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Sample records for human hand bones

  1. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A.; Chettle, D. R.; McNeill, F. E.

    2008-08-01

    Manganese is both an essential element to human health and also toxic when humans are exposed to excessive levels, particularly by means of inhalation. Biological monitoring of manganese exposure is problematic. It is subject to homeostasis; levels in blood (or serum/plasma) reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive technique for measurement of manganese stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following preliminary feasibility studies, the technique has been enhanced by two significant infrastructure advances. A specially designed irradiation facility serves to maximize the activation of manganese with respect to the dose of ionizing radiation. Secondly, an array of eight NaI(Tl) crystals provides a detection system with very close to 4π geometry. This feasibility study, using neutron activation analysis to measure manganese in the bones of the hand, takes two features into account. Firstly, there is considerable magnesium present in the bone and this produces a spectral interference with the manganese. The 26Mg(n,γ)27Mg reaction produces γ-rays of 0.843 MeV from the decay of 27Mg, which interfere with the 0.847 MeV γ-rays from the decay of 56Mn, produced by the 55Mn(n,γ)56Mn reaction. Secondly, this work provides estimates of the levels of manganese to be expected in referent subjects. A revised estimate has been made from the most recent literature to explore the potential of the technique as a suitable means of screening patients and people exposed to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. This report presents the enhancements to the neutron activation system, by which manganese can be measured, which resulted in a detection limit in the hand of human subjects of 1.6 µg/g Ca. It

  2. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A; Chettle, D R; McNeill, F E [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: aslamib@mcmaster.ca

    2008-08-07

    Manganese is both an essential element to human health and also toxic when humans are exposed to excessive levels, particularly by means of inhalation. Biological monitoring of manganese exposure is problematic. It is subject to homeostasis; levels in blood (or serum/plasma) reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive technique for measurement of manganese stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following preliminary feasibility studies, the technique has been enhanced by two significant infrastructure advances. A specially designed irradiation facility serves to maximize the activation of manganese with respect to the dose of ionizing radiation. Secondly, an array of eight NaI(Tl) crystals provides a detection system with very close to 4{pi} geometry. This feasibility study, using neutron activation analysis to measure manganese in the bones of the hand, takes two features into account. Firstly, there is considerable magnesium present in the bone and this produces a spectral interference with the manganese. The {sup 26}Mg(n,{gamma}){sup 27}Mg reaction produces {gamma}-rays of 0.843 MeV from the decay of {sup 27}Mg, which interfere with the 0.847 MeV {gamma}-rays from the decay of {sup 56}Mn, produced by the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn reaction. Secondly, this work provides estimates of the levels of manganese to be expected in referent subjects. A revised estimate has been made from the most recent literature to explore the potential of the technique as a suitable means of screening patients and people exposed to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. This report presents the enhancements to the neutron activation system, by which manganese can be measured, which resulted in a detection

  3. In vitro strain in human metacarpal bones during striking: testing the pugilism hypothesis of hominin hand evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Joshua; Jung, Rebekah; Carrier, David R

    2015-10-01

    The hands of hominins (i.e. bipedal apes) are distinguished by skeletal proportions that are known to enhance manual dexterity but also allow the formation of a clenched fist. Because male-male physical competition is important in the mating systems of most species of great apes, including humans, we tested the hypothesis that a clenched fist protects the metacarpal bones from injury by reducing the level of strain during striking. We used cadaver arms to measure in vitro strain in metacarpals during forward strikes with buttressed and unbuttressed fist postures and during side slaps with an open palm. If the protective buttressing hypothesis is correct, the clenched fist posture should substantially reduce strain in the metacarpal bones during striking and therefore reduce the risk of fracture. Recorded strains were significantly higher in strikes in which the hand was secured in unbuttressed and slapping postures than in the fully buttressed posture. Our results suggest that humans can safely strike with 55% more force with a fully buttressed fist than with an unbuttressed fist and with twofold more force with a buttressed fist than with an open-hand slap. Thus, the evolutionary significance of the proportions of the hominin hand may be that these are the proportions that improved manual dexterity while at the same time making it possible for the hand to be used as a club during fighting. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Laterality and grip strength influence hand bone micro-architecture in modern humans, an HRpQCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Trousdale, William H; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Braga, José

    2017-06-01

    It is widely hypothesized that mechanical loading, specifically repetitive low-intensity tasks, influences the inner structure of cancellous bone. As such, there is likely a relationship between handedness and bone morphology. The aim of this study is to determine patterns in trabecular bone between dominant and non-dominant hands in modern humans. Seventeen healthy patients between 22 and 32 years old were included in the study. Radial carpal bones (lunate, capitate, scaphoid, trapezium, trapezoid, 1st, 2nd and 3rd metacarpals) were analyzed with high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Additionally, crush and pinch grip were recorded. Factorial analysis indicated that bone volume ratio, trabeculae number (Tb.N), bone surface to volume ratio (BS.BV), body weight, stature and crush grip were all positively correlated with principal components 1 and 2 explaining 78.7% of the variance. Volumetric and trabecular endostructural parameters (BV/TV, BS/BV or Tb.Th, Tb.N) explain the observed inter-individual variability better than anthropometric or clinical parameters. Factors analysis regressions showed correlations between these parameters and the dominant side for crush strength for the lunate (r2 = 0.640, P modern human wrist. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  5. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Pineda, C.J.; Weisman, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.).

  6. A natural human hand model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nierop, O.A.; Van der Helm, A.; Overbeeke, K.J.; Djajadiningrat, T.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a skeletal linked model of the human hand that has natural motion. We show how this can be achieved by introducing a new biology-based joint axis that simulates natural joint motion and a set of constraints that reduce an estimated 150 possible motions to twelve. The model is based on

  7. Right-handed fossil humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Marina; Estalrrich, Almudena; Bondioli, Luca; Fiore, Ivana; Bermúdez de Castro, José-Maria; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Rosas, Antonio; Frayer, David W

    2017-11-01

    Fossil hominids often processed material held between their upper and lower teeth. Pulling with one hand and cutting with the other, they occasionally left impact cut marks on the lip (labial) surface of their incisors and canines. From these actions, it possible to determine the dominant hand used. The frequency of these oblique striations in an array of fossil hominins documents the typically modern pattern of 9 right- to 1 left-hander. This ratio among living Homo sapiens differs from that among chimpanzees and bonobos and more distant primate relatives. Together, all studies of living people affirm that dominant right-handedness is a uniquely modern human trait. The same pattern extends deep into our past. Thus far, the majority of inferred right-handed fossils come from Europe, but a single maxilla from a Homo habilis, OH-65, shows a predominance of right oblique scratches, thus extending right-handedness into the early Pleistocene of Africa. Other studies show right-handedness in more recent African, Chinese, and Levantine fossils, but the sample compiled for non-European fossil specimens remains small. Fossil specimens from Sima del los Huesos and a variety of European Neandertal sites are predominately right-handed. We argue the 9:1 handedness ratio in Neandertals and the earlier inhabitants of Europe constitutes evidence for a modern pattern of handedness well before the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Constraints for control of the human hand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Duinen, Hiske; Gandevia, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    .... The human hand is widely assumed to have evolved from hands like those of African apes, yet recent studies have shown that our hands and those of the earliest hominids are very similar and unlike those of living apes...

  9. Lesions of the bones of the hands and feet: a study of 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppin, Shantveer G; Sundaram, C; Umamahesh, Matapathi; Chandrashekar, P; Rani, Y Jyotsna; Prasad, V B N

    2008-05-01

    The bones of the hands and feet constitute more than half of the bones in the human skeleton (106/ 206), but lesions occurring in them are infrequently reported. Although many of the lesions that occur in the rest of the skeletal bones can occur in bones of the hands or feet, their distribution and frequency differ. To study lesions involving bones of the hands or feet. Retrospective study of all lesions involving bones of the hands or feet during the period from January 2000 to September 2006 from a university hospital in southern India. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features were reviewed. The 50 lesions encountered included 23 (46.0%) infections/inflammatory lesions, 16 (32.0%) benign tumors, 6 (12.0%) malignant tumors, and 5 (10.0%) tumorlike lesions. Giant cell tumor was the most common benign tumor. Malignant tumors involved the nonphalangeal bones, with chondrosarcoma the most common. Lesions of the bones of the hands or feet are uncommon. Awareness and correlation of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features help in making correct diagnoses.

  10. Human hand modelling : Kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand

  11. Human evolution. Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Stephens, Nicholas B; Tsegai, Zewdi J; Foote, Alexandra C; Nguyen, N Huynh; Gross, Thomas; Pahr, Dieter H; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2015-01-23

    The distinctly human ability for forceful precision and power "squeeze" gripping is linked to two key evolutionary transitions in hand use: a reduction in arboreal climbing and the manufacture and use of tools. However, it is unclear when these locomotory and manipulative transitions occurred. Here we show that Australopithecus africanus (~3 to 2 million years ago) and several Pleistocene hominins, traditionally considered not to have engaged in habitual tool manufacture, have a human-like trabecular bone pattern in the metacarpals consistent with forceful opposition of the thumb and fingers typically adopted during tool use. These results support archaeological evidence for stone tool use in australopiths and provide morphological evidence that Pliocene hominins achieved human-like hand postures much earlier and more frequently than previously considered. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. The human hand as an inspiration for robot hand development

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    “The Human Hand as an Inspiration for Robot Hand Development” presents an edited collection of authoritative contributions in the area of robot hands. The results described in the volume are expected to lead to more robust, dependable, and inexpensive distributed systems such as those endowed with complex and advanced sensing, actuation, computation, and communication capabilities. The twenty-four chapters discuss the field of robotic grasping and manipulation viewed in light of the human hand’s capabilities and push the state-of-the-art in robot hand design and control. Topics discussed include human hand biomechanics, neural control, sensory feedback and perception, and robotic grasp and manipulation. This book will be useful for researchers from diverse areas such as robotics, biomechanics, neuroscience, and anthropologists.

  13. Texture analysis of hand radiographs to assess bone structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klifa, Catherine S.; Lin, John C.; Augat, Peter; Fuerst, Thomas; Jiang, Yebin; Majumdar, Sharmila; Genant, Harry K.

    1998-06-01

    In this study we compared trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) with textural parameters (cooccurence matrices features) extracted from trabecular bone structures in radiographic images of the hand. Our data consists of 12 cadaver hands radiographed and digitized. After application of a specific preprocessing step on all images, the textural parameters were calculated within 4 regions of interest defined within the metacarpal and proximal phalanges on trabecular bone. The results show that using a combination of textural parameters calculated at different directions within the ROI could increase significantly the correlation with BMD. Some further research will validate this finding on a larger set of data. This work is intended to be applicable in the study of bone fractures associated with osteoporosis, and could be of great benefit to a large segment of the population at risk.

  14. Primary bone tumours of the hand. Report of 21 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Azouz, E.M.; Campbell, J.; Marton, D.; Morris, L.; Padovani, J.; Sprague, P.; Beluffi, G.; Berzero, G.F.; Cherubino, P.

    1988-02-01

    Twenty-one primary bone tumours of the hand in children from 8 paediatric hospitals are reported. Osteochondromas and enchondromas were not included. Our material consisted of 16 patients with common tumours (3 Ewing's sarcoma, 5 aneurysmal bone cyst, 6 osteoid osteoma and 2 epithelioma) and 5 patients with uncommon tumours (osteoma, simple bone cyst, haemangiopericytoma, capillary angiomatous tumour and benign ossifying fibroma or osteoblastoma). The X-ray diagnosis of the common tumours should have high concordance with histology, whereas that of uncommon tumours in much more difficult and uncertain. The characteristic features of Ewing's sarcoma are stressed as all our children with this tumour had a delayed diagnosis and a fatal outcome. Differential diagnosis with other short tubular bone lesions of the hand - specifically osteomyelitis - is discussed and the posibilities of microscopic diagnosis are stressed.

  15. HUMAN HAND STUDY FOR ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON DELVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIROUAS Flaviu Ionut

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will be presenting research with application in the rehabilitation of hand motor functions by the aid of robotics. The focus will be on the dimensional parameters of the biological human hand from which the robotic system will be developed. The term used for such measurements is known as anthropometrics. The anthropometric parameters studied and presented in this paper are mainly related to the angular limitations of the finger joints of the human hand.

  16. Trabecular bone structure correlates with hand posture and use in hominoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdi J Tsegai

    Full Text Available Bone is capable of adapting during life in response to stress. Therefore, variation in locomotor and manipulative behaviours across extant hominoids may be reflected in differences in trabecular bone structure. The hand is a promising region for trabecular analysis, as it is the direct contact between the individual and the environment and joint positions at peak loading vary amongst extant hominoids. Building upon traditional volume of interest-based analyses, we apply a whole-epiphysis analytical approach using high-resolution microtomographic scans of the hominoid third metacarpal to investigate whether trabecular structure reflects differences in hand posture and loading in knuckle-walking (Gorilla, Pan, suspensory (Pongo, Hylobates and Symphalangus and manipulative (Homo taxa. Additionally, a comparative phylogenetic method was used to analyse rates of evolutionary changes in trabecular parameters. Results demonstrate that trabecular bone volume distribution and regions of greatest stiffness (i.e., Young's modulus correspond with predicted loading of the hand in each behavioural category. In suspensory and manipulative taxa, regions of high bone volume and greatest stiffness are concentrated on the palmar or distopalmar regions of the metacarpal head, whereas knuckle-walking taxa show greater bone volume and stiffness throughout the head, and particularly in the dorsal region; patterns that correspond with the highest predicted joint reaction forces. Trabecular structure in knuckle-walking taxa is characterised by high bone volume fraction and a high degree of anisotropy in contrast to the suspensory brachiators. Humans, in which the hand is used primarily for manipulation, have a low bone volume fraction and a variable degree of anisotropy. Finally, when trabecular parameters are mapped onto a molecular-based phylogeny, we show that the rates of change in trabecular structure vary across the hominoid clade. Our results support a link

  17. Trabecular Bone Structure Correlates with Hand Posture and Use in Hominoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsegai, Zewdi J.; Kivell, Tracy L.; Gross, Thomas; Nguyen, N. Huynh; Pahr, Dieter H.; Smaers, Jeroen B.; Skinner, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is capable of adapting during life in response to stress. Therefore, variation in locomotor and manipulative behaviours across extant hominoids may be reflected in differences in trabecular bone structure. The hand is a promising region for trabecular analysis, as it is the direct contact between the individual and the environment and joint positions at peak loading vary amongst extant hominoids. Building upon traditional volume of interest-based analyses, we apply a whole-epiphysis analytical approach using high-resolution microtomographic scans of the hominoid third metacarpal to investigate whether trabecular structure reflects differences in hand posture and loading in knuckle-walking (Gorilla, Pan), suspensory (Pongo, Hylobates and Symphalangus) and manipulative (Homo) taxa. Additionally, a comparative phylogenetic method was used to analyse rates of evolutionary changes in trabecular parameters. Results demonstrate that trabecular bone volume distribution and regions of greatest stiffness (i.e., Young's modulus) correspond with predicted loading of the hand in each behavioural category. In suspensory and manipulative taxa, regions of high bone volume and greatest stiffness are concentrated on the palmar or distopalmar regions of the metacarpal head, whereas knuckle-walking taxa show greater bone volume and stiffness throughout the head, and particularly in the dorsal region; patterns that correspond with the highest predicted joint reaction forces. Trabecular structure in knuckle-walking taxa is characterised by high bone volume fraction and a high degree of anisotropy in contrast to the suspensory brachiators. Humans, in which the hand is used primarily for manipulation, have a low bone volume fraction and a variable degree of anisotropy. Finally, when trabecular parameters are mapped onto a molecular-based phylogeny, we show that the rates of change in trabecular structure vary across the hominoid clade. Our results support a link between inferred

  18. Sex Determination According to the Lengths of Hand Bones in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huaxiang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Hu, Fengxia; Hu, Haiyang

    2017-10-01

    Measurement of hand bone length has been used for sex determination in humans and nonhuman primates (McFadden and Bracht: Early Hum Dev 85 (2009) 117-124; El-Morsi and Al-Hawary: J Forensic Leg Med 20 (2013) 6-13). The aim of this study was to determine the sex of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on the basis of the lengths of corresponding rows of metacarpals and phalanges in a macaque population by means of developing discriminant functions. Measurements on direct dry bones only included lengths for 19 bones of the left hand in 39 macaques (consisting of 13 adult males and 26 adult females). The results revealed that the mean values of males were significantly greater than those of females for all of the metacarpals and phalanges. The results were obtained in 84.4% of accuracy from distal phalanges, 93.8% from middle phalanges, and 96.9% from both metacarpals and proximal phalanges, respectively. There was a remarkable difference in the magnitude of sex dimorphism in lengths of each section of the hand bones between the population of macaques and humans. This difference may be attributable to the interaction between genetic factors and various environmental factors. As sex differences of hand bones are population-specific (Lazenby: Am J phys Anthropol 118 (2002) 378-384; Lu, Huo, Shi, Peng, Dang, Jiao, Zhu, Zhong, and Chen: Acta Aantomica Sinica 39 (2008) 267-271; Eshak, Ahmed, and Gawad: J Forensic Leg Med 18 (2011) 246-252), the discriminant equations for all of the metacarpals and phalanges are applicable to the population of Macaca mulatta from the Taihang Mountain. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:1741-1746, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Aneurysmal Bone Cysts of the Hand, Wrist, and Forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Matthew M; Houdek, Matthew T; Moran, Steven L; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2015-10-01

    To determine the outcomes of surgical management of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) in the hand, wrist, and forearm. The medical records of 11 patients undergoing surgical treatment of ABCs distal to the elbow from 1994 to 2011 with at least 12 months follow-up were reviewed retrospectively. Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 13-56 months). There were 7 males and 4 females. Four lesions presented in the radius, 3 in the ulna, 2 in the metacarpals, and 2 in the phalanges. Ten patients underwent wide unroofing and intralesional curettage with 9 undergoing associated high-speed burring. Multiple chemical and thermal adjuvants were used. One patient underwent en bloc resection with reconstruction. There was 1 recurrence in a periphyseal lesion in a 2-year-old boy treated with curettage, burring, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Ten patients incorporated the bone graft and healed without further surgery. One patient required revision bone grafting. The diagnosis of ABC should remain in the differential diagnosis for cystic lesions in the upper extremity in pediatric and adult patients. Low recurrence has been obtained predominantly with intralesional curettage and high-speed burring with and without chemical and thermal adjuvant therapy. Appropriate healing has been obtained with both allograft and autograft reconstructions. Periarticular and periphyseal lesions remain challenging and provide the highest chance for incomplete resection and recurrence. Follow-up with plain radiographs did not lead to any delay in diagnosis of recurrence in any case. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS......: DXR-BMD was measured from hand x-rays in a reference cohort (1485 men/2541 women) without arthritis randomly selected from an urban Danish population. Sex- and age-related HBL/year was estimated. DXR-BMD was measured in rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 350: at start of TNFI, and ~2 years after TNFI...

  1. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  2. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    . In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS...

  3. Palatine bone in human cyclopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, P

    1989-01-01

    In human cyclopia, a maxillopalatine mass separates the median orbit from the oral cavity. The palatine component of this bony mass has been studied in serial sections through the median third of the head in three perinatal human specimens presenting with a median orbit and proboscis. One head was sectioned in the sagittal plane and two in the coronal plane. The course of each neurovascular bundle arising from the maxillary artery and nerve was used to facilitate the identification of the various parts of the palatine bone. The data obtained were used to outline the palatine component of the maxillopalatine mass as it presented on the inferior aspect of a dried cyclops skull. The suggestion is made that the abnormalities of the palatine bone in human cyclopia are secondary to the absence of the presphenoid and the nasal cavity.

  4. Developing a computational model of human hand kinetics using AVS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowitz, Mark S. [State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop a finite element model of the human hand at the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR), this project extended existing computational tools for analyzing and visualizing hand kinetics. These tools employ a commercial, scientific visualization package called AVS. FORTRAN and C code, originally written by David Giurintano of the Gillis W. Long Hansen`s Disease Center, was ported to a different computing platform, debugged, and documented. Usability features were added and the code was made more modular and readable. When the code is used to visualize bone movement and tendon paths for the thumb, graphical output is consistent with expected results. However, numerical values for forces and moments at the thumb joints do not yet appear to be accurate enough to be included in ISCR`s finite element model. Future work includes debugging the parts of the code that calculate forces and moments and verifying the correctness of these values.

  5. X-ray vector radiography of a human hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Christoph; Braig, Eva; Dierolf, Martin; Eggl, Elena; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz; Münzel, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Grating based x-ray phase-contrast reveals differential phase-contrast (DPC) and dark-field contrast (DFC) on top of the conventional absorption image. X-ray vector radiography (XVR) exploits the directional dependence of the DFC and yields the mean scattering strength, the degree of anisotropy and the orientation of scattering structures by combining several DFC-projections. Here, we perform an XVR of an ex vivo human hand specimen. Conventional attenuation images have a good contrast between the bones and the surrounding soft tissue. Within the bones, trabecular structures are visible. However, XVR detects subtler differences within the trabecular structure: there is isotropic scattering in the extremities of the phalanx in contrast to anisotropic scattering in its body. The orientation changes as well from relatively random in the extremities to an alignment along the longitudinal trabecular orientation in the body. In the other bones measured, a similar behavior was found. These findings indicate a deeper insight into the anatomical configuration using XVR compared to conventional radiography. Since microfractures cause a discontinuous trabecular structure, XVR could help to detect so-called radiographically occult fractures of the trabecular bones.

  6. Human computer interaction using hand gesture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Silas; Nguyen, Hung T

    2008-01-01

    Hand gesture is a very natural form of human interaction and can be used effectively in human computer interaction (HCI). This project involves the design and implementation of a HCI using a small hand-worn wireless module with a 3-axis accelerometer as the motion sensor. The small stand-alone unit contains an accelerometer and a wireless Zigbee transceiver with microcontroller. To minimize intrusiveness to the user, the module is designed to be small (3cm by 4 cm). A time-delay neural network algorithm is developed to analyze the time series data from the 3-axis accelerometer. Power consumption is reduced by the non-continuous transmission of data and the use of low-power components, efficient algorithm and sleep mode between sampling for the wireless module. A home control interface is designed so that the user can control home appliances by moving through menus. The results demonstrate the feasibility of controlling home appliances using hand gestures and would present an opportunity for a section of the aging population and disabled people to lead a more independent life.

  7. Human evolution. Response to Comment on "Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Stephens, Nicholas B; Tsegai, Zewdi J; Foote, Alexandra C; Nguyen, N Huynh; Gross, Thomas; Pahr, Dieter H; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2015-06-05

    Almécija and colleagues claim that we apply a simplified understanding of bone functional adaptation and that our results of human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus are not novel. We argue that our results speak to actual behavior, rather than potential behaviors, and our functional interpretation is well supported by our methodological approach, comparative sample, and previous experimental data. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Micro-computed tomography of false starts produced on bone by different hand-saws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletti, Guido; Viel, Guido; Fais, Paolo; Viero, Alessia; Visentin, Sindi; Miotto, Diego; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Giraudo, Chiara

    2017-05-01

    The analysis of macro- and microscopic characteristics of saw marks on bones can provide useful information about the class of the tool utilized to produce the injury. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of false starts experimentally produced on 32 human bone sections using 4 different hand-saws in order to verify the potential utility of micro-CT for distinguishing false starts produced by different saws and to correlate the morphology of the tool with that of the bone mark. Each sample was analysed through stereomicroscopy and micro-CT. Stereomicroscopic analysis allowed the identification of the false starts and the detection of the number of tool marks left by each saw. Micro-CT scans, through the integration of 3D renders and multiplanar reconstructions (MPR), allowed the identification of the shape of each false start correlating it to the injuring tool. Our results suggest that micro-CT could be a useful technique for assessing false starts produced by different classes of saws, providing accurate morphological profiles of the bone marks with all the advantages of high resolution 3D imaging (e.g., high accuracy, non-destructive analysis, preservation and documentation of evidence). However, further studies are necessary to integrate qualitative data with quantitative metrical analysis in order to further characterize the false start and the related injuring tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of bone mineral density of human bones for strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indirect indicator of osteoporosis and fracture risk. This medical bone density is not the true physical “density” of the bone, which would be computed as mass per ... It forms part of the hip joint (at the acetabulum) and part of the knee joint, which is located above. There are four eminences, or protuberances, in the human ...

  10. Constraint Study for a Hand Exoskeleton: Human Hand Kinematics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fai Chen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the number of projects studying the human hand from the robotic point of view has increased rapidly, due to the growing interest in academic and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the complexity of the human hand given its large number of degrees of freedom (DoF within a significantly reduced space requires an exhaustive analysis, before proposing any applications. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete summary of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the human hand as a preliminary step towards the development of hand devices such as prosthetic/robotic hands and exoskeletons imitating the human hand shape and functionality. A collection of data and constraints relevant to hand movements is presented, and the direct and inverse kinematics are solved for all the fingers as well as the dynamics; anthropometric data and dynamics equations allow performing simulations to understand the behavior of the finger.

  11. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  12. Bone metabolism and hand grip strength response to aerobic versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in diabetic patients in prevention of osteoporosis is incomplete and has prompted our interest to identify the type of effective osteogenic exercise. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the changes in handgrip strength and bone metabolism after 6 ...

  13. Bone metabolism and hand grip strength response to aerobic versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in diabetic patients in prevention of osteo- porosis is incomplete and has prompted our interest to identify the type of effective osteogenic exercise. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the changes in handgrip strength and bone metabolism after 6 ...

  14. Radiographic Assessment of Skeletal Maturation Stages for Orthodontic Patients: Hand-wrist Bones or Cervical Vertebrae?

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Eddie Hsiang-Hua; Liu, Jen-Pei; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Tsai, Shih-Jaw; Yao, Chung-Chen Jane; Chen, Mu-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Jane; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The skeletal maturation status of a growing patient can influence the selection of orthodontic treatment procedures. Either lateral cephalometric or hand-wrist radiography can be used to assess skeletal development. In this study, we examined the correlation between the maturation stages of cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist bones in Taiwanese individuals. Methods: The study group consisted of 330 male and 379 female subjects ranging in age from 8 to 18 years. A total of 709 hand-wrist and ...

  15. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale - the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  16. The relationship between osteoarthritis of the hands, bone mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They underwent thorough clinical examination including measurement of body mass index (BMI). They completed the AUSCAN questionnaire. Grip strength was measured using a hand held dynamometer and lateral pinch strength was measured using a pinchmeter. They underwent BMD measurement at the hip and wrist ...

  17. The evolution of human and ape hand proportions

    OpenAIRE

    Alm?cija, Sergio; Smaers, Jeroen B; Jungers, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Human hands are distinguished from apes by possessing longer thumbs relative to fingers. However, this simple ape-human dichotomy fails to provide an adequate framework for testing competing hypotheses of human evolution and for reconstructing the morphology of the last common ancestor (LCA) of humans and chimpanzees. We inspect human and ape hand-length proportions using phylogenetically informed morphometric analyses and test alternative models of evolution along the anthropoid tree of life...

  18. Combined Hand Gesture — Speech Model for Human Action Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Tzong; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Li, Jian-Pan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a dynamic hand gesture detection technology to effectively detect dynamic hand gesture areas, and a hand gesture recognition technology to improve the dynamic hand gesture recognition rate. Meanwhile, the corresponding relationship between state sequences in hand gesture and speech models is considered by integrating speech recognition technology with a multimodal model, thus improving the accuracy of human behavior recognition. The experimental results proved that the proposed method can effectively improve human behavior recognition accuracy and the feasibility of system applications. Experimental results verified that the multimodal gesture-speech model provided superior accuracy when compared to the single modal versions. PMID:24351628

  19. Perfluoroalkyl substances in human bone: concentrations in bones and effects on bone cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, A; Koponen, J; Lehenkari, P; Viluksela, M; Korkalainen, M; Tuukkanen, J

    2017-07-28

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including two most commonly studied compounds perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), are widely distributed environmental pollutants, used extensively earlier. Due to their toxicological effects the use of PFAS is now regulated. Based on earlier studies on PFOA's distribution in bone and bone marrow in mice, we investigated PFAS levels and their possible link to bone microarchitecture of human femoral bone samples (n = 18). Soft tissue and bone biopsies were also taken from a 49-year old female cadaver for PFAS analyses. We also studied how PFOA exposure affects differentiation of human osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PFAS were detectable from all dry bone and bone marrow samples, PFOS and PFOA being the most prominent. In cadaver biopsies, lungs and liver contained the highest concentrations of PFAS, whereas PFAS were absent in bone marrow. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) was present in the bones, PFOA and PFOS were absent. In vitro results showed no disturbance in osteogenic differentiation after PFOA exposure, but in osteoclasts, lower concentrations led to increased resorption, which eventually dropped to zero after increase in PFOA concentration. In conclusion, PFAS are present in bone and have the potential to affect human bone cells partly at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  20. Neuroendocrine regulation of human bone metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The skeleton is perhaps the most multifunctional part of our body. It not only provides outer strength, a protective shell and enables locomotion, but it also hosts the bone marrow and serves many metabolic and endocrine functions. This thesis investigates two aspects of human bone metabolism,

  1. Bipolar electric cauterization as adjuvant treatment after curettage of aneurysmal bone cysts of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2014-01-01

    Almost all aneurysmal bone cysts of the hand were managed with either simple curettage plus or minus bone graft or en block excision and autograft reconstruction. The high recurrence rate is a major disadvantage of the former technique, whereas complexity/donor-site morbidities are known disadvantages of the latter technique. In the long bones of the lower limbs, adjuvant therapy after curettage is known to reduce the recurrence rate. This article introduces adjuvant bipolar electrical cauterization after curettage of aneurysmal bone cysts of the hands. This technique was used in 6 cases including 1 case with a recurrent lesion after curettage done elsewhere. Complications have been minimal and there was no recurrence at a mean follow-up of 3 years. Although the number of cases in this series is small, the favorable results warrant trying the technique in a multicenter comparative study.

  2. The evolution of human and ape hand proportions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Almécija, Sergio; Smaers, Jeroen B; Jungers, William L

    2015-01-01

    ...) of humans and chimpanzees. We inspect human and ape hand-length proportions using phylogenetically informed morphometric analyses and test alternative models of evolution along the anthropoid tree of life, including fossils...

  3. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Moris

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma.

  4. Trabecular bone structure correlates with hand posture and use in hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Tsegai, Zewdi J; Kivell, Tracy L.; Gross, Thomas; Nguyen, N. Huynh; Pahr, Dieter H.; Smaers, Jeroen B; Skinner, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is capable of adapting during life in response to stress. Therefore, variation in locomotor and manipulative behaviours across extant hominoids may be reflected in differences in trabecular bone structure. The hand is a promising region for trabecular analysis, as it is the direct contact between the individual and the environment and joint positions at peak loading vary amongst extant hominoids. Building upon traditional volume of interest-based analyses, we apply a whole-epiphysis anal...

  5. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Hatala, E M; Hatala, K G; Hiles, S; Rabey, K N

    2016-06-23

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses.

  6. Changes in hand and generalised bone mineral density in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guler-Yuksel, M.; Allaart, C.F.; Goekoop-Ruiterman, Y.P.; Bouwstra, J.K.; Groenendael, J.H.L.M.; Mallee, C.; Bois, de M.H.W.; Breedveld, F.C.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Lems, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in the hands, hip and spine after 1 and 2 years of follow-up, in relation to antirheumatic and antiresorptive therapies and disease and demographic variables in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis ( RA). Methods: Changes in

  7. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    Human bone blood flow and metabolism during physical exercise remains poorly characterised. In the present study we measured femoral bone blood flow and glucose uptake in young healthy subjects by positron emission tomography in three separate protocols. In six women, blood flow was measured...... in femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... exercise, and during intra-femoral infusion of high-dose adenosine. Bone glucose uptake was measured at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise in five men. The results indicate that isometric exercise increased femoral bone blood flow from rest (1.8 ± 0.6 ml/100g/min) to low intensity exercise (4.1 ± 1...

  8. LIPID COMPOSITION OF HUMAN BONE MARROW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAJDA, M

    1965-04-01

    1. A modified method for the analysis of phospholipid mixtures by selective hydrolysis is described. 2. The phospholipid compositions of normal human bone marrow and of the bone marrows of patients who died with anaemia or various forms of leukaemia were investigated. 3. Phospholipids from normal bone marrow comprised about 44% of lecithin, 4% of choline plasmalogen, 7% of glyceryl ether phospholipid (choline base), 10% of sphingomyelin, 22% of phosphatidylethanolamine plus phosphatidylserine, 8% of ethanolamine plasmalogen and 5% of glyceryl ether phospholipid (ethanolamine base). 4. The proportion of kephalin (i.e. phosphatidylethanolamine plus phosphatidylserine) in the pathological bone marrows tended to be lower than normal. No other consistent differences were observed between the normal and pathological samples. 4. A ceramide dihexoside was isolated from normal bone marrow.

  9. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  10. A novel design method of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands for reproducing human hand grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baiyang; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenrui; Zhang, Qiaofei; Mao, Liu; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Because hand is often used for grasping, developing a design of prosthetic hands, particularly light and compact underactuated anthropomorphic transradial prostheses for reproducing human hand complex grasping is crucial for upper-limb amputees. Obviously, the less the number of actuators is, the worse the anthropomorphic motion capability of the prosthetic hands will be. This paper aims to design a transmission mechanism with few motors actuating fingers which could serve the relatively accurate grasp movement of a human hand and has the potential to be embedded in a palm including the motors. We start with establishing an index for evaluating the anthropomorphic motion capability of a prosthetic hand. Based on the optimization of this index, we determine the number of actuators in fingers and the transmission relationship between the actuators and the metacarpophalangeal(MCP) joints. Then, a new design method to mechanically implement the transmission relationship based on a novel decomposition of transmission matrix is proposed in this paper. Utilizing this method, we obtained the final mechanical structure of a new prosthetic hand.

  11. Crystallographic lattice refinement of human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, R G; Stern, W B

    1992-08-01

    X-ray diffraction studies on bone microsamples (human iliac crest of 87 individuals aged 0-90 years) reveal that certain crystallographic parameters such as unit cell volume of bone apatite, and half-width of (002)-reflection are well correlated with age and with type of tissue (corticalis and spongiosa). Similar to inorganic apatite, the lattice parameters of bone apatite are intensely affected by ionic substitutions and vary mainly due to exchange of hydroxyl- and carbonate-apatite and, to a minor extent, of fluor- and chlorapatite.

  12. Development of the long bones in the hands and feet of children: radiographic and MR imaging correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Clarke, Jeffrey P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yin, Hong [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Pathology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The long bones of the hands and feet in children have an epiphyseal end with a secondary center of ossification and an adjacent transverse physis. In contrast to other long bones in the body, the opposite end in the hands and feet, termed the non-epiphyseal end, is characterized by direct metaphyseal extension of bone to complete terminal ossification. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the developmental stages of each end of the long bones of the hands and feet with radiographic and MR imaging to provide a foundation from which to differentiate normal from abnormal growth. (orig.)

  13. The evolution of human and ape hand proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almécija, Sergio; Smaers, Jeroen B; Jungers, William L

    2015-07-14

    Human hands are distinguished from apes by possessing longer thumbs relative to fingers. However, this simple ape-human dichotomy fails to provide an adequate framework for testing competing hypotheses of human evolution and for reconstructing the morphology of the last common ancestor (LCA) of humans and chimpanzees. We inspect human and ape hand-length proportions using phylogenetically informed morphometric analyses and test alternative models of evolution along the anthropoid tree of life, including fossils like the plesiomorphic ape Proconsul heseloni and the hominins Ardipithecus ramidus and Australopithecus sediba. Our results reveal high levels of hand disparity among modern hominoids, which are explained by different evolutionary processes: autapomorphic evolution in hylobatids (extreme digital and thumb elongation), convergent adaptation between chimpanzees and orangutans (digital elongation) and comparatively little change in gorillas and hominins. The human (and australopith) high thumb-to-digits ratio required little change since the LCA, and was acquired convergently with other highly dexterous anthropoids.

  14. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biologically inspired robotic systems can find important applications in biomedical robotics, since studying and replicating human behaviour can provide new insights into motor recovery, functional substitution and human-robot interaction. The analysis of human hand motion is essential for collecting information about human hand movements useful for generalizing reaching and grasping actions on a robotic system. This paper focuses on the definition and extraction of quantitative indicators for describing optimal hand grasping postures and replicating them on an anthropomorphic robotic hand. A motion analysis has been carried out on six healthy human subjects performing a transverse volar grasp. The extracted indicators point to invariant grasping behaviours between the involved subjects, thus providing some constraints for identifying the optimal grasping configuration. Hence, an optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method has been developed for determining the optimal grasp configuration of a robotic hand, grounded on the aforementioned constraints. It is characterized by a reduced computational cost. The grasp stability has been tested by introducing a quality index that satisfies the form-closure property. The grasping strategy has been validated by means of simulation tests and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  15. Cortical hand bone loss after 1 year in early rheumatoid arthritis predicts radiographic hand joint damage at 5-year and 10-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, M.; Haugeberg, G.; Odegård, S.; Syversen, S.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Kvien, T. K.

    2009-01-01

    To examine 1-year hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a predictor of radiographic damage at 5-year and 10-year follow-up A total of 136 patients with RA (disease duration 0-4 years) were followed for 10 years with clinical data and hand radiographs. Joint damage was scored according

  16. Hand Shape Representations in the Human Posterior Parietal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaes, Christian; Kellis, Spencer; Aflalo, Tyson; Lee, Brian; Pejsa, Kelsie; Shanfield, Kathleen; Hayes-Jackson, Stephanie; Aisen, Mindy; Heck, Christi; Liu, Charles; Andersen, Richard A

    2015-11-18

    Humans shape their hands to grasp, manipulate objects, and to communicate. From nonhuman primate studies, we know that visual and motor properties for grasps can be derived from cells in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Are non-grasp-related hand shapes in humans represented similarly? Here we show for the first time how single neurons in the PPC of humans are selective for particular imagined hand shapes independent of graspable objects. We find that motor imagery to shape the hand can be successfully decoded from the PPC by implementing a version of the popular Rock-Paper-Scissors game and its extension Rock-Paper-Scissors-Lizard-Spock. By simultaneous presentation of visual and auditory cues, we can discriminate motor imagery from visual information and show differences in auditory and visual information processing in the PPC. These results also demonstrate that neural signals from human PPC can be used to drive a dexterous cortical neuroprosthesis. This study shows for the first time hand-shape decoding from human PPC. Unlike nonhuman primate studies in which the visual stimuli are the objects to be grasped, the visually cued hand shapes that we use are independent of the stimuli. Furthermore, we can show that distinct neuronal populations are activated for the visual cue and the imagined hand shape. Additionally we found that auditory and visual stimuli that cue the same hand shape are processed differently in PPC. Early on in a trial, only the visual stimuli and not the auditory stimuli can be decoded. During the later stages of a trial, the motor imagery for a particular hand shape can be decoded for both modalities. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3515466-11$15.00/0.

  17. Pattern of bone erosion and bone proliferation in psoriatic arthritis hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Bird, P; Boonen, A

    2014-01-01

    are described and the imaging modalities compared. RESULTS: Ninety percent of bone erosions detected by CT were located in the metacarpal heads, and most frequently in the 2nd-3rd MCP joints. Radial (37%) and ulnar (31%) surfaces were more frequently eroded than dorsal (10%) and palmar (22%) sites. Using CT...

  18. 3D Visual Sensing of the Human Hand for the Remote Operation of a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New low cost sensors and open free libraries for 3D image processing are making important advances in robot vision applications possible, such as three-dimensional object recognition, semantic mapping, navigation and localization of robots, human detection and/or gesture recognition for human-machine interaction. In this paper, a novel method for recognizing and tracking the fingers of a human hand is presented. This method is based on point clouds from range images captured by a RGBD sensor. It works in real time and it does not require visual marks, camera calibration or previous knowledge of the environment. Moreover, it works successfully even when multiple objects appear in the scene or when the ambient light is changed. Furthermore, this method was designed to develop a human interface to control domestic or industrial devices, remotely. In this paper, the method was tested by operating a robotic hand. Firstly, the human hand was recognized and the fingers were detected. Secondly, the movement of the fingers was analysed and mapped to be imitated by a robotic hand.

  19. Issues in human/computer control of dexterous remote hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, K.

    1987-01-01

    Much research on dexterous robot hands has been aimed at the design and control problems associated with their autonomous operation, while relatively little research has addressed the problem of direct human control. It is likely that these two modes can be combined in a complementary manner yielding more capability than either alone could provide. While many of the issues in mixed computer/human control of dexterous hands parallel those found in supervisory control of traditional remote manipulators, the unique geometry and capabilities of dexterous hands pose many new problems. Among these are the control of redundant degrees of freedom, grasp stabilization and specification of non-anthropomorphic behavior. An overview is given of progress made at the MIT AI Laboratory in control of the Salisbury 3 finger hand, including experiments in grasp planning and manipulation via controlled slip. It is also suggested how we might introduce human control into the process at a variety of functional levels.

  20. Bone age in unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: is there a correlation with hand function and limb length?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je-Sang; Choi, Im Jeong; Shin, Myung Jun; Yoon, Jin-A; Ko, Sung Hwa; Shin, Yong Beom

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the bone age and the upper extremity segmental lengths between the affected and the unaffected side and to reveal the correlation between the difference of bone age and the upper limb length discrepancy in the unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We also evaluated the relationship between difference of bone age and hand function. Seventy-eight patients participated in this study. The bone ages of hand-wrists of the patients were determined by the Greulich and Pyle atlas. Upper extremity segmental lengths were measured by radiograph. The side-to side length discrepancy was calculated as a percentage. Hand function was classified according to the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). There was significant difference in the bone age between the affected and unaffected side (phand function of 56 patients was evaluated by MACS and the MACS level showed correlation with difference of side-to-side bone age (r=0.29, p=0.03) and all segmental upper limb length discrepancies (phand function in the bone-age-delayed group was significantly better than the hand function in the bone-age-symmetrical group (phand function of the affected side is correlated with the difference of side-to-side bone age and the upper limb length discrepancy. Hand function might be helpful for predicting potential limb shortness and delayed bone age.

  1. Age changes in human bone: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, W.D.

    1977-12-03

    The human skeleton steadily changes structure and mass during life because of a variety of internal and external factors. Extracellular substance and bone cells get old, characteristic structural remodeling occurs with age and these age-related changes are important in the discrimination between pathological and physiological changes. Perhaps 20 percent of the bone mass is lost between the fourth and the ninth decades, osteoblasts function less efficiently and gradual loss of bone substance is enhanced by delayed mineralization of an increased surface area of thin and relatively less active osteoid seams. After the fifth decade, osteoclasia and the number of Howship's lacunae increase, and with age, the number of large osteolytic osteocytes increases as the number of small osteocytes declines and empty osteocyte lacunae become more common. The result is greater liability to fracture and diminished healing or replacement of injured bone.

  2. Motor synergies for dampening hand vibration during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Shunta; Kagawa, Takahiro; Uno, Yoji

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the motion required to carry a cup filled with water without spilling it, which is a common human dexterous task. This task requires the individual to dampen hand vibration while walking. We hypothesize that a reduction in hand jerk and a constant cup angle are required to achieve this task. We measured movements while human subjects carried a cup with water (WW task) and with stones (WS task) using a three-dimensional position measurement system and then analyzed joint coordination. We empirically confirmed that the value of hand jerk and the variance in cup angle in the WW task were smaller than those in the WS task. We used uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis to quantify joint coordination corresponding to the motor synergy required to reduce the hand jerk and variance of the cup angle. UCM components, which did not affect the hand jerk and cup angle, were larger than orthogonal components, which directly affected the hand jerk and cup angle in the WW task. These results suggest that there is a coordinated control mechanism that reduces hand jerk and maintains a constant cup angle when carrying a cup filled with water without spilling it. In addition, we suggest that humans adopt a flexible and coordinated control strategy of allowing variance independent of the variables that should be controlled to achieve this dexterous task.

  3. Appendicular bone mass and knee and hand osteoarthritis in Japanese women: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moji Kazuhiko

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that there is an inverse association between osteoarthritis (OA and osteoporosis. However, the relationship of bone mass to OA in a Japanese population whose rates of OA are different from Caucasians remains uncertain. Methods We studied the association of appendicular bone mineral density (second metacarpal; mBMD and quantitative bone ultrasound (calcaneus; stiffness index with knee and hand OA among 567 Japanese community-dwelling women. Knee and hand radiographs were scored for OA using Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L scales. In addition, we evaluated the presence of osteophytes and of joint space narrowing. The hand joints were examined at the distal and proximal interphalangeal (DIP, PIP and first metacarpophalangeal/carpometacarpal (MCP/CMC joints. Results After adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI, stiffness index was significantly higher in women with K/L scale, grade 3 at CMC/MCP joint compared with those with no OA. Adjusted means of stiffness index and mBMD were significantly higher in women with definite osteophytes at the CMC/MCP joint compared to those without osteophytes, whereas there were no significant differences for knee, DIP and PIP joints. Stiffness index, but not mBMD, was higher in women with definite joint space narrowing at the CMC/MCP joint compared with those with no joint space narrowing. Conclusions Appendicular bone mass was increased with OA at the CMC/MCP joint, especially among women with osteophytes. Our findings suggest that the association of peripheral bone mass with OA for knee, DIP or PIP may be less clearcut in Japanese women than in other populations.

  4. Results of low-KV-immersion radiographs of the hand in hormonal and metabolic bone osteopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, F.; Schilling, M.

    1985-12-01

    The early detection of changes in the bones of the hand in hormonal and metabolic osteopathies is possible with the aid of soft tissue immersion radiographic technique combined with ''micro-radioscopy''. The informational value of this special method of investigation will be demonstrated by several examples from the 286 examinations of accentuated osteoporotic and osteomalacic and hyperparathyroidism changes of the skeleton. Structural changes in the normally mineralized and poorly mineralized bone as well as the neighbouring soft tissue (joint capsule, tendons, subdermal fatty tissue) and the skin layer itself can be demonstrated. Examinations following therapy in the hospital or in private practice using this painless special method can demonstrate changes of the macrostructure and during the process of healing within the bone. (orig.).

  5. Effects of dynamic impacts on human bones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    1980-06-02

    Jun 2, 1980 ... Abstract. Flat bones of human skeleton were subjected to dynamic indentation with ball indenters. The impacted surface was studied under high magnification and also by using the technique of multiple beam interferometry. The impulse caused the pile up of material at a little distance from the edge of the ...

  6. Approaching human performance the functionality-driven Awiwi robot hand

    CERN Document Server

    Grebenstein, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Humanoid robotics have made remarkable progress since the dawn of robotics. So why don't we have humanoid robot assistants in day-to-day life yet? This book analyzes the keys to building a successful humanoid robot for field robotics, where collisions become an unavoidable part of the game. The author argues that the design goal should be real anthropomorphism, as opposed to mere human-like appearance. He deduces three major characteristics to aim for when designing a humanoid robot, particularly robot hands: _ Robustness against impacts _ Fast dynamics _ Human-like grasping and manipulation performance   Instead of blindly copying human anatomy, this book opts for a holistic design me-tho-do-lo-gy. It analyzes human hands and existing robot hands to elucidate the important functionalities that are the building blocks toward these necessary characteristics.They are the keys to designing an anthropomorphic robot hand, as illustrated in the high performance anthropomorphic Awiwi Hand presented in this book.  ...

  7. Hand bone mineral density reference values in a Turkish healthy female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioglu, Kenan; Dogu, Beril; Sirzai, Hulya; Yilmaz, Figen; Kuran, Banu

    2017-12-01

    In this study we aimed at identifying the bone mineral density (BMD) reference values of hands, according to age, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and assessing the correlation of these values with lumbar and femoral BMD values. A total of 403 healthy women aged between 20 and 70 participated in our study. All BMD measurements are performed by DEXA method on both hands, anteroposterior lumbar spine (L2-L4) and right femur (femoral neck, total femur) regions. BMD results of all the patients were divided to 10-year age categories and evaluated in five subgroups in total (20-30 to 61-70). Among the 10-year age categories we found both dominant and non-dominant hand peak bone mass values in the 31-40 years age group (0.423 ± 0.039 g/cm², 0.410 ± 0.043 g/cm², respectively). Statistically significant positive correlation was defined between dominant and non-dominant hand BMD values and L2-L4 spine, femur neck and total femur values (for dominant hand r = 0.636, P = 0.0001; r = 0.645, P = 0.0001; r = 0.623; P = 0.0001; for non-dominant hand r = 0.624, P = 0.0001; r = 0.637, P = 0.0001, r = 0.623, P = 0.0001, respectively). Regarding the relationship of age and menopause with BMD results, a negative statistical relationship was observed among dominant and non-dominant hand, L2-L4 spine, femoral neck and total femur BMD values (P = 0.0001). Our study has provided hand BMD reference values in women aged between 20-70 years; further studies are needed to investigate the role of these values in identifying diseases causing osteoporosis in the hand and in evaluating treatment. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Methods and theory in bone modeling drift: comparing spatial analyses of primary bone distributions in the human humerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiano, Corey M; Maggiano, Isabel S; Tiesler, Vera G; Chi-Keb, Julio R; Stout, Sam D

    2016-01-01

    This study compares two novel methods quantifying bone shaft tissue distributions, and relates observations on human humeral growth patterns for applications in anthropological and anatomical research. Microstructural variation in compact bone occurs due to developmental and mechanically adaptive circumstances that are 'recorded' by forming bone and are important for interpretations of growth, health, physical activity, adaptation, and identity in the past and present. Those interpretations hinge on a detailed understanding of the modeling process by which bones achieve their diametric shape, diaphyseal curvature, and general position relative to other elements. Bone modeling is a complex aspect of growth, potentially causing the shaft to drift transversely through formation and resorption on opposing cortices. Unfortunately, the specifics of modeling drift are largely unknown for most skeletal elements. Moreover, bone modeling has seen little quantitative methodological development compared with secondary bone processes, such as intracortical remodeling. The techniques proposed here, starburst point-count and 45° cross-polarization hand-drawn histomorphometry, permit the statistical and populational analysis of human primary tissue distributions and provide similar results despite being suitable for different applications. This analysis of a pooled archaeological and modern skeletal sample confirms the importance of extreme asymmetry in bone modeling as a major determinant of microstructural variation in diaphyses. Specifically, humeral drift is posteromedial in the human humerus, accompanied by a significant rotational trend. In general, results encourage the usage of endocortical primary bone distributions as an indicator and summary of bone modeling drift, enabling quantitative analysis by direction and proportion in other elements and populations. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  9. Osteoblast recruitment routes in human cancellous bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Helene B; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Marcussen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly proposed that bone forming osteoblasts recruited during bone remodeling originate from bone marrow perivascular cells, bone remodeling compartment canopy cells, or bone lining cells. However, an assessment of osteoblast recruitment during adult human cancellous bone remodeling...... is lacking. We addressed this question by quantifying cell densities, cell proliferation, osteoblast differentiation markers, and capillaries in human iliac crest biopsy specimens. We found that recruitment occurs on both reversal and bone-forming surfaces, as shown by the cell density and osterix levels...

