly based on a few post-mortem-human-surrogate (PMHS) experiments. Researchers, out of experimental necessity, typically derive acceleration data, currently an established measure for head impact vulnerability, by calculation. Impact force is divided by the head mass, to produce a "global approximation", a single-generalised head response acceleration value. A need exists for a new experimental methodology, which can provide specific regional or localised response data. A surrogate infant head, was created from high resolution computer tomography scans with properties closely matched to tissue response data and validated against PMHS head impact acceleration data. The skull was 3D-printed from co-polymer materials. The brain, represented as a lumped mass, comprised of an injected gelatin/water mix. High-Speed Digital-Image-Correlation optically measured linear and angular velocities and accelerations, strains and strain rates. The "global approximation" was challenged by comparison with regional and local acceleration data. During impacts, perpendicular (at 90°) to a surface, regional and local accelerations were up to three times greater than the concomitant "global" accelerations. Differential acceleration patterns were very sensitive to impact location. Suture and fontanelle regions demonstrated ten times more strain (103%/s) than bone, resulting in skull deformations similar in magnitude to those observed during child birth, but at much higher rates. Surprisingly, perpendicular impacts produced significantly greater

  12. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  13. Conceiving Human Interaction by Visualising Depth Data of Head Pose Changes and Emotion Recognition via Facial Expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalliatakis, Grigorios; Stergiou, A.G.; Vidakis, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Affective computing in general and human activity and intention analysis in particular comprise a rapidly-growing field of research. Head pose and emotion changes present serious challenges when applied to player’s training and ludology experience in serious games, or analysis of customer

  14. The role of vision in maintaining heading direction: effects of changing gaze and optic flow on human gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, M.; Bohner, C.; Berger, W.; Sprundel, M. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    How is heading direction maintained in human gait? This question was investigated with respect to the role of optic flow and in the context of different movement strategies. While walking on a treadmill the deviation from the ideal straight path was measured in terms of lateral sway induced by a

  15. The role of vision in maintaining heading direction: effects of changing gaze and optic flow on human gait.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, M.; Bohner, C.; Berger, W.; Sprundel, M. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    How is heading direction maintained in human gait? This question was investigated with respect to the role of optic flow and in the context of different movement strategies. While walking on a treadmill the deviation from the ideal straight path was measured in terms of lateral sway induced by a

  16. Trends in head and neck cancer incidence in Denmark, 1978-2007: Focus on human papillomavirus associated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Maria; Nielsen, Ann; Plum, Christian Edinger Munk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the overall trends in the incidence of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) among Danish men and women in 1978-2007, to describe the distribution and incidences of HNCs at different anatomical sites, and to determine whether the incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV...

  17. Calculating the induced electromagnetic fields in real human head by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. This paper presents numerical simulation of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) by considering double cone, H-and Halo coils. Three-dimensional distributions of the induced fields i.e. magnetic flux density, current density and electric fields in realistic head model by dTMS coils were calculated by impedance method and the results were compared with that of figure-of-eight coil. It was found that double cone and H-coils have significantly deep field penetration at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. The Halo coil working with a circular coil carrying currents in opposite directions provides a flexible way to stimulate deep brain structures with much lower stimulation in superficial brain tissues.

  18. A natural human hand model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nierop, O.A.; Van der Helm, A.; Overbeeke, K.J.; Djajadiningrat, T.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a skeletal linked model of the human hand that has natural motion. We show how this can be achieved by introducing a new biology-based joint axis that simulates natural joint motion and a set of constraints that reduce an estimated 150 possible motions to twelve. The model is based on

  19. AHNS series: Do you know your guidelines? Management of head and neck cancer in the era of human papillomavirus: Educating our patients on human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Theresa; Goldenberg, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has changed the face of head and neck cancer over the past 2 decades. No longer is this solely a disease of older patients with a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use. Patients with HPV-related head and neck cancers tend to be younger, healthier, and have an improved prognosis, compared with those with HPV-negative tumors. As more patients are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer, physicians have important topics to consider. These include prevalence, transmission, and natural history of HPV, the role of screening, vaccines, and HPV testing in head and neck cancer. This article continues a series developed by the American Head and Neck Society's Education Committee entitled "Do you know your guidelines?" and is intended to provide guidance for navigating common questions and concerns patients may have about HPV infection and HPV-related head and neck cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 833-839, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In preclinical research MatrixgelTM Basement Membrane Matrix (MG) is used frequently for the establishment of syngeneic and xenograft cancer models. Limited information on its influence on parameters including; tumor growth, vascularization, hypoxia and imaging characteristics...... is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  1. Assessment of model-based image-matching for future reconstruction of unhelmeted sport head impact kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Gregory J; Joodaki, Hamed; Krosshaug, Tron; Forman, Jason L; Crandall, Jeff R; Simms, Ciaran K

    2017-02-28

    Player-to-player contact inherent in many unhelmeted sports means that head impacts are a frequent occurrence. Model-Based Image-Matching (MBIM) provides a technique for the assessment of three-dimensional linear and rotational motion patterns from multiple camera views of a head impact event, but the accuracy is unknown for this application. The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of the MBIM method relative to reflective marker-based motion analysis data for estimating six degree of freedom head displacements and velocities in a staged pedestrian impact scenario at 40 km/h. Results showed RMS error was under 20 mm for all linear head displacements and 0.01-0.04 rad for head rotations. For velocities, the MBIM method yielded RMS errors between 0.42 and 1.29 m/s for head linear velocities and 3.53-5.38 rad/s for angular velocities. This method is thus beneficial as a tool to directly measure six degree of freedom head positional data from video of sporting head impacts, but velocity data is less reliable. MBIM data, combined in future with velocity/acceleration data from wearable sensors could be used to provide input conditions and evaluate the outputs of multibody and finite element head models for brain injury assessment of sporting head impacts.

  2. Rodent models for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lane heading difference: An innovative model for drowsy driving detection using retrospective analysis around curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Drew M; Pilcher, June J; Switzer, Fred S

    2015-07-01

    Driving while sleepy is a serious contributor to automobile accidents. Previous research has shown that drowsy drivers produce systematic errors (variability) in vehicle behavior which are detectable using vehicle monitoring technology. The current study developed a new methodological approach using a vehicle heading difference metric to detect drowsy driving more effectively than other more commonly used methods. Twenty participants completed a driving scenario as well as several measures of fatigue in five testing sessions across a night of sleep deprivation. Each simulated highway driving session lasted 20 min, and was analyzed for lateral lane position variability and vehicle heading difference variability with two statistical methods. Fatigue measures monitored reaction time, attention, and oculomotor movement. The results showed that examining lane heading difference using the absolute value of the raw data detected driving variability better across the night than other statistical models. The results from the fatigue measures indicated an increase in reaction time and response lapses, as well as a decrease in oculomotor reactivity across the night. These results suggest that in fatigued drivers the statistical model using the absolute value of lane heading could be an improved metric for drowsy driving detection that could accurately detect detriments in driving ability at lower levels of fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A finite element head and neck model as a supportive tool for deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihun; Saitou, Kazuhiro; Matuszak, Martha M; Balter, James M

    2016-07-01

    A finite element (FE) head and neck model was developed as a tool to aid investigations and development of deformable image registration and patient modeling in radiation oncology. Useful aspects of a FE model for these purposes include ability to produce realistic deformations (similar to those seen in patients over the course of treatment) and a rational means of generating new configurations, e.g., via the application of force and/or displacement boundary conditions. The model was constructed based on a cone-beam computed tomography image of a head and neck cancer patient. The three-node triangular surface meshes created for the bony elements (skull, mandible, and cervical spine) and joint elements were integrated into a skeletal system and combined with the exterior surface. Nodes were additionally created inside the surface structures which were composed of the three-node triangular surface meshes, so that four-node tetrahedral FE elements were created over the whole region of the model. The bony elements were modeled as a homogeneous linear elastic material connected by intervertebral disks. The surrounding tissues were modeled as a homogeneous linear elastic material. Under force or displacement boundary conditions, FE analysis on the model calculates approximate solutions of the displacement vector field. A FE head and neck model was constructed that skull, mandible, and cervical vertebrae were mechanically connected by disks. The developed FE model is capable of generating realistic deformations that are strain-free for the bony elements and of creating new configurations of the skeletal system with the surrounding tissues reasonably deformed. The FE model can generate realistic deformations for skeletal elements. In addition, the model provides a way of evaluating the accuracy of image alignment methods by producing a ground truth deformation and correspondingly simulated images. The ability to combine force and displacement conditions provides

  5. Survey of Permethrin and Malathion Resistance in Human Head Lice Populations from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Knorr, Mette; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Head lice, Pediculis capitis De Geer, populations were investigated for permethrin and malathion resistance after initial establishment of a discriminating dose of topical application bioassay with body lice, Pediculus humanus L. For both insecticides, 2 times the lethal dose (LD)95 at 4 h...... was selected, 2 ng of permethrin and 100 ng of malathion per head louse, respectively. Head lice were collected from heads of infested children in Denmark at 33 primary schools, one kindergarten, and seven boarding schools. The lice were collected by combing of dry hair, with a fine-toothed antilouse comb...

  6. Dialectical Model of Human Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Cachat, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The DMoHN is a graphical representation of my current understanding and conceptualization of human nature, in addition to embodying the guiding ethos of social neuroscience. The dialectic is a logic, or way of thinking that joins opposite elements together in a uniting fashion to create emergent attributes not present in the elements alone. The dialectical structure of this model explicitly links Culture and Biology within the human brain in order to convey the symbiotic and dynamic interacti...

  7. How the unique configuration of the human head may enhance flavor perception capabilities: an evolutionary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Lieberman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since flavor derives from the synthesis of taste, somatosensation and smell, one of the most important factors in the ability to perceive flavor is retronasal olfaction in which volatile compounds pass from the oral cavity through the pharynx to the olfactory epithelium. Retronasal olfaction has been documented in both humans and rodents, but appears less effective in rodents than orthonasal olfaction because expired air does not come into as much contact with the sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium as inspired air [1,2]. Detailed comparisons of retronasal airflow patterns among different species have not been conducted, but several lines of evidence lead to the hypothesis that retronasal airflow may be specially enhanced in humans because of four derived features of the human head and neck that evolved at different stages because of selection for functions other than olfaction [3]. If so, then human flavor perception capabilities may be more derived than is commonly appreciated, and perhaps played a role in selecting for the evolution of cooking. The first derived adaptation that aids human retronasal olfaction is the absence of the transverse lamina, a horizontal shelf of bone that partitions the olfactory chamber of the nasal fossa from the more inferior respiratory passage. This lamina, which is present in most mammals, was lost during the evolution of monkeys (haplorhines from more primitive primates (strepsirhines as part of a reorganization of the nasal cavity. The function of the transverse lamina has not been tested but it probably aids orthonasal olfaction by trapping inspired air in the olfactory region. Loss of the transverse lamina is commonly interpreted to be one of several trade-offs in primate evolution that favored vision over olfaction [4], but it likely benefits retronasal olfaction by permitting a direct pathway for expired air to flow towards the olfactory epithelium. A second derived adaptation present in humans is

  8. 'Goats that stare at men': dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to human head orientation, but do not spontaneously use head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, comparative research on the mechanisms and species-specific adaptive values of attributing attentive states and using communicative cues has gained increased interest, particularly in non-human primates, birds, and dogs. Here, we investigate these phenomena in a farm animal species, the dwarf goat (Capra aegagrus hircus). In the first experiment, we investigated the effects of different human head and body orientations, as well as human experimenter presence/absence, on the behaviour of goats in a food-anticipating paradigm. Over a 30-s interval, the experimenter engaged in one of four different postures or behaviours (head and body towards the subject-'Control', head to the side, head and body away from the subject, or leaving the room) before delivering a reward. We found that the level of subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the control condition and decreased with a decreasing level of attention paid to the subject by the experimenter. Additionally, goats 'stared' (i.e. stood alert) at the experimental set-up for significantly more time when the experimenter was present but paid less attention to the subject ('Head' and 'Back' condition) than in the 'Control' and 'Out' conditions. In a second experiment, the experimenter provided different human-given cues that indicated the location of a hidden food reward in a two-way object choice task. Goats were able to use both 'Touch' and 'Point' cues to infer the correct location of the reward but did not perform above the level expected by chance in the 'Head only' condition. We conclude that goats are able to differentiate among different body postures of a human, including head orientation; however, despite their success at using multiple physical human cues, they fail to spontaneously use human head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

  9. Influence of the head model on EEG and MEG source connectivity analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Vorwerk, Johannes; Wolters, Carsten H; Knösche, Thomas R

    2015-04-15

    The results of brain connectivity analysis using reconstructed source time courses derived from EEG and MEG data depend on a number of algorithmic choices. While previous studies have investigated the influence of the choice of source estimation method or connectivity measure, the effects of the head modeling errors or simplifications have not been studied sufficiently. In the present simulation study, we investigated the influence of particular properties of the head model on the reconstructed source time courses as well as on source connectivity analysis in EEG and MEG. Therefore, we constructed a realistic head model and applied the finite element method to solve the EEG and MEG forward problems. We considered the distinction between white and gray matter, the distinction between compact and spongy bone, the inclusion of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartment, and the reduction to a simple 3-layer model comprising only the skin, skull, and brain. Source time courses were reconstructed using a beamforming approach and the source connectivity was estimated by the imaginary coherence (ICoh) and the generalized partial directed coherence (GPDC). Our results show that in both EEG and MEG, neglecting the white and gray matter distinction or the CSF causes considerable errors in reconstructed source time courses and connectivity analysis, while the distinction between spongy and compact bone is just of minor relevance, provided that an adequate skull conductivity value is used. Large inverse and connectivity errors are found in the same regions that show large topography errors in the forward solution. Moreover, we demonstrate that the very conservative ICoh is relatively safe from the crosstalk effects caused by imperfect head models, as opposed to the GPDC. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  11. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  12. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  13. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-10-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (Plycopene induced the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic protein, B‑cell lymphoma‑associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells.

  14. [Human papilloma viruses: other risk factor of head and neck carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woto-Gaye, G; M'Farrej, M K; Doh, K; Thiam, I; Touré, S; Diop, R; Dial, C

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) occupy the sixth place as the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. Next to alcohol and tobacco intoxication, other risk factors (RF) are suspected, including the human papilloma viruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of HPVs and histo-epidemiological characteristics of HNC HPV+ in Senegal. This is a prospective, multicenter preliminary study of 18 months (January 1, 2012-June 30, 2014). The cases of HNC histologically confirmed in Senegal were then sent to the bio-pathology department of the Curie Institute in Paris to search HPVs. In the 90 included cases, the PCR technique was successful in 54 cases (60%). HPVs were found in seven cases, that is, a prevalence of 13%. HPVs were associated with 5 cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma and 2 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity. Patients with HNC HPV+ had a median age of 42 years against 49 years for HPV-patients. Three patients (42.8%) with HPV+ carcinomas were smokers. Of the 47 HPV-patients, 40 patients (87.1%) had alcohol intoxication and/or smoking. The concept of oral sex was refuted by all our patients. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only histological type found. HPV+ cell carcinoma showed no specific histological appearance. HPVs are another certain RF of HNC in Senegal. The major therapeutic and prognostic impact of HPVinduced cancers requires the systematic search of the viruses by the PCR technique.

  15. Anticancer activity of Ashwagandha against human head and neck cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeng-Eun; Shin, Ji-Ae; Jeong, Joseph H; Jeon, Jae-Gyu; Lee, Min-Ho; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the apoptotic activity of methanol extract of Ashwagandha (MEAG) and in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We investigated the effects of MEAG on programmed cell death in HNSCC cells using a Live/Dead assay, detection of nuclear morphologic changes, Mitotracker, siRNA knockdown, and RT-PCR. Treatment with MEAG showed dose-dependent growth-inhibitory activity that attribute to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase 9 suggested that MEAG leads to activation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. MEAG selectively upregulated the expression of Bim protein at the transcriptional level and induced the translocation of Bim into the mitochondria. Knockdown of Bim by siRNA partially blocked MEAG-mediated apoptosis. MEAG also caused an increase in truncated Bid (t-Bid), cleaved caspase-8, and death receptor 5 (DR5). Interestingly, withaferin A (WA), a bioactive component of MEAG, clearly induced apoptosis accompanied by upregulation of Bim, t-Bid, caspase-8, and DR5 similar to the effects of MEAG. These suggest that MEAG and WA may be potential natural materials for the treatment of HNSCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. San Mateo County Human Resources Commission Project Head Start - Summer 1966. An Evaluational Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Donald L.; Stein, Nancy L.

    This handbook is a response to the information problems that may arise in the planning of a Head Start program. It is especially designed for use in San Mateo County, California. It purports to bring together an explanation of the requirements for Head Start programs and suggests how these requirements might best be met with the resources…

  17. Head development. Craniofacial genetics makes headway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, J M

    1995-04-01

    Studies of neural crest migration in animal models, and of human syndromes in which craniofacial development is abnormal, are helping us to understand both prenatal and postnatal development of the head.

  18. Dynamic modeling of the neck muscles during horizontal head movement. Part II: Model construction in Pro/Engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Enderle, John D

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the next phase of research on a parametric model of the head-neck system for dynamic simulation of horizontal head rotation. A skull has been imported into Pro/Engineer software and has been assigned mass properties such as density, surface area and moments of inertia. The origin of a universal coordinate system has been located at the center of gravity of the T1 vertebrae. Identification of this origin allows insertion and attachment points of the sternocleidomastoid (SCOM) and splenius capitis to be located. An assembly has been created, marking the location of both muscle sets. This paper will also explore the obstacles encountered when working with an imported feature in Pro/E and attempts to resolve some of these issues. The goal of this work involves the creation of a 3D homeomorphic saccadic eye and head movement system.

  19. Vibrations transmitted from human hands to upper arm, shoulder, back, neck, and head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueyan S; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2017-12-01

    Some powered hand tools can generate significant vibration at frequencies below 25 Hz. It is not clear whether such vibration can be effectively transmitted to the upper arm, shoulder, neck, and head and cause adverse effects in these substructures. The objective of this study is to investigate the vibration transmission from the human hands to these substructures. Eight human subjects participated in the experiment, which was conducted on a 1-D vibration test system. Unlike many vibration transmission studies, both the right and left hand-arm systems were simultaneously exposed to the vibration to simulate a working posture in the experiment. A laser vibrometer and three accelerometers were used to measure the vibration transmitted to the substructures. The apparent mass at the palm of each hand was also measured to help in understanding the transmitted vibration and biodynamic response. This study found that the upper arm resonance frequency was 7-12 Hz, the shoulder resonance was 7-9 Hz, and the back and neck resonances were 6-7 Hz. The responses were affected by the hand-arm posture, applied hand force, and vibration magnitude. The transmissibility measured on the upper arm had a trend similar to that of the apparent mass measured at the palm in their major resonant frequency ranges. The implications of the results are discussed. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the shoulder and neck are important issues among many workers. Many of these workers use heavy-duty powered hand tools. The combined mechanical loads and vibration exposures are among the major factors contributing to the development of MSDs. The vibration characteristics of the body segments examined in this study can be used to help understand MSDs and to help develop more effective intervention methods.

  20. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anayannis, Nicole V J; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Belbin, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence suggests that as many as half of all oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) harbor human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Despite being more advanced at diagnosis, HPV-positive OPSCCs are associated with a better response to therapy and longer patient survival than HPV-negative OPSCCs. Human papillomavirus-positive OPSCC has also been shown to have distinct host gene expression profiles compared with HPV-negative OPSCC. Recently, this distinction has been shown to include the epigenome. It is well supported that cancers are epigenetically deregulated. This review highlights epigenetic differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPSCCs. The epigenetic mechanisms highlighted include methylation changes to host and viral DNA, and host chromatin modification. We also review the current evidence regarding host DNA methylation changes associated with smoking, and deregulation of microRNA expression in HPV-positive OPSCC. To provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms reported in HPV-positive OPSCC, with analogies to cervical cancer, and discussion of the challenges involved in studying epigenetic changes in HPV-associated OPSCC in combination with changes associated with smoking. Sources were a literature review of peer-reviewed articles in PubMed on HPV and either OPSCC or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and related epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic changes are reported to be a contributing factor to maintaining a malignant phenotype in HPV-positive OPSCC. The epigenetic mechanisms highlighted in this review can be studied for potential as biomarkers or as drug targets. Furthermore, continued research on the deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms in HPV-positive OPSCC (compared with HPV-negative OPSCC) may contribute to our understanding of the clinical and biologic differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPSCC.

  1. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    in additional experiments where the top of the head is allowed to strike the surface of the cylinder ( cockpit ), which models a combined insult...the bottom of the lower plate that would give a peak acceleration of the top hull of 2800G in the absence of the compressible cylinders. As shown in...acceleration experienced by a blast loaded vehicle. To do these tests we used two round plates and kept the distance between them constant. The

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma of dogs and cats: an ideal test system for human head and neck PDT protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucroy, Michael D.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is ideally suited for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) in humans. Developing useful PDT protocols for HNC is challenging due to the expense of Phase I and II clinical trials. Moreover, the often-poor predictive value of murine models means that photosensitizers may proceed far into development before problems are noted. Dogs and cats with spontaneous oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) share striking similarities with humans affected with oral SCC. These similarities include viral and environmental tobacco smoke as risk factors, location-dependent prognoses, and relative resistance to chemotherapy. The relatively large oral cancers encountered in veterinary patients allow for light and drug dosimetry that are directly applicable to humans. The irregular shape of oral SCC allows a rigorous evaluation of novel photodynamic therapy protocols under field conditions. Because spontaneous tumors in dogs and cats arise in an outbred animal population it is possible to observe an intact host response to PDT. The shorter lifespan of dogs and cats allows rapid accrual of endpoint data. External beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy are commonplace in veterinary medicine, making dogs and cats with spontaneous SCC a useful resource to study the interactions with PDT and other cancer treatment modalities. Our preliminary results demonstrate that PDT is well-tolerated by dogs with oral cancer, and a Phase II clinical trial of zinc-phthalocyanine-based photodynamic therapy is underway in dogs with oral SCC. The usefulness of 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester-based PDT is being investigated in cats with oral SCC.

  3. The Shigella human challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, C K; Thura, N; Ranallo, R T; Riddle, M S

    2013-02-01

    Shigella is an important bacterial cause of infectious diarrhoea globally. The Shigella human challenge model has been used since 1946 for a variety of objectives including understanding disease pathogenesis, human immune responses and allowing for an early assessment of vaccine efficacy. A systematic review of the literature regarding experimental shigellosis in human subjects was conducted. Summative estimates were calculated by strain and dose. While a total of 19 studies evaluating nine strains at doses ranging from 10 to 1 × 1010 colony-forming units were identified, most studies utilized the S. sonnei strain 53G and the S. flexneri strain 2457T. Inoculum solution and pre-inoculation buffering has varied over time although diarrhoea attack rates do not appear to increase above 75-80%, and dysentery rates remain fairly constant, highlighting the need for additional dose-ranging studies. Expansion of the model to include additional strains from different serotypes will elucidate serotype and strain-specific outcome variability.

  4. Standardisation of digital human models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gunther; Wischniewski, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    Digital human models (DHM) have evolved as useful tools for ergonomic workplace design and product development, and found in various industries and education. DHM systems which dominate the market were developed for specific purposes and differ significantly, which is not only reflected in non-compatible results of DHM simulations, but also provoking misunderstanding of how DHM simulations relate to real world problems. While DHM developers are restricted by uncertainty about the user need and lack of model data related standards, users are confined to one specific product and cannot exchange results, or upgrade to another DHM system, as their previous results would be rendered worthless. Furthermore, origin and validity of anthropometric and biomechanical data is not transparent to the user. The lack of standardisation in DHM systems has become a major roadblock in further system development, affecting all stakeholders in the DHM industry. Evidently, a framework for standardising digital human models is necessary to overcome current obstructions. Practitioner Summary: This short communication addresses a standardisation issue for digital human models, which has been addressed at the International Ergonomics Association Technical Committee for Human Simulation and Virtual Environments. It is the outcome of a workshop at the DHM 2011 symposium in Lyon, which concluded steps towards DHM standardisation that need to be taken.

  5. Human Resource Models: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    simulation models in which human performance plays an important part see, A.I. Siegel and J.J. Wolf , "Digital Behavioral Simulation--State-of-the-Art...atford and Petersen, Charles C., ’Mfaritine 421-439 Factors Adfecting Iberian Security," (Factores hbritimos Que "Northwestern University, Evanston

  6. Modeling and Optimization of Airbag Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries in Bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mehmet; Laksari, Kaveh; Kuo, Calvin; Grant, Gerald A; Camarillo, David B

    2017-04-01

    Bicycling is the leading cause of sports-related traumatic brain injury. Most of the current bike helmets are made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam and ultimately designed to prevent blunt trauma, e.g., skull fracture. However, these helmets have limited effectiveness in preventing brain injuries. With the availability of high-rate micro-electrical-mechanical systems sensors and high energy density batteries, a new class of helmets, i.e., expandable helmets, can sense an impending collision and expand to protect the head. By allowing softer liner medium and larger helmet sizes, this novel approach in helmet design provides the opportunity to achieve much lower acceleration levels during collision and may reduce the risk of brain injury. In this study, we first develop theoretical frameworks to investigate impact dynamics of current EPS helmets and airbag helmets-as a form of expandable helmet design. We compared our theoretical models with anthropomorphic test dummy drop test experiments. Peak accelerations obtained from these experiments with airbag helmets achieve up to an 8-fold reduction in the risk of concussion compared to standard EPS helmets. Furthermore, we construct an optimization framework for airbag helmets to minimize concussion and severe head injury risks at different impact velocities, while avoiding excessive deformation and bottoming-out. An optimized airbag helmet with 0.12 m thickness at 72 ± 8 kPa reduces the head injury criterion (HIC) value to 190 ± 25 at 6.2 m/s head impact velocity compared to a HIC of 1300 with a standard EPS helmet. Based on a correlation with previously reported HIC values in the literature, this airbag helmet design substantially reduces the risks of severe head injury up to 9 m/s.

  7. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and its tripartite receptor complex by cells of the human optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Clark, Abbot F; Wordinger, Robert J

    2007-05-23

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes gene expression, cell survival and differentiation in various types of peripheral and central neurons, glia and nonneural cells. The level of CNTF rises rapidly upon injury to neural tissue, suggesting that CNTF exerts its cytoprotective effects after release from cells via mechanisms induced by cell injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells in the optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex. Well-established optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHA) and lamina cribrosa (LC) cell cultures were derived from normal human donors. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified for mRNA detection. Cytoplasmic protein expression was determined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis of the cellular lysates. Serum free medium was concentrated and used for detecting extracellular proteins. CNTF complexed with CNTFR-alpha was assayed by immunoprecipitation. Cells isolated from the human optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex members (CNTFR-alpha, gp130, LIFR-beta). Taken together, these data suggest a possible neuroprotective role of CNTF in the optic nerve head.

  8. Modeling with finite element of the upper head spring; Modelizacion con elementos finitos del resorte del cabezal superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Cardador, J.; Cerrain Arranz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a model of finite element of the upper head spring so that it can be used as a tool in the design of the same. For this purpose, simulates the behavior to compression spring of the integrated head 17 x 17 using a numerical model and are validated with experimental results obtained in tests conducted by ENUSA. The validated model is a new tool to the spring design of the upper head whose use can extend both for the evaluation of current designs as for the evaluation of new modifications.

  9. A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwendoline Ixia; Holton, Mark D.; Walker, James; Jones, Mark W.; Grundy, Ed; Davies, Ian M.; Clarke, David; Luckman, Adrian; Russill, Nick; Wilson, Vianney; Plummer, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat) unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer’s head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between −80° and 60°, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25° with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between −43° and 0°). Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between −0.00187°/0.1 s and 0.00187°/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between −0.3141°/0.1 s and 0.01263°/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being ‘framed’ by people in relation to environmental content. PMID:26157643

  10. A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendoline Ixia Wilson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP, which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer’s head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between −80° and 60°, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25° with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between −43° and 0°. Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between −0.00187°/0.1 s and 0.00187°/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between −0.3141°/0.1 s and 0.01263°/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being ‘framed’ by people in relation to environmental content.

