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Sample records for human hand movements

  1. Cerebral reorganisation of human hand movement following dynamic immobilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; Coert, JH; Stenekes, MW; Leenders, KL; Paans, AMJ; Nicolai, JRA

    2003-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a flexor tendon lesion of the hand is followed by a 6-week period of dynamic immobilisation. This is achieved by the elastic strings of a Kleinert splint, enabling only passive and no active flexor movements. After such immobilisation, the appearance of a temporary clumsy hand

  2. [Human traveling wave EEG during voluntary movement of the hand].

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    Belov, D R; Stepanova, P A; Kolodiazhnyĭ, S F

    2014-01-01

    The traveling wave trajectories connected with the movements of the right hand were revealed. Above sensomotor cortex 28 electrodes were set as a rectangle--4 rows with 7 electrodes in each one. 2D center-out reaching task was used. The target appeared on the screen edge through the random intervals 0.5-2.5 s equiprobably at the left, on the right, from above or from below. The task was to touch the target with the joystick-operated cursor displacing the cursor in one of the sides from the center to edge. EEG from the target occurrence till cursor contact with it was analyzed. Leading on phase of spontaneous EEG waves in the local area of the left sensomotor cortex and in the centre of back-parietal cortex during cursor movement downwards (the hand with joystick moves to oneself) comparing to rest state and movements in three other directions is revealed. The over time smoothing of data concerning phase alignment reveals hidden constant components in EEG resembling evoked potentials.

  3. Human cortical control of hand movements: parietofrontal networks for reaching, grasping, and pointing.

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    Filimon, Flavia

    2010-08-01

    In primates, control of the limb depends on many cortical areas. Whereas specialized parietofrontal circuits have been proposed for different movements in macaques, functional neuroimaging in humans has revealed widespread, overlapping activations for hand and eye movements and for movements such as reaching and grasping. This review examines the involvement of frontal and parietal areas in hand and arm movements in humans as revealed with functional neuroimaging. The degree of functional specialization, possible homologies with macaque cortical regions, and differences between frontal and posterior parietal areas are discussed, as well as a possible organization of hand movements with respect to different spatial reference frames. The available evidence supports a cortical organization along gradients of sensory (visual to somatosensory) and effector (eye to hand) preferences.

  4. Contributions of skin and muscle afferent input to movement sense in the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordo, Paul J; Horn, Jean-Louis; Künster, Daniela; Cherry, Anne; Bratt, Alex; Gurfinkel, Victor

    2011-04-01

    In the stationary hand, static joint-position sense originates from multimodal somatosensory input (e.g., joint, skin, and muscle). In the moving hand, however, it is uncertain how movement sense arises from these different submodalities of proprioceptors. In contrast to static-position sense, movement sense includes multiple parameters such as motion detection, direction, joint angle, and velocity. Because movement sense is both multimodal and multiparametric, it is not known how different movement parameters are represented by different afferent submodalities. In theory, each submodality could redundantly represent all movement parameters, or, alternatively, different afferent submodalities could be tuned to distinctly different movement parameters. The study described in this paper investigated how skin input and muscle input each contributes to movement sense of the hand, in particular, to the movement parameters dynamic position and velocity. Healthy adult subjects were instructed to indicate with the left hand when they sensed the unseen fingers of the right hand being passively flexed at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint through a previously learned target angle. The experimental approach was to suppress input from skin and/or muscle: skin input by anesthetizing the hand, and muscle input by unexpectedly extending the wrist to prevent MCP flexion from stretching the finger extensor muscle. Input from joint afferents was assumed not to play a significant role because the task was carried out with the MCP joints near their neutral positions. We found that, during passive finger movement near the neutral position in healthy adult humans, both skin and muscle receptors contribute to movement sense but qualitatively differently. Whereas skin input contributes to both dynamic position and velocity sense, muscle input may contribute only to velocity sense.

  5. Gaze and hand position effects on finger-movement-related human brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Patrick; Sanes, Jerome N

    2009-02-01

    Humans commonly use their hands to move and to interact with their environment by processing visual and proprioceptive information to determine the location of a goal-object and the initial hand position. It remains elusive, however, how the human brain fully uses this sensory information to generate accurate movements. In monkeys, it appears that frontal and parietal areas use and combine gaze and hand signals to generate movements, whereas in humans, prior work has separately assessed how the brain uses these two signals. Here we investigated whether and how the human brain integrates gaze orientation and hand position during simple visually triggered finger tapping. We hypothesized that parietal, frontal, and subcortical regions involved in movement production would also exhibit modulation of movement-related activation as a function of gaze and hand positions. We used functional MRI to measure brain activation while healthy young adults performed a visually cued finger movement and fixed gaze at each of three locations and held the arm in two different configurations. We found several areas that exhibited activation related to a mixture of these hand and gaze positions; these included the sensory-motor cortex, supramarginal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, and left cerebellum. We also found regions within the left insula, left cuneus, left midcingulate gyrus, left putamen, and right tempo-occipital junction with activation driven only by gaze orientation. Finally, clusters with hand position effects were found in the cerebellum bilaterally. Our results indicate that these areas integrate at least two signals to perform visual-motor actions and that these could be used to subserve sensory-motor transformations.

  6. Involuntary human hand movements due to FM radio waves in a moving van.

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    Huttunen, P; Savinainen, A; Hänninen, Osmo; Myllylä, R

    2011-06-01

    Finland TRACT Involuntary movements of hands in a moving van on a public road were studied to clarify the possible role of frequency modulated radio waves on driving. The signals were measured in a direct 2 km test segment of an international road during repeated drives to both directions. Test subjects (n=4) had an ability to sense radio frequency field intensity variations of the environment. They were sitting in a minivan with arm movement detectors in their hands. A potentiometer was used to register the hand movements to a computer which simultaneously collected data on the amplitude of the RF signal of the local FM tower 30 km distance at a frequency of about 100 MHz. Involuntary hand movements of the test subjects correlated with electromagnetic field, i.e. FM radio wave intensity measured. They reacted also on the place of a geomagnetic anomaly crossing the road, which was found on the basis of these recordings and confirmed by the public geological maps of the area.In conclusion, RF irradiation seems to affect the human hand reflexes of sensitive persons in a moving van along a normal public road which may have significance in traffic safety.

  7. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Liao

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA. These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26% in all subjects (p<0.05. The present study suggests the similar movement-related spectral changes in EEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies.

  8. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Xiao, Ran; Gonzalez, Jania; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG) signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA). These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26%) in all subjects (pmovement-related spectral changes in EEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies.

  9. Development of rotational movements, hand shaping, and accuracy in advance and withdrawal for the reach-to-eat movement in human infants aged 6-12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Karl, Jenni M; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2012-06-01

    The reach-to-eat movement, transport of a hand to grasp an object that is withdrawn and placed in the mouth, is amongst the earliest developing functional movements of human infants. The present longitudinal study is the first description of the maturation of hand-rotation, hand shaping, and accuracy associated with the advance and withdrawal phases of the movement. Eight infants, aged 6-12 months, and eight adults, were video recorded as they reached for familiar objects or food items. Hand, arm, and trunk movements were assessed frame-by-frame with the Skilled Reaching Rating Scale, previously developed for the assessment of adult reaching, and supplementary kinematic analysis. Reach-to-eat maturation was characterized by three changes. First, for advance, a simple open hand transport gradually matured to a movement associated with pronation and hand shaping of the digits for precision grasping. Second, for withdrawal to the mouth, a direct withdrawal movement gradually became associated with hand supination that oriented the target object to the mouth. Third, associated with the maturation of rotational movements, inaccurate and fragmented hand transport and withdrawal movements developed into precise targeting of the hand-to-object and object-to-mouth. Across the age range, there was a decrease in bimanual reaching and an increase in right handed reaching. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that the maturation of the reach-to-eat movement involves the development of rotational and shaping movements of the hand and visual and somatosensory guidance of a preferred hand.

  10. Human motor development and hand laterality: a kinematic analysis of drawing movements.

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    Blank, R; Miller, V; von Voss, H

    2000-12-08

    This study examines the developmental profiles of basic 'open-loop' drawing movements on the non-dominant hand (ND) in comparison with the dominant hand (D). Fifty-three right-handed children aged 7-14 years and 15 adults aged 27-43 years were examined. Each subject drew lines and circles of different sizes at maximum velocity with a pressure-sensitive pen on a computer graphics tablet. Small lines were drawn at 90 degrees to the axis of the forearm (lines using wrist movements (LWM)) and along the axis of the forearm (lines using elbow movements (LEM)). Larger lines were drawn at 90 degrees to the axis of the forearm (LEM). At both extremities, the movement frequencies of the proximally generated drawing movements increased in a parallel fashion at different levels. In LWM, the right-left-differences (RLD) were high in 7- to 8-year-old children; until puberty, the ND hand reached almost the performance of the D hand. In contrast, the RLD of the LFM increased at the same time. As adulthood approaches, frequencies of all drawings increased further while the LWM on the ND side remained stable. In adults, there were similar RLD for all line drawings involving predominantly flexion and extension movements. When drawing circles, the RLD were highest, though stable in all age groups. Hand laterality of pen use changes over time; these changes are dependent on complexity (combined/sequential cf. flexion-extension muscle activation) and on topography (proximal cf. distal movements). Distinct developmental profiles of motoneuronal populations of the cortex may be responsible for the distinct hand laterality effects and the decreasing variability of motor patterns. The drawing abilities and developmental changes on the untrained ND hand indicate that effector-specific practice plays a minor role.

  11. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements.

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    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly effortless, we adjust our movements to continuously changing environments. After initiation of a goal-directed movement, the motor command is under constant control of sensory feedback loops. The main sensory signals contributing to movement control are vision and proprioception. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive feedback for online reaching control, and demonstrate that distinct cortical areas process proprioceptive-only and multi-sensory information for fast feedback corrections.

  12. The resonant component of human physiological hand tremor is altered by slow voluntary movements.

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    Lakie, Martin; Vernooij, Carlijn A; Osborne, Timothy M; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-05-15

    Limb resonance imparts a characteristic spectrum to hand tremor. Movement will alter the resonance. We have examined the consequences of this change. Rectified forearm extensor muscle EMG and physiological hand tremor were recorded. In postural conditions the EMG spectrum is relatively flat whereas the acceleration spectrum is sharply peaked. Consequently, the gain between EMG and acceleration is maximal at the frequency where the tremor is largest (∼8 Hz). The shape of the gain curve implies mechanical resonance. Substantial alterations in posture do not significantly change the characteristics of the tremor or the shape or size of the gain curve. By contrast, slow or moderately paced voluntary wrist flexion–extension movements dramatically increase the hand tremor size and lower its peak frequency. These changes in size and frequency of the tremor cannot be attributed to changes in the EMG. Instead they reflect a very large change in the size and shape of the gain curve relating EMG to acceleration. The gain becomes larger and the peak moves to a lower frequency (∼6 Hz). We suggest that a movement-related (thixotropic) alteration in resonant properties of the wrist provides a simple explanation for these changes. The mechanism is illustrated by a model. Our new findings confirm that resonance plays a major role in wrist tremor. We also demonstrate that muscles operate very differently under postural and dynamic conditions. The different coupling between EMG and movement in posture and when moving must pose a considerable challenge for neural predictive control of skeletal muscles.

  13. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing...... of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception...... was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive...

  14. Bimanual-vertical hand movements.

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    Kwon, Jay C; Cohen, Matthew L; Williamson, John; Burtis, Brandon; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2011-07-01

    Patients often demonstrate attentional and action-intentional biases in both the transverse and coronal planes. In addition, when making forelimb movements in the transverse plane, normal participants also have spatial and magnitude asymmetries, but forelimb spatial asymmetries have not been studied in coronal space. Thus, to learn if when normal people make vertical movements they have right-left spatial and magnitude biases, seventeen healthy, blindfolded volunteers had their hands (holding pens) placed vertically in their midsagittal plane, 10 inches apart, on pieces of paper positioned above, below, and at eye-level. Participants were asked to move their hands together vertically and meet in the middle. Participants demonstrated less angular deviation in the below-eye condition than in the other spatial conditions, when moving down than up, and with their right than left hand. Movements toward eye level from upper or lower space were also more accurate than movements in the other directions. Independent of hand, lines were longer with downward than upward movements and the right hand moved more distance than the left. These attentional-intentional asymmetries may be related to gravitational force, hand-hemispheric dominance, and spatial "where" asymmetries; however, the mechanisms accounting for these asymmetries must be ascertained by future research.

  15. Evolution and homologies of primate and modern human hand and forearm muscles, with notes on thumb movements and tool use.

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    Diogo, Rui; Richmond, Brian G; Wood, Bernard

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we explore how the results of a primate-wide higher-level phylogenetic analysis of muscle characters can improve our understanding of the evolution and homologies of the forearm and hand muscles of modern humans. Contrary to what is often suggested in the literature, none of the forearm and hand muscle structures usually present in modern humans are autapomorphic. All are found in one or more extant non-human primate taxa. What is unique is the particular combination of muscles. However, more muscles go to the thumb in modern humans than in almost all other primates, reinforcing the hypothesis that focal thumb movements probably played an important role in human evolution. What makes the modern human thumb myology special within the primate clade is not so much its intrinsic musculature but two extrinsic muscles, extensor pollicis brevis and flexor pollicis longus, that are otherwise only found in hylobatids. It is likely that these two forearm muscles play different functional roles in hylobatids and modern humans. In the former, the thumb is separated from elongated digits by a deep cleft and there is no pulp-to-pulp opposition, whereas modern humans exhibit powerful thumb flexion and greater manipulative abilities, such as those involved in the manufacture and use of tools. The functional and evolutionary significance of a third peculiar structure, the intrinsic hand structure that is often called the 'interosseous volaris primus of Henle' (and which we suggest is referred to as the musculus adductor pollicis accessorius) is still obscure. The presence of distinct contrahentes digitorum and intermetacarpales in adult chimpanzees is likely the result of prolonged or delayed development of the hand musculature of these apes. In relation to these structures, extant chimpanzees are more neotenic than modern humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Communicative hand gestures and object-directed hand movements activated the mirror neuron system

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Kimberly J.; Isenberg, Nancy; Haxby, James V.

    2007-01-01

    Humans produce hand movements to manipulate objects, but also make hand movements to convey socially relevant information to one another. The mirror neuron system (MNS) is activated during the observation and execution of actions. Previous neuroimaging experiments have identified the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and frontal operculum as parts of the human MNS. Although experiments have suggested that object-directed hand movements drive the MNS, it is not clear whether communicative hand ge...

  17. Similar hand shaping in reaching-for-food (skilled reaching) in rats and humans provides evidence of homology in release, collection, and manipulation movements.

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    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2009-12-01

    Many animal species use their forelimbs to assist in eating, such as occurs in a reach-to-eat task (skilled reaching) in which a forelimb is extended to grasp food that is placed in the mouth for eating. It is unclear the extent to which the skilled reaching movements of different species share common ancestry and so are homologous or evolved independently and so are analogous (homoplasy). Here hand shaping (the movements of the hand and digits) that occur as the hand is transported to the target, were examined using high-speed (1000 frames/s) video recording and kinematic measurement (Peak Motus) in the rat (Rattus norvegicus) and human (Homo sapiens). Ten movement similarities were identified from the point that the limb initiated transport towards the food item to the point that the food was grasped. The digits were closed and semi-flexed as the hand was lifted (released from a substrate) and supinated. They closed further as the hand was collected for aiming. They then extended as the hand was transported to the target and then opened in conjunction with pronation to orient the hand for grasping (manipulation). Finally the digits were flexed and closed for grasping. These movements occurred at approximately the same point of limb transport in both species even though the rat used a whole paw grasp and the humans used a pincer grasp. Bushbabies (Galago garnettii), titi monkeys (Callicebus brunneus), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus) displayed similar hand shaping in skilled reaching despite species differences in grasping movements. Homologous hand shaping in the rodent clade and the primate clade and within the primate lineage is discussed in relation to its possible derivation from hand shaping movements associated with stepping.

  18. Lateral interception II : Predicting hand movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaels, CF; Jacobs, DM; Bongers, RM

    2006-01-01

    D. M. Jacobs and C. F. Michaels (2006) concluded that aspects of hand movements in lateral catching were predicted by the ratio of lateral optical velocity to expansion velocity. Their conclusions were based partly on a modified version of the required velocity model of catching (C. E. Peper, R. J.

  19. Efficient human hand kinematics for manipulation tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Cobos Guzmán, Salvador; Ferre Perez, Manuel; Sanchez-Uran Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Ortego la Moneda, Javier; Peña, César

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on obtaining efficient human hand models that are suitable for manipulation tasks. A 24 DoF kinematic model of the human hand is defined to realistic movements. This model is based on the human skeleton. Dynamic and Static constraints have been included in order to improve the movement realism. Two simplified hand models with 9 and 6 DoF have been developed according to the constraints predefined. These simplified models involve some errors in reconstructing the hand post...

  20. Mirror activity in the human brain while observing hand movements: a comparison between EEG desynchronization in the mu-range and previous fMRI results.

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    Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo

    2009-07-28

    Mu (mu) rhythms are EEG oscillations between 8-13 Hz distinguished from alpha by having more anterior distribution and being desynchronized by motor rather than visual activity. Evidence accumulating during the last decade suggests that the desynchronization of mu rhythms (mu suppression) might be also a manifestation of a human Mirror Neuron System (MNS). To further explore this hypothesis we used a paradigm that, in a previous fMRI study, successfully activated this putative MNS in humans. Our direct goal was to provide further support for a link between modulation of mu rhythms and the MNS, by finding parallels between the reported patterns of fMRI activations and patterns of mu suppression. The EEG power in the mu range has been recorded while participants passively observed either a left or a right hand, reaching to and grasping objects, and compared it with that recorded while participants observed the movement of a ball, and while observing static grasping scenes or still objects. Mirroring fMRI results (Shmuelof, L., Zohary, E., 2005. Dissociation between ventral and dorsal fMRI activation during object and action recognition. Neuron 47, 457-470), mu suppression was larger in the hemisphere contra-lateral to the moving hand and larger when the hands grasped different objects in different ways than when the movement was repetitive. No suppression was found while participants observed still objects but mu suppression was also found while seeing static grasping postures. These data are discussed in light of similar parallels between modulations of alpha waves and fMRI while recording EEG in the magnet. The present data support a link between mu suppression and a human MNS.

  1. Discrimination of biomechanically possible and impossible hand movements at birth.

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    Longhi, Elena; Senna, Irene; Bolognini, Nadia; Bulf, Hermann; Tagliabue, Paolo; Cassia, Viola Macchi; Turati, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The development of human body perception has long been investigated, but little is known about its early origins. This study focused on how a body part highly relevant to the human species, namely the hand, is perceived a few days after birth. Using a preferential-looking paradigm, 24- to 48-hr-old newborns watched biomechanically possible and impossible dynamic hand gestures (Experiment 1, N = 15) and static hand postures (Experiment 2, N = 15). In Experiment 1, newborns looked longer at the impossible, compared to the possible, hand movement, whereas in Experiment 2 no visual preference emerged. These findings suggest that early in life the representation of the human body may be shaped by sensory-motor experience.

  2. Interaction between the premotor processes of eye and hand movements: possible mechanism underlying eye-hand coordination.

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    Hiraoka, Koichi; Kurata, Naoatsu; Sakaguchi, Masato; Nonaka, Kengo; Matsumoto, Naoto

    2014-03-01

    Interaction between the execution process of eye movement and that of hand movement must be indispensable for eye-hand coordination. The present study investigated corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles during the premotor processes of eye and/or hand movement to elucidate interaction between these processes. Healthy humans performed a precued reaction task of eye and/or finger movement and motor-evoked potentials in the hand muscles were evoked in the reaction time. Leftward eye movement suppressed corticospinal excitability in the right abductor digiti minimi muscle only when little finger abduction was simultaneously executed. Corticospinal excitability in the first dorsal interosseous muscle was not suppressed by eye movement regardless of whether or not it was accompanied by finger movement. Suppression of corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles induced by eye movement in the premotor period depends on the direction of eye movement, the muscle tested, and the premotor process of the tested muscle. The suppression may reflect interaction between the motor process of eye movement and that of hand movement particularly active during eye-hand coordination tasks during which both processes proceed.

  3. Passive hand movements disrupt adults’ counting strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke eImbo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we experimentally tested the role of hand motor circuits in simple-arithmetic strategies. Educated adults solved simple additions (e.g., 8+3 or simple subtractions (e.g., 11–3 while they were required to retrieve the answer from long-term memory (e.g., knowing that 8+3 = 11, to transform the problem by making an intermediate step (e.g., 8+3 = 8+2+1 = 10+1 = 11 or to count one-by-one (e.g., 8+3 = 8…9…10…11. During the process of solving the arithmetic problems, the experimenter did or did not move the participants’ hand on a 4-point matrix. The results show that passive hand movements disrupted the counting strategy while leaving the other strategies unaffected. This pattern of results is in agreement with a procedural account, showing that the involvement of hand motor circuits in adults’ mathematical abilities is reminiscent of finger counting during childhood.

  4. Multi-class EEG classification of voluntary hand movement directions

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    Robinson, Neethu; Guan, Cuntai; Vinod, A. P.; Keng Ang, Kai; Tee, Keng Peng

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Studies have shown that low frequency components of brain recordings provide information on voluntary hand movement directions. However, non-invasive techniques face more challenges compared to invasive techniques. Approach. This study presents a novel signal processing technique to extract features from non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) recordings for classifying voluntary hand movement directions. The proposed technique comprises the regularized wavelet-common spatial pattern algorithm to extract the features, mutual information-based feature selection, and multi-class classification using the Fisher linear discriminant. EEG data from seven healthy human subjects were collected while they performed voluntary right hand center-out movement in four orthogonal directions. In this study, the movement direction dependent signal-to-noise ratio is used as a parameter to denote the effectiveness of each temporal frequency bin in the classification of movement directions. Main results. Significant (p movement direction dependent modulation in the EEG data was identified largely towards the end of movement at low frequencies (≤6 Hz) from the midline parietal and contralateral motor areas. Experimental results on single trial classification of the EEG data collected yielded an average accuracy of (80.24 ± 9.41)% in discriminating the four different directions using the proposed technique on features extracted from low frequency components. Significance. The proposed feature extraction strategy provides very high multi-class classification accuracies, and the results are proven to be more statistically significant than existing methods. The results obtained suggest the possibility of multi-directional movement classification from single-trial EEG recordings using the proposed technique in low frequency components.

  5. Hand spring operated movement enhancer (HandSOME) device for hand rehabilitation after stroke.

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    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Hand rehabilitation after stroke is essential for restoring functional independent lifestyles. After stroke, patients often have flexor hypertonia, making it difficult to open their hand for functional grasp. The development and initial testing of a passive hand rehabilitation device is discussed. The device, Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME), assists with opening the patient's hand using a series of bungee cords that apply extension torques to the finger joints that compensate for the flexor hypertonia. This results in significant increase in range of motion and functional use when wearing HandSOME, even in severely impaired subjects. Device design, calibration, and range of motion are described as well as functional and usability testing with stroke subjects.

  6. fNIRS exhibits weak tuning to hand movement direction.

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    Waldert, Stephan; Tüshaus, Laura; Kaller, Christoph P; Aertsen, Ad; Mehring, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has become an established tool to investigate brain function and is, due to its portability and resistance to electromagnetic noise, an interesting modality for brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). BMIs have been successfully realized using the decoding of movement kinematics from intra-cortical recordings in monkey and human. Recently, it has been shown that hemodynamic brain responses as measured by fMRI are modulated by the direction of hand movements. However, quantitative data on the decoding of movement direction from hemodynamic responses is still lacking and it remains unclear whether this can be achieved with fNIRS, which records signals at a lower spatial resolution but with the advantage of being portable. Here, we recorded brain activity with fNIRS above different cortical areas while subjects performed hand movements in two different directions. We found that hemodynamic signals in contralateral sensorimotor areas vary with the direction of movements, though only weakly. Using these signals, movement direction could be inferred on a single-trial basis with an accuracy of ∼65% on average across subjects. The temporal evolution of decoding accuracy resembled that of typical hemodynamic responses observed in motor experiments. Simultaneous recordings with a head tracking system showed that head movements, at least up to some extent, do not influence the decoding of fNIRS signals. Due to the low accuracy, fNIRS is not a viable alternative for BMIs utilizing decoding of movement direction. However, due to its relative resistance to head movements, it is promising for studies investigating brain activity during motor experiments.

  7. Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME): a portable, passive hand exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Black, Iian; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    Stroke patients often have flexor hypertonia and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. Because of this impairment, hand rehabilitation after stroke is essential for restoring functional independent lifestyles. The goal of this study is to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to assist with hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME), assists with opening the patient's hand using a series of elastic cords that apply extension torques to the finger joints and compensates for the flexor hypertonia. Device design and calibration are described as well as functional and usability testing with stroke subjects with a wide range of hand impairments. In initial testing with eight stroke subjects with finger flexor hypertonia, use of the HandSOME significantly increased range of motion and functional ability (p=0.002) . There was some decrease in grip strength with the HandSOME device at the subject's ideal setting, however this was not statistically significant (p=0.167) and did not seem to have a significant effect on function. Overall HandSOME shows promise as a training tool to facilitate repetitive task practice for improving hand function in stroke patients. HandSOME can be used as part of a home-based therapy program, or as an orthotic for replacing lost function.

  8. Representing tools as hand movements: early and somatotopic visuomotor transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Jacono, Marco; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The term affordance defines a property of objects, which relates to the possible interactions that an agent can carry out on that object. In monkeys, canonical neurons encode both the visual and the motor properties of objects with high specificity. However, it is not clear if in humans exists a similarly fine-grained description of these visuomotor transformations. In particular, it has not yet been proven that the processing of visual features related to specific affordances induces both specific and early visuomotor transformations, given that complete specificity has been reported to emerge quite late (300-450ms). In this study, we applied an adaptation-stimulation paradigm to investigate early cortico-spinal facilitation and hand movements׳ synergies evoked by the observation of tools. We adapted, through passive observation of finger movements, neuronal populations coding either for precision or power grip actions. We then presented the picture of one tool affording one of the two grasps types and applied single-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to the hand primary motor cortex, 150ms after image onset. Cortico-spinal excitability of the Abductor Digiti Minimi and Abductor Pollicis Brevis showed a detailed pattern of modulations, matching tools׳ affordances. Similarly, TMS-induced hand movements showed a pattern of grip-specific whole hand synergies. These results offer a direct proof of the emergence of an early visuomotor transformation when tools are observed, that maintains the same amount of synergistic motor details as the actions we can perform on them.

  9. Corticospinal excitability in human voluntary movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elswijk, G.A.F. van

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addressed the neurophysiologic changes in the human corticospinal system during preparation and execution of voluntary hand movements. The experiments involved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex combined with electromyography (EMG) and e

  10. Revisiting the relationship between hand preference and lateral eye movement

    OpenAIRE

    Indiwar Misra; Damodar Suar; Manas K. Mandal

    2010-01-01

    The study examines the relationship between hand preference and conjugate lateral eye movements. The sample comprised of 224 persons. The hand preference was assessed using a handedness inventory. Conjugate lateral eye movements were elicited in response to verbal and spatial questions among left-, mixed- and right-handers. The left- and mixed-handers exhibit significantly greater number of conjugate lateral eye movements than the right-handers. On the verbal task, right-handers exhibit right...

  11. Alien hand syndrome: neural correlates of movements without conscious will.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schaefer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alien hand syndrome is a striking phenomenon characterized by purposeful and autonomous movements that are not voluntarily initiated. This study aimed to examine neural correlates of this rare neurological disorder in a patient with corticobasal degeneration and alien hand syndrome of the left hand. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain responses associated with unwanted movements in a case study. Results revealed that alien hand movements involved a network of brain activations including the primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, precuneus, and right inferior frontal gyrus. Conscious and voluntary movements of the alien hand elicited a similar network of brain responses but lacked an activation of the inferior frontal gyrus. The results demonstrate that alien and unwanted movements may engage similar brain networks than voluntary movements, but also imply different functional contributions of prefrontal areas. Since the inferior frontal gyrus was uniquely activated during alien movements, the results provide further support for a specific role of this brain region in inhibitory control over involuntary motor responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We discuss the outcome of this study as providing evidence for a distributed neural network associated with unwanted movements in alien hand syndrome, including brain regions known to be related to movement execution and planning as well as areas that have been linked to inhibition control (inferior frontal gyrus and experience of agency (precuneus.

  12. Control strategy of hand movement depends on target redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Shunta; Yoshioka, Toshinori; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2017-03-31

    Reaching toward a point target has been intensively studied in human motor control. However, little is known about reaching toward a redundant target, such as grasping a bar, in which the grasping point is irrelevant to the achievement of a task. We examined whether humans could solve the target-redundancy and control problems in a serial fashion or control their body without solving the target-redundancy problem. We equalized the target ranges between two reaching tasks: a point-to-point reaching task without target-redundancy and a point-to-bar reaching task with target-redundancy. In the both tasks, we measured hand viscoelasticity at movement end as parameters that reflect the adopted control strategy. As a result, the hand viscoelasticity in the point-to-bar reaching task was smaller than that in the point-to-point reaching task, even under the same kinematics. These results indicate that the hand viscoelasticity was modulated depending on the target-redundancy. Moreover, it is suggested that a human reaches toward a redundant target by effectively utilizing information of target redundancy rather than explicitly solving the target-redundancy problem.

  13. Hand movement effects on word learning and retrieval in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciantar, Jessica; Finch, Emma; Copland, David A

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of performing an intentional non-meaningful hand movement on subsequent lexical acquisition and retrieval in healthy adults. Twenty-five right-handed healthy individuals were required to learn the names (2-syllable legal nonwords) for a series of unfamiliar objects. Participants also completed a familiar picture naming task to investigate the effects of the intentional non-meaningful movement on lexical retrieval. Results revealed that performing this hand movement immediately before linguistic tasks interfered with both new word learning and familiar picture naming when compared with no movement. These results extend previous findings of dual task interference effects in healthy individuals, suggesting that complex, non-meaningful, hand movements can also interfere with subsequent lexical acquisition and retrieval.

  14. Hand movement effects on word learning and retrieval in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ciantar

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of performing an intentional non-meaningful hand movement on subsequent lexical acquisition and retrieval in healthy adults. Twenty-five right-handed healthy individuals were required to learn the names (2-syllable legal nonwords for a series of unfamiliar objects. Participants also completed a familiar picture naming task to investigate the effects of the intentional non-meaningful movement on lexical retrieval. Results revealed that performing this hand movement immediately before linguistic tasks interfered with both new word learning and familiar picture naming when compared with no movement. These results extend previous findings of dual task interference effects in healthy individuals, suggesting that complex, non-meaningful, hand movements can also interfere with subsequent lexical acquisition and retrieval.

  15. Hand Movement Effects on Word Learning and Retrieval in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Ciantar; Emma Finch; David A. Copland

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of performing an intentional non-meaningful hand movement on subsequent lexical acquisition and retrieval in healthy adults. Twenty-five right-handed healthy individuals were required to learn the names (2-syllable legal nonwords) for a series of unfamiliar objects. Participants also completed a familiar picture naming task to investigate the effects of the intentional non-meaningful movement on lexical retrieval. Results revealed that performing this...

  16. Coordinated control of eye and hand movements in dynamic reaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, S.F.W.; Bekkering, H.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we integrated two recent, at first sight contradictory findings regarding the question whether saccadic eye movements can be generated to a newly presented target during an ongoing hand movement. Saccades were measured during so-called adaptive and sustained pointing

  17. Coordinated control of eye and hand movements in dynamic reaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, SFW; Bekkering, H

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we integrated two recent, at first sight contradictory findings regarding the question whether saccadic eye movements can be generated to a newly presented target during an ongoing hand movement. Saccades were measured during so-called adaptive and sustained pointing conditions

  18. On the Influence of Hand Dynamics on Motion Planning of Reaching Movements in Haptic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharenko, Igor; Svinin, Mikhail; Hosoe, Shigeyuki; Forstmann, Sven

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of human reaching movements in the task of mass transport is presented. Two models, the minimum hand jerk (MJC) and the minimum driving hand force-change (MFCC), are used for modelling and verification of experimental data. The data were collected with a haptic system supporting object dynamics simulation in real time. The

  19. Rethinking optimal control of human movements

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Dongsung

    2012-01-01

    The complex bio-mechanics of human body is capable of generating an unlimited repertoire of movements, which on one hand yields highly versatile motor behavior but on the other hand presents a formidable control problem for the brain. Understanding the computational process that allows us to easily perform various motor tasks with a high degree of coordination is of central interest to both neuroscience and robotics control. In recent decades, it became widely accepted that the observed movem...

  20. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution.

  1. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  2. Constraint Study for a Hand Exoskeleton: Human Hand Kinematics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fai Chen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the number of projects studying the human hand from the robotic point of view has increased rapidly, due to the growing interest in academic and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the complexity of the human hand given its large number of degrees of freedom (DoF within a significantly reduced space requires an exhaustive analysis, before proposing any applications. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete summary of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the human hand as a preliminary step towards the development of hand devices such as prosthetic/robotic hands and exoskeletons imitating the human hand shape and functionality. A collection of data and constraints relevant to hand movements is presented, and the direct and inverse kinematics are solved for all the fingers as well as the dynamics; anthropometric data and dynamics equations allow performing simulations to understand the behavior of the finger.

  3. Visually Guided Hand Movements in Children with Minor Neurological Dysfunction: Response Time and Movement Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, J. M. H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents preliminary data on how, during the execution of visually guided hand movements, differences in response time between children with and without signs of minor neurological dysfunction may be related to differences in the spatio-temporal organization of their movements. (MP)

  4. A natural human hand model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nierop, O.A.; Van der Helm, A.; Overbeeke, K.J.; Djajadiningrat, T.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a skeletal linked model of the human hand that has natural motion. We show how this can be achieved by introducing a new biology-based joint axis that simulates natural joint motion and a set of constraints that reduce an estimated 150 possible motions to twelve. The model is based on obs

  5. Temporal control and hand movement efficiency in skilled music performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebl, Werner; Palmer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Skilled piano performance requires considerable movement control to accomplish the high levels of timing and force precision common among professional musicians, who acquire piano technique over decades of practice. Finger movement efficiency in particular is an important factor when pianists perform at very fast tempi. We document the finger movement kinematics of highly skilled pianists as they performed a five-finger melody at very fast tempi. A three-dimensional motion-capture system tracked the movements of finger joints, the hand, and the forearm of twelve pianists who performed on a digital piano at successively faster tempi (7-16 tones/s) until they decided to stop. Joint angle trajectories computed for all adjacent finger phalanges, the hand, and the forearm (wrist angle) indicated that the metacarpophalangeal joint contributed most to the vertical fingertip motion while the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints moved slightly opposite to the movement goal (finger extension). An efficiency measure of the combined finger joint angles corresponded to the temporal accuracy and precision of the pianists' performances: Pianists with more efficient keystroke movements showed higher precision in timing and force measures. Keystroke efficiency and individual joint contributions remained stable across tempo conditions. Individual differences among pianists supported the view that keystroke efficiency is required for successful fast performance.

  6. Temporal control and hand movement efficiency in skilled music performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Goebl

    Full Text Available Skilled piano performance requires considerable movement control to accomplish the high levels of timing and force precision common among professional musicians, who acquire piano technique over decades of practice. Finger movement efficiency in particular is an important factor when pianists perform at very fast tempi. We document the finger movement kinematics of highly skilled pianists as they performed a five-finger melody at very fast tempi. A three-dimensional motion-capture system tracked the movements of finger joints, the hand, and the forearm of twelve pianists who performed on a digital piano at successively faster tempi (7-16 tones/s until they decided to stop. Joint angle trajectories computed for all adjacent finger phalanges, the hand, and the forearm (wrist angle indicated that the metacarpophalangeal joint contributed most to the vertical fingertip motion while the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints moved slightly opposite to the movement goal (finger extension. An efficiency measure of the combined finger joint angles corresponded to the temporal accuracy and precision of the pianists' performances: Pianists with more efficient keystroke movements showed higher precision in timing and force measures. Keystroke efficiency and individual joint contributions remained stable across tempo conditions. Individual differences among pianists supported the view that keystroke efficiency is required for successful fast performance.

  7. The dynamics of sensorimotor cortical oscillations during the observation of hand movements: an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Avanzini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The observation of action done by others determines a desynchronization of the rhythms recorded from cortical central regions. Here, we examined whether the observation of different types of hand movements (target directed, non-target directed, cyclic and non-cyclic elicits different EEG cortical temporal patterns. METHODOLOGY: Video-clips of four types of hand movements were shown to right-handed healthy participants. Two were target directed (grasping and pointing motor acts; two were non-target directed (supinating and clenching movements. Grasping and supinating were performed once, while pointing and clenching twice (cyclic movements. High-density EEG was recorded and analyzed by means of wavelet transform, subdividing the time course in time bins of 200 ms. The observation of all presented movements produced a desynchronization of alpha and beta rhythms in central and parietal regions. The rhythms desynchronized as soon as the hand movement started, the nadir being reached around 700 ms after movement onset. At the end of the movement, a large power rebound occurred for all bands. Target and non-target directed movements produced an alpha band desynchronization in the central electrodes at the same time, but with a stronger desynchronization and a prolonged rebound for target directed motor acts. Most interestingly, there was a clear correlation between the velocity profile of the observed movements and beta band modulation. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the observation of motor acts determines a modulation of cortical rhythm analogous to that occurring during motor act execution. In particular, the cortical motor system closely follows the velocity of the observed movements. This finding provides strong evidence for the presence in humans of a mechanism (mirror mechanism mapping action observation on action execution motor programs.

  8. Human hand descriptions and gesture recognition for object manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Salvador; Ferre, Manuel; Sánchez-Urán, M Ángel; Ortego, Javier; Aracil, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    This work focuses on obtaining realistic human hand models that are suitable for manipulation tasks. A 24 degrees of freedom (DoF) kinematic model of the human hand is defined. The model reasonably satisfies realism requirements in simulation and movement. To achieve realism, intra- and inter-finger constraints are obtained. The design of the hand model with 24 DoF is based upon a morphological, physiological and anatomical study of the human hand. The model is used to develop a gesture recognition procedure that uses principal components analysis (PCA) and discriminant functions. Two simplified hand descriptions (nine and six DoF) have been developed in accordance with the constraints obtained previously. The accuracy of the simplified models is almost 5% for the nine DoF hand description and 10% for the six DoF hand description. Finally, some criteria are defined by which to select the hand description best suited to the features of the manipulation task.

  9. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.;

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...

  10. Corticomuscular coherence analysis on hand movement distinction for active rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xinxin; Xiao, Siyuan; Qi, Yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Wang, Yiwen; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2013-01-01

    Active rehabilitation involves patient's voluntary thoughts as the control signals of restore device to assist stroke rehabilitation. Although restoration of hand opening stands importantly in patient's daily life, it is difficult to distinguish the voluntary finger extension from thumb adduction and finger flexion using stroke patients' electroencephalography (EMG) on single muscle activity. We propose to implement corticomuscular coherence analysis on electroencephalography (EEG) and EMG signals on Extensor Digitorum to extract their intention involved in hand opening. EEG and EMG signals of 8 subjects are simultaneously collected when executing 4 hand movement tasks (finger extension, thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest). We explore the spatial and temporal distribution of the coherence and observe statistically significant corticomuscular coherence appearing at left motor cortical area and different patterns within beta frequency range for 4 movement tasks. Linear discriminate analysis is applied on the coherence pattern to distinguish finger extension from thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest. The classification results are greater than those by EEG only. The results indicate the possibility to detect voluntary hand opening based on coherence analysis between single muscle EMG signal and single EEG channel located in motor cortical area, which potentially helps active hand rehabilitation for stroke patients.

  11. Corticomuscular Coherence Analysis on Hand Movement Distinction for Active Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Lou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active rehabilitation involves patient’s voluntary thoughts as the control signals of restore device to assist stroke rehabilitation. Although restoration of hand opening stands importantly in patient’s daily life, it is difficult to distinguish the voluntary finger extension from thumb adduction and finger flexion using stroke patients’ electroencephalography (EMG on single muscle activity. We propose to implement corticomuscular coherence analysis on electroencephalography (EEG and EMG signals on Extensor Digitorum to extract their intention involved in hand opening. EEG and EMG signals of 8 subjects are simultaneously collected when executing 4 hand movement tasks (finger extension, thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest. We explore the spatial and temporal distribution of the coherence and observe statistically significant corticomuscular coherence appearing at left motor cortical area and different patterns within beta frequency range for 4 movement tasks. Linear discriminate analysis is applied on the coherence pattern to distinguish finger extension from thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest. The classification results are greater than those by EEG only. The results indicate the possibility to detect voluntary hand opening based on coherence analysis between single muscle EMG signal and single EEG channel located in motor cortical area, which potentially helps active hand rehabilitation for stroke patients.

  12. Describing baseball pitch movement with right-hand rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahill, A Terry; Baldwin, David G

    2007-07-01

    The right-hand rules show the direction of the spin-induced deflection of baseball pitches: thus, they explain the movement of the fastball, curveball, slider and screwball. The direction of deflection is described by a pair of right-hand rules commonly used in science and engineering. Our new model for the magnitude of the lateral spin-induced deflection of the ball considers the orientation of the axis of rotation of the ball relative to the direction in which the ball is moving. This paper also describes how models based on somatic metaphors might provide variability in a pitcher's repertoire.

  13. Extracting attempted hand movements from EEGs in people with complete hand paralysis following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami eMuralidharan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the feasibility of using electroencephalograms (EEGs to rapidly detect the intent to open one’s hand in individuals with complete hand paralysis following a subcortical ischemic stroke. If detectable, this motor planning activity could be used in real time to trigger a motorized hand exoskeleton or an electrical stimulation device that opens/closes the hand. While EEG-triggered movement-assist devices could restore function, they may also promote recovery by reinforcing the use of remaining cortical circuits. EEGs were recorded while participants were cued to either relax or attempt to extend their fingers. Linear discriminant analysis was used to detect onset of finger extension from the EEGs in a leave-one-trial-out cross-validation process. In each testing trial, the classifier was applied in pseudo real time starting from an initial hand-relaxed phase, through movement planning, and into the initial attempted finger extension phase (finger extension phase estimated from typical time-to-movement-onset measured in the unaffected hand. The classifiers detected attempted finger-extension at a significantly higher rate during both motor planning and early attempted execution compared to rest. To reduce inappropriate triggering of a movement-assist device during rest, the classification threshold could be adjusted to require more certainty about one’s intent to move before triggering a device. Additionally, a device could be set to activate only after multiple time samples in a row were classified as finger extension events. These options resulted in some sessions with no false triggers while the person was resting, but moderate-to-high true trigger rates during attempted movements.

  14. Neuronal network coherent with hand kinematics during fast repetitive hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Op de Beeck, Marc; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Goldman, Serge; De Tiège, Xavier

    2012-01-16

    We quantified the coupling between magnetoencephalographic (MEG) cortical signals and the kinematics of fast repetitive voluntary hand movements monitored by a 3-axis accelerometer. Ten healthy right-handed adults performed self-paced flexion-extension movements of right-hand fingers at ~3Hz with either touching the thumb during flexions (TOUCH) or not (noTOUCH). At the sensor level, we found in all subjects and conditions significant coherence at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1). Coherence values were significantly higher in TOUCH compared to noTOUCH. At the group level, dynamic imaging of coherent sources localized the main source of coherent activity at the left primary motor (M1) hand area, except at F0 TOUCH were the main source was localized at the left primary sensory (S1) hand area. Other coherent brain areas were also identified at right S1-M1 cortices (F0), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (F1), left posterior parietal cortex (F0 TOUCH and F1 noTOUCH) and left medial S1-M1 areas (TOUCH). This study highlights the prominent role of rhythmic neuronal activity phase-locked to movements for the encoding and the integration of key sensori-motor features of limb kinematics. This study also suggests that somatosensory afferences play a key role to sustain a high synchronization level between the neuronal activity in coherent brain areas and hand acceleration. Some coherent brain regions differed between F0 and F1 in both conditions, suggesting that distinct cortical areas are involved in different features of hand kinematics.

  15. Intrinsic hand muscles and digit independence on the preferred and non-preferred hands of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Karen T; Hammond, Geoffrey R

    2006-09-01

    Although the superior dexterity of one hand is an almost ubiquitous human experience, it is unclear which characteristics of the motor system controlling the preferred hand produce this superior dexterity. Between-species studies show that greater dexterity is associated with a motor system that permits more independent movements of the digits. If between-hand dexterity differences are mediated by the same mechanism as between-species dexterity differences, then there should be asymmetries within the corticospinal tracts of humans that would result in between-hand independence differences. The evidence for asymmetries in the corticospinal tracts is sparse, and if an asymmetry does exist, it appears to be limited to the control of intrinsic hand muscles. We wondered, therefore, whether there might be a difference in the degree of independent control on the two hands during performance of a task that primarily uses intrinsic hand muscles. We examined digit individuation when subjects produced abduction or adduction forces with a single digit in isolation. Consistent with previous studies in which forces or movements in single digits were generated primarily by extrinsic hand muscles, we found no difference between the individuation of the digits on the preferred and non-preferred hands. We suggest that whereas independence differences underlie large dexterity differences between species, they do not underlie the more subtle dexterity differences between the preferred and non-preferred hands. Instead, the neural substrate for handedness might be asymmetrical connectivity within M1, with more profuse connections within the dominant than non-dominant M1 imparting a greater potential for excitatory and inhibitory interactions between movement representations which might then result in the more efficient coordination of hand and arm movements of the preferred hand.

  16. Complex unconstrained three-dimensional hand movement and constant equi-affine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Uri; Berthoz, Alain; Flash, Tamar

    2009-02-01

    One long-established simplifying principle behind the large repertoire and high versatility of human hand movements is the two-thirds power law-an empirical law stating a relationship between local geometry and kinematics of human hand trajectories during planar curved movements. It was further generalized not only to various types of human movements, but also to motion perception and prediction, although it was unsuccessful in explaining unconstrained three-dimensional (3D) movements. Recently, movement obeying the power law was proved to be equivalent to moving with constant planar equi-affine speed. Generalizing such motion to 3D space-i.e., to movement at constant spatial equi-affine speed-predicts the emergence of a new power law, whose utility for describing spatial scribbling movements we have previously demonstrated. In this empirical investigation of the new power law, subjects repetitively traced six different 3D geometrical shapes with their hand. We show that the 3D power law explains the data consistently better than both the two-thirds power law and an additional power law that was previously suggested for spatial hand movements. We also found small yet systematic modifications of the power-law's exponents across the various shapes, which further scrutiny suggested to be correlated with global geometric factors of the traced shape. Nevertheless, averaging over all subjects and shapes, the power-law exponents are generally in accordance with constant spatial equi-affine speed. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for the potential role of non-Euclidean geometry in motion planning and control. Moreover, these results seem to imply a relationship between geometry and kinematics that is more complex than the simple local one stipulated by the two-thirds power law and similar models.

  17. On the other hand: overflow movements of infants' hands and legs during unimanual object exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, Kasey C; Galeon, Margaret A; Adolph, Karen E

    2012-05-01

    Motor overflow is extraneous movement in a limb not involved in a motor action. Typically, overflow is observed in people with neurological impairments and in healthy children and adults during strenuous and attention-demanding tasks. In the current study, we found that young infants produce vast amounts of motor overflow, corroborating claims of symmetry being the default state of the motor system. While manipulating an object with one hand, all 27 of the typically developing 4.5- to 7.5-month-old infants who we observed displayed overflow movements of the free hand (on 4/5 of unimanual actions). Mirror-image movements of the hands occurred on 1/8 of unimanual actions, and the hands and legs moved in synchrony on 1/3 of unimanual acts. Motor overflow was less frequent when infants were in a sitting posture and when infants watched their acting hand, suggesting that upright posture and visual examination may help to alleviate overflow and break obligatory symmetry in healthy infants.

  18. Human Purposive Movement Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    movement patterns; for example, horses , deer, and javelina exhibit grazing behaviors that are similar to, but not quite the same as, cattle. Individual...conveyance would be modeled. This might be as simple as a person riding a horse , mule, camel, or burro, or as complex as a multiwheeled truck, train...or tracked vehicle. The assumption presented is that each system of conveyance reflects the will of its operator/ rider , whether that system is a

  19. Human hand modelling: kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand funct

  20. The human hand as an inspiration for robot hand development

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    “The Human Hand as an Inspiration for Robot Hand Development” presents an edited collection of authoritative contributions in the area of robot hands. The results described in the volume are expected to lead to more robust, dependable, and inexpensive distributed systems such as those endowed with complex and advanced sensing, actuation, computation, and communication capabilities. The twenty-four chapters discuss the field of robotic grasping and manipulation viewed in light of the human hand’s capabilities and push the state-of-the-art in robot hand design and control. Topics discussed include human hand biomechanics, neural control, sensory feedback and perception, and robotic grasp and manipulation. This book will be useful for researchers from diverse areas such as robotics, biomechanics, neuroscience, and anthropologists.

  1. Neural coupling of cooperative hand movements: a reflex and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Volker; Macauda, Gianluca; Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Wirz, Markus; Kloter, Evelyne; Michels, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The neural control of "cooperative" hand movements reflecting "opening a bottle" was explored in human subjects by electromyographic (EMG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings. EMG responses to unilateral nonnoxious ulnar nerve stimulation were analyzed in the forearm muscles of both sides during dynamic movements against a torque applied by the right hand to a device which was compensated for by the left hand. For control, stimuli were applied while task was performed in a static/isometric mode and during bilateral synchronous pro-/supination movements. During the dynamic cooperative task, EMG responses to stimulations appeared in the right extensor and left flexor muscles, regardless of which side was stimulated. Under the control conditions, responses appeared only on the stimulated side. fMRI recordings showed a bilateral extra-activation and functional coupling of the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) during the dynamic cooperative, but not during the control, tasks. This activation might reflect processing of shared cutaneous input during the cooperative task. Correspondingly, it is assumed that stimulation-induced unilateral volleys are processed in S2, leading to a release of EMG responses to both forearms. This indicates a task-specific neural coupling during cooperative hand movements, which has consequences for the rehabilitation of hand function in poststroke patients.

  2. Dissociation between neuronal activity in sensorimotor cortex and hand movement revealed as a function of movement rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Dora; Siero, Jeroen C W; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Leijten, Frans S S; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-07-11

    It is often assumed that similar behavior is generated by the same brain activity. However, this does not take into account the brain state or recent behavioral history and movement initiation or continuation may not be similarly generated in the brain. To study whether similar movements are generated by the same brain activity, we measured neuronal population activity during repeated movements. Three human subjects performed a motor repetition task in which they moved their hand at four different rates (0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz). From high-resolution electrocorticography arrays implanted on motor and sensory cortex, high-frequency power (65-95 Hz) was extracted as a measure of neuronal population activity. During the two faster movement rates, high-frequency power was significantly suppressed, whereas movement parameters remained highly similar. This suppression was nonlinear: after the initial movement, neuronal population activity was reduced most strongly, and the data fit a model in which a fast decline rapidly converged to saturation. The amplitude of the beta-band suppression did not change with different rates. However, at the faster rates, beta power did not return to baseline between movements but remained suppressed. We take these findings to indicate that the extended beta suppression at the faster rates, which may suggest a release of inhibition in motor cortex, facilitates movement initiation. These results show that the relationship between behavior and neuronal activity is not consistent: recent movement influences the state of motor cortex and facilitates next movements by reducing the required level of neuronal activity.

  3. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  4. Inverse Kinematic Analysis of Human Hand Thumb Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Tascau, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan; Menyhardt, Karoly; Rosu, Serban; Rusu, Lucian; Vigaru, Cosmina

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with a kinematic model of the thumb of the human hand. The proposed model has 3 degrees of freedom being able to model the movements of the thumb tip with respect to the wrist joint centre. The kinematic equations are derived based on Denavit-Hartenberg Convention and solved in both direct and inverse way. Inverse kinematic analysis of human hand thumb model reveals multiple and connected solutions which are characteristic to nonlinear systems when the number of equations is greater than number of unknowns and correspond to natural movements of the finger.

  5. Brain network analysis of EEG functional connectivity during imagery hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuru, Matteo; Fara, Francesca; Fraschini, Matteo

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of human neural activity during imaginary movement tasks represent an important challenge in order to develop effective applications that allow the control of a machine. Yet methods based on brain network analysis of functional connectivity have been scarcely investigated. As a result we use graph theoretic methods to investigate the functional connectivity and brain network measures in order to characterize imagery hand movements in a set of healthy subjects. The results of the present study show that functional connectivity analysis and minimum spanning tree (MST) parameters allow to successfully discriminate between imagery hand movements (both right and left) and resting state conditions. In conclusion, this paper shows that brain network analysis of EEG functional connectivity could represent an efficient alternative to more classical local activation based approaches. Furthermore, it also suggests the shift toward methods based on the characterization of a limited set of fundamental functional connections that disclose salient network topological features.