  10. Rock Climbing-Related Bone Marrow Edema of the Hand: A Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Christoph; Hochholzer, Thomas; Bayer, Thomas; Schöffl, Volker

    2017-07-06

    Sport climbers strain passive and active anatomical structures of their hands and fingers to the maximum during training or competition. This study was designed to investigate bone marrow edema (BME) in rock climbing athletes. Systematic detection, treatment, and follow-up investigation of rock climbing athletes with BME of the hand. Primary-level orthopedic surgery and sports medicine division of a large academic medical center. Thirty-one high-level climbers with diffuse pain in the hand and wrist joint caused by rock climbing were included in this study. The therapy consisted of consequent stress reduction and a break from sports. Reduction of BME shown through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and regaining of preinjury climbing levels (Union Internationale des Associations d' Alpinisme metric scale). In 28 patients, MRI revealed osseous edema because of overload at the respective area of interest, mainly in the distal radius, the distal ulna, or the carpal bones, which could not be otherwise diagnosed as inflammations, tumors, or injuries. We classified these edemas and fractures of the hamate because of overload. The edema was a stress reaction to highly intensive training and climbing with presumably high traction to the wrist area. The control MRIs demonstrated that even with a consequent stress reduction, the edemas required 3 to 4 months to disappear completely. Climbers with nonspecific, diffuse pain in the wrist and/or the fingers should be examined with MRI to detect or exclude the diagnosis of a BME.

  11. In vivo quantification of bone-fluorine by delayed neutron activation analysis: a pilot study of hand-bone-fluorine levels in a Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Mike; Gräfe, James L; Aslam; Byun, Soo-Hyun; Chettle, David R; Egden, Lesley M; Webber, Colin E; McNeill, Fiona E

    2012-03-01

    Humans can be exposed to fluorine (F) through their diet, occupation, environment and oral dental care products. Fluorine, at proper dosages, is believed to have positive effects by reducing the incidence of dental caries, but fluorine toxicity can occur when people are exposed to excessive quantities of fluorine. In this paper we present the results of a small pilot in vivo study on 33 participants living in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The mean age of participants was 45 ± 18 years with a range of 20-87 years. The observed calcium normalized hand-bone-fluorine concentrations in this small pilot study ranged from 1.1 to 8.8 mg F/g Ca. Every person measured in this study had levels of fluorine in bone above the detection limit of the system. The average fluorine concentration in bone was found to be 3.5 ± 0.4 mg F/g Ca. No difference was observed in average concentration for men and women. In addition, a significant correlation (r(2) = 0.55, p fluorine content and age. The amount of fluorine was found to increase at a rate of 0.084 ± 0.014 mg F/g Ca per year. There was no significant difference observed in this small group of subjects between the accumulation rates in men and women. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time data from in vivo measurement of fluorine content in humans by neutron activation analysis have been presented. The data determined by this technique were found to be consistent with results from ex vivo studies from other countries. We suggest that the data demonstrate that this low risk non-invasive diagnostic technique will permit the routine assessment of bone-fluorine content with potential application in the study of clinical bone-related diseases. This small study demonstrated that people in Southern Ontario are exposed to fluoride in measureable quantities, and that fluoride can be seen to accumulate in bone with age. However, all volunteers were found to have levels below those expected with clinical fluorosis, and only

  12. Regeneration of human bone using different bone substitute biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Tonino; Piattelli, Adriano; Caputi, Sergio; Degidi, Marco; Mangano, Carlo; Scarano, Antonio; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to assess clinical and biological performances of several bone substitute biomaterials (BSBs). The evaluation was conducted at 6 months and after several years on 295 patients undergoing sinus augmentation with 13 different BSBs; the data belonging to previously published studies have been analyzed using innovative mathematical models to evaluate the bone regenerative index (Br) and the structural density index (Ds). After 6 months, compared to the Ds index of native bone, the regenerated bone showed a D3 bone type; while, after several years, the regenerated bone type was D2, with an evident increase in the density of the regenerated bone over time. Moreover, the values of Br were higher for combined biomaterials indicating a fewer amount of residual particles and marrow spaces, while the values of Ds were higher for anorganic bovine bone indicating a greater new bone formation and a lesser amount of marrow spaces. After 20 years, the bone regenerated using hydroxyapatite still had a D4 bone quality. After 6 months of healing, the regenerated bone had a composite structure resembling poor D3 bone type, and covered approximately one-third of the space filled by BSBs. None of the evaluated biomaterials seemed to be ideal. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Directional fractal signature methods for trabecular bone texture in hand radiographs: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolski, M., E-mail: marcin.wolski@curtin.edu.au; Podsiadlo, P.; Stachowiak, G. W. [Tribology Laboratory, School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia 6102 (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop directional fractal signature methods for the analysis of trabecular bone (TB) texture in hand radiographs. Problems associated with the small size of hand bones and the orientation of fingers were addressed. Methods: An augmented variance orientation transform (AVOT) and a quadrant rotating grid (QRG) methods were developed. The methods calculate fractal signatures (FSs) in different directions. Unlike other methods they have the search region adjusted according to the size of bone region of interest (ROI) to be analyzed and they produce FSs defined with respect to any chosen reference direction, i.e., they work for arbitrary orientation of fingers. Five parameters at scales ranging from 2 to 14 pixels (depending on image size and method) were derived from rose plots of Hurst coefficients, i.e., FS in dominating roughness (FS{sub Sta}), vertical (FS{sub V}) and horizontal (FS{sub H}) directions, aspect ratio (StrS), and direction signatures (StdS), respectively. The accuracy in measuring surface roughness and isotropy/anisotropy was evaluated using 3600 isotropic and 800 anisotropic fractal surface images of sizes between 20 × 20 and 64 × 64 pixels. The isotropic surfaces had FDs ranging from 2.1 to 2.9 in steps of 0.1, and the anisotropic surfaces had two dominating directions of 30° and 120°. The methods were used to find differences in hand TB textures between 20 matched pairs of subjects with (cases: approximate Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade ≥2) and without (controls: approximate KL grade <2) radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA). The OA Initiative public database was used and 20 × 20 pixel bone ROIs were selected on 5th distal and middle phalanges. The performance of the AVOT and QRG methods was compared against a variance orientation transform (VOT) method developed earlier [M. Wolski, P. Podsiadlo, and G. W. Stachowiak, “Directional fractal signature analysis of trabecular bone: evaluation of different methods to detect early

  14. Measuring empathy for human and robot hand pain using electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yutaka; Galli, Lisa; Ikeda, Ayaka; Itakura, Shoji; Kitazaki, Michiteru

    2015-11-03

    This study provides the first physiological evidence of humans' ability to empathize with robot pain and highlights the difference in empathy for humans and robots. We performed electroencephalography in 15 healthy adults who observed either human- or robot-hand pictures in painful or non-painful situations such as a finger cut by a knife. We found that the descending phase of the P3 component was larger for the painful stimuli than the non-painful stimuli, regardless of whether the hand belonged to a human or robot. In contrast, the ascending phase of the P3 component at the frontal-central electrodes was increased by painful human stimuli but not painful robot stimuli, though the interaction of ANOVA was not significant, but marginal. These results suggest that we empathize with humanoid robots in late top-down processing similarly to human others. However, the beginning of the top-down process of empathy is weaker for robots than for humans.

  15. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  16. Hands-free human-machine interaction with voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, B. H.

    2004-05-01

    Voice is natural communication interface between a human and a machine. The machine, when placed in today's communication networks, may be configured to provide automation to save substantial operating cost, as demonstrated in AT&T's VRCP (Voice Recognition Call Processing), or to facilitate intelligent services, such as virtual personal assistants, to enhance individual productivity. These intelligent services often need to be accessible anytime, anywhere (e.g., in cars when the user is in a hands-busy-eyes-busy situation or during meetings where constantly talking to a microphone is either undersirable or impossible), and thus call for advanced signal processing and automatic speech recognition techniques which support what we call ``hands-free'' human-machine communication. These techniques entail a broad spectrum of technical ideas, ranging from use of directional microphones and acoustic echo cancellatiion to robust speech recognition. In this talk, we highlight a number of key techniques that were developed for hands-free human-machine communication in the mid-1990s after Bell Labs became a unit of Lucent Technologies. A video clip will be played to demonstrate the accomplishement.

  17. Human-like Compliance for Dexterous Robot Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Active Electromechanical Compliance (AEC) system that was developed for the Jau-JPL anthropomorphic robot. The AEC system imitates the functionality of the human muscle's secondary function, which is to control the joint's stiffness: AEC is implemented through servo controlling the joint drive train's stiffness. The control strategy, controlling compliant joints in teleoperation, is described. It enables automatic hybrid position and force control through utilizing sensory feedback from joint and compliance sensors. This compliant control strategy is adaptable for autonomous robot control as well. Active compliance enables dual arm manipulations, human-like soft grasping by the robot hand, and opens the way to many new robotics applications.

  18. Expansile aneurysmal bone cyst in the tubular bones of the hand treated with en bloc excision and autograft reconstruction: a report of 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, D; Jamshidi, K; Najdmazhar, F; Shariatzade, H; Liaghat, O

    2011-10-01

    Primary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) in the small tubular bones of the hands are rare and optimal treatment is not yet established. Between August 1997 and June 2009, 12 patients with biopsy-proven expansile primary ABCs of the small tubular bones of the hand were treated with en bloc tumor excision and strut autograft reconstruction. The adjacent joint was preserved if feasible, otherwise it was fused. Patients were followed for at least 2 years (mean = 7 years). All grafts were incorporated except for partial resorption in one. There was only one tumor recurrence about 1 year after the operation. Other complications included premature physeal arrest in one case and limitation of adjacent joint motion in three. A relatively low rate of recurrence and other complications indicates that this technique would serve as a good strategy for patients with expansile ABCs in the hand in terms of safety, simplicity and reduced number of re-operations.

  19. Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    pain and bacterial or viral contamination. Thus, there is need for development of alternative bone graft materials. The use of osteoinductive materials such as demineralized bone matrix (DBM) alone or in combination with allograft or commercially available human cancellous bone (CB) may substitute allo...

  20. Recent advances in biodynamics of human hand-arm system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ren G; Wu, John Z; Welcome, Daniel E

    2005-07-01

    The biodynamics of human hand-arm system is one of the most important foundations for the measurement, evaluation, and risk assessment of hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) exposure. This paper presents a new conceptual model relating factors influencing cause-effect relationships for HTV exposure, a new study strategy, and a comprehensive review of the recent advances in the biodynamics closely associated with HTV exposure. The review covers the following five aspects: theoretical modeling of biodynamic responses, vibration transmissibility, driving-point biodynamic responses, evaluation of anti-vibration gloves, and applied forces. This review finds that some significant advances in each of these aspects have been achieved in the recent years. Several important issues and problems in the biodynamic measurement have been identified and resolved, which has significantly helped improve the reliability and accuracy of the experimental data. The results reported in recent years suggest that, from the point of view of biodynamics, the frequency weighting specified in ISO 5349-1 (2001) overestimates the low frequency effect but underestimates the high frequency effect on the fingers and hand. The major problems, issues, and topics for further studies are also outlined in this paper. It is anticipated that the further studies of the biodynamics of the system will eventually lead to establishment of a robust vibration exposure theory. Although this review focuses on the biodynamics of the hand-arm system, the fundamental concepts and some methodologies reviewed in this paper may also be applicable for the study of whole-body vibration exposure.

  1. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make students understand that microorganisms are always associated with humans, and that microorganisms have the ability to degrade chemicals? The presence of microorganisms on humans can be shown by incubating agar plates after they are touched by the hands of students. The ability of microorganisms to degrade chemicals can be shown by an analytical measurement of the degradation of chemicals. When the chemicals are dyes (colorants in water, microbial activity on degradation of dyes can be demonstrated by observing a decreasing degree of color as a result of the enzymatic activity (e.g., azoreductase. Dyes are widely used in the textile, food, and cosmetic industries. They are generally resistant to conventional biological wastewater treatment systems such as the activated sludge process (4. The discharge of wastewater containing dye pollutes surface water. The ability of microorganisms to decolorize and degrade dyes has been widely investigated to use for bioremediation purposes (5. The goal of this tip is to understand the presence of bacteria on human skin and the ability of bacteria to degrade colorant chemicals (decolorization. In this tip, students first cultivate and isolate bacteria on their hands, and then examine potential decolorization activity of each bacterium by observing the degree of color of the liquid in tubes in which bacteria isolated from students’ hands were inoculated. Decolorization activity of bacterial isolates from human skin has been

  2. Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    with using real human tissue. 1 INTRODUCTION Prevention of head injury is receiving growing attention in the sporting arena as well as the...M. Alem, Mechanical properties of cranial bone. Journal of Biomechanics , 1970. 3(5): p. 497-511. 3. Wood, Jack L., Dynamic response of human...cranial bone. Journal of Biomechanics , 1971. 4(1): p. 1-12. 4. Wood, Jack L., Mechanical properties of human cranial bone in tension, in Department of

  3. A computational model of the human hand 93-ERI-053

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K.; Axelrod, T.

    1996-03-01

    The objectives of the Computational Hand Modeling project were to prove the feasibility of the Laboratory`s NIKE3D finite element code to orthopaedic problems. Because of the great complexity of anatomical structures and the nonlinearity of their behavior, we have focused on a subset of joints of the hand and lower extremity and have developed algorithms to model their behavior. The algorithms developed here solve fundamental problems in computational biomechanics and can be expanded to describe any other joints of the human body. This kind of computational modeling has never successfully been attempted before, due in part to a lack of biomaterials data and a lack of computational resources. With the computational resources available at the National Laboratories and the collaborative relationships we have established with experimental and other modeling laboratories, we have been in a position to pursue our innovative approach to biomechanical and orthopedic modeling.

  4. The three-dimensional microstructure of trabecular bone: Analysis of site-specific variation in the human jaw bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jo Eun; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Myung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sung Ook [A Plus Dental Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to analyze human maxillary and mandibular trabecular bone using the data acquired from micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and to characterize the site-specific microstructures of trabeculae. Sixty-nine cylindrical bone specimens were prepared from the mandible and maxilla. They were divided into 5 groups by region: the anterior maxilla, posterior maxilla, anterior mandible, posterior mandible, and mandibular condyle. After the specimens were scanned using a micro-CT system, three-dimensional microstructural parameters such as the percent bone volume, bone specific surface, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, structure model index, and degrees of anisotropy were analyzed. Among the regions other than the condylar area, the anterior mandibular region showed the highest trabecular thickness and the lowest value for the bone specific surface. On the other hand, the posterior maxilla region showed the lowest trabecular thickness and the highest value for the bone specific surface. The degree of anisotropy was lowest at the anterior mandible. The condyle showed thinner trabeculae with a more anisotropic arrangement than the other mandibular regions. There were microstructural differences between the regions of the maxilla and mandible. These results suggested that different mechanisms of external force might exist at each site.

  5. CT-guided bone biopsy: Initial experience with a commercially available hand held Black and Decker{sup TM} drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, O. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Benfayed, W. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Geoghegan, T. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Al-Ismail, K. [Department of Radiology, King Faisal Hospital (Saudi Arabia); Munk, P.L. [Department of Radiology, Musculo-Skeletal division, Vancouver General Hospital, 899 W. 12th Ave., Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9 (Canada); Torreggiani, William C. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)]. E-mail: william.torreggiani@amnch.ie

    2007-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the use of a simple commercially available Black and Decker{sup TM} hand based drill in performing CT-guided bone biopsies. Materials and methods: Three international institutions were enrolled in the study. In each centre, a fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist directed the assessment of a hand based commercial drill for performing CT-guided bone biopsies. A specially designed component was engineered which allowed the connection of a standard bone biopsy set to a commercial drill. The component was distributed to the three centres involved. Over a 3-year period, data from all three institutions was collected. Information regarding technical success, diagnostic data and complication rates were all collated to assess the technical feasibility of this technique. Results: In total 68 patients underwent bone biopsy using a hand held commercial drill. Technical success was achieved in 65 patients. Diagnostic material was obtained in 53 patients. Non-diagnostic material was obtained in 12 patients. Five out of the 12 patients with non-diagnostic material had repeat biopsies with diagnostic material obtained in 2 of these. No major complications occurred in any patient. Conclusion: CT-guided bone biopsy using a hand held commercial drill has a technically high success rate with minimal complications.

  6. Tactile mouse generating velvet hand illusion on human palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadar Rajaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To enhance virtual reality (VR generated by tactile displays, we have focused on a novel tactile illusion, called the Velvet Hand Illusion (VHI. In VHI, moving two parallel wires back and forth between the two hands leads humans to perceive a velvet-like surface between their hands. In earlier studies, we revealed that the intensity of VHI could be controlled by a ratio (r/D, where r and D are the wire stroke and wire distance, respectively. According to these findings, we investigate in this study whether a common tactile display is able to produce VHI, and whether the ratio can also control VHI intensity. We prepare a dot-matrix display as a tactile display in which moving one line of the display’s pins is considered as a wire pattern. We investigate the VHI intensity with regard to changing the stroke r and the line distance D using paired comparison. Experimental results show that the VHI intensity is increased or decreased by changing r and D. We conclude that VHI can be created by the tactile display, and the intensity of VHI is controlled by changing the ratio of r/D.

  7. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (possification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human cortical bone: the SINUPROS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi-Racila, M; Crolet, J M

    2008-01-01

    Several modelizations have been investigated on human cortical bone in our team and we have often observed that the introduction of a new geometrical parameter induces significant perturbations on the numerical values obtained with previous models. We have therefore decided to take into account the totality of all possible parameters in a modelization which is physically and physiologically plausible. In order to do this, we have analyzed the architecture of cortical bone and exhibited all parameters that occur. To determine physical properties at each architectural level, the best adapted tool is without any doubt the mathematical theory of homogenization. All the necessary algorithms have been implemented into SINUPROS software (websites of the Universities). Its main interest is the evaluation of macroscopic physical properties for a given configuration. It can also be used to seek, by successive tests, configurations corresponding to properties experimentally measured. Computation time being too high (10 to 45 minutes according to tested configurations), a fast version based on approximation theory has been developed and thus the obtaining of the results is immediate. The researched configuration being thus obtained, it has then to be validated by the original version.

  9. Early Pleistocene human hand phalanx from the Sima del Elefante (TE) cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez de Castro, J.M.; Carbonell, E.; Arsuaga, J.L.; Martinón-Torres, M.; Valverdú, J.; Huguet, R.; Carretero, J.M.; Pablos, A.; Lorenzo, C.

    2015-01-01

    10.1016/j.jhevol.2014.08.007 In this study, a new Early Pleistocene proximal hand phalanx (ATE9-2) from the Sima del Elefante cave site (TE ¿ Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain), ascribed to Homo sp., is presented and comparatively described in the context of the evolution of the genus Homo. The ATE9-2 specimen is especially important because of the paucity of hand bones in the human fossil record during the Early Pleistocene. The morphological and metrical analyses of the phalanx ATE9-2 indicate...

  10. The osteogenic potential of human bone callus

    OpenAIRE

    Weiqi Han; Wei He; Wanlei Yang; Jianlei Li; Zhifan Yang; Xuanyuan Lu; An Qin; Yu Qian

    2016-01-01

    Bone callus, generated during fracture healing, is commonly discarded during surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of bone callus and its possible use as autograft material for patients needing bone grafts. Histology, immunohistochemistry, micro-computed tomography, and biomechanics were performed to examine osteogenic cells, osteoinductive factors, and the osteoconductive structure of bone callus. Alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts, ost...

  11. Bone dosimetry using synthetic images to represent trabecular bones of five regions of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Jose de M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (POLI). Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Vanildo J. de M., E-mail: vjr@ufpe.br [Departamento de Anatomia. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica (DMAT). Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wagner E. de [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges in numerical dosimetry of ionizing radiation is to estimate the absorbed dose by bone tissue in the human body. The bone tissues of greater radiosensitivity are the red bone marrow (RBM), that consist of the hematopoietic cells, located within the trabecular bones, and the bone surface cells (BSC), called osteogenic cells. The report 70 of the ICRP lists five spongiosa regions with their respective volume percent of trabecular bone: ribs (also contemplating the clavicles and sternum), spine, long bones, pelvis and skull (also contemplating mandible). The Grupo de Pesquisa em Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq) has been built exposure computational models (ECMs) based on voxel phantoms and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. To estimate the energy deposited in the RBM and in the BSC of a phantom, the GDN/CNPq has used a method based on micro-CT images of the five trabecular regions mentioned above. These images were provided by other research institutes and were obtained from scan of bone samples of adult. Here is the greatest difficulty in reproducing this method: besides the need for bone images of real people with micrometer resolution, the distribution of bone marrow in the human body, according to ICRP 70, varies with age. This article presents some proposals of the GDN/CNPQ for replacing in the ECMs the micro-CT images by images synthesized by the computer, based on Monte Carlo sampling. (author)

  12. The osteogenic potential of human bone callus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weiqi; He, Wei; Yang, Wanlei; Li, Jianlei; Yang, Zhifan; Lu, Xuanyuan; Qin, An; Qian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bone callus, generated during fracture healing, is commonly discarded during surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of bone callus and its possible use as autograft material for patients needing bone grafts. Histology, immunohistochemistry, micro-computed tomography, and biomechanics were performed to examine osteogenic cells, osteoinductive factors, and the osteoconductive structure of bone callus. Alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts, osteoinductive factors (including BMP2, FGF2, TGFB1, and IGF1), and a porous structure were found in bone callus. Early-stage callus (within 3 months after fracture) presented significantly improved osteogenic properties compared to medium- (3–9 months) and late-stage (longer than 9 months) callus. The results revealed that bone callus induced new bone formation in a nude mouse model. Early-stage callus showed better performance to medium- and late-stage callus in the induction of new bone formation at both 8 and 12 weeks. These findings indicated that bone callus, especially early-stage callus, possesses osteogenic potential and can potentially serve as an alternative source of material for bone grafts. PMID:27796345

  13. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  14. Chondrosarcoma of the short tubular bones of the hands and feet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawte, T.G.; Steiner, G.C. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Beltran, J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Dorfman, H.D. [Section of Orthopaedic Pathology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Objective. To report 12 cases of chondrosarcoma in a rare location, the short tubular bones of the hands and feet, as well as 12 cases of enchondroma in similar locations, emphasizing the radiologic and histopathologic features. Design and patients. All relevant cases that had both histologic slides and radiographs available were taken from the files of one orthopedic referral hospital and the personal files of one of the authors. A similar number of enchondroma cases was selected at random from the files. Results and conclusions. One malignancy arose in a background of enchondromatosis, with all the others being solitary lesions. A pathologic diagnosis of malignancy is often difficult in the absence of radiologic signs of malignancy (cortical destruction with or without soft tissue extension). However, three cases were unusual in that the initial radiograph demonstrated a benign appearance. Another group of three malignancies was surprisingly indolent biologically. The treatment of choice is ray resection (or more limited amputation in a lesion of the middle or distal phalanx). (orig.) With 10 figs., 3 tabs., 13 refs.

  15. Determination of the standard values of the hand bone mineral density values in males according to ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Temiztürk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study we purposed to determine standardvalues of hand Bone Mineral Density (BMD accordingto ages by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXAin males who applied to our hospital, evaluate associationof hand BMD with lumbar and femur BMD and searchusefulness of hand BMD measurement by DXA.Methods: Totally, 239 male included, whose ages differbetween 27 to 87 years, had no disease associatedwith bone density were included. The cases, betweenthe ages 20 to 70 separated to age groups, comprisedof 5 years. Cases, whose age is 70 and older, included inthe same group. Average of dominant and nondominanthand BMD values of the chosen cases were computedaccording to age groups comprised of 5 years and theassociation with values of L2-L4 and femur neck BMD issearched separately.Results: There is significant association between dominanthand BMD scores with L2-L4 and femur neck BMDscores. Also there is significant association between nondominanthand BMD scores with L2-L4 and femur neckBMD scores. Also there is asignificant association betweenscores of hand BMD with hand grip strenght.Conclusion: In this study there is significant associationbetween BMD scores of dominant and nondominanthand with BMD scores of L2-L4 and femur neck in all agegroups. Rheumatological diseases, reflex sympatheticdystrophy, tendon and nerve lacerations of hand and forearm,fractures of upper extremity and hemiplegy, that cancauses local osteoporosis in the hand, measurement ofhand BMD can be done by DXA.Key words: Bone mineral density, dual energy X ray absorptiometry,osteoporosis

  16. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kramer, Axel; Below, Harald; Bieber, Nora; Kampf, Guenter; Toma, Cyril D; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan

    2007-01-01

    ... when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans...

  17. Human evolution. Comment on "Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almécija, Sergio; Wallace, Ian J; Judex, Stefan; Alba, David M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2015-06-05

    Skinner and colleagues (Research Article, 23 January 2015, p. 395), based on metacarpal trabecular bone structure, argue that Australopithecus africanus employed human-like dexterity for stone tool making and use 3 million years ago. However, their evolutionary and biological assumptions are misinformed, failing to refute the previously existing hypothesis that human-like manipulation preceded systematized stone tool manufacture, as indicated by the fossil record. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Early Pleistocene human hand phalanx from the Sima del Elefante (TE) cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Pablos, Adrián; Carretero, José Miguel; Huguet, Rosa; Valverdú, Josep; Martinón-Torres, María; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new Early Pleistocene proximal hand phalanx (ATE9-2) from the Sima del Elefante cave site (TE - Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain), ascribed to Homo sp., is presented and comparatively described in the context of the evolution of the genus Homo. The ATE9-2 specimen is especially important because of the paucity of hand bones in the human fossil record during the Early Pleistocene. The morphological and metrical analyses of the phalanx ATE9-2 indicate that there are no essential differences between it and comparator fossil specimens for the genus Homo after 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago). Similar to Sima de los Huesos and Neandertal specimens, ATE9-2 is a robust proximal hand phalanx, probably reflecting greater overall body robusticity in these populations or a higher gracility in modern humans. The age of level TE9 from Sima del Elefante and morphological and metrical studies of ATE9-2 suggest that the morphology of the proximal hand phalanges and, thus, the morphology of the hand could have remained stable over the last 1.2-1.3 Ma. Taking into account the evidence recently provided by a metacarpal from Kaitio (Kenya) from around 1.42 Ma, we argue that modern hand morphology is present in the genus Homo subsequent to Homo habilis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide inhibits bone resorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Anne; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Holst, Jens J; Hartmann, Bolette

    2014-11-01

    In humans, the pronounced postprandial reduction in bone resorption (decreasing bone resorption markers by around 50%) has been suggested to be caused by gut hormones. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a peptide hormone secreted postprandially from the small intestine. The hormone is known as an incretin hormone, but preclinical studies have suggested that it may also influence bone metabolism, showing both antiresorptive and anabolic effects as reflected by changes in biomechanical measures, microarchitecture, and activity of the bone cells in response to GIP stimulation. Its role in human bone homeostasis, however, is unknown. To examine the effect of GIP administration on bone resorption in humans. Plasma samples were obtained from 10 healthy subjects during four conditions: euglycemic (5 mmol/L) and hyperglycemic (12 mmol/L) 90-minute glucose clamps with co-infusion of GIP (4 pmol/kg/min for 15 min, followed by 2 pmol/kg/min for 45 min) or placebo. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of degradation products of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), a bone resorption marker. RESULTS regarding effects on pancreatic hormone secretion have been published. During euglycemia, the decremental area under the curve in CTX was significantly (P basal values. We conclude that GIP reduces bone resorption in humans, interacting with a possible effect of hyperglycemia.

  20. A simplified procedure for preparation of undecalcified human bone sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, J A; Tkocz, I; Levinsen, J

    1985-01-01

    A new type of apparatus for sectioning samples of hard, undecalcified bone is described. Slices of fresh or archeological human bone 4-5 mm thick are dehydrated and then embedded in epoxy resin. The apparatus used to prepare sections from the resulting blocks consists of a low-speed rim...

  1. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  2. Bioreactor cultivation of anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Joshua P; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Grayson, Warren L

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a method for engineering bone grafts in vitro with the specific geometry of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. The anatomical geometry of the bone grafts was segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans, converted to G-code, and used to machine decellularized trabecular bone scaffolds into the identical shape of the condyle. These scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinner flasks and cultivated for up to 5 weeks in vitro using a custom-designed perfusion bioreactor system. The flow patterns through the complex geometry were modeled using the FloWorks module of SolidWorks to optimize bioreactor design. The perfused scaffolds exhibited significantly higher cellular content, better matrix production, and increased bone mineral deposition relative to non-perfused (static) controls after 5 weeks of in vitro cultivation. This technology is broadly applicable for creating patient-specific bone grafts of varying shapes and sizes.

  3. Multi-constrained inverse kinematics for the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Kulić, Dana; Gorbet, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the spatial and temporal characteristics of hand movement is a challenging task due to the large number of degrees of freedom (DOF) in the hand. This paper presents a multi-constrained inverse kinematics (IK) approach for hand motion estimation from motion capture data. The IK approach satisfies a set of prioritized motion and postural constraints for each hand joint and link. The high-priority constraint is fully satisfied, while the fulfillment of the low-priority constraints is achieved as long as no conflict with the high-priority constraint exists. The proposed approach can aid marker-based motion capture technologies in accurately reconstructing discontinuities or erroneous marker trajectory segments resulting from occluded, missing, or flipped markers. The performance of the multi-constrained IK approach for the hand is tested for a full range of continuous hand motion.

  4. Human-inspired feedback synergies for environmental interaction with a dexterous robotic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Benjamin A; Engeberg, Erik D

    2014-11-07

    Effortless control of the human hand is mediated by the physical and neural couplings inherent in the structure of the hand. This concept was explored for environmental interaction tasks with the human hand, and a novel human-inspired feedback synergy (HFS) controller was developed for a robotic hand which synchronized position and force feedback signals to mimic observed human hand motions. This was achieved by first recording the finger joint motion profiles of human test subjects, where it was observed that the subjects would extend their fingers to maintain a natural hand posture when interacting with different surfaces. The resulting human joint angle data were used as inspiration to develop the HFS controller for the anthropomorphic robotic hand, which incorporated finger abduction and force feedback in the control laws for finger extension. Experimental results showed that by projecting a broader view of the tasks at hand to each specific joint, the HFS controller produced hand motion profiles that closely mimic the observed human responses and allowed the robotic manipulator to interact with the surfaces while maintaining a natural hand posture. Additionally, the HFS controller enabled the robotic hand to autonomously traverse vertical step discontinuities without prior knowledge of the environment, visual feedback, or traditional trajectory planning techniques.

  5. No effect of Osteoset, a bone graft substitute, on bone healing in humans: a prospective randomized double-blind study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petruskevicius, Juozas; Nielsen, Mette Strange; Kaalund, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of a newly marketed bone substitute, Osteoset, on bone healing in a tibial defect in humans. 20 patients undergoing an ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction with bone-patella tendon-bone graft were block-randomized into 2 groups of 10 each. In the treatment group...

  6. Cerebral reorganisation of human hand movement following dynamic immobilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; Coert, JH; Stenekes, MW; Leenders, KL; Paans, AMJ; Nicolai, JRA

    2003-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a flexor tendon lesion of the hand is followed by a 6-week period of dynamic immobilisation. This is achieved by the elastic strings of a Kleinert splint, enabling only passive and no active flexor movements. After such immobilisation, the appearance of a temporary clumsy hand

  7. Illusory sense of human touch from a warm and soft artificial hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabibihan, John-John; Joshi, Deepak; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-05-01

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well-being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three-step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 °C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when constant indentation force of 1 N was applied to 780 data points on the palmar side of the hand. Results showed that an artificial hand with skeletal structure is as soft as a human hand. Lastly, the participants' arms were touched with human and artificial hands, but they were prevented from seeing the hand that touched them. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggests that a warm and soft artificial hand can create an illusion that the touch is from a human hand. These findings open the possibilities for prosthetic and robotic hands that are life-like and are more socially acceptable.

  8. Histopathological evaluation of bone regeneration using human resorbable demineralized membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Filling a bone defect with bone substitution materials is a therapy of choice, but the infiltration of connective tissue from the mucoperiostal flap may compromise a healing of bone substitutions with bony wall defects. Application of membrane as a barrier is indicated as a solution to this problem. The aim of this study was to show a pathohistological view of bone regeneration and the significance of human resorbable demineralized membrane (HRDM, 200 μ thick in bone regeneration regarding mandibular defects in an experiment on dogs. Methods. The experiment was performed on six dogs. Bone defects were created in all six dogs on the right side of the mandible after the elevation of the mucoperiostal flap. One defect was filled with human deproteinised bone (HDB, and in between HDB and soft tissue RHDM of 200 μ thick was placed. In the second defect, used as a control one, only HDB without RHDM was placed. Two dogs were sacrificed two months after the surgery, another two dogs four months after the surgery and the last two dogs six months after the surgery. After that, samples of bone tissue were taken for histopathological analysis. Results. In all the six dogs with defects treated with HDB and RHDM the level of bone regeneration was much higher in comparison with the control defects without RHDM. Conclusion. Membrane, as a cover of bony defect, is useful and benefits bone regeneration. Bony defects covered with RHDM show better bony healing despite the fact that bone regeneration was not fully complete for as long as six months after the RHDM implantation.

  9. Human decellularized bone scaffolds from aged donors show improved osteoinductive capacity compared to young donor bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Smith

    Full Text Available To improve the safe use of allograft bone, decellularization techniques may be utilized to produce acellular scaffolds. Such scaffolds should retain their innate biological and biomechanical capacity and support mesenchymal stem cell (MSC osteogenic differentiation. However, as allograft bone is derived from a wide age-range, this study aimed to determine whether donor age impacts on the ability an osteoinductive, acellular scaffold produced from human bone to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSC. BM-MSCs from young and old donors were seeded on acellular bone cubes from young and old donors undergoing osteoarthritis related hip surgery. All combinations resulted in increased osteogenic gene expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzyme activity, however BM-MSCs cultured on old donor bone displayed the largest increases. BM-MSCs cultured in old donor bone conditioned media also displayed higher osteogenic gene expression and ALP activity than those exposed to young donor bone conditioned media. ELISA and Luminex analysis of conditioned media demonstrated similar levels of bioactive factors between age groups; however, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 concentration was significantly higher in young donor samples. Additionally, structural analysis of old donor bone indicated an increased porosity compared to young donor bone. These results demonstrate the ability of a decellularized scaffold produced from young and old donors to support osteogenic differentiation of cells from young and old donors. Significantly, the older donor bone produced greater osteogenic differentiation which may be related to reduced IGFBP1 bioavailability and increased porosity, potentially explaining the excellent clinical results seen with the use of allograft from aged donors.

  10. Transplanted Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded onto Peptide Hydrogel Decrease Alveolar Bone Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tcacencu, Ion; Karlstr?m, Erik; Cedervall, Jessica; Wendel, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar bone loss can be caused by periodontitis or periodontal trauma. We have evaluated the effects of transplanted undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on alveolar bone reaction and periodontal ligament healing in an experimental periodontal wound model. The hMSCs seeded onto a self-assembling peptide hydrogel in combination with collagen sponge were implanted into the right mandible of 12 rats and followed for 1 (n=6) or 4 weeks (n=6) postoperatively. The other ...

  11. Centre-surround organization of fast sensorimotor integration in human motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubbioso, Raffaele; Raffin, Estelle; Karabanov, Anke

    2017-01-01

    Using the short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor hand area (M1HAND) can probe how sensory input from limbs modulates corticomotor output in humans. Here we applied a novel TMS mapping approach to chart the spatial representat...... in M1HAND. Like homotopic SAI, heterotopic SAF was somatotopically expressed in M1HAND. Together, the results provide first-time evidence that fast sensorimotor integration involves centre-inhibition and surround-facilitation in human M1HAND....

  12. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter...... of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts....... Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone...

  13. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide inhibits bone resorption in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Anne; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In humans, the pronounced postprandial reduction in bone resorption (decreasing bone resorption markers by around 50%) has been suggested to be caused by gut hormones. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a peptide hormone secreted postprandially from the small......-minute glucose clamps with co-infusion of GIP (4 pmol/kg/min for 15 min, followed by 2 pmol/kg/min for 45 min) or placebo. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of degradation products of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), a bone resorption marker. RESULTS regarding effects...

  14. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Axel; Below, Harald; Bieber, Nora; Kampf, Guenter; Toma, Cyril D; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the increasing promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs and the worldwide use of ethanol-based hand rubs in hospitals only few studies have specifically addressed the issue of ethanol absorption when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans. Methods Twelve volunteers applied t...

  15. Reorganization of the Human Somatosensory Cortex in Hand Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Catalan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Abnormalities of finger representations in the somatosensory cortex have been identified in patients with focal hand dystonia. Measuring blood flow with positron emission tomography (PET can be use to demonstrate functional localization of receptive fields. Methods: A vibratory stimulus was applied to the right thumb and little finger of six healthy volunteers and six patients with focal hand dystonia to map their receptive fields using H215O PET. Results: The cortical finger representations in the primary somatosensory cortex were closer to each other in patients than in normal subjects. No abnormalities were found in secondary somatosensory cortex, but the somatotopy there is less well distinguished. Conclusions: These data confirm prior electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging observations showing abnormalities of finger representations in somatosensory cortex of patients with focal hand dystonia.

  16. Discriminating multiple motor imageries of human hands using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ran; Liao, Ke; Ding, Lei

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of discriminating four different motor imagery (MI) types from both hands using electroencephalography (EEG) through exploring underlying features related to MIs of thumb and fist from one hand. New spectral and spatial features related to different MIs were extracted using principal component analysis (PCA) and squared cross correlation (R(2)). Extracted features were evaluated using a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier, resulting in an average decoding accuracy about 50%, which is significantly higher than the guess level and the 95% confidence level of guess. The preliminary results demonstrate the great potential of extracting features from different MIs from same hands to generate control signals with more degrees of freedom (DOF) for non-invasive brain-computer interface applications. In addition, for movement related applications, especially for neuroprosthesis, the present study may facilitate the development of a non-invasive BCI, which is highly intuitive and based on users' spontaneous intentions.

  17. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Different distributions of human bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms in serum and bone tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Per; Sharp, Christopher A; Farley, John R

    2002-11-01

    In vitro, bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) is released from the osteoblast membrane with its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor still attached (i.e., in an anchor-intact form); however, in vivo, BALP circulates as a variable mixture of anchorless isoforms, which can be identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Previous studies have shown that the relative abundance of these BALP isoforms in serum may be clinically useful for the diagnosis and management of metabolic bone disease. In the current studies, we describe a method for the determination of anchorless BALP isoforms in extracts of bone and we present novel data on the conversion of anchor-intact to anchorless BALP by incubation with endogenous circulating GPI-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD). A 72-h extraction with 0.1% Triton X-100 released approximately 90% of the BALP activity from powdered bone. An average of 19% of this activity was anchorless, but essentially all of the activity could be converted to the anchorless form by incubation with partially purified GPI-PLD from human serum. Using HPLC, we detected four BALP isoforms (B/I, B1x, B1, and B2) in these GPI-PLD-treated extracts of bone. An additional BALP fraction was also detected in the samples during the initial phase of GPI-PLD treatment. The abundance of the BALP isoforms differed between bone and serum, particularly for the B/I isoform, which comprised, on average, 18% of the BALP in GPI-PLD-treated extracts of healthy bone tissue, but only 6% of the total BALP activity in serum from healthy individuals. Based on our recent finding of differences in the number of sialic acid residues between the BALP isoforms, we hypothesize that this difference between BALP isoforms in serum and extracts of bone is due to the different patterns of glycosylation, which results in different biological half-lives in the circulation. A preliminary application of our method to the extraction of BALP isoforms from a small number of human

  19. Nonlinear ultrasound can detect accumulated damage in human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, M; Mitton, D; Talmant, M; Johnson, P; Laugier, P

    2008-01-01

    Bone micro-damage is commonly accepted as a relevant parameter for fracture risk assessment, but there is no available technique for its non-invasive characterization. The objective of this work is to study the potential of nonlinear ultrasound for damage detection in human bone. Ultrasound is particularly desirable due to its non-invasive and non-ionizing characteristics. We show results illustrating the correlation of progressive fatigue of human bone samples to their nonlinear dynamical response. In our experiments, damage was induced in 30 samples of diaphyseal human femur using fatigue cycling. At intervals in the cycling, the nonlinear response of the samples was assessed applying Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS). The nonlinear parameter alpha, which in other materials correlates with the quantity of damage, dramatically increased with the number of mechanical testing cycles. We find a large spread in alpha in the pristine samples and infer that the spread is due to damage differences in the sample population. As damage accumulates during cycling, we find that alpha is much more sensitive to damage than other quantities measured, including the slope and hysteresis of the load/displacement curve, and the dynamic wavespeed. To our knowledge, this study represents the first application of the concept of nonlinear dynamic elasticity to human bone. The results are promising, suggesting the value of further work on this topic. Ultimately, the approach may have merit for in vivo bone damage characterization.

  20. Evidence of Osteoclastic Activity in the Human Temporal Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Takefumi; Nadol, Joseph B

    2017-12-09

    Bone remodeling within the otic capsule has been reported to be inhibited especially at or near the cochlea, except under some pathological conditions such as otosclerosis, Paget's disease, or mastoiditis, when bone remodeling can occur. Microcavitations found in periosteal and endosteal layers of human temporal bone specimens without otosclerosis, Paget's disease, or inflammation as reported in the current study are consistent with osteoclastic bone resorption. Thirty-three temporal bones from 33 patients were prepared for light microscopy and classified into 4 groups: histologically proven dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal (SSCD) (n = 3, group 1), age 20 years or younger (n = 10, group 2), age 90 years or older and with otosclerosis (n = 10, group 3), and age 90 years or older without otosclerosis (n = 10, group 4). Microcavitation was seen at 7 anatomic locations in the temporal bone in all 4 groups, but not in the cochlea or vestibule. Microcavitation within the temporal bone is likely due to osteoclastic activity, and it is seen in both young and old patients, patients with and without otosclerosis, and in cases with SSCD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: Diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Binetti, Katie M

    2014-07-01

    A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and non-human osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential 'mimics' for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements--the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the Healing Potential of Demineralized Dentin Matrix Fixed with Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Bone Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of demineralized dentin matrix (DDM fixed with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 through an experimental and a clinical study. Unilateral upper second and third premolars of eight beagles were extracted. A mucoperiosteal flap was elevated around the extraction socket, and a bone defect was made using a surgical drill. Each DDM was fixed with rhBMP-2, and autogenous bone was grafted at the bone defect area with a collagenous membrane. The beagles were euthanized at two, four, eight, and 12 weeks after receiving the bone graft. Block specimens involving grafted bone and surrounding natural bone were extracted. A total of 23 patients who received bone grafts using human DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 (AutoBT BMP with implant placements (36 implants; maxilla: 14, mandible: 22 were selected. The implant stability, marginal bone loss, and clinical outcome were evaluated. Three trephine cores were harvested fourmonths after bone grafting, and histologic examination was performed. In the histological evaluation performed four weeks after the bone graft, autogenous bone showed 52% new bone formation and DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 showed 33% new bone formation. Twelve weeks after the bone graft, autogenous bone showed 75% new bone formation and DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 showed 48% new bone formation. In the clinical study, favorable osseointegration was obtained in 35 out of 36 implant sites (one case of osseointegration failure. In all cases, severe complications were not observed. Histomorphometrically, new bone formation was observed in 14.98% of the cases. The residual DDM particles were 6.22%. AutoBT BMP provides good osteoinductive and osteoconductive potential and clinical efficacy.

  3. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  4. A new bone banking technique to maintain osteoblast viability in frozen human iliac cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Zöller, Joachim E; Kübler, Alexander

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new cryopreservation technique to maintain the osteoblast viability in frozen iliac bone and to prove cell viability using cell culture techniques. Human iliac cancellous bones were frozen with and without 10% Me(2)SO at -80 degrees C. The tubes were kept in a -80 degrees C freezer for at least 2 days. After the storage period, the frozen bone was thawed by placing the tube in a 37 degrees C water bath. A serial enzymatic digestion technique using 0.2% collagenase was employed to isolate osteoblast-like cells from the bone. The cells that were released were inoculated into tissue culture flasks containing DMEM supplemented with 10% FCS. They were incubated at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 95% air and 5% CO(2). Cells of the second passage were plated at a density of 5 x 10(3)cells/cm(2) in a 24-well plate and used for characterization. For characterization, WST-1 assay, determination of alkaline phosphatase, Type I collagen assay, osteocalcin assay, and von Kossa staining were used. The assays were performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 days after plating the cells. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that the osteoblast-like cells in the frozen bone can survive, only when the bone is frozen with cryoprotectants to prevent injury during freezing and thawing.

  5. Microdamage Caused by Fatigue Loading in Human Cancellous Bone: Relationship to Reductions in Bone Biomechanical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Floor M.; Bouman, Amanda R.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral fractures associated with osteoporosis are often the result of tissue damage accumulated over time. Microscopic tissue damage (microdamage) generated in vivo is believed to be a mechanically relevant aspect of bone quality that may contribute to fracture risk. Although the presence of microdamage in bone tissue has been documented, the relationship between loading, microdamage accumulation and mechanical failure is not well understood. The aim of the current study was to determine how microdamage accumulates in human vertebral cancellous bone subjected to cyclic fatigue loading. Cancellous bone cores (n = 32) from the third lumbar vertebra of 16 donors (10 male, 6 female, age 76±8.8, mean ± SD) were subjected to compressive cyclic loading at σ/E0 = 0.0035 (where σ is stress and E0 is the initial Young’s modulus). Cyclic loading was suspended before failure at one of seven different amounts of loading and specimens were stained for microdamage using lead uranyl acetate. Damage volume fraction (DV/BV) varied from 0.8±0.5% (no loading) to 3.4±2.1% (fatigue-loaded to complete failure) and was linearly related to the reductions in Young’s modulus caused by fatigue loading (r2 = 0.60, pfatigue life was nonlinear and suggests that most microdamage generation occurs late in fatigue loading, during the tertiary phase. Our results indicate that human vertebral cancellous bone tissue with a DV/BV of 1.5% is expected to have, on average, a Young’s modulus 31% lower than the same tissue without microdamage and is able to withstand 92% fewer cycles before failure than the same tissue without microdamage. Hence, even small amounts of microscopic tissue damage in human vertebral cancellous bone may have large effects on subsequent biomechanical performance. PMID:24386247

  6. Development of a hand-gesture recognition system for human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Maqueda Nieto, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this Master Thesis is the analysis, design and development of a robust and reliable Human-Computer Interaction interface, based on visual hand-gesture recognition. The implementation of the required functions is oriented to the simulation of a classical hardware interaction device: the mouse, by recognizing a specific hand-gesture vocabulary in color video sequences. For this purpose, a prototype of a hand-gesture recognition system has been designed and implemented, which is c...

  7. Differentiating human versus non-human bone by exploring the nutrient foramen: implications for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Vail; Beckett, Sophie; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    One of the roles of a forensic anthropologist is to assist medico-legal investigations in the identification of human skeletal remains. In some instances, only small fragments of bone may be present. In this study, a non-destructive novel technique is presented to distinguish between human and non-human long bones. This technique is based on the macroscopic and computed tomography (CT) analysis of nutrient foramina. The nutrient foramen of long bone diaphyses transmits the nutrient artery which provides much of the oxygen and nutrients to the bone. The nutrient foramen and its canal were analysed in six femora and humeri of human, sheep (Ovies aries) and pig (Sus scrofa) species. The location, position and direction of the nutrient foramina were measured macroscopically. The length of the canal, angle of the canal, circumference and area of the entrance of the foramen were measured from CT images. Macroscopic analysis revealed the femora nutrient foramina are more proximal, whereas humeri foramina are more distal. The human bones and sheep humerus conform to the perceived directionality, but the pig bones and sheep femur do not. Amongst the parameters measured in the CT analysis, the angle of the canal had a discriminatory power. This study shows the potential of this technique to be used independently or complementary to other methods in distinguishing between human and non-human bone in forensic anthropology.

  8. Specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Møller, J; Plesner, T

    1989-01-01

    An effective method for specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) with preservation of prethymic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells is presented. The BMMC were incubated with F101.01, a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the T...

  9. Ancient DNA in human bone remains from Pompeii archaeological site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollaro, M; Di Bernardo, G; Galano, G; Galderisi, U; Guarino, F; Angelini, F; Cascino, A

    1998-06-29

    aDNA extraction and amplification procedures have been optimized for Pompeian human bone remains whose diagenesis has been determined by histological analysis. Single copy genes amplification (X and Y amelogenin loci and Y specific alphoid repeat sequences) have been performed and compared with anthropometric data on sexing.

  10. Ex Vivo Behaviour of Human Bone Tumor Endothelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Teresa [SDN-Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, IRCCS, 80143 Naples (Italy); Cesario, Elena [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Fazioli, Flavio [Division of Skeletal Muscles Oncology Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); De Chiara, Annarosaria [Anatomic Pathology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tutucci, Cristina; Apice, Gaetano [Medical Oncology of Bone and Soft Sarcoma tissues Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Nigris, Filomena de, E-mail: filomena.denigris@unina2.it [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2013-04-11

    Cooperation between endothelial cells and bone in bone remodelling is well established. In contrast, bone microvasculature supporting the growth of primary tumors and metastasis is poorly understood. Several antiangiogenic agents have recently been undergoing trials, although an extensive body of clinical data and experimental research have proved that angiogenic pathways differ in each tumor type and stage. Here, for the first time, we characterize at the molecular and functional level tumor endothelial cells from human bone sarcomas at different stages of disease and with different histotypes. We selected a CD31{sup +} subpopulation from biopsies that displayed the capability to grow as adherent cell lines without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our findings show the existence in human primary bone sarcomas of highly proliferative endothelial cells expressing CD31, CD44, CD105, CD146 and CD90 markers. These cells are committed to develop capillary-like structures and colony formation units, and to produce nitric oxide. We believe that a better understanding of tumor vasculature could be a valid tool for the design of an efficacious antiangiogenic therapy as adjuvant treatment of sarcomas.

  11. A simplified procedure for preparation of undecalcified human bone sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, J A; Tkocz, I; Levinsen, J

    1985-11-01

    A new type of apparatus for sectioning samples of hard, undecalcified bone is described. Slices of fresh or archeological human bone 4-5 mm thick are dehydrated and then embedded in epoxy resin. The apparatus used to prepare sections from the resulting blocks consists of a low-speed rim-type diamond cut-off wheel and a slowly advancing table carrying the specimen held in a rotating mount. Sections may be cut at a thickness of 80 micron +/- 1%. After cleaning in an ultrasonic bath, these can be mounted on slides for quantitative microscopic examination with transmitted light. Grinding and polishing are not necessary. The results obtained are illustrated.

  12. Maturation disparity between hand-wrist bones in a Chinese sample of normal children: An analysis based on automatic boneXpert and manual Greulich and Pyle atlas assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ji; Dig, Xiao Yi [Dept. of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Lin, Fang Qin [Dept. of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the maturation disparity of hand-wrist bones using the BoneXpert system and Greulich and Pyle (GP) atlas in a sample of normal children from China. Our study included 229 boys and 168 girls aged 2 - 14 years. The bones in the hand and wrist were divided into five groups: distal radius and ulna, metacarpals, proximal phalanges, middle phalanges and distal phalanges. Bone age (BA) was assessed separately using the automatic BoneXpert and GP atlas by two raters. Differences in the BA between the most advanced and retarded individual bones and bone groups were analyzed. In 75.8% of children assessed with the BoneXpert and 59.4% of children assessed with the GP atlas, the BA difference between the most advanced and most retarded individual bones exceeded 2.0 years. The BA mean differences between the most advanced and most retarded individual bones were 2.58 and 2.25 years for the BoneXpert and GP atlas methods, respectively. Furthermore, for both methods, the middle phalanges were the most advanced group. The most retarded group was metacarpals for BoneXpert, while metacarpals and the distal radius and ulna were the most retarded groups according to the GP atlas. Overall, the BAs of the proximal and distal phalanges were closer to the chronological ages than those of the other bone groups. Obvious and regular maturation disparities are common in normal children. Overall, the BAs of the proximal and distal phalanges are more useful for BA estimation than those of the other bone groups.