  11. Evaluation of an anthropometric shape model of the human scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, Daniël; Huysmans, Toon; Parizel, Paul M; De Bruyne, Guido; Verwulgen, Stijn; Van Hulle, Marc M; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the evaluation a 3D shape model of the human head. A statistical shape model of the head is created from a set of 100 MRI scans. The ability of the shape model to predict new head shapes is evaluated by considering the prediction error distributions. The effect of using intuitive anthropometric measurements as parameters is examined and the sensitivity to measurement errors is determined. Using all anthropometric measurements, the average prediction error is 1.60 ± 0.36 mm, which shows the feasibility of the new parameters. The most sensitive measurement is the ear height, the least sensitive is the arc length. Finally, two applications of the anthropometric shape model are considered: the study of the male and female population and the design of a brain-computer interface headset. The results show that an anthropometric shape model can be a valuable tool for both research and design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Obesity and head and neck cancer risk and survival by human papillomavirus serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinmiao; Nelson, Heather H; Langevin, Scott M; McClean, Michael; Marsit, Carmen J; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Kelsey, Karl T; Michaud, Dominique S

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining the association of body mass index (BMI) with risk of and survival from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have been inconsistent, although an inverse association has been noted for obesity and risk of HNSCC in several studies. Previous studies have not examined whether these associations differ by human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We utilized the resources of a population-based case-control study of HNSCC from the greater Boston area (959 cases and 1,208 controls were eligible for this analysis). Anthropometric history was collected through personal interviews, and HPV status was assessed using serology. We analyzed the association between BMI (assessed 5 years prior to disease incidence) and disease risk and survival using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. After adjusting for known risk factors, the association between obesity and overall risk of HNSCC was not significant (OR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.60-1.04). However, obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) was inversely associated with HNSCC risk among HPV-seronegative cases (OR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.32-0.70), but not among HPV-seropositive cases (OR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.68-1.21). BMI was not associated with survival overall or by HPV status. However, being overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) was associated with longer survival among HPV-seropositive smokers (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.31-0.74). Our findings are consistent with previous observations that obesity is inversely associated with the risk of HNSCC; however, this association appears to be confined to HPV-seronegative cases. Overall, obesity was not associated with HNSCC survival overall or by HPV status. Obesity is associated with risk of non-HPV HNSCC, but not HPV HNSCC.

  13. Oncolytic adenoviruses targeted to Human Papilloma Virus-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocca, Christopher J; Han, Joohee; Salzwedel, Amanda O; Davydova, Julia; Herzberg, Mark C; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Yamamoto, Masato

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the incidence of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has markedly increased. Our aim was to design a novel therapeutic agent through the use of conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds) that are targeted to the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Each adenovirus included small deletion(s) in the E1a region of the genome (Δ24 or CB016) intended to allow for selective replication in HPV-positive cells. In vitro assays were performed to analyze the transduction efficiency of the vectors and the cell viability following viral infection. Then, the UPCI SCC090 cell line (HPV-positive) was used to establish subcutaneous tumors in the flanks of nude mice. The tumors were then treated with either one dose of the virus or four doses (injected every fourth day). The transduction analysis with luciferase-expressing viruses demonstrated that the 5/3 fiber modification maximized virus infectivity. In vitro, both viruses (5/3Δ24 and 5/3CB016) demonstrated profound oncolytic effects. The 5/3CB016 virus was more selective for HPV-positive HNSCC cells, whereas the 5/3Δ24 virus killed HNSCC cells regardless of HPV status. In vivo, single injections of both viruses demonstrated anti-tumor effects for only a few days following viral inoculation. However, after four viral injections, there was statistically significant reductions in tumor growth when compared to the control group (p<0.05). CRAds targeted to HPV-positive HNSCCs demonstrated excellent in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects, and they have the potential to be clinically translated as a novel treatment modality for this emerging disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of human papillomavirus in non-oropharyngeal head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    Accurate estimates of the fraction of head and neck cancer (HNC) attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are essential to predict the effectiveness of interventions based on vaccination against HPV or HPV-testing. In addition, if supported by currently on-going clinical trials, attribution of a HNC to HPV may allow better and less toxic treatments. Here we focused on studies in which the prevalence of molecular and serological HPV markers was similarly assessed in oropharyngeal and non-oropharyngeal HNC. Large data on HPV DNA detection by PCR and p16 expression in HNC biopsies suggests that the probability of a cancer of the oral cavity, larynx, and hypopharynx being attributable to HPV is at least 5-fold lower than that for oropharyngeal cancer. Seropositivity for HPV16 E6 or E7 shows larger differences across sites, but findings vary between studies. Because HPV DNA and p16 detection lack specificity, and E6 and E7 antibody detection lacks sensitivity, these tests are not totally satisfactory. Limited data on in situ hybridization or HPV E6/E7 mRNA, mainly from the United States, suggests that HPV-attributable HNC is rare in the oral cavity (∼3%), larynx (∼7%), and hypopharynx (∼0%). Data on HPV in other rarer HNCs are extremely limited and essentially negative. Available data do not allow the establishment of the way HPV infection and tobacco may interact in non-oropharyngeal HNC. The exclusion of oropharynx as a site of tumor origin and the identification of robust fingerprints of HPV-driven carcinogenesis are the priorities to improve the estimate of HPV-attributable non-oropharyngeal HNC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regional differences in islet distribution in the human pancreas--preferential beta-cell loss in the head region in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Wang

    Full Text Available While regional heterogeneity in islet distribution has been well studied in rodents, less is known about human pancreatic histology. To fill gaps in our understanding, regional differences in the adult human pancreas were quantitatively analyzed including the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Cadaveric pancreas specimens were collected from the head, body and tail regions of each donor, including subjects with no history of diabetes or pancreatic diseases (n = 23 as well as patients with T2D (n = 12. The study further included individuals from whom islets were isolated (n = 7 to study islet yield and function in a clinical setting of islet transplantation. The whole pancreatic sections were examined using an innovative large-scale image capture and unbiased detailed quantitative analyses of the characteristics of islets from each individual (architecture, size, shape and distribution. Islet distribution/density is similar between the head and body regions, but is >2-fold higher in the tail region. In contrast to rodents, islet cellular composition and architecture were similar throughout the pancreas and there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets isolated from different regions of the pancreas. Further studies revealed preferential loss of large islets in the head region in patients with T2D. The present study has demonstrated distinct characteristics of the human pancreas, which should provide a baseline for the future studies integrating existing research in the field and helping to advance bi-directional research between humans and preclinical models.

  16. Determination, mechanism and monitoring of knockdown resistance in permethrin-resistant human head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, J. Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Permethrin resistance has been reported worldwide and clinical failures to commercial pediculicides containing permethrin have likewise occurred. Permethrin resistance in head lice populations from the U.S. is widespread but is not yet uniform and the level of resistance is relatively low (~4–8 fold). Permethrin-resistant lice are cross-resistant to pyrethrins, PBO-synergized pyrethrins and to DDT. Nix®, when applied to human hair tufts following manufacture’s instructions, did not provide 10...

  17. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain.

  18. Tracking a Driver's Face against Extreme Head Poses and Inference of Drowsiness Using a Hidden Markov Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    In-Ho Choi; Chan-Hee Jeong; Yong-Guk Kim

    2016-01-01

    .... Since a driver in the natural driving condition moves his head in diverse ways and his face is often occluded by his hand or the wheel, it should be a great challenge for the standard face models...

  19. Stereoscopic vascular models of the head and neck: A computed tomography angiography visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Dongmei; Lynch, James C; Smith, Andrew D; Wilson, Timothy D; Lehman, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Computer-assisted 3D models are used in some medical and allied health science schools; however, they are often limited to online use and 2D flat screen-based imaging. Few schools take advantage of 3D stereoscopic learning tools in anatomy education and clinically relevant anatomical variations when teaching anatomy. A new approach to teaching anatomy includes use of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of the head and neck to create clinically relevant 3D stereoscopic virtual models. These high resolution images of the arteries can be used in unique and innovative ways to create 3D virtual models of the vasculature as a tool for teaching anatomy. Blood vessel 3D models are presented stereoscopically in a virtual reality environment, can be rotated 360° in all axes, and magnified according to need. In addition, flexible views of internal structures are possible. Images are displayed in a stereoscopic mode, and students view images in a small theater-like classroom while wearing polarized 3D glasses. Reconstructed 3D models enable students to visualize vascular structures with clinically relevant anatomical variations in the head and neck and appreciate spatial relationships among the blood vessels, the skull and the skin. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Portable Wideband Microwave Imaging System for Intracranial Hemorrhage Detection Using Improved Back-projection Algorithm with Model of Effective Head Permittivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobashsher, Ahmed Toaha; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires rapid detection and medication to restrict any brain damage to minimal. Here, an effective wideband microwave head imaging system for on-the-spot detection of intracranial hemorrhage is presented. The operation of the system relies on the dielectric contrast between healthy brain tissues and a hemorrhage that causes a strong microwave scattering. The system uses a compact sensing antenna, which has an ultra-wideband operation with directional radiation, and a portable, compact microwave transceiver for signal transmission and data acquisition. The collected data is processed to create a clear image of the brain using an improved back projection algorithm, which is based on a novel effective head permittivity model. The system is verified in realistic simulation and experimental environments using anatomically and electrically realistic human head phantoms. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons between the images from the proposed and existing algorithms demonstrate significant improvements in detection and localization accuracy. The radiation and thermal safety of the system are examined and verified. Initial human tests are conducted on healthy subjects with different head sizes. The reconstructed images are statistically analyzed and absence of false positive results indicate the efficacy of the proposed system in future preclinical trials. PMID:26842761

  1. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  2. A Military Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Currently it is not known what changes are taking place in the brain with a concussion , how long the changes last and what happens if a second (or...1 AD Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0134 TITLE: A Military-Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and...3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Military-Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury

  3. Amplitudes of head movements during putative eye-only saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Brian S; Stahl, John S

    2005-12-14

    The mechanisms allowing humans and other primates to dissociate head and eye movements during saccades are poorly understood. A more precise knowledge of head movement behavior during apparent eye-only saccades may provide insight into those mechanisms. We studied the distributions of head amplitude in normal humans. In half of the subjects, these distributions indicated the presence of a population of minor ("residual") head movements during eye-only saccades, distinct from the continuum of head movements generated during frank eye-head saccades. Like full-sized head movements, the residual movements grew in proportion to target eccentricity, indicating their drive is derived from the premotor command for the saccade. Furthermore, their amplitudes related most strongly to the head amplitudes obtained when subjects produced full-sized head movements and were reduced when subjects were instructed to perform exclusively eye-only saccades. Both observations suggest that the drive for residual head movements originates downstream of the point in which the head movement command diverges from the generalized gaze shift command. The results are consistent with a model of head control in which a neural gate prevents the common gaze shift command from reaching the head premotor circuitry whenever an eye-only saccade is desired. However, the gate is either imperfect or the multiple pathways that relay gaze shift signals to the head motor circuitry allow for the gate to be circumvented. The results underscore the need for physiological studies to probe neuronal activity related to neck activation during eye-only saccades.

  4. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Conceiving Human Interaction by Visualising Depth Data of Head Pose Changes and Emotion Recognition via Facial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Kalliatakis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Affective computing in general and human activity and intention analysis in particular comprise a rapidly-growing field of research. Head pose and emotion changes present serious challenges when applied to player’s training and ludology experience in serious games, or analysis of customer satisfaction regarding broadcast and web services, or monitoring a driver’s attention. Given the increasing prominence and utility of depth sensors, it is now feasible to perform large-scale collection of three-dimensional (3D data for subsequent analysis. Discriminative random regression forests were selected in order to rapidly and accurately estimate head pose changes in an unconstrained environment. In order to complete the secondary process of recognising four universal dominant facial expressions (happiness, anger, sadness and surprise, emotion recognition via facial expressions (ERFE was adopted. After that, a lightweight data exchange format (JavaScript Object Notation (JSON is employed, in order to manipulate the data extracted from the two aforementioned settings. Motivated by the need to generate comprehensible visual representations from different sets of data, in this paper, we introduce a system capable of monitoring human activity through head pose and emotion changes, utilising an affordable 3D sensing technology (Microsoft Kinect sensor.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  7. Counseling and Human Sexuality: A Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Bill

    1980-01-01

    Presents a counseling and human sexuality course model that provides counselors with an information base in human sexuality and assists them in exploring the emotional aspects of sexuality. Human sexuality is a vital aspect of personal development. (Author)

  8. A mouse model of osteonecrotic femoral head induced by methylprednisolone and lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Thi -Ngan Le

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is caused by various factors, including prolonged use of steroid drugs, use of alcohol, vascular injuries and hemoglobinopathies. This study aims to develop a mouse model for glucocorticoid-induced avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head.Methods: Adult mice were randomly divided into two groups: experimental and control. Group A (the experimental group was given (via intramuscular injection 10 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS and 30 mg/kg of methylprednisolone (MPS. Each mouse additionally received MPS in divided oral doses of 13 mg/kg for 10 consecutive days. Group B (the control group received normal saline at the same location and same volume as those in Group A. Histological changes of the femoral heads were observed by electron microscopy at 3, 5, and 7 weeks after the last chemical injection. The percentage of empty lacunae was measured randomly and the expression of fibrocartilage was evaluated using an image analyz and shy;ing system. The expression of CD31 and VEGF-R2 were observed by immunohistochemistry. The bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells were stained with propidium iodide and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results:The results showed that at weeks 3 and 5, mice in Group A showed an increase in body weight. From weeks 5 to 7, mouse body weight in both groups remained constant. No difference in bone morphology was observed at week 7. The percentage of empty lacunae was 5.87 2.49% at week 5 and 21.58 8.10% at week 7. After 7 weeks, chondrocyte degeneration and fibrocartilage expression were observed. Moreover, the density of CD31 and VEGF-R2 markers increased in the femoral head. The rate of apoptosis in the bone marrow increased at week 3 then decreased. Conclusion: The data show that MPS, combined with LPS, can induce in mice features typical of early AVN of the femoral head. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(3.000: 548-556

  9. Integrated Model of the Eye/Optic Nerve Head Biomechanical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2017-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Previously, it has been suggested that ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to the cephalad fluid shift that results in altered fluid pressures [1]. We are investigating the impact of changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) using a combination of numerical models, which simulate the effects of various environment conditions, including finite element (FE) models of the posterior eye. The specific interest is to understand how altered pressures due to gravitational changes affect the biomechanical environment of tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. METHODS: Additional description of the numerical modeling is provided in the IWS abstract by Nelson et al. In brief, to simulate the effects of a cephalad fluid shift on the cardiovascular and ocular systems, we utilized a lumped-parameter compartment model of these systems. The outputs of this lumped-parameter model then inform boundary conditions (pressures) for a finite element model of the optic nerve head (Figure 1). As an example, we show here a simulation of postural change from supine to 15 degree head-down tilt (HDT), with primary outcomes being the predicted change in strains at the optic nerve head (ONH) region, specifically in the lamina cribrosa (LC), retrolaminar optic nerve, and prelaminar neural tissue (PLNT). The strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as the first, second and third principal strains. We compare the peak tensile (first principal) and compressive (third principal) strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induces tissue remodeling. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our lumped-parameter model predicted an IOP increase of c. 7 mmHg after 21 minutes of 15 degree HDT, which agreed with previous reports of IOP in HDT [1]. The corresponding FEM simulations predicted a relative increase in the magnitudes of the peak tensile

  10. Variability in the control of head movements in seated humans: a link with whiplash injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibert, N; MacDougall, H G; de Waele, C; Gilchrist, D P; Burgess, A M; Sidis, A; Migliaccio, A; Curthoys, I S; Vidal, P P

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how context and on-line sensory information are combined to control posture in seated subjects submitted to high-jerk, passive linear accelerations. Subjects were seated with eyes closed on a servo-controlled linear sled. They were asked to relax and received brief accelerations either sideways or in the fore-aft direction. The stimuli had an abrupt onset, comparable to the jerk experienced during a minor car collision. Rotation and translation of the head and body were measured using an Optotrak system. In some of the subjects, surface electromyographic (EMG) responses of selected neck and/or back muscles were recorded simultaneously. For each subject, responses were highly stereotyped from the first trial, and showed little sign of habituation or sensitisation. Comparable results were obtained with sideways and fore-aft accelerations. During each impulse, the head lagged behind the trunk for several tens of milliseconds. The subjects' head movement responses were distributed as a continuum in between two extreme categories. The 'stiff' subjects showed little rotation or translation of the head relative to the trunk for the whole duration of the impulse. In contrast, the 'floppy' subjects showed a large roll or pitch of the head relative to the trunk in the direction opposite to the sled movement. This response appeared as an exaggerated 'inertial' response to the impulse. Surface EMG recordings showed that most of the stiff subjects were not contracting their superficial neck or back muscles. We think they relied on bilateral contractions of their deep, axial musculature to keep the head-neck ensemble in line with the trunk during the movement. About half of the floppy subjects displayed reflex activation of the neck muscles on the side opposite to the direction of acceleration, which occurred before or during the head movement and tended to exaggerate it. The other floppy subjects seemed to rely on only the passive

  11. BFS Human Behaviour Model for Traffic Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Molan; Gregor Molan

    2011-01-01

    The Butterfly Flower Shower (BFS) Human Behaviour Model describes human behaviour in each demanding, possible accidental situation. The BFS human behaviour model is presented for a traffic situation. The key elements (perception, cognition, reaction) of the human behaviour are identified. Also possible limitations and errors in all elements of human behaviour are presented. The model is presented as the butterfly on the flower under the shower of interventions. The flower is environment descr...

  12. Adaptation to heading direction dissociates the roles of human MST and V6 in the processing of optic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Velia; Hemsworth, Lara; Smith, Andrew T

    2012-08-01

    The extraction of optic flow cues is fundamental for successful locomotion. During forward motion, the focus of expansion (FoE), in conjunction with knowledge of eye position, indicates the direction in which the individual is heading. Therefore, it is expected that cortical brain regions that are involved in the estimation of heading will be sensitive to this feature. To characterize cortical sensitivity to the location of the FoE or, more generally, the center of flow (CoF) during visually simulated self-motion, we carried out a functional MRI (fMRI) adaptation experiment in several human visual cortical areas that are thought to be sensitive to optic flow parameters, namely, V3A, V6, MT/V5, and MST. In each trial, two optic flow patterns were sequentially presented, with the CoF located in either the same or different positions. With an adaptation design, an area sensitive to heading direction should respond more strongly to a pair of stimuli with different CoFs than to stimuli with the same CoF. Our results show such release from adaptation in areas MT/V5 and MST, and to a lesser extent V3A, suggesting the involvement of these areas in the processing of heading direction. The effect could not be explained either by differences in local motion or by attention capture. It was not observed to a significant extent in area V6 or in control area V1. The different patterns of responses observed in MST and V6, areas that are both involved in the processing of egomotion in macaques and humans, suggest distinct roles in the processing of visual cues for self-motion.

  13. Characterization of an Ex vivo Femoral Head Model Assessed by Markers of Bone and Cartilage Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Suzi Hoegh; Goettrup, Anne Sofie; Thomsen, Gedske; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schultz, Nikolaj; Henriksen, Kim; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves the whole joint and is characterized by cartilage degradation and altered subchondral bone turnover. At present, there is a need for biological models that allow investigation of the interactions between the key cellular players in bone/cartilage: osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and chondrocytes. Methods: Femoral heads from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-week-old female mice were isolated and cultured for 10 days in serum-free media in the absence or presence of IGF-I (100 nM) (anabolic stimulation) or OSM (10 ng/mL) + TNF-α (20 ng/mL) (catabolic stimulation). Histology on femoral heads before and after culture was performed, and the growth plate size was examined to evaluate the effects on cell metabolism. The conditioned medium was examined for biochemical markers of bone and cartilage degradation/formation. Results: Each age group represented a unique system regarding the interest of bone or cartilage metabolism. Stimulation over 10 days with OSM + TNF-α resulted in depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage surface in all ages. Furthermore, OSM + TNF-α decreased growth plate size, whereas IGF-I increased the size. Measurements from the conditioned media showed that OSM + TNF-α increased the number of osteoclasts by approximately 80% and induced bone and cartilage degradation by approximately 1200% and approximately 2600%, respectively. Stimulation with IGF-I decreased the osteoclast number and increased cartilage formation by approximately 30%. Conclusion: Biochemical markers and histology together showed that the catabolic stimulation induced degradation and the anabolic stimulation induced formation in the femoral heads. We propose that we have established an explant whole-tissue model for investigating cell-cell interactions, reflecting parts of the processes in the pathogenesis of joint degenerative diseases. PMID:26069585

  14. [Cosmus Conrad Cuno (1652-1745) on a human ectoparasite: the head louse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G H

    1979-07-01

    Cosmus Conrad Cuno, a less well known optician and inventor of microscopes from the second half of the 17th century, published in 1734 at Augsburg his Observationes durch dessen verfertigte Microscopia where along with various observations he communicated salient details pertaining to the biology of the head louse.

  15. Human cadaver brain infusion skull model for neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabe, Jon; Olabe, Javier; Roda, Jose Maria; Sancho, Vidal

    2011-01-01

    Microsurgical technique and anatomical knowledge require extensive laboratory training. Human cadaver models are especially valuable as they supply a good microsurgical training environment simultaneously providing authentic brain anatomy. We developed the "skull infusion model" as an extension of our previous "brain infusion model" taking it a step further maintaining simplicity but enhancing realism. Four human cadaveric brains donated for educational purposes were explanted at autopsy. The specimens were prepared cannulating carotid and vertebral arteries with plastic tubings, flushed with abundant water and fixed for 1 month in formaldehyde. They were then enclosed with white silk clothing (emulating the dura mater) and inserted into human skulls cut previously into two pieces. Tap water at a flow rate of 10 L/h was infused through the arterial tubings. Diverse microsurgical procedures were performed by two trainees, including craniotomies with microsurgical approaches and techniques such as sylvian fissure exposure, extra-intracranial and intra-intracranial bypass, approaches to the ventricles and choroidal fissure opening. The water infusion fills the arterial system, leaking into the interstitial and cisternal space and finally moistening the whole specimen. This makes vascular microsurgical techniques become extremely realistic, increasing its compliance making manipulations easier and more authentic. Standard microsurgical laboratories frequently have difficulties to work with decapitated human cadaver heads but could have human brains readily available. Using the infusion model and inserting it in a human skull makes the environment much more realistic. Its simplicity and inexpensiveness make it a good alternative for developing microsurgical techniques.

  16. The prognostic role of sex, race, and human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal and nonoropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Carole; Westra, William H; Wang, Steven J; van Zante, Annemieke; Zhang, Yuehan; Rettig, Eleni; Yin, Linda X; Ryan, William R; Ha, Patrick K; Wentz, Alicia; Koch, Wayne; Richmon, Jeremy D; Eisele, David W; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established prognostic marker for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPSCC). Because of the limited numbers of women and nonwhites in studies to date, sex and racial/ethnic differences in prognosis have not been well explored. In this study, survival differences were explored by the tumor HPV status among 1) patients with OPSCCs by sex and race and 2) patients with nonoropharyngeal (non-OP) head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). This retrospective, multi-institution study included OPSCCs and non-OP HNSCCs of the oral cavity, larynx, and nasopharynx diagnosed from 1995 to 2012. Race/ethnicity was categorized as white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, Asian non-Hispanic, and Hispanic of any race. Tumors were centrally tested for p16 overexpression and the presence of HPV by HPV16 DNA and high-risk HPV E6/E7 messenger RNA in situ hybridization. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate overall survival (OS). The study population included 239 patients with OPSCC and 621 patients with non-OP HNSCC with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. After adjustments for the tumor HPV status, age, current tobacco use, and stage, the risk of death was lower for women versus men with OPSCC (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.55; P = .04). The results were similar with p16. In contrast, for non-OP HNSCCs, HPV positivity, p16 positivity, and sex were not associated with OS. For OPSCC, there are differences in survival by sex, even after the tumor HPV status has been taken into account. For non-OP HNSCC, the HPV status and the p16 status are not of prognostic significance. Cancer 2017;123:1566-1575. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Statistical shape modelling to aid surgical planning: associations between surgical parameters and head shapes following spring-assisted cranioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Bruse, Jan L; Borghi, Alessandro; Vercruysse, Herman; Ong, Juling; James, Greg; Pennec, Xavier; Dunaway, David J; Jeelani, N U Owase; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    Spring-assisted cranioplasty is performed to correct the long and narrow head shape of children with sagittal synostosis. Such corrective surgery involves osteotomies and the placement of spring-like distractors, which gradually expand to widen the skull until removal about 4 months later. Due to its dynamic nature, associations between surgical parameters and post-operative 3D head shape features are difficult to comprehend. The current study aimed at applying population-based statistical shape modelling to gain insight into how the choice of surgical parameters such as craniotomy size and spring positioning affects post-surgical head shape. Twenty consecutive patients with sagittal synostosis who underwent spring-assisted cranioplasty at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (London, UK) were prospectively recruited. Using a nonparametric statistical modelling technique based on mathematical currents, a 3D head shape template was computed from surface head scans of sagittal patients after spring removal. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was employed to quantify and visualise trends of localised head shape changes associated with the surgical parameters recorded during spring insertion: anterior-posterior and lateral craniotomy dimensions, anterior spring position and distance between anterior and posterior springs. Bivariate correlations between surgical parameters and corresponding PLS shape vectors demonstrated that anterior-posterior (Pearson's [Formula: see text]) and lateral craniotomy dimensions (Spearman's [Formula: see text]), as well as the position of the anterior spring ([Formula: see text]) and the distance between both springs ([Formula: see text]) on average had significant effects on head shapes at the time of spring removal. Such effects were visualised on 3D models. Population-based analysis of 3D post-operative medical images via computational statistical modelling tools allowed for detection of novel associations between surgical

  18. A Gaussian process regression model for walking speed estimation using a head-worn IMU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh; Park, Edward J

    2017-07-01

    Miniature inertial sensors mainly worn on waist, ankle and wrist have been widely used to measure walking speed of the individuals for lifestyle and/or health monitoring. Recent emergence of head-worn inertial sensors in the form of a smart eyewear (e.g. Recon Jet) or a smart ear-worn device (e.g. Sensixa e-AR) provides an opportunity to use these sensors for estimation of walking speed in real-world environment. This work studies the feasibility of using a head-worn inertial sensor for estimation of walking speed. A combination of time-domain and frequency-domain features of tri-axial acceleration norm signal were used in a Gaussian process regression model to estimate walking speed. An experimental evaluation was performed on 15 healthy subjects during free walking trials in an indoor environment. The results show that the proposed method can provide accuracies of better than around 10% for various walking speed regimes. Additionally, further evaluation of the model for long (15-minutes) outdoor walking trials reveals high correlation of the estimated walking speed values to the ones obtained from fusion of GPS with inertial sensors.

  19. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatta, F.; Meneghini, F.; Esposito, F.; Mininel, S.; Di Salle, F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the

  20. Impact injury prediction by FE human body model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynčík L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical simulations as powerful instruments are used in many areas such as traffic, medicine, sport, army etc. The simulations are often performed with models, which are based on the Finite Element Method. The great ability of FE deformable models of human bodies is to predict the injuries during accidents. Due to its modular implementation of thorax and abdomen FE models, human articulated rigid body model ROBBY, which was previously developed at the University of West Bohemia in cooperation with ESI Group (Engineering Simulation for Industry, can be used for this purpose. ROBBY model representing average adult man is still being improved to obtain more precise model of human body with the possibility to predict injuries during accidents. Recently, new generated thoracic model was embedded into ROBBY model and this was subsequently satisfactorily validated. In this study the updated ROBBY model was used and injury of head and thorax were investigated during frontal crashes simulated by virtue of two types of sled tests with various types of restraint system (shoulder belt, lap belt and airbag. The results of the simulation were compared with the experimental ones.