  6. The role of online visual feedback for the control of target-directed and allocentric hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Lore; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2011-02-01

    Studies that have investigated how sensory feedback about the moving hand is used to control hand movements have relied on paradigms such as pointing or reaching that require subjects to acquire target locations. In the context of these target-directed tasks, it has been found repeatedly that the human sensory-motor system relies heavily on visual feedback to control the ongoing movement. This finding has been formalized within the framework of statistical optimality according to which different sources of sensory feedback are combined such as to minimize variance in sensory information during movement control. Importantly, however, many hand movements that people perform every day are not target-directed, but based on allocentric (object-centered) visual information. Examples of allocentric movements are gesture imitation, drawing, or copying. Here we tested if visual feedback about the moving hand is used in the same way to control target-directed and allocentric hand movements. The results show that visual feedback is used significantly more to reduce movement scatter in the target-directed as compared with the allocentric movement task. Furthermore, we found that differences in the use of visual feedback between target-directed and allocentric hand movements cannot be explained based on differences in uncertainty about the movement goal. We conclude that the role played by visual feedback for movement control is fundamentally different for target-directed and allocentric movements. The results suggest that current computational and neural models of sensorimotor control that are based entirely on data derived from target-directed paradigms have to be modified to accommodate performance in the allocentric tasks used in our experiments. As a consequence, the results cast doubt on the idea that models of sensorimotor control developed exclusively from data obtained in target-directed paradigms are also valid in the context of allocentric tasks, such as drawing

  7. Changes in the relationship between movement velocity and movement distance in primary focal hand dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, Janey; Corcos, Daniel M; Leurgans, Sue; Comella, Cynthia L; Weis-McNulty, Annette; MacKinnon, Colum D

    2008-07-01

    The authors examined the relationship between movement velocity and distance and the associated muscle activation patterns in 18 individuals with focal hand dystonia (FHD) compared with a control group of 18 individuals with no known neuromuscular condition. Participants performed targeted voluntary wrist and elbow flexion movements as fast as possible across 5 movement distances. Individuals with FHD were slower than controls across all distances, and this difference was accentuated for longer movements. Muscle activation patterns were triphasic in the majority of individuals with FHD, and muscle activation scaled with distance in a similar manner to controls. Cocontraction did not explain movement slowing in individuals with dystonia, but there was a trend toward underactivation of the 1st agonist burst in the dystonic group. The authors concluded that slowness is a consistent feature of voluntary movement in FHD and is present even in the absence of dystonic posturing. Underactivation of the 1st agonist burst appears to be the most likely reason to explain slowing.

  8. Flexible, task-dependent use of sensory feedback to control hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knill, David C; Bondada, Amulya; Chhabra, Manu

    2011-01-26

    We tested whether changing accuracy demands for simple pointing movements leads humans to adjust the feedback control laws that map sensory signals from the moving hand to motor commands. Subjects made repeated pointing movements in a virtual environment to touch a button whose shape varied randomly from trial to trial-between squares, rectangles oriented perpendicular to the movement path, and rectangles oriented parallel to the movement path. Subjects performed the task on a horizontal table but saw the target configuration and a virtual rendering of their pointing finger through a mirror mounted between a monitor and the table. On one-third of trials, the position of the virtual finger was perturbed by ±1 cm either in the movement direction or perpendicular to the movement direction when the finger passed behind an occluder. Subjects corrected quickly for the perturbations despite not consciously noticing them; however, they corrected almost twice as much for perturbations aligned with the narrow dimension of a target than for perturbations aligned with the long dimension. These changes in apparent feedback gain appeared in the kinematic trajectories soon after the time of the perturbations, indicating that they reflect differences in the feedback control law used throughout the duration of movements. The results indicate that the brain adjusts its feedback control law for individual movements "on demand" to fit task demands. Simulations of optimal control laws for a two-joint arm show that accuracy demands alone, coupled with signal-dependent noise, lead to qualitatively the same behavior.

  9. MovementXML: A representation of semantics of human movement based on Labanotation

    OpenAIRE

    Hatol, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Most of us are familiar with music notations. Dance notations, on the other hand, have not gained widespread acceptance. This can be attributed to the fact that dance notations, and human movement notations in general, are inherently complex. This complexity has also hindered researches in the field. Up to now, there is no de facto standard for dance score interchange. Labanotation is the most prevalent among the different human movement notations. Most technological advances so far have revo...

  10. An experimental investigation on the influence of hand orientation on the control of trunk-assisted upper-limb movements

    OpenAIRE

    CHEVALOT, N; WANG, X; DORIOT, N

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the computationally ill-posed problems related to the kinematic redundancy in both task and joint space of human movements, the present work aims to extend the work done by Wang (1999) and to study trunk-assisted upper limb reaching movements. In particular, the influence of pushing direction on the control of hand trajectory and upper limb movements was studied. The purpose of the paper is to present the main results of this investigation.

  11. Illusory movements of a phantom hand grade with the duration and magnitude of motor commands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lee D; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2010-04-15

    The senses of limb movement and position are critical for accurate control of movement. Recent studies show that central signals of motor command contribute to the sense of limb position but it is not clear whether such signals influence the distinctly different sense of limb movement. Nine subjects participated in two experiments in which we inflated a cuff around their upper arm to produce an ischaemic block, paralysing and anaesthetising the forearm, wrist and hand. This produces an experimental phantom wrist and hand. With their arm hidden from view subjects were asked to make voluntary efforts with their blocked wrist. In the first experiment, efforts were 20 and 40% of maximum and were 2 and 4 s in duration. The second experiment used 1 and 5 s efforts of 5 and 50% of maximum. Subjects signalled perceived movements of their phantom wrist using a pointer. All subjects reported clear perceptions of movement of their phantom hand for all levels and durations of effort. On average, subjects perceived their phantom wrist to move between 16.4 +/- 3.3 deg (mean +/- 95% confidence interval (CI)) and 30.2 +/- 5.4 deg in the first experiment and between 10.3 +/- 3.5 and 38.6 +/- 6.7 deg in the second. The velocity of the movements and total displacement of the phantom graded with the level of effort, and the total displacement also graded with duration. Hence, we have shown that motor command signals have a novel proprioceptive role in the perception of movement of human joints.

  12. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  13. Robotic Assistance by Impedance Compensation for Hand Movements While Manual Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a robotic assistance scheme which allows for impedance compensation with stiffness, damping, and mass parameters for hand manipulation tasks and we apply it to manual welding. The impedance compensation does not assume a preprogrammed hand trajectory. Rather, the intention of the human for the hand movement is estimated in real time using a smooth Kalman filter. The movement is restricted by compensatory virtual impedance in the directions perpendicular to the estimated direction of movement. With airbrush painting experiments, we test three sets of values for the impedance parameters as inspired from impedance measurements with manual welding. We apply the best of the tested sets for assistance in manual welding and perform welding experiments with professional and novice welders. We contrast three conditions: 1) welding with the robot's assistance; 2) with the robot when the robot is passive; and 3) welding without the robot. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the assistance through quantitative measures of both task performance and perceived user's satisfaction. The performance of both the novice and professional welders improves significantly with robotic assistance compared to welding with a passive robot. The assessment of user satisfaction shows that all novice and most professional welders appreciate the robotic assistance as it suppresses the tremors in the directions perpendicular to the movement for welding.

  14. Unintended hand movements after abrupt cessation of variable and constant opposing forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, K; Heuer, H

    2013-04-16

    Humans are highly efficient in moving in a world of variable resistive forces which result, e.g., from different masses of objects or different directions of movements relative to gravity. However, the underlying mechanisms are challenged when an opposing force is suddenly removed. The resulting involuntary movements are known as accident risks in everyday life. We studied their characteristics upon abrupt cessations of opposing forces of 1, 2, and 4N which were presented in a series of variable or constant forces. The characteristics of the involuntary hand movements are largely determined by the mechanical impedance of the limb. The involuntary movements are oscillatory in nature, and their amplitude increases with stronger opposing force. Limb impedance is modulated both in a reactive and in an anticipatory manner. The reactive modulation occurs during each involuntary movement as a consequence of the neural responses elicited by the rapid limb acceleration consequent upon the cessation of the opposing force. Anticipatory modulation of limb impedance may serve to produce similar involuntary movements in spite of different opposing forces. The modulation is thus stronger with variable forces, where differences between resulting involuntary movements can be experienced more easily, than with constant forces.

  15. Hand Movements and Braille Reading Efficiency: Data from the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tessa; Wormsley, Diane P.; Kamei-Hannan, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Using a subset of data from the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study, researchers analyzed the patterns and characteristics of hand movements as predictors of reading performance. Statistically significant differences were found between one- and two-handed readers and between patterns of hand movements and reading rates. (Contains 6…

  16. Human-Like Movement of an Anthropomorphic Robot: Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    e Silva, E. Costa; Costa, M. F.; Bicho, E.; Erlhagen, W.

    2011-09-01

    Human-like movement is fundamental for natural human-robot interaction and collaboration. We have developed in a model for generating arm and hand movements an anthropomorphic robot. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human reaching and grasping movements. In this paper we present some changes to the model we have proposed in [4] and test and compare different nonlinear constrained optimization techniques for solving the large-scale nonlinear constrained optimization problem that rises from the discretization of our time-continuous model. Furthermore, we test different time discretization steps.

  17. HUMAN HAND STUDY FOR ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON DELVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIROUAS Flaviu Ionut

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will be presenting research with application in the rehabilitation of hand motor functions by the aid of robotics. The focus will be on the dimensional parameters of the biological human hand from which the robotic system will be developed. The term used for such measurements is known as anthropometrics. The anthropometric parameters studied and presented in this paper are mainly related to the angular limitations of the finger joints of the human hand.

  18. Linear and nonlinear subspace analysis of hand movements during grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Phil Hengjun; Visell, Yon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated nonlinear patterns of coordination, or synergies, underlying whole-hand grasping kinematics. Prior research has shed considerable light on roles played by such coordinated degrees-of-freedom (DOF), illuminating how motor control is facilitated by structural and functional specializations in the brain, peripheral nervous system, and musculoskeletal system. However, existing analyses suppose that the patterns of coordination can be captured by means of linear analyses, as linear combinations of nominally independent DOF. In contrast, hand kinematics is itself highly nonlinear in nature. To address this discrepancy, we sought to to determine whether nonlinear synergies might serve to more accurately and efficiently explain human grasping kinematics than is possible with linear analyses. We analyzed motion capture data acquired from the hands of individuals as they grasped an array of common objects, using four of the most widely used linear and nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithms. We compared the results using a recently developed algorithm-agnostic quality measure, which enabled us to assess the quality of the dimensional reductions that resulted by assessing the extent to which local neighborhood information in the data was preserved. Although qualitative inspection of this data suggested that nonlinear correlations between kinematic variables were present, we found that linear modeling, in the form of Principle Components Analysis, could perform better than any of the nonlinear techniques we applied.

  19. Decoupling eye and hand movement control: visual short-term memory influences reach planning more than saccade planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issen, Laurel A; Knill, David C

    2012-01-04

    When reaching for objects, humans make saccades to fixate the object at or near the time the hand begins to move. In order to address whether the CNS relies on a common representation of target positions to plan both saccades and hand movements, we quantified the contributions of visual short-term memory (VSTM) to hand and eye movements executed during the same coordinated actions. Subjects performed a sequential movement task in which they picked up one of two objects on the right side of a virtual display (the "weapon"), moved it to the left side of the display (to a "reloading station") and then moved it back to the right side to hit the other object (the target). On some trials, the target was perturbed by 1° of visual angle while subjects moved the weapon to the reloading station. Although subjects did not notice the change, the original position of the target, encoded in VSTM, influenced the motor plans for both the hand and the eye back to the target. Memory influenced motor plans for distant targets more than for near targets, indicating that sensorimotor planning is sensitive to the reliability of available information; however, memory had a larger influence on hand movements than on eye movements. This suggests that spatial planning for coordinated saccades and hand movements are dissociated at the level of processing at which online visual information is integrated with information in short-term memory.

  20. Non-dominant hand movement facilitates the frontal N30 somatosensory evoked potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legon Wynn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous literature has shown that the frontal N30 is increased during movement of the hand contralateral to median nerve stimulation. This finding was a result of non-dominant left hand movement in right-handed participants. It is unclear however if the effect depends upon non-dominant hand movement or if this is a generalized phenomenon across the upper-limbs. This study tests the effect of dominant and non-dominant hand movement upon contralateral frontal and parietal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs and further tests if this relationship persists in left hand dominant participants. Median nerve SEPs were elicited from the wrist contralateral to movement in both right hand and left hand dominant participants alternating the movement hand in separate blocks. Participants were required to volitionally squeeze (~ 20% of a maximal voluntary contraction a pressure-sensitive bulb every ~3 seconds with the hand contralateral to median nerve stimulation. SEPs were continuously collected during the task and individual traces were grouped into time bins relative to movement according to the timing of components of the Bereitschaftspotential. SEPs were then averaged and quantified from both FCZ and CP3/4 scalp electrode sites during both the squeeze task and at rest. Results The N30 is facilitated during non-dominant hand movement in both right and left hand dominant individuals. There was no effect for dominant hand movement in either group. Conclusions N30 amplitude increase may be a result of altered sensory gating from motor areas known to be specifically active during non-dominant hand movement.

  1. Entropic Movement Complexity Reflects Subjective Creativity Rankings of Visualized Hand Motion Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen; Braun, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate 55 novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated 10 times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity. PMID:26733896

  2. Brain Representation of Active and Passive Hand Movements in Healthy Aged People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Weisen; WU Yi; WU Junfa

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To reveal the neural network of active and passive hand movements.Method:Seven healthy aged people were checked,and acquired fimctional magnetic resonance imaging data on a 1.5T scanner.Active movement consisted of repetitive grasping and loosening of hand; passive movement involved the same movement performed by examiner.Both types of hand movements were assessed separately.These data were analysed by Statistical Parametric Mapping Microsoft.Result:The main activated brain areas were the contralateral supplemental motor area,primary motor area,primary sensory area and the ipsilateral cerebellum when subjects gripped right hands actively and passively.The supplemental area was less active in passive hand movement than active hand movement.The activated brain areas were mainly within Brodmann area 4 during active hand movement; in the contrast,the voxels triggered by passive movement were mainly within Brodmann areas 3,1,2 areas.Conclusion:The results suggest that the neural networks of passive and active tasks spared some common areas,and the passive movement could be as effective as active movement to facilitate the recovery of limbs motor function in patients with brain damage.

  3. A novel design method of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands for reproducing human hand grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baiyang; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenrui; Zhang, Qiaofei; Mao, Liu; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Because hand is often used for grasping, developing a design of prosthetic hands, particularly light and compact underactuated anthropomorphic transradial prostheses for reproducing human hand complex grasping is crucial for upper-limb amputees. Obviously, the less the number of actuators is, the worse the anthropomorphic motion capability of the prosthetic hands will be. This paper aims to design a transmission mechanism with few motors actuating fingers which could serve the relatively accurate grasp movement of a human hand and has the potential to be embedded in a palm including the motors. We start with establishing an index for evaluating the anthropomorphic motion capability of a prosthetic hand. Based on the optimization of this index, we determine the number of actuators in fingers and the transmission relationship between the actuators and the metacarpophalangeal(MCP) joints. Then, a new design method to mechanically implement the transmission relationship based on a novel decomposition of transmission matrix is proposed in this paper. Utilizing this method, we obtained the final mechanical structure of a new prosthetic hand.

  4. Modeling movements of a long hand-held tool with effects of moments of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Chen, Hung-Jen

    2014-04-01

    The current experiment aimed to investigate the effects of weight position on movement time in target acquisition tasks. Subsequently, a simple mathematical model was developed to describe the movement time with the moments of inertia. Ten right-handed participants conducted continuous Fitts pointing tasks using a laparoscopic instrument as a long hand-held tool. The results showed significant effects of weight position on movement time. Furthermore, an extended Fitts' law model is proposed for the moments of inertia produced by the hand, instrument, and a constant mass in different positions. This predictive model accounted for 63% of the variance in movement time. The predictive model proposed in the present study can be applied not only to estimate movement time given a particular target width, instrument movement amplitude, and weight position of a long hand-held tool but also to standardize movement time and establish training standards.

  5. Kinematic parameters of hand movement during a disparate bimanual movement task in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisch, Julian; Butler, Jenny; Izadi, Hooshang; Zielinski, Ingar Marie; Aarts, Pauline; Birtles, Deirdre; Green, Dido

    2016-04-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (uCP) experience problems performing tasks requiring the coordinated use of both hands (bimanual coordination; BC). Additionally, some children with uCP display involuntary symmetrical activation of the opposing hand (mirrored movements). Measures, used to investigate therapy-related improvements focus on the functionality of the affected hand during unimanual or bimanual tasks. None however specifically address spatiotemporal integration of both hands. We explored the kinematics of hand movements during a bimanual task to identify parameters of BC. Thirty-seven children (aged 10.9±2.6years, 20 male) diagnosed with uCP participated. 3D kinematic motion analysis was performed during the task requiring opening of a box with their affected- (AH) or less-affected hand (LAH), and pressing a button inside with the opposite hand. Temporal and spatial components of data were extracted and related to measures of hand function and level of impairment. Total task duration was correlated with the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function in both conditions (either hand leading with the lid-opening). Spatial accuracy of the LAH when the box was opened with their AH was correlated with outcomes on the Children's Hand Use Experience Questionnaire. Additionally, we found a subgroup of children displaying non-symmetrical movement interference associated with greater movement overlap when their affected hand opened the box. This subgroup also demonstrated decreased use of the affected hand during bimanual tasks. Further investigation of bimanual interference, which goes beyond small scaled symmetrical mirrored movements, is needed to consider its impact on bimanual task performance following early unilateral brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Locomotor-like leg movements evoked by rhythmic arm movements in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sylos-Labini

    Full Text Available Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs.

  7. Motor synergies for dampening hand vibration during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Shunta; Kagawa, Takahiro; Uno, Yoji

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the motion required to carry a cup filled with water without spilling it, which is a common human dexterous task. This task requires the individual to dampen hand vibration while walking. We hypothesize that a reduction in hand jerk and a constant cup angle are required to achieve this task. We measured movements while human subjects carried a cup with water (WW task) and with stones (WS task) using a three-dimensional position measurement system and then analyzed joint coordination. We empirically confirmed that the value of hand jerk and the variance in cup angle in the WW task were smaller than those in the WS task. We used uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis to quantify joint coordination corresponding to the motor synergy required to reduce the hand jerk and variance of the cup angle. UCM components, which did not affect the hand jerk and cup angle, were larger than orthogonal components, which directly affected the hand jerk and cup angle in the WW task. These results suggest that there is a coordinated control mechanism that reduces hand jerk and maintains a constant cup angle when carrying a cup filled with water without spilling it. In addition, we suggest that humans adopt a flexible and coordinated control strategy of allowing variance independent of the variables that should be controlled to achieve this dexterous task.

  8. Observation of Hand Movements by Older Persons with Dementia : Effects on Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Laura H. P.; Swaab, Dick F.; Hol, Elly M.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Hand movement observation activates mirror neurons, located in brain areas that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease. We examined the effects of hand movement observation on cognition in older persons with dementia. Methods: Nursing home residents with dementia (n = 44) watched eith

  9. Classifying sEMG-based Hand Movements by Means of Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Isaković

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve surface electromyography (sEMG based control of hand prosthesis, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA for feature extraction. The sEMG data from a group of healthy subjects (downloaded from free Ninapro database comprised the following sets: three grasping, eight wrist, and eleven finger movements. We tested the accuracy of a simple quadratic classifier for two sets of features derived from PCA. Preliminary results suggest that the first two principal components do not guarantee successful hand movement classification. The hand movement classification accuracy significantly increased with using three instead of two features, in all three sets of movements and throughout all subjects.

  10. Uncertainty in aiming movements and its association to hand function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Priscila de Paiva Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of the uncertainty of target location on the planning and execution of aiming movements performed towards the ipsilateral and contralateral directions by the right and left upper limbs. In addition, the association between the performance of aiming movements and the performance of functional manual tasks was investigated. Two tasks were proposed: with prior knowledge of the movement direction (simple reaction time or not (choice reaction time. The grip strength and manual dexterity were measured. The choice option in response (i.e. uncertainty influenced planning of the aiming movements, but not its execution, while movements performed towards the contralateral direction were worse in execution as compared to the ipsilateral direction. Manual dexterity was significantly correlated with reaction times, while the performance during movement execution was significantly correlated with handgrip/pinch strength.

  11. Review of human hand microbiome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds-Wilson, Sarah L; Nurinova, Nilufar I; Zapka, Carrie A; Fierer, Noah; Wilson, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances have increased our understanding of the human microbiome, including the skin microbiome. Despite the importance of the hands as a vector for infection transmission, there have been no comprehensive reviews of recent advances in hand microbiome research or overviews of the factors that influence the composition of the hand microbiome. A comprehensive and systematic database search was conducted for skin microbiome-related articles published from January 1, 2008 to April 1, 2015. Only primary research articles that used culture-independent, whole community analysis methods to study the healthy hand skin microbiome were included. Eighteen articles were identified containing hand microbiome data. Most focused on bacteria, with relatively little reported on fungi, viruses, and protozoa. Bacteria from four phyla were found across all studies of the hand microbiome (most to least relative abundance): Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes. Key factors that impacted the hand microbiome composition included temporal and biogeographical dynamics, as well as intrinsic (age, gender) and extrinsic (product use, cohabitants, pet-ownership) variables. There was more temporal variability in the composition of the hand microbiome than in other body sites, making identification of the "normal" microbiome of the hands challenging. The microbiome of the hands is in constant flux as the hands are a critical vector for transmitting microorganisms between people, pets, inanimate objects and our environments. Future studies need to resolve methodological influences on results, and further investigate factors which alter the hand microbiome including the impact of products applied to hands. Increased understanding of the hand microbiome and the skin microbiome in general, will open the door to product development for disease prevention and treatment, and may lead to other applications, including novel diagnostic and forensic approaches.

  12. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-02-15

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses.

  13. 3D Visual Sensing of the Human Hand for the Remote Operation of a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New low cost sensors and open free libraries for 3D image processing are making important advances in robot vision applications possible, such as three- dimensional object recognition, semantic mapping, navigation and localization of robots, human detection and/or gesture recognition for human-machine interaction. In this paper, a novel method for recognizing and tracking the fingers of a human hand is presented. This method is based on point clouds from range images captured by a RGBD sensor. It works in real time and it does not require visual marks, camera calibration or previous knowledge of the environment. Moreover, it works successfully even when multiple objects appear in the scene or when the ambient light is changed. Furthermore, this method was designed to develop a human interface to control domestic or industrial devices, remotely. In this paper, the method was tested by operating a robotic hand. Firstly, the human hand was recognized and the fingers were detected. Secondly, the movement of the fingers was analysed and mapped to be imitated by a robotic hand.

  14. 3D Visual Sensing of the Human Hand for the Remote Operation of a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New low cost sensors and open free libraries for 3D image processing are making important advances in robot vision applications possible, such as three-dimensional object recognition, semantic mapping, navigation and localization of robots, human detection and/or gesture recognition for human-machine interaction. In this paper, a novel method for recognizing and tracking the fingers of a human hand is presented. This method is based on point clouds from range images captured by a RGBD sensor. It works in real time and it does not require visual marks, camera calibration or previous knowledge of the environment. Moreover, it works successfully even when multiple objects appear in the scene or when the ambient light is changed. Furthermore, this method was designed to develop a human interface to control domestic or industrial devices, remotely. In this paper, the method was tested by operating a robotic hand. Firstly, the human hand was recognized and the fingers were detected. Secondly, the movement of the fingers was analysed and mapped to be imitated by a robotic hand.

  15. Kinematic parameters of hand movement during a disparate bimanual movement task in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudisch, J.; Butler, J.; Izadi, H.; Zielinski, I.M.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Birtles, D.; Green, D.

    2016-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (uCP) experience problems performing tasks requiring the coordinated use of both hands (bimanual coordination; BC). Additionally, some children with uCP display involuntary symmetrical activation of the opposing hand (mirrored movements). Measures, used to inv

  16. Give me a sign: decoding complex coordinated hand movements using high-field fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichner, Martin G; Jansma, Johan M; Sellmeijer, Jim; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Ramsey, Nicolas F

    2014-03-01

    Decoding movements from the human cortex has been a topic of great interest for controlling an artificial limb in non-human primates and severely paralyzed people. Here we investigate feasibility of decoding gestures from the sensorimotor cortex in humans, using 7 T fMRI. Twelve healthy volunteers performed four hand gestures from the American Sign Language Alphabet. These gestures were performed in a rapid event related design used to establish the classifier and a slow event-related design, used to test the classifier. Single trial patterns were classified using a pattern-correlation classifier. The four hand gestures could be classified with an average accuracy of 63 % (range 35–95 %), which was significantly above chance (25 %). The hand region was, as expected, the most active region, and the optimal volume for classification was on average about 200 voxels, although this varied considerably across individuals. Importantly, classification accuracy correlated significantly with consistency of gesture execution. The results of our study demonstrate that decoding gestures from the hand region of the sensorimotor cortex using 7 T fMRI can reach very high accuracy, provided that gestures are executed in a consistent manner. Our results further indicate that the neuronal representation of hand gestures is robust and highly reproducible. Given that the most active foci were located in the hand region, and that 7 T fMRI has been shown to agree with electrocorticography, our results suggest that this confined region could serve to decode sign language gestures for intracranial brain–computer interfacing using surface grids.

  17. Are movements necessary for the sense of body ownership? Evidence from the rubber hand illusion in pure hemiplegic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Burin

    Full Text Available A question still debated within cognitive neuroscience is whether signals present during actions significantly contribute to the emergence of human's body ownership. In the present study, we aimed at answer this question by means of a neuropsychological approach. We administered the classical rubber hand illusion paradigm to a group of healthy participants and to a group of neurological patients affected by a complete left upper limb hemiplegia, but without any propriceptive/tactile deficits. The illusion strength was measured both subjectively (i.e., by a self-report questionnaire and behaviorally (i.e., the location of one's own hand is shifted towards the rubber hand. We aimed at examining whether, and to which extent, an enduring absence of movements related signals affects body ownership. Our results showed that patients displayed, respect to healthy participants, stronger illusory effects when the left (affected hand was stimulated and no effects when the right (unaffected hand was stimulated. In other words, hemiplegics had a weaker/more flexible sense of body ownership for the affected hand, but an enhanced/more rigid one for the healthy hand. Possible interpretations of such asymmetrical distribution of body ownership, as well as limits of our results, are discussed. Broadly speaking, our findings suggest that the alteration of the normal flow of signals present during movements impacts on human's body ownership. This in turn, means that movements have a role per se in developing and maintaining a coherent body ownership.

  18. Are movements necessary for the sense of body ownership? Evidence from the rubber hand illusion in pure hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Dalila; Livelli, Alessandro; Garbarini, Francesca; Fossataro, Carlotta; Folegatti, Alessia; Gindri, Patrizia; Pia, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    A question still debated within cognitive neuroscience is whether signals present during actions significantly contribute to the emergence of human's body ownership. In the present study, we aimed at answer this question by means of a neuropsychological approach. We administered the classical rubber hand illusion paradigm to a group of healthy participants and to a group of neurological patients affected by a complete left upper limb hemiplegia, but without any propriceptive/tactile deficits. The illusion strength was measured both subjectively (i.e., by a self-report questionnaire) and behaviorally (i.e., the location of one's own hand is shifted towards the rubber hand). We aimed at examining whether, and to which extent, an enduring absence of movements related signals affects body ownership. Our results showed that patients displayed, respect to healthy participants, stronger illusory effects when the left (affected) hand was stimulated and no effects when the right (unaffected) hand was stimulated. In other words, hemiplegics had a weaker/more flexible sense of body ownership for the affected hand, but an enhanced/more rigid one for the healthy hand. Possible interpretations of such asymmetrical distribution of body ownership, as well as limits of our results, are discussed. Broadly speaking, our findings suggest that the alteration of the normal flow of signals present during movements impacts on human's body ownership. This in turn, means that movements have a role per se in developing and maintaining a coherent body ownership.

  19. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biologically inspired robotic systems can find important applications in biomedical robotics, since studying and replicating human behaviour can provide new insights into motor recovery, functional substitution and human-robot interaction. The analysis of human hand motion is essential for collecting information about human hand movements useful for generalizing reaching and grasping actions on a robotic system. This paper focuses on the definition and extraction of quantitative indicators for describing optimal hand grasping postures and replicating them on an anthropomorphic robotic hand. A motion analysis has been carried out on six healthy human subjects performing a transverse volar grasp. The extracted indicators point to invariant grasping behaviours between the involved subjects, thus providing some constraints for identifying the optimal grasping configuration. Hence, an optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method has been developed for determining the optimal grasp configuration of a robotic hand, grounded on the aforementioned constraints. It is characterized by a reduced computational cost. The grasp stability has been tested by introducing a quality index that satisfies the form-closure property. The grasping strategy has been validated by means of simulation tests and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  20. 3D active workspace of human hand anatomical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungureanu Loredana

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the model of the human hand is created with accuracy by respecting the type of motion provided by each articulation and the dimensions of articulated bones, it can function as the real organ providing the same motions. Unfortunately, the human hand is hard to model due to its kinematical chains submitted to motion constraints. On the other hand, if an application does not impose a fine manipulation it is not necessary to create a model as complex as the human hand is. But always the hand model has to perform a certain space of motions in imposed workspace architecture no matter what the practical application does. Methods Based on Denavit-Hartenberg convention, we conceived the kinematical model of the human hand, having in mind the structure and the behavior of the natural model. We obtained the kinematical equations describing the motion of every fingertip with respect to the general coordinate system, placed on the wrist. For every joint variable, a range of motion was established. Dividing these joint variables to an appropriate number of intervals and connecting them, the complex surface bordering the active hand model workspace was obtained. Results Using MATLAB 7.0, the complex surface described by fingertips, when hand articulations are all simultaneously moving, was obtained. It can be seen that any point on surface has its own coordinates smaller than the maximum length of the middle finger in static position. Therefore, a sphere having the centre in the origin of the general coordinate system and the radius which equals this length covers the represented complex surface. Conclusion We propose a human hand model that represents a new solution compared to the existing ones. This model is capable to make special movements like power grip and dexterous manipulations. During them, the fingertips do not exceed the active workspace encapsulated by determined surfaces. The proposed kinematical model can help to choose

  1. Fuzzy Deductive Inference Scheme Application in Solving the Problem of Modelling Movements of the Hand Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhenyuk Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision-making model with basic fuzzy rule modus ponens is suggested in this paper to control the hand prosthesis. The hand movements are described by angles of finger and wrist flexion. Electromyogram (EMG of hand muscles was used as a source of the input data. Software was developed to implement the decision-making model with fuzzy rule modus ponens. In particular, the software receives EMG data, executes calculations and visualises the output data. The key advantage of the model is smoothness of output data changes; this way a maximum approach to natural hand movements is reached.

  2. Use of the Argus II retinal prosthesis to improve visual guidance of fine hand movements

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We studied the capabilities of the Argus II retinal prosthesis for guiding fine hand movement, and demonstrated and quantified guidance improvement when using the device over when not using the device for progressively less predictable trajectories.

  3. Continuous involuntary hand movements and schizencephaly: epilepsia partialis continua or dystonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Lucio; Bonzano, Laura; Saitta, Laura; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Schizencephaly is regarded as a malformation of cortical development (due to abnormal neuronal organization) and may be associated with continuous involuntary hand movements. The mechanisms underlying these movements are not clear and both dystonia and epilepsia partialis continua have been considered in previously reported cases. We describe a young patient affected by schizencephaly and continuous involuntary movements of the contralateral hand. Functional MRI showed bilateral cerebral activation, while the subject performed tapping movements with the affected hand and no significant difference in the activation pattern after diazepam infusion. Standard and back-averaged EEG showed no alterations. The results obtained from these investigations and the clinical features of the involuntary movements are not in favor of an epileptic genesis, while support the diagnosis of secondary dystonia.

  4. Activation differences in observation of hand movements for imitation or velocity judgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchan, Boris; Melde, Cornelia; Herzog, Hans; Hömberg, Volker; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2008-03-17

    We aimed to investigate the brain areas engaged in observation of hand movements with the intention of imitation or judging movement velocity. Both processes reflect different analytic approaches in movement observation. We were interested if these two processes can be distinguished or share common activation foci. Twelve healthy, right-handed volunteers were required to observe video clips of hand gestures and of object related grasping movements while the regional cerebral blood flow was measured using positron emission tomography. The subjects were instructed either to imitate the actions or to judge the velocity of the observed movements after scanning. Action observation with the instruction to judge movement velocity engaged bilaterally the temporo-occipital junction and adjacent visual cortical areas. In contrast, observation with the instruction to imitate them afterwards, yielded large activation clusters covering the left parietal and premotor cortex. Both contrasts demonstrated activation in the inferior frontal cortex, however, on opposite sides. Results suggest that movement observation with the goal of imitation activated specific areas of the parietal cortex in the dominant hemisphere probably related to programming of the movement kinematics. In contrast, observation with the goal to characterize the velocity of the finger movements activated the ventral visual pathways. Thus, movement observation recruits non-overlapping cortical networks, depending on the information attended to which are characterised by a dorsal ventral dissociation.

  5. Corticospinal Excitability in the Hand Muscles is Decreased During Eye Movement with Visual Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Yuta; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles decreases during smooth pursuit eye movement. The present study tested a hypothesis that the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles at rest during eye movement is not caused by visual feedback but caused by motor commands to the eye muscles. Healthy men (M age = 28.4 yr., SD = 5.2) moved their eyes to the right with visual occlusion (dark goggles) while their arms and hands remained at rest. The motor-evoked potential in the hand muscles was suppressed by 19% in the third quarter of the eye-movement period, supporting a view that motor commands to the eye muscles are the cause of the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles. The amount of the suppression was not significantly different among the muscles, indicating that modulation of corticospinal excitability in one muscle induced by eye movement is not dependent on whether eye movement direction and the direction of finger movement when the muscle contracts are identical. Thus, the finding failed to support a hypothetical view that motor commands to the eye muscles concomittantly produce motor commands to the hand muscles. Moreover, the amount of the suppression was not significantly different between the forearm positions, indicating that the suppression was not affected by proprioception of the forearm muscles when visual feedback is absent. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Movement paths in operating hand-held tools: tests of distal-shift hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sülzenbrück, Sandra; Heuer, Herbert

    2013-06-01

    Extending the body with a tool could imply that characteristics of hand movements become characteristics of the movement of the effective part of the tool. Recent research suggests that such distal shifts are subject to boundary conditions. Here we propose the existence of three constraints: a strategy constraint, a constraint of movement characteristics, and a constraint of mode of control. We investigate their validity for the curvature of transverse movements aimed at a target while using a sliding first-order lever. Participants moved the tip of the effort arm of a real or virtual lever to control a cursor representing movements of the tip of the load arm of the lever on a monitor. With this tool, straight transverse hand movements are associated with concave curvature of the path of the tip of the tool. With terminal visual feedback and when targets were presented for the hand, hand paths were slightly concave in the absence of the dynamic transformation of the tool and slightly convex in its presence. When targets were presented for the tip of the lever, both the concave and convex curvatures of the hand paths became stronger. Finally, with continuous visual feedback of the tip of the lever, curvature of hand paths became convex and concave curvature of the paths of the tip of the lever was reduced. In addition, the effect of the dynamic transformation on curvature was attenuated. These findings support the notion that distal shifts are subject to at least the three proposed constraints.

  7. The Moving Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals that Explicit Sense of Agency for Tapping Movements Is Preserved in Functional Movement Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Angela; Bombieri, Federica; Zampini, Massimiliano; Schena, Federico; Dallocchio, Carlo; Fiorio, Mirta; Tinazzi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Functional movement disorders (FMD) are characterized by motor symptoms (e.g., tremor, gait disorder, and dystonia) that are not compatible with movement abnormalities related to a known organic cause. One key clinical feature of FMD is that motor symptoms are similar to voluntary movements but are subjectively experienced as involuntary by patients. This gap might be related to abnormal self-recognition of bodily action, which involves two main components: sense of agency and sense of body ownership. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate whether this function is altered in FMD, specifically focusing on the subjective feeling of agency, body ownership, and their interaction during normal voluntary movements. Patients with FMD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 21) underwent the moving Rubber Hand Illusion (mRHI), in which passive and active movements can differentially elicit agency, ownership or both. Explicit measures of agency and ownership were obtained via a questionnaire. Patients and controls showed a similar pattern of response: when the rubber hand was in a plausible posture, active movements elicited strong agency and ownership; implausible posture of the rubber hand abolished ownership but not agency; passive movements suppressed agency but not ownership. These findings suggest that explicit sense of agency and body ownership are preserved in FMD. The latter finding is shared by a previous study in FMD using a static version of the RHI, whereas the former appears to contrast with studies demonstrating altered implicit measures of agency (e.g., sensory attenuation). Our study extends previous findings by suggesting that in FMD: (i) the sense of body ownership is retained also when interacting with the motor system; (ii) the subjective experience of agency for voluntary tapping movements, as measured by means of mRHI, is preserved.

  8. The Moving Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals that Explicit Sense of Agency for Tapping Movements Is Preserved in Functional Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Marotta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional movement disorders (FMD are characterized by motor symptoms (e.g., tremor, gait disorder, and dystonia that are not compatible with movement abnormalities related to a known organic cause. One key clinical feature of FMD is that motor symptoms are similar to voluntary movements but are subjectively experienced as involuntary by patients. This gap might be related to abnormal self-recognition of bodily action, which involves two main components: sense of agency and sense of body ownership. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate whether this function is altered in FMD, specifically focusing on the subjective feeling of agency, body ownership, and their interaction during normal voluntary movements. Patients with FMD (n = 21 and healthy controls (n = 21 underwent the moving Rubber Hand Illusion (mRHI, in which passive and active movements can differentially elicit agency, ownership or both. Explicit measures of agency and ownership were obtained via a questionnaire. Patients and controls showed a similar pattern of response: when the rubber hand was in a plausible posture, active movements elicited strong agency and ownership; implausible posture of the rubber hand abolished ownership but not agency; passive movements suppressed agency but not ownership. These findings suggest that explicit sense of agency and body ownership are preserved in FMD. The latter finding is shared by a previous study in FMD using a static version of the RHI, whereas the former appears to contrast with studies demonstrating altered implicit measures of agency (e.g., sensory attenuation. Our study extends previous findings by suggesting that in FMD: (i the sense of body ownership is retained also when interacting with the motor system; (ii the subjective experience of agency for voluntary tapping movements, as measured by means of mRHI, is preserved.

  9. MusicGlove: motivating and quantifying hand movement rehabilitation by using functional grips to play music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nizan; Chan, Vicky; Zondervan, Danny; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2011-01-01

    People with stroke typically must perform much of their hand exercise at home without professional assistance as soon as two weeks after the stroke. Without feedback and encouragement, individuals often lose motivation to practice using the affected hand, and this disuse contributes to further declines in hand function. We developed the MusicGlove as a way to facilitate and motivate at home practice of hand movement. This low-cost device uses music as an interactive and motivating medium to guide hand exercise and to quantitatively assess hand movement recovery. It requires the user to practice functional movements, including pincer grip, key-pinch grip, and finger-thumb opposition, by using those movements to play different musical notes, played along to songs displayed by an interactive computer game. We report here the design of the glove and the results of a single-session experiment with 10 participants with chronic stroke. We found that the glove is well suited for use by people with an impairment level quantified by a Box and Blocks score of at least around 7; that the glove can be used to obtain a measure of hand dexterity (% of notes hit) that correlates strongly with the Box and Blocks score; and that the incorporation of music into training significantly improved both objective measures of hand motor performance and self-ratings of motivation for training in the single session.

  10. Development of manipulative hand movements during the second year of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, WK; Einspieler, C; Dibiasi, J; Garzarolli, B; Bos, AF

    2003-01-01

    Background: Developmental testing in children is concerned mainly with a pass or fail on tasks such as grasping, manipulating and inserting. Knowledge about the qualitative development of hand movements in young children is scarce. Aim: We studied the qualitative development of manipulative hand mov

  11. Hand movements with a phase structure and gestures that depict action stem from a left hemispheric system of conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, I; Lausberg, H

    2014-10-01

    The present study addresses the previously discussed controversy on the contribution of the right and left cerebral hemispheres to the production and conceptualization of spontaneous hand movements and gestures. Although it has been shown that each hemisphere contains the ability to produce hand movements, results of left hemispherically lateralized motor functions challenge the view of a contralateral hand movement production system. To examine hemispheric specialization in hand movement and gesture production, ten right-handed participants were tachistoscopically presented pictures of everyday life actions. The participants were asked to demonstrate with their hands, but without speaking what they had seen on the drawing. Two independent blind raters evaluated the videotaped hand movements and gestures employing the Neuropsychological Gesture Coding System. The results showed that the overall frequency of right- and left-hand movements is equal independent of stimulus lateralization. When hand movements were analyzed considering their Structure, the presentation of the action stimuli to the left hemisphere resulted in more hand movements with a phase structure than the presentation to the right hemisphere. Furthermore, the presentation to the left hemisphere resulted in more right and left-hand movements with a phase structure, whereas the presentation to the right hemisphere only increased contralateral left-hand movements with a phase structure as compared to hand movements without a phase structure. Gestures that depict action were primarily displayed in response to stimuli presented in the right visual field than in the left one. The present study shows that both hemispheres possess the faculty to produce hand movements in response to action stimuli. However, the left hemisphere dominates the production of hand movements with a phase structure and gestures that depict action. We therefore conclude that hand movements with a phase structure and gestures that

  12. Women's Movements and Human Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    1975-01-01

    Two strands of futurism share values of equality, development, and peace, and can catalyze each other into potentially transformational forces. The path is re-education: World order thinking provides an appropriate content for adult learning, and women's movements provide the energy of commitment and a worldwide network for communicating policies.…

  13. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  14. Early detection of hand movements from electroencephalograms for stroke therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, A.; Chae, J.; Taylor, D. M.

    2011-08-01

    Movement-assist devices such as neuromuscular stimulation systems can be used to generate movements in people with chronic hand paralysis due to stroke. If detectable, motor planning activity in the cortex could be used in real time to trigger a movement-assist device and restore a person's ability to perform many of the activities of daily living. Additionally, re-coupling motor planning in the cortex with assisted movement generation in the periphery may provide an even greater benefit—strengthening relevant synaptic connections over time to promote natural motor recovery. This study examined the potential for using electroencephalograms (EEGs) as a means of rapidly detecting the intent to open the hand during movement planning in individuals with moderate chronic hand paralysis following a subcortical ischemic stroke. On average, attempts to open the hand could be detected from EEGs approximately 100-500 ms prior to the first signs of movement onset. This earlier detection would minimize device activation delays and allow for tighter coupling between initial formation of the motor plan in the cortex and augmentation of that plan in the periphery by a movement-assist device. This tight temporal coupling may be important or even essential for strengthening synaptic connections and enhancing natural motor recovery.

  15. Epidural electrocorticography of phantom hand movement following long-term upper-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostheses for upper-limb amputees are currently controlled by either myoelectric or peripheral neural signals. Performance and dexterity of these devices is still limited, particularly when it comes to controlling hand function. Movement-related brain activity might serve as a complementary bio-signal for motor control of hand prosthesis. Methods: We introduced a methodology to implant a cortical interface without direct exposure of the brain surface in an upper-limb amputee. This bi-directional interface enabled us to explore the cortical physiology following long-term transhumeral amputation. In addition, we investigated neurofeedback of electrocorticographic brain activity related to the patient’s motor imagery to open his missing hand, i.e. phantom hand movement, for real-time control of a virtual hand prosthesis.Results: Both event-related brain potentials and cortical stimulation revealed mutually overlapping cortical representations of the phantom hand. Phantom hand movements could be robustly classified and the patient required only three training sessions to gain reliable control of the virtual hand prosthesis in an online closed-loop paradigm that discriminated between hand opening and rest. Conclusion: Epidural implants may constitute a powerful and safe alternative communication pathway between the brain and external devices for upper-limb amputees, thereby facilitating the integrated use of different signal sources for more intuitive and specific control of multi-functional devices in clinical use.

  16. Kinect-based sign language recognition of static and dynamic hand movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalawis, Rando C.; Olayao, Kenneth Deniel R.; Ramos, Evan Geoffrey I.; Samonte, Mary Jane C.

    2017-02-01

    A different approach of sign language recognition of static and dynamic hand movements was developed in this study using normalized correlation algorithm. The goal of this research was to translate fingerspelling sign language into text using MATLAB and Microsoft Kinect. Digital input image captured by Kinect devices are matched from template samples stored in a database. This Human Computer Interaction (HCI) prototype was developed to help people with communication disability to express their thoughts with ease. Frame segmentation and feature extraction was used to give meaning to the captured images. Sequential and random testing was used to test both static and dynamic fingerspelling gestures. The researchers explained some factors they encountered causing some misclassification of signs.

  17. Ethical Considerations in Human Movement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Steve

    1995-01-01

    Highlights ethical issues for human subject research, identifying principles that form the construct of a code of research ethics and evaluating against this construct past human experimentation and current research in human movement studies. The efficacy of legislation and self-regulation is examined. Particular attention is given to the context…

  18. Short latency hand movement classification based on surface EMG spectrogram with PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong Zhai; Jelfs, Beth; Chan, Rosa H M; Chung Tin

    2016-08-01

    Hand gesture recognition from forearm surface electromyography (sEMG) is an active research field in the development of motor prosthesis. Studies have shown that classification accuracy and efficiency is highly dependent on the features extracted from the EMG. In this paper, we show that EMG spectrograms are a particularly effective feature for discriminating multiple classes of hand gesture when subjected to principal component analysis for dimensionality reduction. We tested our method on the Ninapro database which includes sEMG data (12 channels) of 40 subjects performing 50 different hand movements. Our results demonstrate improved classification accuracy (by ~10%) over purely time domain features for 50 different hand movements, including small finger movements and different levels of force exertion. Our method has also reduced the error rate (by ~12%) at the transition phase of gestures which could improve robustness of gesture recognition when continuous classification from sEMG is required.

  19. Analysis of EEG signal by Flicker Noise Spectroscopy: Identification of right/left hand movement imagination

    CERN Document Server

    Broniec, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Flicker Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) has been used for the analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) signal related to the movement imagination. The analysis of sensorimotor rhythms in time-frequency maps reveals the event-related desynchronization (ERD) and the post-movement event-related synchronization (ERS), observed mainly in the contralateral hemisphere to the hand moved for the motor imagery. The signal has been parameterized in accordance with FNS method. The significant changes of the FNS parameters, at the time when the subject imagines the movement, have been observed. The analysis of these parameters allows to distinguish between imagination of right and left hands movement. Our study shows that the flicker-noise spectroscopy can be an alternative method of analyzing EEG signal related to the imagination of movement in terms of a potential application in the brain-computer interface (BCI).

  20. Eye and Hand Movements during Reconstruction of Spatial Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rose Burke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent behavioural and biological evidence indicates common mechanisms serving working memory and attention (eg, Awh et al 2006, Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10, 124–130. This study explored the role of spatial attention and visual search in an adapted Corsi spatial memory task. Eye movements and touch responses were recorded from participants who recalled locations (signalled by colour or shape change from an array presented either simultaneously or sequentially. The time delay between target presentation and recall (0, 5, or 10s and the number of locations to be remembered (2–5 were also manipulated. Analysis of the response phase revealed subjects were less accurate (touch data and fixated longer (eye data when responding to sequentially presented targets. Fixation duration was also influenced by whether spatial location was initially signalled by colour or shape change. We conclude that attention and temporal delays during retention of a target play a minor role in motor behaviour during a corsi spatial memory task. In contrast, the type of memory required (ie, location and/or memory and number of items plays a key role on subject performance and behaviour.

  1. Constant error in aiming movements without visual feedback is higher in the preferred hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Alexandra; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2007-05-01

    There is convincing evidence for a left hand advantage for the spatial planning of aiming movements in right-handers. However, little is known about equivalent proficiency in left-handers. Therefore, 48 participants (24 right-handers and 24 left-handers) performed aiming movements of the hand without visual feedback. While the variable aiming error tended to be lower for the preferred hand, the constant aiming error was consistently lower for the non-preferred hand. Data are consistent with the idea of a spatial accuracy advantage for the controller of the non-preferred hand. Data from an ambidextrous participant suggest that this functional difference might be innate rather than acquired through practice.

  2. Excitability changes in the left primary motor cortex innervating the hand muscles induced during speech about hand or leg movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onmyoji, Yusuke; Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Tanaka, Megumi; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-05-06

    In the present study, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the changes in the excitability of the left primary motor cortex (M1) innervating the hand muscles and in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) during speech describing hand or leg movements. In experiment 1, we investigated the effects of the contents of speech on the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced during reading aloud and silent reading. In experiment 2, we repeated experiment 1 with an additional condition, the non-vocal oral movement (No-Voc OM) condition, and investigated the change in SICI induced in each condition using the paired TMS paradigm. The MEP observed in the reading aloud and No-Voc OM conditions exhibited significantly greater amplitudes than those seen in the silent reading conditions, irrespective of the content of the sentences spoken by the subjects or the timing of the TMS. There were no significant differences in SICI between the experimental conditions. Our findings suggest that the increased excitability of the left M1 hand area detected during speech was mainly caused by speech-related oral movements and the activation of language processing-related brain functions. The increased left M1 excitability was probably also mediated by neural mechanisms other than reduced SICI; i.e., disinhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-09-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  4. Kinematic analysis of hand movements after tendon repair surgery : a new assessment using drawing movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Mulder, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Although several hand outcome tests exist to judge skill level after hand injury, currently none give insight into how tasks are performed by looking at kinematic parameters. In this article, the clinical value of analyzing kinematic parameters related to the drawing of a triangle on a gr

  5. An exploratory study to design a novel hand movement identification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Mahdi; Jahed, Mehran

    2009-05-01

    Electromyogram signal (EMG) is an electrical manifestation of contractions of muscles. Surface EMG (sEMG) signal collected from the surface of skin has been used in diverse applications. One of its usages is in pattern recognition of hand prosthesis movements. The ability of current prosthesis devices has been generally limited to simple opening and closing tasks, minimizing their efficacy compared to natural hand capabilities. In order to extend the abilities and accuracy of prosthesis arm movements and performance, a novel sEMG pattern recognizing system is proposed. To extract more pertinent information we extracted sEMGs for selected hand movements. These features constitute our main knowledge of the signal for different hand movements. In this study, we investigated time domain, time-frequency domain and combination of these as a compound representation of sEMG signal's features to access required signal information. In order to implement pattern recognition of sEMG signals for various hand movements, two intelligent classifiers, namely artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy inference system (FIS), were utilized. The results indicate that our approach of using compound features with principle component analysis (PCA) as dimensionality reduction technique, and FIS as the classifier, provides the best performance for sEMG pattern recognition system.

  6. Classification of right-hand grasp movement based on EMOTIV Epoc+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobing, T. A. M. L.; Prawito, Wijaya, S. K.

    2017-07-01

    Combinations of BCT elements for right-hand grasp movement have been obtained, providing the average value of their classification accuracy. The aim of this study is to find a suitable combination for best classification accuracy of right-hand grasp movement based on EEG headset, EMOTIV Epoc+. There are three movement classifications: grasping hand, relax, and opening hand. These classifications take advantage of Event-Related Desynchronization (ERD) phenomenon that makes it possible to differ relaxation, imagery, and movement state from each other. The combinations of elements are the usage of Independent Component Analysis (ICA), spectrum analysis by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), maximum mu and beta power with their frequency as features, and also classifier Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) and Radial Basis Function (RBF). The average values of classification accuracy are ± 83% for training and ± 57% for testing. To have a better understanding of the signal quality recorded by EMOTIV Epoc+, the result of classification accuracy of left or right-hand grasping movement EEG signal (provided by Physionet) also be given, i.e.± 85% for training and ± 70% for testing. The comparison of accuracy value from each combination, experiment condition, and external EEG data are provided for the purpose of value analysis of classification accuracy.

  7. Movement Coordination in Psychotherapy: Synchrony of Hand Movements is Associated with Session Outcome. A Single-Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that nonverbal behavior was associated with both session-level outcome and global outcome in psychotherapy. Nonverbal synchrony--here the coordination between patient's and psychotherapist's movement behavior--is a facet of nonverbal behavior that has recently been studied with video-based motion energy analysis (MEA). The present study aimed to replicate and extend these findings by using direct acquisition of movement data. In a single-case analysis, we monitored patient's and therapist's hand movements with a high-resolution accelerometric measurement system (Vitaport (r)). In addition to these behavioral data, both patient and therapist provided session-level ratings of various factors relevant to the psychotherapy process, which were assessed with post-session questionnaires. The patient-therapist coordination of hand movements, i.e. nonverbal synchrony, in (N = 27) sessions of this dyadic psychotherapy was positively associated with progress reported in post-session questionnaires. Sessions with good evaluations concerning the quality of therapeutic alliance were characterized by high movement coordination. Thus, accelerometric data of this therapy dyad confirmed previous findings gained through video analyses: The coordination of nonverbal behavior shown by patient and therapist was an indicator of beneficial processes occurring within sessions. This replication study showed that nonverbal synchrony embodies important aspects of the alliance. Its assessment and quantification may provide therapists important additional information on processes that usually occur outside conscious awareness, but that nevertheless influence core aspects of the therapy.