  13. Diagnostic dry bone histology in human paleopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, H. H. Hans; van der Merwe, A. E. Lida

    2016-01-01

    Paleopathology is the study of trauma and disease as may be observed in ancient (human) remains. In contrast to its central role in current medical practice, microscopy plays a rather modest role in paleopathology. This is at least partially due to the differences between fresh and decomposed (i.e.,

  14. Android Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . On such occasions, android and humanoid hand models should have similar structure, functions, and performance as the human hand. In this paper we present the anatomy, and the key functionalities of the human hand followed by a literature review on android/humanoid hands for grasping and manipulating objects...

  15. Real Time Eye Tracking and Hand Tracking Using Regular Video Cameras for Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Expo (ICME 2010), July 2010, Singapore. (15% acceptance rate)  Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer...Computing, Dec. 2009. Las Vegas, NV  Shaun Canavan and Lijun Yin, Dynamic face appearance modeling and sight direction estimation based on local...Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer interaction based on two orthogonal views”, IEEE/IAPR

  16. Distinction between hand dominance and hand preference in primates: a behavioral investigation of manual dexterity in nonhuman primates (macaques) and human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatagny, Pauline; Badoud, Simon; Kaeser, Mélanie; Gindrat, Anne-Dominique; Savidan, Julie; Fregosi, Michela; Moret, Véronique; Roulin, Christine; Schmidlin, Eric; Rouiller, Eric M

    2013-09-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine and confront hand preference (hand chosen in priority to perform a manual dexterity task) and hand dominance (hand with best motor performance) in eight macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and in 20 human subjects (10 left-handers and 10 right-handers). Methods Four manual dexterity tests have been executed by the monkeys, over several weeks during learning and stable performance phases (in controlled body position): the modified Brinkman board, the reach and grasp drawer, the tube and the bimanual board tasks. Three behavioral tests, adapted versions from the monkeys tasks (modified Brinkman board, tube and bimanual board tasks), as well as a handedness questionnaire, have been conducted in human subjects. Results In monkeys, there was a large disparity across individuals and motor tasks. For hand dominance, two monkeys were rather right lateralized, three monkeys rather left lateralized, whereas in three monkeys, the different parameters measured were not consistent. For hand preference, none of the eight monkeys exhibited a homogeneous lateralization across the four motor tasks. Macaca fascicularis do not exhibit a clear hand preference. Furthermore, hand preference often changed with task repetition, both during training and plateau phases. For human subjects, the hand preference mostly followed the self-assessment of lateralization by the subjects and the questionnaire (in the latter, right-handers were more lateralized than left-handers), except a few discrepancies based on the tube task. There was no hand dominance in seven right-handers (the other three performed better with the right hand) and in four left-handers. Five left-handers showed left-hand dominance, whereas surprisingly, one left-hander performed better with the right hand. In the modified Brinkman board task, females performed better than males, right-handers better than left-handers. Conclusions The present study argues for a distinction between hand

  17. Recent origin of low trabecular bone density in modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirchir, Habiba; Kivell, Tracy L; Ruff, Christopher B; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Carlson, Kristian J; Zipfel, Bernhard; Richmond, Brian G

    2015-01-13

    Humans are unique, compared with our closest living relatives (chimpanzees) and early fossil hominins, in having an enlarged body size and lower limb joint surfaces in combination with a relatively gracile skeleton (i.e., lower bone mass for our body size). Some analyses have observed that in at least a few anatomical regions modern humans today appear to have relatively low trabecular density, but little is known about how that density varies throughout the human skeleton and across species or how and when the present trabecular patterns emerged over the course of human evolution. Here, we test the hypotheses that (i) recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the upper and lower limbs compared with other primate taxa and (ii) the reduction in trabecular density first occurred in early Homo erectus, consistent with the shift toward a modern human locomotor anatomy, or more recently in concert with diaphyseal gracilization in Holocene humans. We used peripheral quantitative CT and microtomography to measure trabecular bone of limb epiphyses (long bone articular ends) in modern humans and chimpanzees and in fossil hominins attributed to Australopithecus africanus, Paranthropus robustus/early Homo from Swartkrans, Homo neanderthalensis, and early Homo sapiens. Results show that only recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the limb joints. Extinct hominins, including pre-Holocene Homo sapiens, retain the high levels seen in nonhuman primates. Thus, the low trabecular density of the recent modern human skeleton evolved late in our evolutionary history, potentially resulting from increased sedentism and reliance on technological and cultural innovations.

  18. Recent origin of low trabecular bone density in modern humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirchir, Habiba; Kivell, Tracy L.; Ruff, Christopher B.; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Carlson, Kristian J.; Zipfel, Bernhard; Richmond, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unique, compared with our closest living relatives (chimpanzees) and early fossil hominins, in having an enlarged body size and lower limb joint surfaces in combination with a relatively gracile skeleton (i.e., lower bone mass for our body size). Some analyses have observed that in at least a few anatomical regions modern humans today appear to have relatively low trabecular density, but little is known about how that density varies throughout the human skeleton and across species or how and when the present trabecular patterns emerged over the course of human evolution. Here, we test the hypotheses that (i) recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the upper and lower limbs compared with other primate taxa and (ii) the reduction in trabecular density first occurred in early Homo erectus, consistent with the shift toward a modern human locomotor anatomy, or more recently in concert with diaphyseal gracilization in Holocene humans. We used peripheral quantitative CT and microtomography to measure trabecular bone of limb epiphyses (long bone articular ends) in modern humans and chimpanzees and in fossil hominins attributed to Australopithecus africanus, Paranthropus robustus/early Homo from Swartkrans, Homo neanderthalensis, and early Homo sapiens. Results show that only recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the limb joints. Extinct hominins, including pre-Holocene Homo sapiens, retain the high levels seen in nonhuman primates. Thus, the low trabecular density of the recent modern human skeleton evolved late in our evolutionary history, potentially resulting from increased sedentism and reliance on technological and cultural innovations. PMID:25535354

  19. Bone engineering-vitalisation of alloplastic and allogenic bone grafts by human osteoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Marc Christian; Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad, Margit; Glaum, Ricarda; Gutwald, Ralf; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Sauerbier, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    Human osteoblasts on non-sintered hydroxyapatite and demineralised bone matrix (DBX) were analysed in vitro to find out whether they would be suitable for reconstruction of bones in oral surgery. Human osteoblasts were isolated from the jaw during routine dental operations and seeded onto the two biomaterials. Cells were characterised by assay of alkaline phosphatase, detection of type 1 collagen, and production of osteocalcin. After 21 days of cultivation, the cell/biomaterial constructs were examined by scanning electron microscopy, thin sections, and propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate staining. The osteoblasts formed a vital multiple cell layer on DBX within 3 weeks of cultivation. On hydroxyapatite, the cells showed no tendency to proliferate or migrate onto the synthetic biomaterial, or to form well-spread and viable cell constructs. These findings suggest that surface morphology or the presence of osteoinductive factors may have an important role in the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts. Human DBX can be colonised by human osteoblast-like cells in vitro, indicating the potential of allogeneic carriers for future procedures in bone engineering. Copyright 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bone loss and human adaptation to lunar gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T. S.; Strauss, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Long-duration space missions and establishment of permanently manned bases on the Moon and Mars are currently being planned. The weightless environment of space and the low-gravity environments of the Moon and Mars pose an unknown challenge to human habitability and survivability. Of particular concern in the medical research community today is the effect of less than Earth gravity on the human skeleton, since the limits, if any, of human endurance in low-gravity environments are unknown. This paper provides theoretical predictions on bone loss and skeletal adaptation to lunar and other nonterrestrial-gravity environments based upon the experimentally derived relationship, density approximately (mass x gravity)(exp 1/8). The predictions are compared to skeletal changes reported during bed rest, immobilization, certrifugation, and spaceflight. Countermeasures to reduce bone losses in fractional gravity are also discussed.

  1. New hand at the helm of CERN Human Resources

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Human resources is more than just an administrative function, said CERN's new HR Department head, Carla Bryois, in an interview with the Bulletin. Human resources management is about getting the best out of an organization's staff. That's good for the organisation as a whole, and it's good for the individual. A suitable task for a psychologist, you might think? And that's exactly the kind of person who has just taken over as head of CERN's Human Resources Department. Carla Bryois, who has Dutch and Swiss nationality, took up her duties on 1 April, and brings with her a wealth of experience from the private sector. Her career began with a degree in psychology and social sciences from the Geneva school made famous by Jean Piaget. From there, she went on to specialise in clinical psychology before taking a career break to raise a family. Carla Bryois, CERN's new HR Department head Returning to work, she moved from academic to occupational psychology, taking up a position in human resources with Elsevier scien...

  2. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-01-01

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

  3. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Tsukasa

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make studen...

  4. Effects of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Vertical Bone Augmentation in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2017-09-01

    Vertical bone augmentation (VBA) remains unpredictable and challenging for most clinicians. This study aims to compare hard tissue outcomes of VBA, with and without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2, under space-making titanium mesh in a canine model. Eleven male beagle dogs were used in the study. Experimental ridge defects were created to form atrophic ridges. VBA was performed via guided bone regeneration using titanium mesh and allografts. In experimental hemimandibles, rhBMP-2/absorbable collagen sponge was well mixed with allografts prior to procedures, whereas a control buffer was applied within controls. Dogs were euthanized after a 4-month healing period. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed to assess ridge dimensional changes. In addition, specimens were used for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) assessment and histologic analysis. Membrane exposure was found on five of 11 (45.5%) rhBMP-2-treated sites, whereas it was found on nine of 11 (81.8%) non-rhBMP-2-treated sites. Within 4 months of healing, rhBMP-2-treated sites showed better radiographic bone density, greater defect fill, and significantly more bone gain in ridge height (P 0.05). Under light microscope, predominant lamellar patterns were found in the specimen obtained from rhBMP-2 sites. With inherent limitations of the canine model and the concern of such a demanding surgical technique, current findings suggest that the presence of rhBMP-2 in a composite graft allows an increase of vertical gain, with formation of ectopic bone over the titanium mesh in comparison with non-rhBMP-2 sites.

  5. Creep of trabecular bone from the human proximal tibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitskaya, Ekaterina, E-mail: eevdokim@ucsd.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Zin, Carolyn [Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chang, Neil; Cory, Esther; Chen, Peter [Departments of Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); D’Lima, Darryl [Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education, Scripps Health, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Sah, Robert L. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Departments of Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); McKittrick, Joanna [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, UC, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Creep is the deformation that occurs under a prolonged, sustained load and can lead to permanent damage in bone. Creep in bone is a complex phenomenon and varies with type of loading and local mechanical properties. Human trabecular bone samples from proximal tibia were harvested from a 71-year old female cadaver with osteoporosis. The samples were initially subjected to one cycle load up to 1% strain to determine the creep load. Samples were then loaded in compression under a constant stress for 2 h and immediately unloaded. All tests were conducted with the specimens soaked in phosphate buffered saline with proteinase inhibitors at 37 °C. Steady state creep rate and final creep strain were estimated from mechanical testing and compared with published data. The steady state creep rate correlated well with values obtained from bovine tibial and human vertebral trabecular bone, and was higher for lower density samples. Tissue architecture was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (μCT) both before and after creep testing to assess creep deformation and damage accumulated. Quantitative morphometric analysis indicated that creep induced changes in trabecular separation and the structural model index. A main mode of deformation was bending of trabeculae. - Highlights: • Compressive creep tests of human trabecular bone across the tibia were performed. • The creep rate was found to be inversely proportional to the density of the samples. • μ-computed tomography before and after testing identified regions of deformation. • Bending of the trabeculae was found to be the main deformation mode.

  6. An Upper Palaeolithic engraved human bone associated with ritualistic cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Silvia M; Wallduck, Rosalind; Parfitt, Simon A; Stringer, Chris B

    2017-01-01

    Cut-marked and broken human bones are a recurrent feature of Magdalenian (~17-12,000 years BP, uncalibrated dates) European sites. Human remains at Gough's Cave (UK) have been modified as part of a Magdalenian mortuary ritual that combined the intensive processing of entire corpses to extract edible tissues and the modification of skulls to produce skull-cups. A human radius from Gough's Cave shows evidence of cut marks, percussion damage and human tooth marks, indicative of cannibalism, as well as a set of unusual zig-zagging incisions on the lateral side of the diaphysis. These latter incisions cannot be unambiguously associated with filleting of muscles. We compared the macro- and micro-morphological characteristics of these marks to over 300 filleting marks on human and non-human remains and to approximately 120 engraved incisions observed on two artefacts from Gough's Cave. The new macro- and micro-morphometric analyses of the marks, as well as further comparisons with French Middle Magdalenian engraved artefacts, suggest that these modifications are the result of intentional engraving. The engraved motif comfortably fits within a Magdalenian pattern of design; what is exceptional in this case, however, is the choice of raw material (human bone) and the cannibalistic context in which it was produced. The sequence of the manipulations suggests that the engraving was a purposeful component of the cannibalistic practice, implying a complex ritualistic funerary behaviour that has never before been recognized for the Palaeolithic period.

  7. Single treatment with ethanol hand rub is ineffective against human rhinovirus--hand washing with soap and water removes the virus efficiently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Korpela, Terttu; Simonen-Tikka, Marja-Leena; Amiryousefi, Ali; Ziegler, Thedi; Roivainen, Merja; Hovi, Tapani

    2012-03-01

    Ethanol-containing hand rubs are used frequently as a substitute for hand washing with water and soap. However, not all viruses are inactivated by a short term rubbing with alcohol. The capacity of a single round of instructed and controlled hand cleaning with water and soap or ethanol-containing hand rub, respectively, was tested for removal of human rhinovirus administered onto the skin of healthy volunteers on the back of the hands. Hand washing with soap and water appeared to be much more efficient for removing rhinoviruses from skin than rubbing hands with an ethanol-containing disinfectant. After washing with soap and water the virus was detected in 3/9 (33.3%) test persons from the left hand and 1/9 (11.1%) cases from the right hand, whereas the virus was detected invariably by real-time RT-PCR from both hands after cleaning with alcohol hand rub (P-value soap can clean efficiently hands contaminated with the virus responsible for an extensive share of common cold episodes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2...... years. In a clinical trial (OPERA) of 180 treatment-naive early RA patients, bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from hand radiographs with digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) at baseline, after 6 (n = 90) and 12 months (n = 70) of follow-up. Baseline and 2-year radiographs were scored according...

  9. Longitudinal evolution of bone mineral density and bone markers in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondy, Kristin; Yarasheski, Kevin; Powderly, William G; Whyte, Michael; Claxton, Sherry; DeMarco, Debra; Hoffmann, Mary; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-02-15

    The underlying mechanisms of several bone disorders in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and any relation to antiretroviral therapy have yet to be defined. A longitudinal study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in HIV-infected persons; to assess bone mineralization, metabolism, and histomorphometry over time; and to evaluate predisposing factors. A total of 128 patients enrolled the study, and 93 were observed for 72 weeks. "Classic" risk factors (low body mass index, history of weight loss, steroid use, and smoking) for low bone mineral density (BMD) and duration of HIV infection were strongly associated with osteopenia. There was a weak association between low BMD and receipt of treatment with protease inhibitors; this association disappeared after controlling for the above factors. Markers of bone turnover tended to be elevated in the whole cohort but were not associated with low BMD. BMD increased slightly during follow-up. Traditional risk factors and advanced HIV infection play a more significant pathogenic role in the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis associated with HIV infection than do treatment-associated factors.

  10. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Below, Harald; Bieber, Nora; Kampf, Guenter; Toma, Cyril D; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan

    2007-10-11

    Despite the increasing promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs and the worldwide use of ethanol-based hand rubs in hospitals only few studies have specifically addressed the issue of ethanol absorption when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans. Twelve volunteers applied three hand-rubs containing 95% (hand-rub A), 85% (hand-rub B) and 55% ethanol (hand-rub C; all w/w). For hygienic hand disinfection, 4 mL were applied 20 times for 30 s, with 1 minute break between applications. For surgical hand disinfection, 20 mL of each hand rub was applied to hands and arms up to the level of the elbow 10 times for 3 minutes, with a break of 5 minutes between applications. Blood concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde were determined immediately prior and up to 90 minutes after application using head space gas chromatography. The median of absorbed ethanol after hygienic hand disinfection was 1365 mg (A), 630 mg (B), and 358 mg (C). The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 2.3% (A), 1.1% (B), and 0.9% (C). After surgical hand disinfection, the median of absorbed ethanol was 1067 mg (A), 1542 mg (B), and 477 mg (C). The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 0.7% (A), 1.1% (B), and 0.5% (C). The highest median acetaldehyde concentration after 20 hygienic hand disinfections was 0.57 mg/L (hand-rub C, after 30 min), after 10 surgical hand disinfections 3.99 mg/L (hand-rub A, after 20 minutes). The overall dermal and pulmonary absorption of ethanol was below toxic levels in humans and allows the conclusion that the use of the evaluated ethanol-based hand-rubs is safe.

  11. Quantity of ethanol absorption after excessive hand disinfection using three commercially available hand rubs is minimal and below toxic levels for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Cyril D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the increasing promotion of alcohol-based hand rubs and the worldwide use of ethanol-based hand rubs in hospitals only few studies have specifically addressed the issue of ethanol absorption when repeatedly applied to human skin. The aim of this study was to assess if ethanol absorption occurs during hygienic and surgical hand disinfection using three different alcohol-based hand-rubs, and to quantify absorption levels in humans. Methods Twelve volunteers applied three hand-rubs containing 95% (hand-rub A, 85% (hand-rub B and 55% ethanol (hand-rub C; all w/w. For hygienic hand disinfection, 4 mL were applied 20 times for 30 s, with 1 minute break between applications. For surgical hand disinfection, 20 mL of each hand rub was applied to hands and arms up to the level of the elbow 10 times for 3 minutes, with a break of 5 minutes between applications. Blood concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde were determined immediately prior and up to 90 minutes after application using head space gas chromatography. Results The median of absorbed ethanol after hygienic hand disinfection was 1365 mg (A, 630 mg (B, and 358 mg (C. The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 2.3% (A, 1.1% (B, and 0.9% (C. After surgical hand disinfection, the median of absorbed ethanol was 1067 mg (A, 1542 mg (B, and 477 mg (C. The proportion of absorbed ethanol was 0.7% (A, 1.1% (B, and 0.5% (C. The highest median acetaldehyde concentration after 20 hygienic hand disinfections was 0.57 mg/L (hand-rub C, after 30 min, after 10 surgical hand disinfections 3.99 mg/L (hand-rub A, after 20 minutes. Conclusion The overall dermal and pulmonary absorption of ethanol was below toxic levels in humans and allows the conclusion that the use of the evaluated ethanol-based hand-rubs is safe.

  12. Human Bone Matrix Changes During Deep Saturation Dives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-08

    copyrighted. This research has been conducted in compliance with all applicable federal regulations governing the protection of human subjects in research...hydroxylysine glycosides , acid phosphatase, and N-telopeptide (Ntx). Ntx is a relatively sensitive and specific bone marker. It is detected in the...Medical Research Laboratory and the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery approved this study. Additionally, the Institutional Review Board of the

  13. Bone anchored hearing aid in single sided deafness: outcome in right-handed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Issam; Nader, Marc-Elie; El Fata, Fouad; Leroux, Tony

    2011-10-01

    To assess the benefits in terms of sound localization, to evaluate speech discrimination in noise, to appraise the prosthesis benefit and to identify outcome in right and left handed patients when BAHA are implanted on the right or on the left deaf side. Two years prospective study in a tertiary referral center. Tests consist on Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and sound localization after 6 months of BAHA use. Quality of life was assessed by the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire. The paired T-test and the analysis of variance were used for the statistical measures. Twenty-one subjects participated in this study. HINT: patients score better when speech and noise are spatially separated and noise is not presented to the healthy ear. In the right-handed group (left dominant brain), unaided left-implanted patients performed better than right-implanted patient when speech is in front and noise to the good ear; when speech is presented to the good ear and noise to the front, aided right-implanted patients performed better than aided left-implanted patients. Sound localization: correct answers attain 35% at best. No statistical difference between the frequencies was found, neither between the left and right implanted patients. APHAB: the score improvement is statistically significant for the global score, the background noise subscale at 5 weeks and for the reverberation subscale at 6 months. It seems that left dominant hemisphere is able to filter crossed noise better than the right hemisphere. Results of uncrossed speech to the dominant left brain are better than the uncrossed speech to the non-dominant right brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  15. Human identification and analysis of DNA in bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato; Soares-Vieira, José Arnaldo; Muñoz, Daniel Romero

    2004-12-01

    The introduction of molecular biology techniques, especially of DNA analysis, for human identification is a recent advance in legal medicine. Substantial effort has continuously been made in an attempt to identify cadavers and human remains after wars, socio-political problems and mass disasters. In addition, because of the social dynamics of large cities, there are always cases of missing people, as well as unidentified cadavers and human remains that are found. In the last few years, there has also been an increase in requests for exhumation of human remains in order to determine genetic relationships in civil suits and court action. The authors provide an extensive review of the literature regarding the use of this new methodology for human identification of ancient or recent bones.

  16. Micro-computed tomography assessment of human alveolar bone: bone density and three-dimensional micro-architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeong; Henkin, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a valuable means to evaluate and secure information related to bone density and quality in human necropsy samples and small live animals. The aim of this study was to assess the bone density of the alveolar jaw bones in human cadaver, using micro-CT. The correlation between bone density and three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was evaluated. Thirty-four human cadaver jaw bone specimens were harvested. Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT at resolution of 10.5 μm. The bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the bone mineral density (BMD) value within a volume of interest were measured. The three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was assessed. All the parameters in the maxilla and the mandible were subject to comparison. The variables for the bone density and the three-dimensional micro architecture were analyzed for nonparametric correlation using Spearman's rho at the significance level of p architecture parameters were consistently higher in the mandible, up to 3.3 times greater than those in the maxilla. The most linear correlation was observed between BV/TV and BMD, with Spearman's rho = 0.99 (p = .01). Both BV/TV and BMD were highly correlated with all micro architecture parameters with Spearman's rho above 0.74 (p = .01). Two aspects of bone density using micro-CT, the BV/TV and BMD, are highly correlated with three-dimensional micro architecture parameters, which represent the quality of trabecular bone. This noninvasive method may adequately enhance evaluation of the alveolar bone. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neovascular niche for human myeloma cells in immunodeficient mouse bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirono Iriuchishima

    Full Text Available The interaction with bone marrow (BM plays a crucial role in pathophysiological features of multiple myeloma (MM, including cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and bone lesion progression. To characterize the MM-BM interactions, we utilized an in vivo experimental model for human MM in which a GFP-expressing human MM cell line is transplanted into NOG mice (the NOG-hMM model. Transplanted MM cells preferentially engrafted at the metaphyseal region of the BM endosteum and formed a complex with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A subpopulation of MM cells expressed VE-cadherin after transplantation and formed endothelial-like structures in the BM. CD138(+ myeloma cells in the BM were reduced by p53-dependent apoptosis following administration of the nitrogen mustard derivative bendamustine to mice in the NOG-hMM model. Bendamustine maintained the osteoblast lining on the bone surface and protected extracellular matrix structures. Furthermore, bendamustine suppressed the growth of osteoclasts and mesenchymal cells in the NOG-hMM model. Since VE-cadherin(+ MM cells were chemoresistant, hypoxic, and HIF-2α-positive compared to the VE-cadherin(- population, VE-cadherin induction might depend on the oxygenation status. The NOG-hMM model described here is a useful system to analyze the dynamics of MM pathophysiology, interactions of MM cells with other cellular compartments, and the utility of novel anti-MM therapies.

  18. Comparison of the human bone matrix gelatin (HBMG with autogenous bone graft in reconstruction of the parietal bone defects in rat: a histological and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Shahoon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Autogenous bone graft is commonly used for reconstruction of bone defects in routine surgical procedures. The complexity of producing bone grafts and their application has lead to the use of human bone matrix gelatin (HBMG. The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of HBMG and autograft on the reconstruction of bone defects in rats. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, experimental study, two defects were put on left and right sides of parietal bone of rats. HBMG was placed randomly on defects of one side and autograft in the defects of the other side. All specimens were assessed and compared with each other according to histological and radiographic characteristics. Other assessments included amount and the rate of bone formation, inflammation signs, fibrosis tissue and cartilage formation and also radiographic characteristics of grafts, assessed by digital and film-based methods. Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. Results. The results showed a reduction of inflammation and an increase in new bone formation in both groups in 7, 14, 28 and 60 days after surgery. Bone formation with HBMG on day 24 was more than autograft. However, there was no significant difference between the groups on day 60. Superiority of digital method to film-based method of imaging was also observed. Conclusion. Although HBMG has the same efficacy as autograft, the rate of bone reconstruction with HBMG is higher. HBMG also induces focal, rather than peripheral, bone construction in the defect.

  19. A comparison of the antibacterial efficacy and cytotoxicity to cultured human skin cells of 7 commercial hand rubs and Xgel, a new copper-based biocidal hand rub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tony J; Wren, Michael W D; Jeanes, Annette; Gant, Vanya A

    2009-05-01

    Hand cleanliness is important in hospital infection control, but skin irritation from frequent alcohol-based hand rub use reduces compliance. We have compared a new copper biocide/Aloe vera-based biocidal hand rub (Xgel) with 7 commercially available hand rubs. Hand rubs were cultured with human skin cells for 24 hours after which cytotoxicity was assessed using the sulforhodamine B assay. The EN 12054 bacterial suspension test protocol was used to assess biocidal activity of 2 of the least cytotoxic hand rubs (Xgel and Purell). Hand rubs had 50% cytotoxic concentrations ranging from >10% to 10(8) with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter in 1 minute, whereas Purell only reduced CFU by 10(4) and 10(5), respectively. Purell was ineffective against C difficile spores, whereas Xgel produced a 3 x 10(3) reduction in CFU. The hand rubs had a wide range of cytotoxicity values for human skin cells, with Xgel being the least cytotoxic to human skin cells. In the EN 12054 bacterial suspension test, Xgel was more effective than Purell against all organisms tested. It should be noted that these in vitro results may not translate into clinical differences.

  20. Compressive properties of commercially available polyurethane foams as mechanical models for osteoporotic human cancellous bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Purvi S D; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Hukins, David W L

    2008-01-01

    ... of the low density PU foams are universally accepted as models for osteoporotic (OP) bone. The aim of this study was to determine whether low density PU foam might be suitable for mimicking human OP cancellous bone...

  1. Human left ventral premotor cortex mediates matching of hand posture to object use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Vingerhoets

    Full Text Available Visuomotor transformations for grasping have been associated with a fronto-parietal network in the monkey brain. The human homologue of the parietal monkey region (AIP has been identified as the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, whereas the putative human equivalent of the monkey frontal region (F5 is located in the ventral part of the premotor cortex (vPMC. Results from animal studies suggest that monkey F5 is involved in the selection of appropriate hand postures relative to the constraints of the task. In humans, the functional roles of aIPS and vPMC appear to be more complex and the relative contribution of each region to grasp selection remains uncertain. The present study aimed to identify modulation in brain areas sensitive to the difficulty level of tool object - hand posture matching. Seventeen healthy right handed participants underwent fMRI while observing pictures of familiar tool objects followed by pictures of hand postures. The task was to decide whether the hand posture matched the functional use of the previously shown object. Conditions were manipulated for level of difficulty. Compared to a picture matching control task, the tool object - hand posture matching conditions conjointly showed increased modulation in several left hemispheric regions of the superior and inferior parietal lobules (including aIPS, the middle occipital gyrus, and the inferior temporal gyrus. Comparison of hard versus easy conditions selectively modulated the left inferior frontal gyrus with peak activity located in its opercular part (Brodmann area (BA 44. We suggest that in the human brain, vPMC/BA44 is involved in the matching of hand posture configurations in accordance with visual and functional demands.

  2. Fetal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Enhance Humanization and Bone Formation of BMP7 Loaded Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Abbas; Baldwin, Jeremy G; Patel, Jatin; Holzapfel, Boris M; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineered constructs built with human cells capable of generating a bone-like organ within the mouse have attracted considerable interest over the past decade. Here, we aimed to compare the utility of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) isolated from fetal term placenta (fPL-MSC) and fetal first trimester bone marrow (fBM-MSC) in a polycaprolactone scaffold/BMP7-based model in nude mice. Furthermore, fPL-MSC were co-seeded with fetal placenta-derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) to assess the impact of ECFC on fPL-MSC osteogenesis. X-ray radiography and micro computed tomography analyses showed enhanced bone formation in all BMP7 groups; however there was no difference after 2 months in bone formation between scaffolds seeded with fPL-MSC alone or combination of ECFC and fPL-MSC. Of interest, fBM-MSC showed the highest level of bone formation. Additionally, endochondral ossification contributed in generation of bone in fBM-MSC. Histological analysis showed the primary role of BMP in generation of cortical and trabecular bone, and the recruitment of hematopoietic cells to the scaffolds. Current in vivo engineered bone organs can potentially be used for drug screening or as models to study bone tissue development in combination with haematopoiesis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Selection of suitable hand gestures for reliable myoelectric human computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Claudia F; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2015-04-09

    Myoelectric controlled prosthetic hand requires machine based identification of hand gestures using surface electromyogram (sEMG) recorded from the forearm muscles. This study has observed that a sub-set of the hand gestures have to be selected for an accurate automated hand gesture recognition, and reports a method to select these gestures to maximize the sensitivity and specificity. Experiments were conducted where sEMG was recorded from the muscles of the forearm while subjects performed hand gestures and then was classified off-line. The performances of ten gestures were ranked using the proposed Positive-Negative Performance Measurement Index (PNM), generated by a series of confusion matrices. When using all the ten gestures, the sensitivity and specificity was 80.0% and 97.8%. After ranking the gestures using the PNM, six gestures were selected and these gave sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% (96.5% and 99.3%); Hand open, Hand close, Little finger flexion, Ring finger flexion, Middle finger flexion and Thumb flexion. This work has shown that reliable myoelectric based human computer interface systems require careful selection of the gestures that have to be recognized and without such selection, the reliability is poor.

  4. Human Spinal Bone Dust as a Potential Local Autograft: In vitro Potent Anabolic Effect on Human Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ryan; Street, Matthew; Tay, Mei Lin; Callon, Karen E; Naot, Dorit; Lock, Alistair; Munro, Jacob T; Cornish, Jillian; Ferguson, John; Musson, David

    2017-07-18

    In Vitro Study. To evaluate the effect that factors released from human posterior spinal bone dust have on primary human osteoblast growth and maturation. Bone dust, created during spinal fusion surgeries has the potential to be used as an autologous bone graft by providing a source of viable autologous osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells with osteogenic potential. To date, no information is available on whether bone dust also provides a source of anabolic factors with the potential to enhance osteoblast proliferation and maturation, which would enhance its therapeutic potential. Bone dust was collected from consenting patients undergoing elective posterior spinal fusion surgeries, and primary human osteoblasts were cultured from patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty. Growth factors and cytokines released by bone dust were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Primary human osteoblast proliferation and gene expression in response to bone dust were assessed using H-thymidine incorporation and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), respectively. Human bone dust released anabolic cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) and growth factors (TGF-β, VEGF, FGF-Basic and PDGF-BB) in increasing concentrations over a 7-day period. In vitro, the anabolic factors released by bone dust increased osteoblast proliferation by 7-fold, compared with osteoblasts cultured alone. In addition, the factors released from bone dust up-regulated a number of osteoblastic genes integral to osteoblast differentiation, maturation and angiogenesis. This study is the first to demonstrate that human posterior spinal bone dust released anabolic factors that potently enhance osteoblast proliferation and the expression of genes that favor bone healing and bone union. Given that bone dust is anabolic and its harvest is fast, simple, and safe to perform, spinal surgeons should be encouraged to 'recycle' bone dust and harness the regenerative potential of this free

  5. Accelerators of Osteogenesis by Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Okubo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP appears to be one of the most promising cytokine and for clinical use in reconstructive surgery for bony defects and augmentation. To evaluate the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, 2 or 5 μg of rhBMP-2 was implanted into intramuscular sites of rats. At 21 days after implantation, the osteoinductive activity in the treatment group and control group was compared radiographically, biochemically, and histologically. The amount of new bone in the treatment group was significantly greater than that in the control group. The alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group. These results suggest that bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and HBO accelerated the activity and rate of osteoinduction by rhBMP2. These results may be useful when BMP is applied clinically in near future.

  6. Accelerators of Osteogenesis by Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Okubo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP appears to be one of the most promising cytokine and for clinical use in reconstructive surgery for bony defects and augmentation. To evaluate the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, 2 or 5 μg of rhBMP-2 was implanted into intramuscular sites of rats. At 21 days after implantation, the osteoinductive activity in the treatment group and control group was compared radiographically, biochemically, and histologically. The amount of new bone in the treatment group was signifi cantly greater than that in the control group. The alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content in the treatment group were signifi cantly higher than those in the control group. These results suggest that bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and HBO accelerated the activity and rate of osteoinduction by rhBMP2. These results may be useful when BMP is applied clinically in near future.

  7. Automated determination of bone age from hand X-rays at the end of puberty and its applicability for age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; van Rijn, Rick R; Jenni, Oskar G; Martin, David D

    2017-05-01

    The BoneXpert method for automated determination of bone age from hand X-rays was introduced in 2009, covering the Greulich-Pyle bone age ranges up to 17 years for boys and 15 years for girls. This paper presents an extension of the method up to bone age 19 years for boys and 18 years for girls. The extension was developed based on images from the First Zurich Longitudinal Study of 231 healthy children born in 1954-1956 and followed with annual X-rays of both hands until adulthood. The method was validated on two cross-sectional studies of healthy children from Rotterdam and Los Angeles. We found root mean square deviations from manual rating of 0.69 and 0.45 years in these two studies for boys in the bone age range 17-19 years. For girls, the deviations were 0.75 and 0.59 years, respectively, in the bone age range 15-18 years. It is shown how the automated bone age method can be applied to infer the age probability distribution for healthy Caucasian European males. Considering a population with age 15.0-21.0 years, the method can be used to decide whether the subject is above 18 years with a false positive rate (children classified as adults) of 10 % (95% confidence interval = 7-13%) and a false negative rate of 30 % (adults classified as children). To apply this method in other ethnicities will require a study of the average of "bone age - age" at the end of puberty, i.e. how much this population is shifted relative to the Greulich-Pyle standard.

  8. Human ORF disease localized in the hand: a "false felon". A study of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, J P; Bernard, P; Souyri, N; Pecout, C; Dunoyer, J

    1986-01-01

    The authors report eight cases of human ORF disease localized to the hand and transmitted to man by contact with the sheep. This disease is characterized by typical lesions on exposed cutaneous zones. Those lesions must be distinguished from milker's nodules, botryomycosis and above all felon because ORF disease never require surgery.

  9. Hand-rearing reduces fear of humans in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Feenders

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pending changes in European legislation ban the use of wild-caught animals in research. This change is partly justified on the assumption that captive-breeding (or hand-rearing increases welfare of captive animals because these practices result in animals with reduced fear of humans. However, there are few actual data on the long-term behavioural effects of captive-breeding in non-domestic species, and these are urgently needed in order to understand the welfare and scientific consequences of adopting this practice. We compared the response of hand-reared and wild-caught starlings to the presence of a human in the laboratory. During human presence, all birds increased their general locomotor activity but the wild-caught birds moved away from the human and were less active than the hand-reared birds. After the human departed, the wild-caught birds were slower to decrease their activity back towards baseline levels, and showed a dramatic increase in time at the periphery of the cage compared with the hand-reared birds. We interpret these data as showing evidence of a greater fear response in wild-caught birds with initial withdrawal followed by a subsequent rebound of prolonged attempts to escape the cage. We found no effects of environmental enrichment. However, birds in cages on low shelves were less active than birds on upper shelves, and showed a greater increase in the time spent at the periphery of their cages after the human departed, perhaps indicating that the lower cages were more stressful. In demonstrating reduced fear of humans in hand-reared birds, our results support one of the proposed welfare benefits of this practice, but without further data on the possible welfare costs of hand-rearing, it is not yet possible to reach a general conclusion about its net welfare impact. However, our results confirm a clear scientific impact of both hand-rearing and cage position at the behavioural level.

  10. Guided Bone Regeneration for the Reconstruction of Alveolar Bone Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Khojasteh, Arash; Kheiri, Lida; Motamedian, Saeed Reza; Khoshkam, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is the most common technique for localized bone augmentation. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to categorize and assess various GBR approaches for the reconstruction of human alveolar bone defects. Materials and Methods: Electronic search of four databases including PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane and hand searching were performed to identify human trials attempting GBR for the reconstruction of alveolar bony defects for a...

  11. A User-Developed 3-D Hand Gesture Set for Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anna; Wachs, Juan P; Park, Kunwoo; Rempel, David

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a lexicon for 3-D hand gestures for common human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks by considering usability and effort ratings. Recent technologies create an opportunity for developing a free-form 3-D hand gesture lexicon for HCI. Subjects (N = 30) with prior experience using 2-D gestures on touch screens performed 3-D gestures of their choice for 34 common HCI tasks and rated their gestures on preference, match, ease, and effort. Videos of the 1,300 generated gestures were analyzed for gesture popularity, order, and response times. Gesture hand postures were rated by the authors on biomechanical risk and fatigue. A final task gesture set is proposed based primarily on subjective ratings and hand posture risk. The different dimensions used for evaluating task gestures were not highly correlated and, therefore, measured different properties of the task-gesture match. A method is proposed for generating a user-developed 3-D gesture lexicon for common HCIs that involves subjective ratings and a posture risk rating for minimizing arm and hand fatigue. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. Reticulospinal Contributions to Gross Hand Function after Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stuart N; Perez, Monica A

    2017-10-04

    Multiple descending motor pathways likely contribute to the recovery of hand motor function following spinal cord injury (SCI). Reticulospinal neurons project to spinal motor neurons controlling hand muscles and extensively sprout into gray matter structures after SCI; therefore, it has been proposed that the reticulospinal tract is one of the descending motor pathways involved in recovery of hand function after injury. To test this hypothesis, we examined the StartReact response, an involuntary release of a planned movement via a startling stimulus that engages the reticulospinal tract, by measuring reaction times from electromyographic activity in an intrinsic finger muscle during three motor tasks requiring different degrees of hand dexterity: index finger abduction, a precision grip, and a power grip. Males and females with and without incomplete chronic cervical SCI were tested. We found that although SCI participants voluntarily responded to all tasks, reaction times were shorter during a startle cue while performing a power grip but not index finger abduction or precision grip. Control subjects had similarly shorter reaction times during a startle cue in all motor tasks. These results provide the first evidence for a contribution of the reticulospinal tract to hand control in humans with SCI during gross finger manipulations and suggest that this contribution is less pronounced during fine dexterous finger movements.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It has been long proposed that brainstem pathways contribute to the recovery of hand function in humans with spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we show that individuals with anatomically incomplete chronic cervical SCI responded to a startle stimulus, a test that engages the reticulospinal tract, while performing a power grip but not during index finger abduction or precision grip. Control subjects responded to a startle stimulus similarly across tasks. These observations suggest that reticulospinal outputs after SCI

  13. Vibrations transmitted from human hands to upper arm, shoulder, back, neck, and head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueyan S; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2017-12-01

    Some powered hand tools can generate significant vibration at frequencies below 25 Hz. It is not clear whether such vibration can be effectively transmitted to the upper arm, shoulder, neck, and head and cause adverse effects in these substructures. The objective of this study is to investigate the vibration transmission from the human hands to these substructures. Eight human subjects participated in the experiment, which was conducted on a 1-D vibration test system. Unlike many vibration transmission studies, both the right and left hand-arm systems were simultaneously exposed to the vibration to simulate a working posture in the experiment. A laser vibrometer and three accelerometers were used to measure the vibration transmitted to the substructures. The apparent mass at the palm of each hand was also measured to help in understanding the transmitted vibration and biodynamic response. This study found that the upper arm resonance frequency was 7-12 Hz, the shoulder resonance was 7-9 Hz, and the back and neck resonances were 6-7 Hz. The responses were affected by the hand-arm posture, applied hand force, and vibration magnitude. The transmissibility measured on the upper arm had a trend similar to that of the apparent mass measured at the palm in their major resonant frequency ranges. The implications of the results are discussed. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the shoulder and neck are important issues among many workers. Many of these workers use heavy-duty powered hand tools. The combined mechanical loads and vibration exposures are among the major factors contributing to the development of MSDs. The vibration characteristics of the body segments examined in this study can be used to help understand MSDs and to help develop more effective intervention methods.

  14. Teleoperation of a robot manipulator from 3D human hand-arm motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Jonathan; Verma, Siddharth; Wu, Xianghai; Luu, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    The control of a robot manipulator by a human operator is often necessary in unstructured dynamic environments with unfamiliar objects. Remote teleoperation is required when human presence at the robot site is undesirable or difficult, such as in handling hazardous materials and operating in dangerous or inaccessible environments. Previous approaches have employed mechanical or other contacting interfaces which require unnatural motions for object manipulation tasks or hinder dexterous human motion. This paper presents a non-contacting method of teleoperating a robot manipulator by having the human operator perform the 3D human hand-arm motion that would naturally be used to compete an object manipulation task and tracking the motion with a stereo-camera system at a local site. The 3D human hand-arm motion is reconstructed at the remote robot site and is used to control the position and orientation of the robot manipulator end-effector in real-time. Images captured of the robot interacting with objects at the remote site provide visual feedback to the human operator. Tests in teleoperation of the robot manipulator have demonstrated the ability of the human to carry out object manipulator tasks remotely and the teleoperated robot manipulator system to copy human-arm motions in real-time.

  15. Purification and characterization of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase from a human osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, M; Gorai, I; Minaguchi, H; Rosenquist, C; Qvist, P

    1998-01-01

    Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP) levels are considered to reflect osteoblastic activity and can therefore be used as a marker of bone formation. However, bone ALP is difficult to distinguish from other ALP isoforms since the kidney, liver, and bone isoenzymes are encoded by the same gene and only differ because of post-translational modification of their carbohydrate side chains. The aim of this study was to purify and separate bone ALP which could be used to raise specific antisera against human bone ALP, from Saos-2, a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line. The procedure involved two steps. The first step, cultivation of 10(5) Saos-2 cells, yielded approximately 1 U ALP. Subsequent butanol extraction achieved 1.82-fold purification. For the second step, separating bone ALP, we used serial lectin affinity chromatography to distinguish between the carbohydrate side chains of the various ALP isoforms. A sample of the butanol extract was fractionated into three peaks (I, II, and III) by concanavalin A. Peaks II and III were subsequently identified as types IIa and IIIb bone ALP using pea lectin and wheat germ agglutinin columns, respectively. The specific activity of bone ALP was measured using commercial kits. Since bone ALP accounted for at least 84% of the total ALP activity after the final separation, this method appears more convenient and reproducible than others using bone or Pagetic sera. The bone ALP purified in this study could be used to raise monoclonal antibodies against bone-specific ALP.

  16. Morphological Characterization of the Frontal and Parietal Bones of the Human Skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Human Skull by Stephen L Alexander SURVICE Engineering Company, Belcamp, MD Karin Rafaels Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, ARL C...the direction of physiological loading to reinforce the bone. However, the human skull is not generally considered a load-bearing bone. Therefore...Army Research Laboratory Morphological Characterization of the Frontal and Parietal Bones of the Human Skull by Stephen L Alexander SURVICE

  17. Cytomegalovirus survival and transferability and the effectiveness of common hand-washing agents against cytomegalovirus on live human hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jennifer D; Forlin-Passoni, Daniela; Radford, Kay; Bate, Sheri L; Dollard, Sheila C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Cannon, Michael J; Schmid, D Scott

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) transmission can occur when women acquire CMV while pregnant. Infection control guidelines may reduce risk for transmission. We studied the duration of CMV survival after application of bacteria to the hands and after transfer from the hands to surfaces and the effectiveness of cleansing with water, regular and antibacterial soaps, sanitizer, and diaper wipes. Experiments used CMV AD169 in saliva at initial titers of 1 × 10(5) infectious particles/ml. Samples from hands or surfaces (points between 0 and 15 min) were placed in culture and observed for at least 2 weeks. Samples were also tested using CMV real-time PCR. After application of bacteria to the hands, viable CMV was recovered from 17/20 swabs at 0 min, 18/20 swabs at 1 min, 5/20 swabs at 5 min, and 4/20 swabs at 15 min. After transfer, duration of survival was at least 15 min on plastic (1/2 swabs), 5 min on crackers and glass (3/4 swabs), and 1 min or less on metal and cloth (3/4 swabs); no viable virus was collected from wood, rubber, or hands. After cleansing, no viable virus was recovered using water (0/22), plain soap (0/20), antibacterial soap (0/20), or sanitizer (0/22). Viable CMV was recovered from 4/20 hands 10 min after diaper wipe cleansing. CMV remains viable on hands for sufficient times to allow transmission. CMV may be transferred to surfaces with reduced viability. Hand-cleansing methods were effective at eliminating viable CMV from hands.

  18. Forces generated in guide-wires when drilling human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, I; Hillery, M

    1995-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery guide-wires are extensively used for the drilling of pilot holes in human bones to allow further drilling, reaming and screw-tapping to take place in the repair and reconstruction of fractures. The guide-wires are generally 1.5 to 2.5 mm in diameter and have a three-faceted point with or without a screw thread. This paper describes drilling tests carried out using both types of guide-wire and these are compared with results obtained from a two-faceted geometry developed during this research. Tests were performed on the heads of femurs which had been removed during hip arthroplasty. A variable speed drilling machine together with a very sensitive drilling dynamometer were used for measuring the torque and thrust during the experimental stage of the research. This equipment was developed as part of an overall research programme into the mechanics of drilling of human bone. The indications are, firstly, that little advantage is gained by using a threaded-point guide-wire. In fact using a thread on the guide-wire can be a disadvantage. Secondly, the thrust cutting force is dependent on the spindle speed and feed. An optimum set of speeds of between 800 and 1400 r/min is recommended for 2.5 mm diameter guide-wires.

  19. Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian; Gehrchen, P Martin; Kiaer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A finite element analysis-based bone remodeling study in human was conducted in the lumbar spine operated on with pedicle screws. Bone remodeling results were compared to prospective experimental bone mineral content data of patients operated on with pedicle screws....

  20. Quantification of spatial structure of human proximal tibial bone biopsies using 3D measures of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Prohaska, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    3D data sets of human tibia bone biopsies acquired by a micro-CT scanner. In order to justify the newly proposed approach, the measures of complexity of the bone architecture were compared with the results of traditional 2D bone histomorphometry. The proposed technique is able to quantify......Changes in trabecular bone composition during development of osteoporosis are used as a model for bone loss in microgravity conditions during a space flight. Symbolic dynamics and measures of complexity are proposed and applied to assess quantitatively the structural composition of bone tissue from...

  1. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by means...... of testing the cartilage-bone complex. BACKGROUND: Up to now, mechanical testing of cartilage and bone has been reported separately, and little is known about the mechanical behaviour of both tissues when examined as a unit. METHODS: Cylindrical human proximal tibial cartilage-bone complex specimens from 31...... demonstrates that similar age-related trends were seen in cartilage and bone, as if they behaved as a single mechanical unit. RELEVANCE: The basic information presented here on the mechanical properties of cartilage and bone and the correlations between them reveals the unit function of both tissues...

  2. PHRASEOLOGICAL ITEMS WITH THE COMPONENT HAND DENOTING AND CHARACTERISING HUMAN IN RUSSIAN NATIONAL DIALECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of phrase-creation activity of noun-somatism hand in national dialects and semantic peculiarities of phraseologisms which are created on its basis. More than half of phraseological cluster with a top hand of the national Russian language are presented by exactly dialectal phraseologisms. Among them there is a significant group of items denoting and characterizing human; it proves a strong manifestation of anthropocentrism in this phraseological cluster. Phraseological items are motivated known literary meanings of the word hand and mainly reflect the most productive association of man with this subject: such as work experience, some types of unearned activities, power, possession, lucky or unlucky man.

  3. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  4. Efficacy of alcohols and alcohol-based hand disinfectants against human enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S-C; Li, W-C; Huang, K-Y; Huang, Y-C; Chiu, C-H; Chen, C-J; Hsieh, Y-C; Kuo, C-Y; Shih, S-R; Lin, T-Y

    2013-04-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) infections are a significant public health threat in the Asia-Pacific region and occasionally cause severe neurological complications and even death in children. Although good hand hygiene is important for controlling infection, relevant data regarding the efficacy of widely used hand disinfectants against HEV71 are still lacking. To investigate the virucidal activity of alcohols and alcohol-based hand disinfectants against HEV71. A common alcohol-based hand disinfectant (0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate + 70% isopropanol) as well as different concentrations of isopropanol and ethanol were tested for virucidal activity against HEV71 using the suspension and the fingerpad tests. In suspension tests, 85% and 95% ethanol achieved a mean log10 reduction factor in HEV71 titre of >3 and nearly 6, respectively, within 10 min. By contrast, 70% and 75% ethanol and any concentration of isopropanol (70-95%) produced a factor of 4, while both 75% ethanol and a chlorhexidine gluconate-containing formula were ineffective against HEV71 with a mean log10 reduction factor of alcohol-based hand disinfectants based on 70% ethanol or isopropanol have poor effectiveness against HEV71. Ninety-five percent ethanol is the most effective concentration, but still cannot fully inactivate HEV71 and may be impractical for use in many instances. Hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand disinfectants alone is not recommended for preventing HEV71 transmission. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. RGBD Video Based Human Hand Trajectory Tracking and Gesture Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of human hand trajectory tracking and gesture trajectory recognition based on synchronized color and depth video is considered. Toward this end, in the facet of hand tracking, a joint observation model with the hand cues of skin saliency, motion and depth is integrated into particle filter in order to move particles to local peak in the likelihood. The proposed hand tracking method, namely, salient skin, motion, and depth based particle filter (SSMD-PF, is capable of improving the tracking accuracy considerably, in the context of the signer performing the gesture toward the camera device and in front of moving, cluttered backgrounds. In the facet of gesture recognition, a shape-order context descriptor on the basis of shape context is introduced, which can describe the gesture in spatiotemporal domain. The efficient shape-order context descriptor can reveal the shape relationship and embed gesture sequence order information into descriptor. Moreover, the shape-order context leads to a robust score for gesture invariant. Our approach is complemented with experimental results on the settings of the challenging hand-signed digits datasets and American sign language dataset, which corroborate the performance of the novel techniques.

  6. Understanding Human Hand Gestures for Learning Robot Pick-and-Place Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-I Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Programming robots by human demonstration is an intuitive approach, especially by gestures. Because robot pick-and-place tasks are widely used in industrial factories, this paper proposes a framework to learn robot pick-and-place tasks by understanding human hand gestures. The proposed framework is composed of the module of gesture recognition and the module of robot behaviour control. For the module of gesture recognition, transport empty (TE, transport loaded (TL, grasp (G, and release (RL from Gilbreth's therbligs are the hand gestures to be recognized. A convolution neural network (CNN is adopted to recognize these gestures from a camera image. To achieve the robust performance, the skin model by a Gaussian mixture model (GMM is used to filter out non-skin colours of an image, and the calibration of position and orientation is applied to obtain the neutral hand pose before the training and testing of the CNN. For the module of robot behaviour control, the corresponding robot motion primitives to TE, TL, G, and RL, respectively, are implemented in the robot. To manage the primitives in the robot system, a behaviour-based programming platform based on the Extensible Agent Behavior Specification Language (XABSL is adopted. Because the XABSL provides the flexibility and re-usability of the robot primitives, the hand motion sequence from the module of gesture recognition can be easily used in the XABSL programming platform to implement the robot pick-and-place tasks. The experimental evaluation of seven subjects performing seven hand gestures showed that the average recognition rate was 95.96%. Moreover, by the XABSL programming platform, the experiment showed the cube-stacking task was easily programmed by human demonstration.