  1. A Mechanistic End-to-End Concussion Model That Translates Head Kinematics to Neurologic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J. Ng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Past concussion studies have focused on understanding the injury processes occurring on discrete length scales (e.g., tissue-level stresses and strains, cell-level stresses and strains, or injury-induced cellular pathology. A comprehensive approach that connects all length scales and relates measurable macroscopic parameters to neurological outcomes is the first step toward rationally unraveling the complexity of this multi-scale system, for better guidance of future research. This paper describes the development of the first quantitative end-to-end (E2E multi-scale model that links gross head motion to neurological injury by integrating fundamental elements of tissue and cellular mechanical response with axonal dysfunction. The model quantifies axonal stretch (i.e., tension injury in the corpus callosum, with axonal functionality parameterized in terms of axonal signaling. An internal injury correlate is obtained by calculating a neurological injury measure (the average reduction in the axonal signal amplitude over the corpus callosum. By using a neurologically based quantity rather than externally measured head kinematics, the E2E model is able to unify concussion data across a range of exposure conditions and species with greater sensitivity and specificity than correlates based on external measures. In addition, this model quantitatively links injury of the corpus callosum to observed specific neurobehavioral outcomes that reflect clinical measures of mild traumatic brain injury. This comprehensive modeling framework provides a basis for the systematic improvement and expansion of this mechanistic-based understanding, including widening the range of neurological injury estimation, improving concussion risk correlates, guiding the design of protective equipment, and setting safety standards.

  2. SU-E-J-58: Patient-Specific Biomechanical Head and Neck Models for Interfraction Dose Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, A; Ennis, D; Low, D; Kupelian, P

    2012-06-01

    In this abstract, we discuss a biomechanical head and neck model that will be able to represent patient setup variations as well as physiologic changes and subsequently enable dose calculations on the deformed anatomy. We selected Multi Pose MRI as the imaging modality to aid in model development and validation. The MRI data allowed us to build a biomechanically predictive model that will enable accurate estimation of tumor position when seeded with CT data alone. The soft tissue contrast and lack of ionizing radiation when using MRI enabled us to acquire extensive imaging datasets with a suitable variety of head pose variations. These poses were selected to encompass the clinical positioning variations so that the resulting model will accurately reflect internal organ motion and deformation. All images were acquired using an 8-channel, 1.5T research MRI system in radiology. The imaging volume extended from about T3(upper thoracic vertebrae) to the top of the head, thereby covering the entire head and neck. Model components included: muscles, skeletal bones, lymph nodes, fat tissues, and organs such as salivary glands, tendons, andligaments. At first, one MRI image dataset was selected as the reference image. The biometric properties (length, volume, mass, shape), hinge constraints of the bones, and the biomechanical properties of each of the anatomies were estimated using MRIs acquired at different head and neck poses. The model's ability to represent different head and neck postures can be illustrated by observing the internal tissue deformations andthe model's ability to represent different postures. Results show that the biomechanical model was able to simulate different poses that may be exhibited during interfraction patient setup variations and intrafraction patient motion. Future work would focus on integrating dose calculations on the deforming model and validating the model deformations. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Human Papillomavirus as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Tool in Cancer of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivars, Lars; Tani, Edneia; Näsman, Anders; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Dalianis, Tina

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as a risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), especially tonsillar and base of tongue cancer. Furthermore, HPV-positive tonsillar and base of tongue SCC have a significantly better prognosis than their HPV-negative counterparts and head and neck cancer (HNSCC) in general. HPV has recently also been implicated in cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head and neck region, where a primary tumour is not found despite extensive workup. Using fine-needle aspiration cytology to determine CUP HPV status in cervical lymph nodes could be of advantage, since it is minimally invasive and it is assumed that an HPV-positive lymph node metastasis likely has an HPV-positive otopharyngeal SCC origin. We review the current knowledge of HPV in HNSCC, with an emphasis on CUP of the head and neck region, its relation to oropharyngeal, tonsillar and base of tongue SCC and implications of HPV status for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Oral sex and human papilloma virus-related head and neck squamous cell cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit; Malik, Akshat; Garg, Apurva; Mair, Manish; Nair, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2017-11-01

    Head neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality all around the world. Just like tobacco and alcohol, Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is now recognized to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of HNSCCs. Unprotected sexual behaviours with the HPV carrier plays an important role in transmission of this virus. The global incidence of head and neck cancers is declining, but the incidence of HPV related head and neck cancers is rapidly increasing over the last few decades. However, most institutions do not mandate documentation of sexual history or counselling of patients regarding sexual practices like they do for tobacco and alcohol addictions in HNSCC patients. The aim of this review of literature is to analyse if there is a strong evidence to correlate oral sex with HPV related HNSCC and counsel the patient's regarding sexual behaviours. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Penerapan Model Pembelajaran Kooperatif Tipe Numbered Heads Together (NHT Untuk Meningkatkan Prestasi Belajar Matematika Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marasiwi marasiwi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan prestasi belajar matematika yang rendah siswa kelas V Semester Genap Tahun Ajaran 2016/2017 di SDN Sukolilo 01 Kecamatan Jiwan Kabupaten Madiun dengan menerapkan model pembelajaran kooperatif tipe Numbered Heads Together (NHT. Penelitian ini berjenis PTK yang dilaksanakan melalui 4 tahap yaitu perencanaan, pelaksanaan, observasi, dan refleksi dan dilakukan dalam dua siklus. Penelitian ini dilakukan di SDN Sukolilo 01 Kecamatan Jiwan Kabupaten Madiun Tahun Pelajaran 2016/2017 dengan subjek penelitiannya adalah siswa kelas V Semester Genap Tahun Ajaran 2016/2017 di SDN Sukolilo 01 Kecamatan Jiwan Kabupaten Madiun. Siswa kelas V berjumlah 22 anak. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa penerapan model pembelajaran kooperatif tipe NHT dapat meningkatkan prestasi belajar siswa kelas V SDN Sukolilo 01 Kecamatan Jiwan Kabupaten Madiun Tahun Pelajaran 2016/2017.

  6. Efficacy of neem seed extract shampoo on head lice of naturally infected humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Semmler, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Sixty heavily lice-infested male and female children (4-15 years) were selected and subjected to the treatment with a neem seed extract shampoo. Twenty to thirty milliliter of the shampoo were thoroughly mixed with completely wet hair and rubbed in to reach the skin of the scalp. After 5, 10, 15 and 30 min, the shampoo was washed out and the hair basically combed. Head lice were collected and examined. The neem seed extract shampoo proved to be highly effective against all stages of head lice. No obvious differences regarding the efficacy of the shampoo were observed between an exposure time of 10, 15 or 30 min. No side effects, such as skin irritation, burning sensations, or red spots on the scalp, forehead or neck, respectively, were observed.

  7. Head-up suspension in humans: effects on sympathetic vasomotor activity and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuzzaman, A S; Sugiyama, Y; Kamiya, A; Fu, Q; Mano, T

    1998-05-01

    We hypothesized that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and cardiovascular responses to the conventional head-up tilt (HUT) are different from those to head-up suspension (HUS) because of antigravity muscle activity. The MSNA from the tibial nerve, heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and calf blood flow were measured in 13 healthy young subjects. Left atrial diameter was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography in another nine subjects. The resting MSNA and cardiovascular responses at a low level (20 degrees) of orthostasis were similar during both modes. At higher levels (40 and 60 degrees), the responses of MSNA, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output were significantly stronger and there was a smaller reduction in calf blood flow during HUT than during HUS (P antigravity muscles during HUT may have additive effects on sympathetic vasoconstrictor and cardiovascular responses to orthostatic stress.

  8. Comparison of acute cardiovascular responses to water immersion and head-down tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Makoto; Schou, Morten; Gybel, Mikkel

    2002-01-01

    , and renin activity were suppressed similarly. Mean arterial pressure decreased by 9 mmHg (P hypothesis......The hypothesis was tested that acute water immersion to the neck (WI) compared with 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) induces a more pronounced distension of the heart and lower plasma levels of vasoconstrictor hormones. Ten healthy males underwent 30 min of HDT, WI, and a seated control (randomized...

  9. Human bite injuries to the head and neck: current trends and management protocols in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Glyndwr W; Isaac, Robert; Mustafa, Shakir

    2018-03-01

    Human bite injuries can be challenging in their presentation to the examining physician. In a study by Merchant et al., 18% of patients presenting with a human bite injury had suffered wounds to the head and neck region. Current trends in their initial management at presentation to emergency departments throughout England and Wales will be discussed in this paper. A postal survey was sent out to 100 A&E lead clinicians. This was followed up by telephone enquiries to improve the response rate. The collated results of the survey were entered onto a spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel©) for the purpose of statistical review. A 68% response rate from A&E departments throughout England and Wales demonstrated a lack of consensus in the initial management and subsequent treatment of human bite injuries. Written protocols are in place for human bite injuries in 54.4% of units. In 100% of units, initial management involves irrigation +/- debridement of the wound, though there is a lack of agreement on the surgical management of the wound. 77.9% of units follow 'needle stick protocols' when stratifying risk for blood-borne viruses. Human bites pose a number of unique problems, ranging from cellulitis to the transmission of communicable diseases. The maxillofacial surgeon has the added dilemmas surrounding subsequent repair and reconstruction. Appreciation of the complexity of human bite injuries will ensure optimal care for the patient. We propose a set of guidelines developed 'in-house' to assist in the management of human bite injuries.

  10. The multi-modal responses of a physical head model subjected to various blast exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, S.; Phillippens, M.

    2017-11-01

    The local and global biomechanical response of the body to a blast wave is the first step of a sequence that leads to the development of stresses and strains which can exceed the tolerance of brain tissue. These stresses and strains may then lead to neuro-physical changes in the brain and contribute to initiate a cascade of events leading to injury. The specific biomechanical pathways by which the blast energy is transmitted through the head structure are, however, not clearly understood. Multiple transmission mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of brain stresses following the impingement of a blast wave on the head. With the use of a physical head model, the work presented here aims at demonstrating that the proposed transmission mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. They are part of a continuum of head responses where, depending on the exposure conditions, a given mechanism may or may not dominate. This article presents the joint analysis of previous blast test results generated with the brain injury protection evaluation device (BIPED) headform under four significantly different exposure conditions. The focus of the analysis is to demonstrate how the nature of the recorded response is highly dependent on the exposure characteristics and consequently, on the method used to reproduce blast exposure in a laboratory environment. The timing and magnitude of the variations in intra-cranial pressures (ICP) were analysed relative to the external pressure field in order to better understand the wave dynamics occurring within the brain structure of the headform. ICP waveforms were also analysed in terms of their energy spectral density to better identify the energy partitioning between the different modes of response. It is shown that the BIPED response is multi-modal and that the energy partitioning between its different modes of response is greatly influenced by exposure characteristics such as external peak overpressure, impulse, blast wave

  11. Geometric Modeling and Reasoning of Human-Centered Freeform Products

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Charlie C L

    2013-01-01

    The recent trend in user-customized product design requires the shape of products to be automatically adjusted according to the human body’s shape, so that people will feel more comfortable when wearing these products.  Geometric approaches can be used to design the freeform shape of products worn by people, which can greatly improve the efficiency of design processes in various industries involving customized products (e.g., garment design, toy design, jewel design, shoe design, and design of medical devices, etc.). These products are usually composed of very complex geometric shapes (represented by free-form surfaces), and are not driven by a parameter table but a digital human model with free-form shapes or part of human bodies (e.g., wrist, foot, and head models).   Geometric Modeling and Reasoning of Human-Centered Freeform Products introduces the algorithms of human body reconstruction, freeform product modeling, constraining and reconstructing freeform products, and shape optimization for improving...

  12. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation as a Possible Damage Mechanism in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Post-Mortem Human Subject Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzar, Robert S; Treichler, Derrick; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weiss, Greg; Goeller, Jacques

    2017-04-15

    The potential of blast-induced traumatic brain injury from the mechanism of localized cavitation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is investigated. While the mechanism and criteria for non-impact blast-induced traumatic brain injury is still unknown, this study demonstrates that local cavitation in the CSF layer of the cranial volume could contribute to these injuries. The cranial contents of three post-mortem human subject (PMHS) heads were replaced with both a normal saline solution and a ballistic gel mixture with a simulated CSF layer. Each were instrumented with multiple pressure transducers and placed inside identical shock tubes at two different research facilities. Sensor data indicates that cavitation may have occurred in the PMHS models at pressure levels below those for a 50% risk of blast lung injury. This study points to skull flexion, the result of the shock wave on the front of the skull leading to a negative pressure in the contrecoup, as a possible mechanism that contributes to the onset of cavitation. Based on observation of intracranial pressure transducer data from the PMHS model, cavitation onset is thought to occur from approximately a 140 kPa head-on incident blast.

  13. SAR and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g SAR under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the SAR and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's SAR/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil.

  14. Genomic predictive model for recurrence and metastasis development in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ilda Patrícia; Caramelo, Francisco; Esteves, Luísa; Menoita, Joana; Marques, Francisco; Barroso, Leonor; Miguéis, Jorge; Melo, Joana Barbosa; Carreira, Isabel Marques

    2017-10-24

    The head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) population consists mainly of high-risk for recurrence and locally advanced stage patients. Increased knowledge of the HNSCC genomic profile can improve early diagnosis and treatment outcomes. The development of models to identify consistent genomic patterns that distinguish HNSCC patients that will recur and/or develop metastasis after treatment is of utmost importance to decrease mortality and improve survival rates. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization data from HNSCC patients to implement a robust model to predict HNSCC recurrence/metastasis. This predictive model showed a good accuracy (>80%) and was validated in an independent population from TCGA data portal. This predictive genomic model comprises chromosomal regions from 5p, 6p, 8p, 9p, 11q, 12q, 15q and 17p, where several upstream and downstream members of signaling pathways that lead to an increase in cell proliferation and invasion are mapped. The introduction of genomic predictive models in clinical practice might contribute to a more individualized clinical management of the HNSCC patients, reducing recurrences and improving patients' quality of life. The power of this genomic model to predict the recurrence and metastases development should be evaluated in other HNSCC populations.

  15. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  16. Human Performance Modeling for Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory; Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Laboratory; Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reac- tor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Charac- terization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk framework. In this paper, we review simulation based and non simulation based human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This paper summarizes the founda- tional information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human in- teractions in RISMC simulations.

  17. Learning brain aneurysm microsurgical skills in a human placenta model: predictive validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Magaldi Ribeiro; Ferrarez, Carlos Eduardo; Ramos, Taise Mosso; Malheiros, Jose Augusto; Nicolato, Arthur; Machado, Carla Jorge; Ferreira, Mauro Tostes; de Oliveira, Fellype Borges; de Sousa, Cecília Félix Penido Mendes; Costa, Pollyana Helena Vieira; Gusmao, Sebastiao; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Maestro, Rolando Del

    2017-03-24

    OBJECTIVE Surgery for brain aneurysms is technically demanding. In recent years, the process to learn the technical skills necessary for these challenging procedures has been affected by a decrease in the number of surgical cases available and progressive restrictions on resident training hours. To overcome these limitations, surgical simulators such as cadaver heads and human placenta models have been developed. However, the effectiveness of these models in improving technical skills is unknown. This study assessed concurrent and predictive validity of brain aneurysm surgery simulation in a human placenta model compared with a "live" human brain cadaveric model. METHODS Two human cadaver heads and 30 human placentas were used. Twelve neurosurgeons participated in the concurrent validity part of this study, each operating on 1 human cadaver head aneurysm model and 1 human placenta model. Simulators were evaluated regarding their ability to simulate different surgical steps encountered during real surgery. The time to complete the entire aneurysm task in each simulator was analyzed. The predictive validity component of the study involved 9 neurosurgical residents divided into 3 groups to perform simulation exercises, each lasting 6 weeks. The training for the 3 groups consisted of educational video only (3 residents), human cadaver only (3 residents), and human placenta only (3 residents). All residents had equivalent microsurgical experience with superficial brain tumor surgery. After completing their practice training, residents in each of the 3 simulation groups performed surgery for an unruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm, and their performance was assessed by an experienced vascular neurosurgeon who watched the operative videos. RESULTS All human cadaver heads and human placentas were suitable to simulate brain aneurysm surgery. In the concurrent validity portion of the experiment, the placenta model required a longer time (p model was considered

  18. A general photon source model for clinical linac heads in photon mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, W.; García-Ferreira, I.-B.; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work a general photon source model has been developed to describe clinical linac heads when operating in photon mode. Six different linacs (three operating at 6 MV, one at 15 MV and two at 18 MV) have been studied. The construction of the model as well as its validation have been carried out on the base of the virtual linac approach in which the complete linac geometries have been simulated with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The model includes a primary and a secondary sources whose geometrical characteristics are determined from a set of simulated fluence distributions in air. The photon energy distributions are obtained from the Monte Carlo energy distributions of the photons moving along the beam axis, using a softening function that depends on the nominal energy of the beam and a Compton-like correction. To verify the model, output factors, percentage depth doses and transverse profiles in water obtained from a calculation performed with the complete geometry are compared to those found with the source model. A reasonable agreement is obtained in all cases analyzed except for the 18 MV Mevatron KDS linac for the 20 cm× 20 cm field.

  19. The sex ratio distortion in the human head louse is conserved over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliński Szczepan M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the turn of the 19th century the first observations of a female-biased sex ratio in broods and populations of the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, had been reported. A study by Buxton in 1940 on the sex ratio of lice on prisoners in Ceylon is still today the subject of reanalyses. This sex ratio distortion had been detected in ten different countries. In the last sixty years no new data have been collected, especially on scalp infestations under economically and socially more developed conditions. Results Here we report a female bias of head lice in a survey of 480 school children in Argentina. This bias is independent of the intensity of the pediculosis, which makes local mate competition highly unlikely as the source of the aberrant sex ratio; however, other possible adaptive mechanisms cannot be discounted. These lice as well as lice from pupils in Britain were carrying several strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, one of the most wide spread intracellular sex ratio distorters. Similar Wolbachia strains are also present in the pig louse, Haematopinus suis, suggesting that this endosymbiont might have a marked influence on the biology of the whole order. The presence of a related obligate nutritional bacterium in lice prevents the investigation of a causal link between sex ratio and endosymbionts. Conclusions Regardless of its origin, this sex ratio distortion in head lice that has been reported world wide, is stable over time and is a remarkable deviation from the stability of frequency-dependent selection of Fisher's sex ratio. A female bias first reported in 1898 is still present over a hundred years and a thousand generations later.

  20. Predictive Modelling of Toxicity Resulting from Radiotherapy Treatments of Head and Neck Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, Jamie A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, the radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa (mucosal lining of the throat) is thought to be a major contributing factor to dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction), the most commonly reported severe toxicity. There is a variation in the severity of dysphagia experienced by patients. Understanding the role of the dose distribution in dysphagia would allow improvements in the radiotherapy technique to be explored. The 3D dose distributions delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa of 249 patients treated as part of clinical trials were reconstructed. Pydicom was used to extract DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) data (the standard file formats for medical imaging and radiotherapy data). NumPy and SciPy were used to manipulate the data to generate 3D maps of the dose distribution delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa and calculate metrics describing the dose distribution. Multivariate predictive modelling of severe dysphagia, including descriptions of the d...

  1. A head-to-head comparison of SCRalyze and Ledalab, two model-based methods for skin conductance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Dominik R

    2014-12-01

    Model-based analysis of skin conductance responses (SCR) can furnish less noisy estimates of sympathetic arousal (SA) than operational peak scoring approaches, as shown in previous work. Here, I compare two model-based methods for analysis of evoked (stimulus-locked) SCR, implemented in two software packages, SCRalyze and Ledalab, with respect to their sensitivity in recovering SA. Four datasets are analysed to compare predictive validity, i.e. the sensitivity to distinguish pairs of SA states that are known to be different. SCRalyze was significantly better able than Ledalab to recover this known difference in four out of five tested contrasts and comparable in the remaining one. SCRalyze performed significantly better than conventional analysis in all contrasts. I conclude that the model-based method engendered in SCRalyze is currently the best available approach to provide robust and sensitive estimates of sympathetic arousal. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Papilloma Virus as a Biomarker for Personalized Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Lassen, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    A dramatic increase in the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer has been reported in some parts of the western world over the past 30 years. They constitute a clinically distinct subgroup of cancers in terms of molecular biology, patient characteristics, and treatment outcome. This chapter...... describes the molecular characteristics, epidemiology, and demographics of the HPV-related head and neck cancers and discuss available methods to detect HPV-related tumours. The impact of HPV-related biomarkers in clinical studies on radiotherapy only, altered fractionation, modulation of hypoxia...

  3. The Video Head Impulse Test to Assess the Efficacy of Vestibular Implants in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinand, Nils; Van de Berg, Raymond; Cavuscens, Samuel; Ranieri, Maurizio; Schneider, Erich; Lucieer, Floor; Kingma, Herman; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Pérez Fornos, Angélica

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether it is possible to restore the high-frequency angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) in patients suffering from a severe bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) and implanted with a vestibular implant prototype. Three patients (S1–3) participated in the study. They received a prototype vestibular implant with one to three electrode branches implanted in the proximity of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Five electrodes were available for electrical stimulation: one implanted in proximity of the left posterior ampullary nerve in S1, one in the left lateral and another one in the superior ampullary nerves in S2, and one in the right lateral and another one in the superior ampullary nerves in S3. The high-frequency aVOR was assessed using the video head impulse test (EyeSeeCam; EyeSeeTec, Munich, Germany), while motion-modulated electrical stimulation was delivered via one of the implanted vestibular electrodes at a time. aVOR gains were compared to control measurements obtained in the same patients when the device was not activated. In three out of the five tested electrodes the aVOR gain increased monotonically with increased stimulation strength when head impulses were delivered in the plane of the implanted canal. In these cases, gains ranging from 0.4 to values above 1 were measured. A “reversed” aVOR could also be generated when inversed stimulation paradigms were used. In most cases, the gain for excitatory head impulses was superior to that recorded for inhibitory head impulses, consistent with unilateral vestibular stimulation. Improvements of aVOR gain were generally accompanied by a concomitant decrease of corrective saccades, providing additional evidence of an effective aVOR. High inter-electrode and inter-subject variability were observed. These results, together with previous research, demonstrate that it is possible to restore the aVOR in a broad frequency range using motion

  4. Significant head accelerations can influence immediate neurological impairments in a murine model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullotti, David M; Beamer, Matthew; Panzer, Matthew B; Chen, Yung Chia; Patel, Tapan P; Yu, Allen; Jaumard, Nicolas; Winkelstein, Beth; Bass, Cameron R; Morrison, Barclay; Meaney, David F

    2014-09-01

    Although blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is well recognized for its significance in the military population, the unique mechanisms of primary bTBI remain undefined. Animate models of primary bTBI are critical for determining these potentially unique mechanisms, but the biomechanical characteristics of many bTBI models are poorly understood. In this study, we examine some common shock tube configurations used to study blast-induced brain injury in the laboratory and define the optimal configuration to minimize the effect of torso overpressure and blast-induced head accelerations. Pressure transducers indicated that a customized animal holder successfully reduced peak torso overpressures to safe levels across all tested configurations. However, high speed video imaging acquired during the blast showed significant head accelerations occurred when animals were oriented perpendicular to the shock tube axis. These findings of complex head motions during blast are similar to previous reports [Goldstein et al., 2012, "Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Blast-Exposed Military Veterans and a Blast Neurotrauma Mouse Model," Sci. Transl. Med., 4(134), 134ra160; Sundaramurthy et al., 2012, "Blast-Induced Biomechanical Loading of the Rat: An Experimental and Anatomically Accurate Computational Blast Injury Model," J. Neurotrauma, 29(13), pp. 2352-2364; Svetlov et al., 2010, "Morphologic and Biochemical Characterization of Brain Injury in a Model of Controlled Blast Overpressure Exposure," J. Trauma, 69(4), pp. 795-804]. Under the same blast input conditions, minimizing head acceleration led to a corresponding elimination of righting time deficits. However, we could still achieve righting time deficits under minimal acceleration conditions by significantly increasing the peak blast overpressure. Together, these data show the importance of characterizing the effect of blast overpressure on head kinematics, with the goal of producing models focused on understanding the

  5. Volume-averaged SAR in adult and child head models when using mobile phones: a computational study with detailed CAD-based models of commercial mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Jafar; Heikkilä, Teemu

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies comparing SAR difference in the head of children and adults used highly simplified generic models or half-wave dipole antennas. The objective of this study was to investigate the SAR difference in the head of children and adults using realistic EMF sources based on CAD models of commercial mobile phones. Four MRI-based head phantoms were used in the study. CAD models of Nokia 8310 and 6630 mobile phones were used as exposure sources. Commercially available FDTD software was used for the SAR calculations. SAR values were simulated at frequencies 900 MHz and 1747 MHz for Nokia 8310, and 900 MHz, 1747 MHz and 1950 MHz for Nokia 6630. The main finding of this study was that the SAR distribution/variation in the head models highly depends on the structure of the antenna and phone model, which suggests that the type of the exposure source is the main parameter in EMF exposure studies to be focused on. Although the previous findings regarding significant role of the anatomy of the head, phone position, frequency, local tissue inhomogeneity and tissue composition specifically in the exposed area on SAR difference were confirmed, the SAR values and SAR distributions caused by generic source models cannot be extrapolated to the real device exposures. The general conclusion is that from a volume averaged SAR point of view, no systematic differences between child and adult heads were found. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiayi; Yu, Rongjun

    2015-01-01

    The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato's description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in "the head") reins in our impulses (from "the heart") and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin's evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. Here, drawing findings from behavioral economics and neuroeconomics, we provide a new model, labeled "The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition," to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  7. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi eLuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato’s description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in the head reins in our impulses (from the heart and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin’s evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. In this review, we provide a new model, called The interactive influence model of emotion & cognition, to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  8. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: yxzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Y.S. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: wangyinsong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangyongping@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn; Huang, Y.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: huangyy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; He, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: hew@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  9. Brain and muscle oxygen saturation during head-up-tilt-induced central hypovolaemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, P; Lyck, F; Pedersen, M; Olesen, H L; Nielsen, H; Secher, N H

    1995-09-01

    Near-infrared spectrophotometry-determined cerebral (ScO2) and muscle oxygen saturations (SmO2) were followed in 15 volunteers during passive 50 degrees head-up-tilt-induced central hypovolaemia, and in nine volunteers during ventilatory manoeuvres affecting arterial carbon dioxide tension. During head-up tilt, mean arterial pressure [MAP, 88 (77-118) to 97 (80-136) mmHg, median and range] and heart rate [HR; 66 (49-77) to 87 (42-132) beats min-1 P tilt-up. The ScO2 decreased, and SmO2 increased during hyperventilation, and ScO2 increased during breathing of 5% carbon dioxide. Rebreathing from a bag made SmO2 decrease and resulted in a biphasic ScO2 response: it first increased and subsequently decreased. Cardiovascular changes during tilt were not reflected in skin temperature. The ScO2 reflected the maintained autoregulation of cerebral blood flow until the perfusion pressure decreased markedly. In contrast, SmO2 mirrored muscle vasoconstriction early during tilt, and vasodilatation when pre-syncopal symptoms appeared.

  10. Human Capital in a Credit Cycle Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kubin, Ingrid; Zörner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We augment a model of endogenous credit cycles by Matsuyama et al.(2016) with human capital to study the impact of human capital on the stability of central economic aggregates. Thus we offer a linkage between human capital formation and credit market instability on a macrolevel combined with an analysis of functional income distribution. Human capital is modelled as pure external effect of production following a learning-by-producing approach. Agents have access to two different investment p...

  11. Chromaticity effects on head-tail instabilities for broadband impedance using two particle model, Vlasov analysis, and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yong Ho; Chao, Alexander Wu; Blaskiewicz, Michael M.; Shobuda, Yoshihiro

    2017-07-01

    Effects of the chromaticity on head-tail instabilities for broadband impedances are comprehensively studied, using the two particle model, the Vlasov analysis and computer simulations. We show both in the two particle model and the Vlasov analysis with the trapezoidal (semiconstant) wake model that we can derive universal contour plots for the growth factor as a function of the two dimensionless parameters: the wakefield strength, ϒ , and the difference of the betatron phase advances between the head and the tail, χ . They reveal how the chromaticity affects strong head-tail instabilities and excites head-tail instabilities. We also apply the LEP (Large Electron-Positron Collider) broadband resonator model to the Vlasov approach and find that the results are in very good agreement with those of the trapezoidal wake model. The theoretical findings are also reinforced by the simulation results. The trapezoidal wake model turns out to be a very useful tool since it significantly simplifies the time domain analysis and provides well-behaved impedance at the same time.