  8. Developing a computational model of human hand kinetics using AVS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowitz, Mark S. [State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop a finite element model of the human hand at the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR), this project extended existing computational tools for analyzing and visualizing hand kinetics. These tools employ a commercial, scientific visualization package called AVS. FORTRAN and C code, originally written by David Giurintano of the Gillis W. Long Hansen`s Disease Center, was ported to a different computing platform, debugged, and documented. Usability features were added and the code was made more modular and readable. When the code is used to visualize bone movement and tendon paths for the thumb, graphical output is consistent with expected results. However, numerical values for forces and moments at the thumb joints do not yet appear to be accurate enough to be included in ISCR`s finite element model. Future work includes debugging the parts of the code that calculate forces and moments and verifying the correctness of these values.

  9. Introduction to Physical Education: Concepts of Human Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheffers, John; Evaul, Tom

    This book is written for physical educators and others interested in the performance of the human body in motion. It is divided into four major catagories: (1) The discipline of human movement and its applications; (2) human beings and function through movement; (3) human movement; applied; and (4) human movement: generative and integrated. Six…

  10. Human movement is both diffusive and directed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Padgham

    Full Text Available Understanding the influence of the built environment on human movement requires quantifying spatial structure in a general sense. Because of the difficulty of this task, studies of movement dynamics often ignore spatial heterogeneity and treat movement through journey lengths or distances alone. This study analyses public bicycle data from central London to reveal that, although journey distances, directions, and frequencies of occurrence are spatially variable, their relative spatial patterns remain largely constant, suggesting the influence of a fixed spatial template. A method is presented to describe this underlying space in terms of the relative orientation of movements toward, away from, and around locations of geographical or cultural significance. This produces two fields: one of convergence and one of divergence, which are able to accurately reconstruct the observed spatial variations in movement. These two fields also reveal categorical distinctions between shorter journeys merely serving diffusion away from significant locations, and longer journeys intentionally serving transport between spatially distinct centres of collective importance. Collective patterns of human movement are thus revealed to arise from a combination of both diffusive and directed movement, with aggregate statistics such as mean travel distances primarily determined by relative numbers of these two kinds of journeys.

  11. Hand-held tools with complex kinematics are efficiently incorporated into movement planning and online control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Lee A; Hoe, Erica; Flanagan, J Randall

    2012-10-01

    Certain hand-held tools alter the mapping between hand motion and motion of the tool end point that must be controlled in order to perform a task. For example, when using a pool cue, the motion of the cue tip is reversed relative to the hand. Previous studies have shown that the time required to initiate a reaching movement (Fernandez-Ruiz J, Wong W, Armstrong IT, Flanagan JR. Behav Brain Res 219: 8-14, 2011), or correct an ongoing reaching movement (Gritsenko V, Kalaska JF. J Neurophysiol 104: 3084-3104, 2010), is prolonged when the mapping between hand motion and motion of a cursor controlled by the hand is reversed. Here we show that these time costs can be significantly reduced when the reversal is instantiated by a virtual hand-held tool. Participants grasped the near end of a virtual tool, consisting of a rod connecting two circles, and moved the end point to displayed targets. In the reversal condition, the rod translated through, and rotated about, a pivot point such that there was a left-right reversal between hand and end point motion. In the nonreversal control, the tool translated with the hand. As expected, when only the two circles were presented, movement initiation and correction times were much longer in the reversal condition. However, when full vision of the tool was provided, the reaction time cost was almost eliminated. These results indicate that tools with complex kinematics can be efficiently incorporated into sensorimotor control mechanisms used in movement planning and online control.

  12. Classification of finger movements for the dexterous hand prosthesis control with surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Timemy, Ali H; Bugmann, Guido; Escudero, Javier; Outram, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    A method for the classification of finger movements for dexterous control of prosthetic hands is proposed. Previous research was mainly devoted to identify hand movements as these actions generate strong electromyography (EMG) signals recorded from the forearm. In contrast, in this paper, we assess the use of multichannel surface electromyography (sEMG) to classify individual and combined finger movements for dexterous prosthetic control. sEMG channels were recorded from ten intact-limbed and six below-elbow amputee persons. Offline processing was used to evaluate the classification performance. The results show that high classification accuracies can be achieved with a processing chain consisting of time domain-autoregression feature extraction, orthogonal fuzzy neighborhood discriminant analysis for feature reduction, and linear discriminant analysis for classification. We show that finger and thumb movements can be decoded accurately with high accuracy with latencies as short as 200 ms. Thumb abduction was decoded successfully with high accuracy for six amputee persons for the first time. We also found that subsets of six EMG channels provide accuracy values similar to those computed with the full set of EMG channels (98% accuracy over ten intact-limbed subjects for the classification of 15 classes of different finger movements and 90% accuracy over six amputee persons for the classification of 12 classes of individual finger movements). These accuracy values are higher than previous studies, whereas we typically employed half the number of EMG channels per identified movement.

  13. Different distal-proximal movement balances in right- and left-hand writing may hint at differential premotor cortex involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, A R E; de Jong, B M

    2011-12-01

    Right-handed people generally write with their right hand. Language expressed in script is thus performed with the hand also preferred for skilled motor tasks. This may suggest an efficient functional interaction between the language area of Broca and the adjacent ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in the left (dominant) hemisphere. Pilot observations suggested that distal movements are particularly implicated in cursive writing with the right hand and proximal movements in left-hand writing, which generated ideas concerning hemisphere-specific roles of PMv and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Now we examined upper-limb movements in 30 right-handed participants during right- and left-hand writing, respectively. Quantitative description of distal and proximal movements demonstrated a significant difference between movements in right- and left-hand writing (pwriting with the right hand, while proximal and distal movements similarly contributed to left-hand writing. Although differences between non-language drawings were not tested, we propose that the DME in right-hand writing may reflect functional dominance of PMv in the left hemisphere. More proximal movements in left-hand writing might be related to PMd dominance in right-hemisphere motor control, logically implicated in spatial visuomotor transformations as seen in reaching.

  14. Effects of Hand Proximity and Movement Direction in Spatial and Temporal Gap Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers, Michael; Fischer, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on the interplay between static manual postures and visual attention revealed enhanced visual selection near the hands (near-hand effect). During active movements there is also superior visual performance when moving toward compared to away from the stimulus (direction effect). The “modulated visual pathways” hypothesis argues that differential involvement of magno- and parvocellular visual processing streams causes the near-hand effect. The key finding supporting this hypothesis is an increase in temporal and a reduction in spatial processing in near-hand space (Gozli et al., 2012). Since this hypothesis has, so far, only been tested with static hand postures, we provide a conceptual replication of Gozli et al.’s (2012) result with moving hands, thus also probing the generality of the direction effect. Participants performed temporal or spatial gap discriminations while their right hand was moving below the display. In contrast to Gozli et al. (2012), temporal gap discrimination was superior at intermediate and not near hand proximity. In spatial gap discrimination, a direction effect without hand proximity effect suggests that pragmatic attentional maps overshadowed temporal/spatial processing biases for far/near-hand space. PMID:28018268

  15. Auditory coding of human movement kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinken, Pia M; Kröger, Daniela; Fehse, Ursula; Schmitz, Gerd; Brock, Heike; Effenberg, Alfred O

    2013-01-01

    Although visual perception is dominant on motor perception, control and learning, auditory information can enhance and modulate perceptual as well as motor processes in a multifaceted manner. During last decades new methods of auditory augmentation had been developed with movement sonification as one of the most recent approaches expanding auditory movement information also to usually mute phases of movement. Despite general evidence on the effectiveness of movement sonification in different fields of applied research there is nearly no empirical proof on how sonification of gross motor human movement should be configured to achieve information rich sound sequences. Such lack of empirical proof is given for (a) the selection of suitable movement features as well as for (b) effective kinetic-acoustical mapping patterns and for (c) the number of regarded dimensions of sonification. In this study we explore the informational content of artificial acoustical kinematics in terms of a kinematic movement sonification using an intermodal discrimination paradigm. In a repeated measure design we analysed discrimination rates of six everyday upper limb actions to evaluate the effectiveness of seven different kinds of kinematic-acoustical mappings as well as short-term learning effects. The kinematics of the upper limb actions were calculated based on inertial motion sensor data and transformed into seven different sonifications. Sound sequences were randomly presented to participants and discrimination rates as well as confidence of choice were analysed. Data indicate an instantaneous comprehensibility of the artificial movement acoustics as well as short-term learning effects. No differences between different dimensional encodings became evident thus indicating a high efficiency for intermodal pattern discrimination for the acoustically coded velocity distribution of the actions. Taken together movement information related to continuous kinematic parameters can be

  16. Perception of hand movement by mirror reflection evokes brain activation in the motor cortex contralateral to a non-moving hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Ranjan; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated whether perception of hand movement via mirror reflection evokes activation in the motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the non-moving hand (the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand). Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from 14 participants while they performed unimanual extension-flexion hand movements in direct view and mirror view conditions. We measured the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) as a marker of M1 activation in both conditions. Both the direct and mirror view conditions produced LRPs, with the mirror view conditions revealing clear activation in M1 contralateral to the non-moving hand (ipsilateral to the moving hand) during both flexion and extension phases. This unambiguous demonstration of M1 activation in association with a non-moving hand (which is visually-perceived as moving), suggests that perception of movement can directly lead to M1 activation.

  17. Infantile nystagmus syndrome is associated with inefficiency of goal-directed hand movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrand-Schurink, J.; Cox, R.F.A.; Rens, G.H.M.B. van; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Boonstra, F.N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose.: The effect of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) on the efficiency of goal-directed hand movements was examined. Methods.: We recruited 37 children with INS and 65 control subjects with normal vision, aged 4 to 8 years. Participants performed horizontally-oriented, goal-directed cylinder d

  18. Infantile nystagmus syndrome is associated with inefficiency of goal-directed hand movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrand-Schurink, Joyce; Cox, Ralf F A; van Rens, Ger H M B; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J; Boonstra, F Nienke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effect of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) on the efficiency of goal-directed hand movements was examined. METHODS: We recruited 37 children with INS and 65 control subjects with normal vision, aged 4 to 8 years. Participants performed horizontally-oriented, goal-directed cylinder dis

  19. Arm and Hand Movement in Children Suspected of Having Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Barbara A.; Hilton, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe arm and hand movement in children suspected of having autism spectrum disorder (ASD; age range 29-43 months). A videotaped retrospective review of five children with symptoms of ASD during "Communication Temptation Tasks" was completed at two time points (pre-testing and 6 weeks later). Categories of…

  20. Reduction of Stereotypical Hand Movements in Girls with Rett Syndrome: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Meir; Roth, Dana

    This study explains the characteristics and treatment of individuals with Rett Syndrome and presents two case studies that investigated the use of interventions in reducing stereotypical hand movements (SHM). The case studies involve two girls (ages 5 and 7) with Rett Syndrome who were enrolled in a special education school. Information was…

  1. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... switch. 236.202 Section 236.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall display... over the switch in the normal and in the reverse position, the signal shall display its...

  2. Generating human-like movements on an anthropomorphic robot using an interior point method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa e Silva, E.; Araújo, J. P.; Machado, D.; Costa, M. F.; Erlhagen, W.; Bicho, E.

    2013-10-01

    In previous work we have presented a model for generating human-like arm and hand movements on an anthropomorphic robot involved in human-robot collaboration tasks. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human movements. Numerical results and simulations for reach-to-grasp movements with two different grip types have been presented previously. In this paper we extend our model in order to address the generation of more complex movement sequences which are challenged by scenarios cluttered with obstacles. The numerical results were obtained using the IPOPT solver, which was integrated in our MATLAB simulator of an anthropomorphic robot.

  3. Hand Gesture Based Wheelchair Movement Control for Disabled Person Using MEMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Vishal V. Pande,

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to develop a wheel chair control which is useful to the physically disabled person with his hand movement or his hand gesture recognition using Acceleration technology.Tremendous leaps have been made in the field of wheelchair technology. However, even these significant advances haven‟t been able to help quadriplegics navigate wheelchair unassisted.It is wheelchair which can be controlled by simple hand gestures. It employs a sensor which controls the wheelchair hand gestures made by the user and interprets the motion intended by user and moves accordingly.In Acceleration we have Acceleration sensor. When we change the direction, the sensor registers values are changed and that values are given to microcontroller. Depending on the direction of the Acceleration, microcontroller controls the wheel chair directions like LEFT, RIGHT, FRONT, and BACK. The aim of this paper is to implement wheel chair direction control with hand gesture reorganization. Keywords-

  4. Epilepsia partialis continua with dystonic hand movement in a patient with a malformation of cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyss, Julie; Xie-Brustolin, Jing; Ryvlin, Philippe; Peysson, Stéphane; Beschet, Albert; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Hermier, Marc; Thobois, Stéphane

    2007-09-15

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) with polymicrogyria and schizencephaly are due to abnormal cortical organization and usually manifest by intractable epilepsy and mental retardation. Epileptical activity is often hard to register and focal dystonia associated with such MCD has previously been described but without any metabolic imaging. We report here a 46-year-old man presenting with late-onset atypical abnormal movements of his left hand associated with right central region MCD. To demonstrate the involvement of an epileptical focus, we performed [(18)F]FDG-PET and fMRI both before and after a single dose of clobazam and diazepam, respectively. Characteristics of the abnormal hand movements, clinical response to the medication, and the result of the [(18)F]FDG-PET and fMRI investigations all favor the diagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. We conclude that the dystonic movement is part of the partial seizure.

  5. Capturing human movement patterns in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Zebitz; Gade, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    Non-intrusive and non-privacy violating tracking of people by the use of thermal cameras and Computer Vision The video shows examples of data collection of pedestrian tracks in an urban plaza using a thermal camera. The data is used in my PhD project on Human Movement Patterns in Smart Cities...

  6. Acquisition and Analysis of EMG Signals to Recognize Multiple Hand Movements for Prosthetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Gini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in developing active prosthesis is how to control them in a natural way. In order to increase the effectiveness of hand prostheses there is a need in better exploiting electromyography (EMG signals. After an analysis of the movements necessary for grasping, we individuated five movements for the wrist-hand mobility. Then we designed the basic electronics and software for the acquisition and the analysis of the EMG signals. We built a small size electronic device capable of registering them that can be integrated into a hand prosthesis. Among all the numerous muscles that move the fingers, we have chosen the ones in the forearm and positioned only two electrodes. To recognize the operation, we developed a classification system, using a novel integration of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and wavelet features.

  7. Believe it or not: Moving non-biological stimuli believed to have human origin can be represented as human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, E; Bolton, E; Poliakoff, E

    2016-01-01

    Does our brain treat non-biological movements (e.g. moving abstract shapes or robots) in the same way as human movements? The current work tested whether the movement of a non-biological rectangular object, believed to be based on a human action is represented within the observer's motor system. A novel visuomotor priming task was designed to pit true imitative compatibility, due to human action representation against more general stimulus response compatibility that has confounded previous belief experiments. Stimulus response compatibility effects were found for the object. However, imitative compatibility was found when participants repeated the object task with the belief that the object was based on a human finger movement, and when they performed the task viewing a real human hand. These results provide the first demonstration that non-biological stimuli can be represented as a human movement if they are believed to have human agency and have implications for interactions with technology and robots.

  8. Quantifying the quality of hand movement in stroke patients through three-dimensional curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osu Rieko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To more accurately evaluate rehabilitation outcomes in stroke patients, movement irregularities should be quantified. Previous work in stroke patients has revealed a reduction in the trajectory smoothness and segmentation of continuous movements. Clinically, the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS evaluates the clumsiness of arm movements using an ordinal scale based on the examiner's observations. In this study, we focused on three-dimensional curvature of hand trajectory to quantify movement, and aimed to establish a novel measurement that is independent of movement duration. We compared the proposed measurement with the SIAS score and the jerk measure representing temporal smoothness. Methods Sixteen stroke patients with SIAS upper limb proximal motor function (Knee-Mouth test scores ranging from 2 (incomplete performance to 4 (mild clumsiness were recruited. Nine healthy participant with a SIAS score of 5 (normal also participated. Participants were asked to grasp a plastic glass and repetitively move it from the lap to the mouth and back at a conformable speed for 30 s, during which the hand movement was measured using OPTOTRAK. The position data was numerically differentiated and the three-dimensional curvature was computed. To compare against a previously proposed measure, the mean squared jerk normalized by its minimum value was computed. Age-matched healthy participants were instructed to move the glass at three different movement speeds. Results There was an inverse relationship between the curvature of the movement trajectory and the patient's SIAS score. The median of the -log of curvature (MedianLC correlated well with the SIAS score, upper extremity subsection of Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the jerk measure in the paretic arm. When the healthy participants moved slowly, the increase in the jerk measure was comparable to the paretic movements with a SIAS score of 2 to 4, while the MedianLC was distinguishable

  9. Can human movement analysis contribute to usability understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda-Lois, Juan-Manuel; de-Rosario, Helios; Pons, Romà; Poveda, Rakel; Morón, Ana; Porcar, Rosa; García, Ana-Cruz; Gómez, Amelia

    2010-08-01

    Nowadays human-machine interfaces are evaluated using different methodologies. These methodologies rarely consider the human movements involved in the interaction, and if so, the movements are considered in a simplistic manner. Another often neglected aspect is the relationship between the learning process and the use of the interface. Traditional approaches of cognitive modeling consider learning as just one continuous process. However there is some current evidence of concurrent processes on different time scales. This paper aims to answer, with experimental measurements, if learning actually implies a set of concurrent processes, if those processes are related to the coordinative aspects of hand movement, and how this can vary between young adult and elderly users. Two different interfaces, a washing machine and a domotic system, were analyzed with 23 and 20 people, respectively, classified as men or women and elderly (over 55) or adult (between 40 and 50). The results of the study provide support for the existence of different concurrent processes in learning, previously demonstrated for motor tasks. Moreover, the learning process is actually associated with changes in movement patterns. Finally, the results show that the progression of the learning process depends on age, although elderly people are equally capable of learning to use technological systems as young adults.

  10. Moving Events in Time: Time-Referent Hand-Arm Movements Influence Perceived Temporal Distance to Past Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Stephanie S. A. H.; Semin, Gun R.

    2013-01-01

    We examine and find support for the hypothesis that time-referent hand-arm movements influence temporal judgments. In line with the concept of "left is associated with earlier times, and right is associated with later times," we show that performing left (right) hand-arm movements while thinking about a past event increases (decreases) the…

  11. Somatotopic reorganization of hand representation in bilateral arm amputees with or without special foot movement skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao Jing; He, Hong Jian; Zhang, Qiao Wei; Zhao, Feng; Zee, Chi Shing; Zhang, Shi Zheng; Gong, Xiang Yang

    2014-02-10

    Bilateral arm amputees usually are excellent foot users. To explore the plasticity of the primary motor cortex in upper-extremities amputees and to determine if the acquisition of special foot movement skill is related with the bilateral hand amputation, we studied the primary motor cortex by using combined task and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We investigated 6 bilateral arm amputees with or without special foot movement skill. In the task fMRI study, we found that toe tapping of all the amputees activated the bilateral hand area, including cases without special foot skill. In addition, cases without special foot skill mainly activated the precentral gyrus, which differed from those with more adept foot motor skill who activated both the precentral and postcentral gyri. To further understand the plasticity of the hand area, the resting state functional connectivity was investigated between the foot and hand regions. One-tailed two-sample t-test suggested that the connections between two areas became significantly stronger in the amputee group. Our study demonstrates that hand region of the cortex does not remain 'silent' after bilateral arm amputation, but rather is recruited by other modalities such as adjacent or nonadjacent cortexes to process motor information in a functionally relevant manner. From the data presented, it seems that the bilateral arm amputees have a strong potential to develop new skills in their remaining extremities and practice may further enhance this potential.

  12. Decoding hand movement velocity from electroencephalogram signals during a drawing task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhenghui

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decoding neural activities associated with limb movements is the key of motor prosthesis control. So far, most of these studies have been based on invasive approaches. Nevertheless, a few researchers have decoded kinematic parameters of single hand in non-invasive ways such as magnetoencephalogram (MEG and electroencephalogram (EEG. Regarding these EEG studies, center-out reaching tasks have been employed. Yet whether hand velocity can be decoded using EEG recorded during a self-routed drawing task is unclear. Methods Here we collected whole-scalp EEG data of five subjects during a sequential 4-directional drawing task, and employed spatial filtering algorithms to extract the amplitude and power features of EEG in multiple frequency bands. From these features, we reconstructed hand movement velocity by Kalman filtering and a smoothing algorithm. Results The average Pearson correlation coefficients between the measured and the decoded velocities are 0.37 for the horizontal dimension and 0.24 for the vertical dimension. The channels on motor, posterior parietal and occipital areas are most involved for the decoding of hand velocity. By comparing the decoding performance of the features from different frequency bands, we found that not only slow potentials in 0.1-4 Hz band but also oscillatory rhythms in 24-28 Hz band may carry the information of hand velocity. Conclusions These results provide another support to neural control of motor prosthesis based on EEG signals and proper decoding methods.

  13. Chimpanzee hand preference for throwing and infant cradling:implications for the origin of human handedness

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, William D.; Kim A Bard; Jones, A; Bales, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Calvin (i983) has hypothesized that the neurophysiological, perceptual, and cognitive demands of throwing may have served as important evolutionary precursors to a variety of traits( e.g., handedness, tool use, and language processing) in early hominids. Eighty-eight percent of humans throw with their right hands (Healey, Liederman, and Geschwind I986), and Calvin has argued that this right-handed throwing evolved as a result of a left-hemisphere specialization for planned sequential movement...

  14. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  15. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  16. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  17. Capturing human movement patterns in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Zebitz; Gade, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    Non-intrusive and non-privacy violating tracking of people by the use of thermal cameras and Computer Vision The video shows examples of data collection of pedestrian tracks in an urban plaza using a thermal camera. The data is used in my PhD project on Human Movement Patterns in Smart Cities. Th....... The recording and analysis of the thermal videos has been made in collaboration with Rikke Gade from the Visual Analytics of People Lab at Aalborg University....

  18. The Global Movement for Human Rights Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Flowers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the global movement for human rights education (HRE, its impetus, challenges, and contrasting developments in different regions of the world, focusing especially on Latin America, the Philippines, South Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. Seeks to put HRE in the USA into an international perspective, as well as to show the variety of goals that inspire HRE and how methodologies have evolved to meet specific regional and political cultures and needs.

  19. Hand movement deviations in a visual search task with cross modal cuing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hürol Aslan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the cross-modal effects of an auditory organization on a visual search task and to investigate the influence of the level of detail in instructions describing or hinting at the associations between auditory stimuli and the possible locations of a visual target. In addition to measuring the participants’ reaction times, we paid special attention to tracking the hand movements toward the target. According to the results, the auditory stimuli unassociated with the target locations slightly –but significantly- increased the deviation of the hand movement from the path leading to the target location. The increase in the deviation depended on the degree of association between auditory stimuli and target locations, albeit not on the level of detail in the instructions about the task.

  20. Ipsilateral directional encoding of joystick movements in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Gaona, Charles; Roland, Jarod; Anderson, Nick; Freudenberg, Zachary; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The majority of Brain Computer Interfaces have relied on signals related to primary motor cortex and the operation of the contralateral limb. Recently, the physiology associated with same-sided (ipsilateral) motor movements has been found to have a unique cortical physiology. This study sets out to assess whether more complex motor movements can be discerned utilizing ipsilateral cortical signals. In this study, three invasively monitored human subjects were recorded while performing a center out joystick task with the hand ipsilateral to the hemispheric subdural grid array. It was found that directional tuning was present in ipsilateral cortex. This information was encoded in both distinct anatomic populations and spectral distributions. These findings support the notion that ipsilateral signals may provide added information for BCI operation in the future.

  1. Inhibitory control processes and the strategies that support them during hand and eye movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Michelle Schmitt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Adaptive behavior depends on the ability to voluntarily suppress context-inappropriate behaviors, a process referred to as response inhibition. Stop Signal tests (SSTs are the most frequently studied paradigm used to assess response inhibition. Previous studies of SSTs have indicated that inhibitory control behavior can be explained using a common model in which GO and STOP processes are initiated independent from one and another, and the process that is completed first determines whether the behavior is elicited (GO process or terminated (STOP process. Consistent with this model, studies have indicated that individuals strategically delay their behaviors during SSTs in order to increase their stopping abilities. Despite being controlled by distinct neural systems, prior studies have largely documented similar inhibitory control performance across eye and hand movements. Though, no existing studies have compared the extent to which individuals strategically delay behavior across different effectors is not yet clear. Here, we compared the extent to which inhibitory control processes and the cognitive strategies that support them during oculomotor and manual motor behaviors. Methods: We examined 29 healthy individuals who performed parallel oculomotor and manual motor SSTs. Participants also completed a separate block of GO trials administered prior to the Stop Signal tasks to assess baseline reaction times for each effector and reaction time increases during interleaved GO trials of the SST. Results: Our results showed that stopping errors increased for both effectors as the interval between GO and STOP cues was increased (i.e., stop signal delay, but performance deteriorated more rapidly for eye compared to hand movements with increases in stop signal delay. During GO trials, participants delayed the initiation of their responses for each effector, and greater slowing of reaction times on GO trials was associated with

  2. Classification of Hand Grasp Kinetics and Types Using Movement-Related Cortical Potentials and EEG Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Jochumsen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of single-trial movement intentions from EEG is paramount for brain-computer interfacing in neurorehabilitation. These movement intentions contain task-related information and if this is decoded, the neurorehabilitation could potentially be optimized. The aim of this study was to classify single-trial movement intentions associated with two levels of force and speed and three different grasp types using EEG rhythms and components of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP as features. The feature importance was used to estimate encoding of discriminative information. Two data sets were used. 29 healthy subjects executed and imagined different hand movements, while EEG was recorded over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. The following features were extracted: delta, theta, mu/alpha, beta, and gamma rhythms, readiness potential, negative slope, and motor potential of the MRCP. Sequential forward selection was performed, and classification was performed using linear discriminant analysis and support vector machines. Limited classification accuracies were obtained from the EEG rhythms and MRCP-components: 0.48±0.05 (grasp types, 0.41±0.07 (kinetic profiles, motor execution, and 0.39±0.08 (kinetic profiles, motor imagination. Delta activity contributed the most but all features provided discriminative information. These findings suggest that information from the entire EEG spectrum is needed to discriminate between task-related parameters from single-trial movement intentions.

  3. Hand Gesture and Neural Network Based Human Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aekta Patel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer is used by every people either at their work or at home. Our aim is to make computers that can understand human language and can develop a user friendly human computer interfaces (HCI. Human gestures are perceived by vision. The research is for determining human gestures to create an HCI. Coding of these gestures into machine language demands a complex programming algorithm. In this project, We have first detected, recognized and pre-processing the hand gestures by using General Method of recognition. Then We have found the recognized image’s properties and using this, mouse movement, click and VLC Media player controlling are done. After that we have done all these functions thing using neural network technique and compared with General recognition method. From this we can conclude that neural network technique is better than General Method of recognition. In this, I have shown the results based on neural network technique and comparison between neural network method & general method.

  4. Hand movement deviations in a visual search task with cross modal cuing

    OpenAIRE

    Hürol Aslan; Asli Aslan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the cross-modal effects of an auditory organization on a visual search task and to investigate the influence of the level of detail in instructions describing or hinting at the associations between auditory stimuli and the possible locations of a visual target. In addition to measuring the participants reaction times, we paid special attention to tracking the hand movements toward the target. According to the results, t...

  5. Involvement of secondary motor areas in externally-triggered single-finger movements of dominant and non-dominant hands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yun; ZANG Yufeng; WENG Xuchu; JIA Fucang; LI Enzhong; WANG Jiangjun

    2003-01-01

    Whether the secondary motor areas are involved in simple voluntary movements remains controversial. Differences in the neural substrates of movements with the dominant and the non-dominant hands have not been well documented. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the hemodynamic response in the primary motor cortex (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA) and premotor cortex (PMC) in six healthy right-handed subjects while performing a visually-guided finger-tapping task with their dominant or non-dominant hands. Significant activation was observed in M1, SMA and PMC during this externally triggered simple voluntary movement task. While dominant hand movements only activated contralateral motor areas, non-domi- nant hand movements also activated ipsilateral SMA and PMC. The results provide strong evidence for the involvement of the secondary motor areas in simple voluntary movements, and also suggest that movements of the dominant hand primarily engage the contralateral secondary motor areas, whereas movements of the non-dominant hand engage bilateral secondary motor areas.

  6. A novel approach to recognize hand movements via sEMG patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Mahdi; Jahed, Mehran

    2007-01-01

    Electromyogram signal (EMG) is an electrical manifestation of contractions of muscles. Surface EMG (sEMG) signal collected form surface of the skin has been used in diverse applications. One of its usages is exploiting it in a pattern recognition system which evaluates and synthesizes hand prosthesis movements. The ability of current prosthesis has been limited in simple opening and closing that decreases the efficacy of these devices in contrary to natural hand. In order to extend the ability and accuracy of prosthesis arm movements and performance, a novel approach for sEMG pattern recognizing system is proposed. In order to have a relevant comparison, present and recent research for designing similar systems was re-evaluated. In this study, we investigate time domain, time-frequency domain and combination of these as a representation of sEMG signal feature for accessing signal information. For pattern recognition of sEMG signals for various hand movements, two intelligent classifiers, namely artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy inference system (FIS) were utilized. The results indicate that using compound features with principle component analysis (PCA), dimensionality reduction technique and fuzzy technique for classifier produces the best performance for sEMG pattern recognition system.

  7. Epiglottic movements during breathing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; O'Neill, N; Di Somma, E; Wheatley, J R

    1998-01-01

    Using X-ray fluoroscopy we measured antero-posterior (A–P) and cranio-caudal (C–C) displacements of the epiglottic tip (ET), corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone in seven seated, normal human subjects (age 34 ± 3 years; mean ±s.e.m.; 4 males, 3 females) breathing via a nasal mask or mouthpiece with (RL) and without (UB) a fixed resistive load.During UB, via either mouth or nose, there were no significant A-P ET movements. During RL via the nose the ET at peak expiratory flow was 2.6 ± 1.3 mm cranial to its position at peak inspiratory flow (P <0.05, ANOVA). C–C movements of the ET correlated strongly with C-C movements of the corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone.The ET, corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone (at zero airflow) were situated more caudally during oral UB than for any other condition.When present, epiglottic movements during breathing do not appear to be independent of those of the larynx and hyoid. Furthermore, epiglottic position may be related to the level of upper airway resistance. PMID:9729637

  8. Hand gesture recognition based on motion history images for a simple human-computer interaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timotius, Ivanna K.; Setyawan, Iwan

    2013-03-01

    A human-computer interaction can be developed using several kind of tools. One choice is using images captured using a camera. This paper proposed a simple human-computer interaction system based on hand movement captured by a web camera. The system aims to classify the captured movement into one of three classes. The first two classes contain hand movements to the left and right, respectively. The third class contains non-hand movements or hand movements to other directions. The method used in this paper is based on Motion History Images (MHIs) and nearest neighbor classifier. The resulting MHIs are processed in two manners, namely by summing the pixel values along the vertical axis and reshaping into vectors. We also use two distance criteria in this paper, respectively the Euclidian distance and cross correlation. This paper compared the performance of the combinations of different MHI data processing and distance criteria using 10 runs of 2-fold cross validation. Our experiments show that reshaping the MHI data into vectors combined with a Euclidean distance criterion gives the highest average accuracy, namely 55.67%.

  9. Similarities between GCS and human motor cortex: complex movement coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos

    2014-07-01

    The "Gran Telescopio de Canarias" (GTC1) is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). The GTC control system (GCS), the brain of the telescope, is is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. On the other hand, the Human motor cortex (HMC) is a region of the cerebrum responsible for the coordination of planning, control, and executing voluntary movements. If we analyze both systems, as far as the movement control of their mechanisms and body parts is concerned, we can find extraordinary similarities in their architectures. Both are structured in layers, and their functionalities are comparable from the movement conception until the movement action itself: In the GCS we can enumerate the Sequencer high level components, the Coordination libraries, the Control Kit library and the Device Driver library as the subsystems involved in the telescope movement control. If we look at the motor cortex, we can also enumerate the primary motor cortex, the secondary motor cortices, which include the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area (SMA), the motor units, the sensory organs and the basal ganglia. From all these components/areas we will analyze in depth the several subcortical regions, of the the motor cortex, that are involved in organizing motor programs for complex movements and the GCS coordination framework, which is composed by a set of classes that allow to the high level components to transparently control a group of mechanisms simultaneously.

  10. Combined Hand Gesture — Speech Model for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Tzong Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a dynamic hand gesture detection technology to effectively detect dynamic hand gesture areas, and a hand gesture recognition technology to improve the dynamic hand gesture recognition rate. Meanwhile, the corresponding relationship between state sequences in hand gesture and speech models is considered by integrating speech recognition technology with a multimodal model, thus improving the accuracy of human behavior recognition. The experimental results proved that the proposed method can effectively improve human behavior recognition accuracy and the feasibility of system applications. Experimental results verified that the multimodal gesture-speech model provided superior accuracy when compared to the single modal versions.

  11. Combined hand gesture--speech model for human action recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Tzong; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Li, Jian-Pan

    2013-12-12

    This study proposes a dynamic hand gesture detection technology to effectively detect dynamic hand gesture areas, and a hand gesture recognition technology to improve the dynamic hand gesture recognition rate. Meanwhile, the corresponding relationship between state sequences in hand gesture and speech models is considered by integrating speech recognition technology with a multimodal model, thus improving the accuracy of human behavior recognition. The experimental results proved that the proposed method can effectively improve human behavior recognition accuracy and the feasibility of system applications. Experimental results verified that the multimodal gesture-speech model provided superior accuracy when compared to the single modal versions.

  12. Efficacy of Hand Behind Back Mobilization With Movement for Acute Shoulder Pain and Movement Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Kiran H; Bhandari, Prashant; Hall, Toby

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hand-behind-back (HBB) Mulligan mobilization with movement (MWM) techniques on acute shoulder pain, impairment, and disability. This double-blind, randomized, controlled trial recruited 44 patients with acute shoulder pain and movement impairment presenting to an Indian general hospital. Participants were allocated to receive either MWM and exercise/hot pack (n = 22) or exercise/hot pack alone (n = 22). The average duration of symptoms was 4.1 and 4.7 weeks in the exercise and MWM groups, respectively. The primary outcome was HBB range of motion (ROM). Secondary variables were shoulder internal rotation ROM, pain intensity score, and shoulder disability identified by the shoulder pain and disability index. All variables were evaluated by a blinded assessor before and immediately after 9 treatment sessions over 3 weeks. Paired t tests revealed that both groups demonstrated statistically significant improvements (P < .001) with large effect sizes for all variables. However, for all variables, the MWM-with-exercise group showed significantly greater improvements (P < .05) than the exercise group. Hand-behind-back ROM showed a mean difference of 9.31° (95% confidence interval, 7.38-11.27), favoring greater improvement in the MWM-with-exercise group. In this study, the outcomes of patients with acute shoulder pain and disability receiving shoulder HBB MWM with exercise improved greater than those receiving exercise/hot packs alone. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stereotypical hand movements in 144 subjects with Rett syndrome from the population-based Australian database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philippa; Downs, Jenny; Bebbington, Ami; Williams, Simon; Jacoby, Peter; Kaufmann, Walter E; Leonard, Helen

    2010-02-15

    Stereotypic hand movements are a feature of Rett Syndrome but few studies have observed their nature systematically. Video data in familiar settings were obtained on subjects (n = 144) identified from an Australian population-based database. Hand stereotypies were demonstrated by most subjects (94.4%), 15 categories were observed and midline wringing was seen in approximately 60% of subjects. There was a median of two stereotypies per subject but this number decreased with age. Clapping and mouthing of hands were more prevalent in girls younger than 8 years and wringing was more prevalent in women 19 years or older. Clapping was commoner in those with p.R306C and early truncating mutations, and much rarer in those with p.R106W, p.R270X, p.R168X, and p.R255X. Stereotypies tended to be less frequent in those with more severe mutations. Otherwise, there were no clear relationships between our categories of stereotypies and mutation. Approximately a quarter each had predominantly right and left handed stereotypies and for the remaining half, no clear laterality was seen. Results were similar for all cases and when restricted to those with a pathogenic mutation. Hand stereotypies changed with increasing age but limited relationships with MECP2 mutations were identified.

  14. Changes in Timing and kinematics of goal directed eye-hand movements in early-stage Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muilwijk Danya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Many daily activities involve intrinsic or extrinsic goal-directed eye and hand movements. An extensive visuomotor coordination network including nigro-striatal pathways is required for efficient timing and positioning of eyes and hands. The aim of this study was to investigate how Parkinson’s disease (PD affects eye-hand coordination in tasks with different cognitive complexity. Methods We used a touch screen, an eye-tracking device and a motion capturing system to quantify changes in eye-hand coordination in early-stage PD patients (H&Y  Results In the pro-tapping task, saccade initiation towards extrinsic goals was not impaired. However, in the dual planning and anti-tapping task initiation of saccades towards intrinsic goals was faster in PD patients. Hand movements were differently affected: initiation of the hand movement was only delayed in the pro-tapping and dual planning task. Overall, hand movements in PD patients were slower executed compared to controls. Interpretation Whereas initiation of saccades in an extrinsic goal-directed task (pro-tapping task is not affected, early stage PD patients have difficulty in suppressing reflexive saccades towards extrinsic goals in tasks where the endpoint is an intrinsic goal (e.g. dual planning and anti-tapping task. This is specific for eye movements, as hand movements have delayed responses in the pro-tapping and dual planning task. This suggests that reported impairment of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in early-stage PD patients affects only inhibition of eye movements. We conclude that timing and kinematics of eye and hand movements in visuomotor tasks are affected in PD patients. This result may have clinical significance by providing a behavioral marker for the early diagnosis of PD.

  15. Visuokinesthetic Perception of Hand Movement is Mediated by Cerebro–Cerebellar Interaction between the Left Cerebellum and Right Parietal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagura, Nobuhiro; Oouchida, Yutaka; Aramaki, Yu; Okada, Tomohisa; Matsumura, Michikazu; Sadato, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    Combination of visual and kinesthetic information is essential to perceive bodily movements. We conducted behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments to investigate the neuronal correlates of visuokinesthetic combination in perception of hand movement. Participants experienced illusory flexion movement of their hand elicited by tendon vibration while they viewed video-recorded flexion (congruent: CONG) or extension (incongruent: INCONG) motions of their hand. The amount of illusory experience was graded by the visual velocities only when visual information regarding hand motion was concordant with kinesthetic information (CONG). The left posterolateral cerebellum was specifically recruited under the CONG, and this left cerebellar activation was consistent for both left and right hands. The left cerebellar activity reflected the participants' intensity of illusory hand movement under the CONG, and we further showed that coupling of activity between the left cerebellum and the “right” parietal cortex emerges during this visuokinesthetic combination/perception. The “left” cerebellum, working with the anatomically connected high-order bodily region of the “right” parietal cortex, participates in online combination of exteroceptive (vision) and interoceptive (kinesthesia) information to perceive hand movement. The cerebro–cerebellar interaction may underlie updating of one's “body image,” when perceiving bodily movement from visual and kinesthetic information. PMID:18453537

  16. Hand movements classification for myoelectric control system using adaptive resonance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani Fariman, H; Ahmad, Siti A; Hamiruce Marhaban, M; Alijan Ghasab, M; Chappell, Paul H

    2016-03-01

    This research proposes an exploratory study of a simple, accurate, and computationally efficient movement classification technique for prosthetic hand application. Surface myoelectric signals were acquired from the four muscles, namely, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii, of four normal-limb subjects. The signals were segmented, and the features were extracted with a new combined time-domain feature extraction method. Fuzzy C-means clustering method and scatter plot were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed multi-feature versus Hudgins' multi-feature. The movements were classified with a hybrid Adaptive Resonance Theory-based neural network. Comparative results indicate that the proposed hybrid classifier not only has good classification accuracy (89.09%) but also a significantly improved computation time.

  17. Brain activation related to combinations of gaze position, visual input, and goal-directed hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Patrick; Wu, Min; Sanes, Jerome N

    2011-06-01

    Humans reach to and acquire objects by transforming visual targets into action commands. How the brain integrates goals specified in a visual framework to signals into a suitable framework for an action plan requires clarification whether visual input, per se, interacts with gaze position to formulate action plans. To further evaluate brain control of visual-motor integration, we assessed brain activation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Humans performed goal-directed movements toward visible or remembered targets while fixating gaze left or right from center. We dissociated movement planning from performance using a delayed-response task and manipulated target visibility by its availability throughout the delay or blanking it 500 ms after onset. We found strong effects of gaze orientation on brain activation during planning and interactive effects of target visibility and gaze orientation on movement-related activation during performance in parietal and premotor cortices (PM), cerebellum, and basal ganglia, with more activation for rightward gaze at a visible target and no gaze modulation for movements directed toward remembered targets. These results demonstrate effects of gaze position on PM and movement-related processes and provide new information how visual signals interact with gaze position in transforming visual inputs into motor goals.

  18. A common control signal and a ballistic stage can explain the control of coordinated eye-hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Atul; Murthy, Aditya

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control has been extensively studied in the context of eye and hand movements made in isolation, yet little is known about the nature of control during eye-hand coordination. We probed this with a redirect task. Here subjects had to make reaching/pointing movements accompanied by coordinated eye movements but had to change their plans when the target occasionally changed its position during some trials. Using a race model framework, we found that separate effector-specific mechanisms may be recruited to control eye and hand movements when executed in isolation but when the same effectors are coordinated a unitary mechanism to control coordinated eye-hand movements is employed. Specifically, we found that performance curves were distinct for the eye and hand when these movements were executed in isolation but were comparable when they were executed together. Second, the time to switch motor plans, called the target step reaction time, was different in the eye-alone and hand-alone conditions but was similar in the coordinated condition under assumption of a ballistic stage of ∼40 ms, on average. Interestingly, the existence of this ballistic stage could predict the extent of eye-hand dissociations seen in individual subjects. Finally, when subjects were explicitly instructed to control specifically a single effector (eye or hand), redirecting one effector had a strong effect on the performance of the other effector. Taken together, these results suggest that a common control signal and a ballistic stage are recruited when coordinated eye-hand movement plans require alteration.

  19. Separating timing, movement conditions and individual differences in the analysis of human movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau; Grimme, Britta; Schöner, Gregor;

    2016-01-01

    mixed-effects models as viable alternatives to conventional analysis frameworks. The model is then combined with a novel factor-analysis model that estimates the low-dimensional subspace within which movements vary when the task demands vary. Our framework enables us to visualize different dimensions......A central task in the analysis of human movement behavior is to determine systematic patterns and differences across experimental conditions, participants and repetitions. This is possible because human movement is highly regular, being constrained by invariance principles. Movement timing...... of movement variation and to test hypotheses about the effect of obstacle placement and height on the movement path. We demonstrate that the approach can be used to uncover new properties of human movement....

  20. Repeatability of the timing of eye-hand coordinated movements across different cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, C; van der Steen, J; Schol, R J; Pel, J J M

    2013-08-15

    Quantification of eye-hand coordinated behaviour is a relatively new tool to study neurodegeneration in humans. Its sensitivity depends on the assessment of different behavioural strategies, multiple task testing and repeating tasks within one session. However, large numbers of repetition trials pose a significant burden on subjects. To introduce this method in large-scale population studies, it is necessary to determine whether reducing the number of task repetitions, which will lower subject burden, still leads to acceptable measurement accuracy. The objective of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of eye-hand coordination outcome parameters in eight healthy volunteers using a test-retest approach. Subjects were assessed during a shortened test procedure consisting of eight repetitions of three behavioural tasks: a reflex-based tapping task, a planning-based tapping task and a memory-based tapping task. Eye-hand coordination was quantified in terms of timing (eye and hand latencies), kinematics and accuracy. Eye and hand latencies were found within a normal range (between 150 and 450ms). A paired samples t-test revealed no differences in timing parameters between the first and second measurements. It was concluded that eight trial repetitions are sufficient for quantifying eye-hand coordination in terms of timing, kinematics and accuracy. This approach demonstrates the testing of multiple visuomotor behaviours within a reasonable time span of a few minutes per task.

  1. Evaluation of EEG Features in Decoding Individual Finger Movements from One Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in modern signal processing techniques, the field of brain-computer interface (BCI is progressing fast towards noninvasiveness. One challenge still impeding these developments is the limited number of features, especially movement-related features, available to generate control signals for noninvasive BCIs. A few recent studies investigated several movement-related features, such as spectral features in electrocorticography (ECoG data obtained through a spectral principal component analysis (PCA and direct use of EEG temporal data, and demonstrated the decoding of individual fingers. The present paper evaluated multiple movement-related features under the same task, that is, discriminating individual fingers from one hand using noninvasive EEG. The present results demonstrate the existence of a broadband feature in EEG to discriminate individual fingers, which has only been identified previously in ECoG. It further shows that multiple spectral features obtained from the spectral PCA yield an average decoding accuracy of 45.2%, which is significantly higher than the guess level (P<0.05 and other features investigated (P<0.05, including EEG spectral power changes in alpha and beta bands and EEG temporal data. The decoding of individual fingers using noninvasive EEG is promising to improve number of features for control, which can facilitate the development of noninvasive BCI applications with rich complexity.

  2. Illusory movements induced by tendon vibration in right- and left-handed people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Fusco, Gabriele; Leonardis, Daniele; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-02-01

    Frequency-specific vibratory stimulation of peripheral tendons induces an illusion of limb movement that may be useful for restoring proprioceptive information in people with sensorimotor disability. This potential application may be limited by inter- and intra-subject variability in the susceptibility to such an illusion, which may depend on a variety of factors. To explore the influence of stimulation parameters and participants' handedness on the movement illusion, we vibrated the right and left tendon of the biceps brachii in a group of right- and left-handed people with five stimulation frequencies (from 40 to 120 Hz in step of 20 Hz). We found that all participants reported the expected illusion of elbow extension, especially after 40 and 60 Hz. Left-handers exhibited less variability in reporting the illusion compared to right-handers across the different stimulation frequencies. Moreover, the stimulation of the non-dominant arm elicited a more vivid illusion with faster onset relative to the stimulation of the dominant arm, an effect that was independent from participants' handedness. Overall, our data show that stimulation frequency, handedness and arm dominance influence the tendon vibration movement illusion. The results are discussed in reference to their relevance in linking motor awareness, improving current devices for motor ability recovery after brain or spinal damage and developing prosthetics and virtual embodiment systems.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of the Arm/Hand Movements in Parkinson’s Disease Using a Wireless Armband Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojević, Sofija; Ilić, Tihomir V.; Stojković, Ivan; Potkonjak, Veljko; Rodić, Aleksandar; Santos-Victor, José

    2017-01-01

    We present an approach for quantitative assessment of the arm/hand movements in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), from sensor data acquired with a wearable, wireless armband device (Myo sensor). We propose new Movement Performance Indicators that can be adopted by practitioners for the quantitative evaluation of motor performance and support their clinical evaluations. In addition, specific Movement Performance Indicators can indicate the presence of the bradykinesia symptom. The study includes seventeen PD patients and sixteen age-matched controls. A set of representative arm/hand movements is defined under the supervision of movement disorder specialist. In order to assist the evaluations, and for progress monitoring purposes, as well as for assessing the amount of bradykinesia in PD, a total set of 84 Movement Performance Indicators are computed from the sensor readings. Subsequently, we investigate whether wireless armband device, with the use of the proposed Movement Performance Indicators can be utilized: (1) for objective and precise quantitative evaluation of the arm/hand movements of Parkinson’s patients, (2) for assessment of the bradykinesia motor symptom, and (3) as an adequate low-cost alternative for the sensor glove. We conducted extensive analysis of proposed Movement Performance Indicators and results are indicating following clinically relevant characteristics: (i) adequate reliability as measured by ICC; (ii) high accuracy in discrimination between the patients and controls, and between the disease stages (support to disease diagnosis and progress monitoring, respectively); (iii) substantial difference in comparison between the left-hand and the right-hand movements across controls and patients, as well as between disease stage groups; (iv) statistically significant correlation with clinical scales (tapping test and UPDRS-III Motor Score); and (v) quantitative evaluation of bradykinesia symptom. Results suggest that the proposed

  4. Principal components of hand kinematics and neurophysiological signals in motor cortex during reach to grasp movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Aggarwal, Vikram; Thakor, Nitish V; Schieber, Marc H

    2014-10-15

    A few kinematic synergies identified by principal component analysis (PCA) account for most of the variance in the coordinated joint rotations of the fingers and wrist used for a wide variety of hand movements. To examine the possibility that motor cortex might control the hand through such synergies, we collected simultaneous kinematic and neurophysiological data from monkeys performing a reach-to-grasp task. We used PCA, jPCA and isomap to extract kinematic synergies from 18 joint angles in the fingers and wrist and analyzed the relationships of both single-unit and multiunit spike recordings, as well as local field potentials (LFPs), to these synergies. For most spike recordings, the maximal absolute cross-correlations of firing rates were somewhat stronger with an individual joint angle than with any principal component (PC), any jPC or any isomap dimension. In decoding analyses, where spikes and LFP power in the 100- to 170-Hz band each provided better decoding than other LFP-based signals, the first PC was decoded as well as the best decoded joint angle. But the remaining PCs and jPCs were predicted with lower accuracy than individual joint angles. Although PCs, jPCs or isomap dimensions might provide a more parsimonious description of kinematics, our findings indicate that the kinematic synergies identified with these techniques are not represented in motor cortex more strongly than the original joint angles. We suggest that the motor cortex might act to sculpt the synergies generated by subcortical centers, superimposing an ability to individuate finger movements and adapt the hand to grasp a wide variety of objects.

  5. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  6. Human Movement Potential: Its Ideokinetic Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigard, Lulu E.

    This book focuses on the interdependence of postural alignment and the performance of movement. It provides an educational method (ideokinesis), which stresses the inherent capacity of the nervous system to determine the most efficient neuromuscular coordination for each movement. This method of teaching body balance and efficient movement has…

  7. Unspoken Knowledge: Implicit Learning of Structured Human Dance Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacic, Tajana; Stevens, Catherine; Tillmann, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The sequencing of dance movements may be thought of as a grammar. We investigate implicit learning of regularities that govern sequences of unfamiliar, discrete dance movements. It was hypothesized that observers without prior experience with contemporary dance would be able to learn regularities that underpin structured human movement. Thirty-one…

  8. Unspoken Knowledge: Implicit Learning of Structured Human Dance Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacic, Tajana; Stevens, Catherine; Tillmann, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The sequencing of dance movements may be thought of as a grammar. We investigate implicit learning of regularities that govern sequences of unfamiliar, discrete dance movements. It was hypothesized that observers without prior experience with contemporary dance would be able to learn regularities that underpin structured human movement. Thirty-one…

  9. Human bite of the hand: clinical and surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Simancas-Pereira Hernán; Fonseca-Caro John Fredy; Acevedo-Granados Camilo Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: human bites of the hand carries a risk of infection and functional and/oraesthetic complications, according to the mechanism of trauma, duration and specificfactors of the victim and the aggressor. The management of acute episodes isessential and must be an interdisciplinary care.Objective: to review human bites of the hand.Methodology: Thematic review which included the evaluation of clinical casereports published in the last fifteen years in English and Spanish, obtained by el...

  10. The evolution of human and ape hand proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almécija, Sergio; Smaers, Jeroen B; Jungers, William L

    2015-07-14

    Human hands are distinguished from apes by possessing longer thumbs relative to fingers. However, this simple ape-human dichotomy fails to provide an adequate framework for testing competing hypotheses of human evolution and for reconstructing the morphology of the last common ancestor (LCA) of humans and chimpanzees. We inspect human and ape hand-length proportions using phylogenetically informed morphometric analyses and test alternative models of evolution along the anthropoid tree of life, including fossils like the plesiomorphic ape Proconsul heseloni and the hominins Ardipithecus ramidus and Australopithecus sediba. Our results reveal high levels of hand disparity among modern hominoids, which are explained by different evolutionary processes: autapomorphic evolution in hylobatids (extreme digital and thumb elongation), convergent adaptation between chimpanzees and orangutans (digital elongation) and comparatively little change in gorillas and hominins. The human (and australopith) high thumb-to-digits ratio required little change since the LCA, and was acquired convergently with other highly dexterous anthropoids.

  11. Teleoperator hand controllers: A contextual human factors assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides a human factors assessment of controllers for use with remotely controlled manipulators deployed to remove hazardous waste from underground storage tanks. The analysis concentrates on controller technique (i.e., the broad class of hand controller) and not on details of controller ergonomics. Examples of controller techniques include, for example, direct rate control, resolved unilateral position control, and direct bilateral position control. Using an existing concept, the Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System, as a reference, two basic types of manipulators may be identified for this application. A long reach, gross-positioning manipulator (LRM) may be used to position a smaller manipulator or an end-effector within a work site. For a Long Reach Manipulator, which will have an enormous motion range and be capable of high end-effector velocity, it will be safest and most efficient to use a resolved rate control system. A smaller, dexterous manipulator may be used to perform handling work within a relatively small work site, (i.e., to complete tasks requiring near-human dexterity). For a Dexterous Manipulator, which will have a smaller motion range than the LRM and be required to perform more difficult tasks, a resolved bilateral position control system will be safest and most efficient. However, during some waste recovery tasks it may be important to support the users by restricting movements to a single plane or axis. This can be done with a resolved bilateral position control system by (1) using the master controller force output to restrict controller inputs or (2) switching the controller to a multiaxis rate control mode and using the force output to provide a spring return to center functionality.