  7. A physical mechanism for coupling bone resorption and formation in adult human bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Levin; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Skorzynska, Katarzyna Ewa

    2009-01-01

    During skeletal remodeling, pre-osteoclasts and pre-osteoblasts are targeted to critical sites of the bone to resorb and reconstruct bone matrix, respectively. Coordination of site-specific recruitment of these two cell types is a prerequisite to maintain the specific architecture of each bone wi...

  8. [Autotransplantation of composit complexes of tissues for restoration of the combined bone-soft tissue post-traumatic defects of the wrist and the hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galich, S P; Reznikov, A V

    2008-09-01

    The experience of treatment of 27 patients, suffering the extended bone-soft tissue defects of the wrist and the hand was summarized. In 12 patients (1-st group) the bone plasty was performed, using nonvascularized fragment of os ilei wing with simultaneous excision of the damaged soft tissues and free transplantation of m. latissimus dorsi or m. serratus anterior flaps. In 15 patients (2-nd group) autotransplantation of m. serratus anterior flap, including the vascularized costal fragments in its content, was performed. The musculo-costal flap application had appeared a perspective procedure while restoration of carpal bones defects. Plastic properties of such a transplant are relative technical simplicity of its mobilization, minimal aesthetic defect in the donor zone, possibility of creation of a necessary long vascular pedicle, tolerance of the complex to infection, what secures the expediency of its application in reconstructive plastic surgery.

  9. Copper and zinc isotope ratios in human bone and enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Herrscher, Estelle; Balter, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report Cu and Zn isotope ratios of bones and teeth of French people from various historical periods with the aim to understand how Cu and Zn isotope ratios of bone, a tissue that is continuously remodeled throughout life but that is prone to post-mortem diagenesis, compare with that of tooth enamel, a tissue that forms once during childhood but that is more resistant to diagenesis. Specifically, we examine (1) the potential existence of sex-related differences in the Cu isotope ratios (represented as δ65 Cu) in the tooth enamel of identified men and women, and (2) a decrease of Zn isotope delta ratios (represented as δ66 Zn) related to the increase of meat and fish consumption during the 20th century. Four series of material were studied: the archeological population of Saint-Laurent de Grenoble (17th -18th centuries AD), an anatomical collection of skulls (19th century AD), a contemporary anatomical collection of bones never buried, and contemporary teeth samples. The metals were purified by liquid chromatography and their isotopic ratios measured by means of multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We describe a clear offset between bone and tooth enamel for Zn isotope ratios, as previously observed in animals. There is a similar offset for Cu isotope ratios. We did not observe any difference between the δ65 Cu values of men and women when looking at dental enamel. For the contemporary samples, the δ66 Zn values of bioapatite decreased, which might be explained by the increase of animal product consumption among the French people during this period, notably when the access to seafood became widespread. Our study demonstrates that the Cu and Zn isotope compositions of dental enamel are promising tools for childhood diet reconstruction. Meanwhile, the Cu isotope ratio of tooth enamel is unlikely to be useful for the identification of biological sex, even in the case of populations with early menarche. Further works are needed to

  10. 3D Reconstruction of human bones based on dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binkai; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Xiao; Zheng, Jinjin

    2017-11-01

    An effective method for reconstructing a 3D model of human bones from computed tomography (CT) image data based on dictionary learning is proposed. In this study, the dictionary comprises the vertices of triangular meshes, and the sparse coefficient matrix indicates the connectivity information. For better reconstruction performance, we proposed a balance coefficient between the approximation and regularisation terms and a method for optimisation. Moreover, we applied a local updating strategy and a mesh-optimisation method to update the dictionary and the sparse matrix, respectively. The two updating steps are iterated alternately until the objective function converges. Thus, a reconstructed mesh could be obtained with high accuracy and regularisation. The experimental results show that the proposed method has the potential to obtain high precision and high-quality triangular meshes for rapid prototyping, medical diagnosis, and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of semicarbazide on cultured human lymphocytes and rat bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Dimitris; Moshou, Hariklia; Epeoglou, Klimentini

    2010-01-01

    Semicarbazide (SEM) belongs to the hydrazine family of chemicals, some members of which are known to possess carcinogenic potential. Information on the potential hazard of SEM itself is incomplete and the possibility that it is genotoxic cannot be ruled out. SEM is widely used as a residue marker for the banned veterinary drug nitrofurazone. Also, it occurs as a break-down product of azodicarbonamide (ADC), a chemical used as a flour treatment. Furthermore, it may form as a reaction product of hypochlorite action on food additives. In the present study, we investigated the possible genotoxic effects of SEM with respect to the following cytogenetic end-points: (1) in vitro micronucleus (MN) formation and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in human lymphocytes and (2) in vivo micronucleus induction on rat bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). Comparing MN and SCE frequencies on control and examined concentrations (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 microg ml(-1)) did not reveal statistically significant differences except, marginally, the highest concentration (20 microg ml(-1)) in SCE analysis. On the other hand, oral administration of 50, 100 and 150 mg kg(-1) b.w. of SEM showed a statistically significant effect in MN frequencies on Wistar rats' bone marrow PCEs, with no dose-response pattern. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Animal Models and Bone Histomorphometry: Translational Research for the Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of animal models to research and inform bone morphology, in particular relating to human research in bone loss as a result of low gravity environments. Reasons for use of animal models as tools for human research programs include: time-efficient, cost-effective, invasive measures, and predictability as some model are predictive for drug effects.

  13. Guided bone regeneration with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 9 loaded on either deproteinized bovine bone mineral or a collagen barrier membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulacic, Nikola; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2017-08-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 9 (rhBMP9) has been considered the most osteoinductive growth factor of the BMP-family and has much translation potential for guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures. The aim of this study was to compare bone formation using rhBMP9 loaded with different carrier systems including deprotenized bovine bone mineral (BioOss, BO) or collagen barrier membranes (BioGide, BG) in a rabbit GBR model. rhBMP9 was loaded either on BO; named BO/BMP9, or BG; named BG/BMP9 to investigate the better carrier system for rhBMP9. New bone formation was quantified in a rabbit calvarial defect model using four groups; (1) control (empty, n = 9), (2) BO + BG (n = 9), (3) BO/BMP9 + BG (n = 9; BMP9 loaded onto BO), and (4) BO + BG/BMP9 (n = 9; BMP9 loaded onto BG) by radiographically and histologically at 8 weeks post-surgery. Both BO/BMP9 + BG and BO + BG/BMP9 samples significantly promoted new bone formation when compared to BO + BG samples based on parameters including mineralized tissue volume by microCT analysis, as well as new bone height and new bone area by histomorphometry. Interestingly, BO + BG/BMP9 samples but not BO/BMP9 + BG achieved near perfect horizontal bone defect closure, while demonstrating new bone layers in the defect areas implanted with BG materials and bone formation around BO materials. Both BO and BG positively induced bone formation with rhBMP9 in an experimental rabbit GBR model when compared to BO + BG alone. This study revealed that BG-loaded with rhBMP9 promoted better wound closure when compared to BO-loaded with rhBMP9. GBR procedures with growth factors may thus benefit from loading rhBMP9 onto BG-collagen barrier membranes when compared to BO-bone grafting particles. Future large animal studies with different types of bone grafts and barrier membranes are needed to further investigate these trends. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Spatial distribution of the trace elements zinc, strontium and lead in human bone tissue☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmer, B.; Roschger, A.; Wastl, A.; Hofstaetter, J.G.; Wobrauschek, P.; Simon, R.; Thaler, H.W.; Roschger, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Streli, C.

    2013-01-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements in minute quantities, which are known to accumulate in the bone. Cortical and trabecular bones consist of bone structural units (BSUs) such as osteons and bone packets of different mineral content and are separated by cement lines. Previous studies investigating trace elements in bone lacked resolution and therefore very little is known about the local concentration of zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) in BSUs of human bone. We used synchrotron radiation induced micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR μ-XRF) in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) to determine the distribution and accumulation of Zn, Sr, and Pb in human bone tissue. Fourteen human bone samples (10 femoral necks and 4 femoral heads) from individuals with osteoporotic femoral neck fractures as well as from healthy individuals were analyzed. Fluorescence intensity maps were matched with BE images and correlated with calcium (Ca) content. We found that Zn and Pb had significantly increased levels in the cement lines of all samples compared to the surrounding mineralized bone matrix. Pb and Sr levels were found to be correlated with the degree of mineralization. Interestingly, Zn intensities had no correlation with Ca levels. We have shown for the first time that there is a differential accumulation of the trace elements Zn, Pb and Sr in BSUs of human bone indicating different mechanisms of accumulation. PMID:23932972

  15. Relationship between mechanical properties and bone mineral density of human femoral bone retrieved from patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yvonne; Lindner, Tobias; Fritsche, Andreas; Schiebenhöfer, Ann-Kristin; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Skripitz, Ralf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse retrieved human femoral bone samples using three different test methods, to elucidate the relationship between bone mineral density and mechanical properties. Human femoral heads were retrieved from 22 donors undergoing primary total hip replacement due to hip osteoarthritis and stored for a maximum of 24 hours postoperatively at + 6 °C to 8 °C.Analysis revealed an average structural modulus of 232±130 N/mm(2) and ultimate compression strength of 6.1±3.3 N/mm(2) with high standard deviations. Bone mineral densities of 385±133 mg/cm(2) and 353±172 mg/cm(3) were measured using thedual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), respectively. Ashing resulted in a bone mineral density of 323±97 mg/cm(3). In particular, significant linear correlations were found between DXA and ashing with r = 0.89 (p < 0.01, n = 22) and between structural modulus and ashing with r = 0.76 (p < 0.01, n = 22).Thus, we demonstrated a significant relationship between mechanical properties and bone density. The correlations found can help to determine the mechanical load capacity of individual patients undergoing surgical treatments by means of noninvasive bone density measurements.

  16. Human bone hardness seems to depend on tissue type but not on anatomical site in the long bones of an old subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Caroline; Zwierzak, Iwona; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that among different human subjects, the bone tissue quality varies as a function of the bone segment morphology. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality, evaluated in terms of hardness of packages of lamellae, of cortical and trabecular bones, at different anatomical sites within the human skeleton. The contralateral six long bones of an old human subject were indented at different levels along the diaphysis and at both epiphyses of each bone. Hardness value, which is correlated to the degree of mineralisation, of both cortical and trabecular bone tissues was calculated for each indentation location. It was found that the cortical bone tissue was harder (+18%) than the trabecular one. In general, the bone hardness was found to be locally highly heterogeneous. In fact, considering one single slice obtained for a bone segment, the coefficient of variation of the hardness values was up to 12% for cortical bone and up to 17% for trabecular bone. However, the tissue hardness was on average quite homogeneous within and among the long bones of the studied donor, although differences up to 9% among levels and up to 7% among bone segments were found. These findings seem not to support the mentioned hypothesis, at least not for the long bones of an old subject.

  17. A hand-centric classification of human and robot dexterous manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, I M; Ma, R R; Dollar, A M

    2013-01-01

    This work contributes to the development of a common framework for the discussion and analysis of dexterous manipulation across the human and robotic domains. An overview of previous work is first provided along with an analysis of the tradeoffs between arm and hand dexterity. A hand-centric and motion-centric manipulation classification is then presented and applied in four different ways. It is first discussed how the taxonomy can be used to identify a manipulation strategy. Then, applications for robot hand analysis and engineering design are explained. Finally, the classification is applied to three activities of daily living (ADLs) to distinguish the patterns of dexterous manipulation involved in each task. The same analysis method could be used to predict problem ADLs for various impairments or to produce a representative benchmark set of ADL tasks. Overall, the classification scheme proposed creates a descriptive framework that can be used to effectively describe hand movements during manipulation in a variety of contexts and might be combined with existing object centric or other taxonomies to provide a complete description of a specific manipulation task.

  18. Effects of Drynariae rhizoma on the proliferation of human bone cells and the immunomodulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-Cheon; Lee, Boo-Tae; Yoon, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-02-01

    Drynariae Rhizoma (DR), a traditional Korea medicine, which is known for its effect to strengthen myoskeletal systems, frequently appears as the main ingredient in prescriptions for bone injuries. However, it is unclear how it pharmacologically contributes to the reformation of bone. In this study, the effect of DR on bone cells was investigated in vitro for the first time. The human osteoprecursor cells (OPC-1) were incubated in the medium with different concentrations of DR and the cell proliferation was studied. When the concentration of DR was 250 microg ml(-1). Under most treatments, the cells presented very pale expression for cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) protein; slightly intensified band showed at the highest DR concentration, 120 microg ml(-1) during the course of culture. On the other hand, we investigated the immunomodulatory activity of DR on cellular and humoral immunity. When different doses of ethanolic and water extracts of DR was administered to mice, it was dose-dependently potentiated the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by both sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and oxazolone. It significantly enhanced the production of circulating antibody titre in mice in response to SRBC. But, DR did not any effect on macrophage phagocytosis. Prolonged administration of DR significantly ameliorated the total white blood cell count and also restored the immunosuppressive effects induced by cyclophosphamide. The present investigation reveals that DR possesses immunomodulatory activity. From the results, it was concluded that DR directly stimulated the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, protein secretion and particularly type I collagen synthesis of OPC-1 at dose-dependent manner, and stimulated both the cellular and the humoral immunity.

  19. Lutein Enhances Bone Mass by Stimulating Bone Formation and Suppressing Bone Resorption in Growing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Watanabe, Kenta; Matsumoto, Chiho; Grundler, Florian M W; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a member of the xanthophyll family of carotenoids, which are known to prevent hypoxia-induced cell damage in the eye by removing free radicals. However, its role in other tissues is controversial, and the effects of lutein on bone tissues are unknown. To identify a possible role of lutein in bone tissues, we examined the effects of lutein on bone formation and bone resorption and on femoral bone mass in mice. Lutein enhanced the formation of mineralized bone nodules in cultures of osteoblasts. On the other hand, lutein clearly suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced bone resorption as measured by pit formation in organ culture of mouse calvaria. In co-cultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts, lutein suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced osteoclast formation. In cultures of bone marrow macrophages, lutein suppressed soluble RANKL, the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) ligand, induced osteoclast formation. When five-week-old male mice were orally administered lutein for 4 weeks, the femoral bone mass was clearly enhanced in cortical bone, as measured by bone mineral density in dual X-ray absorptiometry and micro computed tomography (µCT) analyses. The present study indicates that lutein enhances bone mass in growing mice by suppressing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Lutein may be a natural agent that promotes bone turnover and may be beneficial for bone health in humans.

  20. Engineering new bone via a minimally invasive route using human bone marrow-derived stromal cell aggregates, microceramic particles, and human platelet-rich plasma gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjea, Anindita; Yuan, Huipin; Fennema, Eelco; Burer, Ruben; Chatterjea, Supriyo; Garritsen, Henk; Renard, Auke; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2013-02-01

    There is a rise in the popularity of arthroscopic procedures in orthopedics. However, the majority of cell-based bone tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) rely on solid preformed scaffolding materials, which require large incisions and extensive dissections for placement at the defect site. Thus, they are not suitable for minimally invasive techniques. The aim of this study was to develop a clinically relevant, easily moldable, bone TEC, amenable to minimally invasive techniques, using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and calcium phosphate microparticles in combination with an in situ forming platelet-rich plasma gel obtained from human platelets. Most conventional TECs rely on seeding and culturing single-cell suspensions of hMSCs on scaffolds. However, for generating TECs amenable to the minimally invasive approach, it was essential to aggregate the hMSCs in vitro before seeding them on the scaffolds as unaggregated MSCs did not generate any bone. Twenty four hours of in vitro aggregation was determined to be optimal for maintaining cell viability in vitro and bone formation in vivo. Moreover, no statistically significant difference was observed in the amount of bone formed when the TECs were implanted via an open approach or a minimally invasive route. TECs generated using MSCs from three different human donors generated new bone through the minimally invasive route in a reproducible manner, suggesting that these TECs could be a viable alternative to preformed scaffolds employed through an open surgery for treating bone defects.

  1. Differential intracochlear sound pressure measurements in normal human temporal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S; Merchant, Saumil N; Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2009-03-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. The technique we employ, which exploits microscale fiberoptic pressure sensors, enables the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. In our results, the sound pressure in scala vestibuli (P (SV)) was much greater than scala tympani pressure (P (ST)), except for very low and high frequencies where P (ST) significantly affected the input to the cochlea. The differential pressure (P (SV) - P (ST)) is a superior measure of ossicular transduction of sound compared to P (SV) alone: (P (SV)-P (ST)) was reduced by 30 to 50 dB when the ossicular chain was disarticulated, whereas P (SV) was not reduced as much. The middle ear gain P (SV)/P (EC) and the differential pressure normalized to ear canal pressure (P (SV) - P (ST))/P (EC) were generally bandpass in frequency dependence. At frequencies above 1 kHz, the group delay in the middle ear gain is about 83 micros, over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent measurements of stapes velocity produced estimates of cochlear input impedance, the differential impedance across the partition, and round window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round window impedance was consistent with compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our technique of measuring differential pressure can be used to study inner ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round window stimulation and bone conduction)--situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  2. Human biology at the interface of paediatrics: measuring bone mineral accretion during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, Babette S

    2012-09-01

    Professor Tanner established a paradigm for the study of growth and development that demands precise growth measurements, description of normal variability through development to adulthood, consideration of the effects of tempo and the study of factors that influence growth outcomes. The relatively new field of paediatric bone health assessment fits this paradigm and reflects the collaboration of human biologists and paediatricians in understanding the growth of the human skeleton. This review describes the reasons for clinical assessment of bone density in children, the technological developments in bone health assessment in children, the development of reference curves and the effects of growth, body composition, pubertal timing, genetics and lifestyle on bone health outcomes.

  3. Human hand-transmitted vibration measurements on pedestrian controlled tractor operators by a laser scanning vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboli, R; Miccoli, G; Rossi, G L

    1999-06-01

    A first application of a new measurement technique to detect vibration transmitted to the human body in working conditions is presented. The technique is based on the use of a laser scanning vibrometer. It was previously developed, analysed and tested using laboratory test benches with electrodynamical exciters, and comparisons with traditional measurement techniques based on accelerometers were made. First, results of tests performed using a real machine generating vibration are illustrated. The machine used is a pedestrian-controlled tractor working in a fixed position. Reference measurements by using the accelerometer have been simultaneously performed while scanning the hand surface by the laser-based measurement system. Results achieved by means of both measurement techniques have been processed, analysed, compared and used to calculate transmissibility maps of the hands of three subjects.

  4. Skeletal development of the hand and wrist: digital bone age companion - a suitable alternative to the Greulich and Pyle atlas for bone age assessment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunch, Paul M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Altes, Talissa A. [University of Missouri, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); McIlhenny, Joan; Gaskin, Cree M. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, PO Box 800170, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Patrie, James [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Health Evaluation Sciences, PO Box 800717, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To assess reader performance and subjective workflow experience when reporting bone age studies with a digital bone age reference as compared to the Greulich and Pyle atlas (G and P). We hypothesized that pediatric radiologists would achieve equivalent results with each method while digital workflow would improve speed, experience, and reporting quality. IRB approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant study. Two pediatric radiologists performed research interpretations of bone age studies randomized to either the digital (Digital Bone Age Companion, Oxford University Press) or G and P method, generating reports to mimic clinical workflow. Bone age standard selection, interpretation-reporting time, and user preferences were recorded. Reports were reviewed for typographical or speech recognition errors. Comparisons of agreement were conducted by way of Fisher's exact tests. Interpretation-reporting times were analyzed on the natural logarithmic scale via a linear mixed model and transformed to the geometric mean. Subjective workflow experience was compared with an exact binomial test. Report errors were compared via a paired random permutation test. There was no difference in bone age determination between atlases (p = 0.495). The interpretation-reporting time (p < 0.001) was significantly faster with the digital method. The faculty indicated preference for the digital atlas (p < 0.001). Signed reports had fewer errors with the digital atlas (p < 0.001). Bone age study interpretations performed with the digital method were similar to those performed with the Greulich and Pyle atlas. The digital atlas saved time, improved workflow experience, and reduced reporting errors relative to the Greulich and Pyle atlas when integrated into electronic workflow. (orig.)

  5. Hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy skills acquisition: augmented reality simulator versus human cadaver training models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Fabien; Senagore, Anthony J; Ellis, Clyde N; Champagne, Bradley J; Augestad, Knut M; Neary, Paul C; Delaney, Conor P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a simulator with the human cadaver model for hand-assisted laparoscopic colorectal skills acquisition training. An observational prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the laparoscopic surgery training models. The study took place during the laparoscopic colectomy training course performed at the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Thirty four practicing surgeons performed hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy on human cadavers (n = 7) and on an augmented reality simulator (n = 27). Prior laparoscopic colorectal experience was assessed. Trainers and trainees completed independently objective structured assessment forms. Training models were compared by trainees' technical skills scores, events scores, and satisfaction. Prior laparoscopic experience was similar in both surgeon groups. Generic and specific skills scores were similar on both training models. Generic events scores were significantly better on the cadaver model. The 2 most frequent generic events occurring on the simulator were poor hand-eye coordination and inefficient use of retraction. Specific events were scored better on the simulator and reached the significance limit (p = 0.051) for trainers. The specific events occurring on the cadaver were intestinal perforation and left ureter identification difficulties. Overall satisfaction was better for the cadaver than for the simulator model (p = 0.009). With regard to skills scores, the augmented reality simulator had adequate qualities for the hand-assisted laparoscopic colectomy training. Nevertheless, events scores highlighted weaknesses of the anatomical replication on the simulator. Although improvements likely will be required to incorporate the simulator more routinely into the colorectal training, it may be useful in its current form for more junior trainees or those early on their learning curve. Copyright 2010 Association of Program

  6. Making Robots Mill Bone More Like Human Surgeons: Using Bone Density and Anatomic Information to Mill Safely and Efficiently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Neal P; Fichera, Loris; Wellborn, Patrick S; Labadie, Robert F; Webster, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Surgeons and robots typically use different approaches for bone milling. Surgeons adjust their speed and tool incidence angle constantly, which enables them to efficiently mill porous bone. Surgeons also adjust milling parameters such as speed and depth of cut throughout the procedure based on proximity to sensitive structures like nerves and blood vessels. In this paper we use image-based bone density estimates and segmentations of vital anatomy to make a robot mill more like a surgeon and less like an industrial computer numeric controlled (CNC) milling machine. We produce patient-specific plans optimizing velocity and incidence angles for spherical cutting burrs. These plans are particularly useful in bones of variable density and porosity like the human temporal bone. They result in fast milling in non-critical areas, reducing overall procedure time, and lower forces near vital anatomy. We experimentally demonstrate the algorithm on temporal bone phantoms and show that it reduces mean forces near vital anatomy by 63% and peak forces by 50% in comparison to a CNC-type path, without adding time to the procedure.

  7. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in debridement and impacted bone graft for the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of impacted bone graft with or without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH. We examined the effect of bone-grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction, known as the "light bulb" approach, for the treatment of ONFH with a combination of artificial bone (Novobone mixed with or without rhBMP-2. A total of 42 patients (72 hips were followed-up from 5 to 7.67 years (average of 6.1 years. The patients with and without BMP were the first group (IBG+rhBMP-2 and the second group (IBG, respectively. The clinical effectiveness was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS. The radiographic follow-up was evaluated by pre-and postoperative X-ray and CT scan. Excellent, good, and fair functions were obtained in 36, 12, and 7 hips, respectively. The survival rate was 81.8% and 71.8% in the first and second group, respectively. However, the survival rate was 90.3% in ARCO stage IIb, c, and only 34.6% in ARCO stage IIIa (P<0.05. It was concluded that good and excellent mid-term follow-up could be achieved in selected patients with ONFH treated with impacted bone graft operation. The rhBMP-2 might improve the clinical efficacy and quality of bone repair.

  8. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects.

  9. Efficacy of soap and water and alcohol-based hand-rub preparations against live H1N1 influenza virus on the hands of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, M Lindsay; Melvani, Sharmila; Druce, Julian; Barr, Ian G; Ballard, Susan A; Johnson, Paul D R; Mastorakos, Tasoula; Birch, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Although pandemic and avian influenza are known to be transmitted via human hands, there are minimal data regarding the effectiveness of routine hand hygiene (HH) protocols against pandemic and avian influenza. Twenty vaccinated, antibody-positive health care workers had their hands contaminated with 1 mL of 10(7) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)(50)/0.1 mL live human influenza A virus (H1N1; A/New Caledonia/20/99) before undertaking 1 of 5 HH protocols (no HH [control], soap and water hand washing [SW], or use of 1 of 3 alcohol-based hand rubs [61.5% ethanol gel, 70% ethanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution, or 70% isopropanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution]). H1N1 concentrations were assessed before and after each intervention by viral culture and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The natural viability of H1N1 on hands for >60 min without HH was also assessed. There was an immediate reduction in culture-detectable and PCR-detectable H1N1 after brief cutaneous air drying--14 of 20 health care workers had H1N1 detected by means of culture (mean reduction, 10(3-4) TCID(50)/0.1 mL), whereas 6 of 20 had no viable H1N1 recovered; all 20 health care workers had similar changes in PCR test results. Marked antiviral efficacy was noted for all 4 HH protocols, on the basis of culture results (14 of 14 had no culturable H1N1; (Phand rubs, although the actual difference was only 1-100 virus copies/microL. There was minimal reduction in H1N1 after 60 min without HH. HH with SW or alcohol-based hand rub is highly effective in reducing influenza A virus on human hands, although SW is the most effective intervention. Appropriate HH may be an important public health initiative to reduce pandemic and avian influenza transmission.

  10. Bone metabolism and hand grip strength response to aerobic versus resistance exercise training in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Shreef, Fadwa M; Al-Jiffri, Osama H; Abd El-Kader, Shehab M

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to compare the changes in handgrip strength and bone metabolism after 6 months between aerobic and resistance exercise training in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients in Jeddah area...

  11. A word in the hand: action, gesture and mental representation in humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmill, Erica A; Beilock, Sian; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-12

    The movements we make with our hands both reflect our mental processes and help to shape them. Our actions and gestures can affect our mental representations of actions and objects. In this paper, we explore the relationship between action, gesture and thought in both humans and non-human primates and discuss its role in the evolution of language. Human gesture (specifically representational gesture) may provide a unique link between action and mental representation. It is kinaesthetically close to action and is, at the same time, symbolic. Non-human primates use gesture frequently to communicate, and do so flexibly. However, their gestures mainly resemble incomplete actions and lack the representational elements that characterize much of human gesture. Differences in the mirror neuron system provide a potential explanation for non-human primates' lack of representational gestures; the monkey mirror system does not respond to representational gestures, while the human system does. In humans, gesture grounds mental representation in action, but there is no evidence for this link in other primates. We argue that gesture played an important role in the transition to symbolic thought and language in human evolution, following a cognitive leap that allowed gesture to incorporate representational elements.

  12. A word in the hand: action, gesture and mental representation in humans and non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmill, Erica A.; Beilock, Sian; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The movements we make with our hands both reflect our mental processes and help to shape them. Our actions and gestures can affect our mental representations of actions and objects. In this paper, we explore the relationship between action, gesture and thought in both humans and non-human primates and discuss its role in the evolution of language. Human gesture (specifically representational gesture) may provide a unique link between action and mental representation. It is kinaesthetically close to action and is, at the same time, symbolic. Non-human primates use gesture frequently to communicate, and do so flexibly. However, their gestures mainly resemble incomplete actions and lack the representational elements that characterize much of human gesture. Differences in the mirror neuron system provide a potential explanation for non-human primates' lack of representational gestures; the monkey mirror system does not respond to representational gestures, while the human system does. In humans, gesture grounds mental representation in action, but there is no evidence for this link in other primates. We argue that gesture played an important role in the transition to symbolic thought and language in human evolution, following a cognitive leap that allowed gesture to incorporate representational elements. PMID:22106432

  13. Design and implementation of dexterous robotic hand for human controlled interfaces: a comparative analysis with EAP systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Nicholas; Priya, Shashank

    2010-04-01

    An anthropomorphic robotic hand was developed with 23 degree of freedom (DOF) and dexterity to meet the requirements for typing on a standard keyboard. The design was inspired by human hand physiology and consists of 19 servo motors that drive tendons which run from the forearm to the hand. Antagonistic torsional springs and a 4-bar mechanism was used to decrease the number of actuators while maintaining human-like dexterity. The high dexterity also allows other complex tasks such as grasping and object manipulation. In order to achieving complete resemblance to the human hand, servo motors should be replaced with smart actuators that offer advantages in terms of energy density, power consumption, mechanical deformation, response time and noise. This paper will review the advantages and disadvantages of traditional servo motors with respect to commonly studied electro-active polymer based actuators and how they can affect the performance and appearance of humanoid hand.

  14. Osteoinduction by repeat plasmid injection of human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Kenji; Okubo, Yasunori; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, Noriaki; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2010-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is an osteoinductive protein and is considered useful for the treatment of skeletal disorders. Previous studies using BMP-2 in clinical applications have encountered difficulties, including the lack of an efficient, safe, inexpensive and simple delivery system. The gene transfer approach is a promising option for utilizing BMP-2. Although viral vector-mediated gene transfer is efficient, safety concerns prevent its clinical application for common diseases. On the other hand, plasmid-based gene transfer is a safe method and can be harnessed for practical applications. A plasmid encoding human BMP-2 (pCAGGS-BMP-2) was used and injected repeatedly (one to eight times) into the skeletal muscle of mice at a divided dose. We compared the capability of osteoinduction in the skeletal muscle of mice after gene transfer by repeat injection. BMP-2 production was assessed via immunohistochemistry, and osteoinduction was evaluated using radiography, histology and biochemical assays. The BMP-2 gene was transferred into the skeletal muscle of mice by repeat injection using pCAGGS-BMP-2. Mature bone was frequently observed in mice injected repeatedly with pCAGGS-BMP-2 at a divided dose. This confirms that, if the total dose is fixed, repeat injection with pCAGGS-BMP-2 at a divided dose causes osteoinduction more frequently in the skeletal muscle of mice. These results suggest the possibility of the effective clinical use of human BMP-2 gene therapy by direct DNA injection, and facilitate the clinical application of BMP-2 gene therapy. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Application of XRF to measure strontium in human bone in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Vartsky, D.; Yasumura, S.; Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    As a basis for better understanding the role that Sr fulfills in human body, it is desirable to measure directly the main Sr store in human body. Although strontium is omnipresent in human tissues, 99% is stored inthe mineral portion of the bone. In the present study x-ray fluorescence (XRF) was applied to measure the strontium content of the tibial shaft in vivo. The feasibility studies showed that normal levels of stable strontium in the bone can be measured successfully.

  16. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari Kermani, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells...... and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin...

  17. Influence of some psychological factors on temperature dynamics of human hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreneva, L. G.; Apenisheva, N. P.; Zakharov, Pavel V.; Markov, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    Temperature dynamics of the hands of human subjects was investigated by means of dynamical thermography and shown to depend on the personality and psychological conditions of the subjects. For neurotic personalities, especially under stress, the temperature is shown not to change at all in most cases. Stress resistant `independent' persons show very stable dynamics with relatively small temperature changes (about 2 degrees). The dependence of temperature patterns of `intermediate,' or `active,' personalities on the conditions of stress, mental concentration, and so on, is discussed.

  18. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Belmonte, Uriel Haile; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified). Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate. PMID:26742041

  19. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Haile Hernandez-Belmonte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified. Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate.

  20. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Belmonte, Uriel Haile; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2016-01-04

    In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified). Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate.

  1. The identification of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in archaeological human bones and teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M Coulson-Thomas

    Full Text Available Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs. Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS and hyaluronic acid (HA. In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology.

  2. One Million Bones: Measuring the Effect of Human Rights Participation in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jane; Cheatham, Leah P.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the integration of human rights content and a national arts-activism initiative--One Million Bones--into a bachelor's-level macro practice class as a human rights teaching strategy. Two previously validated scales, the Human Rights Exposure (HRX) in Social Work and the Human Rights Engagement (HRE) in Social Work (McPherson…

  3. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth H

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a clinical need for developing systemic transplantation protocols for use of human skeletal stem cells (also known bone marrow stromal stem cells) (hBMSC) in tissue regeneration. In systemic transplantation studies, only a limited number of hBMSC home to injured tissues...... vivo transwell migration and following intravenous injection, better in vivo homing ability to bone fracture when compared to LBF clones. Comparative microarray analysis of HBF versus LBF clones identified enrichment of gene categories of chemo-attraction, adhesion and migration associated genes. Among...

  4. The effects of different maceration techniques on nuclear DNA amplification using human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J; Luedtke, Jennifer G; Allison, Jamie L; Arber, Carolyn E; Merriwether, D Andrew; Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe

    2010-07-01

    Forensic anthropologists routinely macerate human bone for the purposes of identity and trauma analysis, but the heat and chemical treatments used can destroy genetic evidence. As a follow-up to a previous study on nuclear DNA recovery that used pig ribs, this study utilizes human skeletal remains treated with various bone maceration techniques for nuclear DNA amplification using the standard Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) markers. DNA was extracted from 18 samples of human lower leg bones subjected to nine chemical and heat maceration techniques. Genotyping was carried out using the AmpFlSTR COfiler and AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus ID kits. Results showed that heat treatments via microwave or Biz/Na(2)CO(3) in sub-boiling water efficiently macerate bone and produce amplifiable nuclear DNA for genetic analysis. Long-term use of chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide is discouraged as it results in poor bone quality and has deleterious effects on DNA amplification.

  5. A 3D GRAPHICAL MODELLING METHOD FOR HUMAN FEMUR BONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA Dragoş

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of study and the steps to obtain a virtual bone. For that purpose was used a CAD parametric software which permits to define models with a high degree of difficulty. The obtained model attached to other bones will be study using finite elements method and will be prepared for kinematics and dynamic simulation.

  6. The response of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteogenic signals and its impact on bone tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, R.; Fernandes, H.A.M.; Liu, J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is a multidisciplinary field that aims to treat patients with trauma, spinal fusion and large bone defects. Cell-based bone tissue engineering encompasses the isolation of multipotent hMSCs from the bone marrow of the patient, in

  7. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  8. Age-related variations in the microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Linde, F

    2002-01-01

    -related changes in the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone. One hundred and sixty cylindrical cancellous bone specimens were produced from 40 normal proximal tibiae from 40 donors, aged 16-85 years. These specimens were micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanned...

  9. MESOLITHIC HUMAN BONES FROM THE UPPER VOLGA BASIN : RADIOCARBON AND TRACE ELEMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrovskiy, A. L.; Alexandrovskaya, E. I.; Zhilin, M. I.; van der Plicht, J.

    2009-01-01

    Human bones from 3 Mesolithic sites in the Upper Volga basin were analyzed for trace elements, and dated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The radiocarbon dates of the bones correspond to the Mesolithic era. However, some dates differ from those obtained for the enclosing deposits and for the

  10. The effects of bone pâté on human osteoblasts cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Nicola; Buccoliero, Cinzia; De Luca, Concetta; Mori, Giorgio; Brunetti, Giacomina; Colucci, Silvia; Colaianni, Graziana; Grano, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bone pate on human osteoblast differentiation by measuring cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of the transcription factors and of the major components of the extracellular matrix. Although bone paté has been used in ear surgery for many years and when placed in contact with mastoid and external auditory canal bone become viable, the cellular mechanisms that lead to its osteointegration have never been described. Bone paté taken from four patients subjected to mastoidectomy and affected by middle ear and mastoid cholesteatoma was placed in contact with osteoblast-like cell cultures. Four experimental conditions were obtained: cell cultures treated with bone patè, with bone paté mixed with fibrin glue, with fibrin glue and untreated. After 24 h, the viability of the cells was evaluated; after 1 week, alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of transcription factors and bone matrix proteins were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. After 24 h osteoblasts showed increased viability when treated with bone paté (19 % increase) and bone pate mixed with fibrin glue (34 % increase). After 1 week, the number of alkaline phosphatase positive cells increased by 97 and 94 % in cultures treated with bone paté alone and bone pate mixed with fibrin glue. Treatment with bone patè upregulated transcription factors and components of the extracellular matrix. The present data show that bone paté has a high osteoinductive potential on human osteoblasts, enhancing their activity.

  11. Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Christian; Segil, Jacob L; Clemente, Francesco; ff Weir, Richard F; Edin, Benoni

    2014-11-01

    Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions.

  12. Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate predict hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of short duration: a longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøyesen, Pernille; Hoff, Mari; Ødegård, Sigrid; Haugeberg, Glenn; Syversen, Silje W; Gaarder, Per I; Okkenhaug, Cecilie; Kvien, Tore K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has in several studies been shown to be predicted by serological markers widely used in daily clinical practice. The objective of this longitudinal study was to examine if these serological markers also predict hand bone mineral density (BMD) loss in patients with RA of short disease duration. Methods 163 patients with RA of short disease duration (2.4 years) were included and followed longitudinally. Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated protein (anti-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analysed from baseline blood-samples. Hand BMD was measured by digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) based on hand and wrist radiographs obtained at baseline and 1, 2 and 5-year follow-up. Results During the study period, DXR-BMD decreased by median (inter quartile range) 1.7% (4.1 to 0.4), 2.8% (5.3 to 0.9) and 5.6% (11.7 to 2.3) after 1, 2 and 5 years, respectively. Elevated baseline anti-CCP, RF, ESR and CRP levels were in univariate linear regression analyses consistently associated with DXR-BMD change at all time-points. Anti-CCP and ESR were independently associated with hand DXR-BMD in multivariate linear regression analyses. Elevated anti-CCP levels were consistent and independent predictors of loss in cortical hand bone during the study period, with the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) 2.2 (1.0 to 4.5), 2.6 (1.1 to 6.2) and 4.9 (1.4 to 16.7) for the 1, 2, and 5-year follow-up periods, respectively. Conclusions Anti-CCP and ESR were found to be independent predictors of early localised BMD loss. This finding adds to the understanding of anti-CCP and ESR as important predictors of bone involvement in RA. PMID:19570223

  13. Active Learning and Flipped Classroom, Hand in Hand Approach to Improve Students Learning in Human Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, Maria; Javdan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Because Human Anatomy and Physiology (A&P), a gateway course for allied health majors, has high dropout rates nationally, it is challenging to find a successful pedagogical intervention. Reports on the effect of integration of flipped classrooms and whether it improves learning are contradictory for different disciplines. Thus many educators…

  14. Diagnosis of post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome of the hand: current role of sympathetic skin response and three-phase bone scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaj, A; Kotwal, P P; Mittal, R; Deepak, K K; Bal, C S

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the role of sympathetic skin response (SSR) and three-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) in the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). 60 patients with CRPS of the hand were recruited. TPBS was performed using a bolus injection of 20 mCi of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate in an antecubital vein and blood flow (first phase) image, blood pool (second phase) image, and delayed (third phase) image obtained. Patients were considered to have CRPS when the blood pool and blood flow images showed diffuse asymmetric uptake, or when the delayed image indicated increased asymmetric periarticular uptake. SSR was measured simultaneously in the affected and unaffected hands. Standard surface electromyogram disc electrodes were applied to the palm and dorsum of both hands. Electrical stimuli were applied to the skin at the base of little and ring fingers of the unaffected hand. Patients were considered abnormal when response was absent or the peak-to-peak amplitude was CRPS during the initial stages, but not in late cases. SSR can be used to document the sympathetic dysfunction in cases having an associated sweating abnormality and may have some diagnostic value in late cases of CRPS, when TPBS is less reliable.

  15. Micro-CT characterization of human trabecular bone in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, John; Albert, Carolyne; Smith, Peter; Molthen, Robert; Harris, Gerald

    2011-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic syndrome affecting collagen synthesis and assembly. Its symptoms vary widely but commonly include bone fragility, reduced stature, and bone deformity. Because of the small size and paucity of human specimens, there is a lack of biomechanical data for OI bone. Most literature has focused on histomorphometric analyses, which rely on assumptions to extrapolate 3-D properties. In this study, a micro-computed tomography (μCT) system was used to directly measure structural and mineral properties in pediatric OI bone collected during routine surgical procedures. Surface renderings suggested a poorly organized, plate-like orientation. Patients with a history of bone-augmenting drugs exhibited increased bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), and connectivity density (Eu.Conn.D). The latter two parameters appeared to be related to OI severity. Structural results were consistently higher than those reported in a previous histomorphometric study, but these differences can be attributed to factors such as specimen collection site, drug therapy, and assumptions associated with histomorphometry. Mineral testing revealed strong correlations with several structural parameters, highlighting the importance of a dual approach in trabecular bone testing. This study reports some of the first quantitative μCT data of human OI bone, and it suggests compelling possibilities for the future of OI bone assessment.

  16. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone and cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2000-01-01

    such as osteoarthrosis and osteoporosis, and for the design, fixation and durability of total joint prosthesis. The specific aims of the present studies were: 1) to investigate normal age-related variations in the mechanical, physical/compositional, and structural properties of human tibial trabecular bone; and 2...... in the properties of trabecular bone and the cartilage-bone complex, and osteoarthrotic specimens were used for the investigation of changes in the mechanical properties of the cartilage-bone complex induced by this disease process. The mechanical properties and physical/compositional properties of trabecular bone...... in the microstructural properties had the same trends for both medial and lateral condyles of the tibia. The observed increase of anisotropy may be interpreted as the consequence of structural adaptation secondary to age-induced bone loss. The aging trabeculae align more strongly to the primary direction, which...

  17. Expression of odontogenic genes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mashhadi Abbas, Fatemeh; Sichani Fallahi, Hamed; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Mahdavi, Nazanin; Bagheri, Seyedeh Sara

    2013-01-01

    .... A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs...

  18. A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Federico, Paolo; Perez, Monica A

    2017-06-01

    A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with spinal cord injury is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following spinal cord injury, the role of cortical targets remain poorly understood. Here, we use 180 pairs of transcranial magnetic stimulation for ∼30 min over the hand representation of the motor cortex at an interstimulus interval mimicking the rhythmicity of descending late indirect (I) waves in corticospinal neurons (4.3 ms; I-wave protocol) or at an interstimulus interval in-between I-waves (3.5 ms; control protocol) on separate days in a randomized order. Late I-waves are thought to arise from trans-synaptic cortical inputs and have a crucial role in the recruitment of spinal motor neurons following spinal cord injury. Motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, paired-pulse intracortical inhibition, spinal motor neuron excitability (F-waves), index finger abduction force and electromyographic activity as well as a hand dexterity task were measured before and after both protocols in 15 individuals with chronic incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and 17 uninjured participants. We found that motor evoked potentials size increased in spinal cord injury and uninjured participants after the I-wave but not the control protocol for ∼30 to 60 min after the stimulation. Intracortical inhibition decreased and F-wave amplitude and persistence increased after the I-wave but not the control protocol, suggesting that cortical and subcortical networks contributed to changes in corticospinal excitability. Importantly, hand motor output and hand dexterity increased in individuals with spinal cord injury after the I-wave protocol. These results provide the first evidence that late synaptic input to corticospinal neurons may represent a novel therapeutic target for improving motor function

  19. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with human insulin genes can secrete insulin stably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Mingyan

    2006-01-01

    Beta-cell replacement therapy by pancreatic islet transplantation has become a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, the limited supply of human islet tissue prevents this therapy from being widely used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. In order to obtain insulin-secreting cells, retrovirus vector pLNCX was used to transfer the human insulin gene into human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow of healthy volunteers and were expanded in vitro. The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify the insulin DNA fragment from a healthy pancreas sample. The recombinant vector pLNCX-Ins was constructed by cloning the insulin DNA fragment into retrovirus vector pLNCX. After being packaged by BD RetroPack PT67 packaging cells, the virus that contained the insulin gene was used to infect hMSCs. Transcription and expression of the insulin gene in transfected hMSCs were examined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The transfected hMSCs stably secreted insulin into culture media for >3 weeks. Thus, insulin gene-transfected hMSCs can secrete insulin and provide a new way to cope with the shortage of beta cells for therapy of type 1 diabetes.

  20. DNA synthesis in human bone marrow is circadian stage dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaaland, R; Laerum, O D; Lote, K; Sletvold, O; Sothern, R B; Bjerknes, R

    1991-06-15

    Fraction of human bone marrow (BM) cells in DNA synthesis has been studied by sampling BM from the sternum or the iliac crests every 4 hours during one 24-hour period in 16 healthy male volunteers. Three of the subjects underwent the sampling procedure twice, resulting in 19 24-hour profiles. The percentage of cells in DNA synthesis measured by flow cytometry demonstrated a large variation along the circadian time scale for each 24-hour profile, with a range of variation from 29% to 339% from lowest to highest value. Seventeen profiles (89.5%) had the highest DNA synthesis during waking hours between 08:00 hours and 20:00 hours, and the lowest percentage of cells in DNA synthesis between 00:00 hours and 04:00 hours. The mean value of the lowest DNA synthesis for each 19 24-hour period was 8.7% +/- 0.6%, while the mean value of the highest DNA synthesis was 17.6% +/- 0.6%, ie, a twofold difference. There was no difference in DNA synthesis between winter and summer. A significantly higher DNA synthesis was demonstrated for samples obtained from sternum as compared with the iliac crests, but the same circadian pattern was demonstrated for both localizations. By taking circadian stage-dependent variations in DNA synthesis into account it may be possible to reduce BM sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapy, to increase the effect of hematopoietic growth factors as well as increase the fraction of proliferating cells with careful selection of time of day for harvesting BM cells for auto- or allografting.

  1. Structure-activity relationship of human bone sialoprotein peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapuano, Bruce E.; MacDonald, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the relationship between the structure of the RGD-containing human bone sialoprotein (hBSP) peptide 278-293 and its attachment activity toward osteoblast-like (MC3T3) cells was investigated. This goal was accomplished by examining the comparative cell attachment activities of several truncated forms of peptide 278-293. Computer modeling of the various peptides was also performed to assess the role of secondary structure in peptide bioactivity. The elimination of the tyrosine-278 at the N-terminus resulted in a more dramatic loss of cell attachment activity compared to the removal of either tyrosine-293 or the arg-ala-tyr (291-293) tripeptide. Although the replacement of the RGD (arg-gly-asp) peptide moiety with peptide KAE (lys-ala-glu) resulted in a dramatic loss of cell attachment activity, a peptide containing RGE (arg-glyglu) in place of RGD retained 70-85 % of the parental peptide's attachment activity. These results suggest that the N-terminal RGD-flanking region of hBSP peptide 278-293, in particular the tyrosine-278 residue, represents a second cell attachment site that stabilizes the RGD-integrin receptor complex. Computer modeling also suggested that a β-turn encompassing RGD or RGE in some of the hBSP peptides may facilitate its binding to integrins by increasing the exposure of the tripeptide. This knowledge may be useful in the future design of biomimetic peptides which are more effective in promoting the attachment of osteogenic cells to implant surfaces in vivo. PMID:24103036

  2. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...

  3. Clinical assessment of bone quality of human extraction sockets after conversion with growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntounis, Athanasios; Geurs, Nico; Vassilopoulos, Philip; Reddy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of mineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA), alone or in combination with growth factors in extraction sockets, on subjective assessment of bone quality during implant placement. Forty-one patients whose treatment plan involved extraction of anterior or premolar teeth were randomized into four groups: Group 1, collagen plug (control); Group 2, FDBA/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/collagen plug; Group 3, FDBA/β-TCP/platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/collagen plug; Group 4, FDBA/β-TCP/recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (rhPDGF-BB)/collagen plug. After 8 weeks of healing, implants were placed. The clinicians assessed bone quality according to the Misch classification. A benchtop calibration exercise test was conducted to evaluate agreement and accuracy of operators in recognizing different bone qualities. Differences were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) or chi-square tests for continuous and categorical data. Pairwise comparisons were tested using least squares means (LS means). Spearman correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the relationship of bone growth with potential confounders. P bone quality, a chi-square test was used to compare the percent correct for each rater. The benchtop calibration exercise test demonstrated agreement among clinicians (0.75 and 0.92 between raters 1 and 2 and raters 1 and 3, respectively). Raters were more likely to identify the correct bone quality (P > .05). Inclusion of bone grafting is associated with a shift from D4 quality to D3 quality bone. Inclusion of PRP in bone grafting eliminates the incidence of D4 bone, establishing D3 and D2 quality bone as prevalent (56% vs. 42%, respectively). Inclusion of rhPDGF-BB and β-TCP in combination with the bone grafting has the same effect, although D2 quality is less prevalent. When compared to sockets grafted with FDBA/β-TCP/collagen plug alone, the sockets with growth factors demonstrated fewer

  4. Sinus grafting using recombinant human tissue factor, platelet-rich plasma gel, autologous bone, and anorganic bovine bone mineral xenograft: histologic analysis and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, Pierre; Daubie, Valéry; Pochet, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze healthy bone formation by means of histology and immunohistochemistry after grafting with a mixture of autologous ground calvarial bone, inorganic xenograft, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and recombinant human tissue factor (rhTF). Maxillary sinus floor augmentation was performed on 3 patients by grafting with 5 to 10 mL of a paste consisting of autologous powder from calvarial bone (diameter plasma), and about 1 microg rhTF. Six and 10 months after grafting, bone cores were extracted for implant fixation and analyzed. Histology demonstrated a high degree of inorganic xenograft integration and natural bone regeneration. Both the xenograft and newly synthesized bone were colonized with osteocytes and surrounded by osteoblasts. Six-month-old bone cores demonstrated a ratio of synthesized bone to xenograft particles ratio of 0.5, whereas 10-month-old cores demonstrated a ratio of 2. A low degree of inflammation could also be observed using S100A8 immunohistochemistry. Autologous grafting in edentulous patients is a complex procedure; the successful substitution of synthetic analogs for ground bone is a major challenge. In this investigation, it was shown that inorganic xenograft in the harvested bone paste could be safe for patients and had high bone regeneration capacity over time. The sinus graft showed intense bone formation 6 months after grafting and a further increase in bone growth 10 months after grafting.

  5. First forensic records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Queiroz

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the first records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil. The cases reported in this study resulted from forensic analysis of six human skeletons found in northeastern Brazil between 2012 and 2014. Traces of tunnels and nests commonly produced by termites were found on several human bone surfaces as well as the specimens and characteristic signs of osteophagic activity. In four cases, the species were identified: Amitermes amifer Silvestri, 1901, Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855 (on two skeletons, and Microcerotermes indistinctus Mathews, 1977. In two other cases, the activity of termites on bone surfaces was evidenced by remains of nests and tunnels produced by these insects. At least in the samples of human remains available for this report, the number of termites collected was greater on bones found during autumn, the rainy season in the Northeast of Brazil. The human bones examined showed termites like insects with lots of strength at bone degradation, capable of continuing the process of decomposition of human remains even in completely skeletonized bodies.