  12. Electric field calculations in brain stimulation based on finite elements: an optimized processing pipeline for the generation and usage of accurate individual head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhoff, Mirko; Opitz, Alexander; Thielscher, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The need for realistic electric field calculations in human noninvasive brain stimulation is undisputed to more accurately determine the affected brain areas. However, using numerical techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) is methodologically complex, starting with the creation of accurate head models to the integration of the models in the numerical calculations. These problems substantially limit a more widespread application of numerical methods in brain stimulation up to now. We introduce an optimized processing pipeline allowing for the automatic generation of individualized high-quality head models from magnetic resonance images and their usage in subsequent field calculations based on the FEM. The pipeline starts by extracting the borders between skin, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, gray and white matter. The quality of the resulting surfaces is subsequently improved, allowing for the creation of tetrahedral volume head meshes that can finally be used in the numerical calculations. The pipeline integrates and extends established (and mainly free) software for neuroimaging, computer graphics, and FEM calculations into one easy-to-use solution. We demonstrate the successful usage of the pipeline in six subjects, including field calculations for transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. The quality of the head volume meshes is validated both in terms of capturing the underlying anatomy and of the well-shapedness of the mesh elements. The latter is crucial to guarantee the numerical robustness of the FEM calculations. The pipeline will be released as open-source, allowing for the first time to perform realistic field calculations at an acceptable methodological complexity and moderate costs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Validating Non-invasive EEG Source Imaging Using Optimal Electrode Configurations on a Representative Rat Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro A; Bae, Jihye; Song, Yinchen; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Aubert-Vázquez, Eduardo; Riera, Jorge J

    2016-03-30

    The curtain of technical limitations impeding rat multichannel non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) has risen. Given the importance of this preclinical model, development and validation of EEG source imaging (ESI) is essential. We investigate the validity of well-known human ESI methodologies in rats which individual tissue geometries have been approximated by those extracted from an MRI template, leading also to imprecision in electrode localizations. With the half and fifth sensitivity volumes we determine both the theoretical minimum electrode separation for non-redundant scalp EEG measurements and the electrode sensitivity resolution, which vary over the scalp because of the head geometry. According to our results, electrodes should be at least ~3 to 3.5 mm apart for an optimal configuration. The sensitivity resolution is generally worse for electrodes at the boundaries of the scalp measured region, though, by analogy with human montages, concentrates the sensitivity enough to localize sources. Cramér-Rao lower bounds of source localization errors indicate it is theoretically possible to achieve ESI accuracy at the level of anatomical structures, such as the stimulus-specific somatosensory areas, using the template. More validation for this approximation is provided through the comparison between the template and the individual lead field matrices, for several rats. Finally, using well-accepted inverse methods, we demonstrate that somatosensory ESI is not only expected but also allows exploring unknown phenomena related to global sensory integration. Inheriting the advantages and pitfalls of human ESI, rat ESI will boost the understanding of brain pathophysiological mechanisms and the evaluation of ESI methodologies, new pharmacological treatments and ESI-based biomarkers.

  14. Flexural Behavior and Strut-and-tie Model of Joints with headed bar details Connecting Precast Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lungui Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an investigation of an improved longitudinal joint with headed bar details connecting precast decked bulb tee girders for accelerated bridge construction. The testing study included two phases. In phase I, five beam specimens with various headed bar details and a continuous reinforced specimen were tested under flexure loadings. A headed bar detail with 152 mm lap length was recommended for further study. In phase II, two slabs connected by the selected joint were tested under flexure and flexure-shear loadings. Test results were evaluated based on structural behaviors including capacity, deflection, and failure mode. At last, a validated strut-and-tie model was developed to anticipate the capacity of the improved longitudinal joint. It shows that the proposed headed bar details can provide a continuous force transfer in the joint. The lap length interacting with the spacing of the headed bar is the most significant parameter of the improved joint details. To develop a full strength joint, the lap length should not be less than 152 mm and be designed by the strength requirement. The strut-and-tie model can provide a conservative strength anticipation of the joint and it is the lower bound of the ultimate capacity of the joint.

  15. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wang, Edward [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sejpal, Samir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Agulnik, Mark [Section of Medical Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Amit [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Harris, Kirk [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  16. The role of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of head & neck squamous cell carcinoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer statistics report an increased incidence of OSCC and OPSCC around the world. Though improvements in screening and early diagnosis have dramatically reduced the incidence of this neoplasm in recent years, the 5-year-disease-free survival, is still poor, specially for oropharyngeal cancer, despite the great scientific and financial efforts. Recently, several papers showed that HPV may be involved at least in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of oral and cervical SCC, leading to distinct molecular characteristics compared with HPV-negative ones. Nevertheless, OPSCCs associated with HPV infection seem to show a better prognosis and affect younger patients ( Comparing findings reported in the recent literature, the data of this state of the art about HPV might add useful informations concerning oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. Moreover, our review would be useful in order to define novel perspectives of treatment choice for Head & Neck cancer patients, by combining well known chemotherapeutical drugs with new molecular "target" therapy.

  17. 'Goats that stare at men'--revisited: do dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to eye visibility and head direction of a human?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Being able to recognise when one is being observed by someone else is thought to be adaptive during cooperative or competitive events. In particular for prey species, this ability should be of use in the context of predation. A previous study reported that goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) alter their behaviour according to the body and head orientation of a human experimenter. During a food anticipation task, an experimenter remained in a particular posture for 30 s before delivering a reward, and the goats' active anticipation and standing alert behaviour were analysed. To further evaluate the specific mechanisms at work, we here present two additional test conditions. In particular, we investigated the effects of the eye visibility and head orientation of a human experimenter on the behaviour of the goats (N = 7). We found that the level of the subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the conditions where the experimenter was directing his head and body towards the goat ('Control' and 'Eyes closed' conditions), but the anticipatory behaviour was significantly decreased when the body ('Head only') or the head and body of the experimenter were directed away from the subject ('Back' condition). For standing alert, we found no significant differences between the three conditions in which the experimenter was directing his head towards the subject ('Control', 'Eyes closed' and 'Head only'). This lack of differences in the expression of standing alert suggests that goats evaluate the direction of a human's head as an important cue in their anticipatory behaviour. However, goats did not respond to the visibility of the experimenter's eyes alone.

  18. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  19. Evaluation of head-only and head-to-tail electrical stunning of farmed eels (Anguilla anguilla, L.) for the development of a humane slaughter method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooij, E.; Vis, van de J.W.; Kloosterboer, R.J.; Pieterse, C.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective was to evaluate the suitability of electronarcosis as a stunning method for farmed eels. In the first experiment the minimum electrical current needed to induce a general epileptiform insult by head-only stunning was assessed. The individual eels (n = 40) with a live weight of

  20. Fast calculating surrogate models for leg and head impact in vehicle-pedestrian collision simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Peter; Benedikt, Martin; Huber, Philipp; Ferenczi, Izabella

    2015-01-01

    In previous research, a tool chain to simulate vehicle-pedestrian accidents from ordinary driving state to in-crash has been developed. This tool chain allows for injury criteria-based, vehicle-specific (geometry, stiffness, active safety systems, etc.) assessments. Due to the complex nature of the included finite element analysis (FEA) models, calculation times are very high. This is a major drawback for using FEA models in large-scale effectiveness assessment studies. Therefore, fast calculating surrogate models to approximate the relevant injury criteria as a function of pedestrian vehicle collision constellations have to be developed. The development of surrogate models for head and leg injury criteria to overcome the problem of long calculation times while preserving high detail level of results for effectiveness analysis is shown in this article. These surrogate models are then used in the tool chain as time-efficient replacements for the FEA model to approximate the injury criteria values. The method consists of the following steps: Selection of suitable training data sets out of a large number of given collision constellations, detailed FEA calculations with the training data sets as input, and training of the surrogate models with the FEA model's input and output values. A separate surrogate model was created for each injury criterion, consisting of a response surface that maps the input parameters (i.e., leg impactor position and velocity) to the output value. In addition, a performance test comparing surrogate model predictions of additional collision constellations to the results of respective FEA calculations was carried out. The developed method allows for prediction of injury criteria based on impact constellation for a given vehicle. Because the surrogate models are specific to a certain vehicle, training has to be redone for a new vehicle. Still, there is a large benefit regarding calculation time when doing large-scale studies. The method can be

  1. Integration of high-risk human papillomavirus into cellular cancer-related genes in head and neck cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walline, Heather M; Goudsmit, Christine M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Tang, Alice L; Owen, John H; Teh, Bin T; McKean, Erin; Glover, Thomas W; Graham, Martin P; Prince, Mark E; Chepeha, Douglas B; Chinn, Steven B; Ferris, Robert L; Gollin, Susanne M; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Bier, Henning; Brakenhoff, Ruud; Bradford, Carol R; Carey, Thomas E

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer is generally associated with excellent response to therapy, but some HPV-positive tumors progress despite aggressive therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate viral oncogene expression and viral integration sites in HPV16- and HPV18-positive squamous cell carcinoma lines. E6/E7 alternate transcripts were assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences (DIPS-PCR) and sequencing identified viral insertion sites and affected host genes. Cellular gene expression was assessed across viral integration sites. All HPV-positive cell lines expressed alternate HPVE6/E7 splicing indicative of active viral oncogenesis. HPV integration occurred within cancer-related genes TP63, DCC, JAK1, TERT, ATR, ETV6, PGR, PTPRN2, and TMEM237 in 8 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines but UM-SCC-105 and UM-GCC-1 had only intergenic integration. HPV integration into cancer-related genes occurred in 7 of 9 HPV-positive cell lines and of these 6 were from tumors that progressed. HPV integration into cancer-related genes may be a secondary carcinogenic driver in HPV-driven tumors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 840-852, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in debridement and impacted bone graft for the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of impacted bone graft with or without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH. We examined the effect of bone-grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction, known as the "light bulb" approach, for the treatment of ONFH with a combination of artificial bone (Novobone mixed with or without rhBMP-2. A total of 42 patients (72 hips were followed-up from 5 to 7.67 years (average of 6.1 years. The patients with and without BMP were the first group (IBG+rhBMP-2 and the second group (IBG, respectively. The clinical effectiveness was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS. The radiographic follow-up was evaluated by pre-and postoperative X-ray and CT scan. Excellent, good, and fair functions were obtained in 36, 12, and 7 hips, respectively. The survival rate was 81.8% and 71.8% in the first and second group, respectively. However, the survival rate was 90.3% in ARCO stage IIb, c, and only 34.6% in ARCO stage IIIa (P<0.05. It was concluded that good and excellent mid-term follow-up could be achieved in selected patients with ONFH treated with impacted bone graft operation. The rhBMP-2 might improve the clinical efficacy and quality of bone repair.

  3. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkov, M; Kim, J; Siddiqui, F; Kumarasiri, A; Chetty, I; Gordon, J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial.

  4. Semicircular canal modeling in human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Lim, Chee Peng; Nahavandi, Saeid; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2017-07-26

    The human vestibular system is a sensory and equilibrium system that manages and controls the human sense of balance and movement. It is the main sensor humans use to perceive rotational and linear motions. Determining an accurate mathematical model of the human vestibular system is significant for research pertaining to motion perception, as the quality and effectiveness of the motion cueing algorithm (MCA) directly depends on the mathematical model used in its design. This paper describes the history and analyses the development process of mathematical semicircular canal models. The aim of this review is to determine the most consistent and reliable mathematical semicircular canal models that agree with experimental results and theoretical analyses, and offer reliable approximations for the semicircular canal functions based on the existing studies. Selecting and formulating accurate mathematical models of semicircular canals are essential for implementation into the MCA and for ensuring effective human motion perception modeling.

  5. A Modeling of Cerebral Blood Flow Changes due to Head Motion for fNIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nara, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Inoue, Masao; Shimizu, Shunji; Kojima, Satoru

    2013-04-01

    A method is proposed for measuring brain activity during exercises involving head motion by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which investigates cerebral hemodynamics. Obtaining measurements during exercise is difficult because cerebral blood flow changes due to the head motion component (HMC), in addition to neural activity. HMC is an undesirable artifact in the measurement of hemodynamic response caused by neural activity, and as such, it must be estimated and eliminated. In our experiments, cerebral blood flow and head motion were measured during repeated passive forward bending of the subjects. Head motion was measured by 3-D motion capture, and HMC was estimated by deriving a relation between head motion and cerebral blood flow, where the pitch angle was found to be suitable for estimating HMC. In this research, an assumption was made that cerebral blood flow caused by neural activity and that caused by postural change were additive, and thus HMC was eliminated by subtraction.

  6. A human model for primate personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I review the literature to determine how successful the latent trait theory model of personality from differential psychology has been for studying personality in non-human primates. The evidence for the success of this model is quite good, and offers insights and directions for personality research in primates and other animals. This, I conclude, stems from (i) the human trait model's simplicity, and (ii) the fact that the human differential model of personality developed in the face of harsh criticism, which led researchers to test and refine their models. PMID:29021170

  7. A human model for primate personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Alexander

    2017-10-11

    In this article, I review the literature to determine how successful the latent trait theory model of personality from differential psychology has been for studying personality in non-human primates. The evidence for the success of this model is quite good, and offers insights and directions for personality research in primates and other animals. This, I conclude, stems from (i) the human trait model's simplicity, and (ii) the fact that the human differential model of personality developed in the face of harsh criticism, which led researchers to test and refine their models. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Computer modeling of human decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Models of human decision making are reviewed. Models which treat just the cognitive aspects of human behavior are included as well as models which include motivation. Both models which have associated computer programs, and those that do not, are considered. Since flow diagrams, that assist in constructing computer simulation of such models, were not generally available, such diagrams were constructed and are presented. The result provides a rich source of information, which can aid in construction of more realistic future simulations of human decision making.

  9. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  10. Applying DTI white matter orientations to finite element head models to examine diffuse TBI under high rotational accelerations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colgan, Niall C

    2010-12-01

    The in-vivo mechanical response of neural tissue during impact loading of the head is simulated using geometrically accurate finite element (FE) head models. However, current FE models do not account for the anisotropic elastic material behaviour of brain tissue. In soft biological tissue, there is a correlation between internal microscopic structure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, constitutive equations are important for the numerical analysis of the soft biological tissues. By exploiting diffusion tensor techniques the anisotropic orientation of neural tissue is incorporated into a non-linear viscoelastic material model for brain tissue and implemented in an explicit FE analysis. The viscoelastic material parameters are derived from published data and the viscoelastic model is used to describe the mechanical response of brain tissue. The model is formulated in terms of a large strain viscoelastic framework and considers non-linear viscous deformations in combination with non-linear elastic behaviour. The constitutive model was applied in the University College Dublin brain trauma model (UCDBTM) (i.e. three-dimensional finite element head model) to predict the mechanical response of the intra-cranial contents due to rotational injury.

  11. Head-Down Tilt with Balanced Traction as a Model for Simulating Spinal Acclimation to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, R. E.; Styf, J. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Fechner, K.; Haruna, Y.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts experience total body height increases of 4 to 7 cm in microgravity. Thus, stretching of the spinal cord, nerve roots, and muscular and ligamentous tissues may be responsible for the hyperreflexia, back pain, and muscular atrophy associated with exposure to microgravity. Axial compression of the spine makes 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT) an unsuitable model for spinal acclimation to microgravity. However, this axial compression may be counteracted by balanced traction consisting of 10% body weight (sin 6 deg. = 0.1) applied to the legs. Six healthy male subjects underwent 3 days each of 60 HDT with balanced traction and horizontal bed rest (HBR), with a 2 week recovery period between treatments. Total body and spine length, lumbar disc height, back pain, erector spinae intramuscular pressure, and ankle joint torque were measured before, during and after each treatment. Total body and spine (processes of L5 - C7) lengths increased significantly more during HDT with balanced traction (22 +/- 8 mm and 25 +/- 8 mm, respectively) than during HBR (16 +/- 4 mm and 14 +/- 9 mm, respectively). Back and leg pain were significantly greater during HDT with balanced traction than during HBR. The distance between the lower end plate of L4 and the upper endplate of S1, as measured by sonography, increased significantly in both treatments to the same degree (2.9 +/- 1.9 mm, HDT with balanced traction; 3.3 +/- 1.5 mm, HBR). Intramuscular pressure of the erector spinae muscles and maximal ankle joint torque were unaltered with both models. While neither model increased height to the magnitude observed in microgravity, HDT with balanced traction may be a better model for simulating the body lengthening and back pain experienced in microgravity.

  12. Human hand modelling : Kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand

  13. Human cadaver brain infusion model for neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabe, Jon; Olabe, Javier; Sancho, Vidal

    2009-12-01

    Microneurosurgical technique and anatomical knowledge require extensive laboratory training before mastering these skills. There are diverse training models based on synthetic materials, anesthetized animals, cadaver animals, or human cadaver. Human cadaver models are especially beneficial because they are the closest to live surgery with the greatest disadvantage of lacking hemodynamic factors. We developed the "brain infusion model" to provide a simple but realistic training method minimizing animal use or needs for special facilities. Four human cadaveric brains donated for educational purposes were explanted at autopsy. Carotids and vertebral arteries were cannulated with plastic tubes and fixed with suture. Water was flushed through the tubings until the whole arterial vasculature was observed as clean. The cannulated specimens were fixed with formaldehyde. Tap water infusion at a flow rate of 10 L/h was infused through the arterial tubings controlled with a drip regulator filling the arterial tree and leaking into the interstitial and cisternal space. Multiple microneurosurgical procedures were performed by 4 trainees. Cisternal and vascular dissection was executed in a very realistic fashion. Bypass anastomosis was created as well as aneurysm simulation with venous pouches. Vessel and aneurysm clipping and rupture situations were emulated and solution techniques were trained. Standard microsurgical laboratories regularly have scarce opportunities for working with decapitated human cadaver heads but could have human brains readily available. The human brain infusion model presents a realistic microneurosurgical training method. It is inexpensive and easy to set up. Such simplicity provides the adequate environment for developing microsurgical techniques. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the methylation patterns in human papillomavirus type 16 viral DNA in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Seok; Chang, Xiaofei; Loyo, Myriam; Wu, Gaosong; Chuang, Alice; Kim, Myoung Sook; Chae, Young Kwang; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Westra, William H; Saunders, John R; Sidransky, David; Pai, Sara Isabel

    2011-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 can integrate into the host genome, thereby rendering the viral coding genes susceptible to epigenetic modification. Using bisulfite genomic sequencing, we determined the methylation status of all 110 CpG sites within the viral epigenome in advanced stage III/IV HPV-16-associated head and neck cancers. We found that the viral genome was hypomethylated in the majority of head and neck cancers, in particular within the viral regulatory region, long control region (LCR), which controls transcription of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. The hypomethylation status of LCR correlated with detectable levels of E6 and E7 expression, which suggests that the tumors may still be dependent on these viral oncogenes to maintain the malignant phenotype. In addition to the methylation status of LCR, we report other potential factors which may influence intratumoral E6 and E7 expression including viral copy number and integration site. We were able to detect the viral epigenetic alterations in sampled body fluids, such as serum and saliva, which correlated with the changes observed in the primary tumors. Because viral epigenetic changes occur in the setting of viral integration into the human genome, the detection of methylated HPV genes in the serum and/or saliva may have diagnostic potential for early detection strategies of viral integration and assessment of risk for cancer development in high-risk individuals. Our findings also support continued targeting of the E6 and/or E7 antigens through various vaccine strategies against HPV-associated cancers. ©2011 AACR.

  15. PRECLINICAL SAFETY AND ACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT VSV-IFN-B IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT MODEL OF SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisetty, Vittal VS; Heiber, Joshua; Myers, Rae; Pereira, Guilherme S.; Goodwin, Jarrard W.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Peng, Kah Whye; Barber, Glen; Merchan, Jaime R.

    2013-01-01

    Background VSV-IFN-β, a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β, has demonstrated antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In preparation for clinical testing in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck, we conducted preclinical studies of VSV-IFN-β in syngeneic SCC models. Methods and Results In vitro, VSV-IFN-β (expressing rat or mouse IFN-β) induced cytotoxicity and propagated in rat (FAT-7) or mouse (SCC-VII) SCC cells during normoxia and hypoxia. In vivo, intratumoral administration of VSV-rat-IFN-β or VSV-human-IFN-β in FAT-7 bearing or non-tumor bearing immunocompetent rats did not result in acute organ toxicity or death. VSV-r-IFN-β replicated predominantly in tumors and a dose dependent anti-VSV antibody response was observed. Intratumoral or intravenous administration of VSV-IFN-β resulted in growth delay and improved survival compared to controls. Conclusions The above data confirm safety and feasibility of VSV-IFN-β administration in immunocompetent animals and support its clinical evaluation in advanced human head and neck cancer. PMID:24115092

  16. Preclinical safety and activity of recombinant VSV-IFN-β in an immunocompetent model of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisetty, Vittal V S; Heiber, Joshua; Myers, Rae; Pereira, Guilherme S; Goodwin, Jarrard W; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah Whye; Barber, Glen; Merchan, Jaime R

    2014-11-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β (VSV-IFN-β) has demonstrated antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In preparation for clinical testing in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck, we conducted preclinical studies of VSV-IFN-β in syngeneic SCC models. In vitro, VSV-IFN-β (expressing rat or mouse interferon [IFN]-β)-induced cytotoxicity and propagated in rat (FAT-7) or mouse (SCC-VII) SCC cells during normoxia and hypoxia. In vivo, intratumoral administration of VSV-rat-IFN-β or VSV-human-IFN-β in FAT-7 bearing or non-tumor bearing immunocompetent rats did not result in acute organ toxicity or death. VSV-r-IFN-β replicated predominantly in tumors and a dose dependent anti-VSV antibody response was observed. Intratumoral or intravenous administration of VSV-IFN-β resulted in growth delay and improved survival compared with controls. The above data confirm safety and feasibility of VSV-IFN-β administration in immunocompetent animals and support its clinical evaluation in advanced human head and neck cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Capillary Pressure Balance with Repeated Head-Up Tilt in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H. G.; Greenleaf, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    We measured blood density (BD). plasma density (PD) and hematocrit (Ht) during repeated 70 deg head-up tilt (HUT) consisting of a pre-drink period with two supine (P and P3) and two HUT (P2 and P4) phases of 45 min each. At the end of P4 test subjects (N=8) drank 10 ml/kg body weight of isotonic (290 mOsm/kg) sodium chloride (ISO) or hypotonic (drink treatment (P3, P5, P7), supine PV steadly decreased when compared to P1. Tilt-induced PV shifts ranged from 9.7 to 16.7% when compared to PV du. ring the respective previous Phases. After drinking, PV increased above CON values at the end of Phase 7 by 12.9% with ISO, and by 6.6% with HYP. Progressive hemoconcentration. occurred during non-drink supine; isotonic saline ingestion increased supine PV a control level but did not stop or reverse the decrease of upright hemoconcentration. Upright density values were not slowed with repeated upright tilting; decreased fluid loss occurred in consecutive upright periods. Upright capillary pressure balance was achieved with diminished plasma volume loss during repeated tilting.

  18. Effects of anterior offsetting of humeral head component in posteriorly unstable total shoulder arthroplasty: Finite element modeling of cadaver specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gregory S; Conaway, William K; Wee, Hwabok; Kim, H Mike

    2017-02-28

    A novel technique of "anterior offsetting" of the humeral head component to address posterior instability in total shoulder arthroplasty has been proposed, and its biomechanical benefits have been previously demonstrated experimentally. The present study sought to characterize the changes in joint mechanics associated with anterior offsetting with various amounts of glenoid retroversion using cadaver specimen-specific 3-dimensional finite element models. Specimen-specific computational finite element models were developed through importing digitized locations of six musculotendinous units of the rotator cuff and deltoid muscles based off three cadaveric shoulder specimens implanted with total shoulder arthroplasty in either anatomic or anterior humeral head offset. Additional glenoid retroversion angles (0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°) other than each specimen׳s actual retroversion were modeled. Contact area, contact force, peak pressure, center of pressure, and humeral head displacement were calculated at each offset and retroversion for statistical analysis. Anterior offsetting was associated with significant anterior shift of center of pressure and humeral head displacement upon muscle loading (pincreased contact area and decreased peak pressure (p > 0.05). All study variables showed significant differences when compared between the 4 different glenoid retroversion angles (p < 0.05) except for total force (p < 0.05). The study finding suggests that the anterior offsetting technique may contribute to joint stability in posteriorly unstable shoulder arthroplasty and may reduce eccentric loading on glenoid components although the long term clinical results are yet to be investigated in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inter-Relationship of Arterial Supply to Human Retina, Choroid, and Optic Nerve Head Using Micro Perfusion and Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Paula K; McAllister, Ian L; Morgan, William H; Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2017-07-01

    The prevailing view is that the human retina is supplied by the central retinal artery (CRA), the short posterior ciliary arteries (SPCAs) support the choroid, and both the CRA and the SPCAs are so-called "end artery" systems. In this study, we investigate whether vascular connections among the retina, choroid, and the optic nerve head (ONH) exist, using selective cannulation and microperfusion-labeling techniques. The CRA and/or one or more of the SPCAs were selected for cannulation in 18 human donor eyes. Fluorescent probes with different excitation wavelengths were perfused through different arteries on the same eye to distinguish the supply sources of different vascular beds. After labeling and fixation, the ONH region was dissected either longitudinally or transversely as thick sections for confocal microscopy. Retina, choroid, and ONH were imaged from whole-mount specimens. Probes perfused through the CRA or the SPCA alone labeled the microvessels in the retina, choroid, and ONH regions, as well as the optic nerve trunk. The vessels of the lamina cribrosa and the optic nerve trunk were labeled when probes were perfused through the SPCA. Perfusion through both the CRA and SPCA produced double labeling of vessels in the retina, the choroid, and the ONH. The results indicate an inter-relationship of arterial supply to the retina, choroid, and ONH in the human eye. This has important implications in understanding clinical observations and disease mechanisms such as that of glaucoma and ischemic optic nerve disease.

  20. Impact of Full-Day Head Start Prekindergarten Class Model on Student Academic Performance, Cognitive Skills, and Learning Behaviors by the End of Grade 2. Evaluation Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huafang; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2013-01-01

    This brief describes the impact of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) 2007-2008 full-day Head Start prekindergarten (pre-K) class model on student academic performance, cognitive skills, and learning behaviors by the end of Grade 2. This is the fourth impact study of the MCPS full-day Head Start pre-K class model. The following…

  1. Cocoa and Human Health: From Head to Foot--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Araujo, Quintino Reis; Gattward, James Nascimento; Almoosawi, Suzana; Silva, Maria das Graças Conceição Parada Costa; Dantas, Paulo Alfredo De Santana; De Araujo Júnior, Quintino Reis

    2016-01-01

    The cocoa, as part of the wonderful nature, provides the mankind a wide variety of valuable food products and health benefits. The most known and universally relished product derived from this fruit is chocolate, an amazing and unique food for the human nutrition with records of consumption of similar products dating to 1000 years BC. In fact, the cocoa is a complex food that includes over 300 different components. This review is designed to inform scientists, technicians, academicians, farmers, and interested communities of numerous studies that have been conducted worldwide to investigate the properties of various cocoa constituents, their relations to human health, and their potential role in the prevention and treatment of many medical conditions. The general population, for example in Brazil, despite being one of the major producers of cocoa, is poorly informed of the significant and beneficial properties of cocoa. The present review covers important topics linking cocoa to human health and show the state of the art of effect of cocoa in different systems that comprise the human body. The paper is organized based on the main human organ system and includes: cardiovascular/circulatory, neurological/nervous, oral health, endocrine, lymphatic and immunological, respiratory, reproductive, and dermatological systems. Scientific findings tend to confirm the historic designation of cocoa as "food of the Gods."

  2. Tracking a Driver’s Face against Extreme Head Poses and Inference of Drowsiness Using a Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Ho Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new method to track driver’s facial states, such as head pose and eye-blinking in the real-time basis. Since a driver in the natural driving condition moves his head in diverse ways and his face is often occluded by his hand or the wheel, it should be a great challenge for the standard face models. Among many, Active Appearance Model (AAM, and Active Shape Model (ASM are two favored face models. We have extended Discriminative Bayesian ASM by incorporating the extreme pose cases, called it Pose Extended—Active Shape model (PE-ASM. Two face databases (DB are used for the comparison purpose: one is the Boston University face DB and the other is our custom-made driving DB. Our evaluation indicates that PE-ASM outperforms ASM and AAM in terms of the face fitting against extreme poses. Using this model, we can estimate the driver’s head pose, as well as eye-blinking, by adding respective processes. Two HMMs are trained to model temporal behaviors of these two facial features, and consequently the system can make inference by enumerating these HMM states whether the driver is drowsy or not. Result suggests that it can be used as a driver drowsiness detector in the commercial car where the visual conditions are very diverse and often tough to deal with.