  12. [The effect of the membrana interossea antebrachii on the turning movement of the hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsswetter, W

    1979-09-20

    In human cadaveric forearm specimens the membrana interossea antebrachii was examined morphologically and biomechanically. Macroscopical, submacroscopical and microscopical findings reveal new facts about the structure, texture and the microscopical details of the membrana interossea. By measuring the interosseous space and by straingage measurement of elongation of the interosseous membrane during pronation and supination the influence of the membrana interossea antebrachii on pronation and supination of the hand was analyzed biomechanically.

  13. EEG Event-Related Desynchronization of patients with stroke during motor imagery of hand movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernig, Carolina B.; Carrere, Lucía C.; Lopez, Camila A.; Ballario, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be used for therapeutic purposes to improve voluntary motor control that has been affected post stroke. For this purpose, desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) can be used. But it is necessary to study what happens in the affected motor cortex of this people. In this article, we analyse EEG recordings of hemiplegic stroke patients to determine if it is possible to detect desynchronization in the affected motor cortex during the imagination of movements of the affected hand. Six patients were included in the study; four evidenced desynchronization in the affected hemisphere, one of them showed no results and the EEG recordings of the last patient presented high noise level. These results suggest that we could use the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the EEG signal as a BCI paradigm in a rehabilitation programme.

  14. Issues in human/computer control of dexterous remote hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, K.

    1987-01-01

    Much research on dexterous robot hands has been aimed at the design and control problems associated with their autonomous operation, while relatively little research has addressed the problem of direct human control. It is likely that these two modes can be combined in a complementary manner yielding more capability than either alone could provide. While many of the issues in mixed computer/human control of dexterous hands parallel those found in supervisory control of traditional remote manipulators, the unique geometry and capabilities of dexterous hands pose many new problems. Among these are the control of redundant degrees of freedom, grasp stabilization and specification of non-anthropomorphic behavior. An overview is given of progress made at the MIT AI Laboratory in control of the Salisbury 3 finger hand, including experiments in grasp planning and manipulation via controlled slip. It is also suggested how we might introduce human control into the process at a variety of functional levels.

  15. A Study on Decoding Models for the Reconstruction of Hand Trajectories from the Human Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gi Yeom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decoding neural signals into control outputs has been a key to the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. While many studies have identified neural correlates of kinematics or applied advanced machine learning algorithms to improve decoding performance, relatively less attention has been paid to optimal design of decoding models. For generating continuous movements from neural activity, design of decoding models should address how to incorporate movement dynamics into models and how to select a model given specific BCI objectives. Considering nonlinear and independent speed characteristics, we propose a hybrid Kalman filter to decode the hand direction and speed independently. We also investigate changes in performance of different decoding models (the linear and Kalman filters when they predict reaching movements only or predict both reach and rest. Our offline study on human magnetoencephalography (MEG during point-to-point arm movements shows that the performance of the linear filter or the Kalman filter is affected by including resting states for training and predicting movements. However, the hybrid Kalman filter consistently outperforms others regardless of movement states. The results demonstrate that better design of decoding models is achieved by incorporating movement dynamics into modeling or selecting a model according to decoding objectives.

  16. Muscle co-activity tuning in Parkinsonian hand movement: disease-specific changes at behavioral and cerebral level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. M. evan der Stouwe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated different degrees of muscle co-activity in simple hand movement at behavioral and cerebral level in healthy subjects and Parkinson’s disease (PD patients. We compared ‘singular’ movements, dominated by the activity of one agonist muscle, to ‘composite’ movements, requiring conjoint activity of multiple muscles, in a center-out (right hand step-tracking task. Behavioral parameters were obtained by EMG and kinematic recordings. FMRI was used to investigate differences in underlying brain activ¬¬ations between PD patients (N= 12 and healthy (age-matched subjects (N= 18. In healthy subjects, composite movements recruited the striatum and cortical areas comprising bilaterally the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex, contralateral medial prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, primary visual cortex, and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex. Contrarily, the ipsilateral cerebellum was more involved in singular movements. This striking dichotomy between striatal and cortical recruitment versus cerebellar involvement may reflect the complementary roles of these areas in motor control, in which the basal ganglia are involved in movement selection and the cerebellum in movement optimization. Compared to healthy subjects, PD patients showed decreased activation of the striatum and cortical areas in composite movement, while performing worse at behavioral level. This implies that PD patients are especially impaired on tasks requiring highly tuned muscle co-activity. Singular movement, on the other hand, was characterized by a combination of increased activation of the ipsilateral parietal cortex and left cerebellum. As singular movement performance was only slightly compromised, we interpret this as a reflection of increased visuospatial processing, possibly as a compensational mechanism.

  17. On the other hand: Increased cortical activation to human versus mechanical hands in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Marisa; Boas, David A; Wilcox, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    There is a large body of work demonstrating that infants are sensitive to the distinction between human and mechanical entities from the early months of life, and have different expectations for the way these entities move and interact. The current work investigates the extent to which the functional organization of the immature brain reflects these early emerging sensitivities. Infants aged 8months watched two kinds of hands (human or mechanical) engage in two kinds of events (one with a functional outcome and one without). Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), we assessed hemodynamic activation in the left and right temporal and temporal-occipital cortex in response to these events. The neuroimaging data revealed a significantly greater increase in activation in the right middle-posterior temporal cortex to events executed by the human than the mechanical hand; the event in which the hand engaged (function or non-function) did not significantly influence hemodynamic responses. In comparison, the left middle-temporal cortex showed significantly greater activation to events executed by the human than mechanical hand, but only when the events were functionally relevant. That is, the left middle-posterior temporal cortex responded selectively to human (as compared to mechanical) agents, but only in the context of functionally relevant actions on objects. These results reveal that the immature brain is functionally specialized to support infants' processing of human and non-human agents as distinct entities. These results also shed light on the cognitive and cortical mechanisms that guide infants' learning about agentive action and object function.

  18. Eye movement-invariant representations in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Gallant, Jack L

    2017-01-01

    During natural vision, humans make frequent eye movements but perceive a stable visual world. It is therefore likely that the human visual system contains representations of the visual world that are invariant to eye movements. Here we present an experiment designed to identify visual areas that might contain eye-movement-invariant representations. We used functional MRI to record brain activity from four human subjects who watched natural movies. In one condition subjects were required to fixate steadily, and in the other they were allowed to freely make voluntary eye movements. The movies used in each condition were identical. We reasoned that the brain activity recorded in a visual area that is invariant to eye movement should be similar under fixation and free viewing conditions. In contrast, activity in a visual area that is sensitive to eye movement should differ between fixation and free viewing. We therefore measured the similarity of brain activity across repeated presentations of the same movie within the fixation condition, and separately between the fixation and free viewing conditions. The ratio of these measures was used to determine which brain areas are most likely to contain eye movement-invariant representations. We found that voxels located in early visual areas are strongly affected by eye movements, while voxels in ventral temporal areas are only weakly affected by eye movements. These results suggest that the ventral temporal visual areas contain a stable representation of the visual world that is invariant to eye movements made during natural vision.

  19. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachery Ryan Hernandez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although efforts to characterize human movement through EEG have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA dancers. Each dancer performed whole body functional movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities ('Neutral', non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities ('Think’, and enacted expressive movements ('Do'. The expressive movement qualities that were used in the 'Think' and 'Do' actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Efforts as defined by LMA - a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2 – 4 Hz EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher’s discriminant analysis (LFDA for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort (giving a total of 17 classes. Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of neuroprosthetics to restore movements.

  20. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G.; Hernandez, Zachery R.; Nepaul, Sargoon; Bradley, Karen K.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through electroencephalography (EEG) have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities (“Neutral”), non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities (“Think”), and enacted expressive movements (“Do”). The expressive movement qualities that were used in the “Think” and “Do” actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Effort qualities as defined by LMA—a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2–4 Hz) EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher's discriminant analysis (LFDA) for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort quality (giving a total of 17 classes). Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort quality Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of

  1. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G; Hernandez, Zachery R; Nepaul, Sargoon; Bradley, Karen K; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through electroencephalography (EEG) have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities ("Neutral"), non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities ("Think"), and enacted expressive movements ("Do"). The expressive movement qualities that were used in the "Think" and "Do" actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Effort qualities as defined by LMA-a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2-4 Hz) EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher's discriminant analysis (LFDA) for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort quality (giving a total of 17 classes). Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort quality Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of neuroprosthetics to restore

  2. Comparison of Brunnstrom movement therapy and Motor Relearning Program in rehabilitation of post-stroke hemiparetic hand: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Shanta; Arya, Kamal Narayan; Davidson, E W Rajkumar

    2012-07-01

    Motor recovery of the hand usually plateaus in chronic stroke patients. Various conventional and contemporary approaches have been used to rehabilitate the hand post-stroke. However, the evidence for their effectiveness is still limited. To compare the hand therapy protocols based on Brunnstrom approach and motor relearning program in rehabilitation of the hand of chronic stroke patients. Randomized trial. Outpatients attending the occupational therapy department of a rehabilitation institute. 30 post-stroke subjects (35.06 ± 14.52 months) were randomly assigned into two equal groups (Group A and Group B), Outcome Measures: Brunnstrom recovery stages of hand (BRS-H), Fugl-Meyer assessment: wrist and hand (FMA-WH). Group A received Brunnstrom hand manipulation (BHM). BHM is the hand treatment protocol of the Brunnstrom movement therapy, which uses synergies and reflexes to develop voluntary motor control. Group B received the Motor Relearning Program (MRP) based hand protocol. MRP is the practice of specific motor skills, which results in the ability to perform a task. Active practice of context-specific motor task such as reaching and grasping helps regain the lost motor functions. Both the therapy protocols were effective in rehabilitation of the hand (BRS-H; p = 0.003 to 0.004, FMA-WH; p rehabilitation of the hand in chronic post-stroke patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Approaching human performance the functionality-driven Awiwi robot hand

    CERN Document Server

    Grebenstein, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Humanoid robotics have made remarkable progress since the dawn of robotics. So why don't we have humanoid robot assistants in day-to-day life yet? This book analyzes the keys to building a successful humanoid robot for field robotics, where collisions become an unavoidable part of the game. The author argues that the design goal should be real anthropomorphism, as opposed to mere human-like appearance. He deduces three major characteristics to aim for when designing a humanoid robot, particularly robot hands: _ Robustness against impacts _ Fast dynamics _ Human-like grasping and manipulation performance   Instead of blindly copying human anatomy, this book opts for a holistic design me-tho-do-lo-gy. It analyzes human hands and existing robot hands to elucidate the important functionalities that are the building blocks toward these necessary characteristics.They are the keys to designing an anthropomorphic robot hand, as illustrated in the high performance anthropomorphic Awiwi Hand presented in this book.  ...

  4. Separating timing, movement conditions and individual differences in the analysis of human movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau; Grimme, Britta; Schöner, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    A central task in the analysis of human movement behavior is to determine systematic patterns and differences across experimental conditions, participants and repetitions. This is possible because human movement is highly regular, being constrained by invariance principles. Movement timing......-effects model for analyzing temporally continuous signals that contain systematic effects in both timing and path. Identifiability issues of path relative to timing are overcome by using maximum likelihood estimation in which the most likely separation of space and time is chosen given the variation found...

  5. Processing of hand-related verbs specifically affects the planning and execution of arm reaching movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mirabella

    Full Text Available Even though a growing body of research has shown that the processing of action language affects the planning and execution of motor acts, several aspects of this interaction are still hotly debated. The directionality (i.e. does understanding action-related language induce a facilitation or an interference with the corresponding action?, the time course, and the nature of the interaction (i.e. under what conditions does the phenomenon occur? are largely unclear. To further explore this topic we exploited a go/no-go paradigm in which healthy participants were required to perform arm reaching movements toward a target when verbs expressing either hand or foot actions were shown, and to refrain from moving when abstract verbs were presented. We found that reaction times (RT and percentages of errors increased when the verb involved the same effector used to give the response. This interference occurred very early, when the interval between verb presentation and the delivery of the go signal was 50 ms, and could be elicited until this delay was about 600 ms. In addition, RTs were faster when subjects used the right arm than when they used the left arm, suggesting that action-verb understanding is left-lateralized. Furthermore, when the color of the printed verb and not its meaning was the cue for movement execution the differences between RTs and error percentages between verb categories disappeared, unequivocally indicating that the phenomenon occurs only when the semantic content of a verb has to be retrieved. These results are compatible with the theory of embodied language, which hypothesizes that comprehending verbal descriptions of actions relies on an internal simulation of the sensory-motor experience of the action, and provide a new and detailed view of the interplay between action language and motor acts.

  6. Recognition and Synthesis of Human Movements by Parametric HMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker

    2009-01-01

    on the recognition and synthesis of human arm movements. Furthermore, we will show in various experiments the use of PHMMs for the control of a humanoid robot by synthesizing movements for relocating objects at arbitrary positions. In vision-based interaction experiments, PHMM are used for the recognition...... of pointing movements, where the recognized parameterization conveys to a robot the important information which object to relocate and where to put it. Finally, we evaluate the accuracy of recognition and synthesis for pointing and grasping arm movements and discuss that the precision of the synthesis......The representation of human movements for recognition and synthesis is important in many application fields such as: surveillance, human-computer interaction, motion capture, and humanoid robots. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are a common statistical framework in this context, since...

  7. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  8. Transcranial alternating current stimulation to the inferior parietal lobe decreases mu suppression to egocentric, but not allocentric hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Monica B; Cooper, Nicholas R; Romei, Vincenzo

    2017-03-06

    Egocentric vs. allocentric perspective during observation of hand movements has been related to self-other differentiation such that movements observed from an egocentric viewpoint have been considered as self-related while movements observed from an allocentric viewpoint have been considered as belonging to someone else. Correlational studies have generally found that egocentric perspective induces greater neurophysiological responses and larger behavioral effects compared to an allocentric perspective. However, recent studies question previous findings by reporting greater (μ) suppression and greater transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-induced motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) during observation of allocentric compared to egocentric movements. Furthermore, self-other differentiation has been generally related to activity within the inferior parietal lobe (IPL), but direct evidence for a causal and functional role of IPL in self-other differentiation is lacking. The current study was therefore designed to investigate the influence that IPL exerts on self-other differentiation. To this aim, we measured the impact of individually adjusted alpha-tuned transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applied over IPL on μ-suppression during hands movement observation from an egocentric and allocentric perspective. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during movement observation before and immediately after tACS. Results demonstrated that tACS decreased μ-reactivity over sensorimotor (but not visual) regions for egocentric (but not allocentric) movement observation providing direct evidence for a causal involvement of IPL in the observation of self- but not other-related hand movement. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direction of movement is encoded in the human primary motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left and 270° (down elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180° and vertical (90°+270° axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1.

  10. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12-30 Hz) and high gamma (65-90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p press. Furthermore, an increase (p press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity.

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow during rest and skilled hand movements by xenon-133 inhalation and emission computerized tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M; Henriksen, L; Lassen, N A

    1981-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied in 16 normal adult volunteers during rest and in 10 the study was repeated during skilled hand movements. A fast-rotating ("dynamic"), single-photon emission computerized tomograph (ECT) with four detector heads was used. Xenon-133 was inhaled over a 1...

  12. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Pineda, C.J.; Weisman, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.).

  13. Dissociable neural responses to hands and non-hand body parts in human left extrastriate visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, Stefania; Ietswaart, Magdalena; Peelen, Marius V; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana

    2010-06-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a map of visual regions encoding specific categories of objects. For example, a region in the human extrastriate visual cortex, the extrastriate body area (EBA), has been implicated in the visual processing of bodies and body parts. Although in the monkey, neurons selective for hands have been reported, in humans it is unclear whether areas selective for individual body parts such as the hand exist. Here, we conducted two functional MRI experiments to test for hand-preferring responses in the human extrastriate visual cortex. We found evidence for a hand-preferring region in left lateral occipitotemporal cortex in all 14 participants. This region, located in the lateral occipital sulcus, partially overlapped with left EBA, but could be functionally and anatomically dissociated from it. In experiment 2, we further investigated the functional profile of hand- and body-preferring regions by measuring responses to hands, fingers, feet, assorted body parts (arms, legs, torsos), and non-biological handlike stimuli such as robotic hands. The hand-preferring region responded most strongly to hands, followed by robotic hands, fingers, and feet, whereas its response to assorted body parts did not significantly differ from baseline. By contrast, EBA responded most strongly to body parts, followed by hands and feet, and did not significantly respond to robotic hands or fingers. Together, these results provide evidence for a representation of the hand in extrastriate visual cortex that is distinct from the representation of other body parts.

  14. Robustness of muscle synergies underlying three-dimensional force generation at the hand in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Beer, Randall F.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using advanced matrix factorization techniques have shown that the coordination of human voluntary limb movements may be accomplished using combinations of a small number of intermuscular coordination patterns, or muscle synergies. However, the potential use of muscle synergies for isometric force generation has been evaluated mostly using correlational methods. The results of such studies suggest that fixed relationships between the activations of pairs of muscles are relatively rare. There is also emerging evidence that the nervous system uses independent strategies to control movement and force generation, which suggests that one cannot conclude a priori that isometric force generation is accomplished by combining muscle synergies, as shown in movement control. In this study, we used non-negative matrix factorization to evaluate the ability of a few muscle synergies to reconstruct the activation patterns of human arm muscles underlying the generation of three-dimensional (3-D) isometric forces at the hand. Surface electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from eight key elbow and shoulder muscles during 3-D force target-matching protocols performed across a range of load levels and hand positions. Four synergies were sufficient to explain, on average, 95% of the variance in EMG datasets. Furthermore, we found that muscle synergy composition was conserved across biomechanical task conditions, experimental protocols, and subjects. Our findings are consistent with the view that the nervous system can generate isometric forces by assembling a combination of a small number of muscle synergies, differentially weighted according to task constraints. PMID:22279190

  15. Neural substrates of visual spatial coding and visual feedback control for hand movements in allocentric and target-directed tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore eThaler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological evidence suggests that different brain areas may be involved in movements that are directed at visual targets (e.g. pointing or reaching, and movements that are based on allocentric visual information (e.g. drawing or copying. Here we used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of these two types of movements in healthy volunteers. Subjects (n=14 performed right-hand movements in either a target-directed task (moving a cursor to a target dot or an allocentric task (moving a cursor to reproduce the distance and direction between two distal target dots with or without visual feedback about their hand movement. Movements were monitored with an MR compatible touch panel. A whole-brain analysis revealed that movements in allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in the fundus of the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS, in posterior IPS, in bilateral dorsal premotor cortex (PMd, and in the Lateral Occipital Complex (LOC. Visual feedback in both target-directed and allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in area MT+, superior parietal occipital cortex (SPOC and posterior IPS (all bilateral. In addition, we found that visual feedback affected brain activity differently in target-directed as compared to allocentric conditions, in particular in pre-supplementary motor area, PMd, IPS and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results, in combination with previous findings, suggest that the LOC is essential for allocentric visual coding and that SPOC is involved in visual feedback control. The differences in brain activity between target-directed and allocentric visual feedback conditions may be related to behavioral differences in visual feedback control. Our results advance the understanding of the visual coordinate frame used by the LOC. In addition, because of the nature of the allocentric task, our results have relevance for the understanding of neural substrates of magnitude estimation and vector-coding of movements.

  16. Social movements and human rights rhetoric in tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, P D; Banerjee, A

    2005-08-01

    After achieving breathtaking successes in securing state and local restrictions on smoking in public places and restricting youth access to tobacco products, the tobacco movement faces difficult decisions on its future strategic directions. The thesis of this article is that the tobacco control movement is at a point of needing to secure its recent successes and avoiding any public retrenchment. To do so requires rethinking the movement's strategic direction. We use the familiar trans-theoretical model of change to describe where the movement is currently and the threats it faces. The new tobacco control strategy should encompass a focus on voluntary non-smoking strategies, use human rights rhetoric to its advantage, and strengthen the public health voice to be more effective in political battles. In developing a new strategy, tobacco control advocates need to build a social movement based on a more forceful public health voice, along with the strategic use of human rights rhetoric, to focus on the power of voluntary non-smoking efforts. Using human rights rhetoric can help frame the movement in ways that have traditionally appealed to the American public. Perhaps more importantly, doing so can help infuse the tobacco control movement with a broader sense of purpose and mission.

  17. Visual Interpretation Of Hand Gestures For Human Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.Sahane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hand gestures provides an attractive alternative to cumbersome interface devices for human-computer interaction (HCI. In particular, visual interpretation of hand gestures can help in achieving the ease and naturalness desired for HCI. This discussion is organized on the basis of the method used for modeling, analyzing, and recognizing gestures. We propose pointing gesture-based large display interaction using a depth camera. A user interacts with applications for large display by using pointing gestures with the barehand. The calibration between large display and depth camera can be automatically performed by using RGB-D camera.. We also discuss implemented gestural systems as well as other potential applications of vision-based gesture recognition. We discuss directions of future research in gesture recognition, including its integration with other natural modes of human computer interaction.

  18. Eye-Hand-Mouth Coordination in the Human Newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagi, Yasuyuki

    2017-10-01

    There have been several studies concerning rudimentary coordination of the eyes, hands, and mouth in the human newborn. The author attempted to clarify the ontogenetic significance of the coordination during the earliest period of human life through a systematic review. The neural mechanism underlying the coordination was also discussed based on the current knowledge of cognitive neuroscience. Searches were conducted on PubMed and Google Scholar from their inception through March 2017. Studies have demonstrated that the coordination is a visually guided goal-directed motor behavior with intension and emotion. Current cognitive research has proved that feeding requires a large-scale neural network extending over several cortices. The eye-hand-mouth coordination in the newborn can be regarded as a precursor of subsequent self-feeding, and the coordination is very likely mediated through the underdeveloped but essentially the same network interconnecting cortices as in the adult. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hands-free human-machine interaction with voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, B. H.

    2001-05-01

    Voice is natural communication interface between a human and a machine. The machine, when placed in today's communication networks, may be configured to provide automation to save substantial operating cost, as demonstrated in AT&T's VRCP (Voice Recognition Call Processing), or to facilitate intelligent services, such as virtual personal assistants, to enhance individual productivity. These intelligent services often need to be accessible anytime, anywhere (e.g., in cars when the user is in a hands-busy-eyes-busy situation or during meetings where constantly talking to a microphone is either undersirable or impossible), and thus call for advanced signal processing and automatic speech recognition techniques which support what we call ``hands-free'' human-machine communication. These techniques entail a broad spectrum of technical ideas, ranging from use of directional microphones and acoustic echo cancellatiion to robust speech recognition. In this talk, we highlight a number of key techniques that were developed for hands-free human-machine communication in the mid-1990s after Bell Labs became a unit of Lucent Technologies. A video clip will be played to demonstrate the accomplishement.

  20. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design.

  1. Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David; Bromley, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Research on the human rights movement emphasizes direct changes in nation-states, focusing on the efficacy of treaties and the role of advocacy in mitigating immediate violations. However, more than 140 universities in 59 countries established academic chairs, research centers, and programs for human rights from 1968-2000, a development that…

  2. Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David; Bromley, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Research on the human rights movement emphasizes direct changes in nation-states, focusing on the efficacy of treaties and the role of advocacy in mitigating immediate violations. However, more than 140 universities in 59 countries established academic chairs, research centers, and programs for human rights from 1968-2000, a development that…

  3. Neural coding of movement direction in the healthy human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Cowper-Smith

    Full Text Available Neurophysiological studies in monkeys show that activity of neurons in primary cortex (M1, pre-motor cortex (PMC, and cerebellum varies systematically with the direction of reaching movements. These neurons exhibit preferred direction tuning, where the level of neural activity is highest when movements are made in the preferred direction (PD, and gets progressively lower as movements are made at increasing degrees of offset from the PD. Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRI-A paradigm, we show that PD coding does exist in regions of the human motor system that are homologous to those observed in non-human primates. Consistent with predictions of the PD model, we show adaptation (i.e., a lower level of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD time-course signal in M1, PMC, SMA, and cerebellum when consecutive wrist movements were made in the same direction (0° offset relative to movements offset by 90° or 180°. The BOLD signal in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex adapted equally in all movement offset conditions, mitigating against the possibility that the present results are the consequence of differential task complexity or attention to action in each movement offset condition.

  4. Human-like Compliance for Dexterous Robot Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Active Electromechanical Compliance (AEC) system that was developed for the Jau-JPL anthropomorphic robot. The AEC system imitates the functionality of the human muscle's secondary function, which is to control the joint's stiffness: AEC is implemented through servo controlling the joint drive train's stiffness. The control strategy, controlling compliant joints in teleoperation, is described. It enables automatic hybrid position and force control through utilizing sensory feedback from joint and compliance sensors. This compliant control strategy is adaptable for autonomous robot control as well. Active compliance enables dual arm manipulations, human-like soft grasping by the robot hand, and opens the way to many new robotics applications.

  5. Segmentation of human upper body movement using multiple IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takashi; Lin, Jonathan Feng-Shun; Kulic, Dana; Venture, Gentiane

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes an approach for the segmentation of human body movements measured by inertial measurement unit sensors. Using the angular velocity and linear acceleration measurements directly, without converting to joint angles, we perform segmentation by formulating the problem as a classification problem, and training a classifier to differentiate between motion end-point and within-motion points. The proposed approach is validated with experiments measuring the upper body movement during reaching tasks, demonstrating classification accuracy of over 85.8%.

  6. The Role of Human Body Movements in Mate Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hugill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is common scientific knowledge, that most of what we say within a conversation is not only expressed by the words' meaning alone, but also through our gestures, postures, and body movements. This non-verbal mode is possibly rooted firmly in our human evolutionary heritage, and as such, some scientists argue that it serves as a fundamental assessment and expression tool for our inner qualities. Studies of nonverbal communication have established that a universal, culture-free, non-verbal sign system exists, that is available to all individuals for negotiating social encounters. Thus, it is not only the kind of gestures and expressions humans use in social communication, but also the way these movements are performed, as this seems to convey key information about an individual's quality. Dance, for example, is a special form of movement, which can be observed in human courtship displays. Recent research suggests that people are sensitive to the variation in dance movements, and that dance performance provides information about an individual's mate quality in terms of health and strength. This article reviews the role of body movement in human non-verbal communication, and highlights its significance in human mate preferences in order to promote future work in this research area within the evolutionary psychology framework.

  7. Modulation of arm reaching movements during processing of arm/hand-related action verbs with and without emotional connotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Spadacenta

    Full Text Available The theory of embodied language states that language comprehension relies on an internal reenactment of the sensorimotor experience associated with the processed word or sentence. Most evidence in support of this hypothesis had been collected using linguistic material without any emotional connotation. For instance, it had been shown that processing of arm-related verbs, but not of those leg-related verbs, affects the planning and execution of reaching movements; however, at present it is unknown whether this effect is further modulated by verbs evoking an emotional experience. Showing such a modulation might shed light on a very debated issue, i.e. the way in which the emotional meaning of a word is processed. To this end, we assessed whether processing arm/hand-related verbs describing actions with negative connotations (e.g. to stab affects reaching movements differently from arm/hand-related verbs describing actions with neutral connotation (e.g. to comb. We exploited a go/no-go paradigm in which healthy participants were required to perform arm-reaching movements toward a target when verbs expressing emotional hand actions, neutral hand actions or foot actions were shown, and to refrain from moving when no-effector-related verbs were presented. Reaction times and percentages of errors increased when the verb involved the same effector as used to give the response. However, we also found that the size of this interference decreased when the arm/hand-related verbs had a negative emotional connotation. Crucially, we show that such modulation only occurred when the verb semantics had to be retrieved. These results suggest that the comprehension of negatively valenced verbs might require the simultaneous reenactment of the neural circuitry associated with the processing of the emotion evoked by their meaning and of the neural circuitry associated with their motor features.

  8. Modulation of arm reaching movements during processing of arm/hand-related action verbs with and without emotional connotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadacenta, Silvia; Gallese, Vittorio; Fragola, Michele; Mirabella, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The theory of embodied language states that language comprehension relies on an internal reenactment of the sensorimotor experience associated with the processed word or sentence. Most evidence in support of this hypothesis had been collected using linguistic material without any emotional connotation. For instance, it had been shown that processing of arm-related verbs, but not of those leg-related verbs, affects the planning and execution of reaching movements; however, at present it is unknown whether this effect is further modulated by verbs evoking an emotional experience. Showing such a modulation might shed light on a very debated issue, i.e. the way in which the emotional meaning of a word is processed. To this end, we assessed whether processing arm/hand-related verbs describing actions with negative connotations (e.g. to stab) affects reaching movements differently from arm/hand-related verbs describing actions with neutral connotation (e.g. to comb). We exploited a go/no-go paradigm in which healthy participants were required to perform arm-reaching movements toward a target when verbs expressing emotional hand actions, neutral hand actions or foot actions were shown, and to refrain from moving when no-effector-related verbs were presented. Reaction times and percentages of errors increased when the verb involved the same effector as used to give the response. However, we also found that the size of this interference decreased when the arm/hand-related verbs had a negative emotional connotation. Crucially, we show that such modulation only occurred when the verb semantics had to be retrieved. These results suggest that the comprehension of negatively valenced verbs might require the simultaneous reenactment of the neural circuitry associated with the processing of the emotion evoked by their meaning and of the neural circuitry associated with their motor features.

  9. Are there right hemisphere contributions to visually-guided movement? Manipulating left hand reaction time advantages in dextrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peter Carey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have argued for distinct but complementary contributions from each hemisphere in the control of movements to visual targets. Investigators have attempted to extend observations from patients with unilateral left- and right –hemisphere damage, to those using neurologically-intact participants, by assuming that each hand has privileged access to the contralateral hemisphere. Previous attempts to illustrate right hemispheric contributions to the control of aiming have focussed on increasing the spatial demands of an aiming task, to attenuate the typical right hand advantages, to try to enhance a left hand reaction time advantage in right-handed participants. These early attempts have not been successful. The present study circumnavigates some of the theoretical and methodological difficulties of some of the earlier experiments, by using three different tasks linked to specialised functions of the right hemisphere: bisecting, the gap effect, and visuospatial localisation. None of these tasks were effective in reducing the magnitude of left hand reaction time advantages in right handers. Results are discussed in terms of alternatives to right hemispheric functional explanations of the effect, the one dimensional nature of our target arrays, power and precision given the size of the left hand RT effect, and the utility of examining the proportions of participants who show these effects, rather than exclusive reliance on measures of central tendency and their associated null hypothesis significance tests.

  10. Are there right hemisphere contributions to visually-guided movement? Manipulating left hand reaction time advantages in dextrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David P; Otto-de Haart, E Grace; Buckingham, Gavin; Dijkerman, H Chris; Hargreaves, Eric L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have argued for distinct but complementary contributions from each hemisphere in the control of movements to visual targets. Investigators have attempted to extend observations from patients with unilateral left- and right-hemisphere damage, to those using neurologically-intact participants, by assuming that each hand has privileged access to the contralateral hemisphere. Previous attempts to illustrate right hemispheric contributions to the control of aiming have focussed on increasing the spatial demands of an aiming task, to attenuate the typical right hand advantages, to try to enhance a left hand reaction time advantage in right-handed participants. These early attempts have not been successful. The present study circumnavigates some of the theoretical and methodological difficulties of some of the earlier experiments, by using three different tasks linked directly to specialized functions of the right hemisphere: bisecting, the gap effect, and visuospatial localization. None of these tasks were effective in reducing the magnitude of left hand reaction time advantages in right handers. Results are discussed in terms of alternatives to right hemispheric functional explanations of the effect, the one-dimensional nature of our target arrays, power and precision given the size of the left hand RT effect, and the utility of examining the proportions of participants who show these effects, rather than exclusive reliance on measures of central tendency and their associated null hypothesis significance tests.

  11. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make students understand that microorganisms are always associated with humans, and that microorganisms have the ability to degrade chemicals? The presence of microorganisms on humans can be shown by incubating agar plates after they are touched by the hands of students. The ability of microorganisms to degrade chemicals can be shown by an analytical measurement of the degradation of chemicals. When the chemicals are dyes (colorants in water, microbial activity on degradation of dyes can be demonstrated by observing a decreasing degree of color as a result of the enzymatic activity (e.g., azoreductase. Dyes are widely used in the textile, food, and cosmetic industries. They are generally resistant to conventional biological wastewater treatment systems such as the activated sludge process (4. The discharge of wastewater containing dye pollutes surface water. The ability of microorganisms to decolorize and degrade dyes has been widely investigated to use for bioremediation purposes (5. The goal of this tip is to understand the presence of bacteria on human skin and the ability of bacteria to degrade colorant chemicals (decolorization. In this tip, students first cultivate and isolate bacteria on their hands, and then examine potential decolorization activity of each bacterium by observing the degree of color of the liquid in tubes in which bacteria isolated from students’ hands were inoculated. Decolorization activity of bacterial isolates from human skin has been

  12. A computational model of the human hand 93-ERI-053

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K.; Axelrod, T.

    1996-03-01

    The objectives of the Computational Hand Modeling project were to prove the feasibility of the Laboratory`s NIKE3D finite element code to orthopaedic problems. Because of the great complexity of anatomical structures and the nonlinearity of their behavior, we have focused on a subset of joints of the hand and lower extremity and have developed algorithms to model their behavior. The algorithms developed here solve fundamental problems in computational biomechanics and can be expanded to describe any other joints of the human body. This kind of computational modeling has never successfully been attempted before, due in part to a lack of biomaterials data and a lack of computational resources. With the computational resources available at the National Laboratories and the collaborative relationships we have established with experimental and other modeling laboratories, we have been in a position to pursue our innovative approach to biomechanical and orthopedic modeling.

  13. Postural adjustments for online corrections of arm movements in standing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Julia A; Gritsenko, Valeriya; Ouckama, Ryan; Stapley, Paul J

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how humans correct ongoing arm movements while standing. Specifically, we sought to understand whether the postural adjustments in the legs required for online corrections of arm movements are predictive or rely on feedback from the moving limb. To answer this question we measured online corrections in arm and leg muscles during pointing movements while standing. Nine healthy right-handed subjects reached with their dominant arm to a visual target in front of them and aligned with their midline. In some trials, the position of the target would switch from the central target to one of the other targets located 15°, 30°, or 45° to the right of the central (midline) target. For each target correction, we measured the time at which arm kinematics, ground reaction forces, and arm and leg muscle electromyogram significantly changed in response to the target displacement. Results show that postural adjustments in the left leg preceded kinematic corrections in the limb. The corrective postural muscle activity in the left leg consistently preceded the corrective reaching muscle activity in the right arm. Our results demonstrate that corrections of arm movements in response to target displacement during stance are preceded by postural adjustments in the leg contralateral to the direction of target shift. Furthermore, postural adjustments preceded both the hand trajectory correction and the arm-muscle activity responsible for it, which suggests that the central nervous system does not depend on feedback from the moving arm to modify body posture during voluntary movement. Instead, postural adjustments lead the online correction in the arm the same way they lead the initiation of voluntary arm movements. This suggests that forward models for voluntary movements executed during stance incorporate commands for posture that are produced on the basis of the required task demands.

  14. Quantification of Human Movement for Assessment in Automated Exercise Coaching

    CERN Document Server

    Hagler, Stuart; Bajczy, Ruzena; Pavel, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of human movement is a challenge in many areas, ranging from physical therapy to robotics. We quantify of human movement for the purpose of providing automated exercise coaching in the home. We developed a model-based assessment and inference process that combines biomechanical constraints with movement assessment based on the Microsoft Kinect camera. To illustrate the approach, we quantify the performance of a simple squatting exercise using two model-based metrics that are related to strength and endurance, and provide an estimate of the strength and energy-expenditure of each exercise session. We look at data for 5 subjects, and show that for some subjects the metrics indicate a trend consistent with improved exercise performance.

  15. Measuring Human Movement Patterns and Behaviors in Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Zebitz; Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.;

    In order to assess human movement patterns and behaviors in public spaces we present a method using thermal cameras and Computer Vision (CV) technology, combined with the analytical virtues of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), to track people in urban streets and plazas. The method enables...

  16. Learning robotic eye-arm-hand coordination from human demonstration: a coupled dynamical systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Luka; Santos-Victor, José; Billard, Aude

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the role of obstacle avoidance in visually guided reaching and grasping movements. We report on a human study in which subjects performed prehensile motion with obstacle avoidance where the position of the obstacle was systematically varied across trials. These experiments suggest that reaching with obstacle avoidance is organized in a sequential manner, where the obstacle acts as an intermediary target. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the notion of workspace travelled by the hand is embedded explicitly in a forward planning scheme, which is actively involved in detecting obstacles on the way when performing reaching. We find that the gaze proactively coordinates the pattern of eye-arm motion during obstacle avoidance. This study provides also a quantitative assessment of the coupling between the eye-arm-hand motion. We show that the coupling follows regular phase dependencies and is unaltered during obstacle avoidance. These observations provide a basis for the design of a computational model. Our controller extends the coupled dynamical systems framework and provides fast and synchronous control of the eyes, the arm and the hand within a single and compact framework, mimicking similar control system found in humans. We validate our model for visuomotor control of a humanoid robot.

  17. Split-brain monkeys : cerebral control of contralateral and ipsilateral arm, hand and finger movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Brinkman (Jacoba)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study, an investigation has been made of the visuomotor control exerted by one half of the brain over each of the two upper extremities in the rhesus monkey. The hypothesis that one half of the brain can steer movements of each of the two extremities relatively independent

  18. Non-primary motor areas in the human frontal lobe are connected directly to hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitti, S; Määttä, S; Säisänen, L; Könönen, M; Vanninen, R; Hannula, H; Mervaala, E; Karhu, J

    2008-04-15

    Structural studies in primates have shown that, in addition to the primary motor cortex (M1), premotor areas are a source of corticospinal tracts. The function of these putative corticospinal neuronal tracts in humans is still unclear. We found frontal non-primary motor areas (NPMAs), which react to targeted non-invasive magnetic pulses and activate peripheral muscles as fast as or even faster than those in M1. Hand muscle movements were observed in all our subjects about 20 ms after transcranial stimulation of the superior frontal gyrus (Brodmann areas 6 and 8). Stimulation of NPMA could activate both proximal and distal upper limb muscles with the same delay as a stimulation of the M1, indicating converging motor representations with direct functional connections to the hand. We suggest that these non-primary cortical motor representations provide additional capacity for the fast execution of movements. Such a capacity may play a role in motor learning and in recovery from motor deficits.

  19. Hands-free Head-movement Gesture Recognition using Artificial Neural Networks and the Magnified Gradient Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L M; Nguyen, H T; Taylor, P B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a hands-free head-movement gesture classification system using a Neural Network employing the Magnified Gradient Function (MGF) algorithm. The MGF increases the rate of convergence by magnifying the first order derivative of the activation function, whilst guaranteeing convergence. The MGF is tested on able-bodied and disabled users to measure its accuracy and performance. It is shown that for able-bodied users, a classification improvement from 98.25% to 99.85% is made, and 92.08% to 97.50% for disabled users.

  20. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosario, Michael B; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-07-31

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the "smartphone", a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that "count" steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to "close the loop" by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions.

  1. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. del Rosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the “smartphone”, a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU and more recently magnetometer and barometer which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs. As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that “count” steps (i.e., pedometers; gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to “close the loop” by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions.

  2. Temporal discrimination of two passive movements in humans: a new psychophysical approach to assessing kinaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Michele; Stanzani, Clementina; Fiorio, Mirta; Smania, Nicola; Moretto, Giuseppe; Fiaschi, Antonio; Edwards, Mark J; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C

    2005-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical stimulation of the motor point of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) was used to produce a non-painful contraction of the FDI muscle that caused index finger abduction movement but no radiating cutaneous paraesthesias or sharp sensations localized to joints. Pairs of stimuli separated by different time intervals were given and subjects were asked to report whether they perceived a single or a double index finger abduction movement. The threshold value was the shortest interval for which the subjects reported two separate index finger abduction movements. Temporal discrimination movement thresholds (TDMT) were measured for both right and left hand. To assess the possible role of muscle and cutaneous afferents in temporal discrimination, we investigated the effects of high-frequency (20 Hz) electrical stimulation of the right ulnar and radial nerves on TDMT. In humans, muscle afferents from FDI are supplied by the ulnar nerve whereas the cutaneous territory overlying the muscle and joint is supplied by the radial and median nerves. Threshold values were not significantly different for right (75.1 ms) and left (75.6 ms) hands. During ulnar and to a lesser extent during radial nerve stimulation, TDMT values were significantly increased (119.2 and 93.5 ms, respectively) compared with baseline conditions (78.0 ms) whereas no changes were observed during median nerve stimulation (80.5 ms). These results suggest that muscle, and in part cutaneous, afferents contribute to temporal discrimination of a dual movement. The technique may provide a useful way of measuring temporal discrimination of kinaesthetic inputs in humans.

  3. Decoding three-dimensional reaching movements using electrocorticographic signals in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Szrama, Nicholas; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) signals have emerged as a potential control signal for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications due to balancing signal quality and implant invasiveness. While there have been numerous demonstrations in which ECoG signals were used to decode motor movements and to develop BCI systems, the extent of information that can be decoded has been uncertain. Therefore, we sought to determine if ECoG signals could be used to decode kinematics (speed, velocity, and position) of arm movements in 3D space. Approach. To investigate this, we designed a 3D center-out reaching task that was performed by five epileptic patients undergoing temporary placement of ECoG arrays. We used the ECoG signals within a hierarchical partial-least squares (PLS) regression model to perform offline prediction of hand speed, velocity, and position. Main Results. The hierarchical PLS regression model enabled us to predict hand speed, velocity, and position during 3D reaching movements from held-out test sets with accuracies above chance in each patient with mean correlation coefficients between 0.31 and 0.80 for speed, 0.27 and 0.54 for velocity, and 0.22 and 0.57 for position. While beta band power changes were the most significant features within the model used to classify movement and rest, the local motor potential and high gamma band power changes, were the most important features in the prediction of kinematic parameters. Significance. We believe that this study represents the first demonstration that truly three-dimensional movements can be predicted from ECoG recordings in human patients. Furthermore, this prediction underscores the potential to develop BCI systems with multiple degrees of freedom in human patients using ECoG.

  4. Human Posture and Movement Prediction based on Musculoskeletal Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Saeed Davoudabadi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explores an optimization-based formulation, so-called inverse-inverse dynamics, for the prediction of human posture and motion dynamics performing various tasks. It is explained how this technique enables us to predict natural kinematic and kinetic patterns for human posture...... and motion using AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). AMS uses inverse dynamics to analyze musculoskeletal systems and is, therefore, limited by its dependency on input kinematics. We propose to alleviate this dependency by assuming that voluntary postures and movement strategies in humans are guided by a desire...... investigated, a scaling to the mean height and body mass may be sufficient, while other questions require subject-specific models. The movement is parameterized by means of time functions controlling selected degrees-of-freedom (DOF). Subsequently, the parameters of these functions, usually referred...

  5. Human movement analysis with image processing in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, Eric; Paindavoine, Michel; Cannard, F.

    1991-04-01

    In the field of the human sciences, a lot of applications needs to know the kinematic characteristics of the human movements Psycology is associating the characteristics with the control mechanism, sport and biomechariics are associating them with the performance of the sportman or of the patient. So the trainers or the doctors can correct the gesture of the subject to obtain a better performance if he knows the motion properties. Roherton's studies show the children motion evolution2 . Several investigations methods are able to measure the human movement But now most of the studies are based on image processing. Often the systems are working at the T.V. standard (50 frame per secund ). they permit only to study very slow gesture. A human operator analyses the digitizing sequence of the film manually giving a very expensive, especially long and unprecise operation. On these different grounds many human movement analysis systems were implemented. They consist of: - markers which are fixed to the anatomical interesting points on the subject in motion, - Image compression which is the art to coding picture data. Generally the compression Is limited to the centroid coordinates calculation tor each marker. These systems differ from one other in image acquisition and markers detection.

  6. The PowerGlove: assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van K.J.; Verhagen, R.; Noort, van den J.; Bour, L.J.; Veltink, P.H.; Heida, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to test whether the PowerGlove (PG), an instrumented glove which consists of inertial (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors, is a valid and reliable instrument to measure different degrees of hand motor impairments in patients with Parkinson’s diseas

  7. Enhanced propriospinal excitation from hand muscles to wrist flexors during reach-to-grasp in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Burke, David; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    In humans, propriospinal neurons located at midcervical levels receive peripheral and corticospinal inputs and probably participate in the control of grip tasks, but their role in reaching movements, as observed in cats and primates, is still an open question. The effect of ulnar nerve stimulation on flexor carpi radialis (FCR) motor evoked potential (MEP) was tested during reaching tasks and tonic wrist flexion. Significant MEP facilitation was observed at the end of reach during reach-to-grasp but not during grasp, reach-to-point, or tonic contractions. MEP facilitation occurred at a longer interstimulus interval than expected for convergence of corticospinal and afferent volleys at motoneuron level and was not paralleled by a change in the H-reflex. These findings suggest convergence of the two volleys at propriospinal level. Ulnar-induced MEP facilitation was observed when conditioning stimuli were at 0.75 motor response threshold (MT), but not 1 MT. This favors an increased excitability of propriospinal neurons rather than depression of their feedback inhibition, as has been observed during tonic power grip tasks. It is suggested that the ulnar-induced facilitation of FCR MEP during reach may be due to descending activation of propriospinal neurons, assisting the early recruitment of large motoneurons for rapid movement. Because the feedback inhibitory control is still open, this excitation can be truncated by cutaneous inputs from the palmar side of the hand during grasp, thus assisting movement termination. It is concluded that the feedforward activation of propriospinal neurons and their feedback control may be involved in the internal model, motor planning, and online adjustments for reach-to-grasp movements in humans.

  8. Mu suppression and human movement responses to the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime A; Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Parolin, Laura; Viglione, Donald J

    2011-03-30

    Electroencephalographic μ wave suppression was investigated using all 10 static, ambiguous Rorschach stimuli. In an earlier study using four Rorschach stimuli, the two stimuli that elicited feelings of movement were associated with μ suppression. In this study, we replicated this relationship using all 10 Rorschach stimuli while overcoming a number of other earlier limitations. The results strongly support the hypothesis that internal representation of the feeling of movement is sufficient to suppress the μ rhythm even when minimal external cues are present. This outcome increases the generalizability and ecological validity of this approach and gives support to the traditional interpretation of the Rorschach human movement responses as being associated with cognitive functioning, empathy, and social cognition.

  9. Individual left-hand and right-hand intra-digit representations in human primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A; Frahm, Jens; Schweizer, Renate

    2015-09-01

    Individual intra-digit somatotopy of all phalanges of the middle and little finger of the right and left hand was studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging in 12 healthy subjects. Phalanges were tactilely stimulated and activation in BA 3b of the human primary somatosensory cortex could be observed for each individual phalanx. Activation peaks were further analysed using the Direction/Order (DiOr) method, which identifies somatotopy, if a significantly high number of subjects exhibit ordered distal-to-proximal phalanx representions along a similar direction. Based on DiOr, ordered and similar-direction-aligned intra-digit maps across subjects were found at the left hand for the little and middle finger and at the right hand for the little finger. In these digits the proximal phalanges were represented more medially along the course of the central sulcus than the distal phalanges. This is contrasted by the intra-digit maps for the middle finger of the right hand, which showed larger inter-subject variations of phalanx alignments without a similar within-digit representation across subjects. As all subjects were right-handed and as the middle finger of the dominant hand probably plays a more individual role in everyday tactile performance than the little finger of the right hand and all left-hand digits, the observed variation might reflect a functional somatotopy based on individual use of that particular digit at the dominant hand.

  10. Dopamine function and the efficiency of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Li, Xiaoyan; Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard

    2014-03-01

    To sustain successful behavior in dynamic environments, active organisms must be able to learn from the consequences of their actions and predict action outcomes. One of the most important discoveries in systems neuroscience over the last 15 years has been about the key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in mediating such active behavior. Dopamine cell firing was found to encode differences between the expected and obtained outcomes of actions. Although activity of dopamine cells does not specify movements themselves, a recent study in humans has suggested that tonic levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may in part enable normal movement by encoding sensitivity to the energy cost of a movement, providing an implicit "motor motivational" signal for movement. We investigated the motivational hypothesis of dopamine by studying motor performance of patients with Parkinson disease who have marked dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum and compared their performance with that of elderly healthy adults. All participants performed rapid sequential movements to visual targets associated with different risk and different energy costs, countered or assisted by gravity. In conditions of low energy cost, patients performed surprisingly well, similar to prescriptions of an ideal planner and healthy participants. As energy costs increased, however, performance of patients with Parkinson disease dropped markedly below the prescriptions for action by an ideal planner and below performance of healthy elderly participants. The results indicate that the ability for efficient planning depends on the energy cost of action and that the effect of energy cost on action is mediated by dopamine.

  11. Unspoken knowledge: implicit learning of structured human dance movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacic, Tajana; Stevens, Catherine; Tillmann, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The sequencing of dance movements may be thought of as a grammar. We investigate implicit learning of regularities that govern sequences of unfamiliar, discrete dance movements. It was hypothesized that observers without prior experience with contemporary dance would be able to learn regularities that underpin structured human movement. Thirty-one adults were assigned to either an exposure or a control group. Exposure consisted of 22 grammatical 3-, 4-, and 5-movement sequences presented twice in random order; sequence duration ranged from 9 to 19 s. In a test phase, exposure and control groups identified previously unseen sequences as grammatical or ungrammatical, and rated confidence of judgment. The exposure group selected significantly more new grammatical sequences in the test phase than the control group. In addition, for the exposure group, the zero correlation criterion, wherein no relation between confidence and accuracy indicates unconscious knowledge, was satisfied. Through exposure, novice observers can learn a grammar that governs the sequencing of dance movements. This has implications for implicit learning of long sequences, working memory, and the development of expectations through exposure to contemporary dance.

  12. Adaptation or exaptation? The case of the human hand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marta Linde-Medina

    2011-09-01

    A controversy of relevance to the study of biological form involves the concept of adaptation. This controversy is illustrated by the structure and function of the human hand. A review of the principal definitions of adaptation points to two main problems: (1) they are qualitative and make reference to the whole structure (or substructural feature) and (2) they are based on the idea of natural selection as a moulding factor. The first problem would be solved by a definition that encompasses quantitative measures of the effects of selection, drawing on new advances in the comparative method. The second problem is deeper and presents greater conceptual difficulties. I will argue that the idea of natural selection as a moulding factor depends on the notion of a genetic program for development. But regarding the hand, experimental evidence on limb development challenges the idea of a genetic program for skeletal pattern formation, undermining a simple application of standard adaptationist concepts. These considerations lead to a revised definition of adaptation and interpretation of the evolutionary determinants of the hand’s form.

  13. Hand-movement-based in-vehicle driver/front-seat passenger discrimination for centre console controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Enrico; Makrushin, Andrey; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Langnickel, Mirko; Kraetzer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Successful user discrimination in a vehicle environment may yield a reduction of the number of switches, thus significantly reducing costs while increasing user convenience. The personalization of individual controls permits conditional passenger enable/driver disable and vice versa options which may yield safety improvement. The authors propose a prototypic optical sensing system based on hand movement segmentation in near-infrared image sequences implemented in an Audi A6 Avant. Analyzing the number of movements in special regions, the system recognizes the direction of the forearm and hand motion and decides whether driver or front-seat passenger touch a control. The experimental evaluation is performed independently for uniformly and non-uniformly illuminated video data as well as for the complete video data set which includes both subsets. The general test results in error rates of up to 14.41% FPR / 16.82% FNR and 17.61% FPR / 14.77% FNR for driver and passenger respectively. Finally, the authors discuss the causes of the most frequently occurring errors as well as the prospects and limitations of optical sensing for user discrimination in passenger compartments.

  14. Human Hand Kinematic Modeling Based on Robotic Concepts for Digit Animation with Dynamic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondu, Bertrand

    The recent development of highly anthropomorphic avatars in computer graphics has emphasized the importance of accurate hand kinematic models. Although kinematic methods derived from robotics have recently been applied to the modeling of hands, we consider that original/new and relevant results can be brought into play with the use of more advanced applications of robotic techniques to human hand kinematic modeling. Our chapter analyses some of these questions both in the non-differential and differential fields. More specifically, we study how to integrate the peculiar natural digit movement constraints into robotics-based inverse kinematic modeling. As a result, we propose an original approach based on an interpretation of each joint dynamic constraint as a linear joint synergy. This leads to defining the considered digit as a serial chain kinematically redundant in position and reducing the dimension of its joint space by associated joint synergies. The method is applied to the Cartesian positioning simulation of a 4 d.o.f. index model; a comparison with a Jacobian pseudo-inverse-based approach emphasizes its relevance.

  15. Movement-related activity during goal-directed hand actions in the monkey ventrolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Luciano; Rozzi, Stefano; Bimbi, Marco; Fogassi, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    Grasping actions require the integration of two neural processes, one enabling the transformation of object properties into corresponding motor acts, and the other involved in planning and controlling action execution on the basis of contextual information. The first process relies on parieto-premotor circuits, whereas the second is considered to be a prefrontal function. Up to now, the prefrontal cortex has been mainly investigated with conditional visuomotor tasks requiring a learned association between cues and behavioural output. To clarify the functional role of the prefrontal cortex in grasping actions, we recorded the activity of ventrolateral prefrontal (VLPF) neurons while monkeys (Macaca mulatta) performed tasks requiring reaching-grasping actions in different contextual conditions (in light and darkness, memory-guided, and in the absence of abstract learned rules). The results showed that the VLPF cortex contains neurons that are active during action execution (movement-related neurons). Some of them showed grip selectivity, and some also responded to object presentation. Most movement-related neurons discharged during action execution both with and without visual feedback, and this discharge typically did not change when the action was performed with object mnemonic information and in the absence of abstract rules. The findings of this study indicate that a population of VLPF neurons play a role in controlling goal-directed grasping actions in several contexts. This control is probably exerted within a wider network, involving parietal and premotor regions, where the role of VLPF movement-related neurons would be that of activating, on the basis of contextual information, the representation of the motor goal of the intended action (taking possession of an object) during action planning and execution.

  16. Effect of Observation of Simple Hand Movement on Brain Activations in Patients with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinomais, Mickael; Lignon, Gregoire; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Minassian, Aram Ter; The Tich, Sylvie N'Guyen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine and compare brain activation in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) during observation of simple hand movement performed by the paretic and nonparetic hand. Nineteen patients with clinical unilateral CP (14 male, mean age 14 years, 7-21 years) participated…

  17. Smart Sensor-Based Motion Detection System for Hand Movement Training in Open Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinyao; Byrns, Simon; Cheng, Irene; Zheng, Bin; Basu, Anup

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a smart sensor-based motion detection technique for objective measurement and assessment of surgical dexterity among users at different experience levels. The goal is to allow trainees to evaluate their performance based on a reference model shared through communication technology, e.g., the Internet, without the physical presence of an evaluating surgeon. While in the current implementation we used a Leap Motion Controller to obtain motion data for analysis, our technique can be applied to motion data captured by other smart sensors, e.g., OptiTrack. To differentiate motions captured from different participants, measurement and assessment in our approach are achieved using two strategies: (1) low level descriptive statistical analysis, and (2) Hidden Markov Model (HMM) classification. Based on our surgical knot tying task experiment, we can conclude that finger motions generated from users with different surgical dexterity, e.g., expert and novice performers, display differences in path length, number of movements and task completion time. In order to validate the discriminatory ability of HMM for classifying different movement patterns, a non-surgical task was included in our analysis. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach had 100 % accuracy in discriminating between expert and novice performances. Our proposed motion analysis technique applied to open surgical procedures is a promising step towards the development of objective computer-assisted assessment and training systems.

  18. Deep Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Electromyography Data: A Resource for the Classification of Movements for Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Cognolato, Matteo; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Natural control methods based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications, and commercial prostheses are capable of offering natural control for only a few movements. In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its methods for natural control of robotic hands via sEMG using a large number of intact subjects and amputees. We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 transradial amputees. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets. The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods, but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accurate results comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters) can be fundamental for the analysis of sEMG data. Larger networks can achieve higher accuracy on computer vision and object recognition tasks. This fact suggests that it may be interesting to evaluate if larger networks can increase sEMG classification accuracy too. PMID:27656140

  19. Deep Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Electromyography Data: A Resource for the Classification of Movements for Prosthetic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Cognolato, Matteo; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Natural control methods based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications, and commercial prostheses are capable of offering natural control for only a few movements. In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its methods for natural control of robotic hands via sEMG using a large number of intact subjects and amputees. We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 transradial amputees. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets. The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods, but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accurate results comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters) can be fundamental for the analysis of sEMG data. Larger networks can achieve higher accuracy on computer vision and object recognition tasks. This fact suggests that it may be interesting to evaluate if larger networks can increase sEMG classification accuracy too.

  20. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas.

  1. Shape-estimation of human hand using polymer flex sensor and study of its application to control robot arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyuck; Kim, Dae Hyun [Seoul National University of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Ultrasonic inspection robot systems have been widely researched and developed for the real-time monitoring of structures such as power plants. However, an inspection robot that is operated in a simple pattern has limitations in its application to various structures in a plant facility because of the diverse and complicated shapes of the inspection objects. Therefore, accurate control of the robot is required to inspect complicated objects with high-precision results. This paper presents the idea that the shape and movement information of an ultrasonic inspector's hand could be profitably utilized for the accurate control of robot. In this study, a polymer flex sensor was applied to monitor the shape of a human hand. This application was designed to intuitively control an ultrasonic inspection robot. The movement and shape of the hand were estimated by applying multiple sensors. Moreover, it was successfully shown that a test robot could be intuitively controlled based on the shape of a human hand estimated using polymer flex sensors.

  2. S-R compatibility effects on motor potentials associated with hand and foot movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Two four-choice reaction time (RT) experiments used the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) and the limb selection potential (LSP) to assess the effects of spatial S-R compatibility on motor processes. Individual stimuli were presented at one corner of a square centered at fixation, and each response was made with the left or right hand or foot. In Experiment 1, the correct response was determined by stimulus location, whereas in Experiment 2 it was determined by stimulus identity. Horizontal and vertical compatibility affected both RT and response accuracy, but the LRP and LSP results suggested that compatibility had little or no direct effect on the duration of motor processes. In addition, the results suggest that the relatively new LSP measure is a useful index of motor activation processes. Its insensitivity to horizontal stimulus artifacts makes it especially useful for studying the effects of horizontal spatial compatibility.

  3. Robot-Assisted Training of Arm and Hand Movement Shows Functional Improvements for Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Gerard E; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Berliner, Jeffrey; OʼMalley, Marcia K; Pehlivan, Ali Utku; Kadivar, Zahra; Fitle, Kyle; Boake, Corwin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility, tolerability, and effectiveness of robotic-assisted arm training in incomplete chronic tetraplegia. Pretest/posttest/follow-up was conducted. Ten individuals with chronic cervical spinal cord injury were enrolled. Participants performed single degree-of-freedom exercise of upper limbs at an intensity of 3-hr per session for 3 times a week for 4 wks with MAHI Exo-II. Arm and hand function tests (Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Action Research Arm Test), strength of upper limb (upper limb motor score, grip, and pinch strength), and independence in daily living activities (Spinal Cord Independence Measure II) were performed at baseline, end of training, and 6 mos later. After 12 sessions of training, improvements in arm and hand functions were observed. Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (0.14[0.04]-0.21[0.07] items/sec, P = 0.04), Action Research Arm Test (30.7[3.8]-34.3[4], P = 0.02), American Spinal Injury Association upper limb motor score (31.5[2.3]-34[2.3], P = 0.04) grip (9.7[3.8]-12[4.3] lb, P = 0.02), and pinch strength (4.5[1.1]-5.7[1.2] lb, P = 0.01) resulted in significant increases. Some gains were maintained at 6 mos. No change in Spinal Cord Independence Measure II scores and no adverse events were observed. Results from this pilot study suggest that repetitive training of arm movements with MAHI Exo-II exoskeleton is safe and has potential to be an adjunct treatment modality in rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injury with mild to moderate impaired arm functions.

  4. The phenomenological movement and research in the human sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Amedeo

    2005-01-01

    Phenomenology, as a modern movement in philosophy, has focused discussion upon human subjectivity in new and critically important ways. Because human participants can relate intentionally to objects of the world consciousness manifests relationships to things and others that are other than cause-effect relationships. Consequently, the concepts and practices of the natural sciences are not the best model for the human sciences to follow. Husserl in his philosophy introduced a method for a more adequate approach to the achievements of consciousness and when properly modified the phenomenological method can serve as the basis for the human sciences, including nursing. The use of such a method can make the qualitative analysis of phenomena rigorous and scientific.

  5. The perception of humanness from the movements of synthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James C; Trafton, J Gregory; McKnight, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    As technology develops, social robots and synthetic avatars might begin to play more of a role in our lives. An influential theory of the perception of synthetic agents states that as they begin to look and move in a more human-like way, they elicit profound discomfort in the observer--an effect known as the Uncanny Valley. Previous attempts to examine the existence of the Uncanny Valley have not adequately manipulated movement parameters that contribute to perceptions of the humanness or eeriness. Here we parametrically manipulated three different kinematic features of two walking avatars and found that, contrary to the Uncanny Valley hypothesis, ratings of the humanness, familiarity, and eeriness of these avatars changed monotonically. Our results indicate that, when a full gradient of motion parameter changes is examined, ratings of synthetic agents by human observers do not show an Uncanny Valley.

  6. Towards Human Capture Movement: Estimation of Anatomical Movements of the Shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Salmerón-Quiroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus on the human arm motion capture, which is motivated by the requirements in physical rehabilitation and training of stroke patients in the same way as monitoring of elderly person activities. The proposed methodology uses a data fusion of low-cost and low-weight MEMS sensors jointly to an a priori knowledge of the arm anatomy. The main goal is to estimate the arm position, the anatomical movements of the shoulder and its accelerations. We propose a discrete optimization based-approach which aims to search the optimal attitude ambiguity directly without decorrelation of ambiguity, and to computing the baseline vector consequently. The originality of this paper is to apply the discrete optimization to track the desired trajectory of a nonlinear system such as the Human Movement in the presence of uncertainties. The global asymptotic convergence of the nonlinear observer is guaranteed. Extensive tests of the presented methodology with real world data illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed procedure.

  7. The Analysis of Hand Movement Distinction Based on Relative Frequency Band Energy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of successfully developing a prosthetic control system, many attempts have been made to improve the classification accuracy of surface electromyographic (SEMG signals. Nevertheless, the effective feature extraction is still a paramount challenge for the classification of SEMG signals. The relative frequency band energy (RFBE method based on wavelet packet decomposition was proposed for the prosthetic pattern recognition of multichannel SEMG signals. Firstly, the wavelet packet energy of SEMG signals in each subspace was calculated by using wavelet packet decomposition and the RFBE of each frequency band was obtained by the wavelet packet energy. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA and the Davies-Bouldin (DB index were used to perform the feature selection. Lastly, the support vector machine (SVM was applied for the classification of SEMG signals. Our results demonstrated that the RFBE approach was suitable for identifying different types of forearm movements. By comparing with other classification methods, the proposed method achieved higher classification accuracy in terms of the classification of SEMG signals.

  8. Spontaneous cyclic embryonic movements in humans and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Renée H M; Mulder, Eduard J H; Lüchinger, Annemarie B; van Kan, Colette M; Taverne, Marcel A M; de Vries, Johanna I P

    2012-08-01

    Motility assessment before birth can be used to evaluate the integrity of the nervous system. Sideways bending (SB) of head and/or rump, the earliest embryonic motility in both humans and guinea pigs, can be visualized sonographically. We know from other species that early embryonic motility is cyclic. This study explores the distribution of SB-to-SB intervals in human and guinea pig embryos before the appearance of more complex movements such as general movements. We hypothesized that the activity in both species is cyclic. We made 15-min sonographic recordings of SBs between 5 weeks and 0 days (5wk0d) and 7wk0d conceptional age (CA) in 18 human embryos of uncomplicated IVF pregnancies (term 38 weeks) and in 20 guinea pig embryos between 3wk4d and 4wk0d CA (term 9 weeks). SB-to-SB interval durations were categorized as long (≥10 s) or short (guinea pigs 38 s (range, 10-288 s) and 5 s (range, 1-9 s), respectively. During development, the duration of long intervals decreased while the number of short intervals increased for both species. The earliest embryonic motility in the human and guinea pig is performed cyclically with distinct developmental milestones. The resemblance of their interval development offers promising possibilities to use the guinea pig as a noninvasive animal model of external influences on motor and neural development.

  9. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindolia, Deepa K; Garcia, Andres J; Wesolowski, Amy; Smith, David L; Buckee, Caroline O; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Tatem, Andrew J

    2012-06-18

    Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM) in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i) discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii) document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii) highlight where data gaps remain and (iv) briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements.

  10. Features of hand-foot crawling behavior in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclellan, M J; Ivanenko, Y P; Cappellini, G; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F

    2012-01-01

    Interlimb coordination of crawling kinematics in humans shares features with other primates and nonprimate quadrupeds, and it has been suggested that this is due to a similar organization of the locomotor pattern generators (CPGs). To extend the previous findings and to further explore the neural control of bipedal vs. quadrupedal locomotion, we used a crawling paradigm in which healthy adults crawled on their hands and feet at different speeds and at different surface inclinations (13°, 27°, and 35°). Ground reaction forces, limb kinematics, and electromyographic (EMG) activity from 26 upper and lower limb muscles on the right side of the body were collected. The EMG activity was mapped onto the spinal cord in approximate rostrocaudal locations of the motoneuron pools to characterize the general features of cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord activation. The spatiotemporal pattern of spinal cord activity significantly differed between quadrupedal and bipedal gaits. In addition, participants exhibited a large range of kinematic coordination styles (diagonal vs. lateral patterns), which is in contrast to the stereotypical kinematics of upright bipedal walking, suggesting flexible coupling of cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Results showed strikingly dissimilar directional horizontal forces for the arms and legs, considerably retracted average leg orientation, and substantially smaller sacral vs. lumbar motoneuron activity compared with quadrupedal gait in animals. A gradual transition to a more vertical body orientation (increasing the inclination of the treadmill) led to the appearance of more prominent sacral activity (related to activation of ankle plantar flexors), typical of bipedal walking. The findings highlight the reorganization and adaptation of CPG networks involved in the control of quadrupedal human locomotion and a high specialization of the musculoskeletal apparatus to specific gaits.

  11. Automated Classification of L/R Hand Movement EEG Signals using Advanced Feature Extraction and Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Alomari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an automated computer platform for the purpose of classifying Electroencephalography (EEG signals associated with left and right hand movements using a hybrid system that uses advanced feature extraction techniques and machine learning algorithms. It is known that EEG represents the brain activity by the electrical voltage fluctuations along the scalp, and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI is a device that enables the use of the brain’s neural activity to communicate with others or to control machines, artificial limbs, or robots without direct physical movements. In our research work, we aspired to find the best feature extraction method that enables the differentiation between left and right executed fist movements through various classification algorithms. The EEG dataset used in this research was created and contributed to PhysioNet by the developers of the BCI2000 instrumentation system. Data was preprocessed using the EEGLAB MATLAB toolbox and artifacts removal was done using AAR. Data was epoched on the basis of Event-Related (De Synchronization (ERD/ERS and movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP features. Mu/beta rhythms were isolated for the ERD/ERS analysis and delta rhythms were isolated for the MRCP analysis. The Independent Component Analysis (ICA spatial filter was applied on related channels for noise reduction and isolation of both artifactually and neutrally generated EEG sources. The final feature vector included the ERD, ERS, and MRCP features in addition to the mean, power and energy of the activations of the resulting Independent Components (ICs of the epoched feature datasets. The datasets were inputted into two machine-learning algorithms: Neural Networks (NNs and Support Vector Machines (SVMs. Intensive experiments were carried out and optimum classification performances of 89.8 and 97.1 were obtained using NN and SVM, respectively. This research shows that this method of feature extraction

  12. Intervention to enhance skilled arm and hand movements after stroke: A feasibility study using a new virtual reality system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaughlin Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation programs designed to develop skill in upper extremity (UE function after stroke require progressive practice that engage and challenge the learner. Virtual realty (VR provides a unique environment where the presentation of stimuli can be controlled systematically for optimal challenge by adapting task difficulty as performance improves. We describe four VR tasks that were developed and tested to improve arm and hand movement skills for individuals with hemiparesis. Methods Two participants with chronic post-stroke paresis and different levels of motor severity attended 12 training sessions lasting 1 to 2 hours each over a 3-week period. Behavior measures and questionnaires were administered pre-, mid-, and post-training. Results Both participants improved VR task performance across sessions. The less impaired participant averaged more time on task, practiced a greater number of blocks per session, and progressed at a faster rate over sessions than the more impaired participant. Impairment level did not change but both participants improved functional ability after training. The less impaired participant increased the number of blocks moved on the Box & Blocks test while the more impaired participant achieved 4 more items on the Functional Test of the Hemiparetic UE. Conclusion Two participants with differing motor severity were able to engage in VR based practice and improve performance over 12 training sessions. We were able to successfully provide individualized, progressive practice based on each participant's level of movement ability and rate of performance improvement.

  13. Eye movements reveal epistemic curiosity in human observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranes, Adrien; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Gottlieb, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    Saccadic (rapid) eye movements are primary means by which humans and non-human primates sample visual information. However, while saccadic decisions are intensively investigated in instrumental contexts where saccades guide subsequent actions, it is largely unknown how they may be influenced by curiosity - the intrinsic desire to learn. While saccades are sensitive to visual novelty and visual surprise, no study has examined their relation to epistemic curiosity - interest in symbolic, semantic information. To investigate this question, we tracked the eye movements of human observers while they read trivia questions and, after a brief delay, were visually given the answer. We show that higher curiosity was associated with earlier anticipatory orienting of gaze toward the answer location without changes in other metrics of saccades or fixations, and that these influences were distinct from those produced by variations in confidence and surprise. Across subjects, the enhancement of anticipatory gaze was correlated with measures of trait curiosity from personality questionnaires. Finally, a machine learning algorithm could predict curiosity in a cross-subject manner, relying primarily on statistical features of the gaze position before the answer onset and independently of covariations in confidence or surprise, suggesting potential practical applications for educational technologies, recommender systems and research in cognitive sciences. With this article, we provide full access to the annotated database allowing readers to reproduce the results. Epistemic curiosity produces specific effects on oculomotor anticipation that can be used to read out curiosity states.

  14. The study of intramuscular nerve distribution patterns and relative spindle abundance of the thenar and hypothenar muscles in human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Jiang, Yanjun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yang, Shengbo

    2012-01-01

    The intramuscular nerve distribution and relative spindle abundance of the human hand have not been well defined, although this is important in guiding hand surgery. Forty human hands were dissected and subjected to modified Sihler's stain and haematoxylin and eosin stain to investigate intramuscular nerve distribution and relative spindle abundance, respectively. The flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), adductor pollicis (AP), and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) contain separate nerve compartments. Neural anastomoses were observed in the thenar and hypothenar muscles, including the Y-like, O-like, H-like, and U-like appearance. We found that U-like neural anastomoses may be the characteristic of the opponens muscles. The relative spindle abundance was the greatest in the opponens muscles which may coordinate fine movements. Except for the two opponens muscles, the rest of the thenar and hypothenar muscles could be used as whole muscle or half-muscle donors for muscle transplant. Our nerve map of the hand offers valuable guidance for hand reconstruction.

  15. Convergence of human brain mapping tools: neuronavigated TMS parameters and fMRI activity in the hand motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Diekhoff, Svenja; Wang, Ling E; Liuzzi, Gianpiero; Uludağ, Kamil; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are well-established tools for investigating the human motor system in-vivo. We here studied the relationship between movement-related fMRI signal changes in the primary motor cortex (M1) and electrophysiological properties of the hand motor area assessed with neuronavigated TMS in 17 healthy subjects. The voxel showing the highest task-related BOLD response in the left hand motor area during right hand movements was identified for each individual subject. This fMRI peak voxel in M1 served as spatial target for coil positioning during neuronavigated TMS. We performed correlation analyses between TMS parameters, BOLD signal estimates and effective connectivity parameters of M1 assessed with dynamic causal modeling (DCM). The results showed a negative correlation between the movement-related BOLD signal in left M1 and resting as well as active motor threshold (MT) obtained for left M1. The DCM analysis revealed that higher excitability of left M1 was associated with a stronger coupling between left supplementary motor area (SMA) and M1. Furthermore, BOLD activity in left M1 correlated with ipsilateral silent period (ISP), i.e. the stronger the task-related BOLD response in left M1, the higher interhemispheric inhibition effects targeting right M1. DCM analyses revealed a positive correlation between the coupling of left SMA with left M1 and the duration of ISP. The data show that TMS parameters assessed for the hand area of M1 do not only reflect the intrinsic properties at the stimulation site but also interactions with remote areas in the human motor system.

  16. Restoring cortical control of functional movement in a human with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Chad E; Shaikhouni, Ammar; Annetta, Nicholas V; Bockbrader, Marcia A; Friedenberg, David A; Nielson, Dylan M; Sharma, Gaurav; Sederberg, Per B; Glenn, Bradley C; Mysiw, W Jerry; Morgan, Austin G; Deogaonkar, Milind; Rezai, Ali R

    2016-05-12

    Millions of people worldwide suffer from diseases that lead to paralysis through disruption of signal pathways between the brain and the muscles. Neuroprosthetic devices are designed to restore lost function and could be used to form an electronic 'neural bypass' to circumvent disconnected pathways in the nervous system. It has previously been shown that intracortically recorded signals can be decoded to extract information related to motion, allowing non-human primates and paralysed humans to control computers and robotic arms through imagined movements. In non-human primates, these types of signal have also been used to drive activation of chemically paralysed arm muscles. Here we show that intracortically recorded signals can be linked in real-time to muscle activation to restore movement in a paralysed human. We used a chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode array to record multiunit activity from the motor cortex in a study participant with quadriplegia from cervical spinal cord injury. We applied machine-learning algorithms to decode the neuronal activity and control activation of the participant's forearm muscles through a custom-built high-resolution neuromuscular electrical stimulation system. The system provided isolated finger movements and the participant achieved continuous cortical control of six different wrist and hand motions. Furthermore, he was able to use the system to complete functional tasks relevant to daily living. Clinical assessment showed that, when using the system, his motor impairment improved from the fifth to the sixth cervical (C5-C6) to the seventh cervical to first thoracic (C7-T1) level unilaterally, conferring on him the critical abilities to grasp, manipulate, and release objects. This is the first demonstration to our knowledge of successful control of muscle activation using intracortically recorded signals in a paralysed human. These results have significant implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology

  17. Centre-surround organization of fast sensorimotor integration in human motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubbioso, Raffaele; Raffin, Estelle; Karabanov, Anke

    2017-01-01

    Using the short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor hand area (M1HAND) can probe how sensory input from limbs modulates corticomotor output in humans. Here we applied a novel TMS mapping approach to chart the spatial representat...... in M1HAND. Like homotopic SAI, heterotopic SAF was somatotopically expressed in M1HAND. Together, the results provide first-time evidence that fast sensorimotor integration involves centre-inhibition and surround-facilitation in human M1HAND....

  18. Modelling and monitoring of passive control structures in human movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemami, Hooshang; Hemami, Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Passive tissues, ligaments and cartilage are vital to human movement. Their contribution to stability, joint function and joint integrity is essential. The articulation of their functions and quantitative assessment of what they do in a healthy or injured state are important in athletics, orthopaedics, medicine and health. In this paper, the role of cartilage and ligaments in stability of natural contacts, connections and joints is articulated by including them in two very simple skeletal systems: one- and three-link rigid body systems. Based on the Newton-Euler equations, a state space presentation of the dynamics is discussed that allows inclusion of ligament and cartilage structures in the model, and allows for Lyapunov stability studies for the original and reduced systems. The connection constraints may be holonomic and non-holonomic depending on the structure of the passive elements. The development is pertinent to the eventual design of a computational framework for the study of human movement that involves computer models of all the relevant skeletal, neural and physiological elements of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a structure also permits testing of different hypotheses about the functional neuroanatomy of the CNS, and the study of the effects and dynamics of disease, deterioration, aging and injuries. The formulation here is applied to one- and three-link systems. Digital computer simulations of a two rigid body system are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach and the methods.

  19. Reorganization of human motor cortex after hand replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röricht, S; Machetanz, J; Irlbacher, K; Niehaus, L; Biemer, E; Meyer, B U

    2001-08-01

    In 10 patients, reorganizational changes of the motor cortex contralateral to a replanted hand (MCreplant) were studied one to 14 years after complete traumatic amputation and consecutive successful replantation of the hand. The organizational state of MCreplant was assessed for the deafferentated and peripherally deefferentated hand-associated motor cortex and the adjacent motor representation of the proximal arm. For this, response maps were established for the first dorsal interosseus and biceps brachii muscle using focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on a skull surface grid. Characteristics of the maps were center of gravity (COG), number of effective stimulation sites, amplitude sum, and amplitudes and response threshold at the optimal stimulation point. The COG is defined by the spatial distribution of response amplitudes on the map and lies over the cortex region with the most excitable corticospinal neurones supplying the recorded muscle. The COG of the biceps map in MCreplant was shifted laterally by 9.8 +/- 3.6 mm (range 5.0-15.7 mm). The extension of the biceps map in MCreplant was increased and the responses were enlarged and had lowered thresholds. For the muscles of the replanted hand, the pattern of reorganization was different: Response amplitudes were enlarged but thresholds, COG, and area of the cortical response map were normal. The different reorganizational phenomena observed for the motor cortical areas supplying the replanted hand and the biceps brachii of the same arm may be influenced by a different extent of deafferentation and by their different role in hand motor control.

  20. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans

    OpenAIRE

    Toma Cyril D; Kampf Guenter; Bieber Nora; Below Harald; Kramer Axel; Huebner Nils-Olaf; Assadian Ojan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the increasing promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs and the worldwide use of ethanol-based hand rubs in hospitals only few studies have specifically addressed the issue of ethanol absorption when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans. Methods Twelve volunteers applied t...

  1. Monosynaptic Ia projections from intrinsic hand muscles to forearm motoneurones in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Pauvert, V; Nicolas, G; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    2000-01-01

    Heteronymous Ia excitatory projections from intrinsic hand muscles to human forearm motoneurones (MNs) were investigated. Changes in firing probability of single motor units (MUs) in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) were studied after electrical stimuli were applied to the median and ulnar nerve at wrist level and to the corresponding homonymous nerve at elbow level.Homonymous facilitation, occurring at the same latency as the H reflex, and therefore attributed to monosynaptic Ia EPSPs, was found in all the sampled units. In many MUs an early facilitation was also evoked by heteronymous low-threshold afferents from intrinsic hand muscles. The low threshold (between 0.5 and 0.6 times motor threshold (MT)) and the inability of a pure cutaneous stimulation to reproduce this effect indicate that it is due to stimulation of group I muscle afferents.Evidence for a similar central delay (monosynaptic) in heteronymous as in homonymous pathways was accepted when the difference in latencies of the homonymous and heteronymous peaks did not differ from the estimated supplementary afferent conduction time from wrist to elbow level by more than 0.5 ms (conduction velocity in the fastest Ia afferents between wrist and elbow levels being equal to 69 m s−1).A statistically significant heteronymous monosynaptic Ia excitation from intrinsic hand muscles supplied by both median and ulnar nerves was found in MUs belonging to all forearm motor nuclei tested (although not in ECU MUs after ulnar stimulation). It was, however, more often found in flexors than in extensors, in wrist than in finger muscles and in muscles operating in the radial than in the ulnar side.It is argued that the connections of Ia afferents from intrinsic hand muscles to forearm MNs, which are stronger and more widely distributed than in the cat, might

  2. Electromyographic bridge for promoting the recovery of hand movements in subacute stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xuan Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The electromyographic bridge (EMGB detects surface electromyographic signals from a non-paretic limb. It then generates electric pulse trains according to the electromyographic time domain features, which can be used to stimulate a paralysed or paretic limb in real time. This strategy can be used for the contralateral control of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES to improve motor function after stroke. The aim of this study was to compare the treat-ment effects of EMGB vs cyclic NMES on wrist and finger impairments in subacute stroke patients. Methods: A total of 42 hemiplegic patients within 6 months of their cerebrovascular accidents were randomly assigned to 4-week treatments with EMGB or cyclic NMES. Each group underwent a standard rehabilitation programme and 10 sessions per week of hand training with EMGB or cyclic NMES. Outcome measures were: Brunnstrom stage, upper extremity components of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motor Status Scale, voluntary surface electromyographic ratio and active range of motion of the wrist and finger joints. Results: The EMGB group showed significantly greater improvements than the cyclic NMES group on the following measures: Brunnstrom stages for the hand, upper extremity – Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motor Status Scale, and the voluntary surface electromyographic ratio of wrist and finger extensors. Eleven and 4 participants of the EMGB group who had no active wrist and finger movements, respectively, at the start of the treatment could perform measurable wrist and finger extensions after EMGB training. The corresponding numbers in the cyclic NMES group were only 4 and 1. Conclusion: In the present group of subacute stroke patients, the results favour EMGB over cyclic NMES for augmenting the recovery of volitional wrist and finger motion.

  3. Reorganization of the Human Somatosensory Cortex in Hand Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Catalan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Abnormalities of finger representations in the somatosensory cortex have been identified in patients with focal hand dystonia. Measuring blood flow with positron emission tomography (PET can be use to demonstrate functional localization of receptive fields. Methods: A vibratory stimulus was applied to the right thumb and little finger of six healthy volunteers and six patients with focal hand dystonia to map their receptive fields using H215O PET. Results: The cortical finger representations in the primary somatosensory cortex were closer to each other in patients than in normal subjects. No abnormalities were found in secondary somatosensory cortex, but the somatotopy there is less well distinguished. Conclusions: These data confirm prior electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging observations showing abnormalities of finger representations in somatosensory cortex of patients with focal hand dystonia.

  4. Human Movement Detection and Identification Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseok Yun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric infrared (PIR sensors are widely used as a presence trigger, but the analog output of PIR sensors depends on several other aspects, including the distance of the body from the PIR sensor, the direction and speed of movement, the body shape and gait. In this paper, we present an empirical study of human movement detection and identification using a set of PIR sensors. We have developed a data collection module having two pairs of PIR sensors orthogonally aligned and modified Fresnel lenses. We have placed three PIR-based modules in a hallway for monitoring people; one module on the ceiling; two modules on opposite walls facing each other. We have collected a data set from eight subjects when walking in three different conditions: two directions (back and forth, three distance intervals (close to one wall sensor, in the middle, close to the other wall sensor and three speed levels (slow, moderate, fast. We have used two types of feature sets: a raw data set and a reduced feature set composed of amplitude and time to peaks; and passage duration extracted from each PIR sensor. We have performed classification analysis with well-known machine learning algorithms, including instance-based learning and support vector machine. Our findings show that with the raw data set captured from a single PIR sensor of each of the three modules, we could achieve more than 92% accuracy in classifying the direction and speed of movement, the distance interval and identifying subjects. We could also achieve more than 94% accuracy in classifying the direction, speed and distance and identifying subjects using the reduced feature set extracted from two pairs of PIR sensors of each of the three modules.

  5. Development of visual and somatosensory attention of the reach-to-eat movement in human infants aged 6 to 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Karl, Jenni M; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2012-11-01

    The reach-to-eat movement is a natural act in which an object or food item is grasped and brought to the mouth. It is one of the earliest forelimb behaviours displayed by human infants, who bring almost all grasped objects to the mouth, and is used daily by adults. In adults, there is a tight coupling between visual attention and the advance phase of the reach-to-eat movement. The target is visually engaged just as hand advance is initiated and visually disengaged just as the target is grasped. This coupling of vision and hand advance suggests that advance is mediated by visual attention and withdrawal by somatosensation. The present study examined when the tight coupling between visual attention and the advance phase of the movement develops in infancy. In a longitudinal study, eight infants, aged 6-12 months, and 20 adults reached for familiar inanimate objects and food items. Visual gaze, hand movement and hand accuracy were measured using frame-by-frame video scoring and 2D kinematic analysis. The study found that the youngest infants (6-8 months) visually engaged the target well before initiating a reaching movement and continued to fixate on the target after it was grasped and as it was brought to the mouth. Between 10 and 12 months of age, infants began to visually engage the target just as the reaching movement was initiated and visually disengaged the target as it was grasped, as did the adults. Over the same developmental time period, the infants developed rotatory hand shaping movements, precision grasping, and improved targeting accuracy both for grasping the object and placing it into the mouth. The results suggest that visual guidance of advance and somatosensory guidance of withdrawal develop together and in concert with hand movement ability and skill.

  6. Effects of observation of hand movements reflected in a mirror on cortical activation in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Moon-Young; Kim, Hwan-Hee; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Oh, Jae-Seop; Jang, Chel; Yoon, Tae-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine what changes occur in brain waves when patients with stroke receive mirror therapy intervention. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 14 patients with stroke (6 females and 8 males). The subjects were assessed by measuring the alpha and beta waves of the EEG (QEEG-32 system CANS 3000). The mirror therapy intervention was delivered over the course of four weeks (a total of 20 sessions). [Results] Relative alpha power showed statistically significant differences in the F3, F4, O1, and O2 channels in the situation comparison and higher for hand observation than for mirror observation. Relative beta power showed statistically significant differences in the F3, F4, C3, and C4 channels. [Conclusion] This study analyzed activity of the brain in each area when patients with stroke observed movements reflected in a mirror, and future research on diverse tasks and stimuli to heighten activity of the brain should be carried out.

  7. Decoding of human hand actions to handle missing limbs in Neuroprosthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana eBelic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The only way we can interact with the world is through movements, and our primary interactions are via the hands, thus any loss of hand function has immediate impact on our quality of life. However, to date it has not been systematically assessed how coordination in the hand's joints affects every day actions. This is important for two fundamental reasons. Firstly, to understand the representations and computations underlying motor control in-the-wild situations, and secondly to develop smarter controllers for prosthetic hands that have the same functionality as natural limbs. In this work we exploit the correlation structure of our hand and finger movements in daily-life. The novelty of our idea is that instead of averaging variability out, we take the view that the structure of variability may contain valuable information about the task being performed. We asked seven subjects to interact in 17 daily-life situations, and quantified behaviour in a principled manner using CyberGlove body sensor networks that, after accurate calibration, track all major joints of the hand. Our key findings are: 1. We confirmed that hand control in daily-life tasks is very low-dimensional, with four to five dimensions being sufficient to explain 80-90% of the variability in the natural movement data. 2. We established a universally applicable measure of manipulative complexity that allowed us to measure and compare limb movements across tasks. We used Bayesian latent variable models to model the low-dimensional structure of finger joint angles in natural actions. 3. This allowed us to build a naïve classifier that within the first 1000ms of action initiation (from a flat hand start configuration predicted which of the 17 actions was going to be executed - enabling us to reliably predict the action intention from very short-time-scale initial data, further revealing the foreseeable nature of hand movements for control of neuroprosthetics and tele operation

  8. The "Feeling of Movement": Notes on the Rorschach Human Movement Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Piero; Kleiger, James H

    2016-01-01

    Human movement responses (M) on the Rorschach have been traditionally viewed as lying neither completely in the inkblot (external reality) nor within the subject's mind (inner world). The authors contend that M is not reducible to the "body that I have" but to the "body that I am," which is a higher level organization of bottom-up and top-down brain networks, integrating body implicit awareness, psychological functioning, and social cognition. Two sources of evidence suggest the close relationship among M, psychological functions, and brain mechanisms. One comes from meta-analytical evidence supporting the close association between M and higher level cognitive functioning or empathy. The second comes from some preliminary studies showing that M activates brain circuits included in the mirror neuron system (MNS). Two conclusions can be drawn: (a) M is related to the effective use of the mentalization function; and (b) future neuroscientific investigations could lead to an understanding of the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying Rorschach responses and variables.

  9. Human movement training with a cable driven ARm EXoskeleton (CAREX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying; Jin, Xin; Gera Dutta, Geetanjali; Scholz, John P; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the authors have proposed lightweight exoskeleton designs for upper arm rehabilitation using multi-stage cable-driven parallel mechanism. Previously, the authors have demonstrated via experiments that it is possible to apply "assist-as-needed" forces in all directions at the end-effector with such an exoskeleton acting on an anthropomorphic machine arm. A human-exoskeleton interface was also presented to show the feasibility of CAREX on human subjects. The goals of this paper are to 1) further address issues when CAREX is mounted on human subjects, e.g., generation of continuous cable tension trajectories 2) demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of CAREX on movement training of healthy human subjects and a stroke patient. In this research, CAREX is rigidly attached to an arm orthosis worn by human subjects. The cable routing points are optimized to achieve a relatively large "tensioned" static workspace. A new cable tension planner based on quadratic programming is used to generate continuous cable tension trajectory for smooth motion. Experiments were carried out on eight healthy subjects. The experimental results show that CAREX can help the subjects move closer to a prescribed circular path using the force fields generated by the exoskeleton. The subjects also adapt to the path shortly after training. CAREX was also evaluated on a stroke patient to test the feasibility of its use on patients with neural impairment. The results show that the patient was able to move closer to a prescribed straight line path with the "assist-as-needed" force field.

  10. Ergonomic Evaluation of Biomechanical Hand Function

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyung-Sun; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The human hand is a complex structure that performs various functions for activities of daily living and occupations. This paper presents a literature review on the methodologies used to evaluate hand functions from a biomechanics standpoint, including anthropometry, kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG). Anthropometry describes the dimensions and measurements of the hand. Kinematics includes hand movements and the range of motion of finger joints. Kinetics includes hand models for...

  11. Patterns of Selection of Human Movements IV: Energy Efficiency, Mechanical Advantage, and Asynchronous Arm-Cranking

    OpenAIRE

    Hagler, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Human movements are physical processes combining the classical mechanics of the human body moving in space and the biomechanics of the muscles generating the forces acting on the body under sophisticated sensory-motor control. The characterization of the performance of human movements is a problem with important applications in clinical and sports research. One way to characterize movement performance is through measures of energy efficiency that relate the mechanical energy of the body and m...

  12. State-based decoding of hand and finger kinematics using neuronal ensemble and LFP activity during dexterous reach-to-grasp movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vikram; Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Davidson, Adam G; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-06-01

    The performance of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that continuously control upper limb neuroprostheses may benefit from distinguishing periods of posture and movement so as to prevent inappropriate movement of the prosthesis. Few studies, however, have investigated how decoding behavioral states and detecting the transitions between posture and movement could be used autonomously to trigger a kinematic decoder. We recorded simultaneous neuronal ensemble and local field potential (LFP) activity from microelectrode arrays in primary motor cortex (M1) and dorsal (PMd) and ventral (PMv) premotor areas of two male rhesus monkeys performing a center-out reach-and-grasp task, while upper limb kinematics were tracked with a motion capture system with markers on the dorsal aspect of the forearm, hand, and fingers. A state decoder was trained to distinguish four behavioral states (baseline, reaction, movement, hold), while a kinematic decoder was trained to continuously decode hand end point position and 18 joint angles of the wrist and fingers. LFP amplitude most accurately predicted transition into the reaction (62%) and movement (73%) states, while spikes most accurately decoded arm, hand, and finger kinematics during movement. Using an LFP-based state decoder to trigger a spike-based kinematic decoder [r = 0.72, root mean squared error (RMSE) = 0.15] significantly improved decoding of reach-to-grasp movements from baseline to final hold, compared with either a spike-based state decoder combined with a spike-based kinematic decoder (r = 0.70, RMSE = 0.17) or a spike-based kinematic decoder alone (r = 0.67, RMSE = 0.17). Combining LFP-based state decoding with spike-based kinematic decoding may be a valuable step toward the realization of BMI control of a multifingered neuroprosthesis performing dexterous manipulation.

  13. Comparison of Urban Human Movements Inferring from Multi-Source Spatial-Temporal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Tu, Wei; Cao, Jinzhou; Li, Qingquan

    2016-06-01

    The quantification of human movements is very hard because of the sparsity of traditional data and the labour intensive of the data collecting process. Recently, much spatial-temporal data give us an opportunity to observe human movement. This research investigates the relationship of city-wide human movements inferring from two types of spatial-temporal data at traffic analysis zone (TAZ) level. The first type of human movement is inferred from long-time smart card transaction data recording the boarding actions. The second type of human movement is extracted from citywide time sequenced mobile phone data with 30 minutes interval. Travel volume, travel distance and travel time are used to measure aggregated human movements in the city. To further examine the relationship between the two types of inferred movements, the linear correlation analysis is conducted on the hourly travel volume. The obtained results show that human movements inferred from smart card data and mobile phone data have a correlation of 0.635. However, there are still some non-ignorable differences in some special areas. This research not only reveals the citywide spatial-temporal human dynamic but also benefits the understanding of the reliability of the inference of human movements with big spatial-temporal data.

  14. COMPARISON OF URBAN HUMAN MOVEMENTS INFERRING FROM MULTI-SOURCE SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of human movements is very hard because of the sparsity of traditional data and the labour intensive of the data collecting process. Recently, much spatial-temporal data give us an opportunity to observe human movement. This research investigates the relationship of city-wide human movements inferring from two types of spatial-temporal data at traffic analysis zone (TAZ level. The first type of human movement is inferred from long-time smart card transaction data recording the boarding actions. The second type of human movement is extracted from citywide time sequenced mobile phone data with 30 minutes interval. Travel volume, travel distance and travel time are used to measure aggregated human movements in the city. To further examine the relationship between the two types of inferred movements, the linear correlation analysis is conducted on the hourly travel volume. The obtained results show that human movements inferred from smart card data and mobile phone data have a correlation of 0.635. However, there are still some non-ignorable differences in some special areas. This research not only reveals the citywide spatial-temporal human dynamic but also benefits the understanding of the reliability of the inference of human movements with big spatial-temporal data.

  15. The role of human movement in the transmission of vector-borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Stoddard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human movement is a key behavioral factor in many vector-borne disease systems because it influences exposure to vectors and thus the transmission of pathogens. Human movement transcends spatial and temporal scales with different influences on disease dynamics. Here we develop a conceptual model to evaluate the importance of variation in exposure due to individual human movements for pathogen transmission, focusing on mosquito-borne dengue virus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We develop a model showing that the relevance of human movement at a particular scale depends on vector behavior. Focusing on the day-biting Aedes aegypti, we illustrate how vector biting behavior combined with fine-scale movements of individual humans engaged in their regular daily routine can influence transmission. Using a simple example, we estimate a transmission rate (R(0 of 1.3 when exposure is assumed to occur only in the home versus 3.75 when exposure at multiple locations--e.g., market, friend's--due to movement is considered. Movement also influences for which sites and individuals risk is greatest. For the example considered, intriguingly, our model predicts little correspondence between vector abundance in a site and estimated R(0 for that site when movement is considered. This illustrates the importance of human movement for understanding and predicting the dynamics of a disease like dengue. To encourage investigation of human movement and disease, we review methods currently available to study human movement and, based on our experience studying dengue in Peru, discuss several important questions to address when designing a study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Human movement is a critical, understudied behavioral component underlying the transmission dynamics of many vector-borne pathogens. Understanding movement will facilitate identification of key individuals and sites in the transmission of pathogens such as dengue, which then may provide

  16. Hand to hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Susanna E; Graboys, Thomas B

    2002-08-01

    Examination of the hands has the potential to transform the encounter between physician and patient. Taking the hands conveys a sense of warmth and connectedness and is a means to communicate the physician's mindfulness. The hands can focus the examination on the individual patient as a complete human being, and not merely a disease or a collection of symptoms. The hands provide readily accessible information that may not be available through other evaluations, and they offer clues to a patient's physical and mental health. Commonplace observations, such as those revealed in the hands, can unravel medical mysteries and provide profound clinical insights.

  17. Hand posture classification using electrocorticography signals in the gamma band over human sensorimotor brain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H.; Foster, Brett L.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Parvizi, Josef; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface systems translate recorded neural signals into command signals for assistive technology. In individuals with upper limb amputation or cervical spinal cord injury, the restoration of a useful hand grasp could significantly improve daily function. We sought to determine if electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain sufficient information to select among multiple hand postures for a prosthetic hand, orthotic, or functional electrical stimulation system.Approach. We recorded ECoG signals from subdural macro- and microelectrodes implanted in motor areas of three participants who were undergoing inpatient monitoring for diagnosis and treatment of intractable epilepsy. Participants performed five distinct isometric hand postures, as well as four distinct finger movements. Several control experiments were attempted in order to remove sensory information from the classification results. Online experiments were performed with two participants. Main results. Classification rates were 68%, 84% and 81% for correct identification of 5 isometric hand postures offline. Using 3 potential controls for removing sensory signals, error rates were approximately doubled on average (2.1×). A similar increase in errors (2.6×) was noted when the participant was asked to make simultaneous wrist movements along with the hand postures. In online experiments, fist versus rest was successfully classified on 97% of trials; the classification output drove a prosthetic hand. Online classification performance for a larger number of hand postures remained above chance, but substantially below offline performance. In addition, the long integration windows used would preclude the use of decoded signals for control of a BCI system. Significance. These results suggest that ECoG is a plausible source of command signals for prosthetic grasp selection. Overall, avenues remain for improvement through better electrode designs and placement, better participant training

  18. Android Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . On such occasions, android and humanoid hand models should have similar structure, functions, and performance as the human hand. In this paper we present the anatomy, and the key functionalities of the human hand followed by a literature review on android/humanoid hands for grasping and manipulating objects...

  19. HUMAN NATURE, DIRTY HANDS AND SOCIAL DISORDER: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ike

    problems and various forms of immorality. Every society desires ..... 2(c) Human Nature and Machiavellian Challenge. Politics, in the .... salary (enforcing the laws against tax evasion with threats of .... shares something of the others concerns.

  20. Different distal-proximal movement balances in right- and left-hand writing may hint at differential premotor cortex involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgieser, A. R. E.; de Jong, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Right-handed people generally write with their right hand. Language expressed in script is thus performed with the hand also preferred for skilled motor tasks. This may suggest an efficient functional interaction between the language area of Broca and the adjacent ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in th

  1. Different distal-proximal movement balances in right- and left-hand writing may hint at differential premotor cortex involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgieser, A. R. E.; de Jong, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Right-handed people generally write with their right hand. Language expressed in script is thus performed with the hand also preferred for skilled motor tasks. This may suggest an efficient functional interaction between the language area of Broca and the adjacent ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in th

  2. COMPARING PUMA ROBOT ARM WITH THE HUMAN ARM MOVEMENTS; AN ALTERNATIVE ROBOTIC ARM SHOULDER DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa BOZDEMİR; ADIGÜZEL, Esat

    1999-01-01

    Using the robotic arms instead of human power becomes increasingly widespread nowadays. Widening of the robotic arms usage field is parallel to improvement of movement capability of it. In this study PUMA Robotic Arm System that is a developed system of the robotic arms was compared with a human arm due to movement. A new joint was added to PUMA Robotic Arm System to have the movements similar to the human shoulder joint. Thus, a shoulder was designed that can make movements through the sides...

  3. Long-lasting contralateral motor cortex excitability is increased by unilateral hand movement that triggers electrical stimulation of opposite homologous muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthew W; Hinder, Mark R; Summers, Jeffery J; Garry, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Long-term changes in the motor cortex can be induced by practicing motor tasks with simultaneous application of peripheral nerve stimulation. This combination may augment motor rehabilitation after stroke but has been used primarily during contraction of the affected hand. The authors tested the effect of a right hand movement that electrically stimulated left hand contraction on right motor cortex excitability. Three tasks were used in 15 healthy subjects--a motor and stimulation task (MS(task)), stimulation only task (S(task)), and motor only task (M(task)). The MS(task) consisted of isometric thumb abduction of the right hand that triggered paired electrical stimulation of the left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseus (FDI) motor points. The S(task) was performed 1 week later and matched the stimulation received in the MS(task). The M(task) was performed as a control. Transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the right motor cortex assessed corticospinal excitability, short latency intracortical inhibition, and intracortical facilitation of the FDI and APB before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after task performance. Corticospinal excitability increased in the FDI and APB following the MS(task) but not following the S(task) or M(task). The increased excitability present 30 minutes after the MS(task) also correlated with excitability measures recorded 1 week later. A bilateral motor and electrical stimulation task can drive persistent adaptation within the corticospinal system. Hemiplegic subjects who have poor voluntary movement of the affected hand may be able to contract the unaffected hand to activate and train homologous movements.

  4. Limitations of surface EMG signals of extrinsic muscles in predicting postures of human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinjamuri, Ramana; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert; Sun, Mingui

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the limitations of sEMG (surface Electromyography) signals collected from the extrinsic muscles in the forearm in predicting the postures of human hand. Four subjects were asked to try ten extreme postures of hand which need high effort. Two of these four subjects were asked to try ten more normal postures which did not need effort During the experiments, muscle activity and static postures of the hand were measured. The data obtained were analyzed by principal component analysis. The results obtained revealed the limitations of sEMG signals of extrinsic muscles in reproducing the postures of the hand.

  5. Stuck in Traffic: Sexual Politics and Criminal Injustice in Social Movements Against Human Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, Edith Celine Marie

    2011-01-01

    Stuck in Traffic: Sexual Politics and Criminal Injustice in Social Movements Against Human TraffickingThis dissertation analyzes the sexual politics of transnational movements against human trafficking. I track the periodic securitization of women's migration and commercial sexual exploitation in international affairs from the Victorian-era movement against "White Slavery" to the contemporary campaign against "modern day slavery" and sex trafficking, using the case of Thailand to investigate ...

  6. Proprioception contributes to the sense of agency during visual observation of hand movements: evidence from temporal judgments of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Cole, Jonathan; Miall, R Chris

    2007-01-01

    The ability to recognize visually one's own movement is important for motor control and, through attribution of agency, for social interactions. Agency of actions may be decided by comparisons of visual feedback, efferent signals, and proprioceptive inputs. Because the ability to identify one's own...... visual feedback from passive movements is decreased relative to active movements, or in some cases is even absent, the role of proprioception in self-recognition has been questioned. Proprioception during passive and active movements may, however, differ, and so to address any role for proprioception...... synchronously or asynchronously with a random delay, and reported whether or not they felt they controlled the cursor. Movement accuracy was matched between groups. In the absence of proprioception, I.W. was less able than the control group to discriminate self- from computer-produced cursor movement based...

  7. Higher precision in pointing movements of the preferred vs. non-preferred hand is associated with an earlier occurrence of anticipatory postural adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bruttini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is a common experience to exhibit a greater dexterity when performing a pointing movement with the preferred limb vs. the non-preferred one. Here we provide evidence that the higher precision in pointing movements of the preferred vs. non-preferred hand is associated with an earlier occurrence of the Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs.In this aim, we compared the APAs which stabilize the left or the right arm when performing a pen-pointing movement (prime mover Flexor Carpi Radialis. Moreover, we analysed the elbow and wrist kinematics as well as the precision of the pointing movement. The mean kinematics of wrist movement and its latency, with respect to prime mover recruitment, were similar in the two sides, while APAs in Triceps Brachii, Biceps Brachii and Anterior Deltoid were more anticipated when movements were performed with the preferred than with the non-preferred hand (60-70 vs. 20-30 ms. APAs amplitudes were comparable in the muscles of the two sides. Earlier APAs in the preferred limb were associated with a better fixation of the elbow, which showed a lower excursion, and with a less scattered pointing error (preferred: 10.1 ± 0.8 mm; non-preferred: 16.3 ± 1.7.Present results suggest that, by securing the more proximal joints dynamics, an appropriate timing of the intra-limb APAs is necessary for refining the voluntary movement precision, which is known to be scarce on the non-preferred side.

  8. The European Romani Women's Movement: The struggle for human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Izsák

    2009-01-01

    Rita Izsák discusses the International Romani Women's Network (IRWN), the first registered international umbrella organization representing Romani women of all European Romani groups. She examines how IRWN is promoting women's rights, and the connection between mainstream feminist movements and the Romani movement. Development (2009) 52, 200–207. doi:10.1057/dev.2009.9

  9. New hand at the helm of CERN Human Resources

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Human resources is more than just an administrative function, said CERN's new HR Department head, Carla Bryois, in an interview with the Bulletin. Human resources management is about getting the best out of an organization's staff. That's good for the organisation as a whole, and it's good for the individual. A suitable task for a psychologist, you might think? And that's exactly the kind of person who has just taken over as head of CERN's Human Resources Department. Carla Bryois, who has Dutch and Swiss nationality, took up her duties on 1 April, and brings with her a wealth of experience from the private sector. Her career began with a degree in psychology and social sciences from the Geneva school made famous by Jean Piaget. From there, she went on to specialise in clinical psychology before taking a career break to raise a family. Carla Bryois, CERN's new HR Department head Returning to work, she moved from academic to occupational psychology, taking up a position in human resources with Elsevier scien...