  6. Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis mediated by novel glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors induces bone formation and a unique bone turnover biomarker profile in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, Peter S., E-mail: Peter.Gilmour@astrazeneca.com [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); O' Shea, Patrick J.; Fagura, Malbinder [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Pilling, James E. [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Sanganee, Hitesh [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Wada, Hiroki [R and I IMed, AstraZeneca R and D, Molndal (Sweden); Courtney, Paul F. [DMPK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Kavanagh, Stefan; Hall, Peter A. [Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Escott, K. Jane [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Wnt activation by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) causes bone anabolism in rodents making GSK-3 a potential therapeutic target for osteoporotic and osteolytic metastatic bone disease. To understand the wnt pathway related to human disease translation, the ability of 3 potent inhibitors of GSK-3 (AZD2858, AR79, AZ13282107) to 1) drive osteoblast differentiation and mineralisation using human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) in vitro; and 2) stimulate rat bone formation in vivo was investigated. Bone anabolism/resorption was determined using clinically relevant serum biomarkers as indicators of bone turnover and bone formation assessed in femurs by histopathology and pQCT/μCT imaging. GSK-3 inhibitors caused β-catenin stabilisation in human and rat mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated hADSC commitment towards osteoblasts and osteogenic mineralisation in vitro. AZD2858 produced time-dependent changes in serum bone turnover biomarkers and increased bone mass over 28 days exposure in rats. After 7 days, AZD2858, AR79 or AZ13282107 exposure increased the bone formation biomarker P1NP, and reduced the resorption biomarker TRAcP-5b, indicating increased bone anabolism and reduced resorption in rats. This biomarker profile was differentiated from anabolic agent PTH{sub 1–34} or the anti-resorptive Alendronate-induced changes. Increased bone formation in cortical and cancellous bone as assessed by femur histopathology supported biomarker changes. 14 day AR79 treatment increased bone mineral density and trabecular thickness, and decreased trabecular number and connectivity assessed by pQCT/μCT. GSK-3 inhibition caused hADSC osteoblastogenesis and mineralisation in vitro. Increased femur bone mass associated with changes in bone turnover biomarkers confirmed in vivo bone formation and indicated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. - Highlights: • Wnt modulation with 3 novel GSK-3 inhibitors alters bone growth. • Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis

  7. Double nerve intraneural interface implant on a human amputee for robotic hand control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Paolo M; Micera, Silvestro; Benvenuto, Antonella; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Cavallo, Giuseppe; Citi, Luca; Cipriani, Christian; Denaro, Luca; Denaro, Vincenzo; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ferreri, Florinda; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Rigosa, Jacopo; Rossini, Luca; Tombini, Mario; Dario, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The principle underlying this project is that, despite nervous reorganization following upper limb amputation, original pathways and CNS relays partially maintain their function and can be exploited for interfacing prostheses. Aim of this study is to evaluate a novel peripheral intraneural multielectrode for multi-movement prosthesis control and for sensory feed-back, while assessing cortical reorganization following the re-acquired stream of data. Four intrafascicular longitudinal flexible multielectrodes (tf-LIFE4) were implanted in the median and ulnar nerves of an amputee; they reliably recorded output signals for 4 weeks. Artificial intelligence classifiers were used off-line to analyse LIFE signals recorded during three distinct hand movements under voluntary order. Real-time control of motor output was achieved for the three actions. When applied off-line artificial intelligence reached >85% real-time correct classification of trials. Moreover, different types of current stimulation were determined to allow reproducible and localized hand/fingers sensations. Cortical organization was observed via TMS in parallel with partial resolution of symptoms due to the phantom-limb syndrome (PLS). tf-LIFE4s recorded output signals in human nerves for 4 weeks, though the efficacy of sensory stimulation decayed after 10 days. Recording from a number of fibres permitted a high percentage of distinct actions to be classified correctly. Reversal of plastic changes and alleviation of PLS represent corollary findings of potential therapeutic benefit. This study represents a breakthrough in robotic hand use in amputees. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone scan and joint scan of hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis; Scintigraphie osseuse et articulaire des mains et des pieds dans la polyarthrite rhumatoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, N.; Verbeke, S.; Perdrisot, R.; Grilo, R.M.; Quenesson, E.; Bonnet, C.; Vergne, P.; Treves, R.; Bertin, P.; Boutros-Toni, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Dupuytren, Faculte de Medecine, 87 - Limoges (France)

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of joint scan and bone scan of hands and feet, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to localize the altered joints. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of joint scan were determined in comparison with clinical joint assessment. Fifteen patients (780 joints) were clinically examined (pain and synovitis); during the same day, a bone scan and a joint scan were realized by oxidronate {sup 99m}Tc intravenous injection. Patients were scanned 5 minutes (tissual time, T{sub t}) and 3 hours 1/4 (bone time, T{sub 0}) after the administration. The uptake of the bi-phosphonate was evaluated with a qualitative method using a grey scale. The uptake of {sup 99m}Tc oxidronate was quantitated using an extra-articular region of interest. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the scan at Tt were 46%, 96%, 85% et 78%. The same parameters were 75%, 66%, 53% and 84% for the scan realized at T{sub 0}. The joint scan has showed 22% of false positive. These false positives could be a consequence of an earlier detection of joint alterations by scan. The joint scan should forecast the evolution of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  9. Relationship between subsinus bone height and bone volume requirements for dental implants: a human radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecka, Dana; Simunek, Antonin; Brazda, Tomas; Rota, Martin; Slezak, Radovan; Capek, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the vertical dimension of subsinus alveolar bone that is available for placement of endosseous implants. Subsinus alveolar bone height (SBH) was determined via radiographs and categorized into three groups: Group A corresponded to SBH 9 mm. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon paired test with the threshold for statistical significance set at P minimum in the area of the first molar, and increases again significantly in the second molar region. From a clinical point of view, the lateral window technique of sinus elevation remains the dominant augmentative procedure in the molar area, whereas in the premolar area, less invasive alternative methods may be more appropriate.

  10. Serum cytokine profiles of children with human enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gan, Xing; Song, Juan; Sun, Peng; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Cytokine profiles may impact the pathogenicity and severity of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by human enterovirus (HEV) 71. In 91 severe or mild HEV 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease children, serum was collected between days 2 and 10 or day >10. Serum cytokines including Type 1 T helper (Th1) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12, and IL-18, Type 1 T helper (Th2) cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), were assessed during the early stage and recovery. In the patients with mild illness, the peaks of IL-8 and IL-10 were observed on day 6 and that of IL-18 was on day 4. In the patients with severe illness, all cytokines spiked on day 3 and peaked on day 11. All cytokines except IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly correlated with immunoglobulin M levels by the end of the disease course. Cytokine profile variations between the patients with mild and severe illness may indicate prognosis and strain virulence, useful in clinical treatment of patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Hand-held optoacoustic probe for three-dimensional imaging of human morphology and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We report on a hand-held imaging probe for real-time optoacoustic visualization of deep tissues in three dimensions. The proposed solution incorporates a two-dimensional array of ultrasonic sensors densely distributed on a spherical surface, whereas illumination is performed coaxially through a cylindrical cavity in the array. Visualization of three-dimensional tomographic data at a frame rate of 10 images per second is enabled by parallel recording of 256 time-resolved signals for each individual laser pulse along with a highly efficient GPUbased real-time reconstruction. A liquid coupling medium (water), enclosed in a transparent membrane, is used to guarantee transmission of the optoacoustically generated waves to the ultrasonic detectors. Excitation at multiple wavelengths further allows imaging spectrally distinctive tissue chromophores such as oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin. The performance is showcased by video-rate tracking of deep tissue vasculature and three-dimensional measurements of blood oxygenenation in a healthy human volunteer. The flexibility provided by the hand-held hardware design, combined with the real-time operation, makes the developed platform highly usable for both small animal research and clinical imaging in multiple indications, including cancer, inflammation, skin and cardiovascular diseases, diagnostics of lymphatic system and breast

  12. Plasticity of human handedness: decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Weigelt, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Athletes frequently have to adapt their skills to fast changes of play, often requiring the flexible execution of a particular movement skill with either hand. To assess the influence of sport-specific expertise and extensive sport training on human laterality, a video analysis of regular basketball games was performed for professional, semi-professional, and amateur players to investigate how non-dominant hand use and proficiency change with increasing expertise. Our results showed that the right-hand (i.e. dominant hand) bias in basketball players is reduced with increasing expertise (i.e., competitive level). Accordingly, we found that professional players use their non-dominant hand more often and with greater success than semi-professional and amateur players. This was true for most of the basketball-specific skills. Based on these results, we assume that increasing amounts of bilateral practice can lead to a shift in task-specific manual preference towards a higher use of both hands in competition, as well as to a higher proficiency for non-dominant hand actions in particular. From an applied perspective, the more frequent use and higher proficiency of the non-dominant hand in professional basketball players, compared with amateurs, suggests that the context-specific and skilled use of the non-dominant hand is crucial for successful play at higher competitive levels in the sport of basketball.

  13. Platelet lysate favours in vitro expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for bone and cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, S H; Ottonello, A; Strada, P; Cancedda, R; Mastrogiacomo, M

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneous population of non-haematopoietic cells residing in the bone marrow (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and the different fractions and components obtained from platelet-rich plasma provide an invaluable source of autologous cells and growth factors for bone and other connective tissue reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the effect of an allogenic platelet lysate on human BMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Cell proliferation and number of performed cell doublings were enhanced in cultures supplemented with the platelet-derived growth factors (platelet lysate, PL), either with or without the concomitant addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS), compared to cultures performed in the presence of FBS and FGF2. Both in vitro and in vivo osteogenic differentiation were unaltered in cells maintained in medium supplemented with PL and not FBS (Only PL) and in cells maintained in medium containing FBS and FGF2. Interestingly, the in vitro cartilage formation was more effective in the pellet of BMSCs expanded in the Only PL medium. In particular, a chondrogenic differentiation was observed in pellets of some in vitro-expanded BMSCs in the Only PL medium, whereas pellets from parallel cell cultures in medium containing FBS did not respond to the chondrogenic induction. We conclude that the platelet lysate from human source is an effective and even more beneficial substitute for fetal bovine serum to support the in vitro expansion of human BMSCs for subsequent tissue-engineering applications. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. No Effect of TETRA Hand Portable Transmission Signals on Human Cognitive Function and Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2010-01-01

    Current radio frequency radiation exposure guidelines rest on well-established thermal effects. However, recent research into analogue and digital transmission fields at levels covered by the exposure guidelines has indicated possible detrimental effects on human cognitive performance....... To investigate this, we conducted a controlled climate chamber study of possible changes in cognitive performance in healthy volunteers exposed to transmission signals from TETRA hand portables (TETRA handsets). The trial deployed a balanced, randomized, double-blinded cross-over design. Performance on different...... paper-and-pencil, auditory and computer-based cognitive tasks was monitored in 53 male volunteers (mean age 36.41 years, SD 8.35) during 45-min exposure to a TETRA handset and sham control signals remotely controlled from a laboratory more than 100 km away. The main cognitive outcome was the Trail...

  15. Cross-modal recognition of shape from hand to eyes in human newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streri, Arlette

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis that the ability to coordinate information between tactual and visual modalities is present at birth and dependent on perceptual inherent structures was tested in human newborns. Using an intersensory paired-preference procedure, we showed that newborns can visually recognize the shape of an object that they have previously manipulated with their right hand, out of sight. This is an experimental evidence that newborns can extract shape information in a tactual format and transform it in a visual format before they have had the opportunity to learn from the pairings of visual and tactual experience. This is contrary to a host of theories and models of perceptual learning, both traditional (empiricist philosophers) and modern (connectionist).

  16. Numerical estimation of bone density and elastic constants distribution in a human mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, J M; García-Aznar, J M; Domínguez, J; Doblaré, M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we try to predict the distribution of bone density and elastic constants in a human mandible, based on the stress level produced by mastication loads using a mathematical model of bone remodelling. These magnitudes are needed to build finite element models for the simulation of the mandible mechanical behavior. Such a model is intended for use in future studies of the stability of implant-supported dental prostheses. Various models of internal bone remodelling, both phenomenological and more recently mechanobiological, have been developed to determine the relation between bone density and the stress level that bone supports. Among the phenomenological models, there are only a few that are also able to reproduce the level of anisotropy. These latter have been successfully applied to long bones, primarily the femur. One of these models is here applied to the human mandible, whose corpus behaves as a long bone. The results of bone density distribution and level of anisotropy in different parts of the mandible have been compared with various clinical studies, with a reasonable level of agreement.

  17. [Obesity and bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecki, Michał; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Wiecek, Andrzej; Nieszporek, Teresa; Zak-Gołab, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Both bone and adipose tissue change their size, shape and distribution during the whole human being's life. Many factors, including genetic factors, hormones and activity of nervous system are responsible for these changes. It is generally accepted that obesity has a protective effect on bone tissue. On the other hand some authors present an opposite results--the lack of beneficial effect of obesity on development of osteoporosis fractures. The aim of this article was to present and discuss the relations between adipose tissue and bone metabolism.

  18. Optimized demineralization of human cancellous bone by application of a vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Mark J; Rooney, Paul; Kearney, John N

    2015-07-01

    Human demineralized bone matrix derived from cortical bone is used by surgeons due to its ability to promote bone formation. There is also a need for shaped demineralized bone matrices made from cancellous bone, where the properties of the material allow its insertion into defects, therefore acting as a void filler and scaffold onto which new bone can form. In this study, we report that demineralized bone sponges were prepared by dissecting and cutting knee bone into cancellous bone cubes of 1 cm(3) . These cubes were then taken through a series of warm water washes, some with sonication, centrifugation, and two decontamination chemical washes. The cubes were optimally demineralized into sponges with 0.5N hydrochloric acid under vacuum with constant pH measurement. Demineralization was confirmed by quantitative measurement of calcium and qualitatively by compression. The sponges were freeze dried before terminal sterilisation with a target dose of 25 kGy gamma radiation whilst frozen. Samples of the sponges were histologically examined for calcium and collagen and also tested for osteoinductivity. Data showed well defined collagen staining in the sponges, with little residual calcium. Sponges from two out of three donors demonstrated osteoinductivity when implanted into the muscle of an athymic mouse. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of bone quantity and quality in human trabeculae using scanning ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi

    Fractures and associated bone fragility induced by osteoporosis and osteopenia are widespread health threat to current society. Early detection of fracture risk associated with bone quantity and quality is important for both the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and consequent complications. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is an engineering technology for monitoring bone quantity and quality of humans on earth and astronauts subjected to long duration microgravity. Factors currently limiting the acceptance of QUS technology involve precision, accuracy, single index and standardization. The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy and precision of an image-based QUS technique for non-invasive evaluation of trabecular bone quantity and quality by developing new techniques and understanding ultrasound/tissue interaction. Several new techniques have been developed in this dissertation study, including the automatic identification of irregular region of interest (iROI) in bone, surface topology mapping (STM) and mean scattering spacing (MSS) estimation for evaluating trabecular bone structure. In vitro results have shown that (1) the inter- and intra-observer errors in QUS measurement were reduced two to five fold by iROI compared to previous results; (2) the accuracy of QUS parameter, e.g., ultrasound velocity (UV) through bone, was improved 16% by STM; and (3) the averaged trabecular spacing can be estimated by MSS technique (r2=0.72, prisk by monitoring of bone's quality. The developed QUS imaging technique can be used to assess bone's quantity and quality with improved accuracy and precision.

  20. Biofilm formation by staphylococci on fresh, fresh-frozen and processed human and bovine bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, M; Tafin, U F; Bizzini, A; Trampuz, A; Ilchmann, T

    2013-01-30

    Biofilm formation is a multi-step process influenced by surface properties. We investigated early and mature biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus on 4 different biological calcium phosphate (CaP) bone grafts used for filling bone defects. We investigated standardised cylinders of fresh and fresh-frozen human bone grafts were harvested from femoral heads; processed humanand bovine bone grafts were obtained preformed. Biofilm formation was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB) using S. aureus (ATCC 29213) with static conditions. Biofilm density after 3 h (early biofilm) and 24 h (mature biofilm) was investigated by sonication and microcalorimetry. After 3 h, bacterial density was highest on fresh-frozenandfresh bone grafts. After 24 h, biofilm density was lowest on freshbone grafts (p  0.05). The lowest increase in bacterial density was detected on fresh bone grafts (p bone grafts showed minor structural differences in architecture but marked differences concerning serum coverage and the content of bone marrow, fibrous tissue and bone cells. These variations resulted in a decreased biofilm density on freshand fresh-frozenbone grafts after 24 h, despite an increased early biofilm formation and might also be responsible for the variations in colony morphology (small colonies). Detection of small colony variants by microcalorimetry might be a new approach to improve the understanding of biofilm formation.

  1. Radiocarbon dating of charred human bone remains preserved in urns excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Sagawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Kanehara, Masaaki; Tsuchimoto, Norio; Minami, Masayo; Omori, Takayuki; Okuno, Mitsuru; Ohta, Tomoko

    2010-04-01

    For a preliminary test of 14C dating of cremated human remains, we have collected charred bone and wood-charcoal fragments from cremated remains contained in cinerary urns that had been excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery at the Hoenji temple in Aichi prefecture, central Japan. More than 230 urn vessels were discovered from the excavated area of ca. 14 m wide and 14 m long. The identification of charred bone or charcoal fragments among the remains was performed by observation of surface appearance, inspection of fine structures by a microscope, bubble formation during the HCl treatments in preparing target material for AMS 14C dating, carbon and nitrogen contents, δ13C and δ15N values of the fragments. All 14C ages obtained for the samples that were identified as charred bone remains were almost consistent with the archeological age estimated based on typological analysis of respective urns. On the other hand, some 14C ages for the remains identified as wood charcoal, which had been produced from firewood or a wooden coffin during the cremation, were not consistent with archeological estimation, shifting toward older 14C ages, most probably as the result of old wood effect.

  2. Radiocarbon dating of charred human bone remains preserved in urns excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio, E-mail: nakamura@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.j [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sagawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Tetsuya [Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Properties, Nakain, Nara 630-8392 (Japan); Kanehara, Masaaki [School of Science Education, Nara University of Education, Takabatake, Nara 630-8528 (Japan); Tsuchimoto, Norio [Ichinomiya City Museum, Yamato, Ichinomiya 491-0922 (Japan); Minami, Masayo [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Okuno, Mitsuru [Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, Jonan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ohta, Tomoko [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    For a preliminary test of {sup 14}C dating of cremated human remains, we have collected charred bone and wood-charcoal fragments from cremated remains contained in cinerary urns that had been excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery at the Hoenji temple in Aichi prefecture, central Japan. More than 230 urn vessels were discovered from the excavated area of ca. 14 m wide and 14 m long. The identification of charred bone or charcoal fragments among the remains was performed by observation of surface appearance, inspection of fine structures by a microscope, bubble formation during the HCl treatments in preparing target material for AMS {sup 14}C dating, carbon and nitrogen contents, delta{sup 13}C and delta{sup 15}N values of the fragments. All {sup 14}C ages obtained for the samples that were identified as charred bone remains were almost consistent with the archeological age estimated based on typological analysis of respective urns. On the other hand, some {sup 14}C ages for the remains identified as wood charcoal, which had been produced from firewood or a wooden coffin during the cremation, were not consistent with archeological estimation, shifting toward older {sup 14}C ages, most probably as the result of old wood effect.

  3. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Klein, Melanie; Proske, Judith; Werno, Christian; Schneider, Katharina; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Rack, Brigitte; Buchholz, Stefan; Ganzer, Roman; Blana, Andreas; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Nitsche, Ulrich; Männel, Daniela N; Klein, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD) comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  4. Bare hands and attention: evidence for a tactile representation of the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslett, H Branch; Lie, Eunhui

    2004-01-01

    If brain lesions impair the allocation of attention to a representation of the body surface and the hand may serve as an attentional focus or "wand", one might expect that somatosensory deficits caused by cerebral lesions would be ameliorated by contact with the ipsilesional hand. To test this prediction, tactile detection tasks were administered to two subjects with right hemisphere lesions. Subject CB's left tactile extinction was investigated in conditions in which the degree of contact between the right and left hands and the spatial relationship between his hands was systematically varied. His left tactile extinction was significantly reduced by touch of the right hand. Similarly, extinction at the left knee was ameliorated by touch of the knee by the right hand; touch of the right foot had no effect. Subject NC's ability to detect a tactile stimulus delivered to the left side was systematically assessed in conditions in which the hands touched and the spatial relationship between the hands was varied. His ability to detect a touch on the left hand improved in conditions in which the left hand was touched by the right hand. This effect was not observed if direct contact between the two hands was prevented by inserting a thin cloth between the hands. For both subjects, placing the right hand in close proximity to the left hand or altering the spatial location of the hands relative to the body did not influence performance. These data demonstrate that the hand may serve as a conduit for attention and provide strong evidence for a distinct representation of the body surface that is at least in part independent of spatial representations.

  5. Skeletal maturation in individuals with Down's syndrome: Comparison between PGS curve, cervical vertebrae and bones of the hand and wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauber Carinhena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted with the aim of adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the pubertal growth spurt (PGS curve. It also aimed to test the reliability and agreement between those methods and the method of hand and wrist radiograph when compared two by two and all together. METHODS: The sample comprised 72 radiographs, with 36 lateral radiographs of the head and 36 hand-wrist radiographs of 36 subjects with Down's syndrome (DS, 13 female and 23 male, aged between 8 years and 6 months and 18 years and 7 months, with an average age of 13 years and 10 months. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Results revealed that adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the curve of PGS is practical and useful in determining the stage of growth and development of individuals. The stages of maturation evaluated by cervical vertebrae and ossification centers observed in radiographs of the hand and wrist were considered reliable, with excellent level of agreement between the methods by Hassel and Farman as well as Baccetti, Franchi and McNamara Jr and Martins and Sakima. Additionally, results revealed an agreement that ranged between reasonable to good for the three methods used to assess the skeletal maturation, showing statistical significance.

  6. Bringing transcranial mapping into shape: Sulcus-aligned mapping captures motor somatotopy in human primary motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Motor representations express some degree of somatotopy in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND), but within-M1HAND corticomotor somatotopy has been difficult to study with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we introduce a “linear” TMS mapping approach based on the individual shape...... motor threshold. We pseudorandomly stimulated six targets located on a straight mediolateral line corresponding to the overall orientation of the central sulcus with a fixed coil orientation of 45° to the mid-sagittal line (STRAIGHT-450 FIX) or seven targets in the posterior part of the crown...

  7. Beyond the functional matrix hypothesis: a network null model of human skull growth for the formation of bone articulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial sutures and synchondroses form the boundaries among bones in the human skull, providing functional, developmental and evolutionary information. Bone articulations in the skull arise due to interactions between genetic regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic factors such as functional matrices (soft tissues and cranial cavities), which mediate bone growth. These matrices are largely acknowledged for their influence on shaping the bones of the skull; however, it is not fully understood to what extent functional matrices mediate the formation of bone articulations. Aiming to identify whether or not functional matrices are key developmental factors guiding the formation of bone articulations, we have built a network null model of the skull that simulates unconstrained bone growth. This null model predicts bone articulations that arise due to a process of bone growth that is uniform in rate, direction and timing. By comparing predicted articulations with the actual bone articulations of the human skull, we have identified which boundaries specifically need the presence of functional matrices for their formation. We show that functional matrices are necessary to connect facial bones, whereas an unconstrained bone growth is sufficient to connect non-facial bones. This finding challenges the role of the brain in the formation of boundaries between bones in the braincase without neglecting its effect on skull shape. Ultimately, our null model suggests where to look for modified developmental mechanisms promoting changes in bone growth patterns that could affect the development and evolution of the head skeleton. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  8. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Bone and Muscle Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Julie; Gregor, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Bone and Muscle Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) met at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on October 4-6, 2009 to discuss the areas of current and future research targeted by the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Using evidence-based knowledge as a background for identified risks to astronaut health and performance, NASA had identified gaps in knowledge to address those risks. Ongoing and proposed tasks were presented to address the gaps. The charge to the Bone and Muscle Risk SRP was to review the gaps, evaluate whether the tasks addressed these gaps and to make recommendations to NASA s HRP Science Management Office regarding the Panel's review. The Bone and Muscle Risk SRP consisted of scientists who are experts in muscle, bone, or both and could evaluate the existing evidence with sufficient knowledge of the potential effects of long duration exposure to microgravity. More important, although expertise in basic science is important, the SRP was requested to evaluate the practicality of the proposed efforts in light of the realistic demands placed on the HRP. In short, all tasks presented in the Integrated Research Plan (IRP) should address specific questions related to the challenges faced by the astronauts as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity. All tasks proposed to fill the gaps in knowledge should provide applied, translational data necessary to answer the specific questions. Several presentations were made to the SRP during the site visit and the SRP spent sufficient time to address the panel charge, either as a group or in separate sessions for the Bone and Muscle Risk subgroups. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist, Dr. John B. Charles, on October 6, 2009. Taking the evidence and identified risks as givens, the SRP concluded that 1) integration of information should lead to a more comprehensive approach to identifying the gaps, 2) not all tasks addressed the gaps as

  9. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...

  10. Decellularized bone extracellular matrix and human dental pulp stem cells as a construct for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Alom, Noura; Amer, Mahetab; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Dental pulp tissue represents a source of mesenchymal stem cells that have a strong differentiation potential towards the osteogenic lineage. The objective of the current study was to examine in vitro osteogenic induction of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on hydrogel scaffolds derived from decellularized bone extracellular matrix (bECM) compared to collagen type I (Col-I), the major component of bone matrix. DPSCs in combination with bECM hydrogels were cultured under three different conditions: basal medium, osteogenic medium and medium supplemented with growth factors (GFs) and cell growth, mineral deposition, gene and protein expression were investigated. The DPSCs/bECM hydrogel constructs cultured in basal medium showed that cells were viable after three weeks and that the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were significantly upregulated in the absence of extra osteogenic inducers compared to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. In addition, the protein expression levels of BSP and osteocalcin were higher on bECM with respect to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, DPSCs/bECM hydrogels cultured with osteogenic or GFs supplemented medium displayed a higher upregulation of the osteo-specific markers compared to Col-I hydrogels in identical media. Collectively, our results demonstrate that bECM hydrogels might be considered as suitable scaffolds to support osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  11. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

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    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  12. Heavy metals in human bones in different historical epochs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, M J; Moreno, J M; Moreno-Clavel, J; Vergara, N; García-Sánchez, A; Guillamón, A; Portí, M; Moreno-Grau, S

    2005-09-15

    The concentration of the metals lead, copper, zinc, cadmium and iron was determined in bone remains belonging to 30 individuals buried in the Region of Cartagena dating from different historical periods and in eight persons who had died in recent times. The metals content with respect to lead, cadmium and copper was determined either by anodic stripping voltammetry or by atomic absorption spectroscopy on the basis of the concentrations present in the bone remains. In all cases, zinc and iron were quantified by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lead concentrations found in the bone remains in our city are greater than those reported in the literature for other locations. This led to the consideration of the sources of these metals in our area, both the contribution from atmospheric aerosols as well as that from the soil in the area. Correlation analysis leads us to consider the presence of the studied metals in the analysed bone samples to be the consequence of analogous inputs, namely the inhalation of atmospheric aerosols and diverse contributions in the diet. The lowest values found in the studied bone remains correspond to the Neolithic period, with similar contents to present-day samples with respect to lead, copper, cadmium and iron. As regards the evolution over time of the concentrations of the metals under study, a clear increase in these is observed between the Neolithic period and the grouping made up of the Bronze Age, Roman domination and the Byzantine period. The trend lines used to classify the samples into 7 periods show that the maximum values of lead correspond to the Roman and Byzantine periods. For copper, this peak is found in the Byzantine Period and for iron, in the Islamic Period. Zinc shows an increasing tendency over the periods under study and cadmium is the only metal whose trend lines shows a decreasing slope.

  13. Decoding Individual Finger Movements from One Hand Using Human EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jania; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG) signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA). These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26%) in all subjects (pEEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies. PMID:24416360

  14. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Liao

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA. These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26% in all subjects (p<0.05. The present study suggests the similar movement-related spectral changes in EEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies.

  15. Human bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip for studying metastatic colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano-Kruik, Alessandro; Nava, Michele Maria; Yeager, Keith; Chramiec, Alan; Hao, Luke; Robinson, Samuel; Guo, Edward; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2018-02-06

    Eight out of 10 breast cancer patients die within 5 years after the primary tumor has spread to the bones. Tumor cells disseminated from the breast roam the vasculature, colonizing perivascular niches around blood capillaries. Slow flows support the niche maintenance by driving the oxygen, nutrients, and signaling factors from the blood into the interstitial tissue, while extracellular matrix, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal stem cells regulate metastatic homing. Here, we show the feasibility of developing a perfused bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip to investigate the progression and drug resistance of breast cancer cells colonizing the bone. The model is a functional human triculture with stable vascular networks within a 3D native bone matrix cultured on a microfluidic chip. Providing the niche-on-a-chip with controlled flow velocities, shear stresses, and oxygen gradients, we established a long-lasting, self-assembled vascular network without supplementation of angiogenic factors. We further show that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have undergone phenotypical transition toward perivascular cell lineages, support the formation of capillary-like structures lining the vascular lumen. Finally, breast cancer cells exposed to interstitial flow within the bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip persist in a slow-proliferative state associated with increased drug resistance. We propose that the bone perivascular niche-on-a-chip with interstitial flow promotes the formation of stable vasculature and mediates cancer cell colonization.

  16. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

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    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  17. Identification of Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 3 as a Novel Gene Affecting Human Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brum, A M; Leije, M; J, Schreuders-Koedam

    2017-01-01

    involved in osteoblast differentiation of human bone marrow–derived MSCs (hMSCs). We identified the gene chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3) to be strongly upregulated during MSC-derived osteoblast differentiation. Lentiviral overexpression of CLIC3 in hMSCs caused a 60% increase of matrix......-fold increase in bone formation (0.33% versus 5.05% bone area relative to scaffold). Using a Clic3-His-tagged pull-down assay and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LS/MS)-based proteomics analysis in lysates of osteogenically differentiated hMSCs, we showed that CLIC3 interacts with NIMA...

  18. What do we currently know from in vivo bone strain measurements in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P F; Brüggemann, G-P; Rittweger, J

    2011-03-01

    Bone strains are the most important factors for osteogenic adaptive responses. During the past decades, scientists have been trying to describe the relationship between bone strain and bone osteogenic responses quantitatively. However, only a few studies have examined bone strains under physiological condition in humans, owing to technical difficulty and ethical restrictions. The present paper reviews previous work on in vivo bone strain measurements in humans, and the various methodologies adopted in these measurements are discussed. Several proposals are made for future work to improve our understanding of the human musculoskeletal system. Literature suggests that strains and strain patterns vary systematically in response to different locomotive activities, foot wear, and even different venues. The principal compressive, tension and engineering shear strain, compressive strain rate and shear strain rate in the tibia during running seem to be higher than those during walking. The high impact exercises, such as zig-zag hopping and basketball rebounding induced greater principal strains and strain rates in the tibia than normal activities. Also, evidence suggests an increase of tibia strain and strain rate after muscle fatigue, which strongly supports the opinion that muscle contractions play a role on the alteration of bone strain patterns.

  19. Human saliva exposure modulates bone cell performance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, Susanne; Steinberg, Thorsten; Keller, Constantin; Wolkewitz, Martin; Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad, Margit; Finkenzeller, Guenter; Hannig, Christian; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Various situations encountered by a clinician during the daily routine including surgical periodontitis therapy, dental implant insertion, or tooth extraction involve the contact of saliva with the jaw bone. However, there are only sparse data concerning the influence of saliva on bone cells. Saliva specimens were incorporated within culture medium and administered to murine MC3T3 osteoblasts, of which the morphology (REM), proliferation (EZ4U), and differentiation (qRT-PCR, alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix calcification) were assessed. Simultaneously, the composition of saliva media was analyzed with respect to the content of lactoferrin, activities of classical salivary enzymes, and the ability to provoke inflammatory cytokine production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. The morphology, proliferation, and expression of differentiation-associated genes were seriously handicapped by saliva contact. Saliva-touched cells exhibited less alkaline phosphatase but normal levels of extracellular matrix mineralization. Saliva-containing culture media featured physiological activities of salivary enzymes and considerable amounts of lactoferrin but almost completely lacked salivary alkaline phosphatase and unspecific proteases. Upon saliva incubation, MC3T3 osteoblasts did not release noteworthy levels of interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although saliva is generally considered to vitalize oral tissues, this study reveals that it harms osteoblast-like cells more due to the presence of salivary enzymes than by triggering of inflammation. This issue is clinically relevant because it broadens the understanding of the bone cell fate within the rather complex cosmos of the oral cavity thereby providing a basis for clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. It seems to be reasonable to restrict the contact period between saliva and bone.

  20. Human maxillary sinus floor elevation as a model for bone regeneration enabling the application of one-step surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farre-Guasch, E.; Prins, H.J.; Overman, J.R.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Helder, M.N.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss in the oral and maxillofacial region caused by trauma, tumors, congenital disorders, or degenerative diseases is a health care problem worldwide. To restore (reconstruct) these bone defects, human or animal bone grafts or alloplastic (synthetic) materials have been used. However, several

  1. Human Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation as a Model for Bone Regeneration Enabling the Application of One-Step Surgical Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farre-Guasch, E.; Prins, H.J.; Overman, J.R.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Helder, M.N.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss in the oral and maxillofacial region caused by trauma, tumors, congenital disorders, or degenerative diseases is a health care problem worldwide. To restore (reconstruct) these bone defects, human or animal bone grafts or alloplastic (synthetic) materials have been used. However, several

  2. SERPINB2 is a novel TGFβ-responsive lineage fate determinant of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β1, a multifunctional regulator of cell growth and differentiation, is the most abundant bone matrix growth factor. During differentiation of human bone stromal cells (hBMSCs), which constitute bone marrow osteoblast (OS) and adipocyte (AD) progenitor cells, continuous TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treat...

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Human Bone in Cryoprobe Freezing as Related to Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle E; Baldini, Todd; Lindeque, Bennie G

    2017-03-01

    Cryoprobes create localized cell destruction through freezing. Bone is resistant to temperature flow but is susceptible to freezing necrosis at warmer temperatures than tumor cells. Few studies have determined the thermal conductivity of human bone. No studies have examined conductivity as related to density. The study goal was to examine thermal conductivity in human bone while comparing differences between cancellous and cortical bone. An additional goal was to establish a relationship between bone density and thermal conductivity. Six knee joints from 5 cadavers were obtained. The epiphyseal region was sliced in half coronally prior to inserting an argon-circulating cryoprobe directed away from the joint line. Thermistor thermometers were placed perpendicularly at measured increments, and the freezing cycle was recorded until steady-state conditions were achieved. For 2 cortical samples, the probe was placed intramedullary in metaphyseal samples and measurements were performed radially from the central axis of each sample. Conductivity was calculated using Fournier's Law and then plotted against measured density of each sample. Across samples, density of cancellous bone ranged from 0.86 to 1.38 g/mL and average thermal conductivity ranged between 0.404 and 0.55 W/mK. Comparatively, cortical bone had a density of 1.70 to 1.86 g/mL and thermal conductivity of 0.0742 to 0.109 W/mK. A strong 2-degree polynomial correlation was seen (R2=0.8226, P<.001). Bone is highly resistant to temperature flow. This resistance varies and inversely correlates strongly with density. This information is clinically relevant to maximize tumor ablation while minimizing morbidity through unnecessary bone loss and damage to surrounding structures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):90-94.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

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    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  5. The relationship between porosity and specific surface in human cortical bone is subject specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerebours, C; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G; Buenzli, P R; Pivonka, P

    2015-03-01

    A characteristic relationship for bone between bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and specific surface (BS/TV) has previously been proposed based on 2D histological measurements. This relationship has been suggested to be bone intrinsic, i.e., to not depend on bone type, bone site and health state. In these studies, only limited data comes from cortical bone. The aim of this paper was to investigate the relationship between BV/TV and BS/TV in human cortical bone using high-resolution micro-CT imaging and the correlations with subject-specific biometric data such as height, weight, age and sex. Images from femoral cortical bone samples of the Melbourne Femur Collection were obtained using synchrotron radiation micro-CT (SPring8, Japan). Sixteen bone samples from thirteen individuals were analysed in order to find bone volume fraction values ranging from 0.20 to 1. Finally, morphological models of the tissue microstructure were developed to help explain the relationship between BV/TV and BS/TV. Our experimental findings indicate that the BV/TV vs BS/TV relationship is subject specific rather than intrinsic. Sex and pore density were statistically correlated with the individual curves. However no correlation was found with body height, weight or age. Experimental cortical data points deviate from interpolating curves previously proposed in the literature. However, these curves are largely based on data points from trabecular bone samples. This finding challenges the universality of the curve: highly porous cortical bone is significantly different to trabecular bone of the same porosity. Finally, our morphological models suggest that changes in BV/TV within the same sample can be explained by an increase in pore area rather than in pore density. This is consistent with the proposed mechanisms of age-related endocortical bone loss. In addition, these morphological models highlight that the relationship between BV/TV and BS/TV is not linear at high BV/TV as suggested in the

  6. Restoration of a Critical Mandibular Bone Defect Using Human Alveolar Bone-Derived Stem Cells and Porous Nano-HA/Collagen/PLA Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal bone defects occur in a wide variety of clinical situations. Adult stem cell- and biomaterial-based bone tissue regeneration are a promising alternative to natural bone grafts. Recent evidence has demonstrated that two populations of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs can be distinguished based on their embryonic origins. These BMSCs are not interchangeable, as bones preferentially heal using cells that share the same embryonic origin. However, the feasibility of tissue engineering using human craniofacial BMSCs was unclear. The goal of this study was to explore human craniofacial BMSC-based therapy for the treatment of localized mandibular defects using a standardized, minimally invasive procedure. The BMSCs’ identity was confirmed. Scanning electron microscopy, a cell proliferation assay, and supernatant detection indicated that the nHAC/PLA provided a suitable environment for aBMSCs. Real-time PCR and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays demonstrated that osteogenic markers were upregulated by osteogenic preinduction. Moreover, in a rabbit critical-size mandibular bone defect model, total bone formation in the nHAC/PLA + aBMSCs group was significantly higher than in the nHAC/PLA group but significantly lower than in the nHAC/PLA + preinduced aBMSCs. These findings demonstrate that this engineered bone is a valid alternative for the correction of mandibular bone defects.

  7. Evaluation of human hand thermal images using wavelet transform based local spatial features - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthi, S S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2013-01-01

    Transform-based spatial analyses of medical Infrared (IR) images are found to be useful to extract local information, which can be used to identify the abnormalities associated with in region of interest. In this work, human hand infrared images are analyzed by extracting local spatial features using wavelet transform method. The images for this study were acquired using uncooled micro bolometer with focal plane array technology based medical IR camera with dedicated software having high array resolution and spectral response under controlled protocol. The acquired images were decomposed into Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) using bidimensional empirical mode decomposition. Extrema points were detected using eight connected neighbor window method and interpolated using thin plate spline interpolation technique to generate IMFs. The edge information were extracted from local phase of the first IMF. Edges were detected using phase congruency measure by applying Gabor function based wavelet transform. The results showed that it was possible to detect edges from only the first IMF without being influenced by other IMFs. It was further observed that the edge intermittence that arises due to noise component was reduced by treating images with local phase distributions. Hence, it appears that the edge information extraction could enhance the diagnostic relevance of thermal image analysis.

  8. A Study on Decoding Models for the Reconstruction of Hand Trajectories from the Human Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gi Yeom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decoding neural signals into control outputs has been a key to the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. While many studies have identified neural correlates of kinematics or applied advanced machine learning algorithms to improve decoding performance, relatively less attention has been paid to optimal design of decoding models. For generating continuous movements from neural activity, design of decoding models should address how to incorporate movement dynamics into models and how to select a model given specific BCI objectives. Considering nonlinear and independent speed characteristics, we propose a hybrid Kalman filter to decode the hand direction and speed independently. We also investigate changes in performance of different decoding models (the linear and Kalman filters when they predict reaching movements only or predict both reach and rest. Our offline study on human magnetoencephalography (MEG during point-to-point arm movements shows that the performance of the linear filter or the Kalman filter is affected by including resting states for training and predicting movements. However, the hybrid Kalman filter consistently outperforms others regardless of movement states. The results demonstrate that better design of decoding models is achieved by incorporating movement dynamics into modeling or selecting a model according to decoding objectives.

  9. The human touch: skin temperature during the rubber hand illusion in manual and automated stroking procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Rohde

    Full Text Available A difference in skin temperature between the hands has been identified as a physiological correlate of the rubber hand illusion (RHI. The RHI is an illusion of body ownership, where participants perceive body ownership over a rubber hand if they see it being stroked in synchrony with their own occluded hand. The current study set out to replicate this result, i.e., psychologically induced cooling of the stimulated hand using an automated stroking paradigm, where stimulation was delivered by a robot arm (PHANToM(TM force-feedback device. After we found no evidence for hand cooling in two experiments using this automated procedure, we reverted to a manual stroking paradigm, which is closer to the one employed in the study that first produced this effect. With this procedure, we observed a relative cooling of the stimulated hand in both the experimental and the control condition. The subjective experience of ownership, as rated by the participants, by contrast, was strictly linked to synchronous stroking in all three experiments. This implies that hand-cooling is not a strict correlate of the subjective feeling of hand ownership in the RHI. Factors associated with the differences between the two designs (differences in pressure of tactile stimulation, presence of another person that were thus far considered irrelevant to the RHI appear to play a role in bringing about this temperature effect.

  10. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  11. Assessing land-use change using the trace element chemistry of human bones (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, R. E.; Darrah, T. H.; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Reconstruction of environmental life histories using the elemental chemistry of biominerals is becoming common in ecological research. Less common is the application of these approaches to reconstruct environmental records from human bones. Here we present trace element data from human long bone of various ages and environments. Specifically samples from poorhouse burials in Rochester, NY (1750’s) and Buffalo, NY (1855) and a pioneer burial site in Mt. Morris, NY (1810) and associated soil samples were analyzed by ICP-MS. Based on differences in soil type, geology, groundwater chemistry, diet, bone pathology, life style at time of death (diet etc.) we reconstructed environmental life histories of the three populations as well as identified differences between individuals attributable to life style. These data reveal the potential of human bone trace element chemistry to provide retrospective information regarding land-use. Using human bone chemistry of populations within a single area is it possible to assess long-term changes in land-use as reflective of diet, occupation, etc.

  12. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R prevents experimental human breast cancer bone metastasis in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Zhang, Yong; Matsumoto,Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Yamamoto, Mako; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a lethal and morbid late stage of breast cancer that is currently treatment resistant. More effective mouse models and treatment are necessary. High bone-metastatic variants of human breast cancer cells were selected in nude mice by cardiac injection. After cardiac injection of a high bone-metastatic variant of breast cancer, all untreated mice had bone metastases compared to only 20% with parental cells. Treatment with tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R completely...

  13. Characterization of human cancellous and subchondral bone with respect to electro physical properties and bone mineral density by means of impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yvonne; Wurm, Andreas; Köckerling, Martin; Schick, Christoph; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Computational simulation of electrical bone stimulation of the electrical and dielectric parameters of osteoarthritic bone tissue is useful for an exact patient-individual adaptation of the bone models. Therefore, we investigated electrical and dielectric parameters at a frequency of 20Hz of cancellous and subchondral human femoral head bone samples. Furthermore, the mechanical properties and the bone mineral density (BMD) were determined. Finally, these data were compared with the electrical and dielectric parameters. The bone samples were taken from patients with hip osteoarthritis. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of cancellous bone amounted to 0.043S/m and 8.1⋅106. BMD of the bone samples determined by dual-x-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) and ashing resulted in 193 ± 70mg/cm² and 286 ± 59mg/cm³ respectively. Structural modulus (ES) and ultimate compression strength (σmax) were measured with 227 ± 94N/mm² and 6.5 ± 3.4N/mm². No linear correlation of the electrical and dielectric parameters compared with BMD and mechanical properties of cancellous bone samples was found. Electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of subchondral bone resulted in 0.029S/m and 8.97×106. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationships among ultrasonic and mechanical properties of cancellous bone in human calcaneus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Dreher, Maureen L; Sadoughi, Saghi; Zhu, Shan; Keaveny, Tony M

    2017-10-01

    Clinical bone sonometers applied at the calcaneus measure broadband ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound. However, the relation of ultrasound measurements to bone strength is not well-characterized. Addressing this issue, we assessed the extent to which ultrasonic measurements convey in vitro mechanical properties in 25 human calcaneal cancellous bone specimens (approximately 2×4×2cm). Normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation, speed of sound, and broadband ultrasound backscatter were measured with 500kHz transducers. To assess mechanical properties, non-linear finite element analysis, based on micro-computed tomography images (34-micron cubic voxel), was used to estimate apparent elastic modulus, overall specimen stiffness, and apparent yield stress, with models typically having approximately 25-30 million elements. We found that ultrasound parameters were correlated with mechanical properties with R=0.70-0.82 (pmechanical properties beyond that provided by bone quantity alone (p≤0.05). Adding ultrasound variables to linear regression models based on bone quantity improved adjusted squared correlation coefficients from 0.65 to 0.77 (stiffness), 0.76 to 0.81 (apparent modulus), and 0.67 to 0.73 (yield stress). These results indicate that ultrasound can provide complementary (to bone quantity) information regarding mechanical behavior of cancellous bone. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  17. Noninvasive optical measurement of bone marrow lesions: a Monte Carlo study on visible human dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow is both the main hematopoietic and important immune organ. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a series of severe complications and even myeloma. The traditional diagnosis of BMLs rely on mostly bone marrow biopsy/ puncture, and sometimes MRI, X-ray, and etc., which are either invasive and dangerous, or ionizing and costly. A diagnosis technology with advantages in noninvasive, safe, real-time continuous detection, and low cost is requested. Here we reported our preliminary exploration of feasibility verification of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in clinical diagnosis of BMLs by Monte Carlo simulation study. We simulated and visualized the light propagation in the bone marrow quantitatively with a Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media and Visible Chinese Human data set, which faithfully represents human anatomy. The results indicate that bone marrow actually has significant effects on light propagation. According to a sequence of simulation and data analysis, the optimal source-detector separation was suggested to be narrowed down to 2.8-3.2cm, at which separation the spatial sensitivity distribution of NIRS cover the most region of bone marrow with high signal-to-noise ratio. The display of the sources and detectors were optimized as well. This study investigated the light transport in spine addressing to the BMLs detection issue and reported the feasibility of NIRS detection of BMLs noninvasively in theory. The optimized probe design of the coming NIRS-based BMLs detector is also provided.

  18. The state of human bone tissue during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, V. S.; Rakhmanov, A. S.; Novikov, V. E.; Zatsepin, S. T.; Rodionova, S. S.; Cann, Ch.

    The results of studying the bone tissue of cosmonauts after the flights (4-8 month) have been compared to the data of investigating the healthy individuals during head-down tilt (HDT, 370 days). Noninvasive methods (computer tomography, gammaphoton absorptiometry) revealed a decrease in the vertebral spongy mineral density or a increase of this parameter by a similar magnitude versus the individual preflight values in some cosmonauts. During studies of clinical cases of osteoporosis it was shown that the vertebral mineral density ratios and presence or absence of vertebral compression fractures in different age groups are nonequal.

  19. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106 were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans.

  20. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα stimulates the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rougier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports that TNF-α is a potent mitogen for human bone marrow sternal cells in vitro (assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counts. In contrast, cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, LIF, SCF, M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect. The effect of TNF-α on the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells could be of importance during inflammatory processes which take place in the marrow, for example marrow fibrosis.

  1. Statistical analysis of the spontaneously emitted photon signals from palm and dorsal sides of both hands in human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E.P.A. van; Wijk, R.V.; Bajpai, R.P.; Greef, J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Photon signals emitted spontaneously from dorsal and palm sides of both hands were recorded using 6000 time windows of size T=50. ms in 50 healthy human subjects. These photon signals demonstrated universal behaviour by variance and mean. The data sets for larger time windows up to T=50. s were

  2. The fighting hypothesis in combat : How well does the fighting hypothesis explain human left-handed minorities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Ton G.G.; McManus, I.C.; Schaafsma, Sara M.; Geuze, Reint H.; McGrew, WC; Schiefenhovel, W; Marchant, LF

    The strong population bias in hand preference in favor of right-handedness seems to be a typical human trait. An elegant evolutionary hypothesis explaining this trait is the so-called fighting hypothesis that postulates that left-handedness is under frequency-dependent selection. The fighting

  3. (Not) Made by the human hand: media consciousness and immediacy in the cultural production of the real

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, M.

    2011-01-01

    Taking its examples from the realm of popular religion and popular culture, this essay shows how sensations of im-mediacy are sought and produced in a great number of fantasy scripts. Some of these scripts seek to undo media-awareness: concealing or denying the involvement of the human hand they

  4. In vivo measurement of mechanical properties of human long bone by using sonic sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, M. Jayed, E-mail: zed.hossain06@gmail.com; Rahman, M. Moshiur, E-mail: razib-121@yahoo.com; Alam, Morshed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Vibration analysis has evaluated as non-invasive techniques for the in vivo assessment of bone mechanical properties. The relation between the resonant frequencies, long bone geometry and mechanical properties can be obtained by vibration analysis. In vivo measurements were performed on human ulna as a simple beam model with an experimental technique and associated apparatus. The resonant frequency of the ulna was obtained by Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) analysis of the vibration response of piezoelectric accelerometer. Both elastic modulus and speed of the sound were inferred from the resonant frequency. Measurement error in the improved experimental setup was comparable with the previous work. The in vivo determination of bone elastic response has potential value in screening programs for metabolic bone disease, early detection of osteoporosis and evaluation of skeletal effects of various therapeutic modalities.

  5. On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Barth, Holly D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-03-09

    Akin to other mineralized tissues, human cortical bone can resist deformation and fracture due to the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans the molecular to macroscopic length-scales. Deformation at the smallest scales, mainly through the composite action of the mineral and collagen, contributes to bone?s strength or intrinsic fracture resistance, while crack-tip shielding mechanisms active on the microstructural scale contribute to the extrinsic fracture resistance once cracking begins. The efficiency with which these structural features can resist fracture at both small and large length-scales becomes severely degraded with such factors as aging, irradiation and disease. Indeed aging and irradiation can cause changes to the cross-link profile at fibrillar length-scales as well as changes at the three orders of magnitude larger scale of the osteonal structures, both of which combine to inhibit the bone's overall resistance to the initiation and growth of cracks.

  6. Elastic interactions between single microcrack and single osteon microstructure of human femur cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, N. N.; Daud, R.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Mat, F.; Bajuri, Y.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    Inmultiscale Haversian system of cortical bone fracture, a homogenous bone modeling consideration is limited to only one Young modulus was significant for each cortex without having any constituents in that bone. A two dimension model of human femur cortical bone is presented by considering the anatomical positions of four cortices, e.g anterior, posterior, medial and lateral. The Haversian system is modeled under tensile loading by considering the interstitial matrix, osteon and cement line mechanical properties. The interaction between single microcrack and single osteon is evaluated using linear elastic fracture mechanics theory, and was determined using of stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and the critical stress intensity factor and critical strain energy release rate parameter. The results indicate that the medial cortex has the highest SIFs while the lowest was posterior cortex. The Young modulus of material was greatly influence the fracture parameters. More stiff the material, the SIF was reduced.

  7. Real-time control of a prosthetic hand using human electrocorticography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Hirata, Masayuki; Saitoh, Youichi; Goto, Tetsu; Kishima, Haruhiko; Fukuma, Ryohei; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2011-06-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) offers patients with severe motor disabilities greater independence by controlling external devices such as prosthetic arms. Among the available signal sources for the BMI, electrocorticography (ECoG) provides a clinically feasible signal with long-term stability and low clinical risk. Although ECoG signals have been used to infer arm movements, no study has examined its use to control a prosthetic arm in real time. The authors present an integrated BMI system for the control of a prosthetic hand using ECoG signals in a patient who had suffered a stroke. This system used the power modulations of the ECoG signal that are characteristic during movements of the patient's hand and enabled control of the prosthetic hand with movements that mimicked the patient's hand movements. A poststroke patient with subdural electrodes placed over his sensorimotor cortex performed 3 types of simple hand movements following a sound cue (calibration period). Time-frequency analysis was performed with the ECoG signals to select 3 frequency bands (1-8, 25-40, and 80-150 Hz) that revealed characteristic power modulation during the movements. Using these selected features, 2 classifiers (decoders) were trained to predict the movement state--that is, whether the patient was moving his hand or not--and the movement type based on a linear support vector machine. The decoding accuracy was compared among the 3 frequency bands to identify the most informative features. With the trained decoders, novel ECoG signals were decoded online while the patient performed the same task without cues (free-run period). According to the results of the real-time decoding, the prosthetic hand mimicked the patient's hand movements. Offline cross-validation analysis of the ECoG data measured during the calibration period revealed that the state and movement type of the patient's hand were predicted with an accuracy of 79.6% (chance 50%) and 68.3% (chance 33.3%), respectively

  8. The combined bone forming capacity of human periosteal derived cells and calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Scott J; Geris, Liesbet; Kerckhofs, Greet; Desmet, Eline; Schrooten, Jan; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-07-01

    Current knowledge suggests that the periosteum, a fibrous tissue which covers the surface of all bones, contains a population of progenitor cells which mediate the repair of bone defects. In an effort to optimise the utilisation of this source of cells for bone engineering, herein we describe the rational selection of calcium phosphate (CaP) containing materials, based on biomaterial properties, and evaluation of their combined bone forming capacity. Five different commercially available orthopaedic 3D matrices composed of CaP particles in an open collagen network (NuOss™, CopiOs™, Bio-Oss(®), Collagraft™ and Vitoss(®)) were evaluated in vitro and in vivo with human periosteal derived cells (hPDCs). It was found that the cell-material combinations behaved quite differently in vivo, despite apparent in vitro similarities in gene expression profiles. Bone formation was highest within the NuOss™/hPDC implant at 13.03%, which also contained the highest incidence of bone marrow formation. The bone formed in this implant was chimeric with approximately 65% originating from implanted cells. Upon analysis of human specific gene expression, although it was found that predominantly osteogenic differentiation was observed within NuOss™/hPDC implants, a lesser induction of chondrogenic genes was also observed. The formation of a cartilage intermediate was confirmed by histology. Additionally the NuOss™/hPDC implant integrated into the mouse environment with apparent active scaffold resorption. This study demonstrates the importance of matching a cell support/biological matrix with a cell type and subsequently has outlined parameters which can be used for the rational selection of biomaterials for bone engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tensile material properties of human tibia cortical bone effects of orientation and loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Manoogian, Sarah J; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify effects of both specimen orientation and loading rate on the tensile material properties for human tibia cortical bone in a controlled study. This study presents 25 human tibia cortical bone coupon tests obtained from the mid-diaphysis of two fresh frozen male human cadavers: 11 axial and 14 lateral. The primary component for the tension coupon testing was a high rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor. The specimen were loaded at a constant strain rate of approximately 0.05 strains/s, 0.5 strains/s, or 5.0 strains/s. Axial specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress and ultimate strain compared to lateral specimens for all loading rates, and a significantly larger modulus for low and high loading rates. This finding illustrates the anisentropic behavior of bone over a range of strain rates, which is attributed to the microstructure of the bone and the osteon orientation along the long axis of the bone. With respect to loading rate, both axial and lateral specimens showed significant increases in the modulus and significant decreases in ultimate strain with increased loading rate. Although not significant, axial specimens showed another traditional viscoelastic trend, with ultimate stress increasing with increased loading rate.

  10. Establishment of an experimental human lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1BM with high bone metastases potency by {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Shunfang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)], E-mail: yzyg@sh163.net; Dong Qianggang [Laboratory of Mol-diagnosis, Shanghai Cancer Institute of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yao Ming [Laboratory of Pathology, Shanghai Cancer Institute of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi Meiping [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ye Jianding [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhao Langxiang [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Su Jianzhong; Gu Weiyong [Shanghai Thoracic Tumor Institute, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Xie Wenhui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Chest Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wang Kankan; Du Yanzhi [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Ruijin Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Li Yao [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huang Yan [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: huangyan@fudan.edu.cn

    2009-04-15

    Background: Bone metastasis is one of the most common clinical phenomena of late stage lung cancer. A major impediment to understanding the pathogenesis of bone metastasis has been the lack of an appropriate animal and cell model. This study aims to establish human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with highly bone metastases potency with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy. Methods: The human lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells SPC-A-1 were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of NIH-Beige-Nude-XID (NIH-BNX) immunodeficient mice. The metastatic lesions of tumor-bearing mice were imaged with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy on a Siemens multi-single photon emission computed tomography. Pinhole images were acquired on a GZ-B conventional gamma camera with a self-designed pinhole collimator. The mice with bone metastasis were sacrificed under deep anesthesia, and the lesions were resected. Bone metastatic cancer cells in the resected lesions were subjected for culture and then reinoculated into the NIH-BNX mice through left cardiac ventricle. The process was repeated for eight cycles to obtain a novel cell subline SPC-A-1BM. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to compare the gene expression differences in the parental and SPC-A-1BM cells. Results: The bone metastasis sites were successfully revealed by bone scintigraphy. The established bone metastasis cell line SPC-A-1BM had a high potential to metastasize in bone, including mandible, humerus, thoracic vertebra, lumbar, femur, patella, ilium and cartilage rib. The expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor gene family, Bcl-2 and cell adhesion-related genes ECM1, ESM1, AF1Q, SERPINE2 and FN1 were examined. Gene expression difference was found between parental and bone-seeking metastasis cell SPC-A-1BM, which indicates SPC-A-1BM has metastatic capacity vs. its parental cells. Conclusion: SPC-A-1BM is a bone-seeking metastasis human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Bone scintigraphy may be used as

  11. Impaired prehension is associated with lesions of the superior and inferior hand representation within the human cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küper, Michael; Brandauer, Barbara; Thürling, Markus; Schoch, Beate; Gizewski, Elke R; Timmann, Dagmar; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-05-01

    Impairment of patients with cerebellar disease in prehension is well recognized. So far specific localizations within the human cerebellum associated with the impairment have rarely been assessed. To address this question we performed voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) in patients with chronic focal cerebellar lesions in relation to specific deficits in prehensile movements. Patients with stroke within the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (n = 13) or the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) territory (n = 7) and corresponding control subjects were included in the study. Participants reached out, grasped, and lifted an object with either the left or right hand and with fast or normal movement speed. Both kinematic and grip-force parameters were recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging anatomical scans of the cerebellum were acquired, and lesions were marked as regions of interest. For VLSM analysis, a nonparametric test (Brunner-Munzel) was applied. Cerebellar patients showed clear abnormalities in hand transport (impaired movement speed and straightness) and, to a lesser degree, in hand shaping (increased finger touch latencies) while grip function was preserved. Deficits were most prominent in patients with SCA lesions and for ipsilesional, fast movements. Disorders in hand transport may be more difficult to compensate than deficits in hand shaping and grip-force control in chronic focal lesions of the cerebellum because of higher demands on predictive control of interaction torques. Lesions of the superior cerebellar cortex (lobules IV, V, VI) were associated with slower hand transport, whereas lesions of both superior (lobules VI, V, VI) and inferior cerebellar cortex (lobules VII, VIII) were associated with impaired movement straightness. These findings show that both the superior and inferior hand representations within the cerebellum contribute to hand transport during prehensile movements; however, they may have a different functional role.

  12. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Xiao, Ran; Gonzalez, Jania; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG) signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA). These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26%) in all subjects (psignals using noninvasive technologies.

  13. On the applicability of bovine morsellized cortico-cancellous bone as a substitute for human morsellized cortico-cancellous bone for in vitro mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Knut B; Foss, Olav A; Skallerud, Bjørn

    2008-12-05

    Morsellized cortico-cancellous bone (MCB) is frequently used in orthopaedic revision surgery to restore lost bone stock. In this study, we examine the validity of using bovine MCB as a substitute for human MCB in in vitro mechanical testing of bone grafts. The paper describes the fat and water content of impacted and unimpacted human and bovine MCB. During this work we applied constrained compression testing to describe the elastic, plastic and time dependent response. Nearly all parameters were found to be significantly different and were influenced differently by impaction for the two types of MCB. The denser trabecular structure, higher fat content of bovine MCB and higher stiffness and compressive strength of cortical bovine bone may explain the differences observed. Consequently we are not confident about the applicability of bovine MCB as a substitute for human MCB for in vitro mechanical testing.

  14. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Jie-Yuan; Jia, Wei-Tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration.

  15. METHOD OF PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICAL PROCEDURES FOR THERMAL IMPACT ON SELECTED AREAS WITH HUMAN HANDS THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Sulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The device for thermal impact on separate zones of a hand of the person executed on the basis of thermoelectric converters of energy is considered. The advantages consisting in high environmental friendliness, noiselessness, reliability, functionality, universality are noted it. The technique of carrying out medical (preventive physiotherapeutic procedures, the hands of the person consisting in contrast thermal impact on a site with various level of heating and cooling, and also lasting expositions is described.

  16. Hand posture classification using electrocorticography signals in the gamma band over human sensorimotor brain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H.; Foster, Brett L.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Parvizi, Josef; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface systems translate recorded neural signals into command signals for assistive technology. In individuals with upper limb amputation or cervical spinal cord injury, the restoration of a useful hand grasp could significantly improve daily function. We sought to determine if electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain sufficient information to select among multiple hand postures for a prosthetic hand, orthotic, or functional electrical stimulation system.Approach. We recorded ECoG signals from subdural macro- and microelectrodes implanted in motor areas of three participants who were undergoing inpatient monitoring for diagnosis and treatment of intractable epilepsy. Participants performed five distinct isometric hand postures, as well as four distinct finger movements. Several control experiments were attempted in order to remove sensory information from the classification results. Online experiments were performed with two participants. Main results. Classification rates were 68%, 84% and 81% for correct identification of 5 isometric hand postures offline. Using 3 potential controls for removing sensory signals, error rates were approximately doubled on average (2.1×). A similar increase in errors (2.6×) was noted when the participant was asked to make simultaneous wrist movements along with the hand postures. In online experiments, fist versus rest was successfully classified on 97% of trials; the classification output drove a prosthetic hand. Online classification performance for a larger number of hand postures remained above chance, but substantially below offline performance. In addition, the long integration windows used would preclude the use of decoded signals for control of a BCI system. Significance. These results suggest that ECoG is a plausible source of command signals for prosthetic grasp selection. Overall, avenues remain for improvement through better electrode designs and placement, better participant training

  17. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  18. Influence of Environmental Factors and Relationships between Vanadium, Chromium, and Calcium in Human Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Lanocha-Arendarczyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of environmental factors on the concentrations of vanadium (V, chromium (Cr, and calcium (Ca and to examine the synergistic or antagonistic relationships between these metals, in cartilage (C, cortical bone (CB, and spongy bone (SB samples obtained following hip joint surgery on patients with osteoarthritis in NW Poland. We found significantly higher concentrations of V and Cr in spongy bone in patients who consumed game meat and also those with prosthetic implants. Chromium levels were significantly lower in patients with kidney diseases. The greatest positive correlations were found between spongy bone V and (i the amount of consumed beer and (ii seafood diet. Correlation analysis also showed a significant correlation between Cr levels and seafood diet. To a certain extent these results indicate that the concentrations of V, Cr, and Ca in the human hip joint tissues are connected with occupational exposure, kidney diseases, diet containing game meat, sea food, beer, and the presence of implants. Furthermore, we noted new types of interactions in specific parts of the femoral head. Vanadium may contribute to the lower bone Ca levels, especially in the external parts (cartilage and cortical bone.

  19. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  20. Influence of Environmental Factors and Relationships between Vanadium, Chromium, and Calcium in Human Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Kolodziej, Lukasz; Budis, Halina; Safranow, Krzysztof; Kot, Karolina; Ciosek, Zaneta; Tomska, Natalia; Galant, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of environmental factors on the concentrations of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), and calcium (Ca) and to examine the synergistic or antagonistic relationships between these metals, in cartilage (C), cortical bone (CB), and spongy bone (SB) samples obtained following hip joint surgery on patients with osteoarthritis in NW Poland. We found significantly higher concentrations of V and Cr in spongy bone in patients who consumed game meat and also those with prosthetic implants. Chromium levels were significantly lower in patients with kidney diseases. The greatest positive correlations were found between spongy bone V and (i) the amount of consumed beer and (ii) seafood diet. Correlation analysis also showed a significant correlation between Cr levels and seafood diet. To a certain extent these results indicate that the concentrations of V, Cr, and Ca in the human hip joint tissues are connected with occupational exposure, kidney diseases, diet containing game meat, sea food, beer, and the presence of implants. Furthermore, we noted new types of interactions in specific parts of the femoral head. Vanadium may contribute to the lower bone Ca levels, especially in the external parts (cartilage and cortical bone).

  1. Do Porous Titanium Granule Grafts Affect Bone Microarchitecture at Augmented Maxillary Sinus Sites? A Pilot Split-Mouth Human Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Dursun, Ceyda Kanli; Eratalay, Kenan; Orhan, Kaan; Celik, Hakan Hamdi; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical study was to analyze the bone microarchitecture at augmented maxillary sinus sites by using different materials in patients to compare the effect of porous titanium granules as a sinus augmentation material with bone microstructural features. Eight subjects with bilateral atrophic posterior maxilla of residual bone height Dental) and xenograft (1 g) + porous titanium (1 g) granules (Natix; Tigran Technologies AB). Sixteen human bone biopsy samples were taken from patients receiving two-stage sinus augmentation therapy during implant installation and analyzed using microcomputerized tomography. Three-dimensional bone structural parameters were analyzed in details: tissue volume, bone volume, percentage of bone volume, bone surface and bone surface density, bone specific surface, trabecular thickness trabecular separation, trabecular number, trabecular pattern factor, structural model index, fractal dimension, and bone mineral density. No statistically significant differences were found between groups according to bone structural parameters. Porous titanium grafts may ensure a space for new bone formation in the granules, which may be a clinical advantage for long-term success.

  2. Human-Computer Interaction Based on Hand Gestures Using RGB-D Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Llorente

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new method for hand gesture recognition based on an RGB-D sensor. The proposed approach takes advantage of depth information to cope with the most common problems of traditional video-based hand segmentation methods: cluttered backgrounds and occlusions. The algorithm also uses colour and semantic information to accurately identify any number of hands present in the image. Ten different static hand gestures are recognised, including all different combinations of spread fingers. Additionally, movements of an open hand are followed and 6 dynamic gestures are identified. The main advantage of our approach is the freedom of the user’s hands to be at any position of the image without the need of wearing any specific clothing or additional devices. Besides, the whole method can be executed without any initial training or calibration. Experiments carried out with different users and in different environments prove the accuracy and robustness of the method which, additionally, can be run in real-time.

  3. Selective inhibition of B lymphocytes in TBTC-treated human bone marrow long-term culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carfi', M.; Bowe, G.; Pieters, R.; Gribaldo, L.

    2010-01-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTC) is well known for its immunotoxic effect, in particular towards immature thymocytes. TBTC is also known to induce adipocyte differentiation in primary human bone marrow cultures, which is reflected in the decrease in a number of adipocyte-derived cytokines, chemokines and

  4. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  5. Improved performance of aging human mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, H.A.D.C.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, an improvement in general life conditions has led to an increace in human life span but, concomitantly, also led to an increasing incidence of bone related disorders. A substancial effort has been placed in the development of new techologies to overcome current limitations of

  6. Spontaneous gene transfection of human bone cells using 3D mineralized alginate-chitosan macrocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of nonviral gene therapy remains uncertain because of low transfection efficiencies and high toxicities compared with viral-based strategies. We describe a simple system for transient transfection of continuous human cell lines, with low toxicity, using mineral-coated chitosan and alginate capsules. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate transfection of Saos-2 and MG63 human osteosarcoma continuous cell lines with gfp, LacZ reporter genes, and a Sox-9 carrying plasmid, to illustrate expression of a functional gene with therapeutic relevance. We show that continuous cell lines transfect with significant efficiency of up to 65% possibly through the interplay between chitosan and DNA complexation and calcium/phosphate-induced translocation into cells entrapped within the 3D polysaccharide based environment, as evidenced by an absence of transfection in unmineralized and chitosan-free capsules. We demonstrated that our transfection system was equally effective at transfection of primary human bone marrow stromal cells. To illustrate, the Sox-9, DNA plasmid was spontaneously expressed in primary human bone marrow stromal cells at 7 days with up to 90% efficiency in two repeats. Mineralized polysaccharide macrocapsules are gene delivery vehicles with a number of biological and practical advantages. They are highly efficient at self-transfecting primary bone cells, with programmable spatial and temporal delivery prospects, premineralized bone-like environments, and have no cytotoxic effects, as compared with many other nonviral systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in demineralized, lyophilized or frozen human bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antebi, Uri; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: uri@usp.br, E-mail: mathor@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Guimaraes, Rodrigo P., E-mail: clinicaguimaraes@gmail.com [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCM/SCSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2015-07-01

    The aim is the study of the application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electron) as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, the demineralized bone tissue frozen and freeze-dried for use in transplants. Five human femoral diaphysis of different donors demineralized bone tissues were preserved as lyophilized or frozen at - 80 deg C. The samples were divided into non-irradiated groups (control) and irradiated by gamma rays or electron beam. The bone proteins were extracted and used to determine the concentrations of total protein, BMP 2 and 7. It was observed a decrease in total protein concentrations, and BMP 2 and 7. The decrease in total protein concentrations, as compared to respective control groups was significant in the lyophilized and frozen samples irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy gamma radiation and beam electrons with greater than 30% reduction. The significant decrease in the levels of BMP 2 and 7 were also observed in higher doses and especially by electron beam. The reductions in the concentrations of total protein and osteoinductive proteins (BMP 2 and 7), were related to the radiation dose, i.e., increase with higher doses of ionizing radiation type and the type of preservation of the bones. The largest reductions in concentrations were observed in bone irradiated by electron beam and at a dose of 50 kGy. But this type of radiation and this high dose are not usual practice for the sterilization of bone tissue. Keywords: demineralized bone tissue, ionizing radiation, Tissue Bank, BMP 2, BMP 7, bone proteins. (author)

  8. Mineralization of human bone tissue under hypokinesia and physical exercise with calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Verentsov, Grigori E.; Abratov, Nikolai I.

    It has been suggested that physical exercise and calcium supplements may be used to prevent demineralization of bone tissue under hypokinesia (diminished muscular activity). Thus, the aim of this study was to determine mineral content of bones of 12 physically healthy men aged 19-24 years under 90 days of hypokinesia and intensive physical exercise (PE) with calcium lactate (C) supplements. They were divided into experimental and control groups with 6 men in each. The experimental group of men were subjected to hypokinesia (HK) and intensive PE and took 650 mg C 6 times per day; the control group was placed under pure HK, i.e. without the use of any preventive measures. The mineral content of different bone tissues was measured with a densitometric X-ray method in milligrams of calcium per 1 mm 3 before and after exposure to HK. The level of bone density of the examined bone tissues decreased by 7-9% and 5-7% for the control and experimental groups of men, respectively. A statistical analysis revealed that the reduction of bone mineralization was significant with P bone density changes in the control and experimental groups of men failed to demonstrate significant differences. It was concluded that the level of mineralization of bone tissues decreased under hypokinesia and physical exercise with calcium supplements. Experimental studies of hypokinetic physiology are generally based on the assumption that diminished muscular activity (progressive reduction of number of steps per day) is detrimental to animal and human organisms, since the entire animal kingdom had been formed in an environment of high motor activity which left its imprint on the evolution, structure, function and behaviour of animals and men. The impossibility of the body tissues to retain optimum amounts of fluid and electrolytes is the dominant hypokinetic effect.

  9. Bone metabolism markers and angiogenic cytokines as regulators of human hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Terpos, Evangelos; Boutsikas, Georgios; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Anargyrou, Konstantinos; Lalou, Eleni; Dimitrakopoulou, Aglaia; Kalpadakis, Christina; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Siakantaris, Marina; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Angelopoulou, Maria K

    2017-06-28

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization involves cleavage of ligands between HSC and niche components. However, there are scarce data regarding the role of bone cells in human HSC mobilization. We studied biochemical markers of bone metabolism and angiogenic cytokines during HSC mobilization in 46 patients' sera with lymphoma and multiple myeloma, by ELISA. Significant changes between pre-mobilization and collection samples were found: (1) Bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) increased, indicating augmentation of bone formation; (2) Receptor activator of Nf-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio (RANKL/OPG) increased, showing osteoclastic differentiation and survival; however, there was no evidence of increased osteoclastic activity; and (3) Angiopoietin-1/Angiopoietin-2 ratio (ANGP-1/ANGP-2) decreased, consistent with vessel destabilization. Poor mobilizers had significantly higher carboxy-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (CTX) and lower ANGP-1 at pre-mobilization samples, compared to good ones. CTX, amino-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (NTX) and ANGP-1 pre-mobilization levels correlated significantly with circulating CD34 + peak cell counts. Our results indicate that bone formation and vessel destabilization are the two major events during human HSC mobilization. Osteoblasts seem to be the orchestrating cells, while osteoclasts are stimulated but not fully active. Moreover, ANGP-1, CTX and NTX may serve as predictors of poor mobilization.

  10. Characterization of bone diagenesis by histology in forensic contexts: a human taphonomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Yann; Colard, Thomas; Cannet, Catherine; Mesli, Vadim; Hédouin, Valéry; Penel, Guillaume; Ludes, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    The diagenesis of a bone in the postmortem period causes an identifiable deterioration in histology. This degradation is characterized by a collagenous alteration, which can be observed very early. In order to develop a method for determining a postmortem interval for medico-legal use, two ribs collected from six human bodies were studied prospectively over 2 years. Each bone was studied after staining with Sirius red to demonstrate the degradation of collagen as a function of time. This study demonstrated a time-based bone alteration characterized by the architectural degradation of the lamellar bone, without any microbial influence in this postmortem period. The staining was carried out by using Sirius red and correlated this alteration with a collagenic degradation by chemical hydrolysis owing to the affinity of this dye to the amino acids lysine, hydroxylysine, and arginine. Our work asserts that human bone samples that were studied in a controlled environment and analyzed for 24 months underwent a diagenetic trajectory whose main element was collagen hydrolysis.

  11. Variations in bone density across the body of the immature human mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Erin F; Farella, Mauro; Hoffman, Jakobus; Kramer, Beverley

    2017-05-01

    During growth the mandible accommodates increases in biomechanical loading resulting from changes in the function of structures of the oral cavity. Biomechanical loads are thought to play an intricate and vital role in the modelling and remodelling of bone, with site-specific effects on bone mineral density. It is anticipated that the effects of this loading on bone mineral density are intensified during the functional transition from prenatal to postnatal stages. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate changes in bone mineral density across the body of the immature human mandible during the early stages of dental development. The study sample included 45 human mandibles, subdivided into three age groups: prenatal (30 gestational weeks to birth; n = 15); early postnatal (birth to 12 months; n = 18); and late postnatal (1-5 years; n = 12). Mandibles were scanned using X-ray micro-computed tomography. Eight landmarks were selected along the buccal/labial and lingual surfaces of each dental crypt for evaluation of the bone mineral density. Bone mineral density values were calculated using a reference standard and analysed using multivariate statistics. The bone mineral density of the lingual surface was found to be significantly higher (P ≤ 0.000) than that of the buccal/labial surface. Furthermore, bone mineral density in the alveolar region of the buccal/labial surface of the deciduous central incisor (P ≤ 0.001), the deciduous first molar (P ≤ 0.013) and lingual alveolar area of the deciduous second molar (P ≤ 0.032) were significantly greater in the early postnatal period than in the prenatal period. While changes in bone mineral density across the lingual surface were consistent with the progression of development and the biomechanical demand of the tongue as previously demonstrated, changes observed across the buccal/labial surface of the mandible appeared to accompany the advancing dental development. Thus, changes in bone mineral density across the

  12. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang FJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT. Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs were injected via carotid artery (IA or tail vein (TV into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments.

  13. The morphology of human hyoid bone in relation to sex, age and body proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, P; Hejna, P; Zátopková, L; Šafr, M

    2013-06-01

    Morphological aspects of the human hyoid bone are, like many other skeletal elements in human body, greatly affected by individual's sex, age and body proportions. Still, the known sex-dependent bimodality of a number of body size characteristics overshadows the true within-group patterns. Given the ambiguity of the causal effects of age, sex and body size upon hyoid morphology the present study puts the relationship between shape of human hyoid bone and body proportions (height and weight) under scrutiny of a morphological study. Using 211 hyoid bones and landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics, it was shown that the size of hyoid bones correlated positively with measured body dimensions but showed no correlation if the individual's sex was controlled for. For shape variables, our results revealed that hyoid morphology is clearly related to body size as expressed in terms of the height and weight. Yet, the hyoid shape was shown to result primarily from the sex-related bimodal distribution of studied body size descriptors which, in the case of the height-dependent model, exhibited opposite trends for males and females. Apart from the global hyoid shape given by spatial arrangements of the greater horns, body size dependency was translated into size and position of the hyoid body. None of the body size characters had any impact on hyoid asymmetry. Ultimately, sexually dimorphic variation was revealed for age-dependent changes in both size and shape of hyoid bones as male hyoids tend to be more susceptible to modifications with age than female bones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Nature, Dirty Hands and Social Disorder: A Socio-Political ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and what is reasonable is in accordance with human nature as such. The good of the human being is in accord with reason, and human evil is being outside the order of reasonableness... so human virtue which make good both the human ...

  15. Decoding of human hand actions to handle missing limbs in Neuroprosthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana eBelic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The only way we can interact with the world is through movements, and our primary interactions are via the hands, thus any loss of hand function has immediate impact on our quality of life. However, to date it has not been systematically assessed how coordination in the hand's joints affects every day actions. This is important for two fundamental reasons. Firstly, to understand the representations and computations underlying motor control in-the-wild situations, and secondly to develop smarter controllers for prosthetic hands that have the same functionality as natural limbs. In this work we exploit the correlation structure of our hand and finger movements in daily-life. The novelty of our idea is that instead of averaging variability out, we take the view that the structure of variability may contain valuable information about the task being performed. We asked seven subjects to interact in 17 daily-life situations, and quantified behaviour in a principled manner using CyberGlove body sensor networks that, after accurate calibration, track all major joints of the hand. Our key findings are: 1. We confirmed that hand control in daily-life tasks is very low-dimensional, with four to five dimensions being sufficient to explain 80-90% of the variability in the natural movement data. 2. We established a universally applicable measure of manipulative complexity that allowed us to measure and compare limb movements across tasks. We used Bayesian latent variable models to model the low-dimensional structure of finger joint angles in natural actions. 3. This allowed us to build a naïve classifier that within the first 1000ms of action initiation (from a flat hand start configuration predicted which of the 17 actions was going to be executed - enabling us to reliably predict the action intention from very short-time-scale initial data, further revealing the foreseeable nature of hand movements for control of neuroprosthetics and tele operation

  16. Decoding of human hand actions to handle missing limbs in neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belić, Jovana J; Faisal, A Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The only way we can interact with the world is through movements, and our primary interactions are via the hands, thus any loss of hand function has immediate impact on our quality of life. However, to date it has not been systematically assessed how coordination in the hand's joints affects every day actions. This is important for two fundamental reasons. Firstly, to understand the representations and computations underlying motor control "in-the-wild" situations, and secondly to develop smarter controllers for prosthetic hands that have the same functionality as natural limbs. In this work we exploit the correlation structure of our hand and finger movements in daily-life. The novelty of our idea is that instead of averaging variability out, we take the view that the structure of variability may contain valuable information about the task being performed. We asked seven subjects to interact in 17 daily-life situations, and quantified behavior in a principled manner using CyberGlove body sensor networks that, after accurate calibration, track all major joints of the hand. Our key findings are: (1) We confirmed that hand control in daily-life tasks is very low-dimensional, with four to five dimensions being sufficient to explain 80-90% of the variability in the natural movement data. (2) We established a universally applicable measure of manipulative complexity that allowed us to measure and compare limb movements across tasks. We used Bayesian latent variable models to model the low-dimensional structure of finger joint angles in natural actions. (3) This allowed us to build a naïve classifier that within the first 1000 ms of action initiation (from a flat hand start configuration) predicted which of the 17 actions was going to be executed-enabling us to reliably predict the action intention from very short-time-scale initial data, further revealing the foreseeable nature of hand movements for control of neuroprosthetics and tele operation purposes. (4) Using the

  17. Shape-estimation of human hand using polymer flex sensor and study of its application to control robot arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyuck; Kim, Dae Hyun [Seoul National University of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Ultrasonic inspection robot systems have been widely researched and developed for the real-time monitoring of structures such as power plants. However, an inspection robot that is operated in a simple pattern has limitations in its application to various structures in a plant facility because of the diverse and complicated shapes of the inspection objects. Therefore, accurate control of the robot is required to inspect complicated objects with high-precision results. This paper presents the idea that the shape and movement information of an ultrasonic inspector's hand could be profitably utilized for the accurate control of robot. In this study, a polymer flex sensor was applied to monitor the shape of a human hand. This application was designed to intuitively control an ultrasonic inspection robot. The movement and shape of the hand were estimated by applying multiple sensors. Moreover, it was successfully shown that a test robot could be intuitively controlled based on the shape of a human hand estimated using polymer flex sensors.

  18. Thermovision Analysis Changes of Human Hand Surface Temperature in Cold Pressor Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwałczyńska, Agnieszka; Gruszka, Katarzyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Sobiech, Krzysztof A

    2015-01-01

    The cold pressor test (CTP) as a diagnostic method of the circulatory system reactivity may be a basis for the qualification for thermal stimulation therapy. The aim of the work was a thermovisual assessment of the reaction to the Hines and Brown cold pressor test. A group of 30 healthy men in the age of 23.5 ± 0.8 years were examined. The average weight of the examinees was 78.4 ± 9.2 kg, their height 180.7 ± 5.9 cms, and BMI 23.9 ± 2.2 kg/m(2). A thermovisual picture of a tested and not tested hand of all the subjects was taken before and after the cold pressor test. Under the influence of cold water the surface temperature of a tested hand has decreased in a statistically significant way by 8.3°C on average, which is 29% of the temperature before the test, whilst the temperature of an untested hand dropped by 0.67°C. The decreases of temperature were not even and there was a statistically significant difference between the dorsal and palmar side of the hand. The correlation between the changes of systolic blood pressure and the hand surface temperature before and after CTP was observed.

  19. Calcium resorption from bone in a human studied by 41Ca tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Berkovits, D.; Boaretto, E.; Gelbart, Z.; Ghelberg, S.; Meirav, O.; Paul, M.; Prior, J.; Sossi, V.; Venczel, E.

    1994-06-01

    We are investigating long- and short-term processes that involve the resorption of the bone calcium in the human body, using accelerator mass spectrometry of 41Ca ( T {1}/{2} = 104000 years). The evolution of an injected dose of 41Ca has been followed over 900 days by measurements in urine and serum. The 41 Ca/Ca isotopic ratio rapidly decreased after injection and after about 100 days, reached a quasi-steady state of 1.5 × 10 -11. Variations in this level would signal a change in rates of calcium resorption from the bone.

  20. Bone Diagenesis and its Implication for Disease Diagnosis: The Relevance of Bone Microstructure Analysis for the Study of Past Human Remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Sandra; Keenleyside, Anne; Santos, Ana Luísa; Cardoso, Francisca Alves

    2015-08-01

    When bone is exposed to the burial environment it may experience structural changes induced by multiple agents. The study of postmortem alterations is important to differentiate decomposition phenomena from normal physiological processes or pathological lesions, as well as to assess bone tissue quality. Microscopy is of great utility to evaluate the integrity of bone microstructure and it provides significant data on long-term bone decomposition. A total of 18 human bone sections (eight archeological and ten retrieved from an identified skeletal collection) were selected for analysis under plane light and polarized light. The aim of this exploratory study was to analyze the impact of diagenesis and taphonomy on the bone microstructure, as well as on the differential diagnosis of pathological conditions. The results showed that the microscopy approach to bone tissues contributed materially as an aid in the detailed description of the main diagenetic changes observed. It showed that gross inspection does not provide a realistic assessment of bone tissue preservation, which can impact in the characterization of lesions present and subsequent disease diagnosis. Therefore, researchers should continue to consider the application of histological techniques if the aim is to comprehend tissue integrity and its association with decomposition or disease.

  1. Flakes of Fire, Handfuls of Light: The Humanities as Uncontrolled Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Huston

    1980-01-01

    The humanities are described as the custodians of the human image. Today's humanities have burdens which are social and conceptual. Higher education training in critical thinking works against the image of man, which keeps civilization vital. (JN)

  2. Osteogenic Differentiation Capacity of In Vitro Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle for Expedited Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Expedited bone tissue engineering employs the biological stimuli to harness the intrinsic regenerative potential of skeletal muscle to trigger the reparative process in situ to improve or replace biological functions. When genetically modified with adenovirus mediated BMP2 gene transfer, muscle biopsies from animals have demonstrated success in regenerating bone within rat bony defects. However, it is uncertain whether the human adult skeletal muscle displays an osteogenic potential in vitro when a suitable biological trigger is applied. In present study, human skeletal muscle cultured in a standard osteogenic medium supplemented with dexamethasone demonstrated significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity approximately 24-fold over control at 2-week time point. More interestingly, measurement of mRNA levels revealed the dramatic results for osteoblast transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoproteins, transcription factor CBFA1, collagen type I, and osteocalcin. Calcified mineral deposits were demonstrated on superficial layers of muscle discs after an extended 8-week osteogenic induction. Taken together, these are the first data supporting human skeletal muscle tissue as a promising potential target for expedited bone regeneration, which of the technologies is a valuable method for tissue repair, being not only effective but also inexpensive and clinically expeditious.

  3. Osteogenic Differentiation Capacity of In Vitro Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle for Expedited Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Chunlei; Zhou, Lulu; Tian, Lufeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fanghong; Liu, Tianyi; Tang, Shengjian; Liu, Fangjun

    2017-01-01

    Expedited bone tissue engineering employs the biological stimuli to harness the intrinsic regenerative potential of skeletal muscle to trigger the reparative process in situ to improve or replace biological functions. When genetically modified with adenovirus mediated BMP2 gene transfer, muscle biopsies from animals have demonstrated success in regenerating bone within rat bony defects. However, it is uncertain whether the human adult skeletal muscle displays an osteogenic potential in vitro when a suitable biological trigger is applied. In present study, human skeletal muscle cultured in a standard osteogenic medium supplemented with dexamethasone demonstrated significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity approximately 24-fold over control at 2-week time point. More interestingly, measurement of mRNA levels revealed the dramatic results for osteoblast transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoproteins, transcription factor CBFA1, collagen type I, and osteocalcin. Calcified mineral deposits were demonstrated on superficial layers of muscle discs after an extended 8-week osteogenic induction. Taken together, these are the first data supporting human skeletal muscle tissue as a promising potential target for expedited bone regeneration, which of the technologies is a valuable method for tissue repair, being not only effective but also inexpensive and clinically expeditious.

  4. Epidemiology of Fracture Nonunion in 18 Human Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zura, Robert; Xiong, Ze; Einhorn, Thomas; Watson, J Tracy; Ostrum, Robert F; Prayson, Michael J; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Mehta, Samir; McKinley, Todd; Wang, Zhe; Steen, R Grant

    2016-11-16

    Failure of bone fracture healing occurs in 5% to 10% of all patients. Nonunion risk is associated with the severity of injury and with the surgical treatment technique, yet progression to nonunion is not fully explained by these risk factors. To test a hypothesis that fracture characteristics and patient-related risk factors assessable by the clinician at patient presentation can indicate the probability of fracture nonunion. An inception cohort study in a large payer database of patients with fracture in the United States was conducted using patient-level health claims for medical and drug expenses compiled for approximately 90.1 million patients in calendar year 2011. The final database collated demographic descriptors, treatment procedures as per Current Procedural Terminology codes; comorbidities as per International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes; and drug prescriptions as per National Drug Code Directory codes. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for variables associated with nonunion. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012. Continuous enrollment in the database was required for 12 months after fracture to allow sufficient time to capture a nonunion diagnosis. The final analysis of 309 330 fractures in 18 bones included 178 952 women (57.9%); mean (SD) age was 44.48 (13.68) years. The nonunion rate was 4.9%. Elevated nonunion risk was associated with severe fracture (eg, open fracture, multiple fractures), high body mass index, smoking, and alcoholism. Women experienced more fractures, but men were more prone to nonunion. The nonunion rate also varied with fracture location: scaphoid, tibia plus fibula, and femur were most likely to be nonunion. The ORs for nonunion fractures were significantly increased for risk factors, including number of fractures (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 2.34-2.99), use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs plus opioids (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.73-1.95), operative

  5. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  6. Recapitulation of endochondral bone formation using human adult mesenchymal stem cells as a paradigm for developmental engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Celeste; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Scherberich, Arnaud; Schaeren, Stefan; Schauerte, Alexandra; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Zeller, Rolf; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2010-04-20

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are typically used to generate bone tissue by a process resembling intramembranous ossification, i.e., by direct osteoblastic differentiation. However, most bones develop by endochondral ossification, i.e., via remodeling of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. To date, endochondral bone formation has not been reproduced using human, clinically compliant cell sources. Here, we aimed at engineering tissues from bone marrow-derived, adult human MSC with an intrinsic capacity to undergo endochondral ossification. By analogy to embryonic limb development, we hypothesized that successful execution of the endochondral program depends on the initial formation of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. Human MSC, subcutaneously implanted into nude mice at various stages of chondrogenic differentiation, formed bone trabeculae only when they had developed in vitro hypertrophic tissue structures. Advanced maturation in vitro resulted in accelerated formation of larger bony tissues. The underlying morphogenetic process was structurally and molecularly similar to the temporal and spatial progression of limb bone development in embryos. In particular, Indian hedgehog signaling was activated at early stages and required for the in vitro formation of hypertrophic cartilage. Subsequent development of a bony collar in vivo was followed by vascularization, osteoclastic resorption of the cartilage template, and appearance of hematopoietic foci. This study reveals the capacity of human MSC to generate bone tissue via an endochondral program and provides a valid model to study mechanisms governing bone development. Most importantly, this process could generate advanced grafts for bone regeneration by invoking a "developmental engineering" paradigm.

  7. [Pubertal growth spurt in the thickness of the bones of the human cranium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaichenko, A A

    1985-05-01

    Frontal saw-cuts of 60 human cranial fornices (age 1-21 years) served as the material for the investigation. By means of the microscope MBC-2 thickness of the bones was measured. The age changes of the bone thickness in the cranial fornix are approximated by the function of asymptotic growth TK' = 5.3-3.5 X 10(-0.14(X-1) (mm), where X = 1.2,..., 8 and logistic function TK' = 1/(1 + 10(11.4 - 0.74X) +4.93 (mm), where X = 8.9,..., 21 (years). Thus the bone thickness of the cranial fornix undergoes the pubertal spurt of growth, when the maximal rate in increasing thickness is noted between 15 and 16 years of age. This phenomenon should determine certain increase in dimentions of the skull during the pubertal period.

  8. Early human bone response to laser metal sintering surface topography: a histologic report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; d'Avila, Susana; Iezzi, Giovanna; Mangano, Francesco; Onuma, Tatiana; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2010-01-01

    This histologic report evaluated the early human bone response to a direct laser metal sintering implant surface retrieved after a short period of healing. A selective laser sintering procedure using a Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder with a particle size of 25-45 microm prepared this surface topography. One experimental microimplant was inserted into the anterior mandible of a patient during conventional implant surgery of the jaw. The microimplant and surrounding tissues were removed after 2 months of unloaded healing and were prepared for histomorphometric analysis. Histologically, the peri-implant bone appeared in close contact with the implant surface, whereas marrow spaces could be detected in other areas along with prominently stained cement lines. The mean of bone-to-implant contact was 69.51%. The results of this histologic report suggest that the laser metal sintering surface could be a promising alternative to conventional implant surface topographies.

  9. Mutual associations among microstructural, physical and mechanical properties of human cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Danielsen, CC

    2002-01-01

    were tested to determine the mechanical properties and the physical/compositional properties were evaluated. The type of structure together with anisotropy correlated well with Young's modulus of human tibial cancellous bone. The plate-like structure reflected high mechanical stress and the rod......-like structure low mechanical stress. There was a strong correlation between the type of trabecular structure and the bone-volume fraction. The most effective microstructural properties for predicting the mechanical properties of cancellous bone seem to differ with age.......Previous studies have shown that low-density, rod-like trabecular structures develop in regions of low stress, whereas high-density, plate-like trabecular structures are found in regions of high stress. This phenomenon suggests that there may be a close relationship between the type of trabecular...

  10. Quantifying temporal bone morphology of great apes and humans: an approach using geometric morphometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles A; Lynch, John M; Kimbel, William H

    2002-01-01

    The hominid temporal bone offers a complex array of morphology that is linked to several different functional systems. Its frequent preservation in the fossil record gives the temporal bone added significance in the study of human evolution, but its morphology has proven difficult to quantify. In this study we use techniques of 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify differences among humans and great apes and discuss the results in a phylogenetic context. Twenty-three landmarks on the ectocranial surface of the temporal bone provide a high level of anatomical detail. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) is used to register (adjust for position, orientation and scale) landmark data from 405 adults representing Homo, Pan, Gorilla and Pongo. Principal components analysis of residuals from the GPA shows that the major source of variation is between humans and apes. Human characteristics such as a coronally orientated petrous axis, a deep mandibular fossa, a projecting mastoid process, and reduced lateral extension of the tympanic element strongly impact the analysis. In phenetic cluster analyses, gorillas and orangutans group together with respect to chimpanzees, and all apes group together with respect to humans. Thus, the analysis contradicts depictions of African apes as a single morphotype. Gorillas and orangutans lack the extensive preglenoid surface of chimpanzees, and their mastoid processes are less medially inflected. These and other characters shared by gorillas and orangutans are probably primitive for the African hominid clade. PMID:12489757

  11. Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of porous-coated titanium implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Allogenic bone graft has been considered the gold standard in connection with bone graft material in revision joint arthroplasty. However, the lack of osteogenic potential and the risk of disease transmission are clinical challenges. The use of osteoinductive materials, such as demineralized bone...

  12. Bone strains around apically free versus grafted implants in the posterior maxilla of human cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Murat Cavit; Akkocaoglu, Murat; Comert, Ayhan; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Akca, Kivanc

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the bone strains of apically free versus grafted implants in the posterior maxilla. The experiments were undertaken in four edentulous maxillary posterior regions of fresh human cadavers, having a minimum bone height of 8 mm. In each bone fragment, two Ø 4.1 mm x 12 mm Straumann implants were placed, and insertion torque values (ITV) and implant stability quotients (ISQ) of the implants were quantified to determine implant anchorage. Two splinted crowns were fabricated for each experimental model. Strain gauges were bonded on the buccal and sinus floor cortical bones around apically free and grafted implants. Microstrains were recorded by a data acquisition system and corresponding software at a sample rate of 10 KHz under central and buccally oriented lateral-axial static loads of 100 and 150 N in separate cases. The data were compared by independent T test at a significance level set at PBone tissue strains on the buccal cortical areas adjacent to apically free implants were higher than those of apically grafted implants (Pbone around apically free and grafted implants (PBone strains around anterior implants were higher than those of posterior implants. Microstrains in the sinus floor cortical bone in apically grafted models were slightly higher than apically free models. Bone tissue strains on the buccal cortical areas adjacent to apicallyfree implants are higher than those of apically grafted implants. Sinus lifting, resulting in an enhanced apical support, slightly increases strains at the sinus floor region, but leads to a decrease in bone strains around the collar of supporting implants.

  13. Hand collection - hand harvest

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of activities related to the collection and harvest of seeds on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. Information about hand...

  14. Spontaneous Ultra-Weak Photon Emission from Human Hands Is Time Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Wijk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-weak photon emission in the visible range was measured on palm and dorsal side of left and right hand by means of a low noise photomultiplier system. To study the dynamics of this photon emission in a 24 h period photon emission was recorded in 2 h intervals in 5 experiments, utilizing strict protocols for dark adaptation and recording of subjects. Fluctuations in photon emission in the course of 24 h period were demonstrated for each anatomic location. Mean photon emission over the 24 h period differed both between subjects and hand locations. To detect a pattern in the fluctuations the mean value for each location of each subject in each experiment was utilized to calculate fluctuations during the course of 24 h for each anatomical location. The fluctuations in photon emission in the course of 24 h were more at dorsal sides than palm sides. The correlation between fluctuations in palm and dorsal side was not apparent. During the 24 h period a change in left-right symmetry occurred for the dorsal side but not for the palm of the hands. Photon emission at the left dorsal location was high at night, while the right dorsal side emitted most during the day. It is concluded that a daily rhythm in photon emission can be recorded from both the dorsal and palm sides of the hands.

  15. Manual activity shapes structure and function in contralateral human motor hand area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granert, Oliver; Peller, Martin; Gaser, Christian

    2011-01-01

    which was designed to improve handwriting-associated dystonia. Initially the dystonic hand was immobilized for 4 weeks with the intention to reverse faulty plasticity. After immobilization, patients accomplished a motor re-training for 8 weeks. T1-weighted MRIs of the whole brain and single-pulse TMS...

  16. The effects of smoke hand grenades on human lung cells and bacteria for toxicity screening purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, M. van; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Langenberg, J.P.; Tuinman, I.L.; Alblas, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to signaling smoke is almost impossible to avoid, and may have adverse health effects. Hand grenades with signaling smoke are used during training and/or military operations. To obtain the most realistic results when estimating the toxicity of the smoke, not only the smoke–forming

  17. Compact DD generator-based neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to determine fluorine in human bone in vivo: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott P; Liu, Yingzi; Sowers, Daniel A; Nie, Linda H

    2015-10-01

    The subject of whether fluorine (F) is detrimental to human health has been controversial for many years. Much of the discussion focuses on the known benefits and detriments to dental care and problems that F causes in bone structure at high doses. It is therefore advantageous to have the means to monitor F concentrations in the human body as a method to directly assess exposure. F accumulates in the skeleton making bone a useful biomarker to assess long term cumulative exposure to F. This study presents work in the development of a non-invasive method for the monitoring of F in human bone. The work was based on the technique of in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA). A compact deuterium-deuterium (DD) generator was used to produce neutrons. A moderator/reflector/shielding assembly was designed and built for human hand irradiation. The gamma rays emitted through the (19)F(n,γ)(20)F reaction were measured using a HPGe detector. This study was undertaken to (i) find the feasibility of using DD system to determine F in human bone, (ii) estimate the F minimum detection limit (MDL), and (iii) optimize the system using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code in order to improve the MDL of the system. The F MDL was found to be 0.54 g experimentally with a neutron flux of 7   ×   10(8) n s(-1) and an optimized irradiation, decay, and measurement time scheme. The numbers of F counts from the experiment were found to be close to the (MCNPX) simulation results with the same irradiation and detection parameters. The equivalent dose to the irradiated hand and the effective dose to the whole body were found to be 0.9 mSv and 0.33 μSv, respectively. Based on these results, it is feasible to develop a compact DD generator based IVNAA system to measure bone F in a population with moderate to high F exposure.

  18. Identification of Rorβ targets in cultured osteoblasts and in human bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roforth, Matthew M., E-mail: roforth.matthew@mayo.edu; Khosla, Sundeep, E-mail: khosla.sundeep@mayo.edu; Monroe, David G., E-mail: monroe.david@mayo.edu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •We examine the gene expression patterns controlled by Rorβ in osteoblasts. •Genes involved in extracellular matrix regulation and proliferation are affected. •Rorβ mRNA levels increase in aged, human bone biopsies. •Rorβ may affect osteoblast activity by modulation of these pathways. -- Abstract: Control of osteoblastic bone formation involves the cumulative action of numerous transcription factors, including both activating and repressive functions that are important during specific stages of differentiation. The nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor β (Rorβ) has been recently shown to suppress the osteogenic phenotype in cultured osteoblasts, and is highly upregulated in bone marrow-derived osteogenic precursors isolated from aged osteoporotic mice, suggesting Rorβ is an important regulator of osteoblast function. However the specific gene expression patterns elicited by Rorβ are unknown. Using microarray analysis, we identified 281 genes regulated by Rorβ in an MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast cell model (MC3T3-Rorβ-GFP). Pathway analysis revealed alterations in genes involved in MAPK signaling, genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) regulation, and cytokine-receptor interactions. Whereas the identified Rorβ-regulated ECM genes normally decline during osteoblastic differentiation, they were highly upregulated in this non-mineralizing MC3T3-Rorβ-GFP model system, suggesting that Rorβ may exert its anti-osteogenic effects through ECM disruption. Consistent with these in vitro findings, the expression of both RORβ and a subset of RORβ-regulated genes were increased in bone biopsies from postmenopausal women (73 ± 7 years old) compared to premenopausal women (30 ± 5 years old), suggesting a role for RORβ in human age-related bone loss. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Rorβ regulates known osteogenic pathways, and may represent a novel therapeutic target for age-associated bone loss.

  19. Cultivation of Human Bone-Like Tissue from Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Osteogenic Progenitors in Perfusion Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems—bioreactors—has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries. PMID:24281874

  20. Changes in human palatine bone location and tongue position during prenatal palatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, I; Bach-Petersen, S; Graem, N; Kjaer, T

    1993-01-01

    Closure of the palatal shelves during normal prenatal palate formation is commonly supposed to be the result of a complex interaction between tissue growth processes and functional factors such as mandibular and tongue movements. The purpose of the present study was to analyze tongue and palatine bone positions during palatal shelf closure. The material consisted of 40 normal human fetuses (CRL 26-57 mm). The series covers the developmental stages in which palatal shelf closure takes place. The spatial relation between the tip of the tongue and the lips was examined by visual inspection, and radiographic/cephalometric methods were used for analyzing palatine bone positions. On axial radiographs of the upper jaws, the angle in the horizontal plane between the vertical plates of the palatine bones was measured. The study revealed that the vertical plates of the palatine bones rotate on their vertical axes during palatal closure, the mean interpalatine angle changing from 23.7 degrees (SD 2.0 degrees) to 13.3 degrees (SD 3.2 degrees), P palatine bones occurred while the cranial base was still unossified. Moreover, the tip of the tongue became visible between the lips immediately after palate closure. In the present study the rotational changes observed in skeletal tissue provided information about soft tissue changes during palatal closure. These normal developmental aspects are discussed in relation to skeletal deviations in congenital cleft palate malformations.

  1. Effect of Aging on the Toughness of Human Cortical Bone: Evaluation by R-Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, J

    2004-10-08

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, are responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40% over six decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  2. Ectopic Bone Formation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Term Placenta and the Decidua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina D Kusuma

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are one of the most attractive cell types for cell-based bone tissue repair applications. Fetal-derived MSCs and maternal-derived MSCs have been isolated from chorionic villi of human term placenta and the decidua basalis attached to the placenta following delivery, respectively. Chorionic-derived MSCs (CMSCs and decidua-derived MSCs (DMSCs generated in this study met the MSCs criteria set by International Society of Cellular Therapy. These criteria include: (i adherence to plastic; (ii >90% expression of CD73, CD105, CD90, CD146, CD44 and CD166 combined with <5% expression of CD45, CD19 and HLA-DR; and (iii ability to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In vivo subcutaneous implantation into SCID mice showed that both bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU-labelled CMSCs and DMSCs when implanted together with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate particles were capable of forming ectopic bone at 8-weeks post-transplantation. Histological assessment showed expression of bone markers, osteopontin (OPN, osteocalcin (OCN, biglycan (BGN, bone sialoprotein (BSP, and also a marker of vasculature, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. This study provides evidence to support CMSCs and DMSCs as cellular candidates with potent bone forming capacity.