  3. Modelling soil erosion in a head catchment of Jemma Basin on the Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cama, Mariaelena; Schillaci, Calogero; Kropáček, Jan; Hochschild, Volker; Maerker, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion represents one of the most important global issues with serious effects on agriculture and water quality especially in developing countries such as Ethiopia where rapid population growth and climatic changes affect wide mountainous areas. The catchment of Andit-Tid is a head catchment of Jemma Basin draining to the Blue Nile (Central Ethiopia). It is located in an extremely variable topographical environment and it is exposed to high degradation dynamics especially in the lower part of the catchment. The increasing agricultural activity and grazing, lead to an intense use of the steep slopes which altered the soil structure. As a consequence, water erosion processes accelerated leading to the evolution of sheet erosion, gullies and badlands. This study is aimed at a geomorphological assessment of soil erosion susceptibility. First, a geomorphological map is generated using high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) derived from high resolution stereoscopic satellite data, multispectral imagery from Rapid Eye satellite system . The map was then validated by a detailed field survey. The final maps contains three inventories of landforms: i) sheet, ii) gully erosion and iii) badlands. The water erosion susceptibility is calculated with a Maximum Entropy approach. In particular, three different models are built using the three inventories as dependent variables and a set of spatial attributes describing the lithology, terrain, vegetation and land cover from remote sensing data and DEMs as independent variables. The single susceptibility maps for sheet, gully erosion as well as badlands showed good to excellent predictive performances. Moreover, we reveal and discuss the importance of different sets of variables among the three models. In order to explore the mutual overlap of the three susceptibility maps we generated a combined map as color composite whereas each color represents one component of water erosion. The latter map yield a useful information

  4. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cascading walks model for human mobility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Xiang-Wen; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the mechanism behind the scaling laws and series of anomalies in human trajectories is of fundamental significance in understanding many spatio-temporal phenomena. Recently, several models, e.g. the explorations-returns model (Song et al., 2010) and the radiation model for intercity travels (Simini et al., 2012), have been proposed to study the origin of these anomalies and the prediction of human movements. However, an agent-based model that could reproduce most of empirical observations without priori is still lacking. In this paper, considering the empirical findings on the correlations of move-lengths and staying time in human trips, we propose a simple model which is mainly based on the cascading processes to capture the human mobility patterns. In this model, each long-range movement activates series of shorter movements that are organized by the law of localized explorations and preferential returns in prescribed region. Based on the numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show more than five statistical characters that are well consistent with the empirical observations, including several types of scaling anomalies and the ultraslow diffusion properties, implying the cascading processes associated with the localized exploration and preferential returns are indeed a key in the understanding of human mobility activities. Moreover, the model shows both of the diverse individual mobility and aggregated scaling displacements, bridging the micro and macro patterns in human mobility. In summary, our model successfully explains most of empirical findings and provides deeper understandings on the emergence of human mobility patterns.

  6. Numerical Simulation and Validation of a High Head Model Francis Turbine at Part Load Operating Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Rahul; Trivedi, Chirag; Kumar Gandhi, Bhupendra; Cervantes, Michel J.

    2017-07-01

    Hydraulic turbines are operated over an extended operating range to meet the real time electricity demand. Turbines operated at part load have flow parameters not matching the designed ones. This results in unstable flow conditions in the runner and draft tube developing low frequency and high amplitude pressure pulsations. The unsteady pressure pulsations affect the dynamic stability of the turbine and cause additional fatigue. The work presented in this paper discusses the flow field investigation of a high head model Francis turbine at part load: 50% of the rated load. Numerical simulation of the complete turbine has been performed. Unsteady pressure pulsations in the vaneless space, runner, and draft tube are investigated and validated with available experimental data. Detailed analysis of the rotor stator interaction and draft tube flow field are performed and discussed. The analysis shows the presence of a rotating vortex rope in the draft tube at the frequency of 0.3 times of the runner rotational frequency. The frequency of the vortex rope precession, which causes severe fluctuations and vibrations in the draft tube, is predicted within 3.9% of the experimental measured value. The vortex rope results pressure pulsations propagating in the system whose frequency is also perceive in the runner and upstream the runner.

  7. Mathematical models of human behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, Anders Edsberg

    During the last 15 years there has been an explosion in human behavioral data caused by the emergence of cheap electronics and online platforms. This has spawned a whole new research field called computational social science, which has a quantitative approach to the study of human behavior. Most...... studies have considered data sets with just one behavioral variable such as email communication. The Social Fabric interdisciplinary research project is an attempt to collect a more complete data set on human behavior by providing 1000 smartphones with pre-installed data collection software to students...... at the Technical University of Denmark. The data set includes face-to-face interaction (Bluetooth), communication (calls and texts), mobility (GPS), social network (Facebook), and general background information including a psychological profile (questionnaire). This thesis presents my work on the Social Fabric...

  8. Brown (Eulemur fulvus) and ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) use human head orientation as a cue to gaze direction in a food choice task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botting, Jennifer L; Wiper, Mallory L; Anderson, James R

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the ability to follow human gaze has been demonstrated in monkeys and apes, there is little evidence that prosimians share this ability. The current study used a food choice paradigm to assess whether captive brown (Eulemur fulvus) and ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) use human gaze direction as a cue when choosing between an attending or non-attending human. Four experiments assessed the use of body, head and eye cues by the lemurs. In experiment 1, the non-attending human stood with her back to a food item; 3 of the 5 lemurs preferentially chose the attending human with an equivalent food item in view. In experiments 2 and 3, which used head angles of 90°, 4 out of 5 lemurs preferentially chose the attending human. In experiment 4, in which the humans differed only by whether their eyes were open or shut, no significant preferences were found. This study provides the first tentative evidence that lemurs are capable of discriminating human gaze direction and can use both body and head direction to do so. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Microdialysis in the femoral head of the minipig and in a blood cloth of human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten Foged; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    is happening in the dead space around the catheter in the drill canal, and is there an equilibrium period after the insertion of the catheter? Material and methods In an ex-vivo study using 5 syringes with 5 mL human blood, a microdialysis catheter was inserted and microdialysis was performed over 3 h...

  10. Jack Human Modelling Tool: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    CAD objects using its native modelling capability, such as a sphere, cone, cylinder, or cube, which can be used as building blocks to create more...the 2000 Digital Human Modeling conference [33] (only a powerpoint presentation was included on the conference proceedings CD). Limited information ...Computer and Information Sciences. 25. Monheit, G. and N.I. Badler, A kinematic model of the human spine and torso. IEEE Computer Graphics & Applications

  11. Optimising femoral-head osteochondral allograft transplantation in a preclinical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett D. Crist

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: These data provide initial translational and clinical evidence for large osteochondral allografts as a potential option for functional resurfacing of full-thickness cartilage defects of the femoral head.

  12. Location of General Head Boundaries (GHB) in the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset represents the area where lateral flow into and out of the Central Valley groundwater-flow system occurs. The General Head Boundary (GHB) is set...

  13. Network modeling identifies molecular functions targeted by miR-204 to suppress head and neck tumor metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large number of putative microRNA gene targets predicted by sequence-alignment databases and the relative low accuracy of such predictions which are conducted independently of biological context by design, systematic experimental identification and validation of every functional microRNA target is currently challenging. Consequently, biological studies have yet to identify, on a genome scale, key regulatory networks perturbed by altered microRNA functions in the context of cancer. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time how phenotypic knowledge of inheritable cancer traits and of risk factor loci can be utilized jointly with gene expression analysis to efficiently prioritize deregulated microRNAs for biological characterization. Using this approach we characterize miR-204 as a tumor suppressor microRNA and uncover previously unknown connections between microRNA regulation, network topology, and expression dynamics. Specifically, we validate 18 gene targets of miR-204 that show elevated mRNA expression and are enriched in biological processes associated with tumor progression in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC. We further demonstrate the enrichment of bottleneckness, a key molecular network topology, among miR-204 gene targets. Restoration of miR-204 function in HNSCC cell lines inhibits the expression of its functionally related gene targets, leads to the reduced adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro and attenuates experimental lung metastasis in vivo. As importantly, our investigation also provides experimental evidence linking the function of microRNAs that are located in the cancer-associated genomic regions (CAGRs to the observed predisposition to human cancers. Specifically, we show miR-204 may serve as a tumor suppressor gene at the 9q21.1-22.3 CAGR locus, a well established risk factor locus in head and neck cancers for which tumor suppressor genes have not been identified. This new strategy

  14. BCG immune activation reduces growth and angiogenesis in an in vitro model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Carolina; Cruces, Keyliz Peraza; Riestra Ayora, Juan; Martín-Sanz, Eduardo; Sanz-Fernández, Ricardo

    2017-11-07

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most frequent cancers worldwide and is associated with poor survival and significant treatment morbidity. The immune profile in patients with HNSCC is immunosuppressive and presents cytokine-mediated adaptive immune responses, triggered apoptosis of T cells, and alterations in antigen processing machinery. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy has been used successfully as a treatment for several types of cancer. In the present study, we sought to determine the antitumor effect of soluble mediators from peripheral blood mononuclear immune cells (PBMCs) activated with BCG vaccine in a three-dimensional coculture model of HNSCC growth using FaDu hypopharynx carcinoma squamous cells. BCG activation of PBMCs led to an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets concomitant with an elevation in the levels of the antitumor cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and a EGFR in FaDu cells. In addition, coculture with BCG-activated PBMCs reduced FaDu proliferation and increased cytotoxicity and apoptosis in parallel with an increase in caspase-3 activity and p53 expression. Finally, conditioned medium from BCG-activated PBMCs reduced the levels of the angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-2 produced by human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs), and inhibited their proliferation and differentiation into capillary-like structures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that BCG vaccination induces antitumor responses in an HNSCC in vitro model and suggest that the BCG vaccine could be an effective alternative therapy for the treatment of HNSCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurotrophy and immunomodulation of induced neural stem cell grafts in a mouse model of closed head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Closed head injury (CHI usually results in severe and permanent neurological impairments, which are caused by several intertwined phenomena, such as cerebral edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, neuronal loss, astroglial scarring and inflammation. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs, similar to neural stem cells (NSCs, can accelerate neurological recovery in vivo and produce neurotrophic factors in vitro. However, the effects of iNSC neurotrophy following CHI were not determined. Moreover, whether iNSCs have immunomodulatory properties is unknown. Mouse models of CHI were established using a standardized weight-drop device and assessed by neurological severity score (NSS. Although these models fail to mimic the complete spectrum of human CHI, they reproduce impairment in neurological function observed in clinical patients. Syngeneic iNSCs or NSCs were separately transplanted into the brains of CHI mice at 12 h after CHI. Neurological impairment post-CHI was evaluated by several tests. Animals were sacrificed for morphological and molecular biological analyses. We discovered that iNSC administration promoted neurological functional recovery in CHI mice and reduced cerebral edema, BBB disruption, cell death and astroglial scarring following trauma. Implanted iNSCs could up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF levels to support the survival of existing neurons after CHI. In addition, engrafted iNSCs decreased immune cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the brain post-injury. Moreover, we found significant nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB inhibition in the presence of iNSC grafts. In short, iNSCs exert neurotrophic and immunomodulatory effects that mitigate CHI-induced neurological impairment.

  16. Design of a Kaplan turbine for a wide range of operating head -Curved draft tube design and model test verification-

    Science.gov (United States)

    KO, Pohan; MATSUMOTO, Kiyoshi; OHTAKE, Norio; DING, Hua

    2016-11-01

    As for turbomachine off-design performance improvement is challenging but critical for maximising the performing area. In this paper, a curved draft tube for a medium head Kaplan type hydro turbine is introduced and discussed for its significant effect on expanding operating head range. Without adding any extra structure and working fluid for swirl destruction and damping, a carefully designed outline shape of draft tube with the selected placement of center-piers successfully supresses the growth of turbulence eddy and the transport of the swirl to the outlet. Also, more kinetic energy is recovered and the head lost is improved. Finally, the model test results are also presented. The obvious performance improvement was found in the lower net head area, where the maximum efficiency improvement was measured up to 20% without compromising the best efficiency point. Additionally, this design results in a new draft tube more compact in size and so leads to better construction and manufacturing cost performance for prototype. The draft tube geometry parameter designing process was concerning the best efficiency point together with the off-design points covering various water net heads and discharges. The hydraulic performance and flow behavior was numerically previewed and visualized by solving Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The simulation was under the assumption of steady-state incompressible turbulence flow inside the flow passage, and the inlet boundary condition was the carefully simulated flow pattern from the runner outlet. For confirmation, the corresponding turbine efficiency performance of the entire operating area was verified by model test.

  17. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucousmembranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplasticlesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital regionwhich might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according tothe invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papillomais often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children andyoung adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, butpeople’s lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  18. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelke, Kamil H; Lysenko, Lidia; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Gerber, Hanna

    2013-07-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucous membranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplastic lesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region which might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according to the invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papilloma is often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children and young adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, but people's lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  19. Lithospheric Flexure and Sedimentary Basin Evolution: the Steer's Head Model Re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. D. P.; Watts, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Backstripping studies of biostratigraphic data from deep wells show that sediment loading is one of the main factors controlling the subsidence and uplift history of sedimentary basins. Previous studies based on single layer models of elastic and viscoelastic plates overlying an inviscid fluid have shown that sediment loading, together with a tectonic subsidence that decreases exponentially with time, can explain the large-scale 'architecture' of rift-type basins and, in some cases, details of their internal stratigraphy such as onlap and offlap patterns. One problem with these so-called 'steer's head' models is that they were based on a simple rheological model in which the long-term strength of the lithosphere increased with thermal age. Recent oceanic flexure studies, however, reveal that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends not only on thermal age, but also load age. We have used the thermal structure based on plate cooling models, together with recent experimentally-derived flow laws, to compute the viscosity structure of the lithosphere and a new analytical model to compute the flexure of a multilayer viscoelastic plate by a trapezoid-shaped sediment load at different times since basin initiation. If we define the nondimensional number Dw = τm/τt, where τm is the Maxwell time constant and τt is the thermal time constant, we find that for Dw > 1 the flexure approximates that of a viscoelastic plate and an offlap pattern develops (Fig. 2). Interestingly Dw ~ 1 produces a basin in which onlap dominates its early evolution while offlap dominates its later evolution and an unconformity separates the two different stratal patterns (Fig. 3). Therefore, when consideration is given to the fact that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends on both thermal and load age we are able to produce stratal geometries that not only closely resemble stratigraphic observations, but do not require either long-term sea-level or sediment flux changes in

  20. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Burger-Calderon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD. HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future.

  1. Animal Models of Human Placentation - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael

    2007-01-01

    This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of animal models of human placentation and pays particular attention to the mouse and non-human primates. Analogies can be drawn between mouse and human in placental cell types and genes controlling placental development. There are, however...... and delivers poorly developed young. Guinea pig is a good alternative rodent model and among the few species known to develop pregnancy toxaemia. The sheep is well established as a model in fetal physiology but is of limited value for placental research. The ovine placenta is epitheliochorial...

  2. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are 'Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM' and 'Human-System Modelling (HSM', are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operators' skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory-motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human-mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  3. Frequency and phenotypic implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaoyu; Kachhap, Sushant; Sun, Wenyue; Wu, Guojun; Chuang, Alice; Poeta, Luana; Grumbine, Lawson; Mithani, Suhail K; Chatterjee, Aditi; Koch, Wayne; Westra, William H; Maitra, Anirban; Glazer, Chad; Carducci, Michael; Sidransky, David; McFate, Thomas; Verma, Ajay; Califano, Joseph A

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondrial genomic mutations are found in a variety of human cancers; however, the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in coding regions remains poorly defined, and the functional effects of mitochondrial mutations found in primary human cancers are not well described. Using MitoChip, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial genome in 83 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Forty-one of 83 (49%) tumors contained mtDNA mutations. Mutations occurred within noncoding (D-loop) and coding regions. A nonrandom distribution of mutations was found throughout the mitochondrial enzyme complex components. Sequencing of margins with dysplasia demonstrated an identical nonconservative mitochondrial mutation (A76T in ND4L) as the tumor, suggesting a role of mtDNA mutation in tumor progression. Analysis of p53 status showed that mtDNA mutations correlated positively with p53 mutations (P < 0.002). To characterize biological function of the mtDNA mutations, we cloned NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) mutants based on primary tumor mutations. Expression of the nuclear-transcribed, mitochondrial-targeted ND2 mutants resulted in increased anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, which was accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species production and an aerobic glycolytic metabolic phenotype with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha induction that is reversible by ascorbate. Cancer-specific mitochondrial mutations may contribute to development of a malignant phenotype by direct genotoxic effects from increased reactive oxygen species production as well as induction of aerobic glycolysis and growth promotion.

  4. Correlation of human papillomavirus status with apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Juliette P; van Bemmel, Xander; van Kempen, Pauline M. W.; Janssen, Luuk M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Pameijer, Frank A; Willems, Stefan M.; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of prognostic patient characteristics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of great importance. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive HNSCCs have favorable response to (chemo)radiotherapy. Apparent diffusion coefficient, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI, has

  5. Administrative Strategies of Departmental Heads as Determinants for the Effective Management of Human Resources in Tertiary Institutions in Delta State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated administrative strategies of departmental heads as determinants of effective management of human resources in tertiary institutions. Four research questions were asked and four hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. As a descriptive survey, the population comprised all the eight tertiary institutions in the state…

  6. Experience of Teaching Drawing in German Schools by A. Ažbe and S. Hollósy (On the Example of the Image of Human Head)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to analyze and disclose the methods for teaching drawing of the human head in foreign schools at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries for further application in modern Russian methodology of art education. The relevance of the problem under investigation is due to the structuring and disclosure of…

  7. Associations of Oral α-, β-, and γ-Human Papillomavirus Types With Risk of Incident Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agalliu, Ilir; Gapstur, Susan; Chen, Zigui; Wang, Tao; Anderson, Rebecca L; Teras, Lauren; Kreimer, Aimée R; Hayes, Richard B; Freedman, Neal D; Burk, Robert D

    2016-01-21

    Prospective studies are needed to examine the temporal relationship between oral human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Moreover, the oral cavity contains a wide spectrum of α-, β-, and γ-HPV types, but their association with risk of HNSCC is unknown. To prospectively examine associations between α-, β-, and γ-HPV detection in the oral cavity and incident HNSCC. A nested case-control study was carried out among 96 650 participants, cancer free at baseline, with available mouthwash samples in 2 prospective cohort studies: (1) the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort and (2) the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Incident cases of HNSCC (n = 132) were identified during an average 3.9 years of follow-up in both cohorts. Three controls per case (n = 396) were selected through incidence density sampling and matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and time since mouthwash collection. Through a next-generation sequencing assay, DNA from α-, β-, and γ-HPV types were detected. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs, adjusting for smoking history, alcohol consumption, and detection of HPV-16 for β- and γ-HPVs. Incident HNSCC, which includes cancers of the oropharynx, oral cavity, and larynx. A total of 132 participants developed HNSCC during the follow-up period (103 men and 29 women; average age at baseline, 66.5 years). Oral HPV-16 detection was associated with incident HNSCC (OR, 7.1; 95% CI, 2.2-22.6), with positive association for oropharyngeal SCC (OR, 22.4; 95% CI, 1.8-276.7), but not for oral cavity (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 0.6-34.7) or laryngeal SCCs (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01-834.80). Detection of β1-HPV-5 and β2-HPV-38 types, as well as γ-11 and γ-12 species, had ORs for HNSCC that ranged from 2.64 to 5.45 (P laryngeal SCCs (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.00-7.43; P = .05), whereas γ11- and

  8. Modeling human operator involvement in robotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    A modeling approach is presented to describe complex manned robotic systems. The robotic system is modeled as a (highly) nonlinear, possibly time-varying dynamic system including any time delays in terms of optimal estimation, control and decision theory. The role of the human operator(s) is modeled

  9. Multimodal imaging analysis of an orthotopic head and neck cancer mouse model and application of anti-CD137 tumor immune therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Hermann, Sven; Schäfers, Michael; Wildner, Michael; Kerem, Alexander; Öztürk, Ender; Jure-Kunkel, Maria; Franklin, Cindy; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Recent technical progress makes sophisticated noninvasive imaging methods available for murine models. For the first time, in this study, we applied fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-CT and FDG-PET-MRI to a murine orthotopic model of head and neck cancer immunotherapy. Tumor growth of floor of the mouth tumors was evaluated by multimodal small-animal imaging using FDG-PET-CT and FDG-PET-MRI. The immunotherapeutic effects of anti-CD137 antibody therapy were examined on body weight, tumor growth, and tumor-infiltrating immune cells in longitudinal imaging studies and immunohistochemical analyses. Imaging revealed aggressive, fast-growing tumors without evidence of local or distant metastases. CD137 immunotherapy decreased tumor take and growth and stabilized body weight over time. A clear case of tumor regression was demonstrated by longitudinal PET-CT. The murine model mimics the characteristics of head and neck cancer in humans and offers excellent opportunities to investigate immunomodulatory anticancer drugs. The CD137 antibody showed antitumor effects in some therapy-responsive mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mathematical modelling of the growth of human fetus anatomical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Krzysztof; Kędzia, Wojciech; Kędzia, Emilia; Kędzia, Alicja; Derkowski, Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this study was to present a procedure that would enable mathematical analysis of the increase of linear sizes of human anatomical structures, estimate mathematical model parameters and evaluate their adequacy. Section material consisted of 67 foetuses-rectus abdominis muscle and 75 foetuses- biceps femoris muscle. The following methods were incorporated to the study: preparation and anthropologic methods, image digital acquisition, Image J computer system measurements and statistical analysis method. We used an anthropologic method based on age determination with the use of crown-rump length-CRL (V-TUB) by Scammon and Calkins. The choice of mathematical function should be based on a real course of the curve presenting growth of anatomical structure linear size Ύ in subsequent weeks t of pregnancy. Size changes can be described with a segmental-linear model or one-function model with accuracy adequate enough for clinical purposes. The interdependence of size-age is described with many functions. However, the following functions are most often considered: linear, polynomial, spline, logarithmic, power, exponential, power-exponential, log-logistic I and II, Gompertz's I and II and von Bertalanffy's function. With the use of the procedures described above, mathematical models parameters were assessed for V-PL (the total length of body) and CRL body length increases, rectus abdominis total length h, its segments hI, hII, hIII, hIV, as well as biceps femoris length and width of long head (LHL and LHW) and of short head (SHL and SHW). The best adjustments to measurement results were observed in the exponential and Gompertz's models.

  11. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    needs to support such development through concepts and methods. This leads to a methodological approach that focuses on new artifacts to supplement and substitute existing artifacts. Through a design case, we develop the methodological approach and illustrate how the human–artifact model can be applied...... to analyze present artifacts and to design future ones. The model is used to structure such analysis and to reason about findings while providing leverage from activity theoretical insights on mediation, dialectics, and levels of activity....

  12. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  13. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  14. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  15. Human BDCM Mulit-Route PBPK Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains the code for the BDCM human multi-route model written in the programming language acsl. The final published manuscript is provided since it...

  16. Modelling an advanced ManPAD with dual band detectors and a rosette scanning seeker head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADs) have been a favoured anti aircraft weapon since their appearance on the military proliferation scene in the mid 1960s. Since this introduction there has been a 'cat and mouse' game of Missile Countermeasures (CMs) and the aircraft protection counter counter measures (CCMs) as missile designers attempt to defeat the aircraft platform protection equipment. Magnesium Teflon Viton (MTV) flares protected the target aircraft until the missile engineers discovered the art of flare rejection using techniques including track memory and track angle bias. These early CCMs relied upon CCM triggering techniques such as the rise rate method which would just sense a sudden increase in target energy and assume that a flare CM had been released by the target aircraft. This was not as reliable as was first thought as aspect changes (bringing another engine into the field of view) or glint from the sun could inadvertently trigger a CCM when not needed. The introduction of dual band detectors in the 1980s saw a major advance in CCM capability allowing comparisons between two distinct IR bands to be made thus allowing the recognition of an MTV flare to occur with minimal false alarms. The development of the rosette scan seeker in the 1980s complemented this advancement allowing the scene in the missile field of view (FOV) to be scanned by a much smaller (1/25) instantaneous FOV (IFOV) with the spectral comparisons being made at each scan point. This took the ManPAD from a basic IR energy detector to a pseudo imaging system capable of analysing individual elements of its overall FOV allowing more complex and robust CCM to be developed. This paper continues the work published in [1,2] and describes the method used to model an advanced ManPAD with a rosette scanning seeker head and robust CCMs similar to the Raytheon Stinger RMP.

  17. Improving head and neck CTA with hybrid and model-based iterative reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesten, J M; van der Schaaf, I C; Vos, P C; Willemink, M J; Velthuis, B K

    2015-11-01

    To compare image quality of head and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MIR) algorithms. The raw data of 34 studies were simultaneously reconstructed with FBP, HIR (iDose(4), Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands), and with a prototype version of a MIR algorithm (IMR, Philips Healthcare). Objective (contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR], vascular contrast, automatic vessel analysis [AVA], stenosis grade) and subjective image quality (ranking at level of the circle of Willis, carotid bifurcation, and shoulder) of the five reconstructions were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc analysis. Vascular contrast was significantly higher in both the circle of Willis and carotid bifurcation with both levels of MIR compared to the other reconstruction methods (all pHIR, mid HIR and FBP (pHIR; p>0.33). AVA showed most complete carotids in both MIR-levels, followed by high HIR (p>0.08), mid HIR (pHIR showed the best subjective image quality at the circle of Willis and carotid bifurcation level, followed by mid HIR. At shoulder level, low MIR and high HIR were ranked best, followed by high MIR. Objectively, MIR significantly improved the overall image quality, reduced image noise, and improved automated vessel analysis, whereas FBP showed the lowest objective image quality. Subjectively, the highest level of HIR was considered superior at the level of the circle of Willis and the carotid bifurcation, and along with the lowest level of MIR for the origins of the neck arteries at shoulder level. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A memory model for autonomous virtual humans

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Christopher; O'SULLIVAN, CAROL ANN

    2002-01-01

    PUBLISHED A memory model based on ?stage theory?, the dominant view of memory from the field of cognitive psychology, is presented for application to autonomous virtual humans. The virtual human senses external stimuli through a synthetic vision system. The vision system incorporates multiple modes of vision in order to accommodate a perceptual attention approach. The memory model is used to store perceived and attended object data at different stages in a filtering process....

  19. Modeling Human Cancers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoshita, M; Cagan, R L

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that affects multiple organs. Whole-body animal models provide important insights into oncology that can lead to clinical impact. Here, we review novel concepts that Drosophila studies have established for cancer biology, drug discovery, and patient therapy. Genetic studies using Drosophila have explored the roles of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that when dysregulated promote cancer formation, making Drosophila a useful model to study multiple aspects of transformation. Not limited to mechanism analyses, Drosophila has recently been showing its value in facilitating drug development. Flies offer rapid, efficient platforms by which novel classes of drugs can be identified as candidate anticancer leads. Further, we discuss the use of Drosophila as a platform to develop therapies for individual patients by modeling the tumor's genetic complexity. Drosophila provides both a classical and a novel tool to identify new therapeutics, complementing other more traditional cancer tools. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlashi, Erina, E-mail: evlashi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  1. Distinct pattern of TP53 mutations in human immunodeficiency virus-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleber-Netto, Frederico O; Zhao, Mei; Trivedi, Sanchit; Wang, Jiping; Jasser, Samar; McDowell, Christina; Kadara, Humam; Zhang, Jiexin; Wang, Jing; William, William N; Lee, J Jack; Nguyen, Minh Ly; Pai, Sara I; Walline, Heather M; Shin, Dong M; Ferris, Robert L; Carey, Thomas E; Myers, Jeffrey N; Pickering, Curtis R

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals (HIVIIs) have a higher incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and clinical and histopathological differences have been observed in their tumors in comparison with those of HNSCC patients without a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The reasons for these differences are not clear, and molecular differences between HIV-related HNSCC and non-HIV-related HNSCC may exist. This study compared the mutational patterns of HIV-related HNSCC and non-HIV-related HNSCC. The DNA of 20 samples of HIV-related HNSCCs and 32 samples of non-HIV-related HNSCCs was sequenced. DNA libraries covering exons of 18 genes frequently mutated in HNSCC (AJUBA, CASP8, CCND1, CDKN2A, EGFR, FAT1, FBXW7, HLA-A, HRAS, KEAP1, NFE2L2, NOTCH1, NOTCH2, NSD1, PIK3CA, TGFBR2, TP53, and TP63) were prepared and sequenced on an Ion Personal Genome Machine sequencer. DNA sequencing data were analyzed with Ion Reporter software. The human papillomavirus (HPV) status of the tumor samples was assessed with in situ hybridization, the MassARRAY HPV multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay, and p16 immunostaining. Mutation calls were compared among the studied groups. HIV-related HNSCC revealed a distinct pattern of mutations in comparison with non-HIV-related HNSCC. TP53 mutation frequencies were significantly lower in HIV-related HNSCC. Mutations in HIV+ patients tended to be TpC>T nucleotide changes for all mutated genes but especially for TP53. HNSCC in HIVIIs presents a distinct pattern of genetic mutations, particularly in the TP53 gene. HIV-related HNSCC may have a distinct biology, and an effect of the HIV virus on the pathogenesis of these tumors should not be ruled out. Cancer 2018;124:84-94. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Molecular analyses of unselected head and neck cancer cases demonstrates that human papillomavirus transcriptional activity is positively associated with survival and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, Liam; Winder, David M; Ball, Siolian L. R.; Vaughan, Katie; Lehmann, Martin; Scholtz, Lars-Uwe; Sterling, Jane C; Sudhoff, Holger H; Goon, Peter K C

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus DNA detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has been linked to improved patient prognosis. The main aims of the study was to test the hypotheses that HPV16 E6/E7 oncogene and p53 function within tumours were associated with the widely reported improved patient survival and prognosis in head and neck cancer. Methods HPV16 DNA, mRNA and p53 mRNA presence were analysed in a prospective study of 42 unselected HNSCC patients; correlating the data with pat...

  3. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  4. A Role for MST Neurons in Heading Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, L. S.; Perrone, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    A template model of human visual self-motion perception, which uses neurophysiologically realistic "heading detectors", is consistent with numerous human psychophysical results including the failure of humans to estimate their heading (direction of forward translation) accurately under certain visual conditions. We tested the model detectors with stimuli used by others in single-unit studies. The detectors showed emergent properties similar to those of MST neurons: (1) Sensitivity to non-preferred flow; Each detector is tuned to a specific combination of flow components and its response is systematically reduced by the addition of nonpreferred flow, and (2) Position invariance; The detectors maintain their apparent preference for particular flow components over large regions of their receptive fields. It has been argued that this latter property is incompatible with MST playing a role in heading perception. The model however demonstrates how neurons with the above response properties could still support accurate heading estimation within extrastriate cortical maps.

  5. Intracranial electrical impedance tomography: a method of continuous monitoring in an animal model of head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwaring, Preston K; Moodie, Karen L; Hartov, Alexander; Manwaring, Kim H; Halter, Ryan J

    2013-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a method that can render continuous graphical cross-sectional images of the brain's electrical properties. Because these properties can be altered by variations in water content, shifts in sodium concentration, bleeding, and mass deformation, EIT has promise as a sensitive instrument for head injury monitoring to improve early recognition of deterioration and to observe the benefits of therapeutic intervention. This study presents a swine model of head injury used to determine the detection capabilities of an inexpensive bedside EIT monitoring system with a novel intracranial pressure (ICP)/EIT electrode combination sensor on induced intraparenchymal mass effect, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and cessation of brain blood flow. Conductivity difference images are shown in conjunction with ICP data, confirming the effects. Eight domestic piglets (3-4 weeks of age, mean 10 kg), under general anesthesia, were subjected to 4 injuries: induced intraparenchymal mass effect using an inflated, and later, deflated 0.15-mL Fogarty catheter; hemorrhage by intraparenchymal injection of 1-mL arterial blood; and ischemia/infarction by euthanasia. EIT and ICP data were recorded 10 minutes before inducing the injury until 10 minutes after injury. Continuous EIT and ICP monitoring were facilitated by a ring of circumferentially disposed cranial Ag/AgCl electrodes and 1 intraparenchymal ICP/EIT sensor electrode combination. Data were recorded at 100 Hz. Two-dimensional tomographic conductivity difference (Δσ) images, rendered using data before and after an injury, were displayed in real time on an axial circular mesh. Regions of interest (ROI) within the images were automatically selected as the upper or lower 5% of conductivity data depending on the nature of the injury. Mean Δσ within the ROIs and background were statistically analyzed. ROI Δσ was compared with the background Δσ after an injury event using an unpaired, unequal variance

  6. Computational Intelligence in a Human Brain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Gaftea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the current trends in brain research domain and the current stage of development of research for software and hardware solutions, communication capabilities between: human beings and machines, new technologies, nano-science and Internet of Things (IoT devices. The proposed model for Human Brain assumes main similitude between human intelligence and the chess game thinking process. Tactical & strategic reasoning and the need to follow the rules of the chess game, all are very similar with the activities of the human brain. The main objective for a living being and the chess game player are the same: securing a position, surviving and eliminating the adversaries. The brain resolves these goals, and more, the being movement, actions and speech are sustained by the vital five senses and equilibrium. The chess game strategy helps us understand the human brain better and easier replicate in the proposed ‘Software and Hardware’ SAH Model.

  7. A model of head-related transfer functions based on a state-space analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Norman Herkamp

    This dissertation develops and validates a novel state-space method for binaural auditory display. Binaural displays seek to immerse a listener in a 3D virtual auditory scene with a pair of headphones. The challenge for any binaural display is to compute the two signals to supply to the headphones. The present work considers a general framework capable of synthesizing a wide variety of auditory scenes. The framework models collections of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) simultaneously. This framework improves the flexibility of contemporary displays, but it also compounds the steep computational cost of the display. The cost is reduced dramatically by formulating the collection of HRTFs in the state-space and employing order-reduction techniques to design efficient approximants. Order-reduction techniques based on the Hankel-operator are found to yield accurate low-cost approximants. However, the inter-aural time difference (ITD) of the HRTFs degrades the time-domain response of the approximants. Fortunately, this problem can be circumvented by employing a state-space architecture that allows the ITD to be modeled outside of the state-space. Accordingly, three state-space architectures are considered. Overall, a multiple-input, single-output (MISO) architecture yields the best compromise between performance and flexibility. The state-space approximants are evaluated both empirically and psychoacoustically. An array of truncated FIR filters is used as a pragmatic reference system for comparison. For a fixed cost bound, the state-space systems yield lower approximation error than FIR arrays for D>10, where D is the number of directions in the HRTF collection. A series of headphone listening tests are also performed to validate the state-space approach, and to estimate the minimum order N of indiscriminable approximants. For D = 50, the state-space systems yield order thresholds less than half those of the FIR arrays. Depending upon the stimulus uncertainty, a

  8. Cascading walks model for human mobility patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Pu Han

    Full Text Available Uncovering the mechanism behind the scaling laws and series of anomalies in human trajectories is of fundamental significance in understanding many spatio-temporal phenomena. Recently, several models, e.g. the explorations-returns model (Song et al., 2010 and the radiation model for intercity travels (Simini et al., 2012, have been proposed to study the origin of these anomalies and the prediction of human movements. However, an agent-based model that could reproduce most of empirical observations without priori is still lacking.In this paper, considering the empirical findings on the correlations of move-lengths and staying time in human trips, we propose a simple model which is mainly based on the cascading processes to capture the human mobility patterns. In this model, each long-range movement activates series of shorter movements that are organized by the law of localized explorations and preferential returns in prescribed region.Based on the numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show more than five statistical characters that are well consistent with the empirical observations, including several types of scaling anomalies and the ultraslow diffusion properties, implying the cascading processes associated with the localized exploration and preferential returns are indeed a key in the understanding of human mobility activities. Moreover, the model shows both of the diverse individual mobility and aggregated scaling displacements, bridging the micro and macro patterns in human mobility. In summary, our model successfully explains most of empirical findings and provides deeper understandings on the emergence of human mobility patterns.

  9. A humanized mouse model of tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica E Calderon

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb is the second leading infectious cause of death worldwide and the primary cause of death in people living with HIV/AIDS. There are several excellent animal models employed to study tuberculosis (TB, but many have limitations for reproducing human pathology and none are amenable to the direct study of HIV/M.tb co-infection. The humanized mouse has been increasingly employed to explore HIV infection and other pathogens where animal models are limiting. Our goal was to develop a small animal model of M.tb infection using the bone marrow, liver, thymus (BLT humanized mouse. NOD-SCID/γc(null mice were engrafted with human fetal liver and thymus tissue, and supplemented with CD34(+ fetal liver cells. Excellent reconstitution, as measured by expression of the human CD45 pan leukocyte marker by peripheral blood populations, was observed at 12 weeks after engraftment. Human T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8, as well as natural killer cells and monocyte/macrophages were all observed within the human leukocyte (CD45(+ population. Importantly, human T cells were functionally competent as determined by proliferative capacity and effector molecule (e.g. IFN-γ, granulysin, perforin expression in response to positive stimuli. Animals infected intranasally with M.tb had progressive bacterial infection in the lung and dissemination to spleen and liver from 2-8 weeks post infection. Sites of infection in the lung were characterized by the formation of organized granulomatous lesions, caseous necrosis, bronchial obstruction, and crystallization of cholesterol deposits. Human T cells were distributed throughout the lung, liver, and spleen at sites of inflammation and bacterial growth and were organized to the periphery of granulomas. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential to use the humanized mouse as a model of experimental TB.

  10. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A. [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harris, Stephen L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Manchester, New Hampshire (United States); Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  11. Design of miniaturized double-negative material for specific absorption rate reduction in human head.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rashed Iqbal Faruque

    Full Text Available In this study, a double-negative triangular metamaterial (TMM structure, which exhibits a resounding electric response at microwave frequency, was developed by etching two concentric triangular rings of conducting materials. A finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with the lossy-Drude model was used in this study. Simulations were performed using the CST Microwave Studio. The specific absorption rate (SAR reduction technique is discussed, and the effects of the position of attachment, the distance, and the size of the metamaterials on the SAR reduction are explored. The performance of the double-negative TMMs in cellular phones was also measured in the cheek and the tilted positions using the COMOSAR system. The TMMs achieved a 52.28% reduction for the 10 g SAR. These results provide a guideline to determine the triangular design of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a mobile phone.

  12. Models of the Human in Tantric Hinduism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne Wernicke; Flood, Gavin

    2019-01-01

    This research project explores the origins, developments and transformations of yogic models of the human (e.g. kuṇḍalinī yoga, the cakra system and ritual sex) in the tantric goddess traditions or what might be called Śāktism of medieval India. These Śākta models of esoteric anatomy originating...

  13. Mathematical human body modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Morsink, P.L.J.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modelling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimisation of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently such simulations are largely performed using occupant models

  14. Mathematical human modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Lange, R. de

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash-safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimization of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently, such simulations are largely performed using occupant models

  15. Compression of head-related transfer function using autoregressive-moving-average models and Legendre polynomials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekarchi, Sayedali; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    -moving-average (ARMA) filters whose coefficients are calculated using Prony's method. Such filters are specified by a few coefficients which can generate the full head-related impulse responses (HRIRs). Next, Legendre polynomials (LPs) are used to compress the ARMA filter coefficients. LPs are derived on the sphere...

  16. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Virus DNA by PCR in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in E.N.T. Ward of Ahwaz Imam Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nikakhlagh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, epidemiological and experimental evidences in western countries consistently support an etiological role for human papillomavirus (HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The role of HPV in the etiology of head and neck SCC in developing countries such as Iran has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate HPV DNA in the head and neck cancer by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital Ahwaz.Materials & Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 176 patients with SCC of head and neck who admitted in Ahwaz Imam Khomeini Hospital were evaluated with PCR for HPV DNA and compared to 176 control samples with benign pathology. Results: In this study 7 specimens (3.97% of the case group were positive for HPV DNA that include HPV 16(3 cases ,18(2 cases ,57(1 case, 33 (1case and only 1 specimen (0.57% of the control group was positive that include HPV 6 ( P value<0.001Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of HPVs in the SCC of head and neck. Further studies are needed to evaluate larger population in Ahwaz for the presence and types of HPV.

  17. Low prevalence of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the northwest region of the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Pia Marie; Holzinger, Dana; Salvador, Christianne; Orosa, Jose; Racelis, Sheryl; Leaño, Modesty; Sanchez, Danilo; Angeles, Lara Mae; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Ramos, John Donnie; Pawlita, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Geographic heterogeneity of human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been observed over the last few years. This trend has not been evaluated in the Philippines. Hence, this study aims to provide for the first time a data on the prevalence of HPV in HNSCC in the northwestern region of the Philippines. Two hundred one (201) biopsy samples (179 formalin fixed paraffin embedded and 22 fresh frozen) from 163 Filipino HNSCC cases (oral cavity = 88; larynx = 60; oropharynx = 15) diagnosed between 2003 to 2013 were initially included in this study. HPV DNA was detected by two methods: (1) BSGP5+/6+-PCR/ multiplex human papillomavirus genotyping and (2) TaqMan probes-based real-time qPCR. Presence of HPV type-specific transcripts were also analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with subsequent hybridization to oligonucleotide probes coupled to Luminex beads. Co-amplification of the β-globin and ubiquitin C genes served as internal positive controls for DNA and RNA analyses, respectively. Of the 163, 82 (50.3%) cases had at least one tissue sample that was valid for molecular analysis. Only two of the DNA valid cases (2.4%) were HPV DNA-positive (HPV11 and HPV33). All HPV mRNA assays rendered negative results except for HPV11 transcripts. Results of this study may indicate that there is probably very low prevalence of HPV-associated HNSCC among Filipino adults living in a rural region of the Philippines. This study could serve as a benchmark for designing follow-up studies that would assess possible changes in trends of HNSCC among Filipinos in different ethnic regions of the country, especially urban areas in which the population is expected to adapt Western style sexual behavior. A prospective sampling of fresh frozen tissue is also highly recommended to ensure better molecular analyses.

  18. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  19. Mathematical models of human african trypanosomiasis epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kat S; Stone, Chris M; Hastings, Ian M; Keeling, Matt J; Torr, Steve J; Chitnis, Nakul

    2015-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly called sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma spp. and transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). HAT is usually fatal if untreated and transmission occurs in foci across sub-Saharan Africa. Mathematical modelling of HAT began in the 1980s with extensions of the Ross-Macdonald malaria model and has since consisted, with a few exceptions, of similar deterministic compartmental models. These models have captured the main features of HAT epidemiology and provided insight on the effectiveness of the two main control interventions (treatment of humans and tsetse fly control) in eliminating transmission. However, most existing models have overestimated prevalence of infection and ignored transient dynamics. There is a need for properly validated models, evolving with improved data collection, that can provide quantitative predictions to help guide control and elimination strategies for HAT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conceptual modelling of human resource evaluation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negoiţă Doina Olivia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the highly diverse tasks which employees have to fulfil due to complex requirements of nowadays consumers, the human resource within an enterprise has become a strategic element for developing and exploiting products which meet the market expectations. Therefore, organizations encounter difficulties when approaching the human resource evaluation process. Hence, the aim of the current paper is to design a conceptual model of the aforementioned process, which allows the enterprises to develop a specific methodology. In order to design the conceptual model, Business Process Modelling instruments were employed - Adonis Community Edition Business Process Management Toolkit using the ADONIS BPMS Notation. The conceptual model was developed based on an in-depth secondary research regarding the human resource evaluation process. The proposed conceptual model represents a generic workflow (sequential and/ or simultaneously activities, which can be extended considering the enterprise’s needs regarding their requirements when conducting a human resource evaluation process. Enterprises can benefit from using software instruments for business process modelling as they enable process analysis and evaluation (predefined / specific queries and also model optimization (simulations.

  1. Potential Human Models of Infammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Hanauer

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, there is no single human model representative of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. An optimal human model awaits etiopathogenetic definitions and further reclassification or depiction of clinicopathological scenarios. Current human models can be classified into models depicting risk of disease; preclinical disease; acute inflammation; and miscellaneous IBD. Family studies are the best means of pursuing patients at risk. Evolving genetic and serological markers may further identify subgroups to assess with permeability probes, leukocyte scans or endoscopy for preclinical disease. Provocation with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may be useful in selected patients because NSAID mucosal damage may induce or mimic IBD. Alternative natural history or interventional studies in patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27 spondylarthropathy may be useful. The disease margin and pouchitis are models within the disease state of ulcerative colitis as are the aphthous ulcer, anastomotic margin and diverted fecal stream for Crohn's disease. Newly defined colitides, such as microscopic and collagenous colitis and diversion colitis, also provide potential comparative models to evaluate mucosal immune, inflammatory, reparative, secretory and absorptive regulation.

  2. Mathematical modeling of the human knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricafort, Juliet [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    1996-05-01

    A model was developed to determine the forces exerted by several flexor and extensor muscles of the human knee under static conditions. The following muscles were studied: the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and the set of quadricep muscles. The tibia and fibula were each modeled as rigid bodies; muscles were modeled by their functional lines of action in space. Assumptions based on previous data were used to resolve the indeterminacy.

  3. An analysis of bone and head sinus cancers in radium dial painters using a two-mutation carcinogenesis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenhouts, H.P. [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands). E-mail: Henk.Leenhouts at rivm.nl; Brugmans, M.J.P. [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2000-06-01

    Bone and head sinus cancer incidence after ingestion of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra by radium dial painters is analysed using a two-mutation clonal expansion model for radiation carcinogenesis, taking into account the retention and radiation patterns of these nuclides in the body. The best fit is obtained for compact bone retention and efficient diffusion of {sup 222}Rn to the bone cavities and radiation action on both mutation rates of the cancer model, as found in a similar analysis of bone sarcomas after {sup 226}Ra injection in beagles. The model parameters of the best fit are consistent with cellular radiobiological data and a previous analysis of lung cancer in uranium miners. Due to the low background incidence of bone and head sinus cancer, the resulting dose-effect relationships for these cancers are linear-quadratic with radium ingestion and alpha radiation dose. These results do not support a threshold dose concept, but the risks at low doses calculated by the model come out to about a factor 10 lower than using a linear extrapolation of the data to low doses, a procedure currently applied by ICRP and EPA. Furthermore, the model results indicate radiation risks at low doses to be related with background cancer incidence between relative and absolute radiation risk projections. The results, which are dependent on the model assumptions, might be more generally applicable for bone seekers and will therefore need further study to arrive at better radiation risk estimations. (abstract)

  4. Segmentation of parotid glands in head and neck CT images using a constrained active shape model with landmark uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antong; Noble, Jack H.; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Deeley, Matthew A.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2012-02-01

    Automatic segmentation of parotid glands in head and neck CT images for IMRT planning has drawn attention in recent years. Although previous approaches have achieved substantial success by reaching high overall volume-wise accuracy, suboptimal segmentations are observed on the interior boundary of the gland where the contrast is poor against the adjacent muscle groups. Herein we propose to use a constrained active shape model with landmark uncertainty to improve the segmentation in this area. Results obtained using this method are compared with results obtained using a regular active shape model through a leave-one-out experiment.

  5. Modeling the effect of head drag reduction for a cylinder with a protruding disk at high mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Mikhalev, A. N.; Sudakov, A. G.

    2014-11-01

    Various approaches to modeling super- and hypersonic turbulent airflow past cylindrical bodies with a nontraditional nose in the form of a protruding rod-supported disk have been compared. Aeroballistic experiments on a light-gas propulsion setup were combined with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations using VP2/3 program package based on multiblock computational techniques and a model of shear stress transport with flow-line curvature corrections. The phenomenon of the head and wave drag reduction for the stepped body is analyzed at high Mach numbers (up to 10) and variation of the supporting rod length under conditions of existence of the frontal flow separation zone.

  6. Hidden Markov Models for Human Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sequential structure of human genomic DNA by hidden Markov models. We apply models of widely different design: conventional left-right constructs and models with a built-in periodic architecture. The models are trained on segments of DNA sequences extracted such that they cover...... complete internal exons flanked by introns, or splice sites flanked by coding and non-coding sequence. Together, models of donor site regions, acceptor site regions and flanked internal exons, show that exons - besides the reading frame - hold a specific periodic pattern. The pattern has the consensus: non...

  7. Initial hydraulic heads for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the hydraulic-head values in 16 model layers used to initiate the transient simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  8. Locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital geospatial data set contains the locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient model of...

  9. Critical head, thickness of fine-grained deposit, and skeletal elastic storage arrays of the SUB package of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the SUB package arrays for the model grid, critical head, thickness of fine-grained deposits, and skeletal-elastic-storage used in the...

  10. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. 1. Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit.We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow’s rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals.2. Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semicircular canals (SCC? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those BOLD signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes.3. We investigated if subject’s sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is not arranged into

  11. Effects of dwell time of excitation waveform on meniscus movements for a tubular piezoelectric print-head: experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2017-07-01

    In inkjet applications, it is normal to search for an optimal drive waveform when dispensing a fresh fluid or adjusting a newly fabricated print-head. To test trial waveforms with different dwell times, a camera and a strobe light were used to image the protruding or retracting liquid tongues without ejecting any droplets. An edge detection method was used to calculate the lengths of the liquid tongues to draw the meniscus movement curves. The meniscus movement is determined by the time-domain response of the acoustic pressure at the nozzle of the print-head. Starting at the inverse piezoelectric effect, a mathematical model which considers the liquid viscosity in acoustic propagation is constructed to study the acoustic pressure response at the nozzle of the print-head. The liquid viscosity retards the propagation speed and dampens the harmonic amplitude. The pressure response, which is the combined effect of the acoustic pressures generated during the rising time and the falling time and after their propagations and reflections, explains the meniscus movements well. Finally, the optimal dwell time for droplet ejections is discussed.

  12. Human Operator Modeling for Aerial Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    of the first human centrifuge systems, for aviation studies, in the U.S. and in Germany. The basic human centrifuge is a gimbal-mounted cab at the end...optJ iN + u =L’x + v (t) = u c(t) + v u(t) (1.9) The parameter T N can be interpreted as a " neuromotor " time constant. Usually, is specified and g is...8217 becomes 0 10 2 (1.20)0 ’r N- V U - 1.4.2 Model Application Basically , modeling efforts utilizing the OCM can be approached in two ways: 1. Time-varying

  13. Creating the finite element models of car seats with passive head restraints to meet the requirements of passive safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Solopov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem solution to create the car chairs using modern software complexes (CAE based on the finite elements is capable to increase an efficiency of designing process significantly. Designing process is complicated by the fact that at present there are no available techniques focused on this sort of tasks.This article shows the features to create the final element models (FEM of the car chairs having three levels of complexity. It assesses a passive safety, which is ensured by the developed chair models with passive head restraints according to requirements of UNECE No 25 Regulations, and an accuracy of calculation results compared with those of full-scale experiments.This work is part of the developed technique, which allows effective development of the car chair designs both with passive, and with active head restraints, meeting the requirements of passive safety.By results of calculations and experiments it was established that at assessment by an UNECE No 25 technique the "rough" FEM (the 1st and 2nd levels can be considered as rational (in terms of effort to its creation and task solution and by the errors of results, and it is expedient to use them for preliminary and multiple calculations. Detailed models (the 3rd level provide the greatest accuracy (for accelerations the relative error makes 10%, for movements it is 11%, while in comparison with calculations, the relative error for a model of head restraint only decreases by 5% for accelerations and for 9% for movements.The materials presented in the article are used both in research activities and in training students at the Chair of Wheel Vehicles of the Scientific and Educational Complex "Special Mechanical Engineering" of Bauman Moscow State Technical University.

  14. Generative models of the human connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzel, Richard F.; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; He, Ye; de Reus, Marcel A.; Griffa, Alessandra; Vértes, Petra E.; Mišic, Bratislav; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Hagmann, Patric; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The human connectome represents a network map of the brain's wiring diagram and the pattern into which its connections are organized is thought to play an important role in cognitive function. The generative rules that shape the topology of the human connectome remain incompletely understood. Earlier work in model organisms has suggested that wiring rules based on geometric relationships (distance) can account for many but likely not all topological features. Here we systematically explore a family of generative models of the human connectome that yield synthetic networks designed according to different wiring rules combining geometric and a broad range of topological factors. We find that a combination of geometric constraints with a homophilic attachment mechanism can create synthetic networks that closely match many topological characteristics of individual human connectomes, including features that were not included in the optimization of the generative model itself. We use these models to investigate a lifespan dataset and show that, with age, the model parameters undergo progressive changes, suggesting a rebalancing of the generative factors underlying the connectome across the lifespan. PMID:26427642

  15. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  16. A novel algorithm for reliable detection of human papillomavirus in paraffin embedded head and neck cancer specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Serge J; Hesselink, Albertus T; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Haesevoets, Annick; Snijders, Peter J F; Pawlita, Michael; Meijer, Chris J L M; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Leemans, C René; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2007-12-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) plays a role in the development of a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, uncertainty exists about the true impact of HPV in this tumor type as conflicting reports have been published with prevalence rates from 0 to 100%. We aimed to find a detection algorithm of a biologically and thus clinically meaningful infection, applicable for high-throughput screening of frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. By considering detection of HPV E6 oncogene expression in frozen biopsies as gold standard for a meaningful HPV infection, the value of several assays was evaluated on FFPE tumor specimens and sera of 48 HNSCC patients. The following assays were evaluated on FFPE tissue samples: HPV DNA general primer (GP)5+/6+ PCR, viral load analysis, HPV16 DNA FISH detection, HPV16 E6 mRNA RT-PCR, p16 immunostaining, and on corresponding serum samples detection of antibodies against the HPV16 proteins L1, E6 and E7. Comparing single assays on FFPE tissue samples detection of E6 expression by RT-PCR was superior, but application remains at present limited to HPV16 detection. Most suitable algorithm with 100% sensitivity and specificity appeared p16 immunostaining followed by GP5+/6+ PCR on the p16-positive cases. We show that clinically meaningful viral HPV infections can be more reliably measured in FFPE HNSCC samples in a standard and high throughput manner, paving the way for prognostic and experimental vaccination studies, regarding not only HNSCC, but possibly also cancer types with HPV involvement in subgroups such as penile and anal cancer. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Unsupervised exercise in survivors of human papillomavirus related head and neck cancer: how many can go it alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Joshua; Kim, Jiyoung; Zhang, Xiaochen; Aggarwal, Charu; Cohen, Roger B; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2017-08-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer (HNC) have a better prognosis relative to other types of HNC, making survivorship an emerging and critical issue. Exercise is a core component of survivorship care, but little is known about how many survivors of HPV-related HNC can safely be advised to start exercising on their own, as opposed to needing further evaluation or supervised exercise. We utilized guidelines to identify health issues that would indicate value of further evaluation prior to being safely prescribed unsupervised exercise. We performed a retrospective chart review of 150 patients with HPV-related HNC to assess health issues 6 months after completing definitive therapy. Patients with at least one health issue were deemed appropriate to receive further evaluation prior to prescription for unsupervised exercise. We utilized logistic regression to identify clinical and demographic factors associated with the need for further evaluation, likely performed by outpatient rehabilitation clinicians. In this cohort of patients, 39.3% could safely be prescribed unsupervised exercise 6 months after completing definitive therapy. On multivariable regression, older age, BMI >30, and receipt of radiation were associated with an increased likelihood for requiring further evaluation or supervised exercise. Over half of patients with HPV-related HNC would benefit from referral to physical therapy or an exercise professional for further evaluation to determine the most appropriate level of exercise supervision, based upon current guidelines. Development of such referral systems will be essential to enhance survivorship outcomes for patients who have completed treatment.

  18. Osteopontin is induced by TGF-β2 and regulates metabolic cell activity in cultured human optic nerve head astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Neumann

    Full Text Available The aqueous humor (AH component transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is strongly correlated to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, and was shown to up-regulate glaucoma-associated extracellular matrix (ECM components, members of the ECM degradation system and heat shock proteins (HSP in primary ocular cells. Here we present osteopontin (OPN as a new TGF-β2 responsive factor in cultured human optic nerve head (ONH astrocytes. Activation was initially demonstrated by Oligo GEArray microarray and confirmed by semiquantitative (sq RT-PCR, realtime RT-PCR and western blot. Expressions of most prevalent OPN receptors CD44 and integrin receptor subunits αV, α4, α 5, α6, α9, β1, β3 and β5 by ONH astrocytes were shown by sqRT-PCR and immunofluorescence labeling. TGF-β2 treatment did not affect their expression levels. OPN did not regulate gene expression of described TGF-β2 targets shown by sqRT-PCR. In MTS-assays, OPN had a time- and dose-dependent stimulating effect on the metabolic activity of ONH astrocytes, whereas TGF-β2 significantly reduced metabolism. OPN signaling via CD44 mediated a repressive outcome on metabolic activity, whereas signaling via integrin receptors resulted in a pro-metabolic effect. In summary, our findings characterize OPN as a TGF-β2 responsive factor that is not involved in TGF-β2 mediated ECM and HSP modulation, but affects the metabolic activity of astrocytes. A potential involvement in a protective response to TGF-β2 triggered damage is indicated, but requires further investigation.

  19. Verification of a virtual fields method to extract the mechanical properties of human optic nerve head tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Thakku, Sri Gowtham; Beotra, Meghna R; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin; Goh, James C H; Strouthidis, Nicholas G; Girard, Michael J A

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to verify a custom virtual fields method (VFM) to estimate the patient-specific biomechanical properties of human optic nerve head (ONH) tissues, given their full-field deformations induced by intraocular pressure (IOP). To verify the accuracy of VFM, we first generated 'artificial' ONH displacements from predetermined (known) ONH tissue biomechanical properties using finite element analysis. Using such deformations, if we are able to match back the known biomechanical properties, it would indicate that our VFM technique is accurate. The peripapillary sclera was assumed anisotropic hyperelastic, while all other ONH tissues were considered isotropic. The simulated ONH displacements were fed into the VFM algorithm to extract back the biomechanical properties. The robustness of VFM was also tested against rigid body motions and noise added to the simulated displacements. Then, the computational speed of VFM was compared to that of a gold-standard stiffness measurement method (inverse finite element method or IFEM). Finally, as proof of principle, VFM was applied to IOP-induced ONH deformation data (obtained from one subject's eye imaged with OCT), and the biomechanical properties of the prelamina and lamina cribrosa (LC) were extracted. From given ONH displacements, VFM successfully matched back the biomechanical properties of ONH tissues with high accuracy and efficiency. For all parameters, the percentage errors were less than 0.05%. Our method was insensitive to rigid body motions and was also able to recover the material parameters in the presence of noise. VFM was also found 125 times faster than the gold-standard IFEM. Finally, the estimated shear modulus for the prelamina and the LC of the studied subject's eye were 33.7 and 63.5 kPa, respectively. VFM may be capable of measuring the biomechanical properties of ONH tissues with high speed and accuracy. It has potential in identifying patient-specific ONH biomechanical properties in the clinic if

  20. Detection of active human papilloma virus-16 in head and neck cancers of Asian North Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannigrahi, M K; Singh, V; Sharma, R; Panda, N K; Radotra, B D; Khullar, M

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are one of the most common cancers in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an emerging risk factor for HNC. The present study was carried out to determine the active form of HPV-16 using a combination of PCR, viral load determination, HPV-16 E7 mRNA expression, p16, p53, and pRB immuno-histochemistry (IHC). A total of 226 HNC patients were enrolled in the present study. Sixty-seven (29.7%) of HNC cases were found to be HPV DNA positive. Thirty-two (14%) cases were HPV-16 DNA positive and 20 (9%) cases expressed HPV-16 E7 mRNA. HPV-16 mRNA/p16 positive cases had significantly increased viral load and integrated HPV-16 DNA. In summary, of total HNC patients, 6% cases were positive for both HPV-16 DNA and p16, and 5% were positive for both E7 mRNA and p16 IHC. We observed similar HPV-16 DNA/E7mRNA prevalence in oropharynx and oral cavity sites, however, oropharynx SCC had significantly higher viral load. Our results show low prevalence of active HPV-16 in North Indian HNC patients. HPV-16 E7 mRNA expression correlated with p16 nuclear positivity and increased viral load. Therefore, E7 mRNA expression may be used as a good surrogate indicator for active form of HPV-16 infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Investigation in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Initial Report from the Low Risk HPV Types Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie Niya, Mohammad Hadi; Safarnezhad Tameshkel, Fahimeh; Panahi, Mahshid; Bokharaei Salim, Farah; Monavari, Seyed Hamid Reza; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-09-27

    Background: Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are a major health issue in many parts of the world. Recently, attention has focused on the human papilloma virus (HPV) as a potential causative agent for HNSCC. This study aimed to survey HPV occurrence in HNSCCs as part of a comprehensive molecular epidemiology approach. Methods: In this retrospective study, patients were recruited from hospitals affiliated to the Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks were subjected to DNA isolation by QIAamp® DNA FFPE Tissue Kit and nested PCR, HPV-16 specific conventional PCR, and extra INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping assays were subsequently performed. PCR products were purified with a High Pure PCR Product Purification Kit and sequenced with an ABI 3730 XL sequencer. CLC Main Workbench 5 and MEGA5 bioinformatics software was used to analyze the raw data and to create the phylogenetic tree. SPSS v.20 was applied for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 156 FFPE blocks were collected from 2011 to 2017. Total mean age (y) of participants was 60.5 ± 12.6; 77.6 % (121/156) being men and 22.4% (35/156) e women. Overall, 5/156 (3.2%) patients (3 females and 2 males) were found to be HPV positive using the three methods. HPV genotyping revealed HPV types 16, 2, 27, and 43 in these malignancies. Tumor location and lymph node involvement indicated significant differences between the sexes. Conclusion: Although high risk HPV genotypes have been associated with HNSCCs, our findings indicate a potential of low risk HPV types to also contribute to such malignancies. Creative Commons Attribution License

  2. New and emerging models of human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Andrew R A; Kovacs, Kristof

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, new models of human intelligence have altered the theoretical landscape in psychometrics and cognitive science. In the current article, we provide an overview of key distinguishing features of these new models. Compared to 20th century models of intelligence, the new models proposed in the 21st century are unique for three primary reasons; (1) new models interpret the general factor, or g, as an emergent property reflecting the pattern of positive correlations observed among test scores, not as a causal latent variable, and therefore challenge the notion of general ability, (2) new models bridge correlational and experimental psychology and account for inter-individual differences in behavior in terms of intra-individual psychological processes, and (3) new models make novel predictions about the neural correlates of intelligent behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impact of head models in N170 component source imaging: results in control subjects and ADHD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrachini, L.; Blenkmann, A.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Petroni, A.; Urquina, H.; Manes, F.; Ibáñez, A.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The major goal of evoked related potential studies arise in source localization techniques to identify the loci of neural activity that give rise to a particular voltage distribution measured on the surface of the scalp. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the head model adopted in order to estimate the N170 component source in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and control subjects, considering faces and words stimuli. The standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography algorithm (sLORETA) is used to compare between the three shell spherical head model and a fully realistic model based on the ICBM-152 atlas. We compare their variance on source estimation and analyze the impact on the N170 source localization. Results show that the often used three shell spherical model may lead to erroneous solutions, specially on ADHD patients, so its use is not recommended. Our results also suggest that N170 sources are mainly located in the right occipital fusiform gyrus for faces stimuli and in the left occipital fusiform gyrus for words stimuli, for both control subjects and ADHD patients. We also found a notable decrease on the N170 estimated source amplitude on ADHD patients, resulting in a plausible marker of the disease.

  4. Molecular Markers of Pesticide Resistance and Pathogens in Human Head Lice (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) From Rural Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremeeva, Marina E; Capps, Danielle; Winful, Emmanuel B; Warang, Shamta S; Braswell, Sarah E; Tokarevich, Nikolay K; Bonilla, Denise L; Durden, Lance A

    2017-07-01

    Although the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, and body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus L., both have a worldwide distribution, the occurrence of head louse pediculosis appears to be more prevalent in modern societies despite systematic use of various pediculicides. This study tested head lice collected in rural Georgia and body lice collected in Russia for the prevalence of a kdr-biomarker that is associated with permethrin resistance. This study also screened lice for the presence of DNA from Bartonella quintana and Acinetobacter species. The kdr-permethrin resistance biomarker for the T917I mutation was detected by RFLP and PCR in 99.9% of head lice tested from Georgia, whereas only 2.9% of body lice from Russia tested positive for this kdr biomarker. DNA of B. quintana was detected in 10.3% of head lice from Georgia, whereas 84.8% of body lice from Russia tested positive. Acinetobacter DNA was detected in 80.8% (95% CI, 68-89%) of head lice from Georgia and all body lice from Russia tested. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Initial Model of Social Acceptability for Human Augmentation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eghtebas, Chloe; Pay, Yun Suen; Väänänen, Kaisa; Pfeiffer, Ties; Meyer, Joachim; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Academia and industry engage in major efforts to develop technologies for augmenting human senses and activities. Many of these technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD), haptic augmentation systems, and exoskeletons can be applied in numerous

  6. Analisis Model Pengukuran Human Capital dalam Organisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecep Hidayat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of human capital is not an easy to do because it is dynamic and always changing in accordance with the changing circumstances. Determination of dimensions and indicators of measurement needs to consider various factors such as situations and also the research scopes. This article has objectives to review the concepts, dimensions and measurement models of human capital. The research method used was literature study with a major reference source from current journal articles that discuss the measurement of human capital. Results of the study showed that basically the definition set forth in any dimension containing either explicitly or implicitly. In addition, the result indicated that there are three main categories of equality among researchers regarding the definition of human capital which emphasizes on: economic value/productivity, education, and abilities/competencies. The results also showed that the use of definitions, dimensions, and indicators for measurement of human capital depends on the situation, the scope of research, and the size of the organization. The conclusion of the study indicated that the measurement model and determination of dimensions and indicators of human capital measurement will determine the effectiveness of the measurement, and will have an impact on organizational performance.

  7. Learning Latent Factor Models of Human Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Guerzhoy, Michael; Hertzmann, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    NIPS Workshop on Social Network and Social Media Analysis; International audience; This paper describes probability models for human travel, using latent factors learned from data. The latent factors represent interpretable properties: travel distance cost, desirability of destinations, and affinity between locations. Individuals are clustered into distinct styles of travel. The latent factors combine in a multiplicative manner, and are learned using Maximum Likelihood. The resulting models e...

  8. Animal models for human genetic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharif Sons

    disturbances (including anxiety and depression). (Rosenthal and Brown, 2007). Mouse models for a rare genetic disorder of the blood platelets, May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA) showed same symptoms as occur in humans (American Institute of. Physics, 2011). Also in genetic prion disease, histopathological examination of ...

  9. Future of human models for crash analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Happee, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Lange, R. de

    2001-01-01

    In the crash safety field mathematical models can be applied in practically all area's of research and development including: reconstruction of actual accidents, design (CAD) of the crash response of vehicles, safety devices and roadside facilities and in support of human impact biomechanical

  10. Quality assessment of human behavior models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Accurate and efficient models of human behavior offer great potential in military and crisis management applications. However, little attention has been given to the man ner in which it can be determined if this potential is actually realized. In this study a quality assessment approach that

  11. Human thermal modeling to augment MWIR image analysis in surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, R. L.; Skipper, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    The interpretation of thermal imagery can be augmented with information derived from human thermal modeling to better infer human activity during, or prior to, data capture. This additional insight into human activity could prove useful in security and surveillance applications. We have implemented Tanabe's 65 NM thermocomfort model to predict skin surface temperature under a wide variety of environmental, activity and body parameters. Here, humans are modeled as sixteen segments (head, chest, upper leg, etc.), wherein spherical geometry is assumed for the head and cylindrical geometry is assumed for all other segments. Each segment is comprised of four layers: core, muscle, fat, and skin. Clothing is modeled as an additional layer (or layers) of resistance. Users supply input parameters via our custom MATLAB graphical user interface that includes a robust clothing database based on McCullough's A Database for Determining the Evaporative Resistance of Clothing, and then Tanabe's bioheat equations are solved to predict skin temperatures of each body segment. As an initial step of model validation, we compared our computed thermal resistances with literature values. Our evaporative and dry resistance on a per segment basis agreed with literature values. The dry resistance of each segment varied no more than .03 [m2°C/W]. Model validation will be extended to compare the results of our human subject trials (known body parameters, clothing, environmental factors and activity levels) to model outputs. Agreement would further substantiate the propagation of model- predicted skin temperatures through the thermal imager's transfer function to predict human heat signatures in thermal imagery.

  12. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay ...

  13. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be: Stored Viewed on a monitor Printed on film Three-dimensional models of the head area can ... when you have certain other signs or symptoms Hearing loss (in some people) Symptoms of damage to ...

  14. Refinement and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Head-Spine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    towrds the back, and the z axis is positive vertically up~terd (towards the head). The x-z. y-t, and x-y planes correspond to the frontal plaue , the...motion. The sagittal and frontal plaue bending stiffnesses are of the same order, so the sagittal plane curvature uould tend to louer the sagittal...dynes. The sagittal plane bending stiffness is somewhat . loer than the fronLal plane bending stiffness due to the sagintal plaue curvaturos. SThis

  15. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-12-01

    Reliable disease models are needed in order to improve quality of healthcare. This includes gaining better understanding of disease mechanisms, developing new therapeutic interventions and personalizing treatment. Up-to-date, the majority of our knowledge about disease states comes from in vivo animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. However, it has been exceedingly difficult to model disease at the tissue level. Since recently, the gap between cell line studies and in vivo modeling has been narrowing thanks to progress in biomaterials and stem cell research. Development of reliable 3D culture systems has enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro models. Here we focus on some of the latest advances and future perspectives in 3D organoids for human disease modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable disease models are needed in order to improve quality of healthcare. This includes gaining better understanding of disease mechanisms, developing new therapeutic interventions and personalizing treatment. Up-to-date, the majority of our knowledge about disease states comes from in vivo a...... culture systems has enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro models. Here we focus on some of the latest advances and future perspectives in 3D organoids for human disease modeling....... animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. However, it has been exceedingly difficult to model disease at the tissue level. Since recently, the gap between cell line studies and in vivo modeling has been narrowing thanks to progress in biomaterials and stem cell research. Development of reliable 3D...

  17. Constructing predictive models of human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Revzen, Shai; Guckenheimer, John; Ludwig, Christian; Reger, Johann; Seyfarth, Andre

    2015-02-06

    Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict future motions. We construct SLIP control models using data-driven Floquet analysis, and show how these models may be used to obtain predictive models of human running with six additional states comprising the position and velocity of the swing-leg ankle. Our methods are general, and may be applied to any rhythmic physical system. We provide an approach for identifying an event-driven linear controller that approximates an observed stabilization strategy, and for producing a reduced-state model which closely recovers the observed dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 8 novel loci involved in shape variation of human head hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Gu; Hysi, Pirro G; Wu, Sijie; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Breslin, Krystal; Pospiech, Ewelina; Hamer, Merel A; Peng, Fuduan; Muralidharan, Charanya; Acuna-Alonzo, Victor; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bortolini, Maria Catira; Gonzalez-Jose, Rolando; Zeng, Changqing; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Uitterlinden, André G; Ikram, M Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Nijsten, Tamar; Walsh, Susan; Branicki, Wojciech; Wang, Sijia; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Spector, Timothy D; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-12-06

    Shape variation of human head hair shows striking variation within and between human populations, while its genetic basis is far from being understood. We performed a series of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and replication studies in a total of 28,964 subjects from 9 cohorts from multiple geographic origins. A meta-analysis of three European GWASs identified 8 novel loci (1p36.23 ERRFI1/SLC45A1, 1p36.22 PEX14, 1p36.13 PADI3, 2p13.3 TGFA, 11p14.1 LGR4, 12q13.13 HOXC13, 17q21.2 KRTAP, and 20q13.33 PTK6), and confirmed 4 previously known ones (1q21.3 TCHH/TCHHL1/LCE3E, 2q35 WNT10A, 4q21.21 FRAS1, and 10p14 LINC00708/GATA3), all showing genome-wide significant association with hair shape (P < 5e-8). All except one (1p36.22 PEX14) were replicated with nominal significance in at least one of the 6 additional cohorts of European, Native American and East Asian origins. Three additional previously known genes (EDAR, OFCC1, and PRSS53) were confirmed at nominal significance level. A multivariable regression model revealed that 14 SNPs from different genes significantly and independently contribute to hair shape variation, reaching a cross-validated AUC value of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.62-0.70) and an AUC value of 0.64 in an independent validation cohort, providing an improved accuracy compared to a previous model. Prediction outcomes of 2,504 individuals from a multiethnic sample were largely consistent with general knowledge on the global distribution of hair shape variation. Our study thus delivers target genes and DNA variants for future functional studies to further evaluate the molecular basis of hair shape in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Validation workflow for a clinical Bayesian network model in multidisciplinary decision making in head and neck oncology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypko, Mario A; Stoehr, Matthaeus; Kozniewski, Marcin; Druzdzel, Marek J; Dietz, Andreas; Berliner, Leonard; Lemke, Heinz U

    2017-11-01

    Oncological treatment is being increasingly complex, and therefore, decision making in multidisciplinary teams is becoming the key activity in the clinical pathways. The increased complexity is related to the number and variability of possible treatment decisions that may be relevant to a patient. In this paper, we describe validation of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment decision in the clinical domain of head and neck oncology. Probabilistic graphical models and corresponding inference algorithms, in the form of Bayesian networks, can support complex decision-making processes by providing a mathematically reproducible and transparent advice. The quality of BN-based advice depends on the quality of the model. Therefore, it is vital to validate the model before it is applied in practice. For an example BN subnetwork of laryngeal cancer with 303 variables, we evaluated 66 patient records. To validate the model on this dataset, a validation workflow was applied in combination with quantitative and qualitative analyses. In the subsequent analyses, we observed four sources of imprecise predictions: incorrect data, incomplete patient data, outvoting relevant observations, and incorrect model. Finally, the four problems were solved by modifying the data and the model. The presented validation effort is related to the model complexity. For simpler models, the validation workflow is the same, although it may require fewer validation methods. The validation success is related to the model's well-founded knowledge base. The remaining laryngeal cancer model may disclose additional sources of imprecise predictions.

  20. Modeling fear-conditioned bradycardia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Tzovara, Athina; Staib, Matthias; Paulus, Philipp C; Hofer, Nicolas; Bach, Dominik R

    2016-06-01

    Across species, cued fear conditioning is a common experimental paradigm to investigate aversive Pavlovian learning. While fear-conditioned stimuli (CS+) elicit overt behavior in many mammals, this is not the case in humans. Typically, autonomic nervous system activity is used to quantify fear memory in humans, measured by skin conductance responses (SCR). Here, we investigate whether heart period responses (HPR) evoked by the CS, often observed in humans and small mammals, are suitable to complement SCR as an index of fear memory in humans. We analyze four datasets involving delay and trace conditioning, in which heart beats are identified via electrocardiogram or pulse oximetry, to show that fear-conditioned heart rate deceleration (bradycardia) is elicited and robustly distinguishes CS+ from CS-. We then develop a psychophysiological model (PsPM) of fear-conditioned HPR. This PsPM is inverted to yield estimates of autonomic input into the heart. We show that the sensitivity to distinguish CS+ and CS- (predictive validity) is higher for model-based estimates than peak-scoring analysis, and compare this with SCR. Our work provides a novel tool to investigate fear memory in humans that allows direct comparison between species. © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  1. Modeling human infertility with pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human fertility is dependent upon the correct establishment and differentiation of the germline. This is because no other cell type in the body is capable of passing a genome and epigenome from parent to child. Terminally differentiated germline cells in the adult testis and ovary are called gametes. However, the initial specification of germline cells occurs in the embryo around the time of gastrulation. Most of our knowledge regarding the cell and molecular events that govern human germline specification involves extrapolating scientific principles from model organisms, most notably the mouse. However, recent work using next generation sequencing, gene editing and differentiation of germline cells from pluripotent stem cells has revealed that the core molecular mechanisms that regulate human germline development are different from rodents. Here, we will discuss the major molecular pathways required for human germline differentiation and how pluripotent stem cells have revolutionized our ability to study the earliest steps in human embryonic lineage specification in order to understand human fertility.

  2. Necessary organizational changes according to Burke-Litwin model in the head nurses system of management in healthcare and social welfare institutions - the Slovenia experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filej, Bojana; Skela-Savic, Brigita; Vicic, Visnja H; Hudorovic, Narcis

    2009-05-01

    To discover which changes should be implemented in the system of head nursing management in Slovenian healthcare institutions and social welfare institutions. The questionnaire was distributed to 155 head nurses of Slovenian hospitals, primary healthcare centres and social welfare institutions. The Burke-Litwin organizational change model has been used to look at which changes have to be implemented in the management system of head nurses. In hospitals head nurses have greater independent competence for planning professional training of nursing employees (psocial welfare institutions, and "system (policies and procedures)" for primary healthcare centres. According to results of our study, changes are needed in leadership and management of nursing in primary healthcare centres. In social welfare institutions changes are only required in leadership. Organizational changes are not necessary for any element of the Burke-Litwin model for hospitals.

  3. Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human-Machine Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0006 Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions...AND SUBTITLE Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions 5a.  CONTRACT...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED: PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT When a human and an intelligent machine work together as a team, human

  4. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented

  5. Modeling of interactions of electromagnetic fields with human bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputa, Krzysztof

    Interactions of electromagnetic fields with the human body have been a subject of scientific interest and public concern. In recent years, issues in power line field effects and those of wireless telephones have been in the forefront of research. Engineering research compliments biological investigations by quantifying the induced fields in biological bodies due to exposure to external fields. The research presented in this thesis aims at providing reliable tools, and addressing some of the unresolved issues related to interactions with the human body of power line fields and fields produced by handheld wireless telephones. The research comprises two areas, namely development of versatile models of the human body and their visualisation, and verification and application of numerical codes to solve selected problems of interest. The models of the human body, which are based on the magnetic resonance scans of the body, are unique and differ considerably from other models currently available. With the aid of computer software developed, the models can be arranged to different postures, and medical devices can be accurately placed inside them. A previously developed code for modeling interactions of power line fields with biological bodies has been verified by rigorous, quantitative inter-laboratory comparison for two human body models. This code has been employed to model electromagnetic interference (EMI) of the magnetic field with implanted cardiac pacemakers. In this case, the correct placement and representation of the pacemaker leads are critical, as simplified computations have been shown to result in significant errors. In modeling interactions of wireless communication devices, the finite difference time domain technique (FDTD) has become a de facto standard. The previously developed code has been verified by comparison with the analytical solution for a conductive sphere. While previously researchers limited their verifications to principal axes of the sphere

  6. Human papillomavirus and p53 expression in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region in relation to clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivars, Lars; Näsman, Anders; Tertipis, Nikolaos; Vlastos, Andrea; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Nordemar, Sushma

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head neck region are generally treated with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy at times combined with chemotherapy, a treatment associated with considerable side effects. Some of these tumors may originate as human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with better clinical outcome than head neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in general, and could potentially do well with less treatment. Here, we therefore investigated whether HPV status and p53-expression correlated to clinical outcome in patients with CUP in the head neck region. Fifty metastases were analyzed for presence of HPV DNA, and expression of p16(INK4A) and p53 and the data were correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with HPV DNA-positive (HPVDNA+) metastases had significantly better 5-year overall survival (OS) compared to those with HPVDNA- metastases (80.0% vs. 36.7%, respectively; P = 0.004), with a similar tendency for disease-free survival (DFS). These survival rates showed excellent concordance with those of HPVDNA+ and HPVDNA- OSCC in Sweden during the same time period, strengthening the hypothesis that HPVDNA+ head and neck CUP may originate from HPVDNA+ OSCC. In addition, having absent/intermediary-low as compared to high expression of p53 correlated to a better prognosis with a 69% as compared to 14% 5-year OS, respectively (P < 0.001), and for DFS the tendency was analogous. In conclusion, both HPV status and p53 expression are valuable prognostic factors in patients with CUP in the head and neck region and should be further explored for clinical use. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Learning toward practical head pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Gaoli; He, Feixiang; Zhu, Rong; Xuan, Shibin

    2017-08-01

    Head pose is useful information for many face-related tasks, such as face recognition, behavior analysis, human-computer interfaces, etc. Existing head pose estimation methods usually assume that the face images have been well aligned or that sufficient and precise training data are available. In practical applications, however, these assumptions are very likely to be invalid. This paper first investigates the impact of the failure of these assumptions, i.e., misalignment of face images, uncertainty and undersampling of training data, on head pose estimation accuracy of state-of-the-art methods. A learning-based approach is then designed to enhance the robustness of head pose estimation to these factors. To cope with misalignment, instead of using hand-crafted features, it seeks suitable features by learning from a set of training data with a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN), such that the training data can be best classified into the correct head pose categories. To handle uncertainty and undersampling, it employs multivariate labeling distributions (MLDs) with dense sampling intervals to represent the head pose attributes of face images. The correlation between the features and the dense MLD representations of face images is approximated by a maximum entropy model, whose parameters are optimized on the given training data. To estimate the head pose of a face image, its MLD representation is first computed according to the model based on the features extracted from the image by the trained DCNN, and its head pose is then assumed to be the one corresponding to the peak in its MLD. Evaluation experiments on the Pointing'04, FacePix, Multi-PIE, and CASIA-PEAL databases prove the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Modeling Operations Costs for Human Exploration Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Operations and support (O&S) costs for human spaceflight have not received the same attention in the cost estimating community as have development costs. This is unfortunate as O&S costs typically comprise a majority of life-cycle costs (LCC) in such programs as the International Space Station (ISS) and the now-cancelled Constellation Program. Recognizing this, the Constellation Program and NASA HQs supported the development of an O&S cost model specifically for human spaceflight. This model, known as the Exploration Architectures Operations Cost Model (ExAOCM), provided the operations cost estimates for a variety of alternative human missions to the moon, Mars, and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) in architectural studies. ExAOCM is philosophically based on the DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) concepts of operational nodes, systems, operational functions, and milestones. This paper presents some of the historical background surrounding the development of the model, and discusses the underlying structure, its unusual user interface, and lastly, previous examples of its use in the aforementioned architectural studies.

  9. Therapeutic Targeting of Protein Kinase CK2 Gene Expression in Feline Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Naturally Occurring Large-Animal Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Claire M; Trembley, Janeen H; Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Cornax, Ingrid; Modiano, Jaime F; Ahmed, Khalil

    2017-06-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2) is a highly promising target for cancer therapy, and anti-CK2 gene expression therapy has shown effectiveness in rodent models of human head and neck cancer (HNC). To date, there has been no large-animal model of cancer in which to further explore anti-CK2 therapies. Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) has been proposed as a large-animal model for human HNC, and we have previously shown that CK2 is a rational target in FOSCC. Here we have tested the hypothesis that a novel tenfibgen-coated tumor-specific nanocapsule carrying RNA interference (RNAi) oligonucleotides targeting feline CK2α and CK2α' (TBG-RNAi-fCK2αα') would be safe in cats with FOSCC; assessment of target inhibition and tumor response were secondary aims. Nine cats were enrolled and treated at two dose levels in a 3+3 escalation. Cats received a total of six treatments with TBG-RNAi-fCK2αα'. Pre- and posttreatment, tumor and normal oral mucosa biopsies were collected to assess CK2 expression, using immunohistochemistry (IHC) preparations evaluated by light microscopy. Toxicity and tumor response were assessed on the basis of standard criteria. The most common adverse events were grade 1 or 2 weight loss and anorexia. Grade 3 tissue necrosis was seen in association with tumor response in one cat, asymptomatic grade 4 elevations in aspartate transaminase and creatine phosphokinase in one cat, and asymptomatic grade 3 hypokalemia in one cat. Of six cats with evaluable biopsies, two had a reduction in CK2 IHC score in tumors after treatment. Four cats had progressive disease during the study period, three had stable disease, one had partial response, and response could not be evaluated in one cat. We conclude that the drug appeared safe and that there is some evidence of efficacy in FOSCC. Further investigation regarding dosing, schedule, target modulation, toxicity, and efficacy in a larger group of cats is warranted and may inform future clinical studies in human

  10. Cordycepin enhances cisplatin apoptotic effect through caspase/MAPK pathways in human head and neck tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Hui Chen,1,2,* Jo-Yu Wang,3,* Bo-Syong Pan,3,4 Yi-Fen Mu,3 Meng-Shao Lai,3,4 Edmund Cheung So,5 Thian-Sze Wong,6 Bu-Miin Huang3,4 1Department of Anesthesia, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Liouying, 2Department of Nursing, Min-Hwei College of Health Care Management, 3Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 4The Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 5Department of Anesthesia, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong *Authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The present study aims to investigate whether the combination treatment of cordycepin (an extracted pure compound from Cordyceps sinensis and cisplatin (a platinum-based chemotherapy drug has better apoptotic effect in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods: The apoptotic influences of cordycepin and/or cisplatin treatments to human OC3, OEC-M1, and FaDu HNSCC cells were investigated by morphological observations, viability assay, flow cytometry assay, and Western blotting methods. Results: Data showed that the cell death phenomenon increased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and it appeared more in cordycepin plus cisplatin cotreatment among three cell lines. Cell survival rates significantly decreased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and the better apoptotic effects were observed in cotreatment. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated that percentages of subG1 cells in cordycepin or cisplatin treatments significantly increased, suggesting that cells underwent apoptosis, and cordycepin plus cisplatin induced many more subG1 cells. Furthermore, cordycepin or cisplatin induced caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase protein cleavages, and stimulated c

  11. Investigation of the mechanical behavior of kangaroo humeral head cartilage tissue by a porohyperelastic model based on the strain-rate-dependent permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Senadeera, Wijitha; Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-11-01

    Solid-interstitial fluid interaction, which depends on tissue permeability, is significant to the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of humeral head (shoulder) cartilage. Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to that of the human shoulder, kangaroos present a suitable animal model. Therefore, indentation experiments were conducted on kangaroo shoulder cartilage tissues from low (10(-4)/s) to moderately high (10(-2)/s) strain-rates. A porohyperelastic model was developed based on the experimental characterization; and a permeability function that takes into account the effect of strain-rate on permeability (strain-rate-dependent permeability) was introduced into the model to investigate the effect of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue response. The prediction of the model with the strain-rate-dependent permeability was compared with those of the models using constant permeability and strain-dependent permeability. Compared to the model with constant permeability, the models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability were able to better capture the experimental variation at all strain-rates (p < 0.05). Significant differences were not identified between models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability at strain-rate of 5 × 10(-3)/s (p = 0.179). However, at strain-rate of 10(-2)/s, the model with strain-rate-dependent permeability was significantly better at capturing the experimental results (p < 0.005). The findings thus revealed the significance of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue behavior at large strain-rates, which provides insights into the mechanical deformation mechanisms of cartilage tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of serotonin receptor blockade on endocrine and cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, S; Secher, N H; Knigge, U

    1993-01-01

    Effects of blockade of serotonin (5-HT) receptors on the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine adaptations during head-up tilt were investigated in normal men. In control experiments 50 degrees head-up tilt increased heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), plasma renin activity (PRA...... abolished the adrenomedullary response to hypotension without affecting cardiovascular tolerance or the activity of the pituitary-adrenal axis. The results suggest that serotonergic mechanisms may be involved in the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine responses to central blood volume depletion...

  13. Computer Modeling of Human Delta Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dzimbova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of selective agonists of δ-opioid receptor as well as the model of interaction of ligands with this receptor is the subjects of increased interest. In the absence of crystal structures of opioid receptors, 3D homology models with different templates have been reported in the literature. The problem is that these models are not available for widespread use. The aims of our study are: (1 to choose within recently published crystallographic structures templates for homology modeling of the human δ-opioid receptor (DOR; (2 to evaluate the models with different computational tools; and (3 to precise the most reliable model basing on correlation between docking data and in vitro bioassay results. The enkephalin analogues, as ligands used in this study, were previously synthesized by our group and their biological activity was evaluated. Several models of DOR were generated using different templates. All these models were evaluated by PROCHECK and MolProbity and relationship between docking data and in vitro results was determined. The best correlations received for the tested models of DOR were found between efficacy (erel of the compounds, calculated from in vitro experiments and Fitness scoring function from docking studies. New model of DOR was generated and evaluated by different approaches. This model has good GA341 value (0.99 from MODELLER, good values from PROCHECK (92.6% of most favored regions and MolProbity (99.5% of favored regions. Scoring function correlates (Pearson r = -0.7368, p-value = 0.0097 with erel of a series of enkephalin analogues, calculated from in vitro experiments. So, this investigation allows suggesting a reliable model of DOR. Newly generated model of DOR receptor could be used further for in silico experiments and it will give possibility for faster and more correct design of selective and effective ligands for δ-opioid receptor.

  14. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  15. Towards a human rotavirus disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbom, Marie; Sharma, Sumit; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2012-08-01

    While the clinical importance of human rotavirus (RV) disease is well recognized and potent vaccines have been developed, our understanding of how human RV causes diarrhoea, vomiting and death remains unresolved. The fact that oral rehydration corrects electrolyte and water loss, indicates that enterocytes in the small intestine have a functional sodium-glucose co-transporter. Moreover, RV infection delays gastric emptying and loperamide appears to attenuate RV diarrhoea, thereby suggesting activation of the enteric nervous system. Serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists attenuate vomiting in young children with gastroenteritis while zinc and enkephalinase inhibitors attenuate RV-induced diarrhoea. In this review we discuss clinical symptoms, pathology, histology and treatment practices for human RV infections and compile the data into a simplified disease model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  17. Using our Heads and HARTSS*: Developing Perspective-Taking Skills for Socioscientific Reasoning (*Humanities, ARTs, and Social Sciences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Sami; Zeidler, Dana L.

    2016-04-01

    Functional scientific literacy demands an informed citizenry capable of negotiating controversial socioscientific issues (SSI). Perspective taking is critical to SSI implementation as it enables understanding of the diverse cognitive and emotional perspectives of others. Science teacher educators must therefore facilitate teachers' promotion of classroom environments that value diverse perspectives. The purpose of this theoretical paper is to propose the HARTSS model through which successful practices that promote perspective taking in the humanities, arts, and social sciences are identified and translated into socioscientific contexts, thereby developing an array of promising interventions designed for science teacher educators to foster perspective taking in current and future science teachers and their students.

  18. Computational modeling of blast wave interaction with a human body and assessment of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gupta, R. K.

    2017-07-01

    The modeling of human body biomechanics resulting from blast exposure poses great challenges because of the complex geometry and the substantial material heterogeneity. We developed a detailed human body finite element model representing both the geometry and the materials realistically. The model includes the detailed head (face, skull, brain and spinal cord), the neck, the skeleton, air cavities (lungs) and the tissues. Hence, it can be used to properly model the stress wave propagation in the human body subjected to blast loading. The blast loading on the human was generated from a simulated C4 explosion. We used the highly scalable solvers in the multi-physics code CoBi for both the blast simulation and the human body biomechanics. The meshes generated for these simulations are of good quality so that relatively large time-step sizes can be used without resorting to artificial time scaling treatments. The coupled gas dynamics and biomechanics solutions were validated against the shock tube test data. The human body models were used to conduct parametric simulations to find the biomechanical response and the brain injury mechanism due to blasts impacting the human body. Under the same blast loading condition, we showed the importance of inclusion of the whole body.

  19. Computational modeling of blast wave interaction with a human body and assessment of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gupta, R. K.

    2017-11-01

    The modeling of human body biomechanics resulting from blast exposure poses great challenges because of the complex geometry and the substantial material heterogeneity. We developed a detailed human body finite element model representing both the geometry and the materials realistically. The model includes the detailed head (face, skull, brain and spinal cord), the neck, the skeleton, air cavities (lungs) and the tissues. Hence, it can be used to properly model the stress wave propagation in the human body subjected to blast loading. The blast loading on the human was generated from a simulated C4 explosion. We used the highly scalable solvers in the multi-physics code CoBi for both the blast simulation and the human body biomechanics. The meshes generated for these simulations are of good quality so that relatively large time-step sizes can be used without resorting to artificial time scaling treatments. The coupled gas dynamics and biomechanics solutions were validated against the shock tube test data. The human body models were used to conduct parametric simulations to find the biomechanical response and the brain injury mechanism due to blasts impacting the human body. Under the same blast loading condition, we showed the importance of inclusion of the whole body.

  20. Modeling correlated human dynamics with temporal preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-03-01

    We empirically study the activity pattern of individual blog-posting and observe the interevent time distributions decay as power-laws at both individual and population level. As different from previous studies, we find significant short-term memory in it. Moreover, the memory coefficient first decays in a power law and then turns to an exponential form. Our findings produce evidence for the strong short-term memory in human dynamics and challenge previous models. Accordingly, we propose a simple model based on temporal preference, which can well reproduce both the heavy-tailed nature and the strong memory effects. This work helps in understanding the temporal regularities of online human behaviors.

  1. Modeling fear‐conditioned bradycardia in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzovara, Athina; Staib, Matthias; Paulus, Philipp C.; Hofer, Nicolas; Bach, Dominik R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Across species, cued fear conditioning is a common experimental paradigm to investigate aversive Pavlovian learning. While fear‐conditioned stimuli (CS+) elicit overt behavior in many mammals, this is not the case in humans. Typically, autonomic nervous system activity is used to quantify fear memory in humans, measured by skin conductance responses (SCR). Here, we investigate whether heart period responses (HPR) evoked by the CS, often observed in humans and small mammals, are suitable to complement SCR as an index of fear memory in humans. We analyze four datasets involving delay and trace conditioning, in which heart beats are identified via electrocardiogram or pulse oximetry, to show that fear‐conditioned heart rate deceleration (bradycardia) is elicited and robustly distinguishes CS+ from CS−. We then develop a psychophysiological model (PsPM) of fear‐conditioned HPR. This PsPM is inverted to yield estimates of autonomic input into the heart. We show that the sensitivity to distinguish CS+ and CS− (predictive validity) is higher for model‐based estimates than peak‐scoring analysis, and compare this with SCR. Our work provides a novel tool to investigate fear memory in humans that allows direct comparison between species. PMID:26950648

  2. Human Plague Risk: Spatial-Temporal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    This chpater reviews the use of spatial-temporal models in identifying potential risks of plague outbreaks into the human population. Using earth observations by satellites remote sensing there has been a systematic analysis and mapping of the close coupling between the vectors of the disease and climate variability. The overall result is that incidence of plague is correlated to positive El Nino/Southem Oscillation (ENSO).

  3. MODELING HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS USING MIDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Bruce P. Hallbert; Brian F. Gore

    2006-05-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and NASA Ames Research Center regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error with novel control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of risk significance in recreating past event scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of novel staffing levels in control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of risk in next generation control rooms.

  4. Biomedical Simulation Models of Human Auditory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Mehmet M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed acoustic engineering models that explore noise propagation mechanisms associated with noise attenuation and transmission paths created when using hearing protectors such as earplugs and headsets in high noise environments. Biomedical finite element (FE) models are developed based on volume Computed Tomography scan data which provides explicit external ear, ear canal, middle ear ossicular bones and cochlea geometry. Results from these studies have enabled a greater understanding of hearing protector to flesh dynamics as well as prioritizing noise propagation mechanisms. Prioritization of noise mechanisms can form an essential framework for exploration of new design principles and methods in both earplug and earcup applications. These models are currently being used in development of a novel hearing protection evaluation system that can provide experimentally correlated psychoacoustic noise attenuation. Moreover, these FE models can be used to simulate the effects of blast related impulse noise on human auditory mechanisms and brain tissue.

  5. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radigan KA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn A Radigan,1 Alexander V Misharin,2 Monica Chi,1 GR Scott Budinger11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 2Division of Rheumatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models – mice and ferrets – most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection.Keywords: mice, ferret, influenza, animal model, biosafety

  6. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  7. Modeling Oxygen Transport in the Human Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexander; Filoche, Marcel; Salafia, Carolyn; Grebenkov, Denis

    Efficient functioning of the human placenta is crucial for the favorable pregnancy outcome. We construct a 3D model of oxygen transport in the placenta based on its histological cross-sections. The model accounts for both diffusion and convention of oxygen in the intervillous space and allows one to estimate oxygen uptake of a placentone. We demonstrate the existence of an optimal villi density maximizing the uptake and explain it as a trade-off between the incoming oxygen flow and the absorbing villous surface. Calculations performed for arbitrary shapes of fetal villi show that only two geometrical characteristics - villi density and the effective villi radius - are required to predict fetal oxygen uptake. Two combinations of physiological parameters that determine oxygen uptake are also identified: maximal oxygen inflow of a placentone and the Damköhler number. An automatic image analysis method is developed and applied to 22 healthy placental cross-sections demonstrating that villi density of a healthy human placenta lies within 10% of the optimal value, while overall geometry efficiency is rather low (around 30-40%). In a perspective, the model can constitute the base of a reliable tool of post partum oxygen exchange efficiency assessment in the human placenta. Also affiliated with Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

  8. Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: a pilot study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Billy W; Draney, Mary T; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Ruehm, Stefan G; Pawlicki, Todd; Xing, Lei; Herfkens, Robert J; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

  9. Design and dosimetric analysis of a 385 MHz TETRA head exposure system for use in human provocation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gernot; Bolz, Thomas; Uberbacher, Richard; Escorihuela-Navarro, Ana; Bahr, Achim; Dorn, Hans; Sauter, Cornelia; Eggert, Torsten; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2012-10-01

    A new head exposure system for double-blind provocation studies investigating possible effects of terrestrial trunked radio (TETRA)-like exposure (385 MHz) on central nervous processes was developed and dosimetrically analyzed. The exposure system allows localized exposure in the temporal brain, similar to the case of operating a TETRA handset at the ear. The system and antenna concept enables exposure during wake and sleep states while an electroencephalogram (EEG) is recorded. The dosimetric assessment and uncertainty analysis yield high efficiency of 14 W/kg per Watt of accepted antenna input power due to an optimized antenna directly worn on the subject's head. Beside sham exposure, high and low exposure at 6 and 1.5 W/kg (in terms of maxSAR10g in the head) were implemented. Double-blind control and monitoring of exposure is enabled by easy-to-use control software. Exposure uncertainty was rigorously evaluated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computations, taking into account anatomical differences of the head, the physiological range of the dielectric tissue properties including effects of sweating on the antenna, possible influences of the EEG electrodes and cables, variations in antenna input reflection coefficients, and effects on the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution due to unavoidable small variations in the antenna position. This analysis yielded a reasonable uncertainty of analysis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Animal models and their importance to human physiological responses in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Two prominent theories to explain the physiological effects of microgravity relate to the cascade of changes associated with the cephalic shifts of fluids and the absence of tissue deformation forces. One-g experiments for humans used bed rest and the head-down tilt (HDT) method, while animal experiments have been conducted using the tail-suspended, head-down, and hindlimbs non-weightbearing model. Because of the success of the HDT approach with rats to simulate the gravitational effects on the musculoskeletal system exhibited by humans, the same model has been used to study the effects of gravity on the cardiopulmonary systems of humans and other vertebrates. Results to date indicate the model is effective in producing comparable changes associated with blood volume, erythropoiesis, cardiac mass, baroreceptor responsiveness, carbohydrate metabolism, post-flight VO2max, and post-flight cardiac output during exercise. Inherent with these results is the potential of the model to be useful in investigating responsible mechanisms. The suspension model has promise in understanding the capillary blood PO2 changes in space as well as the arterial PO2 changes in subjects participating in a HDT experiment. However, whether the model can provide insights on the up-or-down regulation of adrenoreceptors remains to be determined, and many investigators believe the HDT approach should not be followed to study gravitational influences on pulmonary function in either humans or animals. It was concluded that the tail-suspended animal model had sufficient merit to study in-flight and post-flight human physiological responses and mechanisms.

  11. Incidence trends for potentially human papillomavirus-related and -unrelated head and neck cancers in France using population-based cancer registries data: 1980-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jéhannin-Ligier, Karine; Belot, Aurélien; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bossard, Nadine; Launoy, Guy; Uhry, Zoé

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently recognised as a carcinogenic factor for a subset of head and neck cancers (HNC). In Europe, France has one of the highest incidence rates of HNC. The aim of this study is to explore changes in HNC incidence in France, potentially in relation with infection by HPV. HNC were classified into two anatomical groups: potentially HPV-related and HPV-unrelated. Trends over the period 1980-2012 were analysed by an age-period-cohort model based on data from eleven French cancer registries. Among men, the age-standardised incidence rate (ASR) of HNC decreased in both groups, but less so for HPV-related sites as compared to unrelated sites, especially in recent years (annual percentage change [APC] over the period 2005-2012: -3.5% vs. -5.4%). Among women, the ASR increased in both groups, but more rapidly for HPV-related as compared to unrelated sites (APC over the period 2005-2012: +1.9% vs. -0.4%). This preferential growth of HPV-related versus unrelated HNC was observed in the cohorts born from 1930 to 1935. The differences in trends between possible HPV-related and HPV-unrelated sites suggest an increasing incidence of HNC due to HPV infection. The difference was less marked in men as compared to women, most likely because of a higher contamination in the HPV-related group by cancers due to tobacco or alcohol consumption. The pattern observed is consistent with observations made in other countries, with studies of HPV prevalence in HNC and the evolution of sexual behaviour in France. © 2017 UICC.

  12. Validation of CRASH Model in Prediction of 14-day Mortality and 6-month Unfavorable Outcome of Head Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Hashemi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, many prognostic models have been proposed to predict the outcome of patients withtraumatic brain injuries. External validation of these models in different populations is of great importancefor their generalization. The present study was designed, aiming to determine the value of CRASH prognosticmodel in prediction of 14-day mortality (14-DM and 6-month unfavorable outcome (6-MUO of patients withtraumatic brain injury. Methods: In the present prospective diagnostic test study, calibration and discriminationof CRASH model were evaluated in head trauma patients referred to the emergency department. Variablesrequired for calculating CRASH expected risks (ER, and observed 14-DM and 6-MUO were gathered. Then ERof 14-DM and 6-MUO were calculated. The patients were followed for 6 months and their 14-DM and 6-MUOwere recorded. Finally, the correlation of CRASH ER and the observed outcome of the patients was evaluated.The data were analyzed using STATA version 11.0. Results: In this study, 323 patients with the mean age of 34.0´s 19.4 years were evaluated (87.3% male. Calibration of the basic and CT models in prediction of 14-day and6-month outcome were in the desirable range (P Ç 0.05. Area under the curve in the basic model for predictionof 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89–0.96 and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90–0.95, respectively. In addition,area under the curve in the CT model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.97 and0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.96, respectively. There was no significant difference between the discriminations of thetwo models in prediction of 14-DM (p Æ 0.11 and 6-MUO (p Æ 0.1. Conclusion: The results of the presentstudy showed that CRASH prediction model has proper discrimination and calibration in predicting 14-DMand6-MUO of head trauma patients. Since there was no difference between the values of the basic and CT models,using the basic model is recommended to simplify the risk

  13. A dynamic model of human physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melissa; Kaplan, Carolyn; Oran, Elaine; Boris, Jay

    2010-11-01

    To study the systems-level transport in the human body, we develop the Computational Man (CMAN): a set of one-dimensional unsteady elastic flow simulations created to model a variety of coupled physiological systems including the circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and lymphatic systems. The model systems are collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To model the actions of a beating heart or expanding lungs, the flow is driven by user-defined changes to the equilibrium areas of the elastic vessels. The equations are then iteratively solved for pressure, area, and average velocity. The model is augmented with valves and contractions to resemble the biological structure of the different systems. CMAN will be used to track material transport throughout the human body for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Parameters will be adjustable to match those of individual patients. Validation of CMAN has used both higher-dimensional simulations of similar geometries and benchmark measurement from medical literature.

  14. The effect of numbered heads together (NHT) cooperative learning model on the cognitive achievement of students with different academic ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasa, Marleny; Duran Corebima, Aloysius

    2017-01-01

    Learning models and academic ability may affect students’ achievement in science. This study, thus aimed to investigate the effect of numbered heads together (NHT) cooperative learning model on elementary students’ cognitive achievement in natural science. This study employed a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group with 2 x 2 factorial. There were two learning models compared NHT and the conventional, and two academic ability high and low. The results of ana Cova test confirmed the difference in the students’ cognitive achievement based on learning models and general academic ability. However, the interaction between learning models and academic ability did not affect the students’ cognitive achievement. In conclusion, teachers are strongly recommended to be more creative in designing learning using other types of cooperative learning models. Also, schools are required to create a better learning environment which is more cooperative to avoid unfair competition among students in the classroom and as a result improve the students’ academic ability. Further research needs to be conducted to explore the contribution of other aspects in cooperative learning toward cognitive achievement of students with different academic ability.

  15. Baseline head in Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokas, H.; Tammisto, E.; Lehtimaeki, T. (Poeyry Environment Oy, Vantaa (Finland))

    2008-11-15

    As part of the programme for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel, Posiva Oy investigates the prevailing hydrological conditions on Olkiluoto island. The hydrological investigations have included several kinds of hydrological tests such as measurements of hydraulic conductivity by flow logging and a double-packer tool as well as interference tests by pumping, in order to study the hydraulic connections between the drillholes. In addition, long-term monitoring of groundwater level and groundwater head as well as measurements of flow conditions in open drillholes, groundwater salinity (in situ EC), precipitation (including snow), sea-water level, surface flow (runoff) etc. have been part of the investigation programme aiming at the characterization of the bedrock. The data have been used in the compilation of deterministic hydro-zones and hydraulic properties for numerical flow modelling to study the flow pattern on Olkiluoto island. In addition, the compiled bedrock models have been used in the planning of the repository layout and in the analyses of the transport of radionuclides and the functionality of engineered barriers. This report focuses on the measurements of groundwater head by means of multi-packers and in connection with flow loggings. The determination of the undisturbed groundwater head (baseline head) in terms of the in situ fresh water head is the main goal of this report. The density of groundwater is strongly dependent on salinity and due to the saline groundwater deep in the bedrock in Olkiluoto the term fresh water head is used instead of hydraulic head. Taking the density of groundwater into account, the gradient of the residual pressure, which actually causes groundwater flow can be calculated. The measured and calculated heads are converted into corresponding in situ fresh water heads, which correspond to the water level (metres above sea level) in the hose that runs from the packed-off section to the ground surface. This means that

  16. Directional and sectional ride comfort estimation using an integrated human biomechanical-seat foam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajer, Navid; Abdi, Hamid; Nahavandi, Saeid; Nelson, Kyle

    2017-09-01

    In the methodology of objective measurement of ride comfort, application of a Human Biomechanical Model (HBM) is valuable for Whole Body Vibration (WBV) analysis. In this study, using a computational Multibody System (MBS) approach, development of a 3D passive HBM for a seated human is considered. For this purpose, the existing MBS-based HBMs of seated human are briefly reviewed first. The Equations of Motion (EoM) for the proposed model are then obtained and the simulation results are shown and compared with idealised ranges of experimental results suggested in the literature. The human-seat interaction is established using a nonlinear vibration model of foam with respect to the sectional behaviour of the seat foam. The developed system is then used for ride comfort estimation offered by a ride dynamic model. The effects of human weight, road class, and vehicle speed on the vibration of the human body segments in different directions are studied. It is shown that the there is a high correlation (more than 99.2%) between the vibration indices of the proposed HBM-foam model and the corresponding ISO 2631 WBV indices. In addition, relevant ISO 2631 indices that show a high correlation with the directional vibration of the head are identified.

  17. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-10-22

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning.

  18. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1044-1047. Canyon, DV, Speare R, et al . “Spatial and kinetic factors for the transfer of head ... for children. Natural products can give parents false sense of safety If using a natural product or ...

  19. Head kinematics and shoulder biomechanics in shoulder impacts similar to pedestrian crashes--a THUMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paas, Ruth; Davidsson, Johan; Brolin, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Head injuries account for the largest percentage of fatalities among pedestrians in car crashes. To prevent or mitigate such injuries, safety systems that reduce head linear and rotational acceleration should be introduced. Human body models (HBMs) are valuable safety system evaluation tools for assessing both head injury risk and head kinematics prior to head contact. This article aims to evaluate the suitability of the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 4.0 for studying shoulder impacts, similar to pedestrian crashes, investigating head, spine, and shoulder kinematics as well as shoulder biomechanics. Shoulder impact experiments including volunteers and postmortem human subjects (PMHSs) were simulated with THUMS. Head linear and angular and vertebral linear displacements of THUMS were compared with volunteers and shoulder deflections with both volunteers and PMHSs. A parameter variation study was conducted to assess head response to shoulder impacts, by varying shoulder posture and impact directions mimicking shoulder-to-vehicle contacts. Functional biomechanics literature was compared with THUMS responses in view of pedestrian-like shoulder impacts. THUMS head linear displacement compared better with tensed than with relaxed volunteers. Head lateral rotation was comparable with volunteer responses up to 120 ms; head twist was greater in THUMS than in the volunteers. The THUMS spine appeared to be stiffer than in the volunteers. Shoulder deflections were smaller than in the relaxed volunteers but matched the PMHSs. Raised shoulder postures decreased the THUMS shoulder deflections and increased head lateral displacements. When the impactor surface orientation or the impact velocity angle was changed from lateral to superolateral, THUMS head lateral displacement decreased. THUMS scapula and clavicle kinematics compared well with previous experimental studies. The shoulder impact conditions influenced the scapula motion over the thorax, which had

  20. An EMG-driven model of the upper extremity and estimation of long head biceps force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer, Joseph; LaScalza, Suzanne; Mell, Amy; Carpenter, James E; Kuhn, John E; Hughes, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG) driven model of the upper extremity has been developed that incorporates musculoskeletal geometry of the glenohumeral and elbow joints, estimated relevant physiologic muscle parameters including optimal muscle lengths, and EMG activity. The model is designed to predict forces in muscles spanning the glenohumeral joint resulting from functionally relevant tasks. The model is composed of four sub-models that comprise a mathematical as well as graphical three-dimensional representation of the upper extremity: a musculoskeletal model for estimation of muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms, a Hill-based muscle force model, a model for estimating optimal muscle lengths, and a model for estimation of muscle activation from EMG signal of the biceps. The purpose of this paper is to describe the components of the model, as well as the data required to drive the model. Collection of data is described in the context of applying the model to determine biceps muscle forces for testing of functional tasks. Results obtained from applying the model to analyze the functional tasks are summarized, and model strengths and limitations are discussed.

  1. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.it [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pedicini, Piernicola [Department of Medical Physics, Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); D' Andrea, Marco [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Department of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  2. Humanized animal exercise model for clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Exercise and physical activity function as a patho-physiological process that can prevent, manage, and regulate numerous chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome and age-related sarcopenia. Because of research ethics and technical difficulties in humans, exercise models using animals are requisite for the future development of exercise mimetics to treat such abnormalities. Moreover, the beneficial or adverse outcomes of a new regime or exercise intervention in the treatment of a specific condition should be tested prior to implementation in a clinical setting. In rodents, treadmill running (or swimming) and ladder climbing are widely used as aerobic and anaerobic exercise models, respectively. However, exercise models are not limited to these types. Indeed, there are no golden standard exercise modes or protocols for managing or improving health status since the types (aerobic vs. anaerobic), time (morning vs. evening), and duration (continuous vs. acute bouts) of exercise are the critical determinants for achieving expected beneficial effects. To provide insight into the understanding of exercise and exercise physiology, we have summarized current animal exercise models largely based on aerobic and anaerobic criteria. Additionally, specialized exercise models that have been developed for testing the effect of exercise on specific physiological conditions are presented. Finally, we provide suggestions and/or considerations for developing a new regime for an exercise model.

  3. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim

    2013-01-01

    was time-varying with long drift motions of up to 18 mm and regular step-wise motion of 1–6 mm. The evaluated measures were significantly better for motion-corrected images compared to no MC. The demonstrated system agreed with a commercial integrated system. Motion-corrected images