  10. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-01-01

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

  11. Signs of muscle thixotropy during human ballistic wrist joint movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, H W

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted on healthy subjects to determine whether voluntary ballistic wrist flexion movements are influenced by immediately preceding conditioning of the forearm muscles. Single rapid wrist flexion movements were made in response to an auditory "Go" signal. Rectified surface EMG was recorded from wrist flexors and extensors, and joint position was measured by a goniometer. The movements were preceded (2-3 s) by four different conditioning routines: 40-s rest (Rest), 10-s voluntary alternating wrist joint flexion and extension movements (Osc), and 10 s of 25 degrees weak isometric wrist extensor (Ext) or flexor contractions (Flex). When subjects made ballistic movements after Osc compared with Rest, peak velocity was higher (P = 0.02) and movement time shorter (P = 0.06), but there was no difference (P = 0.83) in motor reaction time (time between the onset of the first agonist burst and movement onset). If the movements were preceded by Ext compared with Flex, motor reaction time was longer (P = 0.01), indicating a longer electromechanical delay. There were no indications that postconditioning differences in agonist or antagonist muscle activity could explain the results. It was also demonstrated that, after Rest, peak velocity was lower (P < 0.01) for the first than for the second of a series of repetitive ballistic movements. The observations corresponded to results from passive experiments in which the median nerve was electrically stimulated. In conclusion, history-dependent (thixotropic) changes in skeletal muscle resistance seem to have implications for voluntary ballistic wrist movements. The study also provided evidence that muscle conditioning influences the central nervous reaction time preceding ballistic contractions.

  12. Single treatment with ethanol hand rub is ineffective against human rhinovirus--hand washing with soap and water removes the virus efficiently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Korpela, Terttu; Simonen-Tikka, Marja-Leena; Amiryousefi, Ali; Ziegler, Thedi; Roivainen, Merja; Hovi, Tapani

    2012-03-01

    Ethanol-containing hand rubs are used frequently as a substitute for hand washing with water and soap. However, not all viruses are inactivated by a short term rubbing with alcohol. The capacity of a single round of instructed and controlled hand cleaning with water and soap or ethanol-containing hand rub, respectively, was tested for removal of human rhinovirus administered onto the skin of healthy volunteers on the back of the hands. Hand washing with soap and water appeared to be much more efficient for removing rhinoviruses from skin than rubbing hands with an ethanol-containing disinfectant. After washing with soap and water the virus was detected in 3/9 (33.3%) test persons from the left hand and 1/9 (11.1%) cases from the right hand, whereas the virus was detected invariably by real-time RT-PCR from both hands after cleaning with alcohol hand rub (P-value soap can clean efficiently hands contaminated with the virus responsible for an extensive share of common cold episodes.

  13. Human-Computer Interaction Based on Hand Gestures Using RGB-D Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Llorente

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new method for hand gesture recognition based on an RGB-D sensor. The proposed approach takes advantage of depth information to cope with the most common problems of traditional video-based hand segmentation methods: cluttered backgrounds and occlusions. The algorithm also uses colour and semantic information to accurately identify any number of hands present in the image. Ten different static hand gestures are recognised, including all different combinations of spread fingers. Additionally, movements of an open hand are followed and 6 dynamic gestures are identified. The main advantage of our approach is the freedom of the user’s hands to be at any position of the image without the need of wearing any specific clothing or additional devices. Besides, the whole method can be executed without any initial training or calibration. Experiments carried out with different users and in different environments prove the accuracy and robustness of the method which, additionally, can be run in real-time.

  14. Ergonomic Evaluation of Biomechanical Hand Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Sun Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The human hand is a complex structure that performs various functions for activities of daily living and occupations. This paper presents a literature review on the methodologies used to evaluate hand functions from a biomechanics standpoint, including anthropometry, kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG. Anthropometry describes the dimensions and measurements of the hand. Kinematics includes hand movements and the range of motion of finger joints. Kinetics includes hand models for tendon and joint force analysis. EMG is used on hand muscles associated with hand functions and with signal-processing technology.

  15. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Cyril D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the increasing promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs and the worldwide use of ethanol-based hand rubs in hospitals only few studies have specifically addressed the issue of ethanol absorption when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans. Methods Twelve volunteers applied three hand-rubs containing 95% (hand-rub A, 85% (hand-rub B and 55% ethanol (hand-rub C; all w/w. For hygienic hand disinfection, 4 mL were applied 20 times for 30 s, with 1 minute break between applications. For surgical hand disinfection, 20 mL of each hand rub was applied to hands and arms up to the level of the elbow 10 times for 3 minutes, with a break of 5 minutes between applications. Blood concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde were determined immediately prior and up to 90 minutes after application using head space gas chromatography. Results The median of absorbed ethanol after hygienic hand disinfection was 1365 mg (A, 630 mg (B, and 358 mg (C. The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 2.3% (A, 1.1% (B, and 0.9% (C. After surgical hand disinfection, the median of absorbed ethanol was 1067 mg (A, 1542 mg (B, and 477 mg (C. The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 0.7% (A, 1.1% (B, and 0.5% (C. The highest median acetaldehyde concentration after 20 hygienic hand disinfections was 0.57 mg/L (hand-rub C, after 30 min, after 10 surgical hand disinfections 3.99 mg/L (hand-rub A, after 20 minutes. Conclusion The overall dermal and pulmonary absorption of ethanol was below toxic levels in humans and allows the conclusion that the use of the evaluated ethanol-based hand-rubs is safe.

  16. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  17. How vertical hand movements impact brain activity elicited by literally and metaphorically related words: an ERP study of embodied metaphor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bardolph, Megan; Coulson, Seana

    2014-01-01

    ... task involving either upward- or downward- directed arm movements. ERPs were time-locked to words associated with vertical space-either literally (ascend, descend) or metaphorically (inspire, defeat...

  18. Patterns of Selection of Human Movements III: Energy Efficiency, Mechanical Advantage, and Walking Gait

    OpenAIRE

    Hagler, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Human movements are physical processes combining the classical mechanics of the human body moving in space and the biomechanics of the muscles generating the forces acting on the body under sophisticated sensory-motor control. One way to characterize movement performance is through measures of energy efficiency that relate the mechanical energy of the body and metabolic energy expended by the muscles. We expect the practical utility of such measures to be greater when human subjects execute m...

  19. Hand hygiene compliance in Penang, Malaysia: Human audits versus product usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew Fong; Merican, Hassan; Nallusamy, Revathy; Ong, Loke Meng; Mohamed Nazir, Paa; Hamzah, Hafizah Binti; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2016-06-01

    Hand hygiene auditing is mandatory for all Malaysian public hospitals; nonetheless, the burden of auditing is impacting the support and sustainability of the program. We report an alternative method to routinely measure hand hygiene compliance with the aim to test whether alcohol-based handrub purchase data could be used as a proxy for usage because human auditing has decreased validity and reliability inherent in the methodology.

  20. Human mitochondrial mTERF wraps around DNA through a left-handed superhelical tandem repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Menéndez, Nereida; Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Arnan, Carme; Montoya, Julio; Jacobs, Howard T; Bernadó, Pau; Coll, Miquel; Usón, Isabel; Solà, Maria

    2010-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) processes is slowly being characterized at a structural level. We present here crystal structures of human mitochondrial regulator mTERF, a transcription termination factor also implicated in replication pausing, in complex with double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene sequence. mTERF comprises nine left-handed helical tandem repeats that form a left-handed superhelix, the Zurdo domain.

  1. Hand Shape Recognition in Human Machine Interaction through the Singularity Detection with Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinwen; Chen, Yanling; Qin, Hequn; Guo, Junjie

    This paper represents a hand shapes recognition system for the Human Machine Interaction (HMI) with service robot of disable people. This system uses a touchpad to precept the touching of fingers, as well as to provide a background for hand shapes image. Each finger can stay in one of the 4 statuses: stretch- touching on the pad, retracting-touching on the pad, stretch-detaching over the pad and retracting-detaching over the pad. Hand shapes, posed to express HMI instructions, are defined by the status combinations of Index finger, Middle finger, Ring finger and Little finger. Hand shape features, the relative heights of the fingertips, are extracted through the singularity detection with wavelet transform on hand shape contour. The hand shape recognition of this system is based on an optimized Bayesian decision binary tree. The design of 2 types of classifier in the tree and the corresponding error rates of the classifiers are analyzed. Implemented by a DSP processor, a correctness ratio of over 98% is obtained in the identification of 12 hand shapes. Experiments show that this system can provide a flexible, humanized and expendable HMI for service robot, as well as for other applications.

  2. Human hyolaryngeal movements show adaptive motor learning during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Ianessa A; Christopherson, Heather; Lokhande, Akshay; German, Rebecca; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Marlis; Celnik, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    The hyoid bone and larynx elevate to protect the airway during swallowing. However, it is unknown whether hyolaryngeal movements during swallowing can adjust and adapt to predict the presence of a persistent perturbation in a feed-forward manner (adaptive motor learning). We investigated adaptive motor learning in nine healthy adults. Electrical stimulation was administered to the anterior neck to reduce hyolaryngeal elevation, requiring more strength to swallow during the perturbation period of this study. We assessed peak hyoid bone and laryngeal movements using videofluoroscopy across thirty-five 5-ml water swallows. Evidence of adaptive motor learning of hyolaryngeal movements was found when (1) participants showed systematic gradual increases in elevation against the force of electrical stimulation and (2) hyolaryngeal elevation overshot the baseline (preperturbation) range of motion, showing behavioral aftereffects, when the perturbation was unexpectedly removed. Hyolaryngeal kinematics demonstrates adaptive, error-reducing movements in the presence of changing and unexpected demands. This is significant because individuals with dysphagia often aspirate due to disordered hyolaryngeal movements. Thus, if rapid motor learning is accessible during swallowing in healthy adults, patients may be taught to predict the presence of perturbations and reduce errors in swallowing before they occur.

  3. Real Time Multiple Hand Gesture Recognition System for Human Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth S. Rautaray

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing use of computing devices in day to day life, the need of user friendly interfaces has lead towards the evolution of different types of interfaces for human computer interaction. Real time vision based hand gesture recognition affords users the ability to interact with computers in more natural and intuitive ways. Direct use of hands as an input device is an attractive method which can communicate much more information by itself in comparison to mice, joysticks etc allowing a greater number of recognition system that can be used in a variety of human computer interaction applications. The gesture recognition system consist of three main modules like hand segmentation, hand tracking and gesture recognition from hand features. The designed system further integrated with different applications like image browser, virtual game etc. possibilities for human computer interaction. Computer Vision based systems has the potential to provide more natural, non-contact solutions. The present research work focuses on to design and develops a practical framework for real time hand gesture.

  4. Efficient Avoidance of the Penalty Zone in Human Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeuwes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    People use eye movements extremely effectively to find objects of interest in a cluttered visual scene. Distracting, task-irrelevant attention capturing regions in the visual field should be avoided as they jeopardize the efficiency of search. In the current study, we used eye tracking to determine whether people are able to avoid making saccades to a predetermined visual area associated with a financial penalty, while making fast and accurate saccades towards stimuli placed near the penalty area. We found that in comparison to the same task without a penalty area, the introduction of a penalty area immediately affected eye movement behaviour: the proportion of saccades to the penalty area was immediately reduced. Also, saccadic latencies increased, but quite modestly, and mainly for saccades towards stimuli near the penalty area. We conclude that eye movement behaviour is under efficient cognitive control and thus quite flexible: it can immediately be adapted to changing environmental conditions to improve reward outcome. PMID:27930724

  5. Democratising Democracy, Humanising Human Rights. European Decolonial Movements and the “Alternative Thinking of Alternatives"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Krabbe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    des Indigènes de la République (PIR) in France, the Dutch Black Movement, the Islamic Human Rights Commission in the UK, and the Studies Group of the Andalusian Workers' Union (Grupo de Estudios - Sindicato Andaluz de Trabajadores; GE-SAT). These movements all point to two fundamental crises of longue...

  6. Diagram of Calcium Movement in the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This diagram shows the normal pathways of calcium movement in the body and indicates changes (green arrows) seen during preliminary space flight experiments. Calcium plays a central role because 1) it gives strength and structure to bone and 2) all types of cells require it to function normally. To better understand how and why weightlessness induces bone loss, astronauts have participated in a study of calcium kinetics -- that is, the movement of calcium through the body, including absorption from food, and its role in the formation and breakdown of bone.

  7. A novel EOG/EEG hybrid human-machine interface adopting eye movements and ERPs: application to robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiaxin; Zhang, Yu; Cichocki, Andrzej; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a novel human-machine interface (HMI) based on both electrooculography (EOG) and electroencephalography (EEG). This hybrid interface works in two modes: an EOG mode recognizes eye movements such as blinks, and an EEG mode detects event related potentials (ERPs) like P300. While both eye movements and ERPs have been separately used for implementing assistive interfaces, which help patients with motor disabilities in performing daily tasks, the proposed hybrid interface integrates them together. In this way, both the eye movements and ERPs complement each other. Therefore, it can provide a better efficiency and a wider scope of application. In this study, we design a threshold algorithm that can recognize four kinds of eye movements including blink, wink, gaze, and frown. In addition, an oddball paradigm with stimuli of inverted faces is used to evoke multiple ERP components including P300, N170, and VPP. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, two different online experiments are carried out. One is to control a multifunctional humanoid robot, and the other is to control four mobile robots. In both experiments, the subjects can complete tasks effectively by using the proposed interface, whereas the best completion time is relatively short and very close to the one operated by hand.

  8. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  9. Human left ventral premotor cortex mediates matching of hand posture to object use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Vingerhoets

    Full Text Available Visuomotor transformations for grasping have been associated with a fronto-parietal network in the monkey brain. The human homologue of the parietal monkey region (AIP has been identified as the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, whereas the putative human equivalent of the monkey frontal region (F5 is located in the ventral part of the premotor cortex (vPMC. Results from animal studies suggest that monkey F5 is involved in the selection of appropriate hand postures relative to the constraints of the task. In humans, the functional roles of aIPS and vPMC appear to be more complex and the relative contribution of each region to grasp selection remains uncertain. The present study aimed to identify modulation in brain areas sensitive to the difficulty level of tool object - hand posture matching. Seventeen healthy right handed participants underwent fMRI while observing pictures of familiar tool objects followed by pictures of hand postures. The task was to decide whether the hand posture matched the functional use of the previously shown object. Conditions were manipulated for level of difficulty. Compared to a picture matching control task, the tool object - hand posture matching conditions conjointly showed increased modulation in several left hemispheric regions of the superior and inferior parietal lobules (including aIPS, the middle occipital gyrus, and the inferior temporal gyrus. Comparison of hard versus easy conditions selectively modulated the left inferior frontal gyrus with peak activity located in its opercular part (Brodmann area (BA 44. We suggest that in the human brain, vPMC/BA44 is involved in the matching of hand posture configurations in accordance with visual and functional demands.

  10. Are there right hemisphere contributions to visually-guided movement? : Manipulating left hand reaction time advantages in dextrals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, David P; Otto-de Haart, E Grace; Buckingham, Gavin; Dijkerman, H Chris; Hargreaves, Eric L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have argued for distinct but complementary contributions from each hemisphere in the control of movements to visual targets. Investigators have attempted to extend observations from patients with unilateral left- and right-hemisphere damage, to those using neurologically-intact particip

  11. Demonstration of Motor Imagery- and Phantom-Movement Related Neuronal Activity in Human Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, William S.; Weiss, Nirit; Lawson, Herman Christopher; Ohara, Shinji; Rowland, Lance; Lenz, Frederick A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional imaging studies demonstrate that motor imagery activates multiple structures in the human forebrain. We now show that phantom movements in an amputee and imagined movements in intact subjects elicit responses from neurons in several human thalamic nuclei. These include the somatic sensory nucleus receiving input from the periphery (ventral caudal – Vc), and the motor nuclei receiving input from the cerebellum (ventral intermediate -Vim) and the basal ganglia (ventral oral posterior...

  12. J.-M. G. Itard's 1825 study: movement and the science of the human mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sara

    2010-03-01

    Jean-Marc Gaspard Itard's 1825'Study of several involuntary functions of the apparatus of movement,gripping, and voice' discusses 10 individuals with uncontrolled movements but no other significant impairments.Thus, otherwise normal people move in inappropriate ways against their better judgement. Although the study contains the first clinical description of Tourette Syndrome, it has received little attention beyond that notice. Examined in its entirety and in its cultural context, Itard's study characterizes patients' movements in terms of the will, propriety, animals and gender. Lacking control over their movements, the individuals are underdeveloped humans. Accordingly, sufferers' facial expression, bodily movements and unplanned vocalizations render them more animal than human and more deviant than normal, although they are neither insane nor evil.

  13. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Christian T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; van der Spek, J.H.; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need

  14. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Chris T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; Spek, van der Jaap; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need

  15. Meditative Movement as a Treatment for Pulmonary Dysfunction in Flight Attendants Exposed to Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Peter; Zava,David; Fiering, Steven; Crane-Godreau, Mardi

    2016-01-01

    A study protocol is presented for the investigation of meditative movement (MM) as a treatment for pulmonary dysfunction in flight attendants (FA) who were exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke while flying before the smoking ban. The study will have three parts, some of which will run concurrently. The first is a data gathering and screening phase, which will gather data on pulmonary and other aspects of the health of FA, and will also serve to screen participants for the other phases. Seco...

  16. Deterministic and stochastic features of rhythmic human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Anke M; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J

    2006-03-01

    The dynamics of rhythmic movement has both deterministic and stochastic features. We advocate a recently established analysis method that allows for an unbiased identification of both types of system components. The deterministic components are revealed in terms of drift coefficients and vector fields, while the stochastic components are assessed in terms of diffusion coefficients and ellipse fields. The general principles of the procedure and its application are explained and illustrated using simulated data from known dynamical systems. Subsequently, we exemplify the method's merits in extracting deterministic and stochastic aspects of various instances of rhythmic movement, including tapping, wrist cycling and forearm oscillations. In particular, it is shown how the extracted numerical forms can be analysed to gain insight into the dependence of dynamical properties on experimental conditions.

  17. Three-dimensional optical topography of brain activity in infants watching videos of human movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Teresa; Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Everdell, Nick; Blasi, Anna; Elwell, Clare; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Gibson, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We present 3D optical topography images reconstructed from data obtained previously while infants observed videos of adults making natural movements of their eyes and hands. The optical topography probe was placed over the temporal cortex, which in adults is responsible for cognitive processing of similar stimuli. Increases in oxyhaemoglobin were measured and reconstructed using a multispectral imaging algorithm with spatially variant regularization to optimize depth discrimination. The 3D optical topography images suggest that similar brain regions are activated in infants and adults. Images were presented showing the distribution of activation in a plane parallel to the surface, as well as changes in activation with depth. The time-course of activation was followed in the pixel which demonstrated the largest change, showing that changes could be measured with high temporal resolution. These results suggest that infants a few months old have regions which are specialized for reacting to human activity, and that these subtle changes can be effectively analysed using 3D optical topography.

  18. Rotated balance in humans due to repetitive rotational movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, M S; Milla, J Madera; De Durana, A López Diaz; Martínez, C A Cordente; Romo, G Rodríguez; Quintana, M Sillero; Molinuevo, J Sampedro

    2010-03-01

    We show how asymmetries in the movement patterns during the process of regaining balance after perturbation from quiet stance can be modeled by a set of coupled vector fields for the derivative with respect to time of the angles between the resultant ground reaction forces and the vertical in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. In our model, which is an adaption of the model of Stirling and Zakynthinaki (2004), the critical curve, defining the set of maximum angles one can lean to and still correct to regain balance, can be rotated and skewed so as to model the effects of a repetitive training of a rotational movement pattern. For the purposes of our study a rotation and a skew matrix is applied to the critical curve of the model. We present here a linear stability analysis of the modified model, as well as a fit of the model to experimental data of two characteristic "asymmetric" elite athletes and to a "symmetric" elite athlete for comparison. The new adapted model has many uses not just in sport but also in rehabilitation, as many work place injuries are caused by excessive repetition of unaligned and rotational movement patterns.

  19. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  20. Oral and Hand Movement Speeds Are Associated with Expressive Language Ability in Children with Speech Sound Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD…

  1. Oral and Hand Movement Speeds Are Associated with Expressive Language Ability in Children with Speech Sound Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD…

  2. How vertical hand movements impact brain activity elicited by literally and metaphorically related words: an ERP study of embodied metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardolph, Megan; Coulson, Seana

    2014-01-01

    Embodied metaphor theory suggests abstract concepts are metaphorically linked to more experientially basic ones and recruit sensorimotor cortex for their comprehension. To test whether words associated with spatial attributes reactivate traces in sensorimotor cortex, we recorded EEG from the scalp of healthy adults as they read words while performing a concurrent task involving either upward- or downward- directed arm movements. ERPs were time-locked to words associated with vertical space-either literally (ascend, descend) or metaphorically (inspire, defeat)-as participants made vertical movements that were either congruent or incongruent with the words. Congruency effects emerged 200-300 ms after word onset for literal words, but not until after 500 ms post-onset for metaphorically related words. Results argue against a strong version of embodied metaphor theory, but support a role for sensorimotor simulation in concrete language.

  3. How Vertical Hand Movements Impact Brain Activity Elicited by Literally and Metaphorically Related Words: An ERP Study of Embodied Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan eBardolph

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodied metaphor theory suggests abstract concepts are metaphorically linked to more experientially basic ones and recruit sensorimotor cortex for their comprehension. To test whether words associated with spatial attributes reactivate traces in sensorimotor cortex, we recorded EEG from the scalp of healthy adults as they read words with while performing a concurrent task involving either upward- or downward- directed arm movements. ERPs were time-locked to words associated with vertical space – either literally (ascend, descend or metaphorically (inspire, defeat – as participants made vertical movements that were either congruent or incongruent with the words. Congruency effects emerged 200-300ms after word onset for literal words, but not until after 500ms post-onset for metaphorically related words. Results argue against a strong version of embodied metaphor theory, but support a role for sensorimotor simulation in concrete language.

  4. Movement Induces the Use of External Spatial Coordinates for Tactile Localization in Congenitally Blind Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heed, Tobias; Möller, Johanna; Röder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    To localize touch, the brain integrates spatial information coded in anatomically based and external spatial reference frames. Sighted humans, by default, use both reference frames in tactile localization. In contrast, congenitally blind individuals have been reported to rely exclusively on anatomical coordinates, suggesting a crucial role of the visual system for tactile spatial processing. We tested whether the use of external spatial information in touch can, alternatively, be induced by a movement context. Sighted and congenitally blind humans performed a tactile temporal order judgment task that indexes the use of external coordinates for tactile localization, while they executed bimanual arm movements with uncrossed and crossed start and end postures. In the sighted, start posture and planned end posture of the arm movement modulated tactile localization for stimuli presented before and during movement, indicating automatic, external recoding of touch. Contrary to previous findings, tactile localization of congenitally blind participants, too, was affected by external coordinates, though only for stimuli presented before movement start. Furthermore, only the movement's start posture, but not the planned end posture affected blind individuals' tactile performance. Thus, integration of external coordinates in touch is established without vision, though more selectively than when vision has developed normally, and possibly restricted to movement contexts. The lack of modulation by the planned posture in congenitally blind participants suggests that external coordinates in this group are not mediated by motor efference copy. Instead the task-related frequent posture changes, that is, movement consequences rather than planning, appear to have induced their use of external coordinates.

  5. Hand-rearing reduces fear of humans in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Feenders

    Full Text Available Pending changes in European legislation ban the use of wild-caught animals in research. This change is partly justified on the assumption that captive-breeding (or hand-rearing increases welfare of captive animals because these practices result in animals with reduced fear of humans. However, there are few actual data on the long-term behavioural effects of captive-breeding in non-domestic species, and these are urgently needed in order to understand the welfare and scientific consequences of adopting this practice. We compared the response of hand-reared and wild-caught starlings to the presence of a human in the laboratory. During human presence, all birds increased their general locomotor activity but the wild-caught birds moved away from the human and were less active than the hand-reared birds. After the human departed, the wild-caught birds were slower to decrease their activity back towards baseline levels, and showed a dramatic increase in time at the periphery of the cage compared with the hand-reared birds. We interpret these data as showing evidence of a greater fear response in wild-caught birds with initial withdrawal followed by a subsequent rebound of prolonged attempts to escape the cage. We found no effects of environmental enrichment. However, birds in cages on low shelves were less active than birds on upper shelves, and showed a greater increase in the time spent at the periphery of their cages after the human departed, perhaps indicating that the lower cages were more stressful. In demonstrating reduced fear of humans in hand-reared birds, our results support one of the proposed welfare benefits of this practice, but without further data on the possible welfare costs of hand-rearing, it is not yet possible to reach a general conclusion about its net welfare impact. However, our results confirm a clear scientific impact of both hand-rearing and cage position at the behavioural level.

  6. Islamic movement and human rights: Pertubuhan Jamaah Islah Malaysia’s involvement in the “Abolish Internal Security Act Movement,” 2000-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Maszlee Malik

    2014-01-01

    Human rights has been acknowledged as one of the essential characteristics of good governance. Abuse of human rights is strongly associated with bad governance, which is believed by many to be a serious impediment to development and sustainable growth. Despite the active participations of Islamic movements in many parts of the political world, very little is known of their involvement in advocating human rights issues as part of their struggle for power. Nevertheless, as an Islamic movement a...

  7. Teleoperation of a robot manipulator from 3D human hand-arm motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Jonathan; Verma, Siddharth; Wu, Xianghai; Luu, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    The control of a robot manipulator by a human operator is often necessary in unstructured dynamic environments with unfamiliar objects. Remote teleoperation is required when human presence at the robot site is undesirable or difficult, such as in handling hazardous materials and operating in dangerous or inaccessible environments. Previous approaches have employed mechanical or other contacting interfaces which require unnatural motions for object manipulation tasks or hinder dexterous human motion. This paper presents a non-contacting method of teleoperating a robot manipulator by having the human operator perform the 3D human hand-arm motion that would naturally be used to compete an object manipulation task and tracking the motion with a stereo-camera system at a local site. The 3D human hand-arm motion is reconstructed at the remote robot site and is used to control the position and orientation of the robot manipulator end-effector in real-time. Images captured of the robot interacting with objects at the remote site provide visual feedback to the human operator. Tests in teleoperation of the robot manipulator have demonstrated the ability of the human to carry out object manipulator tasks remotely and the teleoperated robot manipulator system to copy human-arm motions in real-time.

  8. Cytomegalovirus survival and transferability and the effectiveness of common hand-washing agents against cytomegalovirus on live human hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jennifer D; Forlin-Passoni, Daniela; Radford, Kay; Bate, Sheri L; Dollard, Sheila C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Cannon, Michael J; Schmid, D Scott

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) transmission can occur when women acquire CMV while pregnant. Infection control guidelines may reduce risk for transmission. We studied the duration of CMV survival after application of bacteria to the hands and after transfer from the hands to surfaces and the effectiveness of cleansing with water, regular and antibacterial soaps, sanitizer, and diaper wipes. Experiments used CMV AD169 in saliva at initial titers of 1 × 10(5) infectious particles/ml. Samples from hands or surfaces (points between 0 and 15 min) were placed in culture and observed for at least 2 weeks. Samples were also tested using CMV real-time PCR. After application of bacteria to the hands, viable CMV was recovered from 17/20 swabs at 0 min, 18/20 swabs at 1 min, 5/20 swabs at 5 min, and 4/20 swabs at 15 min. After transfer, duration of survival was at least 15 min on plastic (1/2 swabs), 5 min on crackers and glass (3/4 swabs), and 1 min or less on metal and cloth (3/4 swabs); no viable virus was collected from wood, rubber, or hands. After cleansing, no viable virus was recovered using water (0/22), plain soap (0/20), antibacterial soap (0/20), or sanitizer (0/22). Viable CMV was recovered from 4/20 hands 10 min after diaper wipe cleansing. CMV remains viable on hands for sufficient times to allow transmission. CMV may be transferred to surfaces with reduced viability. Hand-cleansing methods were effective at eliminating viable CMV from hands.

  9. Improved experimental model for measuring skin degerming activity on the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, R N; McGrath, M B; Goss, W A

    1972-07-01

    A gloved-hand method is presented for evaluating the interaction of antimicrobial agents with the normal resident bacterial flora of human skin. One of the key features of the experimental model is a simplified technique for sampling the skin, which involves the addition of eluting fluid to the gloved hand. As with other skin sampling techniques, the number of bacteria recovered from the hands showed considerable variation from subject to subject. However, no significant differences were observed between the numbers of bacteria recovered from the right and left hands of individual subjects. The mean number of bacteria recovered from the hand before and after washing with nonmedicated soap was consistent and reproducible over a period of at least 5 consecutive days. The number of recoverable bacteria from the hand was greatly reduced by a single treatment with a surgical scrub preparation containing hexachlorophene. The extent of skin degerming achieved was little affected by the use of a surgical brush, and was maximal at approximately 30 min after contact with the hexachlorophene-containing formulation. It was determined that the level of transient bacteria on the hands could be controlled by a simple wash with nonmedicated soap, resulting in a stabilized base-line level from which treatment interactions with the resident microflora could be measured more precisely. The basic elements of the method presented fulfill the requirements of a satisfactory experimental model for the in vivo evaluation of skin-degerming agents on the hand. The selection of appropriate experimental designs allows treatment comparisons to be made with a high degree of statistical confidence.

  10. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    OpenAIRE

    Veltink, Peter H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Chris T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; Spek, van der, R.J.; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need for sensory feedback in FES control systems and gives an overview of available artificial sensors for human use and progress in the derivation and application of signals from natural sensors

  11. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  12. Using an Artificial Neural Bypass to Restore Cortical Control of Rhythmic Movements in a Human with Quadriplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Friedenberg, David A.; Annetta, Nicholas; Glenn, Bradley; Bockbrader, Marcie; Majstorovic, Connor; Domas, Stephanie; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Rezai, Ali; Bouton, Chad

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology has been used to restore cortical control of discrete (non-rhythmic) hand movements in a paralyzed person. However, cortical control of rhythmic movements which originate in the brain but are coordinated by Central Pattern Generator (CPG) neural networks in the spinal cord has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show a demonstration of an artificial neural bypass technology that decodes cortical activity and emulates spinal cord CPG function allowing volitional rhythmic hand movement. The technology uses a combination of signals recorded from the brain, machine-learning algorithms to decode the signals, a numerical model of CPG network, and a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system to evoke rhythmic movements. Using the neural bypass, a quadriplegic participant was able to initiate, sustain, and switch between rhythmic and discrete finger movements, using his thoughts alone. These results have implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology to restore complex movements in people living with paralysis.

  13. Movement prediction using accelerometers in a human population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, L.; He, Bing; Koster, A

    2016-01-01

    the data across subjects by matching the standing up and lying down portions of triaxial accelerometry data. This is necessary to account for differences between the variability in the position of the device relative to gravity, which are induced by body shape and size as well as by the ambiguous...... definition of device placement. We also normalize the data at the device level to ensure that the magnitude of the signal at rest is similar across devices. After normalization we use overlapping movelets (segments of triaxial accelerometry time series) extracted from some of the subjects to predict...... the movement type of the other subjects. The problem was motivated by and is applied to a laboratory study of 20 older participants who performed different activities while wearing accelerometers at the hip. Prediction results based on other people's labeled dictionaries of activity performed almost as well...

  14. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Hatala, E M; Hatala, K G; Hiles, S; Rabey, K N

    2016-06-23

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses.

  15. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands.

  16. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppner, Hannes; Große-Dunker, Maximilian; Stillfried, Georg; Bayer, Justin; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands. PMID:28588472

  17. Searching for Survivors through Random Human-Body Movement Outdoors by Continuous-Wave Radar Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Qi, Fugui; Liu, Miao; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Jing, Xijing; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    It is a major challenge to search for survivors after chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions. At present, biological radar can be used to achieve this goal by detecting the survivor's respiration signal. However, owing to the random posture of an injured person at a rescue site, the radar wave may directly irradiate the person's head or feet, in which it is difficult to detect the respiration signal. This paper describes a multichannel-based antenna array technology, which forms an omnidirectional detection system via 24-GHz Doppler biological radar, to address the random positioning relative to the antenna of an object to be detected. Furthermore, since the survivors often have random body movement such as struggling and twitching, the slight movements of the body caused by breathing are obscured by these movements. Therefore, a method is proposed to identify random human-body movement by utilizing multichannel information to calculate the background variance of the environment in combination with a constant-false-alarm-rate detector. The conducted outdoor experiments indicate that the system can realize the omnidirectional detection of random human-body movement and distinguish body movement from environmental interference such as movement of leaves and grass. The methods proposed in this paper will be a promising way to search for survivors outdoors.

  18. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker's hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers' gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  19. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker’s hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers’ gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  20. RGBD Video Based Human Hand Trajectory Tracking and Gesture Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of human hand trajectory tracking and gesture trajectory recognition based on synchronized color and depth video is considered. Toward this end, in the facet of hand tracking, a joint observation model with the hand cues of skin saliency, motion and depth is integrated into particle filter in order to move particles to local peak in the likelihood. The proposed hand tracking method, namely, salient skin, motion, and depth based particle filter (SSMD-PF, is capable of improving the tracking accuracy considerably, in the context of the signer performing the gesture toward the camera device and in front of moving, cluttered backgrounds. In the facet of gesture recognition, a shape-order context descriptor on the basis of shape context is introduced, which can describe the gesture in spatiotemporal domain. The efficient shape-order context descriptor can reveal the shape relationship and embed gesture sequence order information into descriptor. Moreover, the shape-order context leads to a robust score for gesture invariant. Our approach is complemented with experimental results on the settings of the challenging hand-signed digits datasets and American sign language dataset, which corroborate the performance of the novel techniques.

  1. The application of force-sensing resistor sensors for measuring forces developed by the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonovas, A; Harrison, A J L; Hoult, S; Sammut, D

    2004-01-01

    Most attempts to measure forces developed by the human hand have been implemented by placing force sensors on the object of interaction. Other researchers have placed sensors just on the subject's fingertips. In this paper, a system is described that measures forces over the entire hand using thin-film sensors and associated electronics. This system was developed by the authors and is able to obtain force readings from up to 60 thin-film sensors at rates of up to 400 samples/s per sensor. The sensors can be placed anywhere on the palm and/or fingers of the hand. The sensor readings, together with a video stream containing information about hand posture, are logged into a portable computer using a multiplexer, analogue-to-digital converter and software developed for the purpose. The system has been successfully used to measure forces involved in a range of everyday tasks such as driving a vehicle, lifting saucepans and hitting a golf ball. In the latter case, results are compared with those from an instrumented golf club. Future applications include the assessment of hand strength following disease, trauma or surgery, and to enable quantitative ergonomic investigations.

  2. Understanding Human Hand Gestures for Learning Robot Pick-and-Place Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-I Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Programming robots by human demonstration is an intuitive approach, especially by gestures. Because robot pick-and-place tasks are widely used in industrial factories, this paper proposes a framework to learn robot pick-and-place tasks by understanding human hand gestures. The proposed framework is composed of the module of gesture recognition and the module of robot behaviour control. For the module of gesture recognition, transport empty (TE, transport loaded (TL, grasp (G, and release (RL from Gilbreth's therbligs are the hand gestures to be recognized. A convolution neural network (CNN is adopted to recognize these gestures from a camera image. To achieve the robust performance, the skin model by a Gaussian mixture model (GMM is used to filter out non-skin colours of an image, and the calibration of position and orientation is applied to obtain the neutral hand pose before the training and testing of the CNN. For the module of robot behaviour control, the corresponding robot motion primitives to TE, TL, G, and RL, respectively, are implemented in the robot. To manage the primitives in the robot system, a behaviour-based programming platform based on the Extensible Agent Behavior Specification Language (XABSL is adopted. Because the XABSL provides the flexibility and re-usability of the robot primitives, the hand motion sequence from the module of gesture recognition can be easily used in the XABSL programming platform to implement the robot pick-and-place tasks. The experimental evaluation of seven subjects performing seven hand gestures showed that the average recognition rate was 95.96%. Moreover, by the XABSL programming platform, the experiment showed the cube-stacking task was easily programmed by human demonstration.

  3. Properties of cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the human hand related to touch sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbo, A B; Johansson, R S

    1984-01-01

    Recordings from single peripheral nerve fibres made it possible to analyse the functional properties of tactile afferent units supplying the glabrous skin of the human hand and to assess directly the relation between impulse discharge and perceptive experiences. The 17,000 tactile units in this skin area of the human hand are of four different types: two fast adapting types, FA I and FA II (formerly RA and PC), and two slowly adapting types, SA I and SA II. The receptive field characteristics and the densities in the skin of the type I units (FA I and SA I) indicate that these account for the detailed spatial resolution that is of paramount importance for the motor skill and the explorative role of the hand. The relationship between the stimulus amplitude and perceived intensity during sustained skin indentations did not match the corresponding stimulus response functions of SA units suggesting non-linear transformations within the central nervous system. These transformations, in turn, appear to vary between subjects. A single impulse in a single FA I unit may be felt when originating from the most important tactile regions of the hand, indicating that the psychophysical detection may be set by the threshold of the sense organs. Moreover, no significant noise seems to be superimposed in the respective central sensory pathways.

  4. The demographics of human and malaria movement and migration patterns in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quantification of parasite movements can provide valuable information for control strategy planning across all transmission intensities. Mobile parasite carrying individuals can instigate transmission in receptive areas, spread drug resistant strains and reduce the effectiveness of control strategies. The identification of mobile demographic groups, their routes of travel and how these movements connect differing transmission zones, potentially enables limited resources for interventions to be efficiently targeted over space, time and populations. Methods National population censuses and household surveys provide individual-level migration, travel, and other data relevant for understanding malaria movement patterns. Together with existing spatially referenced malaria data and mathematical models, network analysis techniques were used to quantify the demographics of human and malaria movement patterns in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Movement networks were developed based on connectivity and magnitudes of flow within each country and compared to assess relative differences between regions and demographic groups. Additional malaria-relevant characteristics, such as short-term travel and bed net use, were also examined. Results Patterns of human and malaria movements varied between demographic groups, within country regions and between countries. Migration rates were highest in 20–30 year olds in all three countries, but when accounting for malaria prevalence, movements in the 10–20 year age group became more important. Different age and sex groups also exhibited substantial variations in terms of the most likely sources, sinks and routes of migration and malaria movement, as well as risk factors for infection, such as short-term travel and bed net use. Conclusion Census and survey data, together with spatially referenced malaria data, GIS and network analysis tools, can be valuable for identifying, mapping and quantifying regional connectivities

  5. Efficacy of soap and water and alcohol-based hand-rub preparations against live H1N1 influenza virus on the hands of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, M Lindsay; Melvani, Sharmila; Druce, Julian; Barr, Ian G; Ballard, Susan A; Johnson, Paul D R; Mastorakos, Tasoula; Birch, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Although pandemic and avian influenza are known to be transmitted via human hands, there are minimal data regarding the effectiveness of routine hand hygiene (HH) protocols against pandemic and avian influenza. Twenty vaccinated, antibody-positive health care workers had their hands contaminated with 1 mL of 10(7) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)(50)/0.1 mL live human influenza A virus (H1N1; A/New Caledonia/20/99) before undertaking 1 of 5 HH protocols (no HH [control], soap and water hand washing [SW], or use of 1 of 3 alcohol-based hand rubs [61.5% ethanol gel, 70% ethanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution, or 70% isopropanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution]). H1N1 concentrations were assessed before and after each intervention by viral culture and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The natural viability of H1N1 on hands for >60 min without HH was also assessed. There was an immediate reduction in culture-detectable and PCR-detectable H1N1 after brief cutaneous air drying--14 of 20 health care workers had H1N1 detected by means of culture (mean reduction, 10(3-4) TCID(50)/0.1 mL), whereas 6 of 20 had no viable H1N1 recovered; all 20 health care workers had similar changes in PCR test results. Marked antiviral efficacy was noted for all 4 HH protocols, on the basis of culture results (14 of 14 had no culturable H1N1; (Peffective in reducing influenza A virus on human hands, although SW is the most effective intervention. Appropriate HH may be an important public health initiative to reduce pandemic and avian influenza transmission.

  6. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit and its fluctuation σ :σ ˜β with β ≈1.2 . The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other.

  7. Spontaneous cyclic embryonic movements in humans and guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felt, Renee H. M.; Mulder, Eduard J. H.; Luchinger, Annemarie B.; van Kan, Colette M.; Taverne, Marcel A. M.; de Vries, J. I. P.

    2012-01-01

    Motility assessment before birth can be used to evaluate the integrity of the nervous system. Sideways bending (SB) of head and/or rump, the earliest embryonic motility in both humans and guinea pigs, can be visualized sonographically. We know from other species that early embryonic motility is cycl

  8. Referee comment on Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmela Herzog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many archaeological studies assessing the impact of topography on past human movement, only weak arguments without validation for the weights assigned to different terrain features are given. Therefore a study presenting terrain coefficients relying on sound tests is most welcome though the range of applications in archaeological modelling is limited. This article is a referee comment for de Gruchy, M., Caswell, E and Edwards, J. 2017 Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement, Internet Archaeology.

  9. Malaria drug resistance: the impact of human movement and spatial heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusto, F B

    2014-07-01

    Human habitat connectivity, movement rates, and spatial heterogeneity have tremendous impact on malaria transmission. In this paper, a deterministic system of differential equations for malaria transmission incorporating human movements and the development of drug resistance malaria in an [Formula: see text] patch system is presented. The disease-free equilibrium of the model is globally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. For a two patch case, the boundary equilibria (drug sensitive-only and drug resistance-only boundary equilibria) when there is no movement between the patches are shown to be locally asymptotically stable when they exist; the co-existence equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable whenever the reproduction number for the drug sensitive malaria is greater than the reproduction number for the resistance malaria. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the connected two patch model (when there is movement between the patches) suggest that co-existence or competitive exclusion of the two strains can occur when the respective reproduction numbers of the two strains exceed unity. With slow movement (or low migration) between the patches, the drug sensitive strain dominates the drug resistance strain. However, with fast movement (or high migration) between the patches, the drug resistance strain dominates the drug sensitive strain.

  10. Online control of a humanoid robot through hand movement imagination using CSP and ECoG based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapeller, C; Gergondet, P; Kamada, K; Ogawa, H; Takeuchi, F; Ortner, R; Pruckl, R; Kheddar, A; Scharinger, J; Guger, C

    2015-08-01

    Intention recognition through decoding brain activity could lead to a powerful and independent Brain-Computer-Interface (BCI) allowing for intuitive control of devices like robots. A common strategy for realizing such a system is the motor imagery (MI) BCI using electroencephalography (EEG). Changing to invasive recordings like electrocorticography (ECoG) allows extracting very robust features and easy introduction of an idle state, which might simplify the mental task and allow the subject to focus on the environment. Especially for multi-channel recordings like ECoG, common spatial patterns (CSP) provide a powerful tool for feature optimization and dimensionality reduction. This work focuses on an invasive and independent MI BCI that allows triggering from an idle state, and therefore facilitates tele-operation of a humanoid robot. The task was to lift a can with the robot's hand. One subject participated and reached 95.4 % mean online accuracy after six runs of 40 trials. To our knowledge, this is the first online experiment with a MI BCI using CSPs from ECoG signals.

  11. Human movement variability, nonlinear dynamics, and pathology: is there a connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Nicholas; Decker, Leslie M

    2011-10-01

    Fields studying movement generation, including robotics, psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience utilize concepts and tools related to the pervasiveness of variability in biological systems. The concept of variability and the measures for nonlinear dynamics used to evaluate this concept open new vistas for research in movement dysfunction of many types. This review describes innovations in the exploration of variability and their potential importance in understanding human movement. Far from being a source of error, evidence supports the presence of an optimal state of variability for healthy and functional movement. This variability has a particular organization and is characterized by a chaotic structure. Deviations from this state can lead to biological systems that are either overly rigid and robotic or noisy and unstable. Both situations result in systems that are less adaptable to perturbations, such as those associated with unhealthy pathological states or absence of skillfulness.

  12. An assessment of six muscle spindle models for predicting sensory information during human wrist movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja eMalik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The muscle spindle is an important sensory organ for proprioceptive information, yet there have been few attempts to use Shannon information theory to quantify the capacity of human muscle spindles to encode sensory input.Methods: Computer simulations linked kinematics, to biomechanics, to six muscle spindle models that generated predictions of firing rate. The predicted firing rates were compared to firing rates of human muscle spindles recorded during a step-tracking (center-out task to validate their use. The models were then used to predict firing rates during random movements with statistical properties matched to the ergonomics of human wrist movements. The data were analyzed for entropy and mutual information.Results: Three of the six models produced predictions that approximated the firing rate of human spindles during the step-tracking task. For simulated random movements these models predicted mean rates of 16.0±4.1 imp/s (mean±sd, peak firing rates <50 imp/s and zero firing rate during an average of 25% of the movement. The average entropy of the neural response was 4.1±0.3 bits and is an estimate of the maximum information that could be carried by muscles spindles during ecologically valid movements. The information about tendon displacement preserved in the neural response was 0.10±0.05 bits per symbol; whereas 1.25±0.30 bits per symbol of velocity input were preserved in the neural response of the spindle models.Conclusions: Muscle spindle models, originally based on cat experiments, have predictive value for modeling responses of human muscle spindles with minimal parameter optimization. These models predict more than 10-fold more velocity over length information encoding during ecologically valid movements. These results establish theoretical parameters for developing neuroprostheses for proprioceptive function.

  13. Movement-related theta rhythm in humans: coordinating self-directed hippocampal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Raphael; Doeller, Christian F; Barnes, Gareth R; Litvak, Vladimir; Düzel, Emrah; Bandettini, Peter A; Burgess, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for episodic or declarative memory and the theta rhythm has been implicated in mnemonic processing, but the functional contribution of theta to memory remains the subject of intense speculation. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus might function as a network hub for volitional learning. In contrast to human experiments, electrophysiological recordings in the hippocampus of behaving rodents are dominated by theta oscillations reflecting volitional movement, which has been linked to spatial exploration and encoding. This literature makes the surprising cross-species prediction that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory movements in the service of self-directed learning. We examined the links between theta, spatial exploration, and memory encoding by designing an interactive human spatial navigation paradigm combined with multimodal neuroimaging. We used both non-invasive whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) to look at theta oscillations and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to look at brain regions associated with volitional movement and learning. We found that theta power increases during the self-initiation of virtual movement, additionally correlating with subsequent memory performance and environmental familiarity. Performance-related hippocampal theta increases were observed during a static pre-navigation retrieval phase, where planning for subsequent navigation occurred. Furthermore, periods of the task showing movement-related theta increases showed decreased fMRI activity in the parahippocampus and increased activity in the hippocampus and other brain regions that strikingly overlap with the previously observed volitional learning network (the reverse pattern was seen for stationary periods). These fMRI changes also correlated with participant's performance. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory

  14. The influence of action execution on end-state comfort and underlying movement kinematics: An examination of right and left handed participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharoun, S M; Gonzalez, D A; Bryden, P J; Roy, E A

    2016-02-01

    People typically move in an anticipatory manner, planning the intended action in advance to minimize the energy costs associated with producing the action (e.g., Rosenbaum et al., 2009). This is exemplified behaviorally in the end-state comfort effect, which is characterized by the selection of an uncomfortable initial posture to enable a comfortable posture upon completion of the movement (Rosenbaum et al., 1990). The main objective of this study was to further investigate the end-state comfort effect in left- and right-handers (N=20). More specifically, to: (a) understand the influence of mode of action execution; and (b) delineate the role of handedness. The overturned glass task (Fischman, 1997) was used as means of assessment, where participants were asked to demonstrate picking up a glass to pour water in four modes of execution: (1) pantomime without a stimulus; (2) pantomime with image of the glass as a guide; (3) pantomime with glass as a guide; and (4) grasping the glass. End-state comfort was displayed regardless of mode of execution, hand used to complete the task or handedness group. However, kinematic analysis revealed distinct differences, highlighting how movement parameters are altered as a result the mode of action execution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human sperm pattern of movement during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Soledad Blengini; Maria Eugenia Teves; Diego Rafael Unates; Hector Alejandro Guidobaldi; Laura Virginia Gatica; Laura Cecilia Giojalas

    2011-01-01

    @@ Human spermatozoa may chemotactically find out the egg by following an increasing gradient of attractant molecules.Although human spermatozoa have been observed to show several of the physiological characteristics of chemotaxis,the chemotactic pattern of movement has not been easy to describe.However,it is apparent that chemotactic cells may be identified while returning to the attractant source.This study characterizes the pattern of movement of human spermatozoa during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source,which is a physiological attractant candidate.By means of videomicroscopy and image analysis,a chemotactic pattern of movement was identified as the spermatozoon returned towards the source of a chemotactic concentration of progesterone (10 pmol l-1).First,as a continuation of its original path,the spermatozoon swims away from the progesterone source with linear movement and then turns back with a transitional movement that can be characterized by an increased velocity and decreased linearity.This sperm behaviour may help the spermatozoon to re-orient itself towards a progesterone source and may be used to identify the few cells that are undergoing chemotaxis at a given time.

  16. The sensory somatotopic map of the human hand demonstrated at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldjian, J A; Gottschalk, A; Patel, R S; Detre, J A; Alsop, D C

    1999-07-01

    Recent attempts at high-resolution sensory-stimulated fMRI performed at 1.5 T have had very limited success at demonstrating a somatotopic organization for individual digits. Our purpose was to determine if functional MRI at 4 T can demonstrate the sensory somatotopic map of the human hand. Sensory functional MRI was performed at 4 T in five normal volunteers using a low-frequency vibratory stimulus on the pad of each finger of the left hand. A simple motor control task was also performed. The data were normalized to a standard atlas, and individual and group statistical parametric maps (SPMs) were computed for each task. Volume of activation and distribution of cluster maxima were compared for each task. For three of the subjects, the SPMs demonstrated a somatotopic organization of the sensory cortex. The group SPMs demonstrated a clear somatotopic organization of the sensory cortex. The thumb to fifth finger were organized, in general, with a lateral to medial, inferior to superior, and anterior to posterior relationship. There was overlap in the individual SPMs between fingers. The sensory activation spanned a space of 12-18 mm (thumb to fifth finger) on the primary sensory cortex. The motor activation occurred consistently at the superior-most extent of the sensory activation within and across subjects. The sensory somatotopic map of the human hand can be identified at 4 T. High-resolution imaging at 4 T can be useful for detailed functional imaging studies. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Life in our hands? Some ethical perspectives on the human genome and human genome diversity projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius W. du Toit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with implications of the human genome and the human genome diversity project. It examined some theological implications, such as: humans as the image of God, God as the creator of life, the changed role of miracles and healings in religion, the sacredness of nature, life and the genome. Ethical issues that were addressed include eugenics, germline intervention, determinism and the human genome diversity project. Economic and legal factors that play a role were also discussed. Whilst positive aspects of genome research were considered, a critical stance was adopted towards patenting the human genome and some concluding guidelines were proposed.

  18. Estimating Human Movement Parameters Using a Software Radio-based Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godana, B.; Barroso, A.; Leus, G.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Radar is an attractive technology for long term monitoring of human movement as it operates remotely, can be placed behind walls and is able to monitor a large area depending on its operating parameters. A radar signal reflected off a moving person carries rich information on his or her activity pat

  19. Humans use visual and remembered information about object location to plan pointing movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.-M.; Knill, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether humans use a target's remembered location to plan reaching movements to targets according to the relative reliabilities of visual and remembered information. Using their index finger, subjects moved a virtual object from one side of a table to the other, and then went back to

  20. Coming to Know about the Body in Human Movement Studies Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varea, Valeria; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how a group of undergraduate Human Movement Studies (HMS) students learnt to know about the body during their four-year academic programme at an Australian university. When students begin an undergraduate programme in HMS they bring with them particular constructions, ideas and beliefs about their own bodies and about the body…

  1. On the relevance of residual force enhancement for everyday human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberl, Wolfgang; Paternoster, Florian; Achatz, Florian; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Hahn, Daniel

    2013-08-09

    Although residual force enhancement (RFE), i.e. enhanced force after active muscle stretch, is shown to be present in voluntarily activated human muscles, its relevance for everyday human movement is still elusive. Natural human motion is mainly composed of voluntarily submaximally activated muscle contractions driving coordinated multi-joint movements. Up to now there has been no study that directly investigated the presence of RFE following stretch when performing a submaximal multi-joint movement. For this purpose, n=13 subjects performed feedback controlled bilateral leg extensions at the level of 30% maximum voluntary activation in a motor-driven leg press dynamometer. Isometric-eccentric-isometric and purely isometric contractions were arranged in a randomized experimental protocol. Kinematics, forces and muscular activity were measured using optical motion tracking, 3d force plates and EMG of 9 lower extremity muscles. ANOVA identified significant RFE of external reaction force, and knee extension and plantar flexion torque (calculated by inverse dynamics). Enhanced force and torque ranged between 3% and 22% and was present for up to 22s post-stretch. In spite of motor redundancy for solving a given task, no differences between contraction conditions were observed for any of the analyzed muscles, except for tibialis anterior. On the basis of our results, RFE is present in everyday alike human movement and might be an evolutionary optimization mechanism to enhance muscular performance at a given amount of energetic effort.

  2. Active controlled muscles in numerical model of human arm for movement in two degrees of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budziszewski, P.; Nunen, E. van; Mordaka, J.K.; Kȩdzior, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of numerical model of human upper extremity able to perform movements and stabilization tasks in two degrees of freedom as a result of muscle activation controlled by a PID-based controller. These tasks are defined by functions of specified angle for every degree

  3. Fatigue of intermittently stimulated human quadriceps during imposed cyclical lower leg movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Henry M.; Veltink, Peter H.; Fidder, Marc; Boom, Herman B.K.