  3. Propagation of two longitudinal waves in human cancellous bone: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Otani, Takahiko; Laugier, Pascal; Padilla, Frédéric

    2009-05-01

    The ultrasonic wave propagation of fast and slow waves was investigated in vitro in 35 cubic cancellous bone specimens extracted from human femoral heads. Measurements were performed in three orthogonal directions using home-made PVDF transducers excited by a single sinusoidal wave at 1 MHz. The apparent density of the specimens was measured. Two separated fast and slow waves were clearly observed in 16 specimens, mainly in the main load direction. The waveforms and the sound speeds of fast and slow waves were similar to the reported data in bovine bone. The group of specimens in which the two waves were observed did not exhibit statistically higher apparent density than the rest of the specimens, but did exhibit statistically higher acoustic anisotropy ratio. The speeds in the main load direction were higher than those in the other direction. The fast and slow wave speeds were in good agreement with Biot's model, showing an increase with bone volume fraction (BV/TV). The ratio of peak amplitudes of the fast and slow waves nonlinearly increased as a function of BV/TV. These results open interesting perspective for acoustic assessment of cancellous bone micro-architecture and especially anisotropy that might lead to an improved assessment of bone strength.

  4. Histological assessment of tissue from large human bone defects repaired with β-tricalcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel; Urban, Karel; Kohout, Ales

    2014-12-01

    This report describes the histological characteristics of large human bone defects that were implanted with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). Samples were obtained longer after the primary operation than in the earlier studies. We assessed a total of nine biopsies taken 33-208 weeks after implantation. The tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for general observation, with Gomori stain to visualize the reticulin fibers, and with an antibody against tartrate-resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) to characterize the cells. Ongoing bone remodeling was observed even 208 weeks after implantation as determined by the presence of osteoclasts and active osteoblasts and new woven and lamellar bone. We observed multinuclear giant cells phagocytosing the biomaterial and the attachment of osteoclasts to the β-TCP. The osteoclasts showed intense TRAP positivity, while the giant cells showed variable TRAP positivity. There was a zonal pattern in the original defects: The central regions showed granules and fibrous septa, while peripheral areas showed a layer of new bone formation. These data demonstrate ongoing bone remodeling long after implantation in the peripheral regions of the original defects as well as fibrous changes in the central regions and phagocytosis of biomaterial by multinuclear giant cells.

  5. "Osseous tumors of the hand "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Farzan M

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of osseous tumors of the hand are benign. The surgeon who evaluates and treats osseous tumors of the hand has to be familiar with limb anatomy, tumor biology, various presentations of the tumors and the range of treatment possibilities and their limitations. Lesions in the hand more often present earlier in their course than those at other sites, just because they are more likely to superficial and easily noticed. A review of all cases of osseous tumors of the hand, seen by a hand surgeon over the last 10 years, at Imam Khomeini hospital was performed. Among 55 cases with osseous tumors of hand, 48 primary benign bone tumors, 3 primary malignant bone tumors, and 4 metastatic bone tumors were found. Enchondroma was the most common benign bone tumor followed by osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, aneurismal bone cyst, giant cell tumor, epidermoid cyst, and osteochondroma. There were two chondrosarcoma and one Ewing’s sarcoma as primary malignant bone tumors. Metastasis to the hand from colon, esophagus, and breast were also found. There were also two cases with Brown tumor secondary to hyperparathyroidism, we conclude that a variety of osseous tumors could occur in the hand, and usually they are benign. Although malignant neoplasms in the hand that arise from tissues other than the skin are very rare, the hand may be the site of distant breast, lung, kidney, esophagus, or colon adenocarcinoma metastases, most of which have a predilection for the distal phalanges.

  6. Automated cortical bone segmentation for multirow-detector CT imaging with validation and application to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Chen, Cheng; Letuchy, Elena M; Janz, Kathleen F; Burns, Trudy L; Torner, James C; Levy, Steven M; Saha, Punam K

    2015-08-01

    Cortical bone supports and protects human skeletal functions and plays an important role in determining bone strength and fracture risk. Cortical bone segmentation at a peripheral site using multirow-detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is useful for in vivo assessment of bone strength and fracture risk. Major challenges for the task emerge from limited spatial resolution, low signal-to-noise ratio, presence of cortical pores, and structural complexity over the transition between trabecular and cortical bones. An automated algorithm for cortical bone segmentation at the distal tibia from in vivo MD-CT imaging is presented and its performance and application are examined. The algorithm is completed in two major steps-(1) bone filling, alignment, and region-of-interest computation and (2) segmentation of cortical bone. After the first step, the following sequence of tasks is performed to accomplish cortical bone segmentation-(1) detection of marrow space and possible pores, (2) computation of cortical bone thickness, detection of recession points, and confirmation and filling of true pores, and (3) detection of endosteal boundary and delineation of cortical bone. Effective generalizations of several digital topologic and geometric techniques are introduced and a fully automated algorithm is presented for cortical bone segmentation. An accuracy of 95.1% in terms of volume of agreement with manual outlining of cortical bone was observed in human MD-CT scans, while an accuracy of 88.5% was achieved when compared with manual outlining on postregistered high resolution micro-CT imaging. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98 was obtained in cadaveric repeat scans. A pilot study was conducted to describe gender differences in cortical bone properties. This study involved 51 female and 46 male participants (age: 19-20 yr) from the Iowa Bone Development Study. Results from this pilot study suggest that, on average after adjustment for height and weight differences, males have

  7. The Lrp4R1170Q Homozygous Knock-In Mouse Recapitulates the Bone Phenotype of Sclerosteosis in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Eveline; Yorgan, Timur; Fijalkowski, Igor; Sonntag, Stephan; Steenackers, Ellen; Hendrickx, Gretl; Peeters, Silke; De Maré, Annelies; Vervaet, Benjamin; Verhulst, Anja; Mortier, Geert; D'Haese, Patrick; Schinke, Thorsten; Van Hul, Wim

    2017-08-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare autosomal recessive bone disorder marked by hyperostosis of the skull and tubular bones. Initially, we and others reported that sclerosteosis was caused by loss-of-function mutations in SOST, encoding sclerostin. More recently, we identified disease-causing mutations in LRP4, a binding partner of sclerostin, in three sclerosteosis patients. Upon binding to sclerostin, LRP4 can inhibit the canonical WNT signaling that is known to be an important pathway in the regulation of bone formation. To further investigate the role of LRP4 in the bone formation process, we generated an Lrp4 mutated sclerosteosis mouse model by introducing the p.Arg1170Gln mutation in the mouse genome. Extensive analysis of the bone phenotype of the Lrp4R1170Q/R1170Q knock-in (KI) mouse showed the presence of increased trabecular and cortical bone mass as a consequence of increased bone formation by the osteoblasts. In addition, three-point bending analysis also showed that the increased bone mass results in increased bone strength. In contrast to the human sclerosteosis phenotype, we could not observe syndactyly in the forelimbs or hindlimbs of the Lrp4 KI animals. Finally, we could not detect any significant changes in the bone formation and resorption markers in the serum of the mutant mice. However, the serum sclerostin levels were strongly increased and the level of sclerostin in the tibia was decreased in Lrp4R1170Q/R1170Q mice, confirming the role of LRP4 as an anchor for sclerostin in bone. In conclusion, the Lrp4R1170Q/R1170Q mouse is a good model for the human sclerosteosis phenotype caused by mutations in LRP4 and can be used in the future for further investigation of the mechanism whereby LRP4 regulates bone formation. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Warm hands, cold heart: progressive whole-body cooling increases warm thermosensitivity of human hands and feet in a dose-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Morris, Nathan B; Jay, Ollie

    2017-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Investigations on inhibitory/facilitatory modulation of vision, touch and pain show that conditioning stimuli outside the receptive field of testing stimuli modulate the central processing of visual, touch and painful stimuli. We asked whether contextual modulation also exists in human temperature integration. What is the main finding and its importance? Progressive decreases in whole-body mean skin temperature (the conditioning stimulus) significantly increased local thermosensitivity to skin warming but not cooling (the testing stimuli) in a dose-dependent fashion. In resembling the central mechanisms underlying endogenous analgesia, our findings point to the existence of an endogenous thermosensory system in humans that could modulate local skin thermal sensitivity to facilitate thermal behaviour. Although inhibitory/facilitatory central modulation of vision and pain has been investigated, contextual modulation of skin temperature integration has not been explored. Hence, we tested whether progressive decreases in whole-body mean skin temperature (Tsk ; a large conditioning stimulus) alter the magnitude estimation of local warming and cooling stimuli applied to hairy and glabrous skin. On four separate occasions, eight men (27 ± 5 years old) underwent a 30 min whole-body cooling protocol (water-perfused suit; temperature, 5°C), during which a quantitative thermosensory test, consisting of reporting the perceived magnitude of warming and cooling stimuli (±8°C from 30°C baseline) applied to the hand (palm/dorsum) and foot (sole/dorsum), was performed before cooling and every 10 min thereafter. The cooling protocol resulted in large progressive reductions in Tsk [10 min, -3.36°C (95% confidence interval -2.62 to -4.10); 20 min, -5.21°C (-4.47 to -5.95); and 30 min, -6.32°C (-5.58 to -7.05); P fashion. In highlighting a novel feature of human temperature integration, these findings point to the existence of

  9. Voxel-based approach to generate entire human metacarpal bone with microscopic architecture for finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C Y; Tsui, C P; Tang, Y M; Wei, L; Wong, C T; Lam, K W; Ip, W Y; Lu, W W J; Pang, M Y C

    2014-01-01

    With the development of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology, it is possible to construct three-dimensional (3D) models of human bone without destruction of samples and predict mechanical behavior of bone using finite element analysis (FEA). However, due to large number of elements required for constructing the FE models of entire bone, this demands a substantial computational effort and the analysis usually needs a high level of computer. In this article, a voxel-based approach for generation of FE models of entire bone with microscopic architecture from micro-CT image data is proposed. To enable the FE analyses of entire bone to be run even on a general personal computer, grayscale intensity thresholds were adopted to reduce the amount of elements. Human metacarpal bone (MCP) bone was used as an example for demonstrating the applicability of the proposed method. The micro-CT images of the MCP bone were combined and converted into 3D array of pixels. Dual grayscale intensity threshold parameters were used to distinguish the pixels of bone tissues from those of surrounding soft tissues and improve predictive accuracy for the FE analyses with different sizes of elements. The method of selecting an appropriate value of the second grayscale intensity threshold was also suggested to minimize the area error for the reconstructed cross-sections of a FE structure. Experimental results showed that the entire FE MCP bone with microscopic architecture could be modeled and analyzed on a personal computer with reasonable accuracy.

  10. The effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain®) on gene expression profiles of human primary alveolar bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Z; Rathe, F; Gilissen, C; van der Zande, M; Veltman, J; Junker, R; Yang, F; Jansen, J A; Walboomers, X F

    2014-06-01

    Emdogain® is frequently used in regenerative periodontal treatment. Understanding its effect on gene expression of bone cells would enable new products and pathways promoting bone formation to be established. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of Emdogain® on expression profiles of human-derived bone cells with the help of the micro-array, and subsequent validation. Bone was harvested from non-smoking patients during dental implant surgery. After outgrowth, cells were cultured until subconfluence, treated for 24 h with either Emdogain® (100 µg/ml) or control medium, and subsequently RNA was isolated and micro-array was performed. The most important genes demonstrated by micro-array data were confirmed by qPCR and ELISA tests. Emdogain tipped the balance between genes expressed for bone formation and bone resorption towards a more anabolic effect, by interaction of the PGE2 pathway and inhibition of IL-7 production. In addition the results of the present study indicate that Emdogain possibly has an effect on gene expression for extracellular matrix formation of human bone cells, in particular on bone matrix formation and on proliferation and differentiation. With the micro-array and the subsequent validation, the genes possibly involved in Emdogain action on bone cells were identified. These results can contribute to establishing new products and pathways promoting bone formation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Human Dental Pulp-Derived Cells Produce Bone-Like Tissue and Exhibit Bone Cell-Like Responsiveness to Mechanical Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, David Christian Evar; Melsen, Birte; Bindslev, Dorthe Arenholt

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that dental pulp cells possess stem cell like potential and thus may be potential candidates for tissue engineering purposes particularly in the oro-facial region. Successful tissue engineering ideally requires that newly formed bone adapts its mass, shape, and trabecular...... architecture to the prevailing mechanical load and should be able to conduct bone cell-specific functions, such as bone remodeling. In vitro investigation of the responsiveness of different cell types to mechanical loading is so far a relative new research field. The aim of this study was to establish...... and characterize cell lines from human 3rd molar dental pulp tissue to determine whether human dental pulp-derived cells (DPCs) are osteogenic and responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) in vitro. Methods: Human DPCs used for this study were characterized by measuring proliferation...

  12. Characterization of Multi-layered Tissue Engineered Human Alveolar Bone and Gingival Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almela, Thafar; Al-Sahaf, Sarmad; Bolt, Robert; Brook, Ian; Moharamzadeh, K

    2017-11-01

    Advances in tissue engineering have permitted assembly of multi-layered composite tissue constructs for potential applications in the treatment of combined hard and soft tissue defects and as an alternative in vitro test model to animal experimental systems. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a novel three-dimensional combined human alveolar bone and gingival mucosal model based on primary cells isolated from the oral tissues. Bone component of the model was engineered by seeding primary human alveolar osteoblasts (HAOBs) into a hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) scaffold and culturing in a spinner bioreactor. The engineered bone was then laminated, using an adhesive tissue sealant, with tissue engineered gingival mucosa consisting of air/liquid interface-cultured normal human gingival keratinocytes on oral fibroblast-populated collagen gel scaffold. Histological characterization revealed a structure consisting of established epithelial, connective tissue, and bone layers closely comparable to normal oral tissue architecture. The mucosal component demonstrated a mature epithelium undergoing terminal differentiation similar to that characteristic of native buccal mucosa, as confirmed using cytokeratin 13 (CK13) and cytokeratin 14 (CK14) immunohistochemistry. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence of desmosomes and hemi-desmosomes in the epithelial layer, a continuous basement membrane and newly synthesized collagen in the connective tissue layer. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assessment of osteogenesis-related gene expression showed a higher expression of genes encoded Collagen I (COL1) and Osteonectin (ON) compared with Osteocalcin (OC), Osteopontin (OPN), and Alkaline phosphatase (ALP). ELISA quantification of COL1, ON, and OC confirmed a pattern of secretion which paralleled the model's gene expression profile. We demonstrate here that replicating the anatomical setting between oral mucosa and the underlying alveolar bone is

  13. Culture and differentiation of osteoblasts on coral scaffold from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cong Toai; Gargiulo, Ciro; Thao, Huynh Duy; Tuan, Huynh Minh; Filgueira, Luis; Michael Strong, D

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we describe an approach that aims to provide fundamental information towards a scientific, biomechanical basis for the use of natural coral scaffolds to initiate mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenic differentiation for transplant purposes. Biomaterial, such as corals, is an osteoconductive material that can be used to home human derived stem cells for clinical regenerative purposes. In bone transplantation, the use of biomaterials may be a solution to bypass two main critical obstacles, the shortage of donor sites for autografts and the risk of rejection with allograft procedures. Bone regeneration is often needed for multiple clinical purposes for instance, in aesthetic reconstruction and regenerative procedures. Coral graft Porites lutea has been used by our team for a decade in clinical applications on over a thousand patients with different bone pathologies including spinal stenosis and mandibular reconstruction. It is well accepted that human bone marrow (hBM) is an exceptional source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which may differentiate into different cell phenotypes such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes and neurons. Isolated MSCs from human bone marrow were induced into osteoblasts using an osteogenic medium enriched with two specific growth factors, FGF9 and vitamin D2. Part of the cultured MSCs were directly transferred and seeded onto coral scaffolds (Porites Lutea) and induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and part were cultured in flasks for osteocell culture. The data support the concept that hBM is a reliable source of MSCs which may be easily differentiated into osteoblasts and seeded into coral as an optimal device for clinical application. Within this project we have also discussed the biological nature of MSCs, their potential application for clinical transplantation and the prospect of their use in gene therapy.

  14. Effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on bisphosphonate-treated osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taek-Kyun; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, In-Ryoung; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Cheong, In-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a side effect of bisphophonate therapy that has been reported in recent years. Osteoclastic inactivity by bisphosphonate is the known cause of BRONJ. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) plays an important role in the development of bone. Recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) is potentially useful as an activation factor for bone repair. We hypothesized that rhBMP-2 would enhance the osteoclast-osteoblast interaction related to bone remodeling. Materials and Methods Human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB 1.19) were treated with 100 µM alendronate, and 100 ng/mL rhBMP-2 was added. Cells were incubated for a further 48 hours, and cell viability was measured using an MTT assay. Expression of the three cytokines from osteoblasts, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Cell viability was decreased to 82.75%±1.00% by alendronate and then increased to 110.43%±1.35% after treatment with rhBMP-2 (PrhBMP2 does not affect OPG gene expression in hFOB, but it may increase RANKL and M-CSF gene expression. PMID:25551094

  15. Enamel-calibrated lamellar bone reveals long period growth rate variability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G; Juwayeyi, Yusuf M; Smolyar, Igor; Hu, Bin; Gomez, Santiago; Chisi, John

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian teeth exhibit incremental structures representing successive forming fronts of enamel at varying time scales, including a short daily increment called a cross striation and a long period called a stria of Retzius, the latter of which, in humans, occurs on average every 8-9 days. The number of daily increments between striae is called the repeat interval, which is the same period as that required to form one increment of bone, i.e. the lamella, the fundamental - if not archetypal - unit of bone. Lamellae of known formation time nevertheless vary in width, and thus their measures provide time-calibrated growth rate variability. We measured growth rate variability for as many as 6 years of continuously forming primary incremental lamellar bone from midshaft femur histological sections of sub-Saharan Africans of Bantu origin and known life history. We observed periodic growth rate variability in approximately 6- to 8-week intervals, and in some cases annual rhythms were visible. Endogenous biological periodicities, cycles manifest in the external environment, and/or perturbations of development are all potentially contained within growth rate variability studies of lamellar incremental patterns. Because lamellae are formed within defined periods of time, quantitative measures of widths of individual lamellae provide time-resolved growth rate variability that may reveal rhythms in human bone growth heretofore unknown. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. RELATIVE EFFICACY OF HUMAN SOCIAL INTERACTION AND FOOD AS REINFORCERS FOR DOMESTIC DOGS AND HAND-REARED WOLVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbacher, Erica N; Wynne, Clive D. L

    2012-01-01

    Despite the intimate relationship dogs share with humans in Western society, we know relatively little about the variables that produce and maintain dog social behavior towards humans. One possibility is that human social interaction is itself a reinforcer for dog behavior. As an initial assessment of the variables that might maintain dog social behavior, we compared the relative efficacy of brief human social interaction to a small piece of food as a reinforcer for an arbitrary response (nose touch). We investigated this in three populations of canids: shelter dogs, owned dogs, and hand-reared wolves. Across all three canid populations, brief social interaction was a relatively ineffective reinforcer compared to food for most canids, producing lower responding and longer latencies than food. PMID:22851794

  17. Guided Bone Regeneration for the Reconstruction of Alveolar Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojasteh, Arash; Kheiri, Lida; Motamedian, Saeed Reza; Khoshkam, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is the most common technique for localized bone augmentation. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to categorize and assess various GBR approaches for the reconstruction of human alveolar bone defects. Materials and Methods: Electronic search of four databases including PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane and hand searching were performed to identify human trials attempting GBR for the reconstruction of alveolar bony defects for at least 10 patients from January 2000 to August 2015. To meet the inclusion criteria, studies had to report preoperative defect dimensions in addition to outcomes of bone formation and/or resorption. Results: Twenty-five human clinical trials were included of which 17 used conventional technique that is the use of space maintaining membrane with bone grafting particles (GBR I). Application of block bone graft with overlying membrane and particulate fillers was reported in seven studies (GBR II), and utilizing cortical bone block tented over a defect preserving particulate fillers was reported by one study (GBR III). A wide range of initial defects’ sizes and treatment results were reported. Conclusions: This review introduces a therapeutically oriented classification system of GBR for treating alveolar bone defects. High heterogeneity among studies hindered drawing definite conclusions in regard to superiority of one to the other GBR technique. PMID:29264297

  18. A Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack C Roberts

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the 3-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures seen in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  19. Biochemical and physical correlates of DNA contamination in archaeological human bones and teeth excavated at Matera, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M. T. P.; Rudbeck, L.; Willerslev, E.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of ancient DNA studies on human specimens have utilised teeth and bone as a source of genetic material. In this study the levels of endogenous contamination (i.e. present within the sample prior to sampling for the DNA analysis) are assessed within human bone and teeth specimens...... across Europe, where a significant number of human bones was well preserved. The findings demonstrate several important issues: (a) although teeth are more resilient to contamination than bone, both are readily contaminated (presumably through handling or washing), and (b) once contaminated in this way...... with the presence of observable contamination in both bone and teeth samples from individual samples. While we can only speculate on the cause of this relationship, we posit that they provide useful guides for the assessment of whether samples are likely to be contaminated or not. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  20. Evidence in hand: recent discoveries and the early evolution of human manual manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, it was largely assumed that stone tool use and production were abilities limited to the genus Homo. However, growing palaeontological and archaeological evidence, comparative extant primate studies, as well as results from methodological advancements in biomechanics and morphological analyses, have been gradually accumulating and now provide strong support for more advanced manual manipulative abilities and tool-related behaviours in pre-Homo hominins than has been traditionally recognized. Here, I review the fossil evidence related to early hominin dexterity, including the recent discoveries of relatively complete early hominin hand skeletons, and new methodologies that are providing a more holistic interpretation of hand function, and insight into how our early ancestors may have balanced the functional requirements of both arboreal locomotion and tool-related behaviours. PMID:26483538

  1. Evidence in hand: recent discoveries and the early evolution of human manual manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L

    2015-11-19

    For several decades, it was largely assumed that stone tool use and production were abilities limited to the genus Homo. However, growing palaeontological and archaeological evidence, comparative extant primate studies, as well as results from methodological advancements in biomechanics and morphological analyses, have been gradually accumulating and now provide strong support for more advanced manual manipulative abilities and tool-related behaviours in pre-Homo hominins than has been traditionally recognized. Here, I review the fossil evidence related to early hominin dexterity, including the recent discoveries of relatively complete early hominin hand skeletons, and new methodologies that are providing a more holistic interpretation of hand function, and insight into how our early ancestors may have balanced the functional requirements of both arboreal locomotion and tool-related behaviours. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. The effect of finger spreading on drag of the hand in human swimming

    CERN Document Server

    van Houwelingen, Josje; Kunnen, Rudie P J; van Heijst, GertJan F; Grift, Ernst Jan; Breugem, Wim Paul; Delfos, Rene; Westerweel, Jerry; Clercx, Herman J H; van de Water, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finger spreading on hydrodynamic drag in swimming is studied both with a numerical simulation and with laboratory experiments. Both approaches are based on the exact same 3D model of the hand with attached forearm. The virtual version of the hand with forearm was implemented in a numerical code by means of an immersed boundary method and the physical version was studied in a wind tunnel experiment. An enhancement of the drag coefficient of 2 and 5% compared to the case with closed fingers was found for the numerical simulation and experiment, respectively. A 5 and 8% favourable effect on the (dimensionless) force moment at an optimal finger spreading of 10 degrees was found, which indicates that the difference is more outspoken in the force moment. Also an analytical model is proposed, using scaling arguments similar to the Betz actuator disk model, to explain the drag coefficient as a function of finger spacing.

  3. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly effortless, we adjust our movements to continuously changing environments. After initiation of a goal-directed movement, the motor command is under constant control of sensory feedback loops. The main sensory signals contributing to movement control are vision and proprioception. Recent...... of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception...... was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive...

  4. Ex vivo expansion of Primate CD34+ Cells isolated from Bone Marrow and Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells using a Novel Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaprasad D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived CD34+ cells have been in clinical application in patients with haematological malignancies. One of the major problems with this treatment is the non-availability of matched donors or the necessity of multiple transfusions depending upon the pathology. Recently evidences have been accumulating to prove the safety and efficacy of autologous CD34+ cells in diseases such as myocardial dysfunction, peripheral vascular diseases and neurological certain conditions. However there are only a few reports in the literature on ex vivo expansion of the bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. We have in two different studies proven that isolated CD34+ cells from baboon bone marrow and non-isolated BMMNCs from human bone marrow could be expanded with increase in percentage of CD34+ cells using a novel scaffold.

  5. Tensile material properties of human rib cortical bone under quasi-static and dynamic failure loading and influence of the bone microstucture on failure characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien; Valazquez-Ameijide, Juan; Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Crandall, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Finite element models of the thorax are under development to assist vehicle safety researchers with the design of countermeasures such as advanced restrain systems. Computational models have become more refined with increasing geometrical complexity as element size decreases. These finite element models can now capture small geometrical features with an attempt to predict fracture. However, the bone material properties currently available, and in particular the rate sensitivity, have been mainly determined from compression tests or tests on long bones. There is a need for a new set of material properties for the human rib cortical bone. With this objective, a new clamping technique was developed to test small bone coupons under tensile loading. Ten coupons were harvested from the cortical shell of the sixth and seventh left ribs from three cadavers. The coupons were tested to fracture under quasi-static (target strain rate of 0.07 %/s) and dynamic loading (target strain rate of 170 %/s). Prior to testing, eac...

  6. Bone Turnover Markers After Sleep Restriction and Circadian Disruption: A Mechanism for Sleep-Related Bone Loss in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Christine M; Shea, Steven A; Wolfe, Pamela; Cain, Sean W; Munch, Mirjam; Vujovic, Nina; Czeisler, Charles A; Buxton, Orfeu M; Orwoll, Eric S

    2017-10-01

    Sleep abnormalities are associated with low bone mineral density. Underlying mechanisms are unknown. Investigate the impact of sleep restriction with circadian disruption on bone biomarkers. Intervention study. Four bone biomarkers [C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) = bone resorption, N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) = bone formation, sclerostin and fibroblast growth factor 23 = osteocyte function] were measured in bihourly serum samples over 24 hours at baseline and after ∼3 weeks of sleep restriction (5.6 hours sleep/24 hours) with concurrent circadian disruption (recurring 28-hour "day" in dim light) in 10 men (age groups: 20 to 27 years, n = 6; 55 to 65 years, n = 4). The effects of sleep/circadian disruption and age on bone biomarker levels were evaluated using maximum likelihood estimation in a mixed model for repeated measures. P1NP levels were lower after intervention compared with baseline (P sleep restriction can lead to an uncoupling of bone turnover wherein bone formation is decreased but bone resorption is unchanged. Circadian disruption and sleep restriction may be most detrimental to bone in early adulthood.

  7. Effect of nitrous oxide on folate coenzyme distribution and de novo synthesis of thymidylate in human bone marrow cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. Ermens (Anton); M. Schoester (Martijn); J. Lindemans (Jan); J. Abels

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The effect of nitrous oxide on intracellular folate metabolism of the human bone marrow was studied in vitro. Bone marrow cells, obtained from healthy volunteers, were incubated with 5 × 10−8m-[3H]5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-formylTHF) for 18 hr to label intracellular

  8. Metastasis to Bone in Human Cancer Is Associated with Loss of Occludin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tracey A; Jordan, Nicola; Davies, Eleri L; Jiang, Wen G

    2016-03-01

    Occludin is an integral membrane protein localised at tight junctions (TJ). There is no consensus regarding its paramount role in TJ. In previous work we showed that occludin is aberrantly expressed in both human breast tissues and cancer cell lines. This study demonstrates a link to bone metastasis in human cancer. Primary breast tumours (n=124) and matched normal tissues (n=30) were processed for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis. A hammerhead ribozyme was constructed to create occludin knockdown cell lines, MDA-MB-231(ΔOcc) and PC-3(ΔOcc). The effect of human bone matrix extract (BME) was investigated using cell growth and electric cell impedance sensing (ECIS) technology to measure changes in attachment/migration. Trans-epithelial resistance (TER) was measured for assessing changes in TJ function. Cells used were MDA-MB-231, PC-3, CORL-23, SKMES-1 and A-549 human cancer cell lines. Tumours from patients with bone metastasis had significantly lower occludin expression compared to those remaining alive/well (60.7±21 vs. 331±98, respectively, p=0.008). This was striking in ductal carcinomas, where patients alive/well had significantly higher occludin expression compared to those with bone metastasis (391±12.5 vs. 67.9±28, respectively, p=0.0014). ECIS demonstrated that MDA-MB-231(ΔOcc) showed reduced attachment to 5% BME compared to controls (84% vs. 100%) that prevented closure of wounded cell layers. Moreover, these cells had reduced growth on BME. In addition, BME changed the TER of a number of human cell lines and was able to effect changes in the growth of MDA-MB-241 and PC-3 cells, with greater effect on knockdown cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that occludin expression has a clear relationship with bone metastasis in human cancer. The discrepancy between this and the in vitro data indicating a reduction in migration/growth rate of occludin knockdown indicates that loss of occludin leads to complex changes in human

  9. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. Methods Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146+ and hMSC-CD146− cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high-content analysis...... and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. Results In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts and adipocytes...

  10. Potential Use of Bacterial Community Succession in Decaying Human Bone for Estimating Postmortem Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damann, Franklin E; Williams, Daniel E; Layton, Alice C

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria are taphonomic agents of human decomposition, potentially useful for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) in late-stage decomposition. Bone samples from 12 individuals and three soil samples were analyzed to assess the effects of decomposition and advancing time on bacterial communities. Results indicated that partially skeletonized remains maintained a presence of bacteria associated with the human gut, whereas bacterial composition of dry skeletal remains maintained a community profile similar to soil communities. Variation in the UniFrac distances was significantly greater between groups than within groups (p decomposition stages. The oligotrophic environment of bone relative to soft tissue and the physical protection of organic substrates may preclude bacterial blooms during the first years of skeletonization. Therefore, community membership (unweighted) may be better for estimating PMI from skeletonized remains than community structure (weighted). © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Assessment of imaging quality in magnified phase CT of human bone tissue at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Boliang; Langer, Max; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Gauthier, Remy; Follet, Helene; Mitton, David; Olivier, Cecile; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Francoise

    2017-10-01

    Bone properties at all length scales have a major impact on the fracture risk in disease such as osteoporosis. However, quantitative 3D data on bone tissue at the cellular scale are still rare. Here we propose to use magnified X-ray phase nano-CT to quantify bone ultra-structure in human bone, on the new setup developed on the beamline ID16A at the ESRF, Grenoble. Obtaining 3D images requires the application of phase retrieval prior to tomographic reconstruction. Phase retrieval is an ill-posed problem for which various approaches have been developed. Since image quality has a strong impact on the further quantification of bone tissue, our aim here is to evaluate different phase retrieval methods for imaging bone samples at the cellular scale. Samples from femurs of female donors were scanned using magnified phase nano-CT at voxel sizes of 120 and 30 nm with an energy of 33 keV. Four CT scans at varying sample-to-detector distances were acquired for each sample. We evaluated three phase retrieval methods adapted to these conditions: Paganin's method at single distance, Paganin's method extended to multiple distances, and the contrast transfer function (CTF) approach for pure phase objects. These methods were used as initialization to an iterative refinement step. Our results based on visual and quantitative assessment show that the use of several distances (as opposed to single one) clearly improves image quality and the two multi-distance phase retrieval methods give similar results. First results on the segmentation of osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi from such images are presented.

  12. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Therapy Email to a friend * required fields From * ... ensure a healthy style of work. Find a Hand Therapist Search for a hand therapist in your ...

  13. EF-hands at atomic resolution: The structure of human psoriasin (S100A7) solved by MAD phasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov; Etzerodt, Michael; Madsen, Peder Søndergaard

    1998-01-01

    The S100 family consists of small acidic proteins, belonging to the EF-hand class of calcium-binding proteins. They are primarily regulatory proteins, involved in cell growth, cell structure regulation and signal transduction. Psoriasin (S100A7) is an 11.7 kDa protein that is highly upregulated......-substituted psoriasin has been determined by multiple anomalous wavelength dispersion (MAD) phasing and refined to atomic resolution (1.05 A). The structure represents the most accurately determined structure of a calcium-binding protein. Although the overall structure of psoriasin is similar to those of other S100...... proteins, several important differences exist, mainly in the N-terminal EF-hand motif that contains a distorted loop and lacks a crucial calcium-binding residue. It is these minor differences that may account for the different specificities among members of this family. CONCLUSIONS: The structure of human...

  14. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin in Otitis Media: Analysis of Human and Chinchilla Temporal Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachern, Patricia A; Kwon, Geeyoun; Briles, David E; Ferrieri, Patricia; Juhn, Steven; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Paparella, Michael M; Tsuprun, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial resistance in acute otitis can result in bacterial persistence and biofilm formation, triggering chronic and recurrent infections. To investigate the middle ear inflammatory response to bacterial infection in human and chinchilla temporal bones. Six chinchillas underwent intrabullar inoculations with 0.5 mL of 106 colony-forming units (CFUs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae, serotype 2. Two days later, we counted bacteria in middle ear effusions postmortem. One ear from each chinchilla was processed in paraffin and sectioned at 5 µm. The opposite ear was embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned at a thickness of 1 µm, and stained with toluidine blue. In addition, we examined human temporal bones from 2 deceased donors with clinical histories of otitis media (1 with acute onset otitis media, 1 with recurrent infection). Temporal bones had been previously removed at autopsy, processed, embedded in celloidin, and cut at a thickness of 20 µm. Sections of temporal bones from both chinchillas and humans were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunolabeled with antifibrin and antihistone H4 antibodies. Histopatological and imminohistochemical changes owing to otitis media. Bacterial counts in chinchilla middle ear effusions 2 days after inoculation were approximately 2 logs above initial inoculum counts. Both human and chinchilla middle ear effusions contained bacteria embedded in a fibrous matrix. Some fibers in the matrix showed positive staining with antifibrin antibody, others with antihistone H4 antibody. In acute and recurrent otitis media, fibrin and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are part of the host inflammatory response to bacterial infection. In the early stages of otitis media the host defense system uses fibrin to entrap bacteria, and NETs function to eliminate bacteria. In chronic otitis media, fibrin and NETs appear to persist.

  15. Assessment of Bone Microstructural Changes by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingwen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that age related increases in bone porosity without significant changes in bone mineral density (BMD) (without bone microstructural information) result in a decrease in bone strength. Bone fracture toughness is also significantly correlated to changes in porosity, microarchitecture, collagen integrity, microdamage, and water distribution, all of which are measures of bone quality. Unfortunately, current technology does not allow the non-destructive and non-invasive detection of bone water distribution or other measures of bone quality including microporosity. On the other hand, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation time measurements and computational analytical method have been used to determine microstructural characteristics of various types of fluid filled porous materials. The study in here is to demonstrate that non-destructive and non-invasive NMR proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation techniques has been developed and applied to quantify the porosity, pore size distribution and water distribution in human cortical bone. This new bone microstructural information can then be used as descriptions of bone quality and, along or in combination with existing method (BMD) to more accurately assess bone fracture risk, and the results could help doctors and researchers to detect osteoporosis and other conditions related to weak bones in persons.

  16. Joint attention without gaze following: human infants and their parents coordinate visual attention to objects through eye-hand coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu

    Full Text Available The coordination of visual attention among social partners is central to many components of human behavior and human development. Previous research has focused on one pathway to the coordination of looking behavior by social partners, gaze following. The extant evidence shows that even very young infants follow the direction of another's gaze but they do so only in highly constrained spatial contexts because gaze direction is not a spatially precise cue as to the visual target and not easily used in spatially complex social interactions. Our findings, derived from the moment-to-moment tracking of eye gaze of one-year-olds and their parents as they actively played with toys, provide evidence for an alternative pathway, through the coordination of hands and eyes in goal-directed action. In goal-directed actions, the hands and eyes of the actor are tightly coordinated both temporally and spatially, and thus, in contexts including manual engagement with objects, hand movements and eye movements provide redundant information about where the eyes are looking. Our findings show that one-year-olds rarely look to the parent's face and eyes in these contexts but rather infants and parents coordinate looking behavior without gaze following by attending to objects held by the self or the social partner. This pathway, through eye-hand coupling, leads to coordinated joint switches in visual attention and to an overall high rate of looking at the same object at the same time, and may be the dominant pathway through which physically active toddlers align their looking behavior with a social partner.

  17. Comparison of the FreeHand® robotic camera holder with human assistants during endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Franz, Toni; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Minh, Do; Dietel, Anja; Hicks, James; Nicolaus, Martin; Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2011-03-01

    • To assess, in a prospective randomized study, the efficiency of the FreeHand® (Prosurgics Ltd, Bracknell, UK) compared to manual camera control during the performance of endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE). • Three surgeons performed 50 EERPE for localized prostate cancer. In group A (n= 25), procedures were performed with manual control of the camera by the assistant, whereas group B (n= 25) patients were treated with the assistance of the FreeHand® robotic device. • The EERPE procedure was divided into several steps. • Total operation duration, time for each surgical step, number of camera movements, number of movement errors, number of times the lens was cleaned, blood loss and margin status were compared. • No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of patient age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, positive cores and prostate volume. • The average operation duration required for the performance of each step did not differ significantly between the two groups. • Significant differences in favour of the FreeHand® camera holder were observed in case of horizontal and zooming camera movement, camera cleaning and camera errors. • Vertical camera movements were performed significantly faster by the human assistant compared to the robotic camera holder. • The average total operation duration was similar for both groups. • Positive surgical margins were detected in one patient in each group (4% of the patients). • A comparison of the FreeHand® robotic camera holder with human camera control during EERPE showed a similar time requirement for the performance of each step of the procedure. • The robotic system provided accurate and fast movements of the camera without compromising the outcome of the procedure. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  18. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  19. Analysis of OPLA scaffolds for bone engineering constructs using human jaw periosteal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dorothea; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Munz, Adelheid; Friedrich, Björn; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Reinert, Siegmar

    2008-03-01

    For bone regeneration constructs using human jaw periosteal cells (JPC) the extent of osteoinductive ability of different three-dimensional scaffolds is not yet established. We analyzed open-cell polylactic acid (OPLA) scaffolds for their suitability as bone engineering constructs using human JPC. Cell adhesion and spreading was visualized on the surface of scaffolds by scanning electron microscopy. JPC proliferation within OPLA scaffolds was compared with proliferation within collagen and calcium phosphate scaffolds. We found a significant increase of proliferation rates in OPLA scaffolds versus Coll/CaP scaffolds at three time points. Live-measurements of oxygen consumption within the cell-seeded scaffolds indicate that the in vitro culturing time should not exceed 12-15 days. OPLA scaffolds, which were turned out to be the most beneficial for JPC growth, were chosen for osteogenic differentiation experiments with or without BMP-2. Gene expression analyses demonstrated induction of several osteogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase, osterix, Runx-2 and insulin-like growth factor) within the 3D-scaffolds after 12 days of in vitro culturing. Element analysis by EDX spectrometry of arising nodules during osteogenesis demonstrated that JPC growing within OPLA scaffolds are able to form CaP particles. We conclude that OPLA scaffolds provide a promising environment for bone substitutes using human JPC.

  20. Sustained human hematopoiesis in sheep transplanted in utero during early gestation with fractionated adult human bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, E F; Zanjani, E D; Brandt, J E; Leemhuis, T; Briddell, R A; Heerema, N A; Hoffman, R

    1992-03-15

    Sheep were transplanted in utero during early gestation with subpopulations of adult human bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for human progenitor and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Chimerism was documented in three of seven transplanted fetuses using monoclonal antibodies against human-specific hematopoietic cell lineages and/or cytogenetic analysis of BM and peripheral blood cells of recipients. Only chimeric sheep BM cells expressing CD45 (6.0% of total BM cells) formed human hematopoietic colonies in response to human recombinant cytokines as determined by cytogenetic analysis. Sorted CD45+ BM cells developed human T-cell colonies containing CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells. DNA from chimeric BM cells obtained 3 months after birth displayed a finger printing pattern identical to that of DNA from the human donor of the HSC graft. These studies indicate that first trimester sheep fetuses are tolerant of adult human HSC grafts, thus permitting the creation of xenogeneic chimera expressing human myeloid and lymphoid lineages. The present findings also suggest that HSC grafts from immunologically competent, HLA-mismatched adult donors may be useful for correcting human genetic diseases in utero during early gestation.

  1. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes

    OpenAIRE

    Galeazzi, Juan M.; Navajas, Joaquin; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw....

  2. Sound wave propagation on the human skull surface with bone conduction stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Stenfelt, Stefan; Ihrle, Sebastian; Gerig, Rahel; Pfiffner, Flurin; Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Röösli, Christof

    2017-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) is an alternative to air conduction to stimulate the inner ear. In general, the stimulation for BC occurs on a specific location directly on the skull bone or through the skin covering the skull bone. The stimulation propagates to the ipsilateral and contralateral cochlea, mainly via the skull bone and possibly via other skull contents. This study aims to investigate the wave propagation on the surface of the skull bone during BC stimulation at the forehead and at ipsilateral mastoid. Measurements were performed in five human cadaveric whole heads. The electro-magnetic transducer from a BCHA (bone conducting hearing aid), a Baha® Cordelle II transducer in particular, was attached to a percutaneously implanted screw or positioned with a 5-Newton steel headband at the mastoid and forehead. The Baha transducer was driven directly with single tone signals in the frequency range of 0.25-8 kHz, while skull bone vibrations were measured at multiple points on the skull using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) system and a 3D LDV system. The 3D velocity components, defined by the 3D LDV measurement coordinate system, have been transformed into tangent (in-plane) and normal (out-of-plane) components in a local intrinsic coordinate system at each measurement point, which is based on the cadaver head's shape, estimated by the spatial locations of all measurement points. Rigid-body-like motion was dominant at low frequencies below 1 kHz, and clear transverse traveling waves were observed at high frequencies above 2 kHz for both measurement systems. The surface waves propagation speeds were approximately 450 m/s at 8 kHz, corresponding trans-cranial time interval of 0.4 ms. The 3D velocity measurements confirmed the complex space and frequency dependent response of the cadaver heads indicated by the 1D data from the SLDV system. Comparison between the tangent and normal motion components, extracted by transforming the 3D velocity components

  3. Effects of bone damage on creep behaviours of human vertebral trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; Szarko, Matthew; Wang, Yue; Luo, Jin

    2018-01-01

    A subgroup of patients suffering with vertebral fractures can develop progressive spinal deformities over time. The mechanism underlying such clinical observation, however, remains unknown. Previous studies suggested that creep deformation of the vertebral trabeculae may play a role. Using the acoustic emission (AE) technique, this study investigated effects of bone damage (modulus reduction) on creep behaviours of vertebral trabecular bone. Thirty-seven human vertebral trabeculae samples were randomly assigned into five groups (A to E). Bones underwent mechanical tests using similar experimental protocols but varied degree of bone damage was induced. Samples first underwent creep test (static compressive stress of 0.4MPa) for 30min, and then were loaded in compression to a specified strain level (0.4%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.5%, and 4% for group A to E, respectively) to induce different degrees of bone damage (0.4%, no damage control; 1.0%, yield strain; 1.5%, beyond yield strain, 2.5% and 4%, post-ultimate strains). Samples were creep loaded (0.4MPa) again for 30min. AE techniques were used to monitor bone damage. Bone damage increased significantly from group A to E (P30% of modulus reduction in group D and E. Before compressive loading, creep deformation was not different among the five groups and AE hits in creep test were rare. After compressive loading, creep deformation was significantly greater in group D and E than those in other groups (P<0.05). The number of AE hits and other AE measurements during creep test were significantly greater in group D and E than in group A, B, and C (P<0.05 for all). Data suggested that with the increase of vertebral trabecular bone damage, substantial creep deformation may occur even when the vertebra was under physiological loads. The boosted creep deformation observed may be attributed to newly created trabecular microfractures. Findings provide a possible explanation as to why some vertebral fracture patients develop progressive

  4. Gestures in instructional animations: A helping hand to understanding non-human movements?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, B.B.; Tabbers, H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on dynamic visualizations suggests that these visualizations are effective for learning human movements such as knot tying or paper folding. Using embodied theories of cognition, this study investigated whether learning non-human movements from a dynamic visualization can also be

  5. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E., E-mail: andrade@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Solís, C.; Canto, C.E.; Lucio, O.G. de [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Chavez, E. [ESIME-Z, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ALM Zacatenco, 07738 México D.F. (Mexico); Rocha, M.F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C.A. [Centro INAH Zacatecas, Miguel Auza No. 205, Col. Centro, Zacatecas/Zacatecas CP 98000 (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in “El Cóporo”, an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: {sup 14}C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The {sup 14}C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone’s black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment.

  6. An analysis of factors affecting the mercury content in the human femoral bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, A; Dąbrowski, M; Kubaszewski, Ł; Rogala, P; Kowalski, A; Frankowski, M

    2017-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the content of mercury in bone tissue of the proximal femur (head and neck bone) of 95 patients undergoing total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, using CF-AFS analytical technique. Furthermore, the investigations were aimed at assessing the impact of selected factors, such as age, gender, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to chemical substance at work, type of degenerative changes, clinical evaluation and radiological parameters, type of medications, on the concentration of mercury in the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Mercury was obtained in all samples of the head and neck of the femur (n = 190) in patients aged 25-91 years. The mean content of mercury for the whole group of patients was as follows: 37.1 ± 35.0 ng/g for the femoral neck and 24.2 ± 19.5 ng/g for the femoral head. The highest Hg contents were found in femoral neck samples, both in women and men, and they amounted to 169.6 and 176.5 ng/g, respectively. The research showed that the mercury content of bones can be associated with body mass index, differences in body anatomy, and gender. The uses of statistical analysis gave the possibility to define the influence of factors on mercury content in human femoral bones.

  7. [The role of osteocalcin in the connection of bone and glucose metabolism in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buday, Barbara; Kulcsár, Eniko; Literáti Nagy, Botond; Horváth, Tünde; Vitai, Márta; Vecsei, Istvánné; Bezzegh, Katalin; Kiss, József; Péterfai, Eva; Koltay, László; Korányi, László

    2008-12-21

    The lack of osteoblast derived osteocalcin in mice causes reduced pancreatic beta-cell proliferation, decreased expression of insulin gene and adiponectin gene in adipocytes as well. The relationship between insulin sensitivity, osteocalcin and bone state in 45 healthy (20 females, 25 males) and 92 glucose intolerant (51 females, 41 males) subjects was examined. Body composition, bone density, markers of bone resorption and formation as well as glucose uptake (M value for insulin sensitivity) measured by hyperinsulinemic normoglycemic clamp were determined separately in males and females. Osteocalcin levels were similar in the two genders, however, glucose intolerant men had lower osteocalcin levels than healthy men (24.5+/-11 vs. 18.1+/-9 ng/ml, p genders. Based on a multivariate regression analysis, in all females significant independent predictors of osteocalcin level were fasting blood glucose, whole and lean body mass glucose uptake, metabolic clearance rate, estradiol and LDL-cholesterol levels (determined 92% of its value), while in all men these were serum calcium, OGTT glucose area under the curve, free fatty acid levels, insulogenic index, HOMA-R and waist/hip ratio (determined 95% of its value). The BMU index characterizing bone resorption/formation correlated significantly with the M values only in women. This study confirmed the relationship between insulin sensitivity and osteocalcin in healthy human population, although basic difference was found between the two genders which was not related to osteocalcin.

  8. Analysis of crack propagation in human long bone by using finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohammad Shahril; Salleh, Ahmad Faizal; Daud, Ruslizam

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research is to present a numerical modeling of crack for human long bone specifically on femur shaft bone under mode I loading condition. Two - dimensional model (2D) of long bone was developed based on past research study. The finite element analysis and construction of the model are done using Mechanical APDL (ANSYS) v14.0 software. The research was conducted mainly based on two conditions that were at different crack lengths and different loading forces for male and female. In order to evaluate the stress intensity factor (KI) of the femur shaft of long bone, this research employed finite element method to predict the brittle fracture loading by using three-point bending test. The result of numerical test found that the crack was formed when the crack length reached 0.0022 m where KI values are proportional with the crack's length. Also, various loading forces in range of 400 N to 1000 N were applied in an attempt to study their effect on stress intensity factor and it was found that the female dimension has higher KI values compared to male. It was also observed that K values found by this method have good agreement with theoretical results based on previous research.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) inactivation of banked bone by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salai, M; Vonsover, A; Pritch, M; von Versen, R; Horoszowski, H

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-positive carriers, poses difficulties when musculo-skeletal tissues are considered for banking in readiness for future clinical application. This study was conducted to test the actual yield of gamma irradiation on HIV infectivity, within HIV-infected bones. The effect of gamma irradiation on bones containing T-cells chronically infected with HIV type I (HIV-I) was studied, in respect to inactivation of the virus. After exposure of the cell-free virus or infected T-cells to 2.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, the authors were able to demonstrate complete inactivation of the virus. It would appear from this study that gamma irradiation at this dose is sufficient to achieve clinical sterilisation of bones and facilitate their use for reconstructive procedures by eliminating the risk of HIV transmission to the recipient. Furthermore, when preparing bones for banking, this would also seem to be the method of choice in preventing the transmission of various strains of bacteria, fungi and other viruses.

  10. Bone tissue engineering with human mesenchymal stem cell sheets constructed using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-08-01

    An in vitro reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues without the use of scaffolds may be an alternative strategy for tissue engineering. We have developed a novel tissue engineering strategy, termed magnetic force-based tissue engineering (Mag-TE), in which magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) with a positive charge at the liposomal surface, and magnetic force were used to construct 3D tissue without scaffolds. In this study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) magnetically labeled with MCLs were seeded onto an ultra-low attachment culture surface, and a magnet (4000 G) was placed on the reverse side. The MSCs formed multilayered sheet-like structures after a 24-h culture period. MSCs in the sheets constructed by Mag-TE maintained an in vitro ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes after a 21-day culture period using each induction medium. Using an electromagnet, MSC sheets constructed by Mag-TE were harvested and transplanted into the bone defect in the crania of nude rats. Histological observation revealed that new bone surrounded by osteoblast-like cells was formed in the defect area 14 days after transplantation with MSC sheets, whereas no bone formation was observed in control rats without the transplant. These results indicated that Mag-TE could be used for the transplantation of MSC sheets using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force, providing novel methodology for bone tissue engineering.

  11. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  12. Novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based cryoprotection method that facilitates cutting frozen sections of decalcified human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, I Piotr; Rahner, Christoph; Nowakowski, Andrej Maria; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2013-12-01

    Processing adult human trabecular bone to obtain tissue sections suitable for research or diagnostic purposes has always been challenging, particularly in the preparation of adult bone specimens for advanced immunohistochemistry applications. In contrast to the majority of soft tissues, decalcified bone samples perform poorly under standard paraffin embedding techniques and immunolabeling protocols fail frequently, due to the loss of protein antigenicity observed. We report on a new, PVA based infiltration method that avoids excessive heat exposure to tissue samples during embedding. The developed PVA based infiltration medium provides sufficient structural support to the heterogenic morphology and distinct architecture of subchondral trabecular bone and adjacent articular cartilage. Furthermore, the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to this infiltration solution guaranteed safe attachment of cryosections to glass slides. The protocol allows the preparation of high quality sections of adult human trabecular bone tissues which can be used for both classical histochemical stains and for immunohistochemistry, since protein antigenicity is satisfactorily preserved.

  13. The use of human dental pulp stem cells for in vivo bone tissue engineering: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker Junior, Alessander; Gomes Pinheiro, Carla Cristina; Lazzaretti Fernandes, Tiago; Franco Bueno, Daniela

    2018-01-01

    Dental pulp represents a promising and easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for clinical applications. Many studies have investigated the use of human dental pulp stem cells and stem cells isolated from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth for bone tissue engineering in vivo. However, the type of scaffold used to support the proliferation and differentiation of dental stem cells, the animal model, the type of bone defect created, and the methods for evaluation of results were extremely heterogeneous among these studies conducted. With this issue in mind, the main objective of this study is to present and summarize, through a systematic review of the literature, in vivo studies in which the efficacy of human dental pulp stem cells and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for bone regeneration was evaluated. The article search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science databases. Original research articles assessing potential of human dental pulp stem cells and SHED for in vivo bone tissue engineering, published from 1984 to November 2017, were selected and evaluated in this review according to the following eligibility criteria: published in English, assessing dental stem cells of human origin and evaluating in vivo bone tissue formation in animal models or in humans. From the initial 1576 potentially relevant articles identified, 128 were excluded due to the fact that they were duplicates and 1392 were considered ineligible as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. As a result, 56 articles remained and were fully analyzed in this systematic review. The results obtained in this systematic review open new avenues to perform bone tissue engineering for patients with bone defects and emphasize the importance of using human dental pulp stem cells and SHED to repair actual bone defects in an appropriate animal model.

  14. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  15. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K.; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth Hauberg

    2015-01-01

    by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In order to identify the molecular phenotype associated with enhanced migration, we carried out comparative DNA microarray analysis of gene expression of hBMSC-derived high bone forming (HBF) clones versus low bone forming (LBF) clones. RESULTS: HBF clones were exhibited higher ex...

  16. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, Huipin; Coffer, P.J.; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  17. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, H.; Coffer, P.J; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  18. [Bacteriological study of oral cavity of people of Mexican origin to determine etiology agents of human infections in hand bite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo-Guzmán, Cristhyan Baruch; Espinosa-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Guzmán-Murillo, María Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Hand infections secondary to human bites often leave serious consequences on the functioning of the hand. Such infections are caused by different bacteria. Most bacteriological studies have been made to people of Anglo-Saxon origin or descent, and based on these findings; provide treatment to patients of different origins which may not always be as effective. Descriptive, internal stratified 17 patients were isolated samples of oral cavity and dental plaque bacterial species to identify and define the possible treatment according to the species identified. Microorganisms were isolated Gram (+) and Gram (-) belonging to the normal flora of the oral cavity and dental plaque in all the cases studied, presenting a variable number of microorganisms according to age but not by sex. The group of Gram-positive bacteria isolated showed sensitivity to: erythromycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. In the group of Gram negative: kanamycin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, E. Corrodens sensitive to the group of quinolones as ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin as well as ceftriaxone and cefoperazone sulbactam. The bacterial species that are commonly found in normal flora of the oral cavity and dental plaque may be potential pathogens in a hand injury where to find the appropriate conditions for their development.

  19. Discrimination of human bodies from bones and teeth remains by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Manzoor, S.; Ugidos, T.; Navarro-Villoslada, F.; Caceres, J. O.

    2014-11-01

    A fast and minimally destructive method based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Neural Networks (NN) has been developed and applied to the classification and discrimination of human bones and teeth fragments. The methodology can be useful in Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) tasks. The elemental compositions of bone and teeth samples provided enough information to achieve a correct discrimination and reassembling of different human remains. Individuals were classified with spectral correlation higher than 95%, regardless of the type of bone or tooth sample analyzed. No false positive or false negative was observed, demonstrating the high robustness and accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  20. Effects of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Dose and Ceramic Composition on New Bone Formation and Space Maintenance in a Canine Mandibular Ridge Saddle Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Anne D; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Shimko, Daniel A; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Cochran, David L; Guelcher, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of mandibular osseous defects is a significant clinical challenge. Maintenance of the height and width of the mandibular ridge is essential for placement of dental implants and restoration of normal dentition. While guided bone regeneration using protective membranes is an effective strategy for maintaining the anatomic contour of the ridge and promoting new bone formation, complications have been reported, including wound failure, seroma, and graft exposure leading to infection. In this study, we investigated injectable low-viscosity (LV) polyurethane/ceramic composites augmented with 100 μg/mL (low) or 400 μg/mL (high) recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) as space-maintaining bone grafts in a canine mandibular ridge saddle defect model. LV grafts were injected as a reactive paste that set in 5-10 min to form a solid porous composite with bulk modulus exceeding 1 MPa. We hypothesized that compression-resistant LV grafts would enhance new bone formation and maintain the anatomic contour of the mandibular ridge without the use of protective membranes. At the rhBMP-2 dose recommended for the absorbable collagen sponge carrier in dogs (400 μg/mL), LV grafts maintained the width and height of the host mandibular ridge and supported new bone formation, while at suboptimal (100 μg/mL) doses, the anatomic contour of the ridge was not maintained. These findings indicate that compression-resistant bone grafts with bulk moduli exceeding 1 MPa and rhBMP-2 doses comparable to that recommended for the collagen sponge carrier support new bone formation and maintain ridge height and width in mandibular ridge defects without protective membranes.

  1. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally James

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis of functional markers for BMSC subsets. All clones expressed typical BMSC cell-surface antigens; however, clones with trilineage differentiation capacity exhibited enhanced vascular interaction gene sets, whereas non-differentiating clones were uniquely CD317 positive with significantly enriched immunomodulatory transcriptional networks and high IL-7 production. IL-7 lineage tracing and CD317 immunolocalization confirmed the existence of a rare non-differentiating BMSC subtype, distinct from Cxcl12-DsRed+ perivascular stromal cells in vivo. Colony-forming CD317+ IL-7hi cells, identified at ∼1%–3% frequency in heterogeneous human BMSC fractions, were found to have the same biomolecular profile as non-differentiating BMSC clones using Raman spectroscopy. Distinct functional identities can be assigned to BMSC subpopulations, which are likely to have specific roles in immune control, lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis.

  2. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O'Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium's osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell-implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications.

  3. Reducing microbial and human contamination in DNA extractions from ancient bones and teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korlević, Petra; Gerber, Tobias; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Nagel, Sarah; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Meyer, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Although great progress has been made in improving methods for generating DNA sequences from ancient biological samples, many, if not most, samples are still not amenable for analyses due to overwhelming contamination with microbial or modern human DNA. Here we explore different DNA decontamination procedures for ancient bones and teeth for use prior to DNA library preparation and high-throughput sequencing. Two procedures showed promising results: (i) the release of surface-bound DNA by phosphate buffer and (ii) the removal of DNA contamination by sodium hypochlorite treatment. Exposure to phosphate removes on average 64% of the microbial DNA from bone powder but only 37% of the endogenous DNA (from the organism under study), increasing the percentage of informative sequences by a factor of two on average. An average 4.6-fold increase, in one case reaching 24-fold, is achieved by sodium hypochlorite treatment, albeit at the expense of destroying 63% of the endogenous DNA preserved in the bone. While both pretreatment methods described here greatly reduce the cost of genome sequencing from ancient material due to efficient depletion of microbial DNA, we find that the removal of human DNA contamination remains a challenging problem.

  4. Dextrous robot hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Editor); Iberall, Thea (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of human hand function and their implications for the design of robot hands are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include human grasp choice and robotic grasp analysis, opposition space and human prehension, coordination in normal and prosthetic reaching, and intelligent exploration by the human hand. Consideration is given to a task-oriented dextrous manipulation architecture, the control architecture for the Belgrade/USC hand, the analysis of multifingered grasping and manipulation, and tactile sensing for shape interpretation. Diagrams, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  5. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Microencapsulated Human Pheochromocytoma Cell in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l lysine-alginate (APA microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain.

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in lyophilized or frozen demineralized human bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Antebi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the effects of application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electrons as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, on lyophilized or frozen demineralized bone tissue for use in transplants. METHODS: Five human femoral diaphyses from different donors of musculoskeletal tissue were demineralized and preserved as lyophilized or frozen at -80 °C. The samples were divided into two groups: non-irradiated (control and irradiated by means of gamma rays or an electron beam. The bone proteins were extracted and used to determine the concentrations of total protein and BMP 2 and 7. RESULTS: Decreases in total protein and BMP 2 and 7 concentrations were observed. The decreases in total protein concentrations, in comparison with the respective control groups, were significant in the lyophilized and frozen samples that were irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy of gamma radiation and electron beam, with reductions of more than 30%. Significant decreases in the levels of BMP 2 and 7 were also observed at higher doses and especially through use of the electron beam. CONCLUSION: The reductions in the concentrations of total proteins and osteoinductive proteins (BMP 2 and 7 were related to the radiation dose, i.e. they increased with higher doses of ionizing radiation type and the type of bone preservation. The largest reductions in concentrations were observed in the bones irradiated by means of an electron beam and at a dose of 50 kGy. However, this type of radiation and this high dose are not usual practices for sterilization of bone tissue.

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in lyophilized or frozen demineralized human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antebi, Uri; Mathor, Monica Beatriz; da Silva, André Ferreira; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the effects of application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electrons) as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, on lyophilized or frozen demineralized bone tissue for use in transplants. Five human femoral diaphyses from different donors of musculoskeletal tissue were demineralized and preserved as lyophilized or frozen at -80 °C. The samples were divided into two groups: non-irradiated (control) and irradiated by means of gamma rays or an electron beam. The bone proteins were extracted and used to determine the concentrations of total protein and BMP 2 and 7. Decreases in total protein and BMP 2 and 7 concentrations were observed. The decreases in total protein concentrations, in comparison with the respective control groups, were significant in the lyophilized and frozen samples that were irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy of gamma radiation and electron beam, with reductions of more than 30%. Significant decreases in the levels of BMP 2 and 7 were also observed at higher doses and especially through use of the electron beam. The reductions in the concentrations of total proteins and osteoinductive proteins (BMP 2 and 7) were related to the radiation dose, i.e. they increased with higher doses of ionizing radiation type and the type of bone preservation. The largest reductions in concentrations were observed in the bones irradiated by means of an electron beam and at a dose of 50 kGy. However, this type of radiation and this high dose are not usual practices for sterilization of bone tissue.

  8. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plutonium and uranium in human bones from areas surrounding the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Sakaguchi, Aya; Shinohara, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Osamu; Apsalikov, Kazbek N; Gusev, Boris I

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the present levels of 239,240Pu and U in residents living near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, more than 70 bone samples were obtained at autopsy. The subjects ranged in age from 30 to 86 years (mean 59.3+/-12.9). Most of the samples consisted of victims who died of various diseases. Plutonium and U were radiochemically separated and determined by alpha-ray spectrometry. The mean concentrations of 239,240Pu and 238U observed were 0.050+/-0.041 mBq/g-ash (vertebrae 71, long-bones 18) and 0.28+/-0.13 mBq/g-ash (22.8+/-10.6 microg U/kg-ash) (vertebrae 58, long bones 16), respectively. The present 239,240Pu levels were within the range found for human bone samples from other countries due solely to global fallout in the early 1980s. The average U concentration was close to the estimate (mean 22.5 microg U/kg-ash) for the UK, and about 10 times higher than those estimated for residents in New York City and Japan. By assuming that the average concentration of 239,240Pu in bone samples is the value at 45 years after instantaneous inhalation in 1955, the initial total intake and the effective dose for 45 years were estimated as 10 Bq and 0.2 mSv, respectively. The annual intake of total U (234,235,238U) and its effective dose for 60 years were estimated as 30 Bq for adult and 0.1 mSv, respectively, for chronic ingestion.

  10. Ethylene oxide sterilization of bone, dura mater, and fascia lata for human transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, D J; Pedrotti, P W; White, D H

    1980-05-01

    The use of allogeneic human bone, dura, and fascia has achieved an enduring and accelerating role in the augmentation of spinal fusions and the repair of skeletal and dural defects. Primary sterilization of these nonviable cadaveric tissues magnifies the potential sources and ensures the microbiological sterility of the implant. Subsequent lyophilization facilitates preservation and distribution and reduces the immunogenicity of the graft. The evaluation of gaseous ethylene oxide (EO) as a sterilant was suggested by the delerious effects of alternative methods. Through a series of experiments, the following properties of EO sterilization were studied: (a) surface and interstitial sterilization; (b) the diffusion of EO into tissue, the formation of the reaction products ethylene chlorohydrin (EC) and ethylene glycol (EG), and the desorption of all three from tissues; (c) lyophilization and aeration in the removal of residues; and (d) minimization of residues through pretreatment. Gaseous EO is a very effective surface sterilant of wet bone, dura, and fascia and does not grossly alter these tissues. Its partial penetration through compact bone renders it less reliable for an interstitial antimicrobial effect, unless access to the interior is provided by serial openings. The toxicity of EO, EC, and EG mandates the desorption through lyophilization of these compounds (EC and EG are formed during sterilization with EO). Before sterilization, bone must be rid of marrow by vigorous irrigation with deionized water. The resultant reduction of the number of cells and of the available chloride decreases antigenicity and the formation of EC. Freeze-drying for more than 72 hours, in some cases augmented by prolonged aeration at room temperature, reduces EO, EC, and EG to acceptable levels. The accurate assay of residues in tissue requires acetone extraction for gas chromatography on rehydrated tissues because extraction of dry tissues gives falsely low results. Rigorous

  11. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S. S.; Mohamad, M.; Syazarina, S. O.; Nafisah, W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain.

  12. Extensive human DNA contamination in extracts from ancient dog bones and teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Helena; Storå, Jan; Dalén, Love; Holmlund, Gunilla; Götherström, Anders

    2005-10-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) sequences, especially those of human origin, are notoriously difficult to analyze due to molecular damage and exogenous DNA contamination. Relatively few systematic studies have focused on this problem. Here we investigate the extent and origin of human DNA contamination in the most frequently used sources for aDNA studies, that is, bones and teeth from museum collections. To distinguish contaminant DNA from authentic DNA we extracted DNA from dog (Canis familiaris) specimens. We monitored the presence of a 148-bp human-specific and a 152-bp dog-specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragment in DNA extracts as well as in negative controls. The total number of human and dog template molecules were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the sequences were characterized by amplicon cloning and sequencing. Although standard precautions to avoid contamination were taken, we found that all samples from the 29 dog specimens contained human DNA, often at levels exceeding the amount of authentic ancient dog DNA. The level of contaminating human DNA was also significantly higher in the dog extracts than in the negative controls, and an experimental setup indicated that this was not caused by the carrier effect. This suggests that the contaminating human DNA mainly originated from the dog bones rather than from laboratory procedures. When cloned, fragments within a contaminated PCR product generally displayed several different sequences, although one haplotype was often found in majority. This leads us to believe that recognized criteria for authenticating aDNA cannot separate contamination from ancient human DNA the way they are presently used.

  13. Establishing quiescence in human bone marrow stem cells leads to enhanced osteoblast marker expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Rumman, Mohammad; Kassem, Moustapha

    67 and BRDU, were demonstrated to down regulate within 24hrs of cell suspension and reestablishment of proliferation was observed by 24hrs post G0 as demonstrated by Ki67 and BRDU staining. In addition, no staining was observed for the senescence marker b-Galactosidase during or post G0. Gene......Human bone marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hBMSC) are cells that retain a multi-lineage differentiation potential and are thus increasingly being investigated for use in clinical applications. In vivo BMSC, which comprise approximately 0.1% of the bone marrow compartment, are thought...... to maintain their ‘stemness’ in the niche for prolonged periods of time by inducing a reversible exit of the cell cycle termed quiescence (G0). However, little is known about the induction, regulation or maintenance of this state in hBMSC. Quiescence, which usually occurs during the G1 stage of the cell cycle...

  14. Growth and potential damage of human bone-derived cells on fresh and aged fullerene c60 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopova, Ivana; Bacakova, Lucie; Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri

    2013-04-26

    Fullerenes are nanoparticles composed of carbon atoms arranged in a spherical hollow cage-like structure. Numerous studies have evaluated the therapeutic potential of fullerene derivates against oxidative stress-associated conditions, including the prevention or treatment of arthritis. On the other hand, fullerenes are not only able to quench, but also to generate harmful reactive oxygen species. The reactivity of fullerenes may change in time due to the oxidation and polymerization of fullerenes in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of fullerene films (from one week to one year) and the proliferation, viability and metabolic activity of human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS). We also monitored potential membrane and DNA damage and morphological changes of the cells. After seven days of cultivation, we did not observe any cytotoxic morphological changes, such as enlarged cells or cytosolic vacuole formation. Furthermore, there was no increased level of DNA damage. The increasing age of the fullerene films did not cause enhancement of cytotoxicity. On the contrary, it resulted in an improvement in the properties of these materials, which are more suitable for cell cultivation. Therefore, fullerene films could be considered as a promising material with potential use as a bioactive coating of cell carriers for bone tissue engineering.

  15. [Comparative analysis of bone mineral composition in human archeological material taken from different regions of Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noceń, I

    1999-01-01

    The actual paper presents the method and results of studies covering the mineral composition of the skulls of humans in the archaeological material stemming from different regions of Poland. The concentration of fluoride, zinc, iron, manganese, lead, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus was determined in 248 skulls. Distribution of individual burial sites providing the study material is presented in Fig. 1. The material was divided into four groups in relation to the place of deposition and in relation to the soil composition. Macro-, microelements determined by the method of atom absorption, phosphate by colourometric method, fluoride by potentiometric method. It has been disclosed that the bony material at the burial site is subjected to processes of fossilisation--replacing the organic matter by mineral one under definite soil conditions. The soil composition is the factor that influences the mineral composition of the bones in case of the following elements: zinc, manganese, lead, magnesium (Tab. 1). No influence was exerted by components contained in the soil on the determined concentrations of fluoride and iron in bones being explored from human skulls originating from archaeological excavation, undergo dynamic transformations in their mineral composition during their deposition in the soil. With the lapse of the time the content of fluoride (Tab. 2), magnesium (Tab. 7), calcium (Tab. 8), phosphate (Tab. 9) increases, while that of zinc (Tab. 3), iron (Tab. 4), manganese (Tab. 5) and lead (Tab. 6) decreases. The end concentration of elements in the archaeological bony material results from the following processes, namely: Cumulation, the example of which is the change in the concentration of fluoride, washing out the components of bone into the soil, to which the compounds of iron and manganese are subjected, compensations of concentrations of the bone soil border. That process took place in the case involving the changes in concentration of zinc, lead

  16. Theobromine Upregulates Osteogenesis by Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and Accelerates Bone Development in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; Ylostalo, Joni; Browder, Elizabeth; McNeill, Eoin P; Bartosh, Thomas J; Rawls, H Ralph; Nakamoto, Tetsuo; Gregory, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Theobromine (THB) is one of the major xanthine-like alkaloids found in cacao plant and a variety of other foodstuffs such as tea leaves, guarana and cola nuts. Historically, THB and its derivatives have been utilized to treat cardiac and circulatory disorders, drug-induced nephrotoxicity, proteinuria and as an immune-modulator. Our previous work demonstrated that THB has the capacity to improve the formation of hydroxyl-apatite during tooth development, suggesting that it may also enhance skeletal development. With its excellent safety profile and resistance to pharmacokinetic elimination, we reasoned that it might be an excellent natural osteoanabolic supplement during pregnancy, lactation and early postnatal growth. To determine whether THB had an effect on human osteoprogenitors, we subjected primary human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to osteogenic assays after exposure to THB in vitro and observed that THB exposure increased the rate of osteogenesis and mineralization by hMSCs. Moreover, THB exposure resulted in a list of upregulated mRNA transcripts that best matched an osteogenic tissue expression signature as compared to other tissue expression signatures archived in several databases. To determine whether oral administration of THB resulted in improved skeletal growth, we provided pregnant rats with chow supplemented with THB during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, offspring received THB continuously until postnatal day 50 (approximately 10 mg kg-1 day-1). Administration of THB resulted in neonates with larger bones, and 50-day-old offspring accumulated greater body mass, longer and thicker femora and superior tibial trabecular parameters. The accelerated growth did not adversely affect the strength and resilience of the bones. These results indicate that THB increases the osteogenic potential of bone marrow osteoprogenitors, and dietary supplementation of a safe dose of THB to expectant mothers and during the postnatal period could

  17. Monitoring Dynamic Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and Human Bone Tissue in a Co-Culture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contag, Christopher H.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Bammer, Marie C.; Hardy, Jonathan W.; Schmidt, Tobi L.; Maloney, William J.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bone is a preferential site of breast cancer metastasis and models are needed to study this process at the level of the microenvironment. We have used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and multiplex biomarker immunoassays to monitor dynamic breast cancer cell behaviors in co-culture with human bone tissue. Procedures Femur tissue fragments harvested from hip replacement surgeries were co-cultured with luciferase-positive MDA-MB-231-fLuc cells. BLI was performed to quantify breast cell division and track migration relative to bone tissue. Breast cell colonization of bone tissues was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Biomarkers in co-culture supernatants were profiled with MILLIPLEX® immunoassays. Results BLI demonstrated increased MDA-MB-231-fLuc proliferation (pbones, and revealed breast cell migration toward bone. Immunohistochemistry illustrated MDA-MB-231-fLuc colonization of bone, and MILLIPLEX® profiles of culture supernatants suggested breast/bone crosstalk. Conclusions Breast cell behaviors that facilitate metastasis occur reproducibly in human bone tissue co-cultures and can be monitored and quantified using BLI and multiplex immunoassays. PMID:24008275

  18. Human factors identification and classification related to accidents'causality on hand injuries in the manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Rosa María; Maldonado-Macías, Aide; Prado-León, Lilia Roselia

    2012-01-01

    The causes of occupational accidents from the perspective of human factors have been a subject which has received little attention into the field of scientific research. The aim of this research was to identify and classify the human factors that influence human errors and failures that cause accidents and injuries specifically on hands. Available studies related to the topic have been developed mainly for aerospace applications and are found insufficient to explain accidents causalities in the manufacturing industry. This research was developed in the assembly industry of automotive harnesses and was conducted following a mixed Cognitive Anthropological approach. This study was developed in two phases. During the first qualitative phase, participants freely listed their knowledge to identify elements of the cultural domain, then and in the second phase they performed the successive pile sort technique for the collection data to classify elements in the cultural domain. Statistical models like Cluster Analysis and Multidimensional Scaling were applied for results' validation purposes. As results, 70 different human factors were identified and in the second phase they were classified into 4 main categories which were: human error, unsafe conditions, individual factors, and organizational factors. Statistical methods validated these results.

  19. Clinical, histologic, and histomorphometric evaluation of mineralized solvent-dehydrated bone allograf (Puros) in human maxillary sinus grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumbissi, Sammy S; Lozada, Jaime L; Boyne, Philip J; Rohrer, Michael D; Clem, Donald; Kim, Jay S; Prasad, Hari

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (DFDBA) have been successfully used alone or in composite grafts for many decades. Little research has been done on the effect of retaining the mineral content of bone allografts. This study histologically and histomorphometrically evaluated a new mineralized bone allograft material placed in human atrophic maxillary sinuses. Seven partially edentulous patients requiring sinus grafts before implant placement were selected for this study Their age range was 56 to 81 years (mean 67.7 years). Test grafts consisted of a mineralized solvent-dehydrated cancellous bone allograft, and control grafts were a composite of DFDBA and deproteinized bovine bone xenograft (1:1). Bilateral cases (n = 3) received both test and control grafts on opposite sides, and unilateral cases received either a test (n = 3) or control (n = 1) graft only. At 10 months, core biopsies were taken from each graft site, and dental implants were placed into the augmented bone. All bone grafts resulted in new bone formation and all implants osseointegrated. Test grafts resorbed and were replaced by newly formed bone significantly faster and in greater quantities than were control grafts. No complications with grafts or implants were noted. Both test and control grafts achieved excellent results. The faster bone formation observed with the test graft may be due, in part, to its smaller particle size compared with the bovine portion of the control graft. Test grafts were either replaced by new bone or displayed new bone-to-particle surface contact in higher percentages than did control grafts. No differences in osseointegration or graft stability were noted 2 years after the study.

  20. Human Urine Derived Stem Cells in Combination with β-TCP Can Be Applied for Bone Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Guan

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering requires highly proliferative stem cells that are easy to isolate. Human urine stem cells (USCs are abundant and can be easily harvested without using an invasive procedure. In addition, in our previous studies, USCs have been proved to be able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, USCs may have great potential and advantages to be applied as a cell source for tissue engineering. However, there are no published studies that describe the interactions between USCs and biomaterials and applications of USCs for bone tissue engineering. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the interactions between USCs with a typical bone tissue engineering scaffold, beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP, and to determine whether the USCs seeded onto β-TCP scaffold can promote bone regeneration in a segmental femoral defect of rats. Primary USCs were isolated from urine and seeded on β-TCP scaffolds. Results showed that USCs remained viable and proliferated within β-TCP. The osteogenic differentiation of USCs within the scaffolds was demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. Furthermore, β-TCP with adherent USCs (USCs/β-TCP were implanted in a 6-mm critical size femoral defect of rats for 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was determined using X-ray, micro-CT, and histologic analyses. Results further demonstrated that USCs in the scaffolds could enhance new bone formation, which spanned bone defects in 5 out of 11 rats while β-TCP scaffold alone induced modest bone formation. The current study indicated that the USCs can be used as a cell source for bone tissue engineering as they are compatible with bone tissue engineering scaffolds and can stimulate the regeneration of bone in a critical size bone defect.

  1. Human Urine Derived Stem Cells in Combination with β-TCP Can Be Applied for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Haiyan; Zhu, Zhenzhong; Guo, Shangchun; Niu, Xin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering requires highly proliferative stem cells that are easy to isolate. Human urine stem cells (USCs) are abundant and can be easily harvested without using an invasive procedure. In addition, in our previous studies, USCs have been proved to be able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, USCs may have great potential and advantages to be applied as a cell source for tissue engineering. However, there are no published studies that describe the interactions between USCs and biomaterials and applications of USCs for bone tissue engineering. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the interactions between USCs with a typical bone tissue engineering scaffold, beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP), and to determine whether the USCs seeded onto β-TCP scaffold can promote bone regeneration in a segmental femoral defect of rats. Primary USCs were isolated from urine and seeded on β-TCP scaffolds. Results showed that USCs remained viable and proliferated within β-TCP. The osteogenic differentiation of USCs within the scaffolds was demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. Furthermore, β-TCP with adherent USCs (USCs/β-TCP) were implanted in a 6-mm critical size femoral defect of rats for 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was determined using X-ray, micro-CT, and histologic analyses. Results further demonstrated that USCs in the scaffolds could enhance new bone formation, which spanned bone defects in 5 out of 11 rats while β-TCP scaffold alone induced modest bone formation. The current study indicated that the USCs can be used as a cell source for bone tissue engineering as they are compatible with bone tissue engineering scaffolds and can stimulate the regeneration of bone in a critical size bone defect.

  2. Animals, Kids & Books: A Guide for Putting Humane Books into the Hands of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Barbara

    This guide for choosing humane children's books (i.e., books in which animals are not eaten, expolited, or treated with cruelty) presents reviews of over 100 books for children up to age 7. Both subtle and blatant examples of animal exploitation portrayed in children's picture books are examined. Reviews are grouped into 3 categories: kind books,…

  3. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Rainsberger, R. [XYZ Scientific Applications, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  4. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  5. Claw hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulnar nerve palsy - claw hand; Ulnar nerve dysfunction - claw hand; Ulnar claw ... Someone can be born with claw hand (congenital), or they can develop it because of certain disorders, such as nerve injury.

  6. Zone-dependent changes in human vertebral trabecular bone: clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Mosekilde, Lis

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that there are pronounced age-related changes in human vertebral cancellous bone density and microarchitecture. However, the magnitude of these changes seemed to be dependent on zone location in the vertebral body-the central third vs. the areas adjacent to the endplates...... this was significant only for trabecular separation. The described differences might have significant clinical implications concerning quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scanning, X-ray analyses, and assessment of fracture liability in the human spine, but the underlying pathogenesis is still not known. This study...... shows that the human vertebral body can be described as two distinct zones with very specific age-related changes in density and microstructure. This zone-specificity is important for the correct interpretation of clinical data....

  7. Rapid and Easy Histological Evaluation of Alveolar Human Bone Quality at Dental Implant Sites Using a Nondecalcified Frozen Cryofilm Section Technique: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kanou, Miwa; Takahashi-Nakagawa, Yasuko; Nakajima, Yoichiro; Sunano, Akihiro; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of bone quality at the site of the alveolar bone for a dental implant is very important. This study presents an easy technique for direct evaluation of alveolar bone quality using nondecalcified cryofilm frozen sections on human alveolar bone core samples. Core samples harvested from alveolar bone were immediately frozen in cooled hexanen and slowly cut using a disposable tungsten carbide blade; the sliced sections were collected with adhesive cryofilms. Staining was performed using von toluidine blue and von Kossa for microscopic observations. All core samples clearly showed bone structure components of cortical bone, trabecular bone, bone marrow, blood vessels, and bone-related cells. These results suggest the efficacy of a nondecalcified cryofilm frozen section technique for histological observation of surgical implant sites.

  8. Regulatory T cells are expanded by Teriparatide treatment in humans and mediate intermittent PTH-induced bone anabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingcan; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Vaccaro, Chiara; Li, Jau-Yi; Hsu, Emory; Buondonno, Ilaria; Sassi, Francesca; Adams, Jonathan; Weitzmann, M Neale; DiPaolo, Richard; Pacifici, Roberto

    2017-11-20

    Teriparatide is a bone anabolic treatment for osteoporosis, modeled in animals by intermittent PTH (iPTH) administration, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of iPTH are largely unknown. Here, we show that Teriparatide and iPTH cause a ~two-threefold increase in the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in humans and mice. Attesting in vivo relevance, blockade of the Treg increase in mice prevents the increase in bone formation and trabecular bone volume and structure induced by iPTH Therefore, increasing the number of Tregs is a pivotal mechanism by which iPTH exerts its bone anabolic activity. Increasing Tregs pharmacologically may represent a novel bone anabolic therapy, while iPTH-induced Treg increase may find applications in inflammatory conditions and transplant medicine. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. A novel strontium(II)-modified calcium phosphate bone cement stimulates human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M; Lode, A; Helth, A; Gelinsky, M

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, the in vitro effects of novel strontium-modified calcium phosphate bone cements (SrCPCs), prepared using two different approaches on human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were evaluated. Strontium ions, known to stimulate bone formation and therefore already used in systemic osteoporosis therapy, were incorporated into a hydroxyapatite-forming calcium phosphate bone cement via two simple approaches: incorporation of strontium carbonate crystals and substitution of Ca(2+) by Sr(2+) ions during cement setting. All modified cements released 0.03-0.07 mM Sr(2+) under in vitro conditions, concentrations that were shown not to impair the proliferation or osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, strontium modification led to a reduced medium acidification and Ca(2+) depletion in comparison to the standard calcium phosphate cement. In indirect and direct cell culture experiments with the novel SrCPCs significantly enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. In conclusion, the SrCPCs described here could be beneficial for the local treatment of defects, especially in the osteoporotic bone. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  11. Effect of Angelica sinensis on the proliferation of human bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Populo, Stephen M; Zhang, Jianying; Yang, Guoguang; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    2002-10-01

    Angelica sinensis, an herbal medicine known for its effect to purify blood quality and improve circulation, frequently appears as the main ingredient in prescriptions for bone injuries. Currently, how pharmacologically it contributes to the reformation of bone is unclear. The effect of the aqueous extract of Angelica sinensis on bone cells was investigated in vitro for the first time. The human osteoprecursor cells (OPC-1) were incubated in the medium with different concentrations of the aqueous extract of Angelica sinensis and the cell proliferation was studied. When the concentration of Angelica sinensis aqueous extract was 250 microg/ml. Under most treatments, the cells presented very pale expression for cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox 2) protein; slightly intensified band showed at the highest Angelica sinensis concentration, 1.0 mg/ml during the course of culture. The aqueous extract of Angelica sinensis was found to directly stimulate the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, protein secretion and particularly type I collagen synthesis of OPC-1 at dose-dependent manner. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. In vitro evidence of the structural optimization of the human skeletal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofolini, Luca

    2015-03-18

    Optimization can be seen in a number of human skeletal bones. While there is strong evidence concerning the mechanism at the tissue-level for bone adaptation to the applied loads, the structural optimization at the organ-level is somewhat less clear. This paper reviews the evidence, mainly based on in vitro testing, but also from anatomical and biomechanical considerations, concerning the shape-function relationship in some exemplar cases. The proximal femur is robustly optimized to resist a force applied in a range of directions during daily life, but also to absorb a large amount of energy if an impact is delivered on the greater trochanter during a sideways fall. The diaphysis of the tibia is shaped so as to act as a uniform-stress structure (i.e. structurally efficient) when loaded by a bending moment in the sagittal plane, such as during locomotion. The body of the thoraco-lumbar vertebrae is optimized to resist to a load applied strictly in an axial direction. The result of this review suggests that the structure of bones derives from a combination of local stimulus-driven tissue-level adaptation within the subject, and organ-level generational evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Consensus statement: recommendations for the management of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Esteban; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Carpintero, Pedro; Casado, José Luis; Del Pino Montes, Javier; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Maalouf, Jorge; Negredo, Eugenia; Ocampo, Antonio; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To provide practical recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Members of scientific societies related to bone metabolism and HIV: Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GeSIDA), Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición (SEEN), Sociedad Española de Investigación Ósea y del Metabolismo Mineral (SEIOMM), and Sociedad Española de Fractura Osteoporótica (SEFRAOS). A systematic search was carried out in PubMed, and papers in English and Spanish with a publication date before 28 May 2013 were included. Recommendations were formulated according to GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) setting both their strength and the quality of supporting evidence. Working groups were established for each major part, and the final resulting document was later discussed in a face-to-face meeting. All the authors reviewed the final written document and agreed with its content. The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations on the detection and treatment of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Alveolar bone in human immunodeficiency virus infection: is it changed by long-term antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Kanjanaprapas, Aree; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Pangsomboon, Kanokporn; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) can lead to osteoporosis in HIV-infected individuals. However, their effects on alveolar bone are not well established. The objective of this study was to measure the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) of HIV-infected patients, with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART), in comparison with that of HIV-free individuals, and to determine factors associated with the BMD of alveolar bone. A cross-sectional study was performed in non-HIV-infected individuals and HIV-infected individuals, with and without ART. Medical status and clinical data were recorded. Periapical radiographs of maxillary and mandibular right premolars were analysed for changes of alveolar BMD based on HIV/ART status. Other factors associated with the changes of alveolar BMD were explored using a parametric multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). One-hundred and one HIV-infected individuals receiving ART (age range: 23-57 years; median age 39 years), 58 receiving no ART (age range: 20-59 years; median age 34 years) and 50 HIV-negative individuals (age range: 19-59 years; median age 36 years) were enrolled. Neither HIV status nor use of ART was significantly associated with the changes of alveolar BMD. Although osteoporosis has been reported in HIV-infected individuals treated with ART, alveolar BMD does not appear to be changed as a result of the infection, or use of ART. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  15. Co-transplantation of fetal bone tissue facilitates the development and reconstitution in human B cells in humanized NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Bongkum; Kim, So Yong; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Roh, Cheong Rae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Sung Joo

    2011-08-01

    In terms of the function and reconstitution efficacy of human immune cells, co-transplantation of human fetal tissues, such as thymus and liver, with CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has potential advantages in the generation of humanized mice. To examine the effects of bone tissues in the reconstitution of human immune cells, particularly in B cells, we generated a new humanized mice co-transplanted with human fetal thymus (hFT)/fetal bone (hFB) tissues and human fetal liver-derived CD34(+) cells. Humanized mice exhibited effective reconstitution of human immune cells earlier compared to control humanized mice. In terms of quantity, the number of immune cells, such as human T, B, and monocyte/macrophages was significantly increased. Furthermore, significant increase of B cell progenitors and immature/naïve B cells could be detected in the bone marrow and spleen of humanized mice. Our results demonstrate that co-transplantation of hFB tissue may facilitate the reconstitution of human B and T cells, and therefore the humanized model may be used to develop therapeutic human antibodies for clinical use.

  16. What do bones tell us? The study of human skeletons from the perspective of forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrieri, Brigida; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Human remains are present in a number of contexts. Some of these are archaeological burial sites, which can comprise individual or mass graves burials. Human remains are usually found buried (or cremated), but they can also be found in museums and in universities, as part of their anatomical collections. Human remains can be found in churches as relics, in ossuaries, and as part of objects. Hence human remains refer to not just a complete skeleton, but also apart of a bone or tooth, hair and mummified remains. In more recent forensic, police or medico-legal cases, human skeletal remains can be found in a number of contexts, such as fire scenes, natural disasters, clandestine graves, or on the surface in open areas (e.g. a woodland). One aspect ofphysical anthropology is that which studies human skeletal remains in order to reconstruct the past, understand human variation, and provide information about the deceased individuals, such as their age at death, sex, ancestry, stature, pathological conditions or traumatic injuries; the remains from medico-legal or police cases fall under the branch offorensic anthropology.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on proteins in lyophilized or frozen demineralized human bone

    OpenAIRE

    Antebi, Uri; Mathor, Monica Beatriz; da Silva, André Ferreira; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the effects of application of ionizing radiation (gamma and electrons) as sterilizing agents at doses of 15 kGy, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, on lyophilized or frozen demineralized bone tissue for use in transplants. METHODS: Five human femoral diaphyses from different donors of musculoskeletal tissue were demineralized and preserved as lyophilized or frozen at -80 °C. The samples were divided into two groups: non-irradiated (control) and irradiated by means of gamma ...

  18. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  19. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-12-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  20. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna E Sroga

    Full Text Available To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation or ribose (ribosylation. Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women. More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples. Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar

  1. Development of a strain rate dependent material model of human cortical bone for computer-aided reconstruction of injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour, Zahra; Zioupos, Peter; Graw, Matthias; Peldschus, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided methods such as finite-element simulation offer a great potential in the forensic reconstruction of injury mechanisms. Numerous studies have been performed on understanding and analysing the mechanical properties of bone and the mechanism of its fracture. Determination of the mechanical properties of bones is made on the same basis used for other structural materials. The mechanical behaviour of bones is affected by the mechanical properties of the bone material, the geometry, the loading direction and mode and of course the loading rate. Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of cortical bone has been well demonstrated in literature studies, but as many of these were performed on animal bones and at non-physiological strain rates it is questionable how these will apply in the human situations. High strain-rates dominate in a lot of forensic applications in automotive crashes and assault scenarios. There is an overwhelming need to a model which can describe the complex behaviour of bone at lower strain rates as well as higher ones. Some attempts have been made to model the viscoelastic and viscoplastic properties of the bone at high strain rates using constitutive mathematical models with little demonstrated success. The main objective of the present study is to model the rate dependent behaviour of the bones based on experimental data. An isotropic material model of human cortical bone with strain rate dependency effects is implemented using the LS-DYNA material library. We employed a human finite element model called THUMS (Total Human Model for Safety), developed by Toyota R&D Labs and the Wayne State University, USA. The finite element model of the human femur is extracted from the THUMS model. Different methods have been employed to develop a strain rate dependent material model for the femur bone. Results of one the recent experimental studies on human femur have been employed to obtain the numerical model for cortical femur. A

  2. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands.

  3. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhances Fracture Healing in an Ischemic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuanyong; Xing, Zhiqing; Yu, Yan-yiu; Colnot, Celine; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia predisposes orthopaedic trauma patients to delayed fracture healing or non-union. The goal of this study was to test the ability of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) to stimulate fracture repair in an ischemic environment. Ischemic fractures were generated in male adult mice by resecting the femoral artery prior to the creation of a non-stabilized tibia fracture. Recombinant human BMP7 (rhBMP7, 50µg) was injected into the fracture site immediately after surgery. Histomorphometric analyses revealed that rhBMP7 induced more cartilage at day 7, more callus and bone at days 14 and 28, and more adipose tissue and fibrous tissue at days 7, 14 and 28 compared to controls (n=5/group/time). At day 28, all fractures treated with rhBMP7 (50µg, n=5) healed, whereas only 3 of 5 control fractures exhibited slight bony bridging. In addition, we found that rhBMP7 (both 10 and 50µg) significantly increased the amount of cartilage compared to controls in stabilized fractures, confirming its chondrogenic effect. No significant effects of rhBMP7 on tissue vascularization were observed at 3 days after fracture. Lastly, using bone marrow transplantation we determined that no donor-derived osteocytes or chondrocytes were present in rhBMP7 treated fractures, suggesting rhBMP7 did not recruit mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow to the fracture site. In conclusion, our results indicate that rhBMP7 is a promising treatment for fractures with severely disrupted blood supply. PMID:19918910

  4. Enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation in co-culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells with exogenous VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, K; Uusitalo, L; Alm, J J; Aro, H T; Hentunen, T A; Heino, T J

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in bone tissue engineering, efficient bone formation and vascularization remains a challenge for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate if the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can be enhanced by co-culturing them with peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MNCs), with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a coupling factor of bone formation and angiogenesis. Human bone marrow (BM) derived MSCs were co-cultured with PB-MNCs in osteogenic medium with or without VEGF. Osteoblastic differentiation and mineral deposition were studied by staining for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and von Kossa, respectively, and measurements for ALP activity and calcium concentration (Ca). Cell proliferation was assayed with Alamar blue. The mechanism(s) were further studied by Transwell(®) cell culture experiments. Both ALP and mineralization (von Kossa and Ca) were significantly higher in the MSC-MNC co-cultures compared to plain MSC cultures. VEGF alone had no effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs, but further enhanced differentiation in co-culture settings. The mechanism was shown to require cell-cell contact between MSCs and MNCs and the factors contributing to further differentiation appear to be soluble. No differences were observed in cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that the in vitro ALP activity and mineralization of human BM-MSCs is more efficient in the presence of PB-MNCs, and exogenously added VEGF further enhances the stimulatory effect. This indicates that PB-MNCs could be a potential cell source in development of co-culture systems for novel tissue engineering applications for enhanced bone healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A quantification of regenerated bone tissue in human sinus biopsies: influences of anatomical region, age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Karoline Maria; Huber, Christian Domitian; Heimel, Patrick; Ulm, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Tangl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Sinus augmentation is a standard procedure to increase vertical bone supply for dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxilla. Despite the longstanding application of this method, information about some basic factors that could potentially influence bone regeneration after sinus augmentation is rare. The objective of this study was therefore to quantify the impact of the maxillary region (premolar/molar) and patients' age and sex on bone regeneration after sinus grafting. Sinus augmentation procedures were performed in 107 patients (66 female: 52.8 ± 11.0 years, 41 male: 50.6 ± 11.3 years). After 6 ± 1 months, 201 sinus biopsies were harvested and histomorphometrically analysed. Height (oldHt) and bone volume fraction of pristine bone (oldBV/TV), as well as the amount of new bone (newBV/TV) and bone-to-bone substitute contact (BBSC) in the augmentation area, were assessed. In women, newBV/TV in the augmented sinus decreased significantly by 0.22 ± 0.08% per year. In men, no similar trend was observed. There were strong influences of the maxillary region and the dimensions of the host bone. In the premolar region, newBV/TV was 23.1 ± 7.9% and 25.1 ± 10.1%; in the molar region, newBV/TV averaged 20.4 ± 9.4% and 17.8 ± 8.8% for women and men, respectively. The greater the thickness of the wall of the sinus floor (mainly in the former premolar region), the greater was the amount of new bone tissue formed in the spaces in-between bone substitute particles. These empirical results derived from a large human sample, link factors that influence the quality of biomaterial integration to the known clinical risks for the success of dental implants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Insights into the processes behind the contamination of degraded human teeth and bone samples with exogenous sources of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M. T. P.; Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, E.

    2006-01-01

    A principal problem facing human DNA studies that use old and degraded remains is contamination from other sources of human DNA. In this study we have attempted to contaminate deliberately bones and teeth sampled from a medieval collection excavated in Trondheim, Norway, in order to investigate...... to lambda=254nm ultraviolet light, prior to DNA extraction and analysis for evidence of the persistence of the contaminant. The results support previous speculation that bone is more susceptible to water-borne sources of contaminant DNA, although both bone and teeth are readily contaminated...... and are difficult to decontaminate using the tested protocol. We believe that this is largely due to the porous nature of bone and teeth facilitating the deep penetration of the contaminant DNA. To simulate a more realistic handling situation, 27 further teeth were directly handled and washed, then decontaminated...

  7. External fixation of femoral defects in athymic rats: Applications for human stem cell implantation and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terasa Foo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate animal model is critical for the research of stem/progenitor cell therapy and tissue engineering for bone regeneration in vivo. This study reports the design of an external fixator and its application to critical-sized femoral defects in athymic rats. The external fixator consists of clamps and screws that are readily available from hardware stores as well as Kirschner wires. A total of 35 rats underwent application of the external fixator with creation of a 6-mm bone defect in one femur of each animal. This model had been used in several separate studies, including implantation of collagen gel, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or bone morphogenetic protein-2. One rat developed fracture at the proximal pin site and two rats developed deep tissue infection. Pin loosening was found in nine rats, but it only led to the failure of external fixation in two animals. In 8 to 10 weeks, various degrees of bone growth in the femoral defects were observed in different study groups, from full repair of the bone defect with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation to fibrous nonunion with collagen gel implantation. The external fixator used in these studies provided sufficient mechanical stability to the bone defects and had a comparable complication rate in athymic rats as in immunocompetent rats. The external fixator does not interfere with the natural environment of a bone defect. This model is particularly valuable for investigation of osteogenesis of human stem/progenitor cells in vivo.

  8. Metric dimensions of the proximal phalanges of the human hand and their relationship to side, position, and asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Varas, C E; Thompson, T J U

    2011-04-01

    The anatomy of the proximal phalanges of the human hand has been widely described. Nevertheless, when consulting osteology and anatomy publications, the general opinion of researchers is that siding and allocating the proximal phalanges with regard to finger position is difficult, if not impossible. We provide morphological criteria for determining the side of the proximal phalanges and a metric means of allocating a phalanx to a specific finger. This paper also quantifies the absolute and directional asymmetry found in phalanges within this sample. The sample studied consists of three groups, one modern and two archaeological. To investigate these, three measurements were taken-maximum length, maximum width at the base and maximum width at the head. It was found that phalanges could be assigned correctly to the side and finger of origin in 100% of the cases when the five phalanges of a given hand were present, and that this result dropped to 92% when allocating isolated phalanges. The means of the measurements taken were larger in the modern group and a constant relationship between the greater basal width of the second and the fourth proximal phalanges was found. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. The fighting hypothesis in combat: how well does the fighting hypothesis explain human left-handed minorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis, Ton G G; McManus, I C; Schaafsma, Sara M; Geuze, Reint H

    2013-06-01

    The strong population bias in hand preference in favor of right-handedness seems to be a typical human trait. An elegant evolutionary hypothesis explaining this trait is the so-called fighting hypothesis that postulates that left-handedness is under frequency-dependent selection. The fighting hypothesis assumes that left-handers, being in the minority because of health issues, are still maintained in the population since they would have a greater chance of winning in fights than right-handers due to a surprise effect. This review critically evaluates the assumptions and evidence for this hypothesis and concludes that some evidence, although consistent with the fighting hypothesis, does not directly support it and may also be interpreted differently. Other supportive data are ambiguous or open for both statistical and theoretical criticism. We conclude that, presently, evidence for the fighting hypothesis is not particularly strong, but that there is little evidence to reject it either. The hypothesis thus remains an intuitively plausible explanation for the persistent left-hand preference in the population. We suggest alternative explanations and several ways forward for obtaining more crucial data for testing this frequently cited hypothesis. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Speckle shearing pattern interferometry to assess mechanical strain in the human mandible jaw bone under physiological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, V.; Vázquez-Vázquez, C.; Gallas, M.; Crespo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) has been used in experiments to measure displacement on the surface of bones undergoing external forces. However in order to asses directly the derivative of the displacements a related technique, Shearography, is used. This technique has been applied in biomechanical experiments although limited to small pieces of bone to determine their elastic properties. In this work we propose the use of Shearing Speckle Interferometry to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of the human mandible under compressive stress, simulating masticatory forces or impacts, in order to analyze the strain distribution on mandibular bone.

  11. Assessment of the heat sinking effect of a human hand that holds a flexible phototherapy device for use in Kangaroo Mother Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jimenez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer process from a 6.4 Watt blue light flexible phototherapy mattress to a human hand has been studied. The intended use of the mattress is the provision of neonatal jaundice phototherapy during Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC or skin-to-skin care. The heat transfer process has been studied with temperature and heat flow sensors inside an expanded- polystyrene spheroid 25mm of thickness where the phototherapy mattress’s non emitting surface is in contact and folded around the hand while the light radiates outwards, to the polystyrene spheroid. The effective thermal capacitance of the phototherapy mattress was calculated as 3.4 J/oK, the mattress-to-hand thermal conductance was found to be 0.25 W/oC, the maximum temperature gradient between the mattress and the palm of the hand was 10oC and the maximum power absorbed by the hand, 2.5W. The palm of the hand skin-to-core temperature gradient was 0.5oC. It is expected that when used in KMC only one half of the hand skin surface would be in contact with the phototherapy mattress so that the effective thermal conductance to the hand in this conditions would be 0.125 W/oC. Further study is suggested to include sweating effect of the hand.

  12. A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Hans Ulrik; Thomsen, J.S.; Hougen, Hans Petter

    1999-01-01

    To determine the possibility for adaptive growth in human condyles, quantifying the thickness of fibrocartilage and the constitution of cells with potential activity, the trabecular bone volume, and the structural parameter: marrow space star volume in a larger sample of human autopsy condyles...

  13. Insight into the processes behind the contamination of degraded human teeth and bone samples with exogenous sources of DNA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M.T.P.; Willerslev, A.J.H.E.; Turner-Walker, G.; Collins, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A principal problem facing human DNA studies that use old and degraded remains is contamination from other sources of human DNA. In this study we have attempted to contaminate deliberately bones and teeth sampled from a medieval collection excavated in Trondheim, Norway, in order to investigate this

  14. Influence of object location in different FOVs on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of human mandible: a cone beam CT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibrahim, N.; Parsa, A.; Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Nambiar, P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different object locations in different fields of view (FOVs) of two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of a human mandible. A block of dry human mandible was scanned at five different locations (centre,

  15. The effect of nicotine on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, K; Togo, Y; Kaihara, S; Hussain, A; Takahashi, K; Bessho, K

    2014-08-01

    Nicotine, one of the constituents of tobacco, is known to have an adverse effect on human health. We sought to clarify the interaction between nicotine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) in terms of osteogenesis in vitro and osteoinduction in vivo. Nicotine did not inhibit or stimulate alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity or the amount of osteocalcin in C2C12 cells in the presence of rhBMP-2 in vitro. Ectopic bone formation using a collagen sponge containing rhBMP-2 was evaluated with and without nicotine after 21 days using radiographic, histological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses. ALP activity in the medium-dose group (2.2±0.9IU/mg protein; P=0.047) and the high-dose group (2.0±0.1IU/mg protein; P=0.03) was significantly lower than in the control group. The calcium content in the medium-dose group (35.4±12.9μg/mg t