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Sample records for human haematopoietic neoplasms

  1. Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Ryohichi; Jha, Deepak Kumar; Han, Areum; Soria-Valles, Clara; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Lu, Yi-Fen; Goettel, Jeremy A.; Serrao, Erik; Rowe, R. Grant; Malleshaiah, Mohan; Wong, Irene; Sousa, Patricia; Zhu, Ted N.; Ditadi, Andrea; Keller, Gordon; Engelman, Alan N.; Snapper, Scott B.; Doulatov, Sergei; Daley, George Q.

    2018-01-01

    A variety of tissue lineages can be differentiated from pluripotent stem cells by mimicking embryonic development through stepwise exposure to morphogens, or by conversion of one differentiated cell type into another by enforced expression of master transcription factors. Here, to yield functional human haematopoietic stem cells, we perform morphogen-directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into haemogenic endothelium followed by screening of 26 candidate haematopoietic stem-cell-specifying transcription factors for their capacity to promote multi-lineage haematopoietic engraftment in mouse hosts. We recover seven transcription factors (ERG, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXA10, LCOR, RUNX1 and SPI1) that are sufficient to convert haemogenic endothelium into haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that engraft myeloid, B and T cells in primary and secondary mouse recipients. Our combined approach of morphogen-driven differentiation and transcription-factor-mediated cell fate conversion produces haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells and holds promise for modelling haematopoietic disease in humanized mice and for therapeutic strategies in genetic blood disorders. PMID:28514439

  2. Second neoplasms in adult patients submitted to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Torrent, Anna; Ferrá, Christelle; Morgades, Mireia; Jiménez, María-José; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Vives, Susana; Batlle, Montserrat; Moreno, Miriam; Xicoy, Blanca; Oriol, Albert; Ibarra, Gladys; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2018-06-08

    Patients submitted to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased risk of late complications, such as second neoplasm (SN). The incidence and risk factors of SN in patients receiving HSCT at a single centre were analysed. The follow-up of adult patients who received a first HSCT (autologous [auto-HSCT] or allogeneic [allo-HSCT]) between January 2000 and December 2015 was reviewed. We collected their demographic characteristics, the primary disease and type of HSCT, and analysed the cumulative incidence of SN and their risk factors. Of 699 transplanted patients (auto-HSCT, n=451; allo-HSCT, n=248), 42 (6%) developed SN (17 haematological and 25 solid), 31 post-auto-HSCT and 11 post-allo-HSCT. Haematologic SN were more frequent after auto-HSCT than after allo-HSCT. The median time between HSCT and SN was 4.09 years [range 0.07-13.15], with no differences between auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT. The cumulative incidence of SN was 5% (95% CI 3-6) at 5 years, 7% (95% CI 5-10) at 10 years and 11% (95% CI 8-15) at 15 years, without differences according to the type of HSCT. Only the age over 40 years correlated with an increased risk of SN. In this series, the incidence of post-HSCT SN was similar to that previously described. Patients submitted to an auto-HSCT showed a higher frequency of haematologic SN. A higher incidence of SN was detected in patients older than 40 at the time of HSCT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiosensitivity of human haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Omori, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    The haematopoietic system is regenerative tissue with a high proliferative potential; therefore, haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are sensitive to extracellular oxidative stress caused by radiation and chemotherapeutic agents. An understanding of this issue can help predict haematopoietic recovery from radiation exposure as well as the extent of radiation damage to the haematopoietic system. In the present study, the radiosensitivity of human lineage-committed myeloid haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), including colony-forming unit–granulocyte macrophage, burst-forming unit–erythroid and colony-forming unit–granulocyte–erythroid–macrophage–megakaryocyte cells, which are contained in adult individual peripheral blood (PB) and fetus/neonate placental/umbilical cord blood (CB), were studied. The PB of 59 healthy individual blood donors and the CB of 42 neonates were investigated in the present study. HSPCs prepared from PB and CB were exposed to 0.5 or 2 Gy x-irradiation. The results showed that large individual differences exist in the surviving fraction of cells. In the case of adult PB, a statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the surviving fraction observed at a dose of 0.5 Gy and the age of the blood donors; however, none of these correlations were observed after 2 Gy x-irradiation. In addition, seasonal and gender variation were observed in the surviving fraction of CB HSPCs. The present results suggest that there are large individual differences in the surviving fraction of HSPCs contained in both adult PB and fetus/neonate CB. In addition, some factors, including the gender, age and season of birth, affect the radiosensitivity of HSPCs, especially with a relatively low-dose exposure. (paper)

  4. Radiation response of haematopoietic cell lines of human origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.; Rybka, W.B.; Suissa, S.; Giambattisto, D.

    1986-01-01

    Six human haematopoietic cell lines, five of leukaemic origin, including cells with myeloid, lymphoid and undifferentiated phenotype have been studied with respect to radiation response. The intrinsic radio-sensitivity of the cells varied widely, the D 0 s ranging from 0.53 to 1.39 Gy. Five of the cell lines showed some capacity to accumulate sublethal damage; in three of these, enhanced survival was demonstrated in split-dose experiments. One cell line (HL-60) was anomalous in that although little accumulation of sublethal damage was demonstrable, survival was enhanced by fractionation of the dose. Five of the six cell lines studied were of leukaemic origin. The results support the belief that, in contrast to the almost constant radiosensitivity of normal haematopoietic cell progenitors, leukaemic cell progenitors may show a wide range of radiosensitivities. (author)

  5. The influence of prenatal exposure to trans-fatty acids for development of childhood haematopoietic neoplasms (EnTrance): a natural societal experiment and a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Ina Olmer; Huybrechts, Inge; Frederiksen, Peder; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Chajes, Veronique; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2018-01-24

    Little is known about the causes of childhood cancer, partly as not many children develop cancer, although childhood cancer is a leading cause of death by disease in the young. The young age of the children suggests that risk factors for childhood cancer may be present during pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that exposure to trans-fat, a type of unsaturated fat common in industrially produced foods (iTFA), has adverse health effects in adults, including the risk of developing cancer. Haematopoietic neoplasms are the most common cancer types among European children under the age of 15 years. This study will bring new knowledge as to whether trans-fat and other fatty acids may also increase the risk of developing haematopoietic neoplasms during childhood. We will investigate if the Danish iTFA legislation ban, which radically reduced the use of iTFA in foodstuffs, influenced the risk of childhood haematopoietic neoplasms in children born either before or after the change in legislation, adjusting for relevant secular trends. Further, in a case-control study, we will examine if levels of fatty acids in dried blood spots from newborns can predict the risk of developing childhood haematopoietic neoplasms. Permission from the Danish Data Protection Agency and the Ethical Committee has been granted. The results from this study will provide important information about fatty acids in the mother's diet as a contributor to development of haematopoietic neoplasms during childhood, which may result in relevant preventive action. Not relevant.

  6. Targeted genome editing in human repopulating haematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Genovese (Pietro); G. Schiroli (Giulia); G. Escobar (Giulia); T. Di Tomaso (Tiziano); C. Firrito (Claudia); A. Calabria (Andrea); D. Moi (Davide); R. Mazzieri (Roberta); C. Bonini (Chiara); M.V. Holmes (Michael); P.D. Gregory (Philip); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); B. Gentner (Bernhard); E. Montini (Eugenio); A. Lombardo (Angelo); L. Naldini (Luigi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTargeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that

  7. Different mutations of the human c-mpl gene indicate distinct haematopoietic diseases.

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    He, Xin; Chen, Zhigang; Jiang, Yangyan; Qiu, Xi; Zhao, Xiaoying

    2013-01-25

    The human c-mpl gene (MPL) plays an important role in the development of megakaryocytes and platelets as well as the self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells. However, numerous MPL mutations have been identified in haematopoietic diseases. These mutations alter the normal regulatory mechanisms and lead to autonomous activation or signalling deficiencies. In this review, we summarise 59 different MPL mutations and classify these mutations into four different groups according to the associated diseases and mutation rates. Using this classification, we clearly distinguish four diverse types of MPL mutations and obtain a deep understand of their clinical significance. This will prove to be useful for both disease diagnosis and the design of individual therapy regimens based on the type of MPL mutations.

  8. A broad survey of cathepsin K immunoreactivity in human neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Martignoni, Guido; Antonescu, Cristina; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Eberhart, Charles; Netto, George; Taube, Janis; Westra, William; Epstein, Jonathan I; Lotan, Tamara; Maitra, Anirban; Gabrielson, Edward; Torbenson, Michael; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Demarzo, Angelo; Shih, Ie Ming; Illei, Peter; Wu, T C; Argani, Pedram

    2013-02-01

    Cathepsin K is consistently and diffusely expressed in alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) and a subset of translocation renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). However, cathepsin K expression in human neoplasms has not been systematically analyzed. We constructed tissue microarrays (TMA) from a wide variety of human neoplasms, and performed cathepsin K immunohistochemistry (IHC). Only 2.7% of 1,140 carcinomas from various sites exhibited cathepsin K labeling, thus suggesting that among carcinomas, cathepsin K labeling is highly specific for translocation RCC. In contrast to carcinomas, cathepsin K labeling was relatively common (54.6%) in the 414 mesenchymal lesions studied, including granular cell tumor, melanoma, and histiocytic lesions, but not paraganglioma, all of which are in the morphologic differential diagnosis of ASPS. Cathepsin K IHC can be helpful in distinguishing ASPS and translocation RCC from some but not all of the lesions in their differential diagnosis.

  9. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

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    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  10. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms

  11. RNA-based, transient modulation of gene expression in human haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

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    Diener, Yvonne; Jurk, Marion; Kandil, Britta; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wild, Stefan; Bissels, Ute; Bosio, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is a useful tool to study the biology of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and might also be instrumental to expand these cells for therapeutic approaches. Most of the studies so far have employed stable gene modification by viral vectors that are burdensome when translating protocols into clinical settings. Our study aimed at exploring new ways to transiently modify HSPC gene expression using non-integrating, RNA-based molecules. First, we tested different methods to deliver these molecules into HSPCs. The delivery of siRNAs with chemical transfection methods such as lipofection or cationic polymers did not lead to target knockdown, although we observed more than 90% fluorescent cells using a fluorochrome-coupled siRNA. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that despite extensive washing, siRNA stuck to or in the cell surface, thereby mimicking a transfection event. In contrast, electroporation resulted in efficient, siRNA-mediated protein knockdown. For transient overexpression of proteins, we used optimised mRNA molecules with modified 5′- and 3′-UTRs. Electroporation of mRNA encoding GFP resulted in fast, efficient and persistent protein expression for at least seven days. Our data provide a broad-ranging comparison of transfection methods for hard-to-transfect cells and offer new opportunities for DNA-free, non-integrating gene modulation in HSPCs. PMID:26599627

  12. Neurotensin receptors in human neoplasms: high incidence in Ewing's sarcomas.

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    Reubi, J C; Waser, B; Schaer, J C; Laissue, J A

    1999-07-19

    Receptors for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), expressed at high density by neoplastic cells, can be instrumental for tumor diagnosis and therapy. Little is known about the expression of neurotensin receptors in human tumors. In the present study, 464 human neoplasms of various types were investigated for their neurotensin receptor content by in vitro receptor autoradiography on tissue sections using 125I-[Tyr3]-neurotensin as radioligand. Neurotensin receptors were identified and localized in tumor cells of 11/17 Ewing's sarcomas, 21/40 meningiomas, 10/23 astrocytomas, 5/13 medulloblastomas, 7/24 medullary thyroid cancers and 2/8 small cell lung cancers. They were rarely found in non-small cell lung cancers and breast carcinomas; they were absent in prostate, ovarian, renal cell and hepatocellular carcinomas, neuroendocrine gut tumors, pituitary adenomas, schwannomas, neuroblastomas and lymphomas. When present, the receptors bound with nanomolar affinity neurotensin and acetyl-neurotensin-(8-13), with lower affinity neuromedin N, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acidneurotensin-(8-13) and SR 48692, but not neurotensin-(1-11). They were all of the NT1 type, without high affinity for levocabastine. Further, in 2 receptor-positive Ewing's sarcomas, neurotensin mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization techniques. Since neurotensin is known to stimulate cell proliferation, the presence of neurotensin receptors in human neoplasia may be of biological relevance, possibly as an integrative part of an autocrine feedback mechanism of tumor growth stimulation.

  13. Making Blood: The Haematopoietic Niche throughout Ontogeny

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    Mohammad A. Al-Drees

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-quarter of all cells in the adult human body are blood cells. The haematopoietic system is therefore massive in scale and requires exquisite regulation to be maintained under homeostatic conditions. It must also be able to respond when needed, such as during infection or following blood loss, to produce more blood cells. Supporting cells serve to maintain haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions. This coalition of supportive cell types, organised in specific tissues, is termed the haematopoietic niche. Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are generated in a number of distinct locations during mammalian embryogenesis. These stem and progenitor cells migrate to a variety of anatomical locations through the conceptus until finally homing to the bone marrow shortly before birth. Under stress, extramedullary haematopoiesis can take place in regions that are typically lacking in blood-producing activity. Our aim in this review is to examine blood production throughout the embryo and adult, under normal and pathological conditions, to identify commonalities and distinctions between each niche. A clearer understanding of the mechanism underlying each haematopoietic niche can be applied to improving ex vivo cultures of haematopoietic stem cells and potentially lead to new directions for transplantation medicine.

  14. THE ANALYSIS OF STATISTICAL DATA ON MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN P APILLOMAVIRUS

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    A. A. Kostin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study of statistical data for the first time in Russia the analysis of the morbidity and mortality of patients with malignant neoplasms that may be associated with human papilloma virus (HPV is performed: cervical cancer (cervical cancer, cancer of the vulva and vagina, cancer of penis, cancer of the rectum, anal canal and rectosigmoid junction cancer, cancer of the pharynx and larynx.

  15. Growth and apoptosis of human natural killer cell neoplasms: role of interleukin-2/15 signaling.

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    Yamasaki, Satoshi; Maeda, Motoi; Ohshima, Koichi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Otsuka, Teruhisa; Harada, Mine

    2004-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 plays an important role in the survival of human natural killer (NK) cells. We investigated IL-2/15 signaling in NK cell neoplasms from five patients and in five cell lines (NK-92, KHYG-1, SNK-6, HANK1 and MOTN-1) compared to mature peripheral NK cells from 10 healthy subjects. Apoptosis of NK cell lines was prevented by addition of IL-15 in vitro. Blocking IL-2/15Rbeta on IL-2-stimulated NK-92 cells resulted in reduced expression of Bcl-X(L) and phosphorylated Stat5, which paralleled early apoptosis without altering Bcl-2 expression. These data add IL-2/15Rbeta to the list of factors important for the survival of NK cell neoplasms.

  16. Optimisation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based strategy for the detection and quantification of human herpesvirus 6 DNA in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam YH Ueda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 may cause severe complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Monitoring this virus and providing precise, rapid and early diagnosis of related clinical diseases, constitute essential measures to improve outcomes. A prospective survey on the incidence and clinical features of HHV-6 infections after HSCT has not yet been conducted in Brazilian patients and the impact of this infection on HSCT outcome remains unclear. A rapid test based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR has been optimised to screen and quantify clinical samples for HHV-6. The detection step was based on reaction with TaqMan® hydrolysis probes. A set of previously described primers and probes have been tested to evaluate efficiency, sensitivity and reproducibility. The target efficiency range was 91.4% with linearity ranging from 10-106 copies/reaction and a limit of detection of five copies/reaction or 250 copies/mL of plasma. The qPCR assay developed in the present study was simple, rapid and sensitive, allowing the detection of a wide range of HHV-6 loads. In conclusion, this test may be useful as a practical tool to help elucidate the clinical relevance of HHV-6 infection and reactivation in different scenarios and to determine the need for surveillance.

  17. Radiation-Induced Neoplasms in Beagles after Administrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 226}Ra

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    Goldman, M.; Dungworth, D. L.; Bulgin, M. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Richards, W. P.C.; Bustad, L. K. [Radiobiology Laboratory and Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1969-11-15

    The comparative carcinogenic efficiency of two bone-seeking radionuclides is under study in a colony of several hundred beagles. The toxicity of internally deposited alpha emitters ({sup 226}Ra and its daughters) and of beta irradiation ({sup 90}Sr) at comparable dosage rates indicates marked differences in site of appearance and mode of action in litters studied up to 7 years of age. Radiation carcinogenesis in beagles exposed to {sup 90}Sr daily from midgestation to adulthood (1.5 yr) is at present confined to dogs fed 4 {mu}Ci {sup 90}Sr/d or higher. The 20 cases constitute a spectrum of myeloproliferative disorders characterized by terminal anaemias, and ranging from myeloid metaplasia to granulocytic leukaemia. Continuous high-level {sup 90}Sr irradiation to bone and marrow from early life onward causes a thickened hypocellular bone ('pachyostosis'), some instances of myelofibrosis, and persistent mild leukopenia on which the final spectrum of terminal disoideis is superimposed. In contrast, up to 100 {mu}Cl {sup 226}Ra given intravenously (8 equally spaced injections at 14 to 18 months of age) to young adults is not a potent marrow cell carcinogen. The higher LET, shorter-range alpha particles are efficient in inducing bone cancers (14 cases) and skeletal lesions similar to those documented in watch-dial luminizers exposed to {sup 226}Ra in the early 1900's. The incidence of haematopoietic and skeletal neoplasms observed is dose-rate related, and the morphologic characteristics have several analogues in human cancer. The use of identically treated litters rather than individuals affords additional opportunity to study possible familial factors in the distribution of the neoplasms. Pathogenic evaluation at this juncture strongly indicates that continued bone and marrow irradiation in early life is more likely to induce haematopoietic neoplasms than is skeletal irradiation starting in young adulthood, which induces osseous neoplasms. (author)

  18. Molecular Profiling of Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Polycythemia Vera and Related Neoplasms: Identification of Deregulated Genes of Significance for Inflammation and Immune Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are haematopoietic stem cell neoplasms that may be associated with autoimmune or chronic inflammatory disorders. Earlier gene expression profiling studies have demonstrated aberrant expression of genes involved...

  19. Pneumonia Caused by Moraxella Catarrhalis in Haematopoietic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant who developed pneumonia caused by M. catarrhalis at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh are reported and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, these are the first case reports of M. catarrhalis pneumonia in haematopoietic stem cell ...

  20. Cerebral toxoplasmosis after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Agnieszka Zaucha-Prażmo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The infection is severe and difficult to diagnose in patients receiving allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. It frequently involves the central nervous system. The case is presented of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a 17-year-old youth with Fanconi anaemia treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT

  1. Colon neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura F, K.

    1991-01-01

    The main aspects of colon neoplasms are described, including several factors that predispose the disease, the occurrence, the main biomedical radiography and the evaluation after the surgery. (C.G.C.)

  2. Adrenal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Dhliwayo, H.; Lomas, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenoma, myelolipoma, phaeochromocytoma, metastases, adrenocortical carcinoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma account for the majority of adrenal neoplasms that are encountered in clinical practice. A variety of imaging methods are available for evaluating adrenal lesions including ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine techniques such as meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and positron-emission tomography (PET). Lipid-sensitive imaging techniques such as unenhanced CT and chemical shift MRI enable detection and characterization of lipid-rich adenomas based on an unenhanced CT attenuation of ≤10 HU and signal loss on opposed-phase compared to in-phase T1-weighted images, respectively. In indeterminate cases, an adrenal CT washout study may differentiate adenomas (both lipid-rich and lipid-poor) from other adrenal neoplasms based on an absolute percentage washout of >60% and/or a relative percentage washout of >40%. This is based on the principle that adenomas show rapid contrast washout while most other adrenal neoplasms including malignant tumours show slow contrast washout instead. 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose–PET ( 18 FDG-PET) imaging may differentiate benign from malignant adrenal neoplasms by demonstrating high tracer uptake in malignant neoplasms based on the increased glucose utilization and metabolic activity found in most of these malignancies. In this review, the multi-modality imaging appearances of adrenal neoplasms are discussed and illustrated. Key imaging findings that facilitate lesion characterization and differentiation are emphasized. Awareness of these imaging findings is essential for improving diagnostic confidence and for reducing misinterpretation errors.

  3. Myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roaldsnes, Christina; Holst, René; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and myelofibrosis (MF) are clonal disorders collectively named as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Published data on epidemiology of MPN after the discovery of the JAK2 mutation and the 2008 WHO classifications are scarce. We...

  4. Ascorbate regulates haematopoietic stem cell function and leukaemogenesis.

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    Agathocleous, Michalis; Meacham, Corbin E; Burgess, Rebecca J; Piskounova, Elena; Zhao, Zhiyu; Crane, Genevieve M; Cowin, Brianna L; Bruner, Emily; Murphy, Malea M; Chen, Weina; Spangrude, Gerald J; Hu, Zeping; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Morrison, Sean J

    2017-09-28

    Stem-cell fate can be influenced by metabolite levels in culture, but it is not known whether physiological variations in metabolite levels in normal tissues regulate stem-cell function in vivo. Here we describe a metabolomics method for the analysis of rare cell populations isolated directly from tissues and use it to compare mouse haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to restricted haematopoietic progenitors. Each haematopoietic cell type had a distinct metabolic signature. Human and mouse HSCs had unusually high levels of ascorbate, which decreased with differentiation. Systemic ascorbate depletion in mice increased HSC frequency and function, in part by reducing the function of Tet2, a dioxygenase tumour suppressor. Ascorbate depletion cooperated with Flt3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3 ITD ) leukaemic mutations to accelerate leukaemogenesis, through cell-autonomous and possibly non-cell-autonomous mechanisms, in a manner that was reversed by dietary ascorbate. Ascorbate acted cell-autonomously to negatively regulate HSC function and myelopoiesis through Tet2-dependent and Tet2-independent mechanisms. Ascorbate therefore accumulates within HSCs to promote Tet activity in vivo, limiting HSC frequency and suppressing leukaemogenesis.

  5. The neoplasms imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, M.; Pilizzari, CH.

    1996-01-01

    New devices of NMR imaging and computed tomography give three-dimensional images of the human body and automatically interpret the anatomical pictures. These new techniques are useful for the detection and the treatment of neoplasms. They are explained into details. (O.M.)

  6. Assessment of the role of transcript for GATA-4 as a marker of unfavorable outcome in human adrenocortical neoplasms

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    Martin Regina M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant neoplasia of the adrenal cortex is usually associated with very poor prognosis. When adrenocortical neoplasms are diagnosed in the early stages, distinction between carcinoma and adenoma can be very difficult to accomplish, since there is yet no reliable marker to predict tumor recurrence or dissemination. GATA transcription factors play an essential role in the developmental control of cell fate, cell proliferation and differentiation, organ morphogenesis, and tissue-specific gene expression. Normal mouse adrenal cortex expresses GATA-6 while its malignant counterpart only expresses GATA-4. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this reciprocal change in the expression of GATA factors might be relevant for predicting the prognosis of human adrenocortical neoplasms. Since human adrenal cortices express luteinizing hormone (LH/hCG receptor and the gonadotropins are known to up-regulate GATA-4 in gonadal tumor cell lines, we also studied the expression of LH/hCG receptor. Methods We conducted a study on 13 non-metastasizing (NM and 10 metastasizing/recurrent (MR tumors obtained from a group of twenty-two adult and pediatric patients. The expression of GATA-4, GATA-6, and LH/hCG receptor (LHR in normal and tumoral human adrenal cortices was analysed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR complemented by dot blot hybridization. Results Messenger RNA for GATA-6 was detected in normal adrenal tissue, as well as in the totality of NM and MR tumors. GATA-4, by its turn, was detected in normal adrenal tissue, in 11 out of 13 NM tumors, and in 9 of the 10 MR tumors, with larger amounts of mRNA found among those presenting aggressive clinical behavior. Transcripts for LH receptor were observed both in normal tissue and neoplasms. A more intense LHR transcript accumulation was observed on those tumors with better clinical outcome. Conclusion Our data suggest that the expression of GATA-6 in

  7. 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl (R)-3-methoxy-3-oxo-2-stearamidopropyl phosphate promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukaemia cells and primary human CD34⁺ haematopoietic stem cells.

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    Limb, Jin-Kyung; Song, Doona; Jeon, Mijeong; Han, So-Yeop; Han, Gyoonhee; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-04-01

    In this study we showed that 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl (R)-3-methoxy-3-oxo-2-stearamidopropyl phosphate [(R)-TEMOSPho], a derivative of an organic chemical identified from a natural product library, promotes highly efficient differentiation of megakaryocytes. Specifically, (R)-TEMOSPho induces cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization from K562 and HEL cells, which are used extensively to model megakaryocytic differentiation. In addition, megakaryocyte-specific cell surface markers showed a dramatic increase in expression in response to (R)-TEMOSPho treatment. Importantly, we demonstrated that such megakaryocytic differentiation can also be induced from primary human CD34(+) haematopoietic stem cells. Activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway and, to a lesser extent, the MEK-ERK pathway appears to be required for this process, as blocking with specific inhibitors interferes with the differentiation of K562 cells. A subset of (R)-TEMOSPho-treated K562 cells undergoes spontaneous apoptosis and produces platelets that are apparently functional, as they bind to fibrinogen, express P-selectin and aggregate in response to SFLLRN and AYPGFK, the activating peptides for the PAR1 and PAR4 receptors, respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that (R)-TEMOSPho will be useful for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of megakaryocytic differentiation, and that this class of compounds represents potential therapeutic reagents for thrombocytopenia. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Pneumonia Caused by Moraxella Catarrhalis in Haematopoietic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a gram negative diplococcus that causes a variety of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Patients with malignant, hematological disorders treated with intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy, and recipients of various forms of haematopoietic stem cell transplant receiving immunosuppressive ...