    1993-01-01

    In this study the torque output of intermittently stimulated paralyzed human knee extensor muscles during imposed isokinetic cyclical lower leg movements was investigated in four paraplegic subjects. During prolonged (10 min) experiments the influence of knee angular velocity and stimulation paramet

  4. The effect of handedness on electromyographic activity of human shoulder muscles during movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there was a difference in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of human shoulder muscles between the dominant and nondominant side during movement and to explore whether a possible side-difference depends on the specific task. We compared the EMG ac...

  5. Dosimetry of hands and human factor; Dosimetria de manos y factor humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harr, R. [Sociedad Mexicana de Seguridad Radiologica A. C., Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    The human factor in facilities where open radioactive sources are managed it can be controlled through the use of the ring dosimetry, however, that these devices only provide qualitative information that is not extrapolated to legislative limits. lt is present the case analysis of hands dosimetry of female person with responsibility for professional standards and a very high profile with ratings that allow her to have a high level of knowledge of the basic standards, and because with an attitude and a culture rooted of radiation protection, among other qualities. Their records reveal a trend in which monthly doses are below the 7 mSv, and only occasionally are between 7 and 12 mSv per month and hand. The other case correspond to a technician, trained in radiological techniques, also with a high profile, with two courses for occupationally exposed personnel more than 10 annual retraining, and work experience of over 10 years as occupationally exposed personnel, in which knowledge of standards and because of the entrenched culture of radiation protection and their interest degree in the care of their exposure is still in a phase half, in this case also shows a trend in the monthly dose where found registers between 7 and 11 mSv per month and hand. The third case is of a second technician with less experience and most basic knowledge, his dose register not show a real trend, sometimes be found reads of irregular values as if the dosimeter is not used and some other times as if misused by exposing to purpose (was observed at least one reading above the monthly 30 mSv). By way of conclusion, it is noted that the hands dosimetry is a useful tool to monitor transactions through the data compilation susceptible to analysis with variations which can be placed in the context of the human factor. (Author)

  6. Hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy skills acquisition: augmented reality simulator versus human cadaver training models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Fabien; Senagore, Anthony J; Ellis, Clyde N; Champagne, Bradley J; Augestad, Knut M; Neary, Paul C; Delaney, Conor P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a simulator with the human cadaver model for hand-assisted laparoscopic colorectal skills acquisition training. An observational prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the laparoscopic surgery training models. The study took place during the laparoscopic colectomy training course performed at the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Thirty four practicing surgeons performed hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy on human cadavers (n = 7) and on an augmented reality simulator (n = 27). Prior laparoscopic colorectal experience was assessed. Trainers and trainees completed independently objective structured assessment forms. Training models were compared by trainees' technical skills scores, events scores, and satisfaction. Prior laparoscopic experience was similar in both surgeon groups. Generic and specific skills scores were similar on both training models. Generic events scores were significantly better on the cadaver model. The 2 most frequent generic events occurring on the simulator were poor hand-eye coordination and inefficient use of retraction. Specific events were scored better on the simulator and reached the significance limit (p = 0.051) for trainers. The specific events occurring on the cadaver were intestinal perforation and left ureter identification difficulties. Overall satisfaction was better for the cadaver than for the simulator model (p = 0.009). With regard to skills scores, the augmented reality simulator had adequate qualities for the hand-assisted laparoscopic colectomy training. Nevertheless, events scores highlighted weaknesses of the anatomical replication on the simulator. Although improvements likely will be required to incorporate the simulator more routinely into the colorectal training, it may be useful in its current form for more junior trainees or those early on their learning curve. Copyright 2010 Association of Program

  7. Strategies for controlling non-transmissible infection outbreaks using a large human movement data set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope A Hancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak.

  8. Strategies for controlling non-transmissible infection outbreaks using a large human movement data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Penelope A; Rehman, Yasmin; Hall, Ian M; Edeghere, Obaghe; Danon, Leon; House, Thomas A; Keeling, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak.

  9. Movement as a basic concept in physiotherapy--a human science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström-Grotell, Camilla; Eriksson, Katie

    2012-08-01

    The development of scientific knowledge of physiotherapy (PT) has advanced significantly. Research is mostly conducted within a biomedical paradigm and theory-building is underpinned by a positivist paradigm. The basic philosophical questions and concepts are not much reflected on, and PT lacks an established theoretical frame. The first step in theory development is to define the basic concepts. The aim of this professional theoretical paper was to reflect on and describe the concept of movement in PT based on earlier research as a standpoint for a broader and deeper understanding of the complex nature of PT reality inspired by a model for concept analysis developed in caring science [Eriksson K 2010 Concept determination as part of the development of knowledge in caring science. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 24: 2-11]. The concept of movement in PT is conceptualized as complex and multidimensional. The understanding of human movement in PT is based on five categories described in the paper. The conceptualization of movement includes acting in relation to the socio-cultural environment, inter-dynamic aspects, as well as personal, intradynamic aspects. This paper argues for the need to further develop the concept of movement in PT within a human science approach. A deeper understanding is needed as a basis for understanding complex clinical practice as well as in shaping the PT discipline.

  10. Socially structured human movement shapes dengue transmission despite the diffusive effect of mosquito dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Reiner, Jr.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For sexually and directly transmitted infectious diseases, social connections influence transmission because they determine contact between individuals. For pathogens that are indirectly transmitted by arthropod vectors, the movement of the vectors is thought to diminish the role of social connections. Results from a recent study of mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV, however, indicate that human movement alone can explain significant spatial variation in urban transmission rates. Because movement patterns are structured by social ties, this result suggests that social proximity may be a good predictor of infection risk for DENV and other pathogens transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Here we investigated the effect of socially structured movement on DENV transmission using a spatially explicit, agent-based transmission model. When individual movements overlap to a high degree within social groups we were able to recreate infection patterns similar to those detected in dengue-endemic, northeastern Peru. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that social proximity drives fine-scale heterogeneity in DENV transmission rates, a result that was robust to the influence of mosquito dispersal. This heterogeneity in transmission caused by socially structured movements appeared to be hidden by the diffusive effect of mosquito dispersal in aggregated infection dynamics, which implies this heterogeneity could be present and active in real dengue systems without being easily noticed. Accounting for socially determined, overlapping human movements could substantially improve the efficiency and efficacy of dengue surveillance and disease prevention programs as well as result in more accurate estimates of important epidemiological quantities, such as R0.

  11. Topographic maps of human motor cortex in normal and pathological conditions: mirror movements, amputations and spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L G; Bandinelli, S; Topka, H R; Fuhr, P; Roth, B J; Hallett, M

    1991-01-01

    We studied motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with unilateral upper limb amputations, complete T10-T12 spinal cord transection, and congenital mirror movements and in controls. Different muscles in the trunk and upper and lower extremities were evaluated at rest. In controls, muscles could be activated with stimulation of regions several centimeters wide. These areas overlapped extensively when muscles studied were from the same limb and shifted positions abruptly when muscles were from different limbs. Distal muscles were easier to activate than proximal muscles and normally evidenced exclusively a contralateral representation. Congenital defects in motor control in patients with mirror movements resulted in marked derangement of the map of outputs of distal hand muscles with enlarged and ipsilateral representations. Peripheral lesions, either acquired (amputations) or congenital (congenital absence of a limb), resulted in plastic reorganization of motor outputs targeting muscles immediately proximal to the stump. Central nervous system lesions (i.e., spinal cord injury producing paraplegia) also resulted in enlargement of the map of outputs targeting muscles proximal to the lesion. These results indicate that magnetic stimulation is a useful non-invasive tool for exploring plastic changes in human motor pathways following different types of injury.

  12. Human rights and the politics of risk and blame: lessons from the international reproductive health movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, L P

    1997-01-01

    Recent debates about the "politicization" of public health obscure the ways in which epidemiological concepts of risk are routinely used in the legal and political systems to apportion blame and responsibility for poor health. This article uses the example of reproductive health and rights to argue that new understandings of the connection between socioeconomic conditions and poor health will only generate change when they are reframed into political claims and pressed by social movements. In this connection, human rights language, principles, and practice hold great potential for the US reproductive rights movement, which has sometimes been constrained by the narrow scope of court rulings.

  13. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Belmonte, Uriel Haile; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2016-01-04

    In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified). Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate.

  14. Physiological and subjective evaluation of a human-robot object hand-over task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehais, Frédéric; Sisbot, Emrah Akin; Alami, Rachid; Causse, Mickaël

    2011-11-01

    In the context of task sharing between a robot companion and its human partners, the notions of safe and compliant hardware are not enough. It is necessary to guarantee ergonomic robot motions. Therefore, we have developed Human Aware Manipulation Planner (Sisbot et al., 2010), a motion planner specifically designed for human-robot object transfer by explicitly taking into account the legibility, the safety and the physical comfort of robot motions. The main objective of this research was to define precise subjective metrics to assess our planner when a human interacts with a robot in an object hand-over task. A second objective was to obtain quantitative data to evaluate the effect of this interaction. Given the short duration, the "relative ease" of the object hand-over task and its qualitative component, classical behavioral measures based on accuracy or reaction time were unsuitable to compare our gestures. In this perspective, we selected three measurements based on the galvanic skin conductance response, the deltoid muscle activity and the ocular activity. To test our assumptions and validate our planner, an experimental set-up involving Jido, a mobile manipulator robot, and a seated human was proposed. For the purpose of the experiment, we have defined three motions that combine different levels of legibility, safety and physical comfort values. After each robot gesture the participants were asked to rate them on a three dimensional subjective scale. It has appeared that the subjective data were in favor of our reference motion. Eventually the three motions elicited different physiological and ocular responses that could be used to partially discriminate them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and the Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantifying Human Movement Using the Movn Smartphone App: Validation and Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Gemming, Luke; Monedero, Javier; Bolger, Linda; Belton, Sarahjane; Issartel, Johann; Marsh, Samantha; Direito, Artur; Solenhill, Madeleine; Zhao, Jinfeng; Exeter, Daniel John; Vathsangam, Harshvardhan; Rawstorn, Jonathan Charles

    2017-08-17

    The use of embedded smartphone sensors offers opportunities to measure physical activity (PA) and human movement. Big data-which includes billions of digital traces-offers scientists a new lens to examine PA in fine-grained detail and allows us to track people's geocoded movement patterns to determine their interaction with the environment. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the Movn smartphone app (Moving Analytics) for collecting PA and human movement data. The criterion and convergent validity of the Movn smartphone app for estimating energy expenditure (EE) were assessed in both laboratory and free-living settings, compared with indirect calorimetry (criterion reference) and a stand-alone accelerometer that is commonly used in PA research (GT1m, ActiGraph Corp, convergent reference). A supporting cross-validation study assessed the consistency of activity data when collected across different smartphone devices. Global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data were integrated with geographical information software to demonstrate the feasibility of geospatial analysis of human movement. A total of 21 participants contributed to linear regression analysis to estimate EE from Movn activity counts (standard error of estimation [SEE]=1.94 kcal/min). The equation was cross-validated in an independent sample (N=42, SEE=1.10 kcal/min). During laboratory-based treadmill exercise, EE from Movn was comparable to calorimetry (bias=0.36 [-0.07 to 0.78] kcal/min, t82=1.66, P=.10) but overestimated as compared with the ActiGraph accelerometer (bias=0.93 [0.58-1.29] kcal/min, t89=5.27, Psmartphone app can provide valid passive measurement of EE and can enrich these data with contextualizing temporospatial information. Although enhanced understanding of geographic and temporal variation in human movement patterns could inform intervention development, it also presents challenges for data processing and analytics.

  16. Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J Lucas; Hackney, Madeleine E; Kemp, Charles C; Ting, Lena H

    2017-01-31

    Physical interactions between two people are ubiquitous in our daily lives, and an integral part of many forms of rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated forces arising from physical interactions between humans during a cooperative motor task, particularly during overground movements. As such, the direction and magnitude of interaction forces between two human partners, how those forces are used to communicate movement goals, and whether they change with motor experience remains unknown. A better understanding of how cooperative physical interactions are achieved in healthy individuals of different skill levels is a first step toward understanding principles of physical interactions that could be applied to robotic devices for motor assistance and rehabilitation. Interaction forces between expert and novice partner dancers were recorded while performing a forward-backward partnered stepping task with assigned "leader" and "follower" roles. Their position was recorded using motion capture. The magnitude and direction of the interaction forces were analyzed and compared across groups (i.e. expert-expert, expert-novice, and novice-novice) and across movement phases (i.e. forward, backward, change of direction). All dyads were able to perform the partnered stepping task with some level of proficiency. Relatively small interaction forces (10-30N) were observed across all dyads, but were significantly larger among expert-expert dyads. Interaction forces were also found to be significantly different across movement phases. However, interaction force magnitude did not change as whole-body synchronization between partners improved across trials. Relatively small interaction forces may communicate movement goals (i.e. "what to do and when to do it") between human partners during cooperative physical interactions. Moreover, these small interactions forces vary with prior motor experience, and may act primarily as guiding cues that convey information about

  17. Age-related changes in the joint position sense of the human hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisch T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Kalisch,1,2,* Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth,2,* Rebecca Kowalewski,2 Martin Tegenthoff,1 Hubert R Dinse21Department of Neurology, BG-Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; 2Neural Plasticity Lab, Institute for Neuroinformatics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Age-related changes in lower limb joint position sense and their contributions to postural stability are well documented. In contrast, only a few studies have investigated the effect of age on proprioceptive hand function. Here, we introduce a novel test for measuring joint position sense in the fingers of the human hand. In a concurrent matching task, subjects had to detect volume differences between polystyrene balls grasped with their dominant (seven test stimuli: 126–505 cm3 and their nondominant hand (three reference stimuli: 210, 294, and 505 cm3. A total of 21 comparisons were performed to assess the number of errors, the weight of errors (ie, the volume difference between test and reference stimuli, and the direction of errors (ie, over- or underestimation of test stimulus. The test was applied to 45 healthy subjects aged 21 to 79 years. Our results revealed that all variables changed significantly with age, with the number of errors showing the strongest increase. We also assessed tactile acuity (two-point discrimination thresholds and sensorimotor performance (pegboard performance in a subset of subjects, but these scores did not correlate with joint position sense performance, indicating that the test reveals specific information about joint position sense that is not captured with pure sensory or motor tests. The average test–retest reliability assessed on 3 consecutive days was 0.8 (Cronbach's alpha. Our results demonstrate that this novel test reveals age-related decline in joint position sense acuity that is independent from sensorimotor performance.Keywords: aging, hand

  18. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. M. Lima

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT. Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8, and non-dominant group (n=14 for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and the Motor Activity Log (MAL, whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS. Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0, however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1. Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance.

  19. Riemannian geometric approach to human arm dynamics, movement optimization, and invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biess, Armin; Flash, Tamar; Liebermann, Dario G

    2011-03-01

    We present a generally covariant formulation of human arm dynamics and optimization principles in Riemannian configuration space. We extend the one-parameter family of mean-squared-derivative (MSD) cost functionals from Euclidean to Riemannian space, and we show that they are mathematically identical to the corresponding dynamic costs when formulated in a Riemannian space equipped with the kinetic energy metric. In particular, we derive the equivalence of the minimum-jerk and minimum-torque change models in this metric space. Solutions of the one-parameter family of MSD variational problems in Riemannian space are given by (reparameterized) geodesic paths, which correspond to movements with least muscular effort. Finally, movement invariants are derived from symmetries of the Riemannian manifold. We argue that the geometrical structure imposed on the arm's configuration space may provide insights into the emerging properties of the movements generated by the motor system.

  20. Comparison of three-dimensional, assist-as-needed robotic arm/hand movement training provided with Pneu-WREX to conventional tabletop therapy after chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Chan, Vicky; Chou, Cathy; Cramer, Steven C; Bobrow, James E

    2012-11-01

    Robot-assisted movement training can help individuals with stroke reduce arm and hand impairment, but robot therapy is typically only about as effective as conventional therapy. Refining the way that robots assist during training may make them more effective than conventional therapy. Here, the authors measured the therapeutic effect of a robot that required individuals with a stroke to achieve virtual tasks in three dimensions against gravity. The robot continuously estimated how much assistance patients needed to perform the tasks and provided slightly less assistance than needed to reduce patient slacking. Individuals with a chronic stroke (n = 26; baseline upper limb Fugl-Meyer score, 23 ± 8) were randomized into two groups and underwent 24 one-hour training sessions over 2 mos. One group received the assist-as-needed robot training and the other received conventional tabletop therapy with the supervision of a physical therapist. Training helped both groups significantly reduce their motor impairment, as measured by the primary outcome measure, the Fugl-Meyer score, but the improvement was small (3.0 ± 4.9 points for robot therapy vs. 0.9 ± 1.7 for conventional therapy). There was a trend for greater reduction for the robot-trained group (P = 0.07). The robot group largely sustained this gain at the 3-mo follow-up. The robot-trained group also experienced significant improvements in Box and Blocks score and hand grip strength, whereas the control group did not, but these improvements were not sustained at follow-up. In addition, the robot-trained group showed a trend toward greater improvement in sensory function, as measured by the Nottingham Sensory Test (P = 0.06). These results suggest that in patients with chronic stroke and moderate-severe deficits, assisting in three-dimensional virtual tasks with an assist-as-needed controller may make robotic training more effective than conventional tabletop training.

  1. Getting nowhere fast: trade-off between speed and precision in training to execute image-guided hand-tool movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Anil Ufuk; de Mathelin, Michel; Dresp-Langley, Birgitta

    2016-11-14

    The speed and precision with which objects are moved by hand or hand-tool interaction under image guidance depend on a specific type of visual and spatial sensorimotor learning. Novices have to learn to optimally control what their hands are doing in a real-world environment while looking at an image representation of the scene on a video monitor. Previous research has shown slower task execution times and lower performance scores under image-guidance compared with situations of direct action viewing. The cognitive processes for overcoming this drawback by training are not yet understood. We investigated the effects of training on the time and precision of direct view versus image guided object positioning on targets of a Real-world Action Field (RAF). Two men and two women had to learn to perform the task as swiftly and as precisely as possible with their dominant hand, using a tool or not and wearing a glove or not. Individuals were trained in sessions of mixed trial blocks with no feed-back. As predicted, image-guidance produced significantly slower times and lesser precision in all trainees and sessions compared with direct viewing. With training, all trainees get faster in all conditions, but only one of them gets reliably more precise in the image-guided conditions. Speed-accuracy trade-offs in the individual performance data show that the highest precision scores and steepest learning curve, for time and precision, were produced by the slowest starter. Fast starters produced consistently poorer precision scores in all sessions. The fastest starter showed no sign of stable precision learning, even after extended training. Performance evolution towards optimal precision is compromised when novices start by going as fast as they can. The findings have direct implications for individual skill monitoring in training programmes for image-guided technology applications with human operators.

  2. Eye-hand Hybrid Gesture Recognition System for Human Machine Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Raajan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture Recognition has become a way for computers to recognise and understand human body language. They bridge the gap between machines and human beings and make the primitive interfaces like keyboards and mice redundant. This paper suggests a hybrid gesture recognition system for computer interface and wireless robot control. The real-time eye-hand gesture recognition system can be used for computer drawing, navigating cursors and simulating mouse clicks, playing games, controlling a wireless robot with commands and more. The robot illustrated in this paper is controlled by RF module. Playing a PING-PONG game has also been demonstrated using the gestures. The Haar cascade classifiers and template matching are used to detect eye gestures and convex hull for finding the defects and counting the number of fingers in the given region.

  3. EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraba, K; Hibino, K; Hiranuma, K; Negoro, T

    2000-04-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac 3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by the INF because the disk

  4. Decoding Onset and Direction of Movements Using Electrocorticographic (ECoG Signals in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoguan eWang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication of intent usually requires motor function. This requirement can be limiting when a person is engaged in a task, or prohibitive for some people suffering from neuromuscular disorders. Determining a person's intent, e.g., where and when to move, from brain signals rather than from muscles would have important applications in clinical or other domains. For example, detection of the onset and direction of intended movements may provide the basis for restoration of simple grasping function in people with chronic stroke, or could be used to optimize a user's interaction with the surrounding environment. Detecting the onset and direction of actual movements are a first step in this direction. In this study, we demonstrate that we can detect the onset of intended movements and their direction using electrocorticographic (ECoG signals recorded from the surface of the cortex in humans. We also demonstrate in a simulation that the information encoded in ECoG about these movements may improve performance in a targeting task. In summary, the results in this paper suggest that detection of intended movement is possible, and may serve useful functions.

  5. Active Learning and Flipped Classroom, Hand in Hand Approach to Improve Students Learning in Human Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, Maria; Javdan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Because Human Anatomy and Physiology (A&P), a gateway course for allied health majors, has high dropout rates nationally, it is challenging to find a successful pedagogical intervention. Reports on the effect of integration of flipped classrooms and whether it improves learning are contradictory for different disciplines. Thus many educators…

  6. Bringing transcranial mapping into shape: Sulcus-aligned mapping captures motor somatotopy in human primary motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo;

    2015-01-01

    of the central sulcus following the bending of the central sulcus (CURVED). CURVED mapping employed a fixed (CURVED-450 FIX) or flexible coil orientation producing always a current perpendicular to the sulcal wall (CURVED-900 FLEX). During relaxation, CURVED but not STRAIGHT mapping revealed distinct......Motor representations express some degree of somatotopy in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND), but within-M1HAND corticomotor somatotopy has been difficult to study with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we introduce a “linear” TMS mapping approach based on the individual shape...... was lowest for CURVED-900 FLEX. Together, the results show that within-M1HAND somatotopy can be readily probed with linear TMS mapping aligned to the sulcal shape. Sulcus-aligned linear mapping will benefit non-invasive studies of representational plasticity in human M1HAND....

  7. 星状神经节阻滞改善肩手综合征的水肿及关节活动度%Block of ganglion stellatum on improving edema and range of movement in shoulder- hand syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾西; 陈尚康; 关晨霞; 姜丽; 王留根

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:Shoulder- hand syndrome(SHS) also called reflective sympathetic malnutrition is a common syndrome and often seen in stroke paralysis,which early manifestation is sudden edema of hand,pain,increased skin temperature,shoulder pain.If treatment is prolonged,muscle atrophy of hand and permanent loss of range of movement might occure.Comprehensive rehabilitation treatment has a good effect on SHS.In this article,effect of block of ganglion stellatum on SHS is observed on base of comprehensive rehabilitation treatment.

  8. Incorporating Human Movement Behavior into the Analysis of Spatially Distributed Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lihua; Leung, Henry; Jiang, Hao; Zheng, Hong; Ma, Li

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in human history, the majority of the world's population resides in urban areas. Therefore, city managers are faced with new challenges related to the efficiency, equity and quality of the supply of resources, such as water, food and energy. Infrastructure in a city can be viewed as service points providing resources. These service points function together as a spatially collaborative system to serve an increasing population. To study the spatial collaboration among service points, we propose a shared network according to human's collective movement and resource usage based on data usage detail records (UDRs) from the cellular network in a city in western China. This network is shown to be not scale-free, but exhibits an interesting triangular property governed by two types of nodes with very different link patterns. Surprisingly, this feature is consistent with the urban-rural dualistic context of the city. Another feature of the shared network is that it consists of several spatially separated communities that characterize local people's active zones but do not completely overlap with administrative areas. According to these features, we propose the incorporation of human movement into infrastructure classification. The presence of well-defined spatially separated clusters confirms the effectiveness of this approach. In this paper, our findings reveal the spatial structure inside a city, and the proposed approach provides a new perspective on integrating human movement into the study of a spatially distributed system.

  9. Effect of Human Movement on Galvanic Intra-Body Communication during Single Gait Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I. W.; Razak, A. H. A.; Ahmad, A.; Salleh, M. K. M.

    2015-11-01

    Intra-body communication (IBC) is a communication system that uses human body as a signal transmission medium. From previous research, two coupling methods of IBC were concluded which are capacitive coupling and galvanic coupling. This paper investigates the effect of human movement on IBC using the galvanic coupling method. Because the human movement is control by the limb joint, the knee flexion angle during gait cycle was used to examine the influence of human movement on galvanic coupling IBC. The gait cycle is a cycle of people walking that start from one foot touch the ground till that foot touch the ground again. Frequency range from 300 kHz to 200MHz was swept in order to investigate the signal transmission loss and the result was focused on operating frequency 70MHz to 90MHz. Results show that the transmission loss varies when the knee flexion angle increased. The highest loss of signal at frequency range between 70MHz to 90 MHz was 69dB when the knee flexion angle is 50° and the minimum loss was 51dB during the flexion angle is 5°.

  10. Changes in cortical field potentials during learning processes of go/no-go reaction time hand movement with tone discrimination in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, H

    1993-09-03

    Field potentials were recorded with electrodes implanted in various cortical areas while a monkey acquired a task of go/no-go reaction time hand movement with discrimination between tone stimuli of different frequencies. After a few weeks of training, a surface-negative, depth-positive (s-N, d-P) potential (no-go potential) emerged in the dorsal bank of the principal sulcus. As the potential increased in size in 1-3 months, the monkey gradually discriminated between go and no-go stimuli. The no-go potential is considered to be related to judgement not to move and suppression of motor execution. In the superior temporal gyrus, a s-N, d-P potential at a shorter latency than the no-go potential augmented in size on both go and no-go trials, as the monkey learned the discrimination task. The s-N, d-P potential in this gyrus may reflect an information processing prior to the discrimination in the prefrontal cortex.

  11. Meditative Movement as a treatment for pulmonary dysfunction in flight attendants exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke: Study protocol for a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter ePayne

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A study protocol is presented for the investigation of Meditative Movement (MM as a treatment for pulmonary dysfunction in Flight Attendants (FA who were exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke (SHCS while flying before the smoking ban. The study will have three parts, some of which will run concurrently. The first is a data gathering and screening phase, which will gather data on pulmonary and other aspects of the health of FA, and will also serve to screen participants for the other phases. Second is an exercise selection phase, in which a variety of MM exercises will be taught, over a 16-week period, to a cohort of 20 FA. A subset of these exercises will be selected on the basis of participant feedback on effectiveness and compliance. Third is a 52-week randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of a digitally delivered form of the previously selected exercises on a group of 20 FA, as compared with an attention control group. Outcome measures to be used in all three parts of the study include the six-minute walk test as a primary measure, as well as a range of biomarkers, tests and questionnaires documenting hormonal, cardio-respiratory, autonomic and affective state. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT02612389.

  12. Meditative Movement as a Treatment for Pulmonary Dysfunction in Flight Attendants Exposed to Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Peter; Zava, David; Fiering, Steven; Crane-Godreau, Mardi

    2016-01-01

    A study protocol is presented for the investigation of meditative movement (MM) as a treatment for pulmonary dysfunction in flight attendants (FA) who were exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke while flying before the smoking ban. The study will have three parts, some of which will run concurrently. The first is a data gathering and screening phase, which will gather data on pulmonary and other aspects of the health of FA, and will also serve to screen participants for the other phases. Second is an exercise selection phase, in which a variety of MM exercises will be taught, over a 16-week period, to a cohort of 20 FA. A subset of these exercises will be selected on the basis of participant feedback on effectiveness and compliance. Third is a 52-week randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a digitally delivered form of the previously selected exercises on a group of 20 FA, as compared with an attention control group. Outcome measures to be used in all three parts of the study include the 6-min walk test as a primary measure, as well as a range of biomarkers, tests, and questionnaires documenting hormonal, cardio-respiratory, autonomic, and affective state. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT02612389.

  13. "Apraxic dysgraphia" in a 15-year-old left-handed patient: disruption of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in the planning and execution of graphomotor movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; de Smet, Eric; de Smet, Hyo Jung; Wackenier, Peggy; Dobbeleir, Andre; Verhoeven, Jo

    2013-02-01

    Apraxic agraphia is a peripheral writing disorder caused by neurological damage. It induces a lack or loss of access to the motor engrams that plan and programme the graphomotor movements necessary to produce written output. The neural network subserving handwriting includes the superior parietal region, the dorsolateral and medial premotor cortex and the thalamus of the dominant hemisphere. Recent studies indicate that the cerebellum may be involved as well. To the best of our knowledge, apraxic agraphia has not been described on a developmental basis. This paper reports the clinical, neurocognitive and (functional) neuroimaging findings of a 15-year-old left-handed patient with an isolated, non-progressive developmental handwriting disorder consistent with a diagnosis of "apraxic dysgraphia". Gross motor coordination problems were objectified as well but no signs of cerebellar, sensorimotor or extrapyramidal dysfunction of the writing limb were found to explain the apraxic phenomena. Brain MRI revealed no supra- and infratentorial damage but quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT disclosed decreased perfusion in the anatomoclinically suspected prefrontal and cerebellar brain regions crucially involved in the planning and execution of skilled motor actions. This pattern of functional depression seems to support the hypothesis that "apraxic dysgraphia" might reflect incomplete maturation of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in handwriting. In addition, it is hypothesized that "apraxic dysgraphia" may have to be considered to represent a distinct nosological category within the group of the developmental dyspraxias following dysfunction of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in planned actions.

  14. A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Federico, Paolo; Perez, Monica A

    2017-06-01

    A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with spinal cord injury is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following spinal cord injury, the role of cortical targets remain poorly understood. Here, we use 180 pairs of transcranial magnetic stimulation for ∼30 min over the hand representation of the motor cortex at an interstimulus interval mimicking the rhythmicity of descending late indirect (I) waves in corticospinal neurons (4.3 ms; I-wave protocol) or at an interstimulus interval in-between I-waves (3.5 ms; control protocol) on separate days in a randomized order. Late I-waves are thought to arise from trans-synaptic cortical inputs and have a crucial role in the recruitment of spinal motor neurons following spinal cord injury. Motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, paired-pulse intracortical inhibition, spinal motor neuron excitability (F-waves), index finger abduction force and electromyographic activity as well as a hand dexterity task were measured before and after both protocols in 15 individuals with chronic incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and 17 uninjured participants. We found that motor evoked potentials size increased in spinal cord injury and uninjured participants after the I-wave but not the control protocol for ∼30 to 60 min after the stimulation. Intracortical inhibition decreased and F-wave amplitude and persistence increased after the I-wave but not the control protocol, suggesting that cortical and subcortical networks contributed to changes in corticospinal excitability. Importantly, hand motor output and hand dexterity increased in individuals with spinal cord injury after the I-wave protocol. These results provide the first evidence that late synaptic input to corticospinal neurons may represent a novel therapeutic target for improving motor function

  15. Opportunities to improve the in vivo measurement of manganese in human hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam; Chettle, D. R.; Pejović-Milić, A.; Waker, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an element which is both essential for regulating neurological and skeletal functions in the human body and also toxic when humans are exposed to excessive levels. Its excessive inhalation as a result of exposure through industrial and environmental emissions can cause neurological damage, which may manifest as memory deficit, loss of motor control and reduction in the refinement of certain body motions. A number of clinical studies demonstrate that biological monitoring of Mn exposure using body fluids, particularly blood, plasma/serum and urine is of very limited use and reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges. In this context, a non-invasive neutron activation technique has been developed at the McMaster University accelerator laboratory that could provide an alternative to measure manganese stored in the bones of exposed subjects. In a first pilot study we conducted recently on non-exposed human subjects to measure the ratio of Mn to Ca in hand bones, it was determined that the technique needed further development to improve the precision of the measurements. It could be achieved by improving the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the system from 2.1 µg Mn/g Ca to the reference value of 0.6 µg g-1 Ca (range: 0.16-0.78 µg Mn/g Ca) for the non-exposed population. However, the developed procedure might still be a suitable means of screening patients and people exposed to excessive amounts of Mn, who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. To improve the MDL of the technique to the expected levels of Mn in a reference population, the present study investigates further optimization of irradiation conditions, which includes the optimal selection of proton beam energy, beam current and irradiation time and the effect of upgrading the 4π detection system. The maximum local dose equivalent that could be given to the hand as a result of irradiation

  16. Lymphoid neogenesis in skin of human hand, nonhuman primate, and rat vascularized composite allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina G; Nasr, Isam W; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Barth, Rolf N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Brandacher, Gerald; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Zelger, Bernhard; Cavadas, Pedro; Margreiter, Raimund; Lee, W P Andrew; Pratschke, Johann; Lakkis, Fadi G; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) remain incompletely understood. The formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO) in hand transplantation has been recently described. We assess this phenomenon in experimental and clinical VCA rejection. Skin biopsies of human (n = 187), nonhuman primate (n = 11), and rat (n = 15) VCAs were analyzed for presence of TLO. A comprehensive immunohistochemical assessment (characterization of the cell infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules) including staining for peripheral node addressin (PNAd) was performed and correlated with rejection and time post-transplantation. TLO were identified in human, nonhuman primate, and rat skin samples. Expression of PNAd was increased in the endothelium of vessels upon rejection in human skin (P = 0.003) and correlated with B- and T-lymphocyte numbers and LFA-1 expression. PNAd expression was observed at all time-points after transplantation and increased significantly after year 5. In nonhuman primate skin, PNAd expression was found during inflammatory conditions early and late after transplantation. In rat skin, PNAd expression was strongly associated with acute rejection and time post-transplantation. Lymphoid neogenesis and TLO formation can be uniformly found in experimental and human VCA. PNAd expression in vascular endothelium correlates with skin rejection and T- and B-cell infiltration.

  17. Man bites mosquito: understanding the contribution of human movement to vector-borne disease dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Adams

    Full Text Available In metropolitan areas people travel frequently and extensively but often in highly structured commuting patterns. We investigate the role of this type of human movement in the epidemiology of vector-borne pathogens such as dengue. Analysis is based on a metapopulation model where mobile humans connect static mosquito subpopulations. We find that, due to frequency dependent biting, infection incidence in the human and mosquito populations is almost independent of the duration of contact. If the mosquito population is not uniformly distributed between patches the transmission potential of the pathogen at the metapopulation level, as summarized by the basic reproductive number, is determined by the size of the largest subpopulation and reduced by stronger connectivity. Global extinction of the pathogen is less likely when increased human movement enhances the rescue effect but, in contrast to classical theory, it is not minimized at an intermediate level of connectivity. We conclude that hubs and reservoirs of infection can be places people visit frequently but briefly and the relative importance of human and mosquito populations in maintaining the pathogen depends on the distribution of the mosquito population and the variability in human travel patterns. These results offer an insight in to the paradoxical observation of resurgent urban vector-borne disease despite increased investment in vector control and suggest that successful public health intervention may require a dual approach. Prospective studies can be used to identify areas with large mosquito populations that are also visited by a large fraction of the human population. Retrospective studies can be used to map recent movements of infected people, pinpointing the mosquito subpopulation from which they acquired the infection and others to which they may have transmitted it.

  18. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary and non-voluntary stepping movements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Kazennikov, O V; Ivanenko, Y P

    2014-09-05

    Here, we compared motor evoked potentials (MEP) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and the H-reflex during voluntary and vibration-induced air-stepping movements in humans. Both the MEPs (in mm biceps femoris, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior) and H-reflex (in m soleus) were significantly smaller during vibration-induced cyclic leg movements at matched amplitudes of angular motion and muscle activity. These findings highlight differences between voluntary and non-voluntary activation of the spinal pattern generator circuitry in humans, presumably due to an extra facilitatory effect of voluntary control/triggering of stepping on spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The results support the idea of active engagement of supraspinal motor areas in developing central pattern generator-modulating therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Apnea-Induced Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Disruption Impairs Human Spatial Navigational Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, Andrew W.; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P.; Osorio, Ricardo S.; David M. Rapoport; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restric...

  20. 基于动态阈值的肌电假手动作控制方法研究%Movement Pattern Control for Prosthetic Hand Based on a Method of Dynamic Threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻洪流; 胡加华

    2011-01-01

    由于构成肌电信号采集电路的电子元器件性能不可能完全对称及干扰信号的存在,有时会导致两路肌电信号发生阈值不一致。这时仍采用固定阈值来对两路肌电信号控制的动作进行判别,会导致动作的误判率增加。为了提高对假手动作判别的正确率,本文提出了利用动态阈值对假手动作进行判别。实验结果表明,利用动态阈值对假手动作进行判别,能够提高对动作判别的正确率达约10%。%Due to the function asymmetry of electrical components used for EMG signal acquisition circuit and the existing of undesired signals, sometimes thresholds for judging EMG's occur may be incongruent. If a fixed threshold is used to recognize Prosthetic Hand's movement,the matching rate of prosthetic hand's movement pattern recognition will be increased. In order to improve prosthetic hand's movement pattern recognition, a method of dynamic threshold was used to recognize the prosthetic hand's movement. The exprimental results showed that the method of dynamic threshold can obviously improve Prosthetic Hand's movement pattern recognition by about 10%.

  1. Limited transfer of newly acquired movement patterns across walking and running in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogawa

    Full Text Available The two major modes of locomotion in humans, walking and running, may be regarded as a function of different speed (walking as slower and running as faster. Recent results using motor learning tasks in humans, as well as more direct evidence from animal models, advocate for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying different locomotion tasks. In the current study, we investigated the possible independence of the neural mechanisms underlying human walking and running. Subjects were tested on a split-belt treadmill and adapted to walking or running on an asymmetrically driven treadmill surface. Despite the acquisition of asymmetrical movement patterns in the respective modes, the emergence of asymmetrical movement patterns in the subsequent trials was evident only within the same modes (walking after learning to walk and running after learning to run and only partial in the opposite modes (walking after learning to run and running after learning to walk (thus transferred only limitedly across the modes. Further, the storage of the acquired movement pattern in each mode was maintained independently of the opposite mode. Combined, these results provide indirect evidence for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying the two locomotive modes.

  2. Summer movements, predation and habitat use of wolves in human modified boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurarie, Eliezer; Suutarinen, Johanna; Kojola, Ilpo; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2011-04-01

    Grey wolves (Canis lupus), formerly extirpated in Finland, have recolonized a boreal forest environment that has been significantly altered by humans, becoming a patchwork of managed forests and clearcuts crisscrossed by roads, power lines, and railways. Little is known about how the wolves utilize this impacted ecosystem, especially during the pup-rearing summer months. We tracked two wolves instrumented with GPS collars transmitting at 30-min intervals during two summers in eastern Finland, visiting all locations in the field, identifying prey items and classifying movement behaviors. We analyzed preference and avoidance of habitat types, linear elements and habitat edges, and tested the generality of our results against lower resolution summer movements of 23 other collared wolves. Wolves tended to show a strong preference for transitional woodlands (mostly harvested clearcuts) and mixed forests over coniferous forests and to use forest roads and low use linear elements to facilitate movement. The high density of primary roads in one wolf's territory led to more constrained use of the home territory compared to the wolf with fewer roads, suggesting avoidance of humans; however, there did not appear to be large differences on the hunting success or the success of pup rearing for the two packs. In total, 90 kills were identified, almost entirely moose (Alces alces) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus sspp.) calves of which a large proportion were killed in transitional woodlands. Generally, wolves displayed a high level of adaptability, successfully exploiting direct and indirect human-derived modifications to the boreal forest environment.

  3. Serum cytokine profiles of children with human enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gan, Xing; Song, Juan; Sun, Peng; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Cytokine profiles may impact the pathogenicity and severity of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by human enterovirus (HEV) 71. In 91 severe or mild HEV 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease children, serum was collected between days 2 and 10 or day >10. Serum cytokines including Type 1 T helper (Th1) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12, and IL-18, Type 1 T helper (Th2) cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), were assessed during the early stage and recovery. In the patients with mild illness, the peaks of IL-8 and IL-10 were observed on day 6 and that of IL-18 was on day 4. In the patients with severe illness, all cytokines spiked on day 3 and peaked on day 11. All cytokines except IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly correlated with immunoglobulin M levels by the end of the disease course. Cytokine profile variations between the patients with mild and severe illness may indicate prognosis and strain virulence, useful in clinical treatment of patients.

  4. Changes in sensory hand representation and pain thresholds induced by motor cortex stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Bérengère; Bradley, Claire; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Shrinking of deafferented somatosensory regions after neural damage is thought to participate to the emergence of neuropathic pain, and pain-relieving procedures have been reported to induce the normalization of altered cortical maps. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex can lessen neuropathic pain, no evidence has been provided that this is concomitant to changes in sensory maps. Here, we assessed in healthy volunteers the ability of 2 modes of motor cortex rTMS commonly used in pain patients to induce changes in pain thresholds and plastic phenomena in the S1 cortex. Twenty minutes of high-frequency (20 Hz) rTMS significantly increased pain thresholds in the contralateral hand, and this was associated with the expansion of the cortical representation of the hand on high-density electroencephalogram source analysis. Neither of these effects were observed after sham rTMS, nor following intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). The superiority of 20-Hz rTMS over iTBS to induce sensory plasticity may reflect its better match with intrinsic cortical motor frequencies, which oscillate at around 20 Hz. rTMS-induced changes might partly counterbalance the plasticity induced by a nerve lesion, and thus substantiate the use of rTMS to treat human pain. However, a mechanistic relation between S1 plasticity and pain-relieving effects is far from being established.

  5. Development of Four Dimensional Human Model that Enables Deformation of Skin, Organs and Blood Vessel System During Body Movement - Visualizing Movements of the Musculoskeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a four dimensional human model that is able to visualize the structure of a whole human body, including the inner structures, in real-time to allow us to analyze human dynamic changes in the temporal, spatial and quantitative domains. To verify whether our model was generating changes according to real human body dynamics, we measured a participant's skin expansion and compared it to that of the model conducted under the same body movement. We also made a contribution to the field of orthopedics, as we were able to devise a display method that enables the observer to more easily observe the changes made in the complex skeletal muscle system during body movements, which in the past were difficult to visualize.

  6. Evidence for right-hand feeding biases in a left-handed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flindall, Jason W; Stone, Kayla D; Gonzalez, Claudia L R

    2015-05-01

    We have recently shown that actions with similar kinematic requirements, but different end-state goals may be supported by distinct neural networks. Specifically, we demonstrated that when right-handed individuals reach-to-grasp food items with intent to eat, they produce smaller maximum grip apertures (MGAs) than when they grasp the same item with intent to place it in a location near the mouth. This effect was restricted to right-handed movements; left-handed movements showed no difference between tasks. The current study investigates whether (and to which side) the effect may be lateralized in left-handed individuals. Twenty-one self-identified left-handed participants grasped food items of three different sizes while grasp kinematics were captured via an Optotrak Certus motion capture array. A main effect of task was identified wherein the grasp-to-eat action generated significantly smaller MGAs than did the grasp-to-place action. Further analysis revealed that similar to the findings in right-handed individuals, this effect was significant only during right-handed movements. Upon further inspection however, we found individual differences in the magnitude and direction of the observed lateralization. These results underscore the evolutionary significance of the grasp-to-eat movement in producing population-level right-handedness in humans as well as highlighting the heterogeneity of the left-handed population.

  7. Morphogenesis and three-dimensional movement of the stomach during the human embryonic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaigai, N; Nako, A; Yamada, S; Uwabe, C; Kose, K; Takakuwa, T

    2014-05-01

    The stomach develops as the local widening of the foregut after Carnegie stage (CS) 13 that moves in a dramatic and dynamic manner during the embryonic period. Using the magnetic resonance images of 377 human embryos, we present the morphology, morphometry, and three-dimensional movement of the stomach during CS16 and CS23. The stomach morphology revealed stage-specific features. The angular incisura and the cardia were formed at CS18. The change in the angular incisura angle was approximately 90° during CS19 and CS20, and was stomach revealed that the stomach gradually becomes "deflected" during development. The stomach may appear to move to the left laterally and caudally due to its deflection and differential growth. The track of the reference points in the stomach may reflect the visual three-dimensional movement. The movement of point M, representing the movement of the greater curvature, was different from that of points C (cardia) and P (pyloric antrum). The P and C were located just around the midsagittal plane in all the stages observed. Point M moved in the caudal-left lateral direction until CS22. Moreover, the vector CP does not rotate around the dorsoventral axis, as widely believed, but around the transverse axis. The plane CPM rotated mainly around the longitudinal axis. The data obtained will be useful for prenatal diagnosis in the near future.

  8. In vivo analysis of Cajal body movement, separation, and joining in live human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platani, M; Goldberg, I; Swedlow, J R; Lamond, A I

    2000-12-25

    Cajal bodies (also known as coiled bodies) are subnuclear organelles that contain specific nuclear antigens, including splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and a subset of nucleolar proteins. Cajal bodies are localized in the nucleoplasm and are often found at the nucleolar periphery. We have constructed a stable HeLa cell line, HeLa(GFP-coilin), that expresses the Cajal body marker protein, p80 coilin, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP-coilin). The localization pattern and biochemical properties of the GFP-coilin fusion protein are identical to the endogenous p80 coilin. Time-lapse recordings on 63 nuclei of HeLa(GFP-coilin) cells showed that all Cajal bodies move within the nucleoplasm. Movements included translocations through the nucleoplasm, joining of bodies to form larger structures, and separation of smaller bodies from larger Cajal bodies. Also, we observed Cajal bodies moving to and from nucleoli. The data suggest that there may be at least two classes of Cajal bodies that differ in their size, antigen composition, and dynamic behavior. The smaller size class shows more frequent and faster rates of movement, up to 0.9 microm/min. The GFP-coilin protein is dynamically associated with Cajal bodies as shown by changes in their fluorescence intensity over time. This study reveals an unexpectedly high level of movement and interactions of nuclear bodies in human cells and suggests that these movements may be driven, at least in part, by regulated mechanisms.

  9. Hand dug wells in Namibia: An underestimated water source or a threat to human health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, H.; Nakwafila, A.; Hamutoko, J. T.; Lohe, C.; Neumbo, F.; Petrus, I.; David, A.; Beukes, H.; Masule, N.; Quinger, M.

    The rural population of parts of northern and western Namibia uses hand dug wells for their domestic water supply, partly because no other source (e.g., deep tube wells) is available, but also as a substitute for pipeline water that is often perceived as being too expensive. The water quality of these wells is usually not monitored or controlled, thus a study has been carried out in four study areas in Namibia: southern Omusati/Oshana area, Okongo/Ohangwena area, Omatjete/Omaruru area, Okanguati/Kunene area. Hand dug wells have been tested for on-site parameters: electric conductivity, pH and temperature while samples were taken for major inorganic constituents and several minor and trace constituents including fluoride and nitrate. In addition a sampling campaign in 2010 included the determination of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli. Results were classified according to the Namibian Water Guidelines. The constituents making the water unfit for human consumption are fluoride, nitrate, sulphate and total dissolved solids. Contamination by E. coli was indicated in nearly all wells that are used for livestock watering. For the Omatjete/Omaruru study area an isotope based study on the source of nitrate has indicated manure as a source. The range of recharge values obtained for the studied villages ranges from 1 mm/a to locally more than 100 mm/a. Overall the water resource in the shallow perched aquifers in the study areas is in many places inappropriate for human consumption. Treatment to improve the quality or introduction of protection measures is necessary to bring this resource to an acceptable quality according to national and/or international standards.

  10. Modulation of ongoing EMG by different classes of low-threshold mechanoreceptors in the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, P A; Macefield, V G

    2001-12-15

    1. We have previously demonstrated that the input from single FA I and SA II cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the glabrous skin of the human hand is sufficiently strong to modulate ongoing EMG of muscles acting on the digits. Some unresolved issues have now been addressed. 2. Single cutaneous (n = 60), joint (n = 2) and muscle spindle (n = 34) afferents were recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist. Spike-triggered averaging was used to investigate synaptic coupling between these afferents and muscles acting on the digits. The activity of 37 % of FA I (7/19), 20 % of FA II (1/5) and 52 % of SA II afferents (11/21) evoked a reflex response. The discharge from muscle spindles, 15 SA I and two joint afferents did not modulate EMG activity. 3. Two types of reflex responses were encountered: a single excitatory response produced by irregularly firing afferents, or a cyclic modulation evoked by regularly discharging afferents. Rhythmic stimulation of one FA I afferent generated regularly occurring bursts which corresponded to the associated cyclic EMG response. 4. Selectively triggering from the first or last spike of each burst of one FA I afferent altered the averaged EMG profile, suggesting that afferent input modulates the associated EMG and not vice versa. 5. The discharge from single FA I, FA II and SA II afferents can modify ongoing voluntary EMG in muscles of the human hand, presumably via a spinally mediated oligosynaptic pathway. Conversely, we saw no evidence of such modulation by SA I, muscle spindle or joint afferents.

  11. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  12. Design and validation of a morphing myoelectric hand posture controller based on principal component analysis of human grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segil, Jacob L; Weir, Richard F ff

    2014-03-01

    An ideal myoelectric prosthetic hand should have the ability to continuously morph between any posture like an anatomical hand. This paper describes the design and validation of a morphing myoelectric hand controller based on principal component analysis of human grasping. The controller commands continuously morphing hand postures including functional grasps using between two and four surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes pairs. Four unique maps were developed to transform the EMG control signals in the principal component domain. A preliminary validation experiment was performed by 10 nonamputee subjects to determine the map with highest performance. The subjects used the myoelectric controller to morph a virtual hand between functional grasps in a series of randomized trials. The number of joints controlled accurately was evaluated to characterize the performance of each map. Additional metrics were studied including completion rate, time to completion, and path efficiency. The highest performing map controlled over 13 out of 15 joints accurately.

  13. Islamic movement and human rights: Pertubuhan Jamaah Islah Malaysia’s involvement in the “Abolish Internal Security Act Movement,” 2000-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maszlee Malik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human rights has been acknowledged as one of the essential characteristics of good governance. Abuse of human rights is strongly associated with bad governance, which is believed by many to be a serious impediment to development and sustainable growth. Despite the active participations of Islamic movements in many parts of the political world, very little is known of their involvement in advocating human rights issues as part of their struggle for power. Nevertheless, as an Islamic movement and an Islamic revivalism actor in Malaysia, Pertubuhan Jamaah Islah Malaysia (JIM has shown otherwise. JIM has resembled a different attitude towards the issue of human rights that they believe as an integrated and pertinent composition of good governance. By scrutinising their political activities and discourse since 2000, it becomes clear that JIM has been actively engaged in good governance and human rights issues, especially those that relate to the political rights of citizens through its involvement in the Abolish Internal Security Act (ISA Movement (Gerakan Mansuhkan ISA. This paper examines JIM’s involvement in human rights issues with a special focus on its active and leading role in calling for the abolishment of the Internal Security Act (ISA.

  14. Urban dogs in rural areas: Human-mediated movement defines dog populations in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro, Federico J; Sepúlveda, Maximiliano A; Stowhas, Paulina; Silva-Rodríguez, Eduardo A

    2016-12-01

    Management strategies for dog populations and their diseases include reproductive control, euthanasia and vaccination, among others. However, the effectiveness of these strategies can be severely affected by human-mediated dog movement. If immigration is important, then the location of origin of dogs imported by humans will be fundamental to define the spatial scales over which population management and research should apply. In this context, the main objective of our study was to determine the spatial extent of dog demographic processes in rural areas and the proportion of dogs that could be labeled as immigrants at multiple spatial scales. To address our objective we conducted surveys in households located in a rural landscape in southern Chile. Interviews allowed us to obtain information on the demographic characteristics of dogs in these rural settings, human influence on dog mortality and births, the localities of origin of dogs living in rural areas, and the spatial extent of human-mediated dog movement. We found that most rural dogs (64.1%) were either urban dogs that had been brought to rural areas (40.0%), or adopted dogs that had been previously abandoned in rural roads (24.1%). Some dogs were brought from areas located as far as ∼700km away from the study area. Human-mediated movement of dogs, especially from urban areas, seems to play a fundamental role in the population dynamics of dogs in rural areas. Consequently, local scale efforts to manage dog populations or their diseases are unlikely to succeed if implemented in isolation, simply because dogs can be brought from surrounding urban areas or even distant locations. We suggest that efforts to manage or study dog populations and related diseases should be implemented using a multi-scale approach.

  15. Magic Hands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    THE two most amazing things on the planet may well be the human brain and human hands. When they work together, the results can be enchanting. At an international folk art fair held recently in Beijing, artisans and masters from Japan, India, Switzerland, Peru, South

  16. Modeling collective human mobility: Understanding exponential law of intra-urban movement

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Xiao; Dong, Li; Xu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    It is very important to understand urban mobility patterns because most trips are concentrated in urban areas. In the paper, a new model is proposed to model collective human mobility in urban areas. The model can be applied to predict individual flows not only in intra-city but also in countries or a larger range. Based on the model, it can be concluded that the exponential law of distance distribution is attributed to decreasing exponentially of average density of human travel demands. Since the distribution of human travel demands only depends on urban planning, population distribution, regional functions and so on, it illustrates that these inherent properties of cities are impetus to drive collective human movements.

  17. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part I: Posture and movement detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugade, Vipul; Fortune, Emma; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-02-01

    A robust method for identifying movement in the free-living environment is needed to objectively measure physical activity. The purpose of this study was to validate the identification of postural orientation and movement from acceleration data against visual inspection from video recordings. Using tri-axial accelerometers placed on the waist and thigh, static orientations of standing, sitting, and lying down, as well as dynamic movements of walking, jogging and transitions between postures were identified. Additionally, subjects walked and jogged at self-selected slow, comfortable, and fast speeds. Identification of tasks was performed using a combination of the signal magnitude area, continuous wavelet transforms and accelerometer orientations. Twelve healthy adults were studied in the laboratory, with two investigators identifying tasks during each second of video observation. The intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.95 for all activities except for transitions. Results demonstrated high validity, with sensitivity and positive predictive values of greater than 85% for sitting and lying, with walking and jogging identified at greater than 90%. The greatest disagreement in identification accuracy between the algorithm and video occurred when subjects were asked to fidget while standing or sitting. During variable speed tasks, gait was correctly identified for speeds between 0.1m/s and 4.8m/s. This study included a range of walking speeds and natural movements such as fidgeting during static postures, demonstrating that accelerometer data can be used to identify orientation and movement among the general population.

  18. Human handedness: is there a difference in the independence of the digits on the preferred and non-preferred hands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Karen T; Hammond, Geoffrey R

    2004-05-01

    In non-human primates, comparative studies show that greater dexterity is associated with greater independent control over the digits. Studies of humans, however, show no difference in the degree of independent control of single digits on the more dexterous preferred hand and its less dexterous partner. We wondered whether there might be a difference in the degree of independent control on the two hands during performance of functionally relevant tasks. Many object manipulation tasks require the ability to produce and control forces with more than one finger at the same time. We hypothesized that asymmetrical independence, with greater independence on the preferred than the non-preferred hand, would be evident with a task that requires the simultaneous production of force in two digits. We examined digit individuation when subjects produced flexion forces with a single digit in isolation, and simultaneous flexion forces in all ten combinations of two digits. Consistent with previous studies, we found no difference between the individuation of the digits on the preferred and non-preferred hands during force production with single digits in isolation. Similarly, no asymmetry was present when forces were produced by two digits. However, separation of two-digit forces into thumb-to-digit opposition forces and non-opposition forces showed that although there was no difference in individuation between the two hands for non-opposition forces, the digits on the preferred hand were more independent than those on the non-preferred hand for opposition forces. We suggest that this independence asymmetry is not itself the underlying cause of the dexterity differences between the hands, but rather arises from a difference in the capacity for use-dependent reorganization of the motor cortical circuits controlling each hand, and that this difference might underlie the dexterity differences between the hands.

  19. Effectiveness of a Novel Qigong Meditative Movement Practice for Impaired Health in Flight Attendants Exposed to Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Peter; Fiering, Steven; Leiter, James C.; Zava, David T.; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.

    2017-01-01

    This single-arm non-randomized pilot study explores an intervention to improve the health of flight attendants (FA) exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke prior to the smoking ban on commercial airlines. This group exhibits an unusual pattern of long-term pulmonary dysfunction. We report on Phase I of a two-phase clinical trial; the second Phase will be a randomized controlled trial testing digital delivery of the intervention. Subjects were recruited in the Northeastern US; testing and intervention were administered in 4 major cities. The intervention involved 12 h of training in Meditative Movement practices. Based on recent research on the effects of nicotine on fear learning, and the influence of the autonomic nervous system on immune function, our hypothesis was that this training would improve autonomic function and thus benefit a range of health measures. Primary outcomes were the 6-min walk test and blood levels of C-reactive protein. Pulmonary, cardiovascular, autonomic, and affective measures were also taken. Fourteen participants completed the training and post-testing. There was a 53% decrease in high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (p ≤ 0.05), a 7% reduction in systolic blood pressure (p ≤ 0.05), a 13% increase in the 6-min walk test (p ≤ 0.005), and significant positive changes in several other outcomes. These results tend to confirm the hypothesized benefits of MM training for this population, and indicate that autonomic function may be important in the etiology and treatment of their symptoms. No adverse effects were reported. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02612389/), and is supported by a grant from the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute (FAMRI). PMID:28270757

  20. Effectiveness of a Novel Qigong Meditative Movement Practice for Impaired Health in Flight Attendants Exposed to Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Peter; Fiering, Steven; Leiter, James C; Zava, David T; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A

    2017-01-01

    This single-arm non-randomized pilot study explores an intervention to improve the health of flight attendants (FA) exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke prior to the smoking ban on commercial airlines. This group exhibits an unusual pattern of long-term pulmonary dysfunction. We report on Phase I of a two-phase clinical trial; the second Phase will be a randomized controlled trial testing digital delivery of the intervention. Subjects were recruited in the Northeastern US; testing and intervention were administered in 4 major cities. The intervention involved 12 h of training in Meditative Movement practices. Based on recent research on the effects of nicotine on fear learning, and the influence of the autonomic nervous system on immune function, our hypothesis was that this training would improve autonomic function and thus benefit a range of health measures. Primary outcomes were the 6-min walk test and blood levels of C-reactive protein. Pulmonary, cardiovascular, autonomic, and affective measures were also taken. Fourteen participants completed the training and post-testing. There was a 53% decrease in high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (p ≤ 0.05), a 7% reduction in systolic blood pressure (p ≤ 0.05), a 13% increase in the 6-min walk test (p ≤ 0.005), and significant positive changes in several other outcomes. These results tend to confirm the hypothesized benefits of MM training for this population, and indicate that autonomic function may be important in the etiology and treatment of their symptoms. No adverse effects were reported. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02612389/), and is supported by a grant from the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute (FAMRI).

  1. Detection of error related neuronal responses recorded by electrocorticography in humans during continuous movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Milekovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can translate the neuronal activity underlying a user's movement intention into movements of an artificial effector. In spite of continuous improvements, errors in movement decoding are still a major problem of current BMI systems. If the difference between the decoded and intended movements becomes noticeable, it may lead to an execution error. Outcome errors, where subjects fail to reach a certain movement goal, are also present during online BMI operation. Detecting such errors can be beneficial for BMI operation: (i errors can be corrected online after being detected and (ii adaptive BMI decoding algorithm can be updated to make fewer errors in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that error events can be detected from human electrocorticography (ECoG during a continuous task with high precision, given a temporal tolerance of 300-400 milliseconds. We quantified the error detection accuracy and showed that, using only a small subset of 2×2 ECoG electrodes, 82% of detection information for outcome error and 74% of detection information for execution error available from all ECoG electrodes could be retained. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The error detection method presented here could be used to correct errors made during BMI operation or to adapt a BMI algorithm to make fewer errors in the future. Furthermore, our results indicate that smaller ECoG implant could be used for error detection. Reducing the size of an ECoG electrode implant used for BMI decoding and error detection could significantly reduce the medical risk of implantation.

  2. Selection of suitable hand gestures for reliable myoelectric human computer interface

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Myoelectric controlled prosthetic hand requires machine based identification of hand gestures using surface electromyogram (sEMG) recorded from the forearm muscles. This study has observed that a sub-set of the hand gestures have to be selected for an accurate automated hand gesture recognition, and reports a method to select these gestures to maximize the sensitivity and specificity. Methods Experiments were conducted where sEMG was recorded from the muscles of the forearm while s...

  3. Human Response to Ductless Personalised Ventilation: Impact of Air Movement, Temperature and Cleanness on Eye Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Fillon, Maelys; Bivolarova, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    The performance of ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation (DV) was studied in relation to peoples’ health, comfort and performance. This paper presents results on the impact of room air temperature, using of DPV and local air filtration on eye blink...... rate and tear film quality. In a test room with DV and six workstations 30 human subjects were exposed for four hours to each of the following 5 experimental conditions: 23 °C and DV only, 23 °C and DPV with air filter, 29 °C and DV only, 29 °C and DPV, and 29 °C and DPV with air filter. At warm...... environment facially applied individually controlled air movement of room air, with or without local filtering, did not have significant impact on eye blink frequency and tear film quality. The local air movement and air cleaning resulted in increased eye blinking frequency and improvement of tear film...

  4. Comparing the accuracy of video-oculography and the scleral search coil system in human eye movement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takao; Sekine, Kazunori; Hattori, Kousuke; Takeda, Noriaki; Koizuka, Izumi; Nakamae, Koji; Miura, Katsuyoshi; Fujioka, Hiromu; Kubo, Takeshi

    2005-03-01

    The measurement of eye movements in three dimensions is an important tool to investigate the human vestibular and oculomotor system. The primary methods for three dimensional eye movement measurement are the scleral search coil system (SSCS) and video-oculography (VOG). In the present study, we compare the accuracy of VOG with that of SSCS using an artificial eye. We then analyzed the Y (pitch) and Z (yaw) component of human eye movements during saccades, smooth pursuit and optokinetic nystagmus, and the X (roll) component of human eye movement during the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex induced by rotation in normal subjects, using simultaneous VOG and SSCS measures. The coefficients of the linear relationship between the angle of a simulated eyeball and the angle measured by both VOG and SSCS was almost unity with y-intercepts close to zero for torsional (X), vertical (Y) and horizontal (Z) movements, indicating that the in vitro accuracy of VOG was similar to that of SSCS. The average difference between VOG and SSCS was 0.56 degrees , 0.78 degrees and 0.18 degrees for the X, Y and Z components of human eye movements, respectively. Both the in vitro and in vivo comparisons demonstrate that VOG has accuracy comparable to SSCS, and is a reliable method for measurement of three dimensions (3D) human eye movements.

  5. Effects of human relaxin on orthodontic tooth movement and periodontal ligaments in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Monica S.; Liu, Zee J.; Gu, Gao M.; King, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions Human relaxin does not accelerate orthodontic tooth movement in rats; it can reduce the level of PDL organization, reduce PDL mechanical strength, and increase tooth mobility at early time points. PMID:17208099

  6. Clonal CD8+ T Cell Persistence and Variable Gene Usage Bias in a Human Transplanted Hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Y Kim

    Full Text Available Immune prophylaxis and treatment of transplanted tissue rejection act indiscriminately, risking serious infections and malignancies. Although animal data suggest that cellular immune responses causing rejection may be rather narrow and predictable based on genetic background, there are only limited data regarding the clonal breadth of anti-donor responses in humans after allogeneic organ transplantation. We evaluated the graft-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes in skin punch biopsies of a transplanted hand over 178 days. Profiling of T cell receptor (TCR variable gene usage and size distribution of the infiltrating cells revealed marked skewing of the TCR repertoire indicating oligoclonality, but relatively normal distributions in the blood. Although sampling limitation prevented complete assessment of the TCR repertoire, sequencing further identified 11 TCR clonal expansions that persisted through varying degrees of clinical rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. These 11 clones were limited to three TCR beta chain variable (BV gene families. Overall, these data indicate significant oligoclonality and likely restricted BV gene usage of alloreactive CD8+ T lymphocytes, and suggest that changes in rejection status are more due to varying regulation of their activity or number rather than shifts in the clonal populations in the transplanted organ. Given that controlled animal models produce predictable BV usage in T lymphocytes mediating rejection, understanding the determinants of TCR gene usage associated with rejection in humans may have application in specifically targeted immunotherapy.

  7. Hand controller commonality evaluation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mark A.; Bierschwale, John M.; Wilmington, Robert P.; Adam, Susan C.; Diaz, Manuel F.; Jensen, Dean G.

    1993-01-01

    Hand controller selection for NASA's Orbiter and Space Station Freedom is an important area of human-telerobot interface design and evaluation. These input devices will control remotely operated systems that include large crane-like manipulators (e.g., Remote Manipulator System or RMS), smaller, more dexterous manipulators (e.g., Flight Telerobotic Servicer or FTS), and free flyers (e.g., Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle or OMV). Candidate hand controller configurations for these systems vary in many ways: shape, size, number of degrees-of-freedom (DOF), operating modes, provision of force reflection, range of movement, and 'naturalness' of use. Unresolved design implementation issues remain, including such topics as how the current Orbiter RMS rotational and translational rate hand controllers compare with the proposed Space Station Freedom hand controllers, the advantages that position hand controllers offer for these applications, and whether separate hand controller configurations are required for each application. Since previous studies contain little empirical hand controller task performance data, a controlled study is needed that tests Space Station Freedom candidate hand controllers during representative tasks. This study also needs to include anthropometric and biomechanical considerations.

  8. Vasoconstricting effect of angiotensin II in human hand veins: influence of aging, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Masami; Fujimura, Akio

    2002-09-01

    We examined human hand veins to determine whether venoconstricting response to angiotensin II (Ang II) and noradrenaline (NA) was influenced by aging or such diseases as diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT). Twenty healthy male subjects (20-73 years), and 8 male patients with non-insulin-dependent DM and 8 male patients with essential HT were included in this study. A constant dose (50 ng/min) of Ang II or increasing dose (2-256 ng/min) of NA was infused into the dorsal hand vein and its diameter was measured using a linear variable differential transformer. The constant infusion of Ang II caused rapid desensitization or tachyphylaxis. The venoconstriction by Ang II in the 8 elderly subjects (58 to 73 years) was significantly (p<0.05) larger than that in the 8 young subjects (20 to 36 years) from 6 to 18 min after the start of the infusion (after 6 min: 63.6+/-11.6 (mean+/-SD)% vs. 39.9+/-20.8%, 12 min: 34.0+/-11.9% vs. 12.0+/-12.0%). However, the venoconstriction by Ang II in the patients with DM or HT was not significantly different from that in the 9 age-matched control subjects. No significant difference in venoconstrictor response to NA was observed between the young and elderly subjects, nor between the control subjects and the patients with DM or HT. These findings indicated that venoconstrictor response to Ang II might be greater in the elderly but might not be influenced by DM nor HT.

  9. Human perception of air movement. Impact of frequency and airflow direction on draught sensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genhong Zhou

    1999-08-01

    Draught is defined as an unwanted local cooling of the human body caused by air movement. Air velocity and temperature are the main characteristics of air movement in rooms. Characteristics of instantaneous air velocity and temperature records previously measured in ventilated indoor spaces were analyzed. Air velocity and temperature fluctuated randomly. The amplitude and frequency of the fluctuations changed over time. Air movements around the human body were measured with a three-dimensional laser Doppler amemometer. A new parameter, equivalent frequency, was defined as an integral single parameter for describing the frequency characteristics of air velocity. The equivalent frequency of a randomly fluctuating velocity is defined as the frequency of sinusoidal velocity fluctuations with the same ratio of the standard deviation of acceleration to the standard deviation of air velocity as in the random velocity fluctuations. The equivalent frequencies of numerous instantaneous air-velocity records measured in ventilated space were analysed. The equivalent frequency of an airflow in an indoor space was found to be 0.1 to 2 Hz. The equivalent frequencies of most of the airflows were between 0.2 and 0.6 Hz. The relation between equivalent frequency and mean air velocity and standard deviation was established. Experiments were performed to identify the impact of the equivalent frequency on the human perception of draught. Forty subjects (20 women and 20 men) were subjected to airflows from behind with mean air velocities of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 m/s, with equivalent frequencies from 0 to 1 Hz at an air temperature of 20 deg. C. In this human-subject experimental study the frequency was found to have a significant impact on draught sensation. Subjects were more sensitive to airflow at an equivalent frequency between 0.2 and 0.6 Hz. A mathematical model for the simulation of draught was established and a computer program was developed for simulating the draught. The program

  10. NOTE: A preliminary study for non-invasive quantification of manganese in human hand bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A.; Chettle, D. R.; McNeill, F. E.; Pysklywec, M. W.; Oudyk, J.

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a nutrient essential for regulating neurological and skeletal functions in the human body, but it is also toxic when humans are excessively exposed to Mn. Blood (or serum/plasma) and other body fluids reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive measurement of Mn stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following feasibility studies, a first pilot study, using neutron activation analysis to measure Mn in the bones of the hand of ten healthy male human subjects, was conducted with the approval of the concerned research ethics boards. The participants of this study had no known history of exposure to Mn. Two volunteers were excluded from this study due to technical problems with their measurements. The inverse variance weighted mean value of Mn/Ca for the participants of this study is 0.12 ± 0.68 µg Mn/g Ca which is comparable within uncertainties with the estimated range of 0.16 0.78 µg Mn/g Ca and mean value of 0.63 ± 0.30 µg Mn/g Ca derived from cadaver data. It is recommended to investigate the use of the diagnostic technique for in vivo measurements of workers exposed occupationally to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. The technique needs further development to improve the precision of in vivo measurements in the non-exposed population.

  11. Study of movement coordination in human ensembles via a novel computer-based set-up

    CERN Document Server

    Alderisio, Francesco; Fiore, Gianfranco; di Bernardo, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Movement coordination in human ensembles has been studied little in the current literature. In the existing experimental works, situations where all subjects are connected with each other through direct visual and auditory coupling, and social interaction affects their coordination, have been investigated. Here, we study coordination in human ensembles via a novel computer-based set-up that enables individuals to coordinate each other's motion from a distance so as to minimize the influence of social interaction. The proposed platform makes it possible to implement different visual interaction patterns among the players, so that participants take into consideration the motion of a designated subset of the others. This allows the evaluation of the exclusive effects on coordination of the structure of interconnections among the players and their own dynamics. Our set-up enables also the deployment of virtual players to investigate dyadic interaction between a human and a virtual agent, as well as group synchron...

  12. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  13. [Cutaneo-muscular reflexes of the human hand. II. Neurophysiologic aspects of reflex organization and coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinck, H M; Berkefeld, J; Conrad, B

    1987-09-01

    The organization and coordination of cutaneo-muscular reflexes of human finger and arm muscles to electrical stimulation of the digital nerves were investigated in 14 healthy volunteers. Thumb and finger muscles, although antagonists, showed homonymous reflex effects whereas the wrist and elbow muscles exhibited an reciprocally alternating reflex pattern in pairs of antagonists (Fig. 1). The mechanographical correlate of the homonymous reflex activity in distal muscles was a short release (Fig. 6). The receptive field for evoking such reflex effects covered both the palmar and dorsal surfaces of the fingers (Fig. 2). However, with stimulation of the thumb, the muscles of the fingers and of the wrist showed reflex reversal (Figs 3, 5). If the stimulus was moved from the second to the fifth fingers, a successive attenuation of the transcortical reflex component was seen (Fig. 4). It is concluded that the reflexes investigated are complex flexor reflexes comprising both a distal release and a proximal flexion synergy. According to opposition of the thumb in grasping, the receptive field terminates between thumb and index finger. These reflexes are supposed to have no assisting function during corticalized manipulatory movements--in contrast to the long-loop reflexes evoked by epicritic sensibility. The transcortical servo is blocked if the eliciting stimulus is contaminated by nociceptive signals; its receptive field is confined to those fingers used in the precision grip.

  14. Elephant movement patterns in relation to human inhabitants in and around the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin M. Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of humans and African elephants (Loxodonta africana in the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park can create situations of potential human–elephant conflict. Such conflict will likely be exacerbated as elephant and human populations increase, unless mitigation measures are put in place. In this study we analysed the movement patterns of 13 collared adult African elephants from the northern Kruger National Park over a period of eight years (2006–2014. We compared the occurrence and displacement rates of elephant bulls and cows around villages in the Limpopo National Park and northern border of the Kruger National Park across seasons and at different times of the day. Elephants occurred close to villages more often in the dry season than in the wet season, with bulls occurring more frequently around villages than cows. Both the bulls and the cows preferred to use areas close to villages from early evening to midnight, with the bulls moving closer to villages than the cows. These results suggest that elephants, especially the bulls, are moving through the studied villages in Mozambique and Zimbabwe at night and that these movements are most common during the drier months when resources are known to be scarce.Conservation implications: Elephants from the Kruger National Park are moving in close proximity to villages within the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. Resettlement of villages within and around the park should therefore be planned away from elephant seasonal routes to minimise conflict between humans and elephants.

  15. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  16. Early Pleistocene human hand phalanx from the Sima del Elefante (TE) cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Pablos, Adrián; Carretero, José Miguel; Huguet, Rosa; Valverdú, Josep; Martinón-Torres, María; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new Early Pleistocene proximal hand phalanx (ATE9-2) from the Sima del Elefante cave site (TE - Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain), ascribed to Homo sp., is presented and comparatively described in the context of the evolution of the genus Homo. The ATE9-2 specimen is especially important because of the paucity of hand bones in the human fossil record during the Early Pleistocene. The morphological and metrical analyses of the phalanx ATE9-2 indicate that there are no essential differences between it and comparator fossil specimens for the genus Homo after 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago). Similar to Sima de los Huesos and Neandertal specimens, ATE9-2 is a robust proximal hand phalanx, probably reflecting greater overall body robusticity in these populations or a higher gracility in modern humans. The age of level TE9 from Sima del Elefante and morphological and metrical studies of ATE9-2 suggest that the morphology of the proximal hand phalanges and, thus, the morphology of the hand could have remained stable over the last 1.2-1.3 Ma. Taking into account the evidence recently provided by a metacarpal from Kaitio (Kenya) from around 1.42 Ma, we argue that modern hand morphology is present in the genus Homo subsequent to Homo habilis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of software application dedicated to impulse- radar-based system for monitoring of human movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miękina, Andrzej; Wagner, Jakub; Mazurek, Paweł; Morawski, Roman Z.; Sudmann, Tobba T.; Børsheim, Ingebjørg T.; Øvsthus, Knut; Jacobsen, Frode F.; Ciamulski, Tomasz; Winiecki, Wiesław

    2016-11-01

    The importance of research on new technologies that could be employed in care services for elderly and disabled persons is highlighted. Advantages of radar sensors, when applied for non-invasive monitoring of such persons in their home environment, are indicated. A need for comprehensible visualisation of the intermediate results of measurement data processing is justified. Capability of an impulse-radar-based system to provide information, being of crucial importance for medical or healthcare personnel, are investigated. An exemplary software interface, tailored for non-technical users, is proposed, and preliminary results of impulse-radar-based monitoring of human movements are demonstrated.

  18. Human movement stochastic variability leads to diagnostic biomarkers In Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Torres, Elizabeth B.; Jose, Jorge V.

    2015-03-01

    ASD is a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders. The high heterogeneity of the symptoms associated with the disorder impedes efficient diagnoses based on human observations. Recent advances with high-resolution MEM wearable sensors enable accurate movement measurements that may escape the naked eye. It calls for objective metrics to extract physiological relevant information from the rapidly accumulating data. In this talk we'll discuss the statistical analysis of movement data continuously collected with high-resolution sensors at 240Hz. We calculated statistical properties of speed fluctuations within the millisecond time range that closely correlate with the subjects' cognitive abilities. We computed the periodicity and synchronicity of the speed fluctuations' from their power spectrum and ensemble averaged two-point cross-correlation function. We built a two-parameter phase space from the temporal statistical analyses of the nearest neighbor fluctuations that provided a quantitative biomarker for ASD and adult normal subjects and further classified ASD severity. We also found age related developmental statistical signatures and potential ASD parental links in our movement dynamical studies. Our results may have direct clinical applications.

  19. "Green earth, women's power, human liberation": women in peasant movements in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omvedt, G

    1992-01-01

    The experience of 2 peasant women's movements in India's state of Maharashtra--Stri Mukti Sangharsh and Shetkari Mahila Aghadi--highlights the potential power of women in resisting capitalist exploitation of peasant and forest-dwelling communities. The former organization is the women's branch of a movement that is resisting the ecological destruction and displacement of peasants and tribal people resulting from development projects such as dam construction; the latter addresses the demand for fair prices for agricultural produce and inequities created by a market economy. Both are mass-based, self-financed people's movements unconnected with any political party. Although women are under-represented in the formal decision-making bodies of the parent organizations, they are struggling to become a central force in the development of alternative technology and agriculture. In 1990, Stri Mukti Sangharsh activists devised a new slogan--green earth, women's power, human liberation--summarizing this process. Similarly, Shetkari Mahila Aghadi calls upon women to monopolize political power and runs all-women panels in district council elections. These campaigns have challenged women's exclusion from ownership of land in spite of laws granting property rights and placed the issues of women's health and nutrition on the political agenda. Moreover, peasant women have played a leading role in the current experimentation with energy-recycling, regenerative, low-input agricultural development. Together, these developments may provide Indian women with the power to recover their former centrality in agricultural decision-making and production.

  20. Analysis of Deformation of the Human Ear and Canal Caused by Mandibular Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    Many hearing aid users experience physical discomfort when wearing their device. The main contributor to this problem is believed to be deformation of the ear and ear canal caused by movement of the mandible. Physical discomfort results from added pressure on soft tissue areas in the ear. Identif......Many hearing aid users experience physical discomfort when wearing their device. The main contributor to this problem is believed to be deformation of the ear and ear canal caused by movement of the mandible. Physical discomfort results from added pressure on soft tissue areas in the ear....... Identifying features that can predict potential deformation is therefore important for identifying problematic cases in advance. A study on the physical deformation of the human ear and canal due to movement of the mandible is presented. The study is based on laser scannings of 30 pairs of ear impressions...... and propagated to the shape model, enabling the building of a deformation model in the reference frame of the shape model. A relationship between the two models is established, showing that the shape variation can explain approximately 50% of the variation in the deformation model. An hypothesis test...

  1. Task-dependent modulation of functional connectivity between hand motor cortices and neuronal networks underlying language and music: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparing, R; Meister, I G; Wienemann, M; Buelte, D; Staedtgen, M; Boroojerdi, B

    2007-01-01

    Although language functions are, in general, attributed to the left hemisphere, it is still a matter of debate to what extent the cognitive functions underlying the processing of music are lateralized in the human brain. To investigate hemispheric specialization we evaluated the effect of different overt musical and linguistic tasks on the excitability of both left and right hand motor cortices using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Task-dependent changes of the size of the TMS-elicited motor evoked potentials were recorded in 12 right-handed, musically naive subjects during and after overt speech, singing and humming, i.e. the production of melody without word articulation. The articulation of meaningless syllables served as control condition. We found reciprocal lateralized effects of overt speech and musical tasks on motor cortex excitability. During overt speech, the corticospinal projection of the left (i.e. dominant) hemisphere to the right hand was facilitated. In contrast, excitability of the right motor cortex increased during both overt singing and humming, whereas no effect was observed on the left hemisphere. Although the traditional concept of hemispheric lateralization of music has been challenged by recent neuroimaging studies, our findings demonstrate that right-hemisphere preponderance of music is nevertheless present. We discuss our results in terms of the recent concepts on evolution of language and gesture, which hypothesize that cerebral networks mediating hand movement and those subserving language processing are functionally linked. TMS may constitute a useful tool to further investigate the relationship between cortical representations of motor functions, music and language using comparative approaches.

  2. Associative cortico-cortical plasticity may affect ipsilateral finger opposition movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, V; Bove, M; Naro, A;

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that cortico-cortical paired associative stimulation (cc-PAS) can modulate interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) in the human brain. Here we further explored the after effects of cc-PAS on fine hand movements. Ten healthy right-handed volunteers received 90 paired transc...... influencing motor hand performances. These results may be relevant for future rehabilitative applications.......We have recently demonstrated that cortico-cortical paired associative stimulation (cc-PAS) can modulate interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) in the human brain. Here we further explored the after effects of cc-PAS on fine hand movements. Ten healthy right-handed volunteers received 90 paired...... transcranial stimuli to the right and left primary motor hand area (M1(HAND)) at an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 8 ms. We studied the after effects of cc-PAS on the performance of repetitive finger opposition movements of different complexity on both hands using a sensor-engineered glove. A quantitative...

  3. Hand Path Priming in Manual Obstacle Avoidance: Evidence for Abstract Spatiotemporal Forms in Human Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Robrecht P. R. D.; Fleckenstein, Robin M.; Jax, Steven A.; Rosenbaum, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research suggests that motor equivalence is achieved through reliance on effector-independent spatiotemporal forms. Here the authors report a series of experiments investigating the role of such forms in the production of movement sequences. Participants were asked to complete series of arm movements in time with a metronome and, on some…

  4. Body movement distribution with respect to swimmer's glide position in human underwater undulatory swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Stefan; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-12-01

    Human swimmers use undulatory motions similar to fish locomotion to attain high speeds. The human body is a non-smooth multi-body linkage system with restricted flexibility and is not primarily adapted to motion in the water. Due to anatomical limitations, the human swimmer is forced to deviate from the symmetric fish-like motion and to adjust his motion to his limited abilities. The goal of this paper is to investigates the movement of ten swimmers during human underwater undulatory in a still water pool and to find out to what extent the human swimmer approaches an ideal undulatory wave which is symmetric with respect to the extended gliding position. Therefore, it is necessary to (i) to ascertain the magnitude of the normalized dorsal, ventral and total amplitudes of the undulatory movements, (ii) to examine the distribution and symmetry/asymmetry of the dorsal, ventral and total amplitudes along the length of the swimming body, and (iii) to compare the differences in amplitude distribution and other indicators between different skill levels. The amplitude distribution of the dorsal and ventral deflection along the body (related to the swimmer's stretched position) is highly asymmetric. Skilled swimmers swim with a more linear body wave and use a smaller range of envelop than less skilled swimmers. The durations of the up and down kicks show only minor differences. The down kick is slightly faster than the up kick. Although the down kick is more powerful than the up kick, the hip marker shows almost the same average swimming speed in both half-cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BOBATH APPROACH VERSUS CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY (CIMT TO IMPROVE THE ARM MOTOR FUNCTION AND THE HAND DEXTERITY FUNCTION IN POST STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Rehman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effects of the Bobath Therapy and Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on arm motor function and hand dexterity function among stroke patients with a high level of function on the affected side. Materials and Methods: Study has conducted at the Outpatient physiotherapy department of a stroke unit. With a total of 30 patients were conveniently recruited and then randomized to Bobath Concept group and constraint-induced movement therapy group. Intervention included were the Bobath Concept group was treated for 1.5 hours per day during 5 consecutive weekdays for 4 weeks whereas the constraint-induced movement therapy group received training for 2 hours per day during 5 consecutive weekdays for 3 weeks. Outcome measures by the Wolf Motor Function Test, and Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test. Results: The two groups were found to be homogeneous based on demographic variables and baseline measurements. There were no significant differences in Wolf Motor Function Test at post test (p = 0.861 and at follow up (p = 0.395. There is a significant improvement in JTHFT in both the groups with sight better improvement in group B (except writing components post test p=0.752and checkers at post test p=0.197 and follow up p=0.167 as compared to Group A. Conclusions: Bobath therapy and the Constraint-induced movement therapy have similar efficiencies in improving arm motor function in the paretic arm among stroke patients with a high level of function. Constraint-induced movement therapy seems to be slightly more efficient than the Bobath Concept in improving hand dexterity function.

  6. Learning Dexterous Manipulation for a Soft Robotic Hand from Human Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Dexterous multi-fingered hands can accomplish fine manipulation behaviors that are infeasible with simple robotic grippers. However, sophisticated multi-fingered hands are often expensive and fragile. Low-cost soft hands offer an appealing alternative to more conventional devices, but present considerable challenges in sensing and actuation, making them difficult to apply to more complex manipulation tasks. In this paper, we describe an approach to learning from demonstration that can be used...

  7. [Diagnostics of the skeletal massiveness and human somatotype using hand bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Zamiatina, A O; Galitskaia, O I

    2003-01-01

    The skeleton massiveness (SM) and the somatotype of human constitution were determined on the basis of osteometry of bones of carpal and metacarpal bones (MB) and of phalanxes. Seventy male and 13 female skeletons from the collection of the chair for anthropology, Moscow State University, were investigated. Described are the results of examinations of 8 carpal bones made according to 3 signs (length, width, and height), and of 5 metacarpal bones made according to 4 signs (length, base and head width, and base height); investigation findings of finger phalanxes (in full) are also presented. Methods of current multidimensional statistics were used within the case study, i.e. related with the key components--for SM specification and the discriminative analysis--for constitution specification. The SM determination accuracy according to type A was 40%, according to type B--80%, according to type C--37.5% and according to type D--52.9%. The classification accuracy of constitutions by carpal bones was 50.0%, by MB--46.4%, and by MB plus finger phalanxes--48.1%. It is pointed out that it was for the first time that the elaborated quantitative criteria of osteometry of hand bones could be used in the expertise practice for the purpose of personality identification by osseous remains.

  8. The human touch: skin temperature during the rubber hand illusion in manual and automated stroking procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Rohde

    Full Text Available A difference in skin temperature between the hands has been identified as a physiological correlate of the rubber hand illusion (RHI. The RHI is an illusion of body ownership, where participants perceive body ownership over a rubber hand if they see it being stroked in synchrony with their own occluded hand. The current study set out to replicate this result, i.e., psychologically induced cooling of the stimulated hand using an automated stroking paradigm, where stimulation was delivered by a robot arm (PHANToM(TM force-feedback device. After we found no evidence for hand cooling in two experiments using this automated procedure, we reverted to a manual stroking paradigm, which is closer to the one employed in the study that first produced this effect. With this procedure, we observed a relative cooling of the stimulated hand in both the experimental and the control condition. The subjective experience of ownership, as rated by the participants, by contrast, was strictly linked to synchronous stroking in all three experiments. This implies that hand-cooling is not a strict correlate of the subjective feeling of hand ownership in the RHI. Factors associated with the differences between the two designs (differences in pressure of tactile stimulation, presence of another person that were thus far considered irrelevant to the RHI appear to play a role in bringing about this temperature effect.

  9. The Human Touch: Skin Temperature during the Rubber Hand Illusion in Manual and Automated Stroking Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Marieke; Wold, Andrew; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Ernst, Marc O.

    2013-01-01

    A difference in skin temperature between the hands has been identified as a physiological correlate of the rubber hand illusion (RHI). The RHI is an illusion of body ownership, where participants perceive body ownership over a rubber hand if they see it being stroked in synchrony with their own occluded hand. The current study set out to replicate this result, i.e., psychologically induced cooling of the stimulated hand using an automated stroking paradigm, where stimulation was delivered by a robot arm (PHANToMTM force-feedback device). After we found no evidence for hand cooling in two experiments using this automated procedure, we reverted to a manual stroking paradigm, which is closer to the one employed in the study that first produced this effect. With this procedure, we observed a relative cooling of the stimulated hand in both the experimental and the control condition. The subjective experience of ownership, as rated by the participants, by contrast, was strictly linked to synchronous stroking in all three experiments. This implies that hand-cooling is not a strict correlate of the subjective feeling of hand ownership in the RHI. Factors associated with the differences between the two designs (differences in pressure of tactile stimulation, presence of another person) that were thus far considered irrelevant to the RHI appear to play a role in bringing about this temperature effect. PMID:24260454

  10. Human Age Estimation Method Robust to Camera Sensor and/or Face Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat Tien; Cho, So Ra; Pham, Tuyen Danh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-08-31

    Human age can be employed in many useful real-life applications, such as customer service systems, automatic vending machines, entertainment, etc. In order to obtain age information, image-based age estimation systems have been developed using information from the human face. However, limitations exist for current age estimation systems because of the various factors of camera motion and optical blurring, facial expressions, gender, etc. Motion blurring can usually be presented on face images by the movement of the camera sensor and/or the movement of the face during image acquisition. Therefore, the facial feature in captured images can be transformed according to the amount of motion, which causes performance degradation of age estimation systems. In this paper, the problem caused by motion blurring is addressed and its solution is proposed in order to make age estimation systems robust to the effects of motion blurring. Experiment results show that our method is more efficient for enhancing age estimation performance compared with systems that do not employ our method.

  11. Human Age Estimation Method Robust to Camera Sensor and/or Face Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dat Tien Nguyen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human age can be employed in many useful real-life applications, such as customer service systems, automatic vending machines, entertainment, etc. In order to obtain age information, image-based age estimation systems have been developed using information from the human face. However, limitations exist for current age estimation systems because of the various factors of camera motion and optical blurring, facial expressions, gender, etc. Motion blurring can usually be presented on face images by the movement of the camera sensor and/or the movement of the face during image acquisition. Therefore, the facial feature in captured images can be transformed according to the amount of motion, which causes performance degradation of age estimation systems. In this paper, the problem caused by motion blurring is addressed and its solution is proposed in order to make age estimation systems robust to the effects of motion blurring. Experiment results show that our method is more efficient for enhancing age estimation performance compared with systems that do not employ our method.

  12. Influence of human population movements on urban climate of Beijing during the Chinese New Year holiday

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyong; Wu, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    The population movements for the Chinese New Year (CNY) celebrations, known as the world’s largest yearly migration of human beings, have grown rapidly in the past several decades. The massive population outflows from urban areas largely reduce anthropogenic heat release and modify some other processes, and may thus have noticeable impacts on urban climate of large cities in China. Here, we use Beijing as an example to present observational evidence for such impacts over the period of 1990–2014. Our results show a significant cooling trend of up to 0.55 °C per decade, particularly at the nighttime during the CNY holiday relative to the background period. The average nighttime cooling effect during 2005–2014 reaches 0.94 °C relative to the 1990s, significant at the 99% confidence level. The further analysis supports that the cooling during the CNY holiday is attributable primarily to the population outflow of Beijing. These findings illustrate the importance of population movements in influencing urban climate despite certain limitations. As the world is becoming more mobile and increasingly urban, more efforts are called for to understand the role of human mobility at various spatial and temporal scales. PMID:28358399

  13. Methodological and technological implications of quantitative human movement analysis in long term space flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, G; Baroni, G; Pedotti, A

    1999-04-01

    In the frame of the 179-days EUROMIR '95 space mission, two in-flight experiments foresaw the analysis of three-dimensional human movements in microgravity. For this aim, a space qualified opto-electronic motion analyser based on passive markers was installed onboard the MIR Space Station. The paper describes the experimental procedures designed in order to face technical and operational limitations imposed by the critical environment of the orbital module. The reliability of the performed analysis is discussed, focusing two related aspects: accuracy in three-dimensional marker localisation and data comparability among different experimental sessions. The effect of the critical experimental set-up and of TV cameras optical distortions is evaluated on in-flight acquired data, by performing an analysis on Euclidean distance conservation on rigid bodies. An optimisation method for the recovering of a unique reference frame throughout the whole mission is described. Results highlight the potentiality that opto-electronics and close-range photogrammetry have for automatic motion analysis onboard orbital modules. The discussion of the obtained results provides general suggestions for the implementation of experimental human movement analysis in critical environments, based on the suitable trade-off between external constraints and achievable analysis reliability.

  14. The fighting hypothesis in combat : How well does the fighting hypothesis explain human left-handed minorities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Ton G.G.; McManus, I.C.; Schaafsma, Sara M.; Geuze, Reint H.; McGrew, WC; Schiefenhovel, W; Marchant, LF

    2013-01-01

    The strong population bias in hand preference in favor of right-handedness seems to be a typical human trait. An elegant evolutionary hypothesis explaining this trait is the so-called fighting hypothesis that postulates that left-handedness is under frequency-dependent selection. The fighting hypoth

  15. (Not) Made by the human hand: media consciousness and immediacy in the cultural production of the real

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, M.

    2011-01-01

    Taking its examples from the realm of popular religion and popular culture, this essay shows how sensations of im-mediacy are sought and produced in a great number of fantasy scripts. Some of these scripts seek to undo media-awareness: concealing or denying the involvement of the human hand they pro

  16. Human movement onset detection from isometric force and torque measurements: a supervised pattern recognition approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Cavallo, Giuseppe; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Iannello, Giulio

    2010-09-01

    Recent research has successfully introduced the application of robotics and mechatronics to functional assessment and motor therapy. Measurements of movement initiation in isometric conditions are widely used in clinical rehabilitation and their importance in functional assessment has been demonstrated for specific parts of the human body. The determination of the voluntary movement initiation time, also referred to as onset time, represents a challenging issue since the time window characterizing the movement onset is of particular relevance for the understanding of recovery mechanisms after a neurological damage. Establishing it manually as well as a troublesome task may also introduce oversight errors and loss of information. The most commonly used methods for automatic onset time detection compare the raw signal, or some extracted measures such as its derivatives (i.e., velocity and acceleration) with a chosen threshold. However, they suffer from high variability and systematic errors because of the weakness of the signal, the abnormality of response profiles as well as the variability of movement initiation times among patients. In this paper, we introduce a technique to optimise onset detection according to each input signal. It is based on a classification system that enables us to establish which deterministic method provides the most accurate onset time on the basis of information directly derived from the raw signal. The approach was tested on annotated force and torque datasets. Each dataset is constituted by 768 signals acquired from eight anatomical districts in 96 patients who carried out six tasks related to common daily activities. The results show that the proposed technique improves not only on the performance achieved by each of the deterministic methods, but also on that attained by a group of clinical experts. The paper describes a classification system detecting the voluntary movement initiation time and adaptable to different signals. By

  17. Bringing transcranial mapping into shape: Sulcus-aligned mapping captures motor somatotopy in human primary motor hand area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Estelle; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-10-15

    Motor representations express some degree of somatotopy in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND), but within-M1HAND corticomotor somatotopy has been difficult to study with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we introduce a "linear" TMS mapping approach based on the individual shape of the central sulcus to obtain mediolateral corticomotor excitability profiles of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscles. In thirteen young volunteers, we used stereotactic neuronavigation to stimulate the right M1HAND with a small eight-shaped coil at 120% of FDI resting motor threshold. We pseudorandomly stimulated six targets located on a straight mediolateral line corresponding to the overall orientation of the central sulcus with a fixed coil orientation of 45° to the mid-sagittal line (STRAIGHT-450FIX) or seven targets in the posterior part of the crown of the central sulcus following the bending of the central sulcus (CURVED). CURVED mapping employed a fixed (CURVED-450FIX) or flexible coil orientation producing always a current perpendicular to the sulcal wall (CURVED-900FLEX). During relaxation, CURVED but not STRAIGHT mapping revealed distinct corticomotor excitability peaks in M1HAND with the excitability maximum of ADM located medially to the FDI maximum. This mediolateral somatotopy was still present during tonic contraction of the ADM or FDI. During ADM contraction, cross-correlation between the spatial excitability profiles of ADM and FDI was lowest for CURVED-900FLEX. Together, the results show that within-M1HAND somatotopy can be readily probed with linear TMS mapping aligned to the sulcal shape. Sulcus-aligned linear mapping will benefit non-invasive studies of representational plasticity in human M1HAND.

  18. Very slow search and reach: failure to maximize expected gain in an eye-hand coordination task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Zhang

    Full Text Available We examined an eye-hand coordination task where optimal visual search and hand movement strategies were inter-related. Observers were asked to find and touch a target among five distractors on a touch screen. Their reward for touching the target was reduced by an amount proportional to how long they took to locate and reach to it. Coordinating the eye and the hand appropriately would markedly reduce the search-reach time. Using statistical decision theory we derived the sequence of interrelated eye and hand movements that would maximize expected gain and we predicted how hand movements should change as the eye gathered further information about target location. We recorded human observers' eye movements and hand movements and compared them with the optimal strategy that would have maximized expected gain. We found that most observers failed to adopt the optimal search-reach strategy. We analyze and describe the strategies they did adopt.

  19. Investigation on Inter-Limb Coordination and Motion Stability, Intensity and Complexity of Trunk and Limbs during Hands-Knees Crawling in Human Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shenglan; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Xu

    2017-03-28

    This study aimed to investigate the inter-limb coordination pattern and the stability, intensity, and complexity of the trunk and limbs motions in human crawling under different speeds. Thirty healthy human adults finished hands-knees crawling trials on a treadmill at six different speeds (from 1 km/h to 2.5 km/h). A home-made multi-channel acquisition system consisting of five 3-axis accelerometers (ACC) and four force sensors was used for the data collection. Ipsilateral phase lag was used to represent inter-limb coordination pattern during crawling and power, harmonic ratio, and sample entropy of acceleration signals were adopted to depict the motion intensity, stability, and complexity of trunk and limbs respectively. Our results revealed some relationships between inter-limb coordination patterns and the stability and complexity of trunk movement. Trot-like crawling pattern was found to be the most stable and regular one at low speed in the view of trunk movement, and no-limb-pairing pattern showed the lowest stability and the greatest complexity at high speed. These relationships could be used to explain why subjects tended to avoid no-limb-pairing pattern when speed was over 2 km/h no matter which coordination type they used at low speeds. This also provided the evidence that the central nervous system (CNS) chose a stable inter-limb coordination pattern to keep the body safe and avoid tumbling. Although considerable progress has been made in the study of four-limb locomotion, much less is known about the reasons for the variety of inter-limb coordination. The research results of the exploration on the inter-limb coordination pattern choice during crawling from the standpoint of the motion stability, intensity, and complexity of trunk and limbs sheds light on the underlying motor control strategy of the human CNS and has important significance in the fields of clinical diagnosis, rehabilitation engineering, and kinematics research.

  20. Skin contact transfer of three fragrance residues from candles to human hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Api, Anne Marie; Bredbenner, Amy; McGowen, Margaret; Niemiera, David; Parker, Lori; Renskers, Kevin; Selim, Sami; Sgaramella, Richard; Signorelli, Richard; Tedrow, Sebastian; Troy, William

    2007-08-01

    The dermal hand transfer of three fragrance materials (cinnamic aldehyde, d-limonene and eugenol) from scented candles was determined in 10 subjects (i.e., 20 hands) after grasping scented candles for 5 consecutive 20s exposures/grasps. The fragrance materials from each subject's hands were recovered by isopropyl alcohol wipes and subsequent extractions. Removal efficiencies for both cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol placed directly on the hands were not concentration dependent and ranged from 103% to 106%. The removal efficiency of d-limonene showed an inverse relation with 74.3% removed at the low concentration of 50 microg and 63.8% removed at the high concentration of 500 microg. The residue/transfer of d-limonene from the candles to the hands was below the limit of detection of 50 microg. The residue/transfer of cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol to each subject's hands was consistent between subjects as well as between each exposure/grasp. The total mean residues of cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol transferred per grasp from the candles to the hands were 0.255 microg/cm(2) and 0.279 microg/cm(2), respectively.

  1. METHOD OF PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICAL PROCEDURES FOR THERMAL IMPACT ON SELECTED AREAS WITH HUMAN HANDS THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Sulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The device for thermal impact on separate zones of a hand of the person executed on the basis of thermoelectric converters of energy is considered. The advantages consisting in high environmental friendliness, noiselessness, reliability, functionality, universality are noted it. The technique of carrying out medical (preventive physiotherapeutic procedures, the hands of the person consisting in contrast thermal impact on a site with various level of heating and cooling, and also lasting expositions is described.

  2. Manual activity shapes structure and function in contralateral human motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granert, Oliver; Peller, Martin; Gaser, Christian

    2011-01-01

    From longitudinal voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies we know that relatively short periods of training can increase regional grey matter volume in trained cortical areas. In 14 right-handed patients with writer's cramp, we employed VBM to test whether suppression (i.e., immobilization) or enha......1(HAND) is dynamically shaped by the level of manual activity. This bi-directional structural plasticity is functionally relevant as local grey matter changes are mirrored by changes in regional excitability....

  3. Importance of human right inferior frontoparietal network connected by inferior branch of superior longitudinal fasciculus tract in corporeal awareness of kinesthetic illusory movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Kaoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    It is generally believed that the human right cerebral hemisphere plays a dominant role in corporeal awareness, which is highly associated with conscious experience of the physical self. Prompted by our previous findings, we examined whether the right frontoparietal activations often observed when people experience kinesthetic illusory limb movement are supported by a large-scale brain network connected by a specific branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus fiber tracts (SLF I, II, and III). We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while nineteen blindfolded healthy volunteers experienced illusory movement of the right stationary hand elicited by tendon vibration, which was replicated after the scanning. We also scanned brain activity when they executed and imagined right hand movement, and identified the active brain regions during illusion, execution, and imagery in relation to the SLF fiber tracts. We found that illusion predominantly activated the right inferior frontoparietal regions connected by SLF III, which were not substantially recruited during execution and imagery. Among these regions, activities in the right inferior parietal cortices and inferior frontal cortices showed right-side dominance and correlated well with the amount of illusion (kinesthetic illusory awareness) experienced by the participants. The results illustrated the predominant involvement of the right inferior frontoparietal network connected by SLF III when people recognize postural changes of their limb. We assume that the network bears a series of functions, specifically, monitoring the current status of the musculoskeletal system, and building-up and updating our postural model (body schema), which could be a basis for the conscious experience of the physical self.

  4. Characterization of proteoglycan metabolites in human gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G; Samuels, R H

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have identified glycosaminoglycans in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) associated with a variety of clinical conditions, notably those involving bone resorptive activity. GCF was here collected from around teeth undergoing active orthodontic movement. Proteoglycan metabolites were purified from GCF by anion-exchange chromatography using fast performance liquid chromatography. Sulphated glycosaminoglycan was associated with the most highly anionic protein fractions IV, V and VI, and biochemical analysis was restricted to these fractions. Analysis included glycosaminoglycan content by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, molecular size by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and amino acid analyses. Fraction IV contained hyaluronan (18.7%) and chondroitin sulphate (10.9%), fraction V heparan sulphate (29.5%) and chondroitin sulphate (19.6%) and fraction VI chondroitin sulphate only (21.3%). SDS-PAGE revealed two Coomassie blue bands in fraction V of 72 and 60 kDa and two further bands in fraction VI of 71 and 56 kDa. These proteoglycans appeared resistant to digestion by chondroitinase ABC or heparinase III, although the glycosaminoglycan chains underwent degradation after protein-core removal. The molecular mass and amino acid composition of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan fractions showed a close similarity to those of human alveolar bone proteoglycan. The presence of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in GCF in association with orthodontic movement is in accord with previous reports. The findings support the view that proteoglycans in GCF are 'biomarkers', notably those associated with active resorption of alveolar bone.

  5. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy for three interpolation techniques in kinematic analysis of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P

    2010-12-01

    Marker obstruction during human movement analyses requires interpolation to reconstruct missing kinematic data. This investigation quantifies errors associated with three interpolation techniques and varying interpolated durations. Right ulnar styloid kinematics from 13 participants performing manual wheelchair ramp ascent were reconstructed using linear, cubic spline and local coordinate system (LCS) interpolation from 11-90% of one propulsive cycle. Elbow angles (flexion/extension and pronation/supination) were calculated using real and reconstructed kinematics. Reconstructed kinematics produced maximum elbow flexion/extension errors of 37.1 (linear), 23.4 (spline) and 9.3 (LCS) degrees. Reconstruction errors are unavoidable [minimum errors of 6.7 mm (LCS); 0.29 mm (spline); 0.42 mm (linear)], emphasising careful motion capture system setup must be performed to minimise data interpolation. For the observed movement, LCS-based interpolation (average error of 14.3 mm; correlation of 0.976 for elbow flexion/extension) was most suitable for reconstructing durations longer than 200 ms. Spline interpolation was superior for shorter durations.

  6. A real-time system for biomechanical analysis of human movement and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Antonie J; Geijtenbeek, Thomas; Even-Zohar, Oshri; Steenbrink, Frans; Hardin, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical analysis of movement plays an important role in clinical management of neurological and orthopedic conditions. There has been increasing interest in performing movement analysis in real-time, to provide immediate feedback to both therapist and patient. However, such work to date has been limited to single-joint kinematics and kinetics. Here we present a software system, named human body model (HBM), to compute joint kinematics and kinetics for a full body model with 44 degrees of freedom, in real-time, and to estimate length changes and forces in 300 muscle elements. HBM was used to analyze lower extremity function during gait in 12 able-bodied subjects. Processing speed exceeded 120 samples per second on standard PC hardware. Joint angles and moments were consistent within the group, and consistent with other studies in the literature. Estimated muscle force patterns were consistent among subjects and agreed qualitatively with electromyography, to the extent that can be expected from a biomechanical model. The real-time analysis was integrated into the D-Flow system for development of custom real-time feedback applications and into the gait real-time analysis interactive lab system for gait analysis and gait retraining.

  7. Human dorsomedial parieto-motor circuit specifies grasp during the planning of goal-directed hand actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesia, Michael; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Elahi, Behzad; Jegatheeswaran, Gaayathiri; Isayama, Reina; Neva, Jason L; Davare, Marco; Staines, W Richard; Culham, Jody C; Chen, Robert

    2017-07-01

    According to one influential view, two specialized parieto-frontal circuits control prehension: a dorsomedial stream for hand transport during reaching and a dorsolateral stream for preshaping the fingers during grasping. However, recent evidence argues that an area within the dorsomedial stream-macaque area V6A and, its putative human homolog, superior parietal occipital cortex (SPOC) - encodes both hand transport and grip formation. We tested whether planning varied hand actions modulates functional connectivity between left SPOC and ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) using a dual-site, paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm with two coils (dsTMS). Participants performed three different hand actions to a target object comprising a small cylinder atop a larger cylinder. These actions were: reaching-to-grasp the top (GT) using a precision grip, reaching-to-grasp the bottom (GB) using a whole-hand grip, or reaching-to-touch (Touch) the side of the target object without forming a grip. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from TMS to M1, with or without preceding TMS to SPOC, were recorded from first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) hand muscles in two experiments that varied timing parameters (the stimulus onset asynchrony, SOA, between the 'GO' cue and stimulation and interpulse interval, IPI, between SPOC and M1 stimulation). We found that preparatory response amplitudes in the SPOC-M1 circuit of different hand muscles were selectively modulated early in the motor plan for different types of grasps. First, based on SPOC-M1 interactions, across two experiments, the role of the ADM was facilitated during a whole-hand grasp of a large object (GB) relative to other conditions under certain timing parameters (SOA = 150 msec; IPI = 6 msec). Second, the role of the FDI was facilitated during hand action planning compared to rest. These findings suggest that the human