  9. Polylox barcoding reveals haematopoietic stem cell fates realized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Weike; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rössler, Jens; Wang, Xi; Postrach, Daniel; Busch, Katrin; Rode, Immanuel; Klapproth, Kay; Dietlein, Nikolaus; Quedenau, Claudia; Chen, Wei; Sauer, Sascha; Wolf, Stephan; Höfer, Thomas; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2017-08-24

    Developmental deconvolution of complex organs and tissues at the level of individual cells remains challenging. Non-invasive genetic fate mapping has been widely used, but the low number of distinct fluorescent marker proteins limits its resolution. Much higher numbers of cell markers have been generated using viral integration sites, viral barcodes, and strategies based on transposons and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing; however, temporal and tissue-specific induction of barcodes in situ has not been achieved. Here we report the development of an artificial DNA recombination locus (termed Polylox) that enables broadly applicable endogenous barcoding based on the Cre-loxP recombination system. Polylox recombination in situ reaches a practical diversity of several hundred thousand barcodes, allowing tagging of single cells. We have used this experimental system, combined with fate mapping, to assess haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fates in vivo. Classical models of haematopoietic lineage specification assume a tree with few major branches. More recently, driven in part by the development of more efficient single-cell assays and improved transplantation efficiencies, different models have been proposed, in which unilineage priming may occur in mice and humans at the level of HSCs. We have introduced barcodes into HSC progenitors in embryonic mice, and found that the adult HSC compartment is a mosaic of embryo-derived HSC clones, some of which are unexpectedly large. Most HSC clones gave rise to multilineage or oligolineage fates, arguing against unilineage priming, and suggesting coherent usage of the potential of cells in a clone. The spreading of barcodes, both after induction in embryos and in adult mice, revealed a basic split between common myeloid-erythroid development and common lymphocyte development, supporting the long-held but contested view of a tree-like haematopoietic structure.

  10. Polylox barcoding reveals haematopoietic stem cell fates realized in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Jens; Wang, Xi; Postrach, Daniel; Busch, Katrin; Rode, Immanuel; Klapproth, Kay; Dietlein, Nikolaus; Quedenau, Claudia; Chen, Wei; Sauer, Sascha; Wolf, Stephan; Höfer, Thomas; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2017-01-01

    Developmental deconvolution of complex organs and tissues at the level of individual cells remains challenging. Non-invasive genetic fate mapping1 has been widely used, but the low number of distinct fluorescent marker proteins limits its resolution. Much higher numbers of cell markers have been generated using viral integration sites2, viral barcodes3, and strategies based on transposons4 and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing5; however, temporal and tissue-specific induction of barcodes in situ has not been achieved. Here we report the development of an artificial DNA recombination locus (termed Polylox) that enables broadly applicable endogenous barcoding based on the Cre-loxP recombination system6,7. Polylox recombination in situ reaches a practical diversity of several hundred thousand barcodes, allowing tagging of single cells. We have used this experimental system, combined with fate mapping, to assess haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fates in vivo. Classical models of haematopoietic lineage specification assume a tree with few major branches. More recently, driven in part by the development of more efficient single-cell assays and improved transplantation efficiencies, different models have been proposed, in which unilineage priming may occur in mice and humans at the level of HSCs8–10. We have introduced barcodes into HSC progenitors in embryonic mice, and found that the adult HSC compartment is a mosaic of embryo-derived HSC clones, some of which are unexpectedly large. Most HSC clones gave rise to multilineage or oligolineage fates, arguing against unilineage priming, and suggesting coherent usage of the potential of cells in a clone. The spreading of barcodes, both after induction in embryos and in adult mice, revealed a basic split between common myeloid-erythroid development and common lymphocyte development, supporting the long-held but contested view of a tree-like haematopoietic structure. PMID:28813413

  11. Mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer in Scottish coastal towns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, O.Ll.; Macdonald, J.; Lloyd, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using annual Scottish registration data, the authors have been examining mortality from cancers including all leukaemias, classified within malignant neoplasm of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissue, from 1969/73. The results showed: (1) Coastal burghs had a higher standardised mortality than did inland burghs; (2) the SMRs in communities of the east coast as a whole were consistently higher than those in west-coast communities, whether small burghs, large burghs, or cities were considered; (3) all segments of the eastern coastline, other than the open coastline stretching from Aberdeenshire to Angus, showed relatively high SMRs; (4) on the west coast, the highest SMRs (of only 100) were in Ayrshire and Glasgow; (5) in terms of statistical significance at the level p<=0.5, mortality in inland burghs was significantly low, while in east-coast burghs, in Edinburgh, and in Aberdeen it was significantly high. The geographical distribution cannot be explained in terms of nuclear power stations, and differs importantly from that given by registration data for leukaemia alone (Heasman et al, May 26, p.1188). (U.K.)

  12. Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1): passenger or driver in human neoplasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H

    2013-03-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons make up a significant portion of human genomes, with an estimated 500,000 copies per genome. Like other retrotransposons, L1 retrotransposons propagate through RNA sequences that are reverse transcribed into DNA sequences, which are integrated into new genomic loci. L1 somatic insertions have the potential to disrupt the transcriptome by inserting into or nearby genes. By mutating genes and playing a role in epigenetic dysregulation, L1 transposons may contribute to tumorigenesis. Studies of the "mobilome" have lagged behind other tumor characterizations at the sequence, transcript, and epigenetic levels. Here, we consider evidence that L1 retrotransposons may sometimes drive human tumorigenesis.

  13. Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1: passenger or driver in human neoplasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja Rodić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available LINE-1 (L1 retrotransposons make up a significant portion of human genomes, with an estimated 500,000 copies per genome. Like other retrotransposons, L1 retrotransposons propagate through RNA sequences that are reverse transcribed into DNA sequences, which are integrated into new genomic loci. L1 somatic insertions have the potential to disrupt the transcriptome by inserting into or nearby genes. By mutating genes and playing a role in epigenetic dysregulation, L1 transposons may contribute to tumorigenesis. Studies of the "mobilome" have lagged behind other tumor characterizations at the sequence, transcript, and epigenetic levels. Here, we consider evidence that L1 retrotransposons may sometimes drive human tumorigenesis.

  14. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers......, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis...... and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further...

  15. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-08-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further recommend that such studies should be accompanied by additional assessment of histology and cellularity of each sample. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Humanized medium (h7H) allows long-term primary follicular thyroid cultures from human normal thyroid, benign neoplasm, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Susana B; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Rodrigues, Joana S; Perez-Romero, Sihara; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Suarez-Fariña, Maria; Barreiro, Francisco; Czarnocka, Barbara; Senra, Ana; Lareu, Maria V; Rodriguez-Garcia, Javier; Cameselle-Teijeiro, Jose; Alvarez, Clara V

    2013-06-01

    Mechanisms of thyroid physiology and cancer are principally studied in follicular cell lines. However, human thyroid cancer lines were found to be heavily contaminated by other sources, and only one supposedly normal-thyroid cell line, immortalized with SV40 antigen, is available. In primary culture, human follicular cultures lose their phenotype after passage. We hypothesized that the loss of the thyroid phenotype could be related to culture conditions in which human cells are grown in medium optimized for rodent culture, including hormones with marked differences in its affinity for the relevant rodent/human receptor. The objective of the study was to define conditions that allow the proliferation of primary human follicular thyrocytes for many passages without losing phenotype. Concentrations of hormones, transferrin, iodine, oligoelements, antioxidants, metabolites, and ethanol were adjusted within normal homeostatic human serum ranges. Single cultures were identified by short tandem repeats. Human-rodent interspecies contamination was assessed. We defined an humanized 7 homeostatic additives medium enabling growth of human thyroid cultures for more than 20 passages maintaining thyrocyte phenotype. Thyrocytes proliferated and were grouped as follicle-like structures; expressed Na+/I- symporter, pendrin, cytokeratins, thyroglobulin, and thyroperoxidase showed iodine-uptake and secreted thyroglobulin and free T3. Using these conditions, we generated a bank of thyroid tumors in culture from normal thyroids, Grave's hyperplasias, benign neoplasms (goiter, adenomas), and carcinomas. Using appropriate culture conditions is essential for phenotype maintenance in human thyrocytes. The bank of thyroid tumors in culture generated under humanized humanized 7 homeostatic additives culture conditions will provide a much-needed tool to compare similarly growing cells from normal vs pathological origins and thus to elucidate the molecular basis of thyroid disease.

  17. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); P. Solaimani Kartalaei (Parham); C.S. Vink (Chris); T. Yamada-Inagawa (Tomoko); K. Bollerot (Karine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R. Van Der Linden (Reinier); S.C. de Sousa Lopes (Susana Chuva); R. Monteiro (Rui); C.L. Mummery (Christine); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAdult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they

  19. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants

  20. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J

    2003-03-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants.

  1. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demas, B.E.; Hricak, H.; Braga, C.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four women with suspected gestational trophoblastic neoplasms were evaluated prospectively to identify imaging algorithms optimal for treatment planning. All underwent chest radiography, chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. Ten also underwent pelvic CT, 13 pelvic US. The most sensitive imaging combination was chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. However, correct assignment to ACOG therapeutic categories was achieved by means of history, physical examination, beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin measurements, and chest radiography in 81% of patients. Hepatic and cranial imaging defined the need for radiation therapy. Chest CT was needed only when chest radiographs were negative. Pelvic imaging aided diagnosis but did not assist in treatment planning

  2. Factors controlling the recirculation of haematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, R.V.; Khaitov, R.M.; Alejnikova, N.V.; Gulak, L.V.

    1976-01-01

    Influence of thymectomy on the rate of migration and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells from a shielded part of the bone marrow has been studied on mice X-irradiated with a lethal dose. Inhibition of the migration rate and delay in differentiation of stem cells into colonies of granuloid type have been detected in the thymectomized mice. Transplantation of syngeneic cells of the thymus or lymph nodes to thymectomized mice increases the number of colonies in the spleen and restores the routine way of differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells. It is concluded that the processes of migration and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells are thymus-dependent

  3. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halter, Joerg P.; Schuepbach, W. Michael M.; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T.; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A.; Boelens, Jaap J.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M.; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Simoes, Belinda Pinto; Hammans, Simon R.; Savage, David; Marti, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known

  4. Malignant Lymphatic and Hematopoietic Neoplasms Mortality in Serbia, 1991–2010: A Joinpoint Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited data on mortality from malignant lymphatic and hematopoietic neoplasms have been published for Serbia. Methods The study covered population of Serbia during the 1991–2010 period. Mortality trends were assessed using the joinpoint regression analysis. Results Trend for overall death rates from malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms significantly decreased: by −2.16% per year from 1991 through 1998, and then significantly increased by +2.20% per year for the 1998–2010 period. The growth during the entire period was on average +0.8% per year (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3). Mortality was higher among males than among females in all age groups. According to the comparability test, mortality trends from malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms in men and women were parallel (final selected model failed to reject parallelism, P = 0.232). Among younger Serbian population (0–44 years old) in both sexes: trends significantly declined in males for the entire period, while in females 15–44 years of age mortality rates significantly declined only from 2003 onwards. Mortality trend significantly increased in elderly in both genders (by +1.7% in males and +1.5% in females in the 60–69 age group, and +3.8% in males and +3.6% in females in the 70+ age group). According to the comparability test, mortality trend for Hodgkin's lymphoma differed significantly from mortality trends for all other types of malignant lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms (P<0.05). Conclusion Unfavourable mortality trend in Serbia requires targeted intervention for risk factors control, early diagnosis and modern therapy. PMID:25333862

  5. Conversion of adult endothelium to immunocompetent haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Raphael; Karrasch, Charles C; Poulos, Michael G; Kunar, Balvir; Redmond, David; Duran, Jose G Barcia; Badwe, Chaitanya R; Schachterle, William; Ginsberg, Michael; Xiang, Jenny; Tabrizi, Arash Rafii; Shido, Koji; Rosenwaks, Zev; Elemento, Olivier; Speck, Nancy A; Butler, Jason M; Scandura, Joseph M; Rafii, Shahin

    2017-05-25

    Developmental pathways that orchestrate the fleeting transition of endothelial cells into haematopoietic stem cells remain undefined. Here we demonstrate a tractable approach for fully reprogramming adult mouse endothelial cells to haematopoietic stem cells (rEC-HSCs) through transient expression of the transcription-factor-encoding genes Fosb, Gfi1, Runx1, and Spi1 (collectively denoted hereafter as FGRS) and vascular-niche-derived angiocrine factors. The induction phase (days 0-8) of conversion is initiated by expression of FGRS in mature endothelial cells, which results in endogenous Runx1 expression. During the specification phase (days 8-20), RUNX1 + FGRS-transduced endothelial cells commit to a haematopoietic fate, yielding rEC-HSCs that no longer require FGRS expression. The vascular niche drives a robust self-renewal and expansion phase of rEC-HSCs (days 20-28). rEC-HSCs have a transcriptome and long-term self-renewal capacity similar to those of adult haematopoietic stem cells, and can be used for clonal engraftment and serial primary and secondary multi-lineage reconstitution, including antigen-dependent adaptive immune function. Inhibition of TGFβ and CXCR7 or activation of BMP and CXCR4 signalling enhanced generation of rEC-HSCs. Pluripotency-independent conversion of endothelial cells into autologous authentic engraftable haematopoietic stem cells could aid treatment of haematological disorders.

  6. The Haematopoietic Stem Cell Niche: New Insights into the Mechanisms Regulating Haematopoietic Stem Cell Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lilly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC niche was formulated by Schofield in the 1970s, as a region within the bone marrow containing functional cell types that can maintain HSC potency throughout life. Since then, ongoing research has identified numerous cell types and a plethora of signals that not only maintain HSCs, but also dictate their behaviour with respect to homeostatic requirements and exogenous stresses. It has been proposed that there are endosteal and vascular niches within the bone marrow, which are thought to regulate different HSC populations. However, recent data depicts a more complicated picture, with functional crosstalk between cells in these two regions. In this review, recent research into the endosteal/vascular cell types and signals regulating HSC behaviour are considered, together with the possibility of a single subcompartmentalised niche.

  7. Presumed pluripotency markers UTF-1 and REX-1 are expressed in human adult testes and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, D.M.; Nielsen, J.E.; Skakkebaek, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    NANOG and OCT-3/4, UTF-1 and REX-1 are expressed throughout human testes development. The expression pattern indicated that UTF-1 plays a possible role in spermatogonial self-renewal, whereas expression of REX-1 in meiotic cells from both testes and ovary indicate a role in meiosis. UFT-1 and REX-1...... and REX-1 during human gonadal development and in TGCT. METHODS: Expression of UTF-1 and REX-1 was studied in 52 specimens from human gonadal development and in 86 samples from TGCT. RESULTS: UTF-1 and REX-1 were expressed throughout male gonadal development. In the mature testis, UTF-1 was expressed...

  8. Human chorionic gonadotrophin regression rate as a predictive factor of postmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasm in high-risk hydatidiform mole: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Wook; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Hyunki; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was early prediction of postmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN) after evacuation of high-risk mole, by comparison of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) regression rates. Fifty patients with a high-risk mole initially and spontaneously regressing after molar evacuation were selected from January 1, 1996 to May 31, 2010 (spontaneous regression group). Fifty patients with a high-risk mole initially and progressing to postmolar GTN after molar evacuation were selected (postmolar GTN group). hCG regression rates represented as hCG/initial hCG were compared between the two groups. The sensitivity and specificity of these rates for prediction of postmolar GTN were assessed using receiver operating characteristic curves. Multivariate analyses of associations between risk factors and postmolar GTN progression were performed. The mean regression rate of hCG between the two groups was compared. hCG regression rates represented as hCG/initial hCG (%) were 0.36% in the spontaneous regression group and 1.45% in the postmolar GTN group in the second week (p=0.003). Prediction of postmolar GTN by hCG regression rate revealed a sensitivity of 48.0% and specificity of 89.5% with a cut-off value of 0.716% and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.759 in the 2nd week (pfactor for postmolar GTN. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Presumed pluripotency markers UTF-1 and REX-1 are expressed in human adult testes and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David M; Nielsen, John E; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2008-01-01

    UTF-1 and REX-1/ZFP42 are transcription factors involved in pluripotency. Because of phenotypic similarities between pluripotent embryonic stem cells and testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) and the derivation of pluripotent cells from testes, we investigated the expression of UTF-1 and REX-1 during...... human gonadal development and in TGCT....

  10. Some correlations between eight types of malignant neoplasms: A hint from cancer dynamics of 31 European countries in 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In present study, the data of standardised death rates of malignant neoplasms per 100000 inhabitants in 31 European countries during 1994-2013 were used to analyze linear correlations between eight types of cancers in terms of induced death rates. The results showed that most pairs of cancers closely correlate to each other. The malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri (women and the malignant neoplasm of trachea, bronchus and lung correlate most closely (r=0.5915, followed by the malignant neoplasms (r=0.4832 of colon, rectosigmoid junction, rectum, anus and anal canal and lymphatic/haematopoietic tissue, the malignant neoplasms (r=-0.483 of stomach, and trachea, bronchus and lung, the malignant neoplasms (r=0.4605 of skin and prostate (men, the malignant neoplasms (r=0.4344 of colon, rectosigmoid junction, rectum, anus and anal canal and trachea, bronchus and lung, etc. These correlations are likely caused by common or adverse environmental, social, medical or even genetic / molecular factors.

  11. Risk factors for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachner, A.; Grosche, B.

    1991-06-01

    A broad survey is given of risk factors for neoplasms. The main carcinogenic substances (including also ionizing radiation and air pollution) are listed, and are correlated with the risk factors for various cancers most frequently explained and discussed in the literature. The study is intended to serve as a basis for a general assessment of the incidence of neoplasms in children, and of cancer mortality in the entire population of Bavaria in the years 1983-1989, or 1979-1988, respectively, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment-related health survey. The study therefore takes into account not only ionizing radiation as a main risk factor, but also other risk factors detectable within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations and their effects, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or the social status. (orig./MG) [de

  12. First-in-Human PET/CT Imaging of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms with Cyclotron-Produced 44Sc-DOTATOC: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aviral; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina; Klette, Ingo; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Baum, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    44 Sc is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide (T 1/2  = 4.04 hours, E β+average  = 632 keV) and can be made available, using a cyclotron production route, in substantial quantities as a highly pure product. Herein, the authors report on a first-in-human PET/CT study using 44 Sc-DOTATOC prepared with cyclotron-produced 44 Sc. The production of 44 Sc was carried out through the 44 Ca(p,n) 44 Sc nuclear reaction at Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. After separation, 44 Sc was shipped to Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany, where radiolabeling was performed, yielding radiochemically pure 44 Sc-DOTATOC. Two patients, currently followed up after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, participated in this proof-of-concept study. Blood sampling was performed before and after application of 44 Sc-DOTATOC. PET/CT acquisitions, performed at different time points after injection of 44 Sc-DOTATOC, allowed detection of even very small lesions on delayed scans. No clinical adverse effects were observed and the laboratory hematological, renal, and hepatic profiles remained unchanged. In this study, cyclotron-produced 44 Sc was used in the clinic for the first time. It is attractive for theranostic application with 177 Lu, 90 Y, or 47 Sc as therapeutic counterparts. 44 Sc-based radiopharmaceuticals will be of particular value for PET facilities without radiopharmacy, to which they can be shipped from a centralized production site.

  13. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Batts, William

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11...

  14. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang G; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J; Allis, C David

    2009-06-11

    Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities1. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  15. Haematopoietic ESL-1 enables stem cell proliferation in the bone marrow by limiting TGFβ availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Magdalena; Quintana, Juan A; Ligos, José M; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2016-01-08

    The life-long maintenance of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) critically relies on environmental signals produced by cells that constitute the haematopoietic niche. Here we report a cell-intrinsic mechanism whereby haematopoietic cells limit proliferation within the bone marrow, and show that this pathway is repressed by E-selectin ligand 1 (ESL-1). Mice deficient in ESL-1 display aberrant HSPC quiescence, expansion of the immature pool and reduction in niche size. Remarkably, the traits were transplantable and dominant when mutant and wild-type precursors coexisted in the same environment, but were independent of E-selectin, the vascular receptor for ESL-1. Instead, quiescence is generated by unrestrained production of the cytokine TGFβ by mutant HSPC, and in vivo or in vitro blockade of the cytokine completely restores the homeostatic properties of the haematopoietic niche. These findings reveal that haematopoietic cells, including the more primitive compartment, can actively shape their own environment.

  16. Promotion of haematopoietic activity in embryonic stem cells by the aorta-gonad-mesonephros microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krassowska, Anna; Gordon-Keylock, Sabrina; Samuel, Kay; Gilchrist, Derek; Dzierzak, Elaine; Oostendorp, Robert; Forrester, Lesley M.; Ansell, John D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether the in vitro differentiation of ES cells into haematopoietic progenitors could be enhanced by exposure to the aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) microenvironment that is involved in the generation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during embryonic development. We established a co-culture system that combines the requirements for primary organ culture and differentiating ES cells and showed that exposure of differentiating ES cells to the primary AGM region results in a significant increase in the number of ES-derived haematopoietic progenitors. Co-culture of ES cells on the AM20-1B4 stromal cell line derived from the AGM region also increases haematopoietic activity. We conclude that factors promoting the haematopoietic activity of differentiating ES cells present in primary AGM explants are partially retained in the AM20.1B4 stromal cell line and that these factors are likely to be different to those required for adult HSC maintenance

  17. Neoplasm carcinoid: Description of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, Luis; Abarca, Jaysoom; Penaherrera, Vicente; Legarda, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case of small bowel obstruction associated with a carcinoid neoplasm of the ileum in a 78 year old man who was presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and a mass in right lower quadrant. Carcinoids are neuroendocrine neoplasm originating in multiple locations throughout the body human. About 75% of such neoplasm are located within the gastrointestinal tract and are capable of rpoducing various peptides. Their clinical course is often indolent but can also be aggressive and resistant to therapy. The incidence of these tumours is approximately 2.5 in 100.000 people per year. The former classification system of fore gut, midgut and hind gut tumors is still used in clinical routine. Determination of the histopathology of carcinoid tumors is of utmost importance and involves specific immunohistochemical staining for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, serotonin and gastrin. New localization procedures include somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. Surgery remains the cornerstone of treatment and provides the only chance of a cure. Other cytoreductive procedures include radiofrequency ablation, laser treatment and chemo embolization. New therapies, such as ling acting somatostatin analogs, together with further development of tumor targeted treatments, will come into clinical use in the near future. (The author)

  18. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2 , CALR , or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Epigenetic therapy in myeloproliferative neoplasms: evidence and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Guglielmelli, Paola; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bogani, Costanza; Barbui, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    The classic Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), which include polycythaemia vera, essential thrombocythaemia and primary myelofibrosis, originate from a stem cell-derived clonal myeloproliferation that manifests itself with variable haematopoietic cell lineage involvement; they are characterized by a high degree of similarities and the chance to transform each to the other and to evolve into acute leukaemia. Their molecular pathogenesis has been associated with recurrent acquired mutations in janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene (MPL). These discoveries have simplified the diagnostic approach and provided a number of clues to understanding the phenotypic expression of MPNs; furthermore, they represented a framework for developing and/or testing in clinical trials small molecules acting as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, evidence of abnormal epigenetic gene regulation as a mechanism potentially contributing to the pathogenesis and the phenotypic diversity of MPNs is still scanty; however, study of epigenetics in MPNs represents an active field of research. The first clinical trials with epigenetic drugs have been completed recently, whereas others are still ongoing; results have been variable and at present do not allow any firm conclusion. Novel basic and translational information concerning epigenetic gene regulation in MPNs and the perspectives for therapy will be critically addressed in this review. PMID:19522842

  20. Haematopoietic stem cell niches: new insights inspire new questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Fernando; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches provide an environment essential for life-long HSC function. Intense investigation of HSC niches both feed off and drive technology development to increase our capability to assay functionally defined cells with high resolution. A major driving force behind the desire to understand the basic biology of HSC niches is the clear implications for clinical therapies. Here, with particular emphasis on cell type-specific deletion of SCL and CXCL12, we focus on unresolved issues on HSC niches, framed around some very recent advances and novel discoveries on the extrinsic regulation of HSC maintenance. We also provide ideas for possible paths forward, some of which are clearly within reach while others will require both novel tools and vision. PMID:24022369

  1. Metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, P S R K

    2004-01-01

    The number of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) per animal is conserved across species. This means the HSCs need to maintain hematopoiesis over a longer period in larger animals. This would result in the requirement of stem cell self-renewal. At present the three existing models are the stochastic model, instructive model and the third more recently proposed is the chiaro-scuro model. It is a well known allometric law that metabolic rate scales to the three quarter power. Larger animals have a lower metabolic rate, compared to smaller animals. Here it is being hypothesized that metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. At lower metabolic rate the stem cells commit for self-renewal, where as at higher metabolic rate they become committed to different lineages. The present hypothesis can explain the salient features of the different models. Recent findings regarding stem cell self-renewal suggest an important role for Wnt proteins and their receptors known as frizzleds, which are an important component of cell signaling pathway. The role of cGMP in the Wnts action provides further justification for the present hypothesis as cGMP is intricately linked to metabolic rate. One can also explain the telomere homeostasis by the present hypothesis. One prediction of the present hypothesis is with reference to the limit of cell divisions known as Hayflick limit, here it is being suggested that this is the result of metabolic rate in laboratory conditions and there can be higher number of cell divisions in vivo if the metabolic rate is lower. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Socially disadvantaged parents of children treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hanne Bækgaard; Heilmann, Carsten; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to test a daily Family Navigator Nurse (FNN) conducted intervention program, to support parents during the distressful experience of their child's Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). METHODS: A qualitative analysis of the supportive...

  3. Advancing haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell biology through single-cell profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hamey, Fiona; Nestorowa, Sonia; Wilson, Nicola Kaye; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) sit at the top of the haematopoietic hierarchy, and their fate choices need to be carefully controlled to ensure balanced production of all mature blood cell types. As cell fate decisions are made at the level of the individual cells, recent technological advances in measuring gene and protein expression in increasingly large numbers of single cells have been rapidly adopted to study both normal and pathological HSPC function. In this review we...

  4. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  5. [Spontaneous neoplasms in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khar'kovskaia, N A; Khrustalev, S A; Vasil'eva, N N

    1977-01-01

    The authors present an analysis of the data of foreign literature and the results of their personal studies of spontaneous neoplasms in 40 guinea pigs of national breeding observed during observed during a 5-year period. In 4 of them malignant tumors were diagnosed-lympholeucosis (2 cases), dermoid ovarian cysts and also cancer and adenoma of the adrenal cortex (in one animal). The neoplasms described developed in guinea pigs, aged over 4 years, and they are referred to as mostly common tumors in this species of animals.

  6. Prevention of malignant neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    D. G. Zaridze; D. M. Maksimovich

    2017-01-01

    Research in causation of cancer is an important part of cancer research in general and is an essential prerequisite for cancer prevention. The effective primary prevention is not visible without evidence based knowledge in the causation of cancer in humans.There is sufficient evidence that certain life style and environment factors cause cancer in humans. These factors include: smoking and other types of tobacco consumption, overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, diet rich in proc...

  7. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  8. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Molecular diagnostics of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langabeer, S. E.; Andrikovics, H.; Asp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation in the majority of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis ten years ago, further MPN-specific mutational events, notably in JAK2 exon 12, MPL exon 10 and CALR exon 9 have been...

  10. T cell reconstitution in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, K; Jordan, K K; Uhlving, H H

    2015-01-01

    Infections and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are major causes of treatment-related mortality and morbidity following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Both complications depend on reconstitution of the T-lymphocyte population based on donor T cells. Although...... it is well established that Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for de novo T cell development in the thymus and homoeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells, associations between circulating levels of IL-7 and T cell reconstitution following HSCT have not been investigated previously. We...... in patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) compared with those not treated with ATG (P = 0.0079). IL-7 levels at day +7 were negatively associated with T cell counts at day +30 to +60 (at day +60: CD3(+) : β = -10.6 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.0030; CD8(+) : β = -8.4 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.061; CD4...

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, Paul M; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Thompson, Patrick M; Waltzek, Thomas B; Becker, Joy A; Whittington, Richard J

    2017-11-01

    Low genetic diversity of Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) was determined for the complete genome of 16 isolates spanning the natural range of hosts, geography and time since the first outbreaks of disease. Genomes ranged from 125,591-127,487 nucleotides with 97.47% pairwise identity and 106-109 genes. All isolates shared 101 core genes with 121 potential genes predicted within the pan-genome of this collection. There was high conservation within 90,181 nucleotides of the core genes with isolates separated by average genetic distance of 3.43 × 10 -4 substitutions per site. Evolutionary analysis of the core genome strongly supported historical epidemiological evidence of iatrogenic spread of EHNV to naïve hosts and establishment of endemic status in discrete ecological niches. There was no evidence of structural genome reorganization, however, the complement of non-core genes and variation in repeat elements enabled fine scale molecular epidemiological investigation of this unpredictable pathogen of fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential cytokine contributions of perivascular haematopoietic stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Noboru; Kunisaki, Yuya; Pierce, Halley; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Birbrair, Alexander; Ma'ayan, Avi; Frenette, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    Arterioles and sinusoids of the bone marrow (BM) are accompanied by stromal cells that express nerve/glial antigen 2 (NG2) and leptin receptor (LepR), and constitute specialized niches that regulate quiescence and proliferation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, how niche cells differentially regulate HSC functions remains unknown. Here, we show that the effects of cytokines regulating HSC functions are dependent on the producing cell sources. Deletion of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 12 (Cxcl12) or stem cell factor (Scf) from all perivascular cells marked by nestin-GFP dramatically depleted BM HSCs. Selective Cxcl12 deletion from arteriolar NG2 + cells, but not from sinusoidal LepR + cells, caused HSC reductions and altered HSC localization in BM. By contrast, deletion of Scf in LepR + cells, but not NG2 + cells, led to reductions in BM HSC numbers. These results uncover distinct contributions of cytokines derived from perivascular cells in separate vascular niches to HSC maintenance.

  13. Persistent response of Fanconi anemia haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yibo; Amarachintha, Surya; Wilson, Andrew F; Li, Xue; Du, Wei

    2017-06-18

    Oxidative stress is considered as an important pathogenic factor in many human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA), an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with extremely high risk of leukemic transformation. Members of the FA protein family are involved in DNA damage and other cellular stress responses. Loss of FA proteins renders cells hypersensitive to oxidative stress and cancer transformation. However, how FA cells respond to oxidative DNA damage remains unclear. By using an in vivo stress-response mouse strain expressing the Gadd45β-luciferase transgene, we show here that haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from mice deficient for the FA gene Fanca or Fancc persistently responded to oxidative stress. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that accumulation of unrepaired DNA damage, particularly in oxidative damage-sensitive genes, was responsible for the long-lasting response in FA HSPCs. Furthermore, genetic correction of Fanca deficiency almost completely abolished the persistent oxidative stress-induced G 2 /M arrest and DNA damage response in vivo. Our study suggests that FA pathway is an integral part of a versatile cellular mechanism by which HSPCs respond to oxidative stress.

  14. Prevention of malignant neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Zaridze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in causation of cancer is an important part of cancer research in general and is an essential prerequisite for cancer prevention. The effective primary prevention is not visible without evidence based knowledge in the causation of cancer in humans.There is sufficient evidence that certain life style and environment factors cause cancer in humans. These factors include: smoking and other types of tobacco consumption, overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, diet rich in processed meat and poor in vegetables and fruits, certain types of viral and bacterial infection, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, ambient air pollution, carcinogens at workplace, exogenous hormones.Cancer mortality is decreasing in majority of developed countries, including Russia. This mortality trend is mostly due to decrease in incidence and death rates of lung and other smoking related cancers and is caused by decline in smoking prevalence and change in tar content of cigarette smoke.In Russia trend in mortality from all cancers is as well determined by decrease in incidence and mortality from gastric cancer, which is due to decline in prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and improvement of diet, increase in consumption of fruits and vegetables. Thus the decline in cancer mortality is mostly the result of primary prevention which is the most effective avenue of cancer control. 

  15. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references

  16. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  17. Unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Taiwan and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K L; Chang, C Y; Lin, S; Shyr, M H; Lin, P Y

    2009-06-01

    Since its inception in October 1993, the world-renowned Buddhist Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry has facilitated more than 1800 cases of stem cell donations for patients in 27 countries to date. Under the auspices of the Buddhist Tzu Chi Stem Cells Center (BTCSCC), the Registry (> 310,000 donors) offers, on average, one case of stem cell donation every day to national or international transplantation community. The accomplishment of the Registry stems from the philosophy and spirit of giving without reward that was inspired by its founder Dharma Master Cheng Yen, the Samaritan devotions of selfless voluntary stem cell donors and the efforts from a dedicated network of volunteer workers. Demographically speaking, slightly less than one third of the donations are provided to domestic patients and the rest to mainland China and countries in Asia, North America, Europe, Middle East, Oceania, and South Africa. While most of the patients belong to the Oriental ethnic group, a few of the patients are non-Oriental. In addition to the Registry, a non-profit umbilical cord blood (UCB) bank is operating since 2002 to provide a complimentary role for patients unable to identify appropriate bone marrow stem cell donors in the Registry in time. To date, with an inventory of over 12,000 units of UCB cryopreserved in the Tzu Chi Cord Blood Bank, 47 units have been employed in 37 cases of transplantation for both paediatric and adult patients domestically and internationally. The fact that Buddhist Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry and Cord Blood Bank are established and operating without governmental financial support is unique and special. To facilitate haematopoietic stem cells to its domestic patients experiencing financial burdens, the BTCSCC offers financial aids to the underprivileged for their medical relief. This humanitarian approach and compassion is definitely a role model for many countries in the world.

  18. Non-circadian rhythm in proliferation of haematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necas, E.; Znojil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proportion of haematopoietic stem cells (CFU-s) engaged in DNA synthesis was determined by means of the [ 3 H]-thymidine ([ 3 H]TdR) suicide technique during recovery of bone marrow from the damage caused by a sublethal total body irradiation. In contrast with previous reports the [ 3 H]TdR suicide rate was not permanently increased. It was observed that CFU-s passed through S phase in synchronous waves, following a dose of irradiation of 1.5 Gy. After a dose of 2.6 Gy, there was only one initial wave of increased CFU-s sensitivity to the action of [ 3 H]TdR. Following the depression occurring 26 hr after the irradiation with 2.6 Gy, the proportion of CFU-s killed by the [ 3 H]TdR was permanently increased until 5-6 days after irradiation. Thereafter large differences in the [ 3 H]TdR suicide data were observed among individual mice. Evidence was obtained that individual mice, which had been irradiated by a dose of 2.6 Gy 8-9 days before, had identical values of the CFU-s [ 3 H]TdR suicide rate in the bone marrow from different bones of the lower extremities. The recurrence of the synchronous waves in CFU-s passage through the cell cycle was recorded when the CFU-s population regenerated to only about 10% of its normal value. It is concluded that the synchronous waves in which CFU-s proliferation occurred reflected the action of the control mechanism on CFU-s proliferation. (author)

  19. Non-circadian rhythm in proliferation of haematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necas, E; Znojil, V [Charles Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Faculty of Medicine

    1988-03-01

    The proportion of haematopoietic stem cells (CFU-s) engaged in DNA synthesis was determined by means of the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine ((/sup 3/H)TdR) suicide technique during recovery of bone marrow from the damage caused by a sublethal total body irradiation. In contrast with previous reports the (/sup 3/H)TdR suicide rate was not permanently increased. It was observed that CFU-s passed through S phase in synchronous waves, following a dose of irradiation of 1.5 Gy. After a dose of 2.6 Gy, there was only one initial wave of increased CFU-s sensitivity to the action of (/sup 3/H)TdR. Following the depression occurring 26 hr after the irradiation with 2.6 Gy, the proportion of CFU-s killed by the (/sup 3/H)TdR was permanently increased until 5-6 days after irradiation. Thereafter large differences in the (/sup 3/H)TdR suicide data were observed among individual mice. Evidence was obtained that individual mice, which had been irradiated by a dose of 2.6 Gy 8-9 days before, had identical values of the CFU-s (/sup 3/H)TdR suicide rate in the bone marrow from different bones of the lower extremities. The recurrence of the synchronous waves in CFU-s passage through the cell cycle was recorded when the CFU-s population regenerated to only about 10% of its normal value. It is concluded that the synchronous waves in which CFU-s proliferation occurred reflected the action of the control mechanism on CFU-s proliferation. (author).

  20. Neuroprotective properties of a novel, non-haematopoietic agonist of the erythropoietin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Kiryushko, Dar'Ya; Sonn, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    they are involved in tissue protection. However, the use of erythropoietin as a neuroprotective agent may be hampered by its erythropoietic activity. Therefore, developing non-haematopoietic erythropoietin mimetics is important. Based on the crystal structure of the complex of erythropoietin and its receptor, we...... attenuated seizures, decreased mortality and reduced neurodegeneration in an in vivo model of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast to erythropoietin, Epotris did not stimulate erythropoiesis upon chronic administration. Thus, Epotris is a novel neuroprotective non-haematopoietic erythropoietin...

  1. Human Papillomavirus and Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasm: A Review Literature from Mexico and Colombia / Virus del papiloma humano y el cáncer de cabeza y cuello: revisión de la literatura desde México y Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha Buelvas, Anderson; Grupo de Gestión del Conocimiento de Observatorios, Registros y Sistemas de Información, Dirección de Epidemiología y Demografía, Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social, Bogotá; Bologna Molina, Ronell; Escuela de Odontología, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango; Rocha Buelvas, Cristian; Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogotá

    2013-01-01

    Background: Papillomavirus or papilovirus is considered the most prevalent group of virusesthat cause tumors of head and neck associated with infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). Purpose: Carry out a systematic review of literature on HPV as causal agentof upper aerodigestive tract neoplasm (UADTN), according to epidemiological and clinicaldata. Methods: Pertinent biomedical literature was searched in several databases such asMedline, Proquest, Science Direct, Ovid and Cochrane, as well...

  2. The application of human papilloma virus genotyping for the identification of neoplasm lesions in the cervix of women with abnormal cytology smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszek, Barbara; Heimrath, Jerzy; Ciszek, Marian

    2012-01-01

    A connection between infections with a highly oncogenic type of human papilloma virus and the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and preinvasive cervical cancer has been proven both experimentally and clinically. The period after which persistent virus infection will lead to the development of precancerous and invasive lesions is dependent on, among others, the HPV genotype. The oncogenic types of human papilloma virus destabilize the genome of an infected cell and thus initiate the carcinogenesis process. The aim of this work was to analyze the frequency of occurrence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes among women with abnormal cytological smears and the correlation of this data with the degree of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia exacerbation. The sample consisted of 75 women of child-bearing age (16-43 years old) with an abnormal cytological smear and positive test identifying an infection with an oncogenic type of human papilloma virus. In every case histopathological verification, aimed at excluding pathologies in the endocervix, was conducted using a colposcopy with guided biopsy and cervix abrasion. The authors found that the frequency of occurrence of different HPV genotypes of the groups of cytological diagnoses ASC-US, LSIL and HSIL do not differ statistically (p = 0.57). However, what is noteworthy is the more common occurrence of HPV 16 in type LSIL lesions (45.45%) and HPV 18 of a more advanced type HSIL (37.50%) pathology. Through the verification of the cytology results with histopathological diagnosis of the above groups the authors obtained statistically significant differences (p human papilloma virus, the authors found that the most common were HPV 31, 45 and 33. In CIN 1 and CIN 2 their share was over 60%. In CIS/AIS type pathologies, no other types of human papilloma virus than HPV 16 and HPV 18 were shown. Positive results of DNA HR HPV testing of women with abnormal cytology results identified a risk group for the

  3. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...... be performed to reduce local or hormone-induced symptoms and to improve quality of life. The surgical procedures for GEP-NENs are accordingly described below. In most patients life-long follow-up is required, even following radical surgery, as recurrence may occur several years later....

  4. Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Min, Jee Yeon; Han, Byoung Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neoplasms can develop in each tetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplosms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical and ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings

  5. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology.

  6. Differential diagnosis of skin lesions after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canninga-van Dijk, MR; Sanders, CJ; Verdonck, LF; Fijnheer, R; van den Tweel, JG

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (i.e. bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation) is a common procedure in the treatment of various haematological disorders such as aplastic anaemia, (pre)leukaemias, some malignant lymphomas, multiple myeloma and immunodeficiency

  7. State-of-the-art fertility preservation in children and adolescents undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalle, J-H; Lucchini, G; Balduzzi, A

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a well-established treatment procedure and often the only cure for many patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases. Decrease in short-term complications has substantially contributed to increased survival. Theref...

  8. Platelet-biased stem cells reside at the apex of the haematopoietic stem-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Macaulay, Iain C; Jensen, Christina T; Woll, Petter S; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Moore, Susan; Carella, Cintia; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Bouriez Jones, Tiphaine; Chowdhury, Onima; Stenson, Laura; Lutteropp, Michael; Green, Joanna C A; Facchini, Raffaella; Boukarabila, Hanane; Grover, Amit; Gambardella, Adriana; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Tarrant, Paul; Atkinson, Deborah; Clark, Sally-Ann; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W

    2013-10-10

    The blood system is maintained by a small pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are required and sufficient for replenishing all human blood cell lineages at millions of cells per second throughout life. Megakaryocytes in the bone marrow are responsible for the continuous production of platelets in the blood, crucial for preventing bleeding--a common and life-threatening side effect of many cancer therapies--and major efforts are focused at identifying the most suitable cellular and molecular targets to enhance platelet production after bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy. Although it has become clear that distinct HSC subsets exist that are stably biased towards the generation of lymphoid or myeloid blood cells, we are yet to learn whether other types of lineage-biased HSC exist or understand their inter-relationships and how differently lineage-biased HSCs are generated and maintained. The functional relevance of notable phenotypic and molecular similarities between megakaryocytes and bone marrow cells with an HSC cell-surface phenotype remains unclear. Here we identify and prospectively isolate a molecularly and functionally distinct mouse HSC subset primed for platelet-specific gene expression, with enhanced propensity for short- and long-term reconstitution of platelets. Maintenance of platelet-biased HSCs crucially depends on thrombopoietin, the primary extrinsic regulator of platelet development. Platelet-primed HSCs also frequently have a long-term myeloid lineage bias, can self-renew and give rise to lymphoid-biased HSCs. These findings show that HSC subtypes can be organized into a cellular hierarchy, with platelet-primed HSCs at the apex. They also demonstrate that molecular and functional priming for platelet development initiates already in a distinct HSC population. The identification of a platelet-primed HSC population should enable the rational design of therapies enhancing platelet output.

  9. Anal channel neoplasm: a neoplasm radio chemo curable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Avondet, I.; Vazquez, J.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1997-01-01

    Presently work is made an exhaustive revision of the anatomy of the region, the history of the treatments and of the current treatments of channel cancer anal. It makes emphasis in the importance of the conservative treatment with radiochemotherapy (RQT). The present is a prospective study,longitudinal and descriptive. Material and method: between January of 1989 and December of 1994 20 patients attended with cancer of anal channel with an illness metastasis. An average age it was of 62.4 years.The sex, 16 men and 4 women. The performance status 0,1 or 2 of the scale of the ECOQ. In the pathological anatomy: 15 patient epidermic neoplasm, 5 patient basal neoplasm. State I: 2 patients, II: 12 patients, III: 6 patients, IV: 0 patients.Treatment: the radiotherapy one carries out with cobalt 60 and it irradiates the primary tumour and the ganglion structures region, pelvic and inguinal. It surrendered to Gy/dia from Monday to Friday up to 50 Gy. The chemotherapy one carries out with mitomicine C 10 mg/ previous day to the radiotherapy and 5-UGH 1 intravenous g/my in infusion the days from 1 to 4 and from 29 to 32 after the radiotherapy.Results: to) control locorregional patient RC-16 (80%) ,RP 2 patients (10%) , without answer or with progression lesional a patient (5%) .b) State vital: living 15 patients, died 5 patients(continuation 12 to 60 months) .e)Tolerance: there were not deaths for the gastrointestinal treatment and haematological with toxicity moderate.To conclude:1) The radiochemotherapy is the treatment of elect.2)A feasible treatment of being carried out in our environment.3)Required of a good relationship predictable interdisciplinary.4)Toxicity and tolerable.5)Results of conservation of the sphincter in 80%(AU) [es

  10. Protection from UV light is an evolutionarily conserved feature of the haematopoietic niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Friedrich G.; Perlin, Julie R.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Gansner, John M.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; O'Connell, Lauren A.; Johnson, Nicholas; Amemiya, Chris; Fisher, David E.; Wolfle, Ute; Trompouki, Eirini; Niemeyer, Charlotte M.; Driever, Wolfgang; Zon, Leonard I.

    2018-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) require a specific microenvironment, the haematopoietic niche, which regulates HSPC behaviour. The location of this niche varies across species, but the evolutionary pressures that drive HSPCs to different microenvironments remain unknown. The niche is located in the bone marrow in adult mammals, whereas it is found in other locations in non-mammalian vertebrates, for example, in the kidney marrow in teleost fish. Here we show that a melanocyte umbrella above the kidney marrow protects HSPCs against ultraviolet light in zebrafish. Because mutants that lack melanocytes have normal steady-state haematopoiesis under standard laboratory conditions, we hypothesized that melanocytes above the stem cell niche protect HSPCs against ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage. Indeed, after ultraviolet-light irradiation, unpigmented larvae show higher levels of DNA damage in HSPCs, as indicated by staining of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and have reduced numbers of HSPCs, as shown by cmyb (also known as myb) expression. The umbrella of melanocytes associated with the haematopoietic niche is highly evolutionarily conserved in aquatic animals, including the sea lamprey, a basal vertebrate. During the transition from an aquatic to a terrestrial environment, HSPCs relocated into the bone marrow, which is protected from ultraviolet light by the cortical bone around the marrow. Our studies reveal that melanocytes above the haematopoietic niche protect HSPCs from ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in aquatic vertebrates and suggest that during the transition to terrestrial life, ultraviolet light was an evolutionary pressure affecting the location of the haematopoietic niche.

  11. Effects of low-level radiation upon the haematopoietic stem cell. Implications for leukaemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bond, V.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Miller, M.E.; Bullis, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    These studies address first the effect of single small doses of X-rays upon murine haematopoietic stem cells to obtain a better estimate of the Dsub(q). It is small, of the order of 20 rad. Second, a dose fractionation schedule that does not kill or perturb the kinetics of haematopoietic cell proliferation was sought to investigate the leukaemogenic potential of low-level radiation upon an unperturbed haematopoietic system. Doses used by others in past radiation leukaemogenesis studies clearly perturb haematopoiesis and kill a detectable fraction of stem cells. The studies reported in the paper show that 1.25 rad every day decreases the CFU-S content of bone marrow by the time 80 rad are accumulated. Higher daily doses as used in published studies on radiation leukaemogenesis produce greater effects. Studies of the effect of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 rad three times per week are under way. Two rad three times per week produce a modest decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow after an accumulation of 68 rad. With 3.0 rad three times per week, an accumulation of 102 rad produces a significant decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow. Dose fractionation at 0.5 and 1.0 rad three times per week has not produced a CFU-S depression after accumulation of 17 and 34 rad. Radiation leukaemogenesis studies published to date have used single doses and chronic exposure schedules that probably have significantly perturbed the kinetics of haematopoietic stem cells. Whether radiation will produce leukaemia in animal models with dose schedules that do not perturb the kinetics of haematopoietic stem cells remains to be seen. (author)

  12. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  13. Residual haematopoietic damage in adult and 8 day-old mice exposed to 7 Gy of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, T.; Bueren, J.A.; Gaitan, S.; Tejero, C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors' experiments have focused on the analysis of residual haematopoietic damage in 8-day-old and 12-week-old mice X-irradiated with a single dose of 7 Gy. In the case of adult mice, analysis of femoral and splenic CFU-S, CFU-GM and BFU-E showed a persistent depletion of these haematopoietic progenitor cells after irradiation. In contrast, in 1-week-old irradiated mice, a progressive recovery of the femoral haematopoietic progenitors was observed, achieving essentially normal values 1 year after irradiation. The spleens of these mice, however, contained significantly less haematopoietic progenitors than the control group, mainly as a consequence of the size reduction of this organ. In the peripheral blood, normal cellularity values were observed in most cases, although in the adult group a decline in numbers or circulating cells was noted after the first year following irradiation. (author)

  14. Sodium MR imaging of human brain neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shu; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Takakura, Kintomo; Iio, Masahiro

    1988-01-01

    We reported the experience of the sodium magnetic resonance imaging of 5 patients with brain tumors (4 astrocytomas and 1 craniopharyngioma), using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla superconductive magnet. We used two-dimensional Fourier imaging with a spin-echo scanning sequence (and with the repetition time of 140 msec and the echo time of 11 - 14 msec). The radiofrequency was maintained at 17 MHz. Sodium MR imaging was achieved with a 64 x 64 data acquisition (30 mm slice thickness) in 19.1 min. On the sodium MRI, all four astrocytomas, along with the eye balls and the cerebrospinal fluid spaces, appeared as high-intensity areas. Peritumoral edema is also visualized as highly intense, so that it is difficult to discriminate tumor extent from the surrounding edema. Our comparative studies with malignant glioma cases using the same equipment are needed to clarify the relationship between sodium signal intensities and the malignancy of gliomas, and to evaluate the potential clinical utility of sodium MRI. A craniopharyngioma than contained a yellowish cystic fluid with a sodium concentration as high as CSF was shown on sodium MRI as a mass with highly intense signals. The ability to differentiate extracellular from intracellular sodium, that has been studied by several investigators, would greatly augment the clinical specificity of MR imaging. (author)

  15. Brain and spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bragg, D.G.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional means of detecting CNS neoplasms include plain film studies, isotope brain scans, angiography, pneumoencephalography, and myelography. Computed tomography (CT) scanning has replaced nearly all of these studies in both the initial detection and follow-up of brain tumors. Air studies (pneumoencephalography and ventriculography) have been virtually eliminated, except in certain unusual circumstances when two positions need to be checked, or hydrocephalus followed. The nuclear brain scan has a very limited role at present, being useful primarily for detecting skull or meningeal metastases. Myelography, however, remains a valuable imaging tool for the assessment of tumors of the spinal canal. CT scanning has not only improved our ability to detect smaller brain tumors, but also CT guided stereotactic biopsy techniques provide a safer means of obtaining tissue from these smaller lesions, regardless of location. Surgical techniques, guided by CT sterotactic techniques, show promise as well, but the impact of these therapeutic techniques on survival statistics remains to be defined. CT has revolutionized the approach to the detection and diagnosis of space-occupying lesions in the brain. Tumors can be detected at a smaller site

  16. Molecular diagnostics of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, Stephen E; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Asp, Julia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Carillo, Serge; Haslam, Karl; Kjaer, Lasse; Lippert, Eric; Mansier, Olivier; Oppliger Leibundgut, Elisabeth; Percy, Melanie J; Porret, Naomi; Palmqvist, Lars; Schwarz, Jiri; McMullin, Mary F; Schnittger, Susanne; Pallisgaard, Niels; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation in the majority of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis ten years ago, further MPN-specific mutational events, notably in JAK2 exon 12, MPL exon 10 and CALR exon 9 have been identified. These discoveries have been rapidly incorporated into evolving molecular diagnostic algorithms. Whilst many of these mutations appear to have prognostic implications, establishing MPN diagnosis is of immediate clinical importance with selection, implementation and the continual evaluation of the appropriate laboratory methodology to achieve this diagnosis similarly vital. The advantages and limitations of these approaches in identifying and quantitating the common MPN-associated mutations are considered herein with particular regard to their clinical utility. The evolution of molecular diagnostic applications and platforms has occurred in parallel with the discovery of MPN-associated mutations, and it therefore appears likely that emerging technologies such as next-generation sequencing and digital PCR will in the future play an increasing role in the molecular diagnosis of MPN. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. RENAL DAMAGE WITH MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Kolina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between renal damage and malignant neoplasms is one of the most actual problems of the medicine of internal diseases. Very often, exactly availability of renal damage determines the forecast of cancer patients. The range of renal pathologies associated with tumors is unusually wide: from the mechanical effect of the tumor or metastases on the kidneys and/or the urinary tract and paraneoplastic manifestations in the form of nephritis or amyloidosis to nephropathies induced with drugs or tumor lysis, etc. Thrombotic complications that develop as a result of exposure to tumor effects, side effects of certain drugs or irradiation also play an important role in the development of the kidney damage. The most frequent variants of renal damage observed in the practice of medical internists (therapists, urologists, surgeons, etc., as well as methods of diagnosis and treatment approaches are described in the article. Timely and successful prevention and treatment of tumor-associated nephropathies give hope for retaining renal functions, therefore, a higher life standard after completion of anti-tumor therapy. Even a shortterm episode of acute renal damage suffered by a cancer patient must be accompanied with relevant examination and treatment. In the caseof transformation of acute renal damage into the chronic kidney disease, such patients need systematic and weighted renoprotective therapy and correct dosing of nephrotoxic drugs.

  18. Polycomb Cbx family members mediate the balance between haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauke, Karin; Radulović, Višnja; Broekhuis, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    The balance between self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells is essential for tissue homeostasis. Here we show that in the haematopoietic system this process is governed by polycomb chromobox (Cbx) proteins. Cbx7 is specifically expressed in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and its...... overexpression enhances self-renewal and induces leukaemia. This effect is dependent on integration into polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and requires H3K27me3 binding. In contrast, overexpression of Cbx2, Cbx4 or Cbx8 results in differentiation and exhaustion of HSCs. ChIP-sequencing analysis shows that Cbx......7 and Cbx8 share most of their targets; we identified approximately 200 differential targets. Whereas genes targeted by Cbx8 are highly expressed in HSCs and become repressed in progenitors, Cbx7 targets show the opposite expression pattern. Thus, Cbx7 preserves HSC self-renewal by repressing...

  19. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is also...

  20. Radioprotective potency of ginseng on some haematopoietic and physiological parameters in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.; Hussein, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Currently, investigations focus on co administration of natural products with radiation treatment. The present study was assessed to investigate the potency of ginseng as a radioprotective agent on haematopoietic cell recovery, the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA) level in addition to physiological bio markers. Panax ginseng was intraperitoneally injected (100 mg/ kg) to female rats 24 h before gamma irradiation of 7 Gy which is liable to disturb the haematopoietic system and the organs involved as the bone marrow and spleen. Animals were investigated after 5 and 9 days from irradiation, ginseng or dual treatments. Irradiation caused significant wt loss of the body and spleen, decrease in bone marrow (B.M.) viable cells, significant depression in leukocytes with its differential counts, significant drop in erythrocytes, haemoglobin and haematocrite values besides elevation in MCV. Gamma-irradiation treatment resulted in significant increase in serum MDA and glucose as well as significant reduction in blood GSH. Significant elevations in transaminases (ALT and AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were recorded after gamma irradiation. Preservation of body wt, B.M. viable cells, spleen wt and haematopoietic cell recovery was evident upon ginseng pre-administration. It ameliorated the depression in GSH content and the elevation in MDA level. ALT, AST and ALP were depressed approaching the control level after 9 days from dual treatments and blood sugar level was maintained. The study points out the promising positive role played by ginseng as a nontoxic natural product to reduce the time necessary for reconstituting haematopoietic cells and protecting vital physiological processes after irradiation

  1. Aerobic exercise capacity at long-term follow-up after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, S; Uhlving, H H; Buchvald, F

    2014-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a measure of aerobic exercise capacity, predicts mortality and morbidity in healthy and diseased individuals. Our aim was to determine VO2peak years after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and to identify associations with baseline patient and donor...... type or GvHD were found. Although causes for reduced VO2peak may be multiple, our findings stress the need to focus on physical activity post HSCT to prevent lifestyle diseases and improve quality of life....

  2. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metastatic neoplasms of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metastatic neoplasms to the central nervous system are often encountered in the practice of surgical neuropathology. It is not uncommon for patients with systemic malignancies to present to medical attention because of symptoms from a brain metastasis and for the tissue samples procured from these lesions to represent the first tissue available to study a malignancy from an unknown primary. In general surgical pathology, the evaluation of a metastatic neoplasm of unknown primary is a very complicated process, requiring knowledge of numerous different tumor types, reagents, and staining patterns. The past few years, however, have seen a remarkable refinement in the immunohistochemical tools at our disposal that now empower neuropathologists to take an active role in defining the relatively limited subset of neoplasms that commonly metastasize to the central nervous system. This information can direct imaging studies to find the primary tumor in a patient with an unknown primary, clarify the likely primary site of origin in patients who have small tumors in multiple sites without an obvious primary lesion, or establish lesions as late metastases of remote malignancies. Furthermore, specific treatments can begin and additional invasive procedures may be prevented if the neuropathologic evaluation of metastatic neoplasms provides information beyond the traditional diagnosis of ''metastatic neoplasm.'' In this review, differential cytokeratins, adjuvant markers, and organ-specific antibodies are described and the immunohistochemical signatures of metastatic neoplasms that are commonly seen by neuropathologists are discussed

  4. Clinico-roentgenological characteristic of early stomach neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golub, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Peculiarities of clinic and roentgenosemiotics of early stomach neoplasms in patients were analyzed. Roentgenological picture of early stomach neoplasms depends on anatomic growth shape and size of neoplasms, its localization and on manifestation of inflammatory and functional chages accompanying the neoplasm. Application of complex of gastrological examination including roentgenological diagnostic method, gastrofibroscopy and morphological examination of the tissue permits to diagnose early stomach neoplasm in 95,4 % of patients. 8 refs

  5. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  6. Histopathological audit of salivary gland neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, J.M.; Sheikh, B.

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms are uncommon but important presentation to general surgeons. Objective: To analyze the relative frequency and distribution of Salivary gland neoplasms in our division. Setting: Department of surgery and pathology, Peoples Medical University hospital and GMMMC hospital Sukkur. Study design: Descriptive (case series) Subjects and methods: A total of 40 patients registered for salivary gland tumors from oct 2008 to 0ct 2013 were included in the study. A thorough history, clinical examination, routine haematological and biochemical studies were done in all patients. FNAC was done in all cases. All patients were subjected to surgical intervention on standard rules. Each resected specimen was sent for histopathology. Information about age, gender and tumor location was obtained from clinical record and frequency of different neoplasms was studied from histopathological report. All data was collected on especially designed proforma. Data analysis was done using spss version 17. Results: A total of 40 patients were registered for salivary gland neoplasms. 28 patients (70%) had parotid lesions, 10 patients (25%) had submandibular gland involvement and 2 patients ( 5%) had minor salivary gland tumors. Patients were between 15 - 80 years of age( mean age =34.7 years) 24 patients(60%) were male and 16 (40%) were female,with male to female ratio of 1.5:1.32 . 22 (80%) had benign lesions and 8 patients (20%) had malignant lesions. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumor affecting the parotid gland. Adenocarcinoma represented as the most prevelant parotid malignancy. Benign neoplasms occurred in third and fourth decades of life and malignant neoplasms were diagnosed in sixth and seventh decades of life. Conclusion:Salivary gland neoplasms are uncommon but they have occasioned much interest and debate because of broad histological spectrum. The data presented in this study is corroborated with most of the studied literature worldwide. (author)

  7. Current practices for screening, consent and care of related donors in France: Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation coordinator nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomeni, A; Bompoint, C; Gomez, A; Brissot, E; Ruggeri, A; Belhocine, R; Mohty, M

    2017-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation-coordinating nurses (HSCT-CNs) play an important role in informing related donors (RDs) and in organising human leucocyte antigen (HLA) tests, pre-donation workup and stem cells collection. Our pilot study aimed to explore French HSCT-CNs' perceptions of RD care issues. Twenty-nine French HSCT adult units were sent a questionnaire on the subject of donation procedures, HSCT-CNs' data and their professional experience of related donation issues. Twenty-two HSCT-CNs returned a completed questionnaire, and 90% of HSCT units were involved to some degree in both patient and donor care. Responses indicated that the provision of information to potential donors prior to HLA tests was insufficient, while donors were given a medical consultation only during the pre-donation workup. Questions were raised about the consent and voluntary status of RDs. None of the HSCT teams organised a post-donation consultation, while 57% provided follow-up by phone or via a questionnaire. Our results draw attention to the conflict of interest experienced by HSCT-CNs when caring simultaneously for patients and donors. The specific psychosocial difficulties associated with becoming an RD are also highlighted. French HSCT-CNs' perceptions of related donation reveal many ethical and clinical problems that have yet to be fully explored. Data on this topic remain scarce, and our pilot study may contribute to the current debate on the organisation of RD care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  9. Nutritional survey of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shengtao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to know the nutriture of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy and give nutritional guidance properly, the authors make the following survey. Methods: A dietary survey of twenty-four-hour retrospective method was used; The patients' activity was recorded and their twenty-four hours caloric consumption was calculated. Results: Of all the patients, the intake of protein is more than recommended, percentage of calorific proportion is about 15%-19% of gross caloric. A larger portion of patients' caloric intake, especially female patients, is lower than caloric consumption. Among all the patients, the intake of vegetables is not enough; The consumption of milk and milky products is lower; it is common and serious that neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy have vitamine and mineral's scarcity. Conclusions: Nutriture of neoplasm patients is not optimistic, it is imperative to improve their nutriture

  10. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  11. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Neoplasms of the thoracic cavity are as diverse as the structures and tissues that comprise the thorax. This paper summarizes the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of thoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat. Specific diagnostic techniques are evaluated, as is the utility of imaging techniques for clinical staging. Surgery is recommended as the treatment of choice for intrathoracic neoplasms, with exception for multiple tumor masses, metastasis, or poor patient health. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia are discussed individually or in combination with surgery or each other. Prognosis for specific tumors is discussed, as is lymph node involvement as a prognostic indicator. As the use of newer diagnostic procedures become more available in veterinary medicine, it should be possible to offer patients a variety of positive choices that will enhance their survival and quality of life

  12. Colonic lymphoid follicles associated with colonic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glick, S.N.; Teplick, S.K.; Ross, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors prospectively evaluated 62 patients over 40 years old in whom lymphoid follicles were demonstrated on double-contrast enema examinations. Eighteen patients (29%) had no current radiographic evidence of, or history of, colonic neoplasms. Forty-four patients (71%) had an associated neoplasm. Fourteen patients had associated colonic carcinoma, and ten patients had a history of a previously resected colon cancer. One patient had previously undergone resection for ''polyps.'' Twenty-two patients had an associated ''polyp.'' There were no clinical or radiographic features that could reliably distinguish the neoplastic from the nonneoplastic groups. However, lymphoid follicles in the left colon or diffusely involving the colon were more likely to be associated with a colonic neoplasm. Lymphoid follicles were almost always identified near a malignant lesion

  13. Genetic modification of haematopoietic cells for combined resistance to podophyllotoxins, other agents covered by MDR1-mediated efflux activity and nitrosoureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, C; Peinert, S; Carpinteiro, A; Eckert, H G; Fairbairn, L J

    2000-05-01

    Genetic transfer and expression of drug-resistance functions into haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a promising means to overcome both the acute and longterm side-effects of cytotoxic drugs in bone marrow. Here, we describe a functional analysis of a retroviral vector that co-expresses human cDNAs for multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and a double mutant of O(6)-alkylguanine-alkyltransferase (hATPA/GA) to high levels. The hATPA/GA protein contains two amino acid substitutions that render it resistant to compounds such as O(6)-benzylguanine that inhibit the wild-type protein which is often overexpressed in resistant tumour cells. Evidence for simultaneous drug resistance of genetically modified primary murine progenitor cells to colchicine or the podophyllotoxin etoposide, both covered by MDR1-mediated efflux activity, and the nitrosourea BCNU, which is counteracted by hATPA/GA, is presented using in vitro colony assays.

  14. Radiology of pancreatic neoplasms: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Santa, Luis Gijón; Retortillo, José Antonio Pérez; Miguel, Ainhoa Camarero; Klein, Lea Marie

    2014-09-15

    Diagnostic imaging is an important tool to evaluate pancreatic neoplasms. We describe the imaging features of pancreatic malignancies and their benign mimics. Accurate detection and staging are essential for ensuring appropriate selection of patients who will benefit from surgery and for preventing unnecessary surgeries in patients with unresectable disease. Ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography with multiplanar reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging can help to do a correct diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware of the wide variety of anatomic variants and pathologic conditions that may mimic pancreatic neoplasms. The knowledge of the most important characteristic key findings may facilitate the right diagnosis.

  15. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  16. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  17. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  18. Benign neoplasms of the trachea : case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Hee; Mun, Kyung Mi; Kim, Bum Soo; Choi, Kyu Ho; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital Catholic Univ. Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    Benign tumors of the trachea are rare, accounting for approximately 10% of all primary tracheal neoplasms. They are frequently misdiagnosed and managed as bronchial asthma or chronic bronchitis. We report a lipoma and a leiomyoma of the trachea with emphasis on the clinical, radiographic and CT findings, and review the literature.

  19. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  20. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monill, J.; Pernas, J.; Montserrat, E.; Perez, C.; Clavero, J.; Martinez-Noguera, A.; Guerrero, R.; Torrubia, S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  1. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  2. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumour predominantly affecting young women. We present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically removed as abdominal masses, one from the pancreatic tail and the other posterior to the stomach with an unclear organ of origin. On gross ...

  3. Radiologic features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, N. Cem; Semelka, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents imaging features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms. Microcystic adenoma which is composed of small cysts ( 2 cm) are accounted for mucinous cystic neoplasms, its variant along pancreatic duct is ductectatic mucinous cystic neoplasm. Endocrine tumors of pancreas are hypervascular and can be depicted on early dynamic enhanced crosssectional imaging modalities or on angiography when they are <1 cm. Pancreatic metastases and lymphomas are rare neoplasms which should also be included in differential diagnosis for pancreatic masses

  4. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  5. Thrombotic Microangiopathy in Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Evi; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) represents a vital procedure for patients with various hematologic conditions. Despite advances in the field, HCT carries significant morbidity and mortality. A rare but potentially devastating complication is transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TA-TMA). In contrast to idiopathic TTP, whose etiology is attributed to deficient activity of ADAMTS13, (a member of the A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin 1 repeats family of metalloproteases), patients with TA-TMA have > 5% ADAMTS13 activity. Pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with TA-TMA, include loss of endothelial cell integrity induced by intensive conditioning regimens, immunosuppressive therapy, irradiation, infections and graft-versus-host (GVHD) disease. The reported incidence of TA-TMA ranges from 0.5% to 75%, reflecting the difficulty of accurate diagnosis in these patients. Two different groups have proposed consensus definitions for TA-TMA, yet they fail to distinguish the primary syndrome from secondary causes such as infections or medication exposure. Despite treatment, mortality rate in TA-TMA ranges between 60% to 90%. The treatment strategies for TA-TMA remain challenging. Calcineurin inhibitors should be discontinued and replaced with alternative immunosuppressive agents. Daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody, has shown promising results in the treatment of TA-TMA. Rituximab or the addition of defibrotide, have been reported to induce remission in this patient population. In general, plasma exchange is not recommended. PMID:21776339

  6. THROMBOTIC MICROANGIOPATHY IN HAEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION:AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Stavrou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT represents a vital procedure for patients with various hematologic conditions. Despite advances in the field, HCT carries significant morbidity and mortality. A rare but potentially devastating complication is transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TA-TMA. In contrast to idiopathic TTP, whose etiology is attributed to deficient activity of ADAMTS13, (a member of the A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin 1 repeats family of metalloproteases, patients with TA-TMA have > 5% ADAMTS13 activity. Pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with TA-TMA, include loss of endothelial cell integrity induced by intensive conditioning regimens, immunosuppressive therapy, irradiation, infections and graft-versus-host (GVHD disease. The reported incidence of TA-TMA ranges from 0.5% to 75%, reflecting the difficulty of accurate diagnosis in these patients. Two different groups have proposed consensus definitions for TA-TMA, yet they fail to distinguish the primary syndrome from secondary causes such as infections or medication exposure. Despite treatment, mortality rate in TA-TMA ranges between 60% to 90%. The treatment strategies for TA-TMA remain challenging. Calcineurin inhibitors should be discontinued and replaced with alternative immunosuppressive agents.  Daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody, has shown promising results in the treatment of TA-TMA. Rituximab or the addition of defibrotide, have been reported to induce remission in this patient population. In general, plasma exchange is not recommended.

  7. Manganese effects on haematopoietic cells and circulating coelomocytes of Asterias rubens (Linnaeus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oweson, Carolina; Skoeld, Helen; Pinsino, Annalisa; Matranga, Valeria; Hernroth, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally abundant metal in marine sediments where it mainly occurs as MnO 2 . During hypoxic conditions it is converted into a bioavailable state, Mn 2+ , and can reach levels that previously have shown effects on immune competent cells of the crustacean, Nephrops norvegicus. Here we investigated if Mn also affects circulating coelomocytes and their renewal in the common sea star, Asterias rubens, when exposed to concentrations of Mn that can be found in nature. When the sea stars were exposed to Mn it accumulated in the coelomic fluid and the number of circulating coelomocytes, in contrast to what was recorded in Nephrops, increased significantly. By using the substitute nucleotide, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU, for tracing cell division and by recording mitotic index by nuclei staining, we found that Mn induced proliferation of cells from a putative haematopoietic tissue, the coelomic epithelium. In addition, the haematopoietic tissue and coelomocytes showed stress response in terms of changes in HSP70 levels and protein carbonyls, as judged by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Measurement of dehydrogenase activity, using MTS/PMS, revealed that Mn showed cytotoxic properties. We also found that the phagocytotic capacity of coelomocytes was significantly inhibited by Mn. It was concluded that the exposure of A. rubens to Mn induced renewal of coelomocytes and impaired their immune response

  8. THROMBOTIC MICROANGIOPATHY IN HAEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION:AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillard Michael Lazarus

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT represents a vital procedure for patients with various hematologic conditions. Despite advances in the field, HCT carries significant morbidity and mortality. A rare but potentially devastating complication is transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TA-TMA. In contrast to idiopathic TTP, whose etiology is attributed to deficient activity of ADAMTS13, (a member of the A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin 1 repeats family of metalloproteases, patients with TA-TMA have > 5% ADAMTS13 activity. Pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with TA-TMA, include loss of endothelial cell integrity induced by intensive conditioning regimens, immunosuppressive therapy, irradiation, infections and graft-versus-host (GVHD disease. The reported incidence of TA-TMA ranges from 0.5% to 75%, reflecting the difficulty of accurate diagnosis in these patients. Two different groups have proposed consensus definitions for TA-TMA, yet they fail to distinguish the primary syndrome from secondary causes such as infections or medication exposure. Despite treatment, mortality rate in TA-TMA ranges between 60% to 90%. The treatment strategies for TA-TMA remain challenging. Calcineurin inhibitors should be discontinued and replaced with alternative immunosuppressive agents.  Daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody, has shown promising results in the treatment of TA-TMA. Rituximab or the addition of defibrotide, have been reported to induce remission in this patient population. In general, plasma exchange is not recommended.

  9. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-den Braber, J.; Potting, C.M.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The

  10. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  11. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.

  12. Solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Hansen, A B; Burcharth, F

    1992-01-01

    In two cases of solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), positive staining for argyrophil granules, chromogranin-A, neuron-specific enolase, chymotrypsin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and estrogen receptors was present. Ultrastructurally, neurosecretory as well as zymoge......In two cases of solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), positive staining for argyrophil granules, chromogranin-A, neuron-specific enolase, chymotrypsin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and estrogen receptors was present. Ultrastructurally, neurosecretory as well...... as zymogenlike granules were demonstrated. Measurements of mean nuclear volume and volume-corrected mitotic index discriminated between SPN and well-differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, with notably lower values being seen in SPN. Silver-stained nucleolar organizer region counts showed wide...

  13. The neoplasms of the operated stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ositrova, L.I.; Golubovich, I.A.; Mashevskaya, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that operation and rexction in case of primary and recurrent neoplasm of operated stomach remains low. However radical operation is the only method permitting to hope for healing of shuch patients. A thorough medical examination is necessary at first 3 years following operation. Surgical treatment is accompanied by preoperational irradiation in such patients. Au 198 in 1.48 GBq is intravenously injected to some patients. 10 refs

  14. Granular cell tumor: An uncommon benign neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirthankar Gayen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor.

  15. Neoplasms HIV associated Kaposi sarcoma not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, K.; Sosa, A.; Krygier, G.; Muse, I.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - The incidence of malignancies in virus carriers acquired immunodeficiency (HIV) has increased in conjunction with the disease during the past decade. 40% of all AIDS patients develop cancer during the course of HIV infection. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and cervical cancer have an impact extremely high in HIV infected patients, and they are considered as disease AIDS-defining stage. Many reports suggest that other neoplasms they can have a high impact on the population of HIV carrier, including head and neck carcinoma, rectal cancer - anal, plasma cytomas, and melanoma lung cancer. Methods - We examined the spectrum of cancer in HIV-infected patients, specifically neoplasms except Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed between 1/1998 - 6/2004. Information on age, sex, factors was gathered risk for AIDS, neoplasms and mortality rate. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 21 patients, what 15 were male (71%) and 6 females (29%); the median age was 36 (29-70). Tumors were reported: 11 Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (52%), 2 Hodgkin's lymphoma (6.6%), 1 medullary thyroid cancer (6.6%), 1 melanoma (6.6%), 1 rectal cancer (5%) and three head and neck cancers (14%), 1 cancer 1 lung and breast cancer. Five of the patients were intravenous drug abusers (24%); 4 patients were homosexual, bisexual March 8 straight, on 6 patients know the data. Conclusions - The spectrum of malignancies associated with infection HIV in our study was similar to that described in other populations. ratio between the immune system and the epidemiology of the virus-induced tumors is to importance to identify new therapeutic approaches in the treatment and / or prevention of these neoplasms

  16. Molecular pathobiology of thyroid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallini, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Tumors of thyroid follicular cells provide a very interesting model to understand the development of human cancer. It is becoming apparent that distinct molecular events are associated with specific stages in a multistep tumorigenic process with good genotype/ phenotype correlation. For instance, mutations of the gsp and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor genes are associated with benign hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and adenomas while alterations of other specific genes, such as oncogenic tyrosine kinase alterations (RET/PTC, TRK) in papillary carcinoma and the newly discovered PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma rearrangement, are distinctive features of cancer. Although activating RAS mutations occur at all stages of thyroid tumorigenesis, evidence is accumulating that they may also play an important role in tumor progression, a role that is well documented for p53. Environmental factors (iodine deficiency, ionizing radiations) have been shown to play a crucial role in promoting the development of thyroid cancer, influencing both its genotypic and phenotypic features. It is possible that the follicular thyroid cell has unique ways to respond to DNA damage. Similarly to leukemia or sarcomas (and unlike most epithelial cancers), numerous specific rearrangements are being discovered in thyroid cancer suggesting preferential activation of DNA repair instead of cell death programs after environmentally induced genetic alterations.

  17. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology SB-05, Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Lough, L.R. [Pitts Radiological Associates, Columbia, SC (United States); Shuman, W.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Lazerte, G.D. [Dept. of Pathology RC-72, Washington Univ., Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Conrad, E.U. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery RK-10, Washington Univ., Medical Center of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  18. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Lough, L.R.; Shuman, W.P.; Lazerte, G.D.; Conrad, E.U.

    1994-01-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  19. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  1. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  2. Ginsenoside Rg1 improves bone marrow haematopoietic activity via extramedullary haematopoiesis of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Hsing; Chen, Fei-Peng; Liu, Rong-Kai; Lin, Chun-Lin; Chang, Ko-Tung

    2015-11-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is a chemotherapeutic agent used for cancer and immunological diseases. It induces cytotoxicity of bone marrow and causes myelosuppression and extramedullary haematopoiesis (EMH) in treated patients. EMH is characterized with the emergence of multipotent haematopoietic progenitors most likely in the spleen and liver. Previous studies indicated that a Chinese medicine, ginsenoside Rg1, confers a significant effect to elevate the number of lineage (Lin(-) ) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and restore the function of bone marrow in CY-treated myelosuppressed mice. However, whether the amelioration of bone marrow by Rg1 accompanies an alleviation of EMH in the spleen was still unknown. In our study, the cellularity and weight of the spleen were significantly reduced after Rg1 treatment in CY-treated mice. Moreover, the number of c-Kit(+) HSPCs was significantly decreased but not as a result of apoptosis, indicating that Rg1 alleviated EMH of the spleen induced by CY. Unexpectedly, the proliferation activity of c-Kit(+) HSPCs was only up-regulated in the spleen, but not in the bone marrow, after Rg1 treatment in CY-treated mice. We also found that a fraction of c-Kit(+) /CD45(+) HSPCs was simultaneously increased in the circulation after Rg1 treatment. Interestingly, the effects of Rg1 on the elevation of HSPCs in bone marrow and in the peripheral blood were suppressed in CY-treated splenectomized mice. These results demonstrated that Rg1 improves myelosuppression induced by CY through its action on the proliferation of HSPCs in EMH of the spleen and migration of HSPCs from the spleen to the bone marrow. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Genotoxic consequences of endogenous aldehydes on mouse haematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaycoechea, Juan I; Crossan, Gerry P; Langevin, Frederic; Daly, Maria; Arends, Mark J; Patel, Ketan J

    2012-09-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regenerate blood cells throughout the lifespan of an organism. With age, the functional quality of HSCs declines, partly owing to the accumulation of damaged DNA. However, the factors that damage DNA and the protective mechanisms that operate in these cells are poorly understood. We have recently shown that the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway counteracts the genotoxic effects of reactive aldehydes. Mice with combined inactivation of aldehyde catabolism (through Aldh2 knockout) and the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway (Fancd2 knockout) display developmental defects, a predisposition to leukaemia, and are susceptible to the toxic effects of ethanol-an exogenous source of acetaldehyde. Here we report that aged Aldh2(-/-) Fancd2(-/-) mutant mice that do not develop leukaemia spontaneously develop aplastic anaemia, with the concomitant accumulation of damaged DNA within the haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) pool. Unexpectedly, we find that only HSPCs, and not more mature blood precursors, require Aldh2 for protection against acetaldehyde toxicity. Additionally, the aldehyde-oxidizing activity of HSPCs, as measured by Aldefluor stain, is due to Aldh2 and correlates with this protection. Finally, there is more than a 600-fold reduction in the HSC pool of mice deficient in both Fanconi anaemia pathway-mediated DNA repair and acetaldehyde detoxification. Therefore, the emergence of bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia is probably due to aldehyde-mediated genotoxicity restricted to the HSPC pool. These findings identify a new link between endogenous reactive metabolites and DNA damage in HSCs, and define the protective mechanisms that counteract this threat.

  4. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral.The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%.This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined polymer therapeutic designed to target both tumor and

  5. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, and the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  6. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  7. Metastases in cranean of differential neoplasm tyroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Chapuis, D.; Garrido Vazquez, P.; Vallverdu Carbajal, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of matastases are presented in cranial calota of differentiated neoplasm of tyroids, one of them without other distance lesions ,in which the cranial tumours was the element that it take was to the diagnose. For the local control the surgical resection of the metastasis is recommended in calota, associated to external radiotherapy , while that the total thyroidectomy allows the detection and treatment of other metastasis with Iodine. In this situation the prediction it is unfavourable, with a half survive of 4,5 year(AU) [es

  8. Treatment of hepatic neoplasm through extrahepatic collaterals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, C.S.; Chuang, V.P.; Wallace, S.; Charnsangavej, C.; Carrasco, H.

    1983-04-01

    Twenty-nine patients with hepatic artery occlusion were treated with additional hepatic infusion or embolization through extrahepatic collaterals. Seventeen courses of hepatic infusion were performed in 13 patients through the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery, left gastric artery, or right gastric artery. Twenty-five hepatic embolization procedures were performed in 16 patients through the right and left phrenic arteries, left and right gastric arteries, pancreaticoduodenal artery, gastroduodenal artery, or omentoepiploic artery. In one patient gastric ulcers developed following left gastric artery infusion. No complication related to the embolization procedure was observed in the embolization group. The extrahepatic collaterals are important alternative routes for continuous transcatheter management of hepatic neoplasms following hepatic artery occlusion.

  9. Treatment of hepatic neoplasm through extrahepatic collaterals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, C.S.; Chuang, V.P.; Wallace, S.; Charnsangavej, C.; Carrasco, H.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with hepatic artery occlusion were treated with additional hepatic infusion or embolization through extrahepatic collaterals. Seventeen courses of hepatic infusion were performed in 13 patients through the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery, left gastric artery, or right gastric artery. Twenty-five hepatic embolization procedures were performed in 16 patients through the right and left phrenic arteries, left and right gastric arteries, pancreaticoduodenal artery, gastroduodenal artery, or omentoepiploic artery. In one patient gastric ulcers developed following left gastric artery infusion. No complication related to the embolization procedure was observed in the embolization group. The extrahepatic collaterals are important alternative routes for continuous transcatheter management of hepatic neoplasms following hepatic artery occlusion

  10. Four types of neoplasms in Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and observe four types of neoplasms on different parts (external and internal organs of an Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer. Methods: The sample was collected from local fish landing center (south east coast of India. Histopathology of normal and tumour tissues were analyzed. Results: A total of 83 tumour masses (neoplasm were recorded on the fish skin, also the neoplasms were recorded in internal organs of fish such as liver, stomach and ovary. Conclusions: Aetiology of such neoplasm’s are unknown, further more researches need to confirm the causative agent for this type of neoplasm.

  11. Unusual cystic pancreatic neoplasms -image-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilendarov, A.; Simova, E.; Petrova, A.; Traikova, N.; Deenichin, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the variety of signs and symptoms from the diagnostic imaging methods of atypical neoplasms of the pancreas, presented as a type of cystic lesions. This often leads to unnecessary surgery or inappropriate tracking. In 115 patients (85 men and 30 women) with cystic lesions of the pancreas ultrasonic (US),computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and verified through histological and macroscopic pathology preparations. The ultrasound machines equipped with linear and convex transducers, MDCT and MRI imaging systems were used. In 14 of 115 patients atypical neoplasms of the pancreas were diagnosed: two cases with macroscopic serous cystic neoplasms, two nonmucinous cystic neoplasms, two hemorrhagic mucinous neoplasms, two ductal adenocarcinomas with cystic changes, one islet cell cystic tumor, two lymphoepithetial cysts, one lymphangioma, one solid papillary epithelial neoplasm and one mucinous adenocarcinoma. The authors take into consideration and overlapping of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. Although much of the imaging features and morphological characteristics of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are well known, should be known about the atypical unusual images in so-called 'typical' cystic neoplasms, cystic images in solid neoplasms and various atypical tumors with cystic lesions. (authors)

  12. Management of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas: a comparison with standard pancreatic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; Singhal, D.; Aronson, D. C.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are increasingly diagnosed, but the exact surgical management in terms of extent of the resection is not well defined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients operated on in our hospital between January 1993 and March 2005 formed the study

  13. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, RWTH-Aachen Hosital (Germany); Hans, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, RWTH Aachen Hospital (Germany); 1

    2005-04-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained.

  14. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A.; Hans, F.

    2005-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained

  15. Peptichemio in pretreated patients with plasmacell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A; Salvagno, L; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Bolzonella, S; De Besi, P; Frizzarin, M; Pappagallo, G L; Fosser, V P; Fornasiero, A; Segati, R

    1986-09-01

    Twenty-one patients with alkylator-resistant plasmacell neoplasms were treated with Peptichemio (PTC) at a dose of 40 mg/m2 for 3 days every 3 weeks or, in the case of persistent leukopenia and/or thrombocytopenia, at the single dose of 70 mg/m2 every 2-3 weeks according to haematological recovery. Seventeen patients, 10 with multiple myeloma and seven with extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP), were fully evaluable. Six of 17 patients (35%) responded: three of seven EMP patients had a complete remission and 3 of 10 multiple myeloma patients had an objective response greater than 50%. The median duration of response was 8.5 months. An EMP patient obtained a complete response lasting for 16 months. The most frequent toxic effect were phlebosclerosis, occurring in all the patients, and myelosuppression, which was severe in only one case. PTC appears to be an active drug in patients with plasmacell neoplasms even if resistant to alkylating agents.

  16. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  17. A comparison of the observed and the expected cancers of the haematopoietic and lymphatic systems among workers at Windscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolphin, G.W.

    1976-12-01

    Data are given about the cases of cancers of the haematopoietic and lymphatic systems among workers at Windscale Works, BNFL during the period 1950 to 1974. The number of cancers of these types expected to occur in the working population at Windscale has been estimated for the same period. For none of these types is the observed number of cancers significantly different at the 95% confidence level from that expected. (author)

  18. Dietary restriction ameliorates haematopoietic ageing independent of telomerase, whilst lack of telomerase and short telomeres exacerbates the ageing phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ajmi, Nouf; Saretzki, Gabriele; Miles, Colin; Spyridopoulos, Ioakim

    2014-10-01

    Ageing is associated with an overall decline in the functional capacity of tissues and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as telomere dysfunction. Dietary restriction (DR) is a recognised anti-ageing intervention that extends lifespan and improves health in several organisms. To investigate the role of telomeres and telomerase in haematopoietic ageing, we compared the HSPC profile and clonogenic capacity of bone marrow cells from wild type with telomerase-deficient mice and the effect of DR on these parameters. Compared with young mice, aged wild type mice demonstrated a significant accumulation of HSPCs (1.3% vs 0.2%, P=0.002) and elevated numbers of granulocyte/macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM, 26.4 vs 17.3, P=0.0037) consistent with myeloid "skewing" of haematopoiesis. DR was able to restrict the increase in HSPC number as well as the myeloid "skewing" in aged wild type mice. In order to analyse the influence of short telomeres on the ageing phenotype we examined mice lacking the RNA template for telomerase, TERC(-/-). Telomere shortening resulted in a similar bone marrow phenotype to that seen in aged mice, with significantly increased HSPC numbers and an increased formation of all myeloid colony types but at a younger age than wild type mice. However, an additional increase in erythroid colonies (BFU-E) was also evident. Mice lacking telomerase reverse transcriptase without shortened telomeres, TERT(-/-), also presented with augmented haematopoietic ageing which was ameliorated by DR, demonstrating that the effect of DR was not dependent on the presence of telomerase in HSPCs. We conclude that whilst shortened telomeres mimic some aspects of haematopoietic ageing, both shortened telomeres and the lack of telomerase produce specific phenotypes, some of which can be prevented by dietary restriction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB......) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization....

  20. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need...... for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient....

  1. Impact of oral gut decontamination on Staphylococcus aureus colonisation in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, C Matthias; Weber, Isabel; Seidl, Kati; Rachmühl, Carole; Holzmann-Bürgel, Anne; Müller, Antonia M S; Kuster, Stefan P; Schanz, Urs; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2017-12-01

    Recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are severely immunocompromised and are at increased risk of infection. In this prospective, observational, single-centre study including 110 allo-HSCT recipients, the rate of Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was reduced from 11.8% to 0% (P <0.001) following peritransplant oral gut decontamination. No invasive S. aureus infections were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Angiocrine factors from Akt-activated endothelial cells balance self-renewal and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Butler, Jason M.; O'Donnell, Rebekah; Kobayashi, Mariko; Ding, Bi-Sen; Bonner, Bryant; Chiu, Vi K.; Nolan, Daniel J.; Shido, Koji; Benjamin, Laura; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells establish an instructive vascular niche that reconstitutes haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) through release of specific paracrine growth factors, known as angiocrine factors. However, the mechanism by which endothelial cells balance the rate of proliferation and lineage-specific differentiation of HSPCs is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Akt activation in endothelial cells, through recruitment of mTOR, but not the FoxO pathway, upregulates specific angiocrine factors that support expansion of CD34−Flt3− KLS HSPCs with long-term haematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) repopulation capacity. Conversely, co-activation of Akt-stimulated endothelial cells with p42/44 MAPK shifts the balance towards maintenance and differentiation of the HSPCs. Selective activation of Akt1 in the endothelial cells of adult mice increased the number of colony forming units in the spleen and CD34−Flt3− KLS HSPCs with LT-HSC activity in the bone marrow, accelerating haematopoietic recovery. Therefore, the activation state of endothelial cells modulates reconstitution of HSPCs through the upregulation of angiocrine factors, with Akt–mTOR-activated endothelial cells supporting the self-renewal of LT-HSCs and expansion of HSPCs, whereas MAPK co-activation favours maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation of HSPCs. PMID:20972423

  3. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma cell neoplasms occur when abnormal plasma cells form cancerous tumors. When there is only one tumor, the disease is called a plasmacytoma. When there are multiple tumors, it is called multiple myeloma. Start here to find information on plasma cell neoplasms treatment, research, and statistics.

  4. [Closed needle-biopsy in the diagnosis of neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, M; Perelli Ercolini, M; Beani, G

    1979-04-01

    The AA. demonstrate with this communication the validity of the needle biopsie for the diagnosis of neoplasms. They had used it for the breast, thyroid, flg and some other superficial tumefactions. In the mass-screening for the feminine neoplasms the clinical examination and the needle biopsy are very good method for a careful diagnosis.

  5. Characteristic radionuclide appearance of certain pediatric central nervous system neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of 5 years experience in the localization of brain neoplasms in children are summarized. The radiopharmaceutical of choice was /sup 99m/Tc-labeled pertechnetate administered in a dosage of 100μ Ci/lb. The appearance of the most common neoplasms of the central nervous system in childhood is characterized. (U.S.)

  6. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer MH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magid H Amer Department of Medicine, St Rita's Medical Center, Lima, OH, USA Background: Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. Methods: This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Results: Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284, and three or more primaries (n=38. Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%, with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%, had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%, and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%. When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001. Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95% than for synchronous primaries (59% and single primaries (59%. The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991. Conclusion: Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent

  7. Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma: a rare cutaneous neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leiomyomas are firm, round to oval, skin-coloured to brownish papules and nodules that may present as a solitary, few discrete or multiple clustered lesions. Different uncommon patterns of multiple leiomyoma distribution have been noted as bilateral, symmetrical, linear, zosteriform, or dermatomal-like arrangement. One such rare presentation was seen in a 23-year-old patient who presented with zosteriform skin coloured, occasionally painful cutaneous lesions over left shoulder region. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. He was symptomatically managed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and topical capcicum cream. Case is reported here due to rare occurrence of this benign cutaneous neoplasm in an atypical pattern and on uncommon site. (author)

  8. Radioisotope diagnostics of neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, D.S.; Sinyuta, B.T.; Borisyuk, T.B.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of radioisotope studies of 111 children with neoplasms of locomotor system, retroperitoneal space, maxillofacial region and neck, the limits and possibilities of the method of positive radiodiagnostics with short-life radionuclides sup(99M)Tc pertechnetate and 99 Tc pyrophosphate have been analyzed. It is pointed out that sensitivity of the investigation method with sup(99M)Tc pyrophosphate is higher (91.6%) than that of the method with 99 Tc pertechnetate (84.5%). Specificity of the investigation method with 99 Tc p.ertechnetate is higher (71.5%) than that of the method with sup(99M)Tc pyrophosphate (30%). The method of positive radiodiagnostics is characterized by safety, atraumatism, low radiation burdens and possibility of its realization in ambulatory conditions

  9. Rectal neoplasms. Postoperative follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galano Urgelles, Rolando; Rodriguez Fernandez, Zenen; Casaus Prieto, Arbelio

    1997-01-01

    A study of 31 patients operated on for rectal neoplasms between September, 1989 and September, 1995 in SantiAug de Cuba was performed. Patients Webre followed-up during this period for the purpose of the study. There was a frank predominance of males and ages between 45 and 64, of the stage II and the groups BI and BII according to Dukes' classification. Most patients received 5-fluoracil, without tumor relapses. The current survival rate of the series was 76 % at the end of the investigation. It is recommended that all patients operated on for this segment be followed-up after the operation; to continue with cytostatic treatment using 5-fluoracil, and to emphasize the importance of the use of tumor markers during the follow-up, in addition to transrectal ultrasound, as well as to make an early diagnosis through mass screening methods

  10. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackeng, Wenzel M; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-06-07

    Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. Recent advances in whole exome sequencing, gene expression profiling, and knowledge of tumorigenic pathways have deepened our understanding of the underlying biology of pancreatic neoplasia. These advances have not only confirmed the traditional histologic classification system, but also opened new doors to early diagnosis and targeted treatment. This review discusses the histopathology, genetic and epigenetic alterations and potential treatment targets of the five major malignant pancreatic tumors - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatoblastoma.

  11. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  12. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first) primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284), and three or more primaries (n=38). Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%), with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%), had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%), and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%). When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001). Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95%) than for synchronous primaries (59%) and single primaries (59%). The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years) and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991). Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent clinical behavior with longer survival rates, possibly related to genetic predisposition

  13. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  14. Life coaching following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a mixed-method investigation of feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, M; Young, F; Mufti, G J; Pagliuca, A; Lim, Z; Ream, E

    2015-07-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) cures many haematological cancers. Recovery post-HSCT is physically and psychologically challenging, lasting several months. Beyond the first post-transplant year, a fifth report difficulties encompassing practical, social and emotional domains, including finance and employment. We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and impact of a life coaching intervention designed to address psychosocial 'survivor' concerns of HSCT recipients and facilitate transition to life post-treatment. A concurrent embedded experimental mixed-method design was employed. Pre- and post-intervention data collection comprised qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews and quantitative postal questionnaires. Seven purposively sampled HSCT recipients (life coaching delivered by a professional life coach fortnightly over 8 weeks. Participants reported less anxiety, depression and fewer survivor concerns post-intervention, with a trend for lower social difficulties and increased functional well-being. Perceived self-efficacy was unchanged. Life coaching was feasible to deliver and acceptable to the participants who indicated it was a positive experience, with benefits described in diverse areas including work, lifestyle and hobbies. Life coaching within cancer services potentially offers the means to address psychosocial concerns and support transition to life after treatment, enabling patients to reach their potential, e.g. returning to employment and financial independence. Further investigation of this intervention in cancer survivors is warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation survivorship and quality of life: is it a small world after all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Lisa; Gilroy, Nicole; Dyer, Gemma; Kabir, Masura; Greenwood, Matt; Larsen, Stephen; Moore, John; Kwan, John; Hertzberg, Mark; Brown, Louisa; Hogg, Megan; Huang, Gillian; Tan, Jeff; Ward, Christopher; Gottlieb, David; Kerridge, Ian

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain a rich understanding of the impact that haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has on long-term survivor's quality of life (QoL). Participants included 441 survivors who had undergone HSCT for a malignant or non-malignant disease. Data were obtained by a questionnaire positing a single open-ended question asking respondents to list the three issues of greatest importance to their QoL in survivorship. Responses were analysed and organised into QoL themes and subthemes. Major themes identified included the following: the failing body and diminished physical effectiveness, the changed mind, the loss of social connectedness, the loss of the functional self and the patient for life. Each of these themes manifests different ways in which HSCT survivor's world and opportunities had diminished compared to the unhindered and expansive life that they enjoyed prior to the onset of disease and subsequent HSCT. HSCT has a profound and pervasive impact on the life of survivors-reducing their horizons and shrinking various parts of their worlds. While HSCT survivors can describe the ways in which their life has changed, many of their fears, anxieties, regrets and concerns are existential in nature and are ill-defined-making it exceeding unlikely that they would be adequately captured by standard psychometric measures of QoL post HSCT.

  16. Autoradiography at Cell and Chromosome Level in the Study of Multiplication and Cytodifferentiation of Haematopoietic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavosto, F. [Instituto di Clinica Medica, University of Turin (Italy)

    1967-07-15

    Haematopoietic tissue proliferates by the mitotic activity of the youngest cells. The first data on the proliferation of blood cells recorded by use of the stathmokinetic technique was followed by more detailed information obtained with autoradiographic studies and by using special precursors of DNA such as thymidine. It has been observed that in the bone marrow in progressive myeloid and erythroid maturation, proliferative capacity decreases progressively until it stops altogether at the myelocytic and polychromatic erythroblastic stage. For chronic myeloid leukaemia the labelling index of each proliferating cell type is similar to the values of the corresponding normal cells. In 1958 we used tritiated thymidine to study many cases of acute leukaemia, that is those with a complete differentiation block and a very high blast content, and we found a clear fall in proliferative capacity of these blast cells. The same results have been obtained in other laboratories and now, quite the contrary to what was thought a few years ago, namely that leukaemic cells grew faster than normal cells, we know that the rate of growth of these cells is often much slower than the corresponding normal cells.

  17. Menstrual patterns, fertility and main pregnancy outcomes after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Bruzzi, Paolo; Anserini, Paola; Di Grazia, Carmen; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Two-hundred and sixty-nine females aged ≤42 and undergoing an allogeneic stem cell transplant were retrospectively studied to assess the effect of age, conditioning regimen and chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) on resumption of stable menstrual cyclicity. Overall, a stable menstrual cyclicity was observed in 22% of cases. The cumulative probability of menses resumption was significantly age and conditioning regimen related. A statistically significant inverse correlation between cGVHD severity and menses resumption was observed only in univariate analysis. In patients with residual ovarian function, infertility was found in 43% and early menopause in 45%. An increased incidence of prematurity and low birth weight (LBW) was observed among the single spontaneous pregnancies. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and 17 beta-oestradiol levels were found to be inadequate to detect both early signs of menses resumption and menstrual stability. Our study confirms the crucial role of full dose total body irradiation (TBI) and age on menses recovery and fertility after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The impact of severe cGVHD remains unclear.

  18. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  19. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-12-15

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  20. Therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic precursors for the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Neildez, T.M.A.; Vetillard, J.; Thierry, D.; Nenot, J.C.; Parmentier, C.

    1996-01-01

    After whole body overexposure, the key issue is the therapeutic decision, i.e. the choice between bone marrow transplantation and other strategies. The indications of bone marrow transplantation cover only a short range of doses, provided the exposure is distributed uniformly within the body; a rare event in accidental settings. The results of the clinical trials for Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor: G-CSF, Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: GM-CSF or Interleukin 3: IL-3, in vivo and in vitro radiobiology experiments suggest that growth factor therapy could be of use after most accidental overexposures to evidence and to stimulate the remaining haematopoietic stem cells in order to shorten the duration of aplasia, although questions have been raised about growth factor infusion real clinical efficiency. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic precursor, stem cells and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy, which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with accidental radiation-induced aplasia. These studies aim to expand the pool of progenitors and stem cells for transplantation or to expand differentiated cells (mainly granulocytes but also megakaryocytes) for transfusion. This is made possible due to the development of techniques allowing the selection of a population of haematopoietic progenitors and stem cells from the blood (with stimulation by growth factors prior stem cell harvesting) or bone marrow using immature cell positive selection. The next step consisting in their culture with combination of growth factors or additional stroma cells is also under development. Autologous progenitor cells generated ex vivo has been recently used with some success for reconstitution of haematopoiesis after high-dose chemotherapy. (author)

  1. Genetic and haematopoietic effects of long-term tritiated water ingestion in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of large amounts of tritiated water (HTO) from reactors on the environment is evaluated. Randomly bred mice of the Hale-Stoner-Brookhaven strain have been maintained on HTO (3 μCi/mlitre) for extended periods. First-generation animals on HTO from four weeks of age have been evaluated for changes in growth pattern, and second-generation animals (also on HTO) for breeding efficiency, dominant lethal mutation rate and bone-marrow integrity. A total of 18831 embryos were examined. Statistical analysis of these results using either Student's ''t'' test or Kruskal and Wallis rank test indicates that there was a significant (p<0.01) reduction in viable embryos and an increase in early deaths in matings involving animals drinking HTO. Beginning at eight weeks of age and monthly thereafter, the haematopoietic stem cell content of the bone marrow was determined using the exogenous spleen colony technique. Although the total cellularity of the bone marrow remains comparable in the control and treated groups, the total number of stem cells (CFU) was reduced beginning after approximately 12-20 weeks on the tritium regime. These findings indicate a reduction in the total number of pluripotent stem cells in the marrow together with the ability of this reduced number of cells to maintain normal levels of total cellularity in the bone marrow. Thus, continuous ingestion of HTO at a concentration of 3 μCi/mlitre by mice results in: (1) Reduction in number of viable embryos present in the female at late pregnancy from matings when either the female or both parents have been on HTO; (2) Increase in number of early post-implantation deaths when both parents are on HTO; (3) Reduction in bone-marrow stem cell content after 12 weeks or longer on HTO; (4) No apparent effect on breeding efficiency (percentage of females pregnant) or body weight. These results are discussed in relation to the accumulated radiation dose

  2. NK cells and other innate lymphoid cells in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVacca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILC. At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3 are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILC provide host defences against viruses, bacteria and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodelling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defences that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILC may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodelling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILC. Of note, CD34+ cells isolated from different sources of HSC, may differentiate in vitro towards various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g. IL-1β may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  3. SEVERE (GRADE III-IV ACUTE GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE AFTER ALLOGENEIC HAEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Preložnik-Zupan

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Beside greater susceptibility to infections, acute graft host disease is a consequence of the activation of donor T-cells against host antigens. Most common target organs are skin, liver and intestinal mucosis.Methods. In the 6-year period between January 1995 and December 2000, 49 patients were treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT in Transplant unit, Department of Hematology, Clinical Centre Ljubljana. The standard GVHD prophylaxis regimen consisted of cyclosporine and short-course methotrexate. Severe, grade III-IV aGVHD with skin and/or gastrointestinal and/or liver involvement appeared in 16 (32% of the 49 patients.Results. Among the 16 patients with severe aGVHD, 14 had liver involvement, ten gastrointestinal and eight skin involvement. One patient had skin involvement only, the rest of them had combined involvement of two or three organ systems. Routine first-line treatment for aGVHD, given to all 16 pts with severe forms of the disease, was methylprednisolone (MP 2mg/ kg. Six patients with predominant skin involvement responded to MP. Other ten patients with mainly liver and gastrointestinal involvement needed second or even third line aGVHD treatment. These were anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG and/or monoclonal antibodies (OKT3 and/or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF and/or FK506 (tacrolimus. Seven patients died of advanced aGVHD and treatment related infection.Conclusions. Based on our experiences, we conclude that in critically ill patients with severe aGVHD, neutropenia and high risk for opportunistic infection, each day of ineffective MP therapy may have fatal consequences. Simultaneous institution of a combination of corticosteroids and a second-line drug might prove more appropriate for patients with a severe form of aGVHD.

  4. Minimally-aggressive gestational trophoblastic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Laurence A

    2012-04-01

    We have previously defined a new syndrome "Minimally-aggressive gestational trophoblastic neoplasms" in which choriocarcinoma or persistent hydatidiform mole has a minimal growth rate and becomes chemorefractory. Previously we described a new treatment protocol, waiting for hCG rise to >3000 mIU/ml and disease becomes more advanced, then using combination chemotherapy. Initially we found this treatment successful in 8 of 8 cases, here we find this protocol appropriate in a further 16 cases. Initially we used hyperglycosylated hCG, a limited availability test, to identify this syndrome. Here we propose also using hCG doubling rate to detect this syndrome. Minimally aggressive gestational trophoblastic disease can be detected by chemotherapy resistance or low hyperglycosylated hCG, disease by hyperglycosylated hCG and by hCG doubling test. All were recommended to hold off further chemotherapy until hCG >3000mIU/ml. One case died prior to the start of the study, one case withdrew because of a lung nodule and one withdrew refusing the suggested combination chemotherapy. The remaining 16 women were all successfully treated. A total of 8 plus 16 or 24 of 24 women were successfully treated using the proposed protocol, holding back on chemotherapy until hCG >3000mIU/ml. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ross L

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, a series of studies have provided genetic insight into the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). It is now known that JAK2V617F mutations are present in 90% of patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), 60% of patients with essential thrombocytosis (ET) and 50% of patients with myelofibrosis (MF). Despite the high prevalence of JAK2V617F mutations in these three myeloid malignancies, several questions remain. For example, how does one mutation contribute to the pathogenesis of three clinically distinct diseases, and how do some patients develop these diseases in the absence of a JAK2V617F mutation? Single nucleotide polymorphisms at various loci and somatic mutations, such as those in MPLW515L/K, TET2 and in exon 12 of JAK2, may also contribute to the pathogenesis of these MPNs. There are likely additional germline and somatic genetic factors important to the MPN phenotype. Additional studies of large MPN and control cohorts with new techniques will help identify these factors.

  6. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... Results: Two hundred and ten intracronial neoplasms comprising 172 ... accounted for the largest group of tumours followed by metastases to the brain. ..... Percentage .... astrocytomas may be attributed to the increasing use.

  7. Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm presenting with Cushing's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabayegit Ozlem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncocytic neoplasms occur in several organs and are most commonly found in the thyroid, kidneys and salivary glands. Oncocytic neoplasms of the adrenal cortex are extremely rare and are usually non-functioning. Case presentation We report the case of an adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm with uncertain malignant potential in a 31-year-old man with Cushing's syndrome. The patient had been operated on following diagnosis of a 7 cm adrenal mass. Following surgery, the Cushing's syndrome resolved. The patient is still alive with no metastases one year after the surgery. Conclusion Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms must be considered in the differential diagnosis of both functioning and non-functioning adrenal masses.

  8. Inheritance of the chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Penninga, E; Jelsig, Am

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review investigated the inheritance of the classical chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Sixty-one articles were included and provided 135...

  9. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Jensen, Karl E; Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Vindeløv, Lars; Moser, Claus

    2013-05-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  10. Preoperation diagnosis of stomach neoplasm metases in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.E.; Zholnerovich, E.M.; Zelenkevich, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that application of ultrasonography and computerized tomography in examining the upper part of abdomen in patients with stomach neoplasm permits to judge on metastases into the liver. Application of invasive methods of examination is indicated only in case of indefinite data of ultrasonography and computerized tomography. It is shown that application of invasive methods isn't advisable in patients with stomach neoplasm to which palliative operations are indicated. 4 refs

  11. Respiratory muscle strength of patients with esophagus and stomach neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Aline Boscolo Ruivo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In cancer patients, the reduced food intake causes weight loss and promotes protein-calorie malnutrition. This results in loss of lean body mass, which affects both skeletal muscles and respiratory muscles. Objective: Evaluate and compare the respiratory muscle strength of patients with esophageal and stomach neoplasia during the preoperative period. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study carried out with 24 patients of both genders hospitalized in a teaching hospital. They underwent a physical therapy evaluation composed of anthropometric data and measurement of respiratory muscle strength through manovacuometry. Paired and unpaired t-tests were used to compare the values obtained with the predicted equations. Results: Regarding the disease prevalence, 66.66%(16 of the individuals had stomach neoplasm and 33.33%(8 esophageal neoplasm. Of the patients with esophageal neoplasm, 100% were men with a mean age of 63 ± 9.16 years. Of those with stomach neoplasm, 68.75% were men with a mean age of 69.36 ± 10.92 years. Female patients with stomach neoplasm had significantly higher BMI (p = 0.01 than male patients, and they were classified as overweight. Both neoplasms had significantly lower real values (p ≤ 0.05 than predicted values at the maximal expiratory pressure. Conclusion: Patients with esophageal and stomach neoplasms in the preoperative period present reduction in the expiratory muscle strength. There were no statistically significant differences, when we compared the maximum respiratory pressures between the two types of neoplasms investigated.

  12. Squamous neoplasms arising within tattoos: clinical presentation, histopathology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, A L; Wanat, K A; Farah, R S

    2017-08-01

    Tattooing, which involves the placement of ink into the skin, is an ancient decorative technique that has remained popular in modern society. Tattoos have long been known to cause cutaneous reactions, which include the emergence of neoplasms such as keratoacanthoma (KA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in tattooed areas of the skin. We review the clinical presentations, histology and treatment options for squamous neoplasms, primarily KA and SCC, arising in tattoos. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. [Approach to diagnosis and management of myeloproliferative neoplasm variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-08-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) variants are defined as relatively uncommon myeloid neoplasms which do not meet the criteria for either classical MPN or myelodysplastic syndrome. Due to the lack of specific markers, it has been challenging to accurately diagnose these malignant diseases. Recent studies have revealed new genetic abnormalities in MPN variants. These research advances are anticipated to open new approaches to not only achieving accurate diagnosis but also novel therapeutic options for these diseases.

  14. Inferior phrenic artery embolization in the treatment of hepatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, G.; Charnsangavej, C.; Wallace, S.; Carrasco, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-nine inferior phrenic artery embolizations were performed in 20 patients with primary or metastatic hepatic neoplasms. All patients had interruption of their hepatic arteries by previous infusion of chemotherapy, hepatic arterial embolization or surgical ligation. In one patient, bilateral pleural effusions developed following embolization of the inferior phrenic artery. No other severe complications occurred. Inferior phrenic artery embolization is a safe procedure and permits the continuation of transcatheter treatment of hepatic neoplasms. (orig.)

  15. Inferior phrenic artery embolization in the treatment of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprat, G.; Charnsangavej, C.; Wallace, S.; Carrasco, C.H.

    Twenty-nine inferior phrenic artery embolizations were performed in 20 patients with primary or metastatic hepatic neoplasms. All patients had interruption of their hepatic arteries by previous infusion of chemotherapy, hepatic arterial embolization or surgical ligation. In one patient, bilateral pleural effusions developed following embolization of the inferior phrenic artery. No other severe complications occurred. Inferior phrenic artery embolization is a safe procedure and permits the continuation of transcatheter treatment of hepatic neoplasms.

  16. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  17. JAK2 mutations and clinical practice in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2007-01-01

    With the discovery in the last 3 years of novel Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) mutations, the pathogenetic understanding of and clinical practice for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have entered a new era. Each one of these newly discovered mutations, including JAK2V617F, MPLW515L, and a JAK2 exon 12 mutation, has been shown to result in constitutive activation of JAK-STAT signaling and also induce a MPN phenotype in mice. Thus, JAK2 is now considered to be a legitimate target for drug development in MPNs, and small molecule JAK2 inhibitors have already gone through successful preclinical testing, and early-phase human trials in primary myelofibrosis have already begun. Furthermore, JAK2 mutation screening has now become a front-line diagnostic test in the evaluation of both "erythrocytosis" and thrombocytosis and the 2001 World Health Organization diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis have now been revised to incorporate JAK2V617F mutation screening.

  18. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  19. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen; Peng Yun; Zeng Jinjin

    2010-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  20. Outcomes following splenectomy in patients with myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Speicher, Paul J; Ceppa, Eugene P; Rendell, Victoria R; Vaslef, Steven N; Beaven, Anne; Tyler, Douglas S; Blazer, Dan G

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid neoplasms are classified into five major categories. These patients may develop splenomegaly and require splenectomy to alleviate mechanical symptoms, to ameliorate transfusion-dependent cytopenias, or to enhance stem cell transplantation. The objective of this study was to determine which clinical variables significantly impacted morbidity, mortality, and survival in patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy, and to determine if operative outcomes have improved over time. The records of all patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy from 1993 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty-nine patients (n = 89) underwent splenectomy for myeloid neoplasms. Over half of patients who had symptoms preoperatively had resolution of their symptoms post-splenectomy. The morbidity rate was 38%, with the most common complications being bleeding (14%) or infection (20%). Thirty-day mortality rate was 18% and median survival after splenectomy was 278 days. Decreased survival was associated with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm, anemia, abnormal white blood cell count, and hypoalbuminemia. Patients who underwent stem cell transplantation did not show an increased risk for morbidity or mortality. Patients with myeloid neoplasms have a poor prognosis after splenectomy and the decision to operate is a difficult one, associated with high morbidity and mortality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuoka, Shoji

    1986-01-01

    A recent pathological and epidemiological study on females with ovarian neoplasms among the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Life Span Study (LSS) Extended Sample ascertained 194 malignant and 106 benign ovarian tumor cases which had occurred during the period 1950 - 80. Of the 194 cases of ovarian cancer, 128 (66 %) were reviewed microscopically and the age-adjusted incidence of ovarian cancer revealed a statistically significant linear increase with increasing exposure dose, both in microscopically reviewed and in all cases. The radiation-related excess of ovarian cancer appeared to be highest in women less than 20 years of age when exposed, with these women having the longest latent period for tumor development, compared to the older age groups. The histological distribution of cancer types among exposed individuals appeared not very different from that seen in the general population. The analysis of 106 autopsy subjects with benign ovarian tumors, of which 89 were reviewed microscopically, depicted a trend of increasing radiation-related tumor excess with increasing exposure dose among exposed cases, though the trend is not statistically significant when observation was limited to microscopically reviewed subjects. The histological distribution of benign tumor types among exposed cases appeared not very different from that seen in the general population. The findings are consistent with a hypothesis that radiation-injured ovaries in association with secondary excess of gonadotrophic hormones are important causative factors in the development of ovarian tumors, which has been suggested by experimental findings concerning the induction of ovarian tumors by ionizing radiation and by a recent analysis of breast carcinogenesis in exposed females of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (author)

  2. Secondary malignant neoplasms in testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Stephanie A; Fung, Chunkit; Beard, Clair J

    2015-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 15 to 40 years, and the incidence of testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Despite successful treatment outcomes and the rate of survival at 5 to 10 years being 95%, survivors can experience late effects of both their cancer and the treatment they received, including secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We discuss the development of non-germ cell SMNs that develop after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer and their effect on mortality. Patients diagnosed with testicular cancer frequently choose postoperative surveillance if they are diagnosed with clinical stage I disease. These patients may experience an increased risk for developing SMNs following radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging. Similarly, radiotherapy for testicular cancer is associated with increased risks of developing both solid tumors and leukemia. Studies have reported that patients exposed to higher doses of radiation have an increased risk of developing SMNs when compared with patients who received lower doses of radiation. Patients treated with chemotherapy also experience an increased risk of developing SMNs following testicular cancer, though the risk following chemotherapy and radiation therapy combined is not well described. A large population-based study concluded that the rate ratios for both cancer-specific and all-cause mortality for SMNs among testicular cancer survivors were not significantly different from those of matched first cancers. Although it is known that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy or who undergo routine diagnostic or follow-up imaging for a primary testicular cancer are at an increased risk for developing SMNs, the extent of this risk is largely unknown. It is critically important that research be conducted to determine this risk and its contributing factors as accurately as possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. klf2ash317 Mutant Zebrafish Do Not Recapitulate Morpholino-Induced Vascular and Haematopoietic Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Novodvorsky

    Full Text Available The zinc-finger transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 transduces blood flow into molecular signals responsible for a wide range of responses within the vasculature. KLF2 maintains a healthy, quiescent endothelial phenotype. Previous studies report a range of phenotypes following morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-induced klf2a knockdown in zebrafish. Targeted genome editing is an increasingly applied method for functional assessment of candidate genes. We therefore generated a stable klf2a mutant zebrafish and characterised its cardiovascular and haematopoietic development.Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN we generated a klf2a mutant (klf2ash317 with a 14bp deletion leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2. Western blotting confirmed loss of wild type Klf2a protein and the presence of a truncated protein in klf2ash317 mutants. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutants exhibit no defects in vascular patterning, survive to adulthood and are fertile, without displaying previously described morphant phenotypes such as high-output cardiac failure, reduced haematopoetic stem cell (HSC development or impaired formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutation did not reduce angiogenesis in zebrafish with homozygous mutations in von Hippel Lindau (vhl, a form of angiogenesis that is dependent on blood flow. We examined expression of three klf family members in wildtype and klf2ash317 zebrafish. We detected vascular expression of klf2b (but not klf4a or biklf/klf4b/klf17 in wildtypes but found no differences in expression that might account for the lack of phenotype in klf2ash317 mutants. klf2b morpholino knockdown did not affect heart rate or impair formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch in either wildtypes or klf2ash317 mutants.The klf2ash317 mutation produces a truncated Klf2a protein but, unlike morpholino induced klf2a knockdown, does not affect cardiovascular development.

  4. Imaging findings of abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Sin; Byun, Jae Ho; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ah Young; Shin, Yong Moon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon Gyu; Bae, Kyung Soo

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm. From April 2000 to January 2005, eight patients (four men, four women; mean age, 50.6 years) with pathologically proved, extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm involving the abdominal organs were included in this study. The diagnoses were based on consensus agreement between two radiologists who retrospectively reviewed CT, ultrasonography, and enteroclysis findings. We evaluated the findings by focusing on the location, size, margin, and enhancement pattern of the lesion, and lymphadenopathy on each image. There were multiple myeloma in four patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in the remaining four. Involved abdominal organs were the liver (n = 4), spleen (n 4), lymph node (n = 3), stomach (n = 1), small bowel (n = 1), and colon (n 1). The hepatic involvement of plasma cell neoplasm presented as a homogeneous, well-defined, solitary mass (n = 1), multiple nodules (n = 1), and hepatomegaly (n = 2). Its involvement of the spleen and lymph node appeared as splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, respectively. Its involvement of the gastrointestinal tract including the stomach, small bowel, and colon, presented as a homogeneous, diffuse wall thickening or mass in the gastrointestinal tract. Abdominal extraosseous plasma cell neoplasm involves occasionally the liver, spleen, and lymph node, and rarely the gastrointestinal tract. When we encounter a well-defined, homogeneous lesion of the abdominal organs in patients diagnosed or suspected as having plasma cell neoplasm, we should consider its involvement of the abdominal organs

  5. Sodium MR imaging of human brain neoplasms. A preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Shu; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Takakura, Kintomo; Iio, Masahiro

    1988-08-01

    We reported the experience of the sodium magnetic resonance imaging of 5 patients with brain tumors (4 astrocytomas and 1 craniopharyngioma), using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla superconductive magnet. We used two-dimensional Fourier imaging with a spin-echo scanning sequence (and with the repetition time of 140 msec and the echo time of 11 - 14 msec). The radiofrequency was maintained at 17 MHz. Sodium MR imaging was achieved with a 64 x 64 data acquisition (30 mm slice thickness) in 19.1 min. On the sodium MRI, all four astrocytomas, along with the eye balls and the cerebrospinal fluid spaces, appeared as high-intensity areas. Peritumoral edema is also visualized as highly intense, so that it is difficult to discriminate tumor extent from the surrounding edema. Our comparative studies with malignant glioma cases using the same equipment are needed to clarify the relationship between sodium signal intensities and the malignancy of gliomas, and to evaluate the potential clinical utility of sodium MRI. A craniopharyngioma than contained a yellowish cystic fluid with a sodium concentration as high as CSF was shown on sodium MRI as a mass with highly intense signals. The ability to differentiate extracellular from intracellular sodium, that has been studied by several investigators, would greatly augment the clinical specificity of MR imaging.

  6. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides for Diagnosis and Therapy of Human Neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Larson MD

    2009-09-21

    This project funded since 1986 serves as a core project for cancer research throughout MSKCC, producing key radiotracers as well as basic knowledge about thel physics of radiation decay and imaging, for nuclear medicine applications to cancer diagnosis and therapy. In recent years this research application has broadened to include experiments intended to lead to an improved understanding of cancer biology and into the discovery and testing of new cancer drugs. Advances in immune based radiotargeting form the basis for this project. Both antibody and cellular based immune targeting methods have been explored. The multi-step targeting methodologies (MST) developed by NeoRex (Seattle,Washington), have been adapted for use with positron emitting isotopes and PET allowing the quantification and optimization of targeted delivery. In addition, novel methods for radiolabeling immune T-cells with PET tracers have advanced our ability to track these cells of prolonged period of time.

  7. Incidence and significance of Multiple Primary Malignant Neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Moon June; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Bang, Young Ju; Kim, Noe Kyung

    1986-01-01

    To know the three questions about multiple primary cancers: 1) what are the characteristics of persons having multiple primary cancer? 2) Dose presence of a single primary concern after the susceptibility to multiple primary cancers? 3) Dose the location of one multiple primary cancer influence the site of others?, we analysed 121 cases of multiple primary malignant neoplasms registered in Seoul National University Hospital during 8years from July 1978 to August 1986. Of 121 cases, double primary malignant neoplasms were 119 cases and triple were 2 cases. The incidence of multiple primary malignant neoplasms was 0.7%. The metachronous tumor(> 6 months) was found in 70 cases and the median time between the first and the second was 32 months. The most commonly associated tumors were stomach and primary liver carcinoma. Cervix and Lung cancer, Stomach and Rectal cancer, Stomach and Esophagus cancer were also commonly associated

  8. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency......, clinical presentation, diagnostic/therapeutic work-up, and endoscopic appearance of small-bowel tumors in a large population of patients undergoing VCE. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Identification by a questionnaire of patients with VCE findings suggesting small-bowel tumors and histological confirmation...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  9. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  10. Neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima City. First report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Tomin; Ishida, Morihiro

    1960-04-01

    The 1957-1958 incidence of neoplasms among the survivors of the Hiroshima A-bomb, varies directly with radiation dose insofar as it may be inferred from distance from the hypocenter at exposure. The incidence of all malignant neoplasms among the survivors who were within 1000 meters is more than 4 times that of the non-exposed population. The incidence of benign neoplasms among the survivors exposed within 1500 meters is also significantly higher than that among the non-exposed. For survivors under 1500 meters significant differences are seen between the numbers of observed cancers of the lung, stomach, uterus and ovary and the expected cases calculated from the age-specific rates of the non-exposed portion of the Hiroshima population. The increased incidence among survivors within 1500 meters is not related to sex or age. 18 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  11. Assessing the occupational nature of malignant lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevc, J.; Klener, V.; Plank, V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of lung carcinoma in uranium miners is discussed. In spite of the decreasing radiation risks in mines, the absolute number of neoplasms has increased since the 1960's; this is due to the increasing number of miners, improved diagnostic methods and the aging of miners who thus enter higher age groups where a higher incidence of neoplasms can be expected. The probabilistic method was shown to be of help in deciding whether individual cases of lung carcinoma should be considered an occupational disease; new possible improvements of the method are suggested. (J.J.). 12 refs

  12. Postoperative meningeal enhancement on MRI in children with brain neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Hee; Han, Bokyung Kim; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2000-01-01

    The meninges composed of the dura, the arachnoid and the pia are significant sites of blood-brain barrier. Physical disruption of the integrity of the meninges from a variety of causes including surgery results in various patterns of meningeal enhancement on contrast enhanced MR images. It is important to distinguish normal reactive or benign postoperative enhancement from more serious leptomeningeal metastasis or infection, particularly in children with intracranial neoplasms. We present various patterns of meningeal enhancement on MRI in children following surgery for brain neoplasms. (author)

  13. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  14. Experimental infection with epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum and European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borzym Ewa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the determination of the susceptibility of Polish farmed redfin perch (Perca fluviatilis L. and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum to experimental infection with haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV. A bath challenge model was tested at two temperature ranges: 13-15°C and 20-22°C. After 7 d, the first clinical signs and mortality were observed in fish kept at these temperatures. Significantly more mortality cases were reported in the redfin perch population, reaching a maximum of 24% compared with 12% in the rainbow trout group at 20-22°C. EHNV was reisolated from redfin perch and rainbow trout tissue in cell culture and the infection was confirmed by a molecular method and histopathology during the duration of the experiment. This study revealed that fish from Polish farms can be susceptible to EHNV even at lower temperatures.

  15. Review of Research Projects on Qualitative and Quantitative Effects of Radiation on Haematopoietic Tissue in Man and Experimental Animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilberg, A. W. [Division of Radiological Health, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1967-07-15

    By way of introduction to a review of Research Projects of the Division of Radiological Health concerned with effects of radiation on the haematopoietic tissue in man and the experimental animal, I should like first to discuss briefly the organization of research. Our research is organized into three major disciplines: (1) Epidemiology, (2) Radiation biology, and (3) Environmental sciences. Briefly, epidemiology is concerned with studies, of populations and effects of radiation in.man; radiation biology is concerned with effects in the experimental animal under controlled situations and also concerned with basic research in cellular and sub-cellular effects; and environmental science is concerned with transport mechanisms in the biosphere and how these mechanisms may operate and be interrupted to reduce radiation hazard to man.

  16. Tug of war in the haematopoietic stem cell niche: do myeloma plasma cells compete for the HSC niche?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, J E; Williams, S A; Purton, L E; Zannettino, A C W

    2012-09-14

    In the adult mammal, normal haematopoiesis occurs predominantly in the bone marrow, where primitive haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny reside in specialised microenvironments. The bone marrow microenvironment contains specific anatomical areas (termed niches) that are highly specialised for the development of certain blood cell types, for example HSCs. The HSC niche provides important cell-cell interactions and signalling molecules that regulate HSC self-renewal and differentiation processes. These same signals and interactions are also important in the progression of haematological malignancies, such as multiple myeloma (MM). This review provides an overview of the bone marrow microenvironment and its involvement in normal, physiological HSC maintenance and plasma cell growth throughout MM disease progression.

  17. Proliferative kinetics of the haematopoietic stem cells of the mouse after several weeks of reconvalescence of an irradiation attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The 125 IDU(iodo-deoxyuridine) tracer-technique was applied for investigating proliferative kinetics. The intention was to reveal a possible persistent irradiation damage in the haematopoietic stem-cells of the mouse. The three following methodically differing arrangements were made: 1. 35 days after irradiation with 450 rad no difference is found between the measured turnover of incorporated 125 IUD in the bone marrow and not irradiated mice. However, there is a splenic cell population which unambiguously transfers its activity slowlier. A dose-response relationship exists to a limited extent. 2. By four transplantations at different instants the donors were marked first, and then the turnover of the early haematopoietic precursor cells in the bone marrow was detected. It resulted that 35 days after irradiation with 450 rad the turnover takes place slightly slowlier than in not irradiated early precursor cells. Iodised water, which is administered before the tracer technique is applied, seems to have a stimulating effect, particularly on the turnover of irradiated stem cells; the marking with a specific activity of 2000 Ci/mol seems to have a slightly toxic effect. 3. A test was developed, by which the proliferation velocity of stem cells and their descendants is measured when there is a very high proliferation stimulus. Differing amounts of bone marrow cells are transfused to lethally irradiated receivers. Within the logarithmic phase of the 125 IDU incorporation the relative cellular proliferation, originating in the stem cells being in the spleen, is determined for the interval between day 3 and day 5. It results very clearly that the descendants of those stem cells irradiated with 450 rad after a reconvalescence time of 35 days present a lower degree of rapid proliferative ability than the not irradiated cells. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1998-01-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of 60 Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au)

  20. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are several types of plasma cell neoplasms, including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), isolated plasmacytoma of the bone, extramedullary plasmacytoma, and multiple myeloma. Find evidence-based information on plasma cell neoplasms treatment, research, and statistics.

  1. Reconstruction techniques in the treatment of vertebral neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, R; Boriani, S; Casadei, R; Bandiera, S; De Iure, F; Campanacci, L; Demitri, S; Orsini, U; Di Fiore, M

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a new system for the topographical description of vertebral neoplasms. The general criteria of reconstruction after curettage or vertebral resection are evaluated. The literature is reviewed in terms of the use of prostheses, bone grafts, cement and stabilization systems in the treatment of tumors of the spine. Indications for the different methods are discussed.

  2. Neoplasms radiosensitivity: how to increase the efficiency of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.

    1991-01-01

    The hypoxia in the neoplasms is a radioresistance factor. This article is about the methods able to reduce the hypoxia in tumors: use of hyperbaric oxygen, radiosensitizers (as metronidazole), hyperthermia and modification of oxygen release in the tissues in modifying the blood flow and in reducing the hemoglobin affinity for oxygen [fr

  3. The radiotherapy value in recurrence control mammary neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1996-01-01

    In base on the retrospective analysis of 250 patient carrying of mammals neoplasms recurrence, their general characteristics are determined and the results are emphasized obtained by the radiotherapy, as well as the list that the indicative predict. It culminates in the necessity of indicating the adyuvance postoperative radiotherapy when factors unfavorable presage of recurrence(AU ) [es

  4. Childhood neoplasms presenting at autopsy: A 20-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Victoria A; Booth, John; Palm, Liina; Ashworth, Michael; Jacques, Thomas S; Sebire, Neil J

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the review are to establish the number of undiagnosed neoplasms presenting at autopsy in a single centre and to determine the incidence and most common causes of sudden unexpected death due to neoplasia in infancy and childhood (SUDNIC). Retrospective observational study of paediatric autopsies performed on behalf of Her Majesty's Coroner over a 20-year period (1996-2015; n = 2,432). Neoplasms first diagnosed at autopsy were identified from an established database and cases meeting the criteria for sudden unexpected death were further categorised. Thirteen previously undiagnosed neoplasms were identified, including five haematological malignancies, two medulloblastomas, two neuroblastomas, two cardiac tumours and two malignancies of renal origin. Eight cases met the criteria for SUDNIC (0.33% of autopsies), the commonest group of which were haematological malignancies (n = 3). Neoplasms presenting as unexpected death in infancy and childhood and diagnosed at autopsy are rare. The findings suggest that haematological malignancies are the commonest cause of SUDNIC and highlight the importance of specialist autopsy in cases of sudden unexpected death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Diagnostic molecular pathology of lymphatic and myeloid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, W; Kreipe, H

    2015-03-01

    Molecular pathology has been an integral part of the diagnostics of tumors of the hematopoietic system substantially longer than for solid neoplasms. In contrast to solid tumors, the primary objective of molecular pathology in hematopoietic neoplasms is not the prediction of drug efficacy but the diagnosis itself by excluding reactive proliferation and by using molecular features for tumor classification. In the case of malignant lymphomas, the most commonly applied molecular tests are those for gene rearrangements for immunoglobulin heavy chains and T-cell receptors. However, this article puts the focus on new and diagnostically relevant assays in hematopathology. Among these are mutations of MYD88 codon 265 in lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, B-raf V600E in hairy cell leukemia and Stat3 exon 21 in indolent T-cell lymphomas. In myeloproliferative neoplasms, MPL W515, calreticulin exon 9 and the BCR-ABL and JAK2 V617F junctions are the most frequently analyzed differentiation series. In myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms, SRSF2, SETBP1 and CSF3R mutations provide important differential diagnostic information. Genes mutated in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are particularly diverse but their analysis significantly improves the differential diagnostics between reactive conditions and MDS. The most frequent changes in MDS include mutations of TET2 and various genes encoding splicing factors.

  6. Cystic lesion of pancreas - Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Baijal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas is an intraductal mucin-producing epithelial neoplasm that arises from the main and/or branched pancreatic duct. It usually presents as cystic lesion of pancreas. There are well known differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesion. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are detected at an increasing frequency due to an increased use of abdominal imaging. The diagnosis and treatment of intraductal papillary mucinous tumors (IPMN of the pancreas has evolved over the past decade. IPMN represents a spectrum of disease, ranging from benign to malignant lesions, making the early detection and characterization of these lesions important. Definitive management is surgical resection for appropriate candidates, as benign lesions harbor malignant potential. IPMN has a prognosis, which is different from adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We report a case of a 58-year-old male with intraductal papillary neoplasm involving main duct and side branches presenting to us with clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis with obstructive jaundice and cholangitis treated surgically.

  7. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 19...

  8. Childhood Renal Neoplasms in Lagos Nigera- A 28 Year Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood Renal Neoplasms in Lagos Nigera- A 28 Year Review. ... Most of the patients presented with abdominal mass with a unilaterally enlarged kidney, abdominal pain, haematuria and weight loss. All of them had nephrectomy as initial treatment followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Nigerian Quarterly Journal ...

  9. A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For Cultural Festivals In Borno State, Nigeria. ... Histologically, the papillomas were deeply subdivided into epithelial lobules with the outer and inner aspects of the epithelium running approximately parallel to each other. Irregular sub-dermal masses or cords of ...

  10. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) are treated with chemotherapy or other drugs, stem cell transplant, supportive care, and targeted therapy. They include chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML). Learn about the clinical features and treatment options for these leukemias.

  11. Age-specific incidence of all neoplasms after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with a specific neoplasm tend to have a subsequent excess risk of the same neoplasm. The age incidence of a second neoplasm at the same site is approximately constant with age, and consequently the relative risk is greater at younger age. It is unclear whether such a line of reasoning can be extended from a specific neoplasm to the incidence of all neoplasms in subjects diagnosed with a defined neoplasm. We considered the age-specific incidence of all non-hormone-related epithelial neoplasms after a first primary colorectal cancer (n = 9542) in the Vaud Cancer Registry data set. In subjects with a previous colorectal cancer, the incidence rate of all other epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was stable around 800 per 100,000 between age 30 and 60 years, and rose only about twofold to reach 1685 at age 70 to 79 years and 1826 per 100,000 at age 80 years or older. After excluding synchronous cancers, the rise was only about 1.5-fold, that is, from about 700 to 1000. In the general population, the incidence rate of all epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was 29 per 100,000 at age 30 to 39 years, and rose 30-fold to 883 per 100,000 at age 70 to 79 years. Excluding colorectal cancers, the rise of all non-hormone-related cancers was from 360 per 100,000 at age 40 to 49 years to 940 at age 70 to 79 years after colorectal cancer, and from 90 to 636 per 100,000 in the general population (i.e., 2.6- vs. 7.1-fold). The rise of incidence with age of all epithelial non-hormone-related second cancers after colorectal cancer is much smaller than in the general population. This can possibly be related to the occurrence of a single mutational event in a population of susceptible individuals, although alternative models are plausible within the complexity of the process of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. Retinoic acid postconsolidation therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma patients treated with autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Frank; van Dalen, Elvira C; Enk, Heike; Berthold, Frank

    2017-08-25

    Neuroblastoma is a rare malignant disease and mainly affects infants and very young children. The tumours mainly develop in the adrenal medullary tissue, with an abdominal mass as the most common presentation. About 50% of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. The high-risk group is characterised by metastasis and other features that increase the risk of an adverse outcome. High-risk patients have a five-year event-free survival of less than 50%. Retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit growth of human neuroblastoma cells and has been considered as a potential candidate for improving the outcome of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of additional retinoic acid as part of a postconsolidation therapy after high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid in people with high-risk neuroblastoma (as defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE in PubMed (1946 to 24 November 2016), and Embase in Ovid (1947 to 24 November 2016). Further searches included trial registries (on 22 December 2016), conference proceedings (on 23 March 2017) and reference lists of recent reviews and relevant studies. We did not apply limits by publication year or languages. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating additional retinoic acid after HDCT followed by HSCT for people with high-risk neuroblastoma compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid. Primary outcomes were overall survival and treatment-related mortality. Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival, event-free survival, early toxicity, late toxicity, and health-related quality of life. We used standard

  16. Pentraxin 3 plasma levels at graft-versus-host disease onset predict disease severity and response to therapy in children given haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Dander, Erica; De Lorenzo, Paola; Bottazzi, Barbara; Quarello, Paola; Vinci, Paola; Balduzzi, Adriana; Masciocchi, Francesca; Bonanomi, Sonia; Cappuzzello, Claudia; Prunotto, Giulia; Pavan, Fabio; Pasqualini, Fabio; Sironi, Marina; Cuccovillo, Ivan; Leone, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD) remains a major complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with a significant proportion of patients failing to respond to first-line systemic corticosteroids. Reliable biomarkers predicting disease severity and response to treatment are warranted to improve its management. Thus, we sought to determine whether pentraxin 3 (PTX3), an acute-phase protein produced locally at the site of inflammation, could represent a novel acute G...

  17. Differential expression and prognostic value of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elisa; Wirtz, Ralph M.; Sayeg, Manal; Baum, Richard P.; Schulz, Stefan; Lupp, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction For many tumors, the overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is associated with increased malignancy and poor patient outcomes. However, comprehensive data for neuroendocrine neoplasms of the lung are still lacking. Methods CXCR4 expression was evaluated in a panel of bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms (BP-NEN) comprising typical carcinoids (n = 26), atypical carcinoids (n = 30), and small cell lung cancers (SCLC, n = 34). Samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using the novel monoclonal rabbit anti-human CXCR4 antibody UMB-2 and by qRT-PCR. The expression was correlated with clinical data and overall patient survival. Results CXCR4 was predominantly localized at the plasma membrane of the tumor cells. CXCR4 was expressed with a high intensity in almost all of the 30 SCLC samples. In contrast, it was detected infrequently and with low intensity in the typical carcinoid and atypical carcinoid samples. There was a significant correlation between the immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR data. Additionally, there was a significant negative relationship between CXCR4 expression and overall survival. Conclusions With increasing malignancy, BP-NEN clearly differ in the extent of CXCR4 expression. As in other tumor entities, CXCR4 overexpression significantly correlates with negative patient outcome. Due to its particular high expression rate in SCLC, CXCR4 may serve as a promising new target for diagnostic and pharmacological intervention as well as for peptide receptor-based radionuclide therapy. PMID:25671300

  18. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lesions and Neoplasms of the Penis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to practitioners who care for male patients, with the increased use of high-resolution anoscopy, practitioners who care for women are seeing more men in their practices as well. Some diseases affecting the penis can impact on their sexual partners. Many of the lesions and neoplasms of the penis occur on the vulva as well. In addition, there are common and rare lesions unique to the penis. A review of the scope of penile lesions and neoplasms that may present in a primary care setting is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if such a patient is encountered, as well as for practitioners who care for their sexual partners. A familiarity will assist with recognition, as well as when consultation is needed.

  20. Myeloid Neoplasms in the Guise of Nutritional Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Veda

    2012-01-01

    The classic BCR-ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) which include polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are among the most frequent hematologic neoplasms. Because of their relatively smooth clinical course, it is likely that many of these MPNs actually go undetected. Considering the high prevalence of iron, folic-acid, and vitamin B12 deficiencies in developing countries, their coexistence with MPN can be expected frequently. In such situations where both disorders coexist, MPN is often overlooked. This causes considerable diagnostic delay. In this paper, two cases of PMF and one case of PV where the diagnosis of MPN was delayed for about 3 years are discussed. Presence of concomitant vitamin B12, folate, and iron deficiencies perhaps camouflaged the underlying MPN. Bearing in mind the possibility of MPN, even in the setting of apparent nutritional deficiency and performing a bone marrow evaluation, is the crucial step in unveiling the hidden MPN. PMID:23227377

  1. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Karen; Delvaux, Peter; Huysentruyt, Frederik

    2017-08-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a rare variant of bile duct tumors, characterized by papillary growth within the bile duct lumen and is regarded as a biliary counterpart of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. IPNBs are mainly found in patients from Far Eastern areas, where hepatolithiasis and clonorchiasis are endemic. The Western experience, however, remains limited. In this article, we report a 56-year-old man, referred to our hospital because of deranged liver function tests. Further imaging modalities showed a cystic lesion of 9 cm diameter, arising from the left hepatic duct. Inlying was a heterogeneous, lobulated mass. The patient underwent a left hemihepatectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advanced technologies, diagnosis of IPNB is still challenging, especially in western countries due to its rarity. Early identification and resection of lesions, even in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, are however important prognostic factors.

  2. Food habits in atomic bomb survivors suffering from malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Kazue; Inoue, Hisako; Uchino, Chito

    1984-01-01

    Food habits were surveyed in patients admitted to 13 hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture and other prefectures to compare the incidence of malignant neoplasms according to the food intake between atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group. The incidence of malignant neoplasms was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of milk and salted fish than in those having the high intake of them in atomic bomb exposed group, while it was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of potatoes and milk and in female patients having the low intake of boiled fish paste than in those having the high intake of them in non-exposed group. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: report of two pediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Preeti Ashok; Mittal, Neha Manish; Subramanian, P G; Galani, Komal; Badrinath, Yajamanam; Amare, Pratibha; Gujral, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare subtype of acute leukemia that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults, whereas experience in children with this disease is very limited. We report cases of two children in whom bone marrow showed infiltration by large atypical monocytoid 'blast-like' cells which on immunophenotyping expressed CD4, CD56, HLA-DR and CD33 while were negative for CD34 other T-cell, B-cell and myeloid markers. The differential diagnoses considered were AML, T/NK-cell leukemia and acute undifferentiated leukemia. Additional markers CD303/BDCA-2 and CD123 which are recently validated plasmacytoid dendritic cell markers were done which helped us clinch the diagnosis of this rare neoplasm. An accurate diagnosis of BPDCN is essential in order to provide prompt treatment. Due to its rarity and only recent recognition as a distinct clinicopathological entity, no standardized therapeutic approach has been established for BPDCN.

  4. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  5. Rectum neoplasms treatment advanced with radio and chemotherapy before - surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo Cespedes, A.; Aguiar Vitacca, S.

    1993-01-01

    In Uruguay the colorectal neoplasms has a can rate of mobility. The surgery has 13-26% local recurrence. The irradiation before surgery has demonstrated to improve the resect and the local control.The objective of this protocol it is to decrease the percentage of local relapse , using radiotherapy(RT) before surgery and concomitant chemotherapy that potencies the effect of the RT, improvement this way the therapeutic quotient (AU) [es

  6. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence,...

  7. Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasdev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years. The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (range, 1 – 51. While all patients tested urine positive for BKV at the clinical onset of HC, only four patients had viral quantification, with viral loads ranging from 97,000 to >1 billion/ml. 8 patients had clinical HC. Ten patients experienced acute GVHD (grade I: 6 patients, grade II: 3 patients, grade 4: 1 patient.Results: Four patients received medical management for their HC. Treatments included hyperhydration, MESNA, blood and platelet transfusion, premarin and oxybutynin (Table 6.  Two patients received both medical and surgical management which included cystoscopy with clot evacuation, bladder irrigation and supra-pubic catheter insertion. One patient received exclusive surgical management. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Conclusion: There is limited available evidence for other potential therapeutic strategies highlighting the need for more research into the pathophysiology of HSCT-associated HC. Commonly used interventions with possible clinical benefit (e.g. cidofovir, ciprofloxacin still require to be evaluated in multi-centre, high-quality studies. Potential future preventative and therapeutic options, such as modulation of conditioning, immunosuppression and engraftment, new antiviral and anti-inflammatory and less nephrotoxic agents need to be assessed.---------------------------Cite this article as:Vasdev N, Davidson A, Harkensee C, Slatter M, Gennery A, Willetts I, Thorpe A.Urological management (medical and surgical of BK

  8. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs--data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønden, Louise B; Eriksen, Thomas; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2009-12-18

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans.Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a clinical model for OMM in humans.

  9. Technology insight: endoscopic submucosal dissection of gastrointestinal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hironori

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal neoplasms can be cured by local resection as long as the lesions are in the early stage and have not metastasized. Endoscopic resection is a minimally invasive treatment for early-stage gastrointestinal neoplasms, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is one type of endoscopic resection that has been developed in the past 10 years. For ESD to be a reliable, curative treatment for gastrointestinal neoplasms, it is necessary for the endoscopist to detect the lesion early, make a precise pretreatment diagnosis, ensure that the patient has the correct indication for endoscopic resection, and have the skill to perform ESD. For early lesion detection, endoscopists should pay attention to subtle changes in the surface structure, the color of the mucosa and the visibility of underlying submucosal vessels. Chromoendoscopy and magnifying endoscopy are useful for determining the margin of the lesions for pretreatment diagnosis, and endoscopic ultrasonography and magnifying endoscopy are useful for determining the depth of invasion. For ESD to be successful, local injection of sodium hyaluronate helps maintain mucosal elevation during dissection. Selecting the appropriate knife, using transparent hoods wisely, employing a good strategy that uses gravity, and having good control of bleeding are all needed to make ESD reliable.

  10. Appendiceal pathology at the time of oophorectomy for ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Julia; Galgano, Mary T; Stoler, Mark H; Lachance, Jason A; Modesitt, Susan C; Jazaeri, Amir A

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence of appendiceal pathology in women undergoing surgery for a suspected ovarian neoplasm and the predictive value of intraoperative findings to determine the need for appendectomy at the time of surgery. Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent oophorectomy and appendectomy during the same surgical procedures at the University of Virginia Health System from 1992 to 2007. Observations were stratified based on the nature (benign, borderline, or malignant) and histology (serous compared with mucinous) of the ovarian neoplasm, frozen compared with final pathological diagnosis, and the gross appearance of the appendix. Among the 191 patients identified, frozen section was consistent with seven mucinous and 35 serous carcinomas, 16 serous and 33 mucinous borderline tumors, 71 mucinous and serous cystadenomas, and 29 cases of suspected metastatic tumor from a gastrointestinal primary. The highest rates of coexisting appendiceal pathology were associated with serous ovarian cancers (94.4% of grossly abnormal and 35.3% of normal appendices) and ovarian tumors suspected to be of primary gastrointestinal origin (83.3% grossly abnormal and 60.0% normal appendices harbored coexisting mucinous neoplasms). Linear regression analysis revealed that appearance of the appendix and frozen section diagnosis of the ovarian pathology were statistically significant predictors of coexisting appendiceal pathology, but the latter was more important. The prevalence of coexisting, clinically significant appendiceal pathology is low with a frozen section diagnosis of serous or mucinous cystadenoma. Appendectomy is recommended when frozen section diagnosis is mucinous or serous ovarian carcinoma, borderline tumor or metastatic carcinoma of suspected gastrointestinal origin.

  11. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm mimicking an adnexal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian, Daniel Alin; Grama, Florin Andrei; Becheanu, Gabriel; Pop, Anamaria; Popa, Ileana; Şurlin, Valeriu; Stănilescu, Sorin; Bratu, Ana Magdalena; Burcoş, Traean

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of malignant epithelial neoplasm of the appendix, an uncommon disorder encountered in clinical practice, which poses a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We report a particular case in which the appendix was abnormally located in the pelvis, mimicking an adnexal mass. Therefore, it was difficult to make the preoperative diagnosis on clinical examination, imaging studies and laboratory tests and we discovered the lesion during the diagnostic laparoscopy. No lymphadenopathy or mucinous ascites were found. The case was completely handled via the laparoscopic approach keeping the appendix intact during the operation. The frozen section, the detailed histopathology overview as well as multiple immunostaining with a complex panel of markers report diagnosed a low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN) with no invasion of the wall. No adjuvant therapy was considered needed. At a one-year follow-up oncological assessment, the patient was free of disease. In women with cystic mass in the right iliac fossa an appendiceal mucocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Laparoscopic appendectomy can represent an adequate operation for the appendiceal mucinous neoplasm if the histological report is clear and surgical precautionary measures are taken.

  12. Clinical parameters predictive of malignancy of thyroid follicular neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, N.L.; Gordon, M.; Germann, E.; Robins, R.E.; McGregor, G.I.

    1991-01-01

    Needle aspiration biopsy is commonly employed in the evaluation of thyroid nodules. Unfortunately, the cytologic finding of a 'follicular neoplasm' does not distinguish between a thyroid adenoma and a follicular cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters that characterize patients with an increased risk of having a thyroid follicular cancer who preoperatively have a 'follicular neoplasm' identified by needle aspiration biopsy. A total of 395 patients initially treated at Vancouver General Hospital and the British Columbia Cancer Agency between the years of 1965 and 1985 were identified and their data were entered into a computer database. Patients with thyroid adenomas were compared to patients with follicular cancer using the chi-square test and Student's t-test. Statistically significant parameters that distinguished patients at risk of having a thyroid cancer (p less than 0.05) included age greater than 50 years, nodule size greater than 3 cm, and a history of neck irradiation. Sex, family history of goiter or neoplasm, alcohol and tobacco use, and use of exogenous estrogen were not significant parameters. Patients can be identified preoperatively to be at an increased risk of having a follicular cancer and accordingly appropriate surgical resection can be planned

  13. Human haemato-endothelial precursors: cord blood CD34+ cells produce haemogenic endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Pelosi

    Full Text Available Embryologic and genetic evidence suggest a common origin of haematopoietic and endothelial lineages. In the murine embryo, recent studies indicate the presence of haemogenic endothelium and of a common haemato-endothelial precursor, the haemangioblast. Conversely, so far, little evidence supports the presence of haemogenic endothelium and haemangioblasts in later stages of development. Our studies indicate that human cord blood haematopoietic progenitors (CD34+45+144-, triggered by murine hepatocyte conditioned medium, differentiate into adherent proliferating endothelial precursors (CD144+CD105+CD146+CD31+CD45- capable of functioning as haemogenic endothelium. These cells, proven to give rise to functional vasculature in vivo, if further instructed by haematopoietic growth factors, first switch to transitional CD144+45+ cells and then to haematopoietic cells. These results highlight the plasticity of haemato-endhothelial precursors in human post-natal life. Furthermore, these studies may provide highly enriched populations of human post-fetal haemogenic endothelium, paving the way for innovative projects at a basic and possibly clinical level.

  14. Environmental exposure to cooking oil fumes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.-T.; Lee, L.-H.; Ho, C.-K.; Wu, S.-C.; Lin, L.-Y.; Cheng, B.-H.; Liu, C.-L.; Yang, C.-Y.; Tsai, H.-T.; Wu, T.-N.

    2004-01-01

    The fumes from cooking oil, similar to cigarette smoke, contain numerous carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. In this study, we examined the association between exposure to cooking oil fumes and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The study population in this nested case-control study consisted of women above the age of 19 years living in Chia-Yi County, located in the southwestern Taiwan, who had received pap smear screening between October, 1999, and December, 2000 (n=32,466). The potential cases were women having lesions greater than cervical intraepithelium neoplasm II (≥CIN2) reconfirmed by cervical biopsy (n=116). The potential controls (case: control=1:2) were age-matched (±2 years) and residence-matched women who had normal pap smears within 6 months of the cases. In total, 100 cases and 197 controls were completely interviewed by public health nurses about cooking methods, ventilation, and other potential risk factors. Women who cooked at home in a kitchen (n=269) without the presence of a fume extractor at least once a week between the ages of 20 and 40 had a 2.29 times higher risk [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-4.87] of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than those who did not cook once a week in such a kitchen during the same age span, after adjusting for other potential confounders. This finding was further strengthened by the finding that women who did not use the fume extractors had a 2.47 times higher risk (95% CI=1.15-5.32) of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than women who cooked in kitchens with fume extractors that were always switched on while cooking. We also found a joint protective effect of fume extractor use among women older than 40 years (n=202) if they used the extractors during both age spans of their lives, ages 20-40 and >40 years. Comparing our findings on women more than 40 years old who used fume extractors during

  15. Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Jules J

    2004-01-01

    The new 'Developmental lineage classification of neoplasms' was described in a prior publication. The classification is simple (the entire hierarchy is described with just 39 classifiers), comprehensive (providing a place for every tumor of man), and consistent with recent attempts to characterize tumors by cytogenetic and molecular features. A taxonomy is a list of the instances that populate a classification. The taxonomy of neoplasia attempts to list every known term for every known tumor of man. The taxonomy provides each concept with a unique code and groups synonymous terms under the same concept. A Perl script validated successive drafts of the taxonomy ensuring that: 1) each term occurs only once in the taxonomy; 2) each term occurs in only one tumor class; 3) each concept code occurs in one and only one hierarchical position in the classification; and 4) the file containing the classification and taxonomy is a well-formed XML (eXtensible Markup Language) document. The taxonomy currently contains 122,632 different terms encompassing 5,376 neoplasm concepts. Each concept has, on average, 23 synonyms. The taxonomy populates 'The developmental lineage classification of neoplasms,' and is available as an XML file, currently 9+ Megabytes in length. A representation of the classification/taxonomy listing each term followed by its code, followed by its full ancestry, is available as a flat-file, 19+ Megabytes in length. The taxonomy is the largest nomenclature of neoplasms, with more than twice the number of neoplasm names found in other medical nomenclatures, including the 2004 version of the Unified Medical Language System, the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terminology, the National Cancer Institute's Thesaurus, and the International Classification of Diseases Oncolology version. This manuscript describes a comprehensive taxonomy of neoplasia that collects synonymous terms under a unique code number and assigns each

  16. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I; Kinggaard Holm, D; Galea, G; Aranko, K; Korhonen, M; Nordstrom, K

    2013-11-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization. An online questionnaire was used for data collection in 2011, and 43 replies were received covering 71 product answers from 13 countries. Estimated percentages of tissue and cell banking covered by EBA member blood banks as a proportion of all collections of each individual country varied markedly. There were also major differences in the amounts of products collected and discarded and in proportions tissues provided for grafting. However, discarding of certain collections also reflects the practice of increasing the likelihood of the very best units being used for transplantation. Harmonization of possible practices should focus on matching supply with demand and on identifying the most efficient operators. This could allow for the development of practices for minimizing unnecessary collections. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Towards a global system of vigilance and surveillance in unrelated donors of haematopoietic progenitor cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, B E; Chapman, J; Fechter, M; Foeken, L; Greinix, H; Hwang, W; Phillips-Johnson, L; Korhonen, M; Lindberg, B; Navarro, W H; Szer, J

    2013-11-01

    Safety of living donors is critical to the success of blood, tissue and organ transplantation. Structured and robust vigilance and surveillance systems exist as part of some national entities, but historically no global systems are in place to ensure conformity, harmonisation and the recognition of rare adverse events (AEs). The World Health Assembly has recently resolved to require AE/reaction (AE/R) reporting both nationally and globally. The World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) is an international organisation promoting the safety of unrelated donors and progenitor cell products for use in haematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation. To address this issue, we established a system for collecting, collating, analysing, distributing and reacting to serious adverse events and reactions (SAE/R) in unrelated HPC donors. The WMDA successfully instituted this reporting system with 203 SAE/R reported in 2011. The committee generated two rapid reports, reacting to specific SAE/R, resulting in practice changing policies. The system has a robust governance structure, formal feedback to the WMDA membership and transparent information flows to other agencies, specialist physicians and transplant programs and the general public.

  18. Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Arrests the Progression of Neurodegenerative Disease in Late-Onset Tay-Sachs Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Karolina M; Lum, Su Han; Wraith, J Edmond; Hendriksz, Christian J; Church, Heather J; Priestman, David; Platt, Frances M; Jones, Simon; Jovanovic, Ana; Wynn, Robert

    2017-12-07

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of hexosaminidase A that leads to accumulation of GM2 gangliosides predominantly in neural tissue. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease variant is associated with a higher level of residual HexA activity. Treatment options are limited, and there are a few described cases who have undergone haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with variable outcome.We describe a case of a 23-year-old male patient who presented with a long-standing tremor since 7 years of age. He had gait ataxia, a speech stammer and swallowing problems. His condition had had a static course apart from his tremor that had been gradually deteriorating. Because of the deterioration in his neurological function, the patient had an uneventful, matched-sibling donor bone marrow transplant at the age of 15 years. Eight years post-HSCT, at the age of 23, he retains full donor engraftment, and his white cell beta-HexA of 191 nmol/mg/h is comparable to normal controls (in-assay control = 187). He continues to experience some intentional tremor that is tolerable for daily life and nonprogressive since HSCT. HSCT is a potential treatment option which might arrest neurodegeneration in patients with LOTS.

  19. Defibrotide: a review of its use in severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M

    2014-12-01

    Defibrotide (Defitelio(®)) was recently approved in the EU for the treatment of severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) therapy. It is indicated in adults, adolescents, children and infants over 1 month of age. Defibrotide is also available in the US via an expanded-access protocol. Defibrotide is thought to protect endothelial cells and restore the thrombo-fibrinolytic balance in VOD. In a multicentre, phase III trial, the complete response rate by day +100 (primary endpoint) was significantly higher, and mortality at day +100 was significantly lower, in patients with severe hepatic VOD and multiorgan failure following HSCT who received intravenous defibrotide 6.25 mg/kg every 6 h than in a group of historical controls. The efficacy of defibrotide in severe hepatic VOD following HSCT was also supported by findings from a phase II dose-finding study, compassionate-use data and information provided from an independent transplant registry. Intravenous defibrotide was generally well tolerated in patients with severe hepatic VOD following HSCT, and was not associated with an increased risk of haemorrhagic adverse events. In conclusion, defibrotide is the only agent approved (in the EU) for use in severe hepatic VOD following HSCT and represents a useful advance in the treatment of this condition.

  20. Repopulation dynamics of single haematopoietic stem cells in mouse transplantation experiments: Importance of stem cell composition in competitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Hideo; Uchinomiya, Kouki; Morita, Yohei; Suda, Toshio; Iwasa, Yoh

    2016-04-07

    The transplantation of blood tissues from bone marrow into a lethally irradiated animal is an experimental procedure that is used to study how the blood system is reconstituted by haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In a competitive repopulation experiment, a lethally irradiated mouse was transplanted with a single HSC as a test cell together with a number of bone marrow cells as competitor cells, and the fraction of the test cell progeny (percentage of chimerism) was traced over time. In this paper, we studied the stem cell kinetics in this experimental procedure. The balance between symmetric self-renewal and differentiation divisions in HSC determined the number of cells which HSC produce and the length of time for which HSC live after transplantation. The percentage of chimerism depended on the type of test cell (long-, intermediate-, or short-term HSC), as well as the type and number of HSC included in competitor cells. We next examined two alternative HSC differentiation models, one-step and multi-step differentiation models. Although these models differed in blood cell production, the percentage of chimerism appeared very similar. We also estimated the numbers of different types of HSC in competitor cells. Based on these results, we concluded that the experimental results inevitably include stochasticity with regard to the number and the type of HSC in competitor cells, and that, in order to detect different types of HSC, an appropriate number of competitor cells needs to be used in transplantation experiments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Identification of resident and inflammatory bone marrow derived cells in the sclera by bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Toshio; Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Qiao, Hong; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Toru; Noda, Kousuke; Miyahara, Shinsuke; Harada, Mine; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W

    2007-04-01

    To characterise bone marrow derived cells in the sclera under normal and inflammatory conditions, we examined their differentiation after transplantation from two different sources, bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Bone marrow and HSC from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were transplanted into irradiated wild-type mice. At 1 month after transplantation, mice were sacrificed and their sclera examined by histology, immunohistochemistry (CD11b, CD11c, CD45), and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. To investigate bone marrow derived cell recruitment under inflammatory conditions, experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) was induced in transplanted mice. GFP positive cells were distributed in the entire sclera and comprised 22.4 (2.8)% (bone marrow) and 28.4 (10.9)% (HSC) of the total cells in the limbal zone and 18.1 (6.7)% (bone marrow) and 26.3 (3.4)% (HSC) in the peripapillary zone. Immunohistochemistry showed that GFP (+) CD11c (+), GFP (+) CD11b (+) cells migrated in the sclera after bone marrow and HSC transplantation. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed antigen presenting cells among the scleral fibroblasts. In EAU mice, vast infiltration of GFP (+) cells developed into the sclera. We have provided direct and novel evidence for the migration of bone marrow and HSC cells into the sclera differentiating into macrophages and dendritic cells. Vast infiltration of bone marrow and HSC cells was found to be part of the inflammatory process in EAU.

  2. A survey of fertility and sexual health following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gemma; Gilroy, Nicole; Bradford, Jennifer; Brice, Lisa; Kabir, Masura; Greenwood, Matt; Larsen, Stephen R; Moore, John; Hertzberg, Mark; Kwan, John; Brown, Louisa; Hogg, Megan; Huang, Gillian; Tan, Jeff; Ward, Christopher; Kerridge, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Four hundred and twenty-one adult allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors participated in a cross-sectional study to assess sexual dysfunction and infertility post-transplant. Survey instruments included the Sydney Post-Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Survey, Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment (FACT) - BMT, the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS 21), the Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease (cGVHD) Activity Assessment- Patient Self Report (Form B), the Lee cGVHD Symptom Scale and The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory. Most HSCT survivors reported sexual difficulties (51% of males; 66% of females). Men reported erectile dysfunction (79%) and decreased libido (61·6%) and women reported loss of libido (83%), painful intercourse (73%) and less enjoyment of sex (68%). Women also commonly reported vaginal dryness (73%), vaginal narrowing (34%) and vaginal irritation (26%). Woman had much higher rates of genital cGvHD than men (22% vs. 5%). Age and cGVHD were significantly associated with sexual dysfunction. Few survivors had children following transplant (3·3%). However, for those of reproductive age at HSCT, 22% reported trying to conceive, with 10·3% reporting success. This study is the largest to date exploring sexual function in survivors of allo-HSCT. This data provides the basis for health service reform to better meet the needs of HSCT survivors, including evidence to support counselling and education both pre- and post-transplant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Diamond Blackfan anaemia: a report from the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Zecca, Marco; Lanino, Edoardo; Corti, Paola; Favre, Claudio; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Locatelli, Franco; Prete, Arcangelo

    2014-06-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for patients with Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA). We report the transplantation outcome of 30 Italian DBA patients referred to the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry between 1990 and 2012. This is one of the largest national registry cohorts of transplanted DBA patients. Most patients (83%) were allografted after 2000. A matched sibling donor was employed in 16 patients (53%), the remaining 14 patients (47%) were transplanted from matched unrelated donors. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients engrafted. One patient died at day +6 due to veno-occlusive disease without achieving neutrophil recovery and another patient remained transfusion-dependent despite the presence of a full donor chimerism. The 5-year overall survival and transplant-related mortality was 74·4% and 25·6%, respectively. Patients younger than 10 years as well as those transplanted after 2000 showed a significantly higher overall survival and a significantly lower risk of transplant-related mortality. No difference between donor type was observed. Our data suggest that allogeneic HSCT from a related or unrelated donor was a reasonable alternative to transfusion therapy in young and well chelated DBA patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular genetic tests for JAK2V617F, Exon12_JAK2 and MPLW515K/L are highly informative in the evaluation of patients suspected to have BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcos Tadeu; Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Miyashiro, Kozue; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes L Ferrari; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2014-02-01

    Polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and idiopathic myelofibrosis (MF), are the most common myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) in patients without the BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement. They are caused by clonal expansion of haematopoietic stem cells and share, as a diagnostic criterion, the identification of JAK2V617F mutation. Classically, when other clinical criteria are present, a JAK2V617F negative case requires the analysis of Exon12_JAK2 for the diagnosis of PV, and of MPL515K/L mutations for the diagnosis of ET and MF. Here, we evaluated 78 samples from Brazilian patients suspected to have MPN, without stratification for PV, ET or MF. We found that 28 (35.9%) are JAK2V617F carriers; from the 50 remaining samples, one (2%) showed an Exon12_JAK2 mutation, and another (2%) was positive for MPLW515L mutation. In summary, the investigation of JAK2V617F, Exon12_JAK2 and MPLW515K/L was relevant for the diagnosis of 38.4% of patients suspected to have BCR-ABL1-negative MPN, suggesting that molecular genetic tests are useful for a quick and unequivocal diagnosis of MPN.

  5. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  6. The myeloproliferative neoplasms, unclassifiable: clinical and pathological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianelli, Umberto; Cattaneo, Daniele; Bossi, Anna; Cortinovis, Ivan; Boiocchi, Leonardo; Liu, Yen-Chun; Augello, Claudia; Bonometti, Arturo; Fiori, Stefano; Orofino, Nicola; Guidotti, Francesca; Orazi, Attilio; Iurlo, Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigate in detail the morphological, clinical and molecular features of 71 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, unclassifiable. We performed a meticulous morphological analysis and found that most of the cases displayed a hypercellular bone marrow (70%) with normal erythropoiesis without left-shifting (59%), increased granulopoiesis with left-shifting (73%) and increased megakaryocytes with loose clustering (96%). Megakaryocytes displayed frequent giant forms with hyperlobulated or bulbous nuclei and/or other maturation defects. Interestingly, more than half of the cases displayed severe bone marrow fibrosis (59%). Median values of hemoglobin level and white blood cells count were all within the normal range; in contrast, median platelets count and lactate dehydrogenase were increased. Little less than half of the patients (44%) showed splenomegaly. JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 72% of all patients. Among the JAK2-negative cases, MPLW515L mutation was found in 17% and CALR mutations in 67% of the investigated cases, respectively. Finally, by multiple correspondence analysis of the morphological profiles, we found that all but four of the cases could be grouped in three morphological clusters with some features similar to those of the classic BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Analysis of the clinical parameters in these three clusters revealed discrepancies with the morphological profile in about 55% of the patients. In conclusion, we found that the category of myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable is heterogeneous but identification of different subgroups is possible and should be recommended for a better management of these patients.

  7. Neoplasms in young dogs after irradiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Williams, J.S.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Lee, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    To study the lifetime effects of irradiation during development, 1680 beagle dogs were given single, whole body exposures to 60Co gamma radiation at one of 6 pre- or postnatal ages. Four groups of 120 dogs each (480 or 29%) received 0.16 or 0.83 Gy at early prenatal times, 8 or 28 days postcoitus (dpc). Four groups of 120 dogs each (29%) received 0.16 or 0.83 Gy in the perinatal period at 55 dpc or 2 days postpartum (dpp). Groups of 120 and 240 dogs (21%) received 0.83 Gy at later postnatal times, 70 or 365 dpp, respectively. A group of 360 dogs (21%) were sham-irradiated. The youngest dogs are now 12 years old. Through 4 years of age, 20 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed. Five malignancies and one benign tumor were seen in the first two years, including the only fatal malignancies which occurred in 4 perinatally irradiated dogs. Up to two years of age, the other non-fatal malignancy and benign tumor were found in dogs irradiated at 365 dpp and 55 dpc. The remaining 14 neoplasms, 12 benign and 2 non-fatal malignant, were diagnosed between two and four years of age. Respective numbers of these benign and non-fatal malignant tumors found in control, perinatally irradiated, and all other irradiated dogs were 2 and 0; 5 and 1; and 5 and 1. Eight of the benign lesions were minute papillomas of the eyelids which were more frequent in the perinatally irradiated dogs. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of the malignancies seen in the first four years of life occurred in the 29% of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. Sixty-seven percent (8 of 12) of all neoplasms, excluding eyelid papillomas, also occurred in perinatally irradiated dogs. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation

  8. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

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    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs.We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance.S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41.We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  9. Metanephric stromal tumor: A novel pediatric renal neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Metanephric stromal tumor of kidney is a novel pediatric benign stromal specific renal neoplasm. A few cases have been reported in adults also. This tumor is usually centered in the renal medulla with a characteristic microscopic appearance which differentiates this lesion from congenital mesoblastic nephroma and clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. In most cases complete excision alone is curative. The differentiation of metanephric stromal tumor from clear cell sarcoma of the kidney will spare the child from the ill effects of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this communication we describe the gross and microscopic features of metanephric stromal tumor in a one-month-old child with good prognosis.

  10. Inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor with hemorrhage masquerading high grade cerebral neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demyelinating pseudotumors are rare, benign, solitary intracranial space occupying lesions which masquerade cerebral neoplasms. Contrast MRI shows open ring enhancement which is fairly specific for this entity. Advanced MRI techniques like MR spectroscopy and magnetizing transfer techniques can help differentiating these lesions. NAA/Cr ratio is significantly elevated in central regions of demyelinating pseudotumors than in gliomas and other lesions. Presence of abundant foamy macrophages, lymphoid inflammatory infiltrates around blood vessels, sheets of gemistocytic astrocytes with well-developed processes, well defined border of the lesion absence of neovascularity and necrosis should help us diagnose demyelinating pseudotumor fairly confidently on histopathology.

  11. Rupture of a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rampersad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An acute presentation of a spontaneously ruptured Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN in an 8 year old female is discussed with a review of the world literature. Our literature search revealed 15 other cases of ruptured SPN and with this case the total is now 16. Notably, 12 patients were 16 years of age or less at presentation as in our case. Although rupture of a SPN is rarely reported it appears to be more probable in the pediatric patient. Additionally, larger tumor size and trauma may be contributing factors.

  12. Cervical intraepitheial neoplasm with ichthyosis uteri- A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma Malla Vaidya

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare condition in which the entire surface of the endometrium is replaced by stratified squamous epithelium is called Ichthyosis uteri. Originally described as an endometrial response to iatrogenically-introduced caustic substances, similar changes have since been described in association with a variety of inflammatory conditions of the endometrium.Here we report a case of intraepithelial neoplasm III, with ichthyosis uteri. A 75-years-old female with hypetension, underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salphingo-ophorectomy for watery discharge per vaginal since four months.

  13. Uterine Rupture Due to Invasive Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I.; Pritchard, Amy M.; Clarke, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    While complete molar pregnancies are rare, they are wrought with a host of potential complications to include invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Persistent gestational trophoblastic disease following molar pregnancy is a potentially fatal complication that must be recognized early and treated aggressively for both immediate and long-term recovery. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman with abdominal pain and presyncope 1 month after a molar pregnancy with a subsequent uterine rupture due to invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasm. We will discuss the complications of molar pregnancies including the risks and management of invasive, metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:24106538

  14. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Jing Xie,1,2 Xiao Yan Zhu,1,2 Lu Ming Liu,1,2 Zhi Qiang Meng1,2 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues o...

  15. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas Viruses as agents inducing cutaneous neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bravo Puccio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available El rol oncogénico de los virus en las neoplasias cutáneas es conocido por el hombre desde hace más de un siglo, cuando se atribuía el origen de la verruga vulgar al virus papiloma humano (VPH. En la actualidad, las neoplasias inducidas por virus pueden agruparse en tumores sólidos y procesos linfoproliferativos. Destacan entre los primeros el VPH, del cual ahora conocemos numerosos serotipos, cada uno vinculado a una neoplasia específica, el herpesvirus humano tipo 8 que produce el sarcoma de Kaposi y el poliomavirus vinculado al carcinoma de Merkel. Entre los procesos linfoproliferativos debemos mencionar al virus linfotrópico de células T humanas tipo 1 (HTLV-1 responsable de los linfomas de células T, en los cuales el compromiso cutáneo es inespecífico, con un amplio espectro de presentaciones clínicas y, que por consiguiente, plantean un reto para el diagnóstico diferencial. En este grupo también se encuentra el virus Epstein Barr vinculado a los linfomas nasales de Células NK/T y a los linfomas tipo Hidroa, de reciente descripción. En esta era en la que lo genético y lo molecular priman en las investigaciones en cáncer, no podemos dejar de lado el concepto de neoplasia como resultado de la infección por un agente viral, lo que abre una nueva veta de posibilidades de tratamiento anticanceroso basado en medicamentos antiviralesThe oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV. Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell polyomavirus, highlight among the first group. Regarding the lymphoproliferative disorders, we should mention the

  16. Several adaptor proteins promote intracellular localisation of the transporter MRP4/ABCC4 in platelets and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaletzki, Yvonne; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Bröderdorf, Susanne; Hammer, Elke; Grube, Markus; Hagen, Paul; Sucic, Sonja; Freissmuth, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Greinacher, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H; Kroemer, Heyo K; Jedlitschky, Gabriele

    2017-01-05

    The multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) has been identified as an important transporter for signalling molecules including cyclic nucleotides and several lipid mediators in platelets and may thus represent a novel target to interfere with platelet function. Besides its localisation in the plasma membrane, MRP4 has been also detected in the membrane of dense granules in resting platelets. In polarised cells it is localised at the basolateral or apical plasma membrane. To date, the mechanism of MRP4 trafficking has not been elucidated; protein interactions may regulate both the localisation and function of this transporter. We approached this issue by searching for interacting proteins by in vitro binding assays, followed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, and by visualising their co-localisation in platelets and haematopoietic cells. We identified the PDZ domain containing scaffold proteins ezrin-binding protein 50 (EBP50/NHERF1), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), and sorting nexin 27 (SNX27), but also the adaptor protein complex 3 subunit β3A (AP3B1) and the heat shock protein HSP90 as putative interaction partners of MRP4. The knock-down of SNX27, PSD95, and AP3B1 by siRNA in megakaryoblastic leukaemia cells led to a redistribution of MRP4 from intracellular structures to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of HSP90 led to a diminished expression and retention of MRP4 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that MRP4 localisation and function are regulated by multiple protein interactions. Changes in the adaptor proteins can hence lead to altered localisation and function of the transporter.

  17. Haematopoietic transplants combining a single unrelated cord blood unit and mobilized haematopoietic stem cells from an adult HLA-mismatched third party donor. Comparable results to transplants from HLA-identical related donors in adults with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebrango, Ana; Vicuña, Isabel; de Laiglesia, Almudena; Millán, Isabel; Bautista, Guiomar; Martín-Donaire, Trinidad; Regidor, Carmen; Cabrera, Rafael; Fernandez, Manuel N

    2010-06-01

    We describe results of the strategy, developed by our group, of co-infusion of mobilized haematopoietic stem cells as a support for single-unit unrelated cord blood transplant (dual CB/TPD-MHSC transplants) for treatment of haematological malignancies in adults, and a comparative analysis of results obtained using this strategy and transplants performed with mobilized haematopoietic stem cells from related HLA-identical donors (RTD) for treatment of adults with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Our data show that the dual CB/TPD-MHSC transplant strategy results in periods of post-transplant neutropenia, final rates of full donor chimerism and transplant-related mortality rates comparable to those of the RTD. Final survival outcomes are comparable in adults transplanted because of acute leukaemia, with different incidences of the complications that most influence these: a higher incidence of infections related to late recovery of protective immunity dependent on T cell functions, and a lower incidence of serious acute graft-versus-host disease and relapses. Recent advances in cord blood transplant techniques allow allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to be a viable option for almost every patient who may benefit from this therapeutic approach. Development of innovative strategies to improve the post-transplant recovery of T cells function is currently the main challenge to further improving the possibilities of unrelated cord blood transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The lymph nodes imprint for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche-Alvarado, Carolina; Ramos-Peñafiel, Christian Omar; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Romero-Guadarrama, Mónica; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Rozen-Fuller, Etta; Martínez-Tovar, Adolfo; Collazo-Jaloma, Juan; Mendoza-García, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    lymphoma is the most frequent lymphoid neoplasm in our country. Its diagnosis is based on histopathological findings. The lymph node imprint has been used for more than 40 years. The aim was to establish the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of lymph node imprint and estimate the inter-observer rate. we did an observational, retrospective, prolective study, based on the lymph node imprint obtained by excisional biopsies over a period of 6 years. the inclusion criteria was met on 199 samples, 27.1 % were considered as reactive (n = 54), 16.1 % Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 32), 40.2 % (n = 80) non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 16.6 % (n = 33) as metastatic carcinoma. Comparing with the final histopathology report, the sensitivity and specificity of lymph node imprint were 88 % (0.81-0.95) and 64 % (0.55-0.73) respectively, the positive predictive value was 67 % (0.59-0.76) and the negative predictive value was 86 % (0.79-0.94). The interobserver kappa index was 0.467. the lymph node imprint remains as a useful tool for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasm. The agreement between observers was acceptable.

  19. Pediatric liver neoplasms: a radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.K.; Reiser, M.F.; Ros, P.R.; Mergo, P.J.; Tomczak, R.

    1999-01-01

    Only 1-2 % of all pediatric tumors occur in the liver. Two thirds of these tumors are malignant and almost all of the tumors cause clinical symptoms due to their mass effects. Besides the poor prognosis in most of the malignant tumors, for further treatment the origin and nature of the neoplasm has to be known. Due to the mostly unimpeded growth into the peritoneal cavity, the origin of the tumors is primarily often unclear and can non-invasively only be determined by advanced imaging techniques. The display of the macro- and microhistological key features of primary pediatric liver neoplasms, including hepatoblastoma (HB), infantile hemangioendothelioma (IHE), mesenchymal hamartoma (MH), undifferentiated (embryonal) sarcoma (UES), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), together with their imaging representation by ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, may deepen the understanding of the underlying pathology and its imaging appearance. Furthermore, in many cases sufficient information may be provided not only to differentiate benign from malignant tumors, but also to guide for adequate treatment. (orig.)

  20. Immunoglobulin therapy in hematologic neoplasms and after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masumi; Berger, Melvin; Gale, Robert Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulins are used to prevent or reduce infection risk in primary immune deficiencies and in settings which exploit its anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects. Rigorous proof of immunoglobulin efficacy in persons with lympho-proliferative neoplasms, plasma cell myeloma, and persons receiving hematopoietic cell transplants is lacking despite many clinical trials. Further, there are few consensus guidelines or algorithms for use in these conditions. Rapid development of new therapies targeting B-cell signaling and survival pathways and increased use of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy will likely result in more acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity and infections in persons with cancer. We review immunoglobulin formulations and discuss efficacy and potential adverse effects in the context of preventing infections and in graft-versus-host disease. We suggest an algorithm for evaluating acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity in persons with hematologic neoplasms and recommend appropriate use of immunoglobulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoscopic approach for a laryngeal neoplasm in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal and tracheal tumors are rare in pets; some piece of information on their disease behavior, therapy and evolution are limited. Neoplasms in this area are a diagnostic challenge. In many cases, they can be biopsied and excised using endoscopic instruments, but there is no report of this in canines. The goal of this study is to report a successful case of a laryngeal neoplasm removal through endoscopy. A head and neck radiogram revealed a mass in the laryngeal lumen protruding into the trachea. The patient then underwent an endoscopy to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and to surgically remove the tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated carcinoma. The most appropriate treatment for laryngeal tumors is the resection of the submucosa or a partial laryngectomy however, partial and total laryngectomies are associated with many postoperative complications. In contrast, the endoscopic approach allows for highly magnified visualization of the lesion in situ, which facilitates the surgical removal of the mass through videosurgery. With little manipulation of the affected area, the chances of postoperative complications are reduced, leading to a more rapid recovery.

  2. Classifying the evolutionary and ecological features of neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Carlo C.; Aktipis, Athena; Graham, Trevor A.; Sottoriva, Andrea; Boddy, Amy M.; Janiszewska, Michalina; Silva, Ariosto S.; Gerlinger, Marco; Yuan, Yinyin; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Anderson, Karen S.; Gatenby, Robert; Swanton, Charles; Posada, David; Wu, Chung-I; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Polyak, Kornelia; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Brown, Joel S.; Greaves, Mel; Shibata, Darryl

    2018-01-01

    Neoplasms change over time through a process of cell-level evolution, driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. However, the ecology of the microenvironment of a neoplastic cell determines which changes provide adaptive benefits. There is widespread recognition of the importance of these evolutionary and ecological processes in cancer, but to date, no system has been proposed for drawing clinically relevant distinctions between how different tumours are evolving. On the basis of a consensus conference of experts in the fields of cancer evolution and cancer ecology, we propose a framework for classifying tumours that is based on four relevant components. These are the diversity of neoplastic cells (intratumoural heterogeneity) and changes over time in that diversity, which make up an evolutionary index (Evo-index), as well as the hazards to neoplastic cell survival and the resources available to neoplastic cells, which make up an ecological index (Eco-index). We review evidence demonstrating the importance of each of these factors and describe multiple methods that can be used to measure them. Development of this classification system holds promise for enabling clinicians to personalize optimal interventions based on the evolvability of the patient’s tumour. The Evo- and Eco-indices provide a common lexicon for communicating about how neoplasms change in response to interventions, with potential implications for clinical trials, personalized medicine and basic cancer research. PMID:28912577

  3. Dermal Squamomelanocytic Tumor: Neoplasm of Uncertain Biological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirsad Dorić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of exceedingly rare cutaneous neoplasm with histological features of malignancy and uncertain biological potential. The nodular, darkly pigmented facial tumor with central exulceration, size 12x10x7 mm, of the skin 61-year-old man preauricular left was completely exised.Histologically tumor consists of atypical squamous cells, which express signs of moderate to significant pleomorphism, mitotically active, with foci forming of parakeratotic horn cysts (“pearls”. Characteristically tumor also consists of large number of atypical melanocytes with multifocal pattern, inserted between atypical squamous cells, and which contain large amount of dark brown pigment melanin. Immunohistochemically, squamous cells stain positively with keratin (CK116, melanocytes were stained with S -100 protein, HMB 45, and vimentin, but failed to stain with CK 116.To our knowledge this is the sixth reported case in world literature. The follow-up time of four years no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, similar all reported cases, but it is too short period in estimation to guarantee a benign course. However, it appears that this group of neoplasm may have different prognosis from pure squamous carcinoma or malignant melanoma.

  4. Frequency of heterozygous TET2 deletions in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Tripodi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Tripodi1, Ronald Hoffman1, Vesna Najfeld2, Rona Weinberg31The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine and 2Department of Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 3The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Cellular Therapy Laboratory, The New York Blood Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis, are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders with overlapping clinical and cytogenetic features and a variable tendency to evolve into acute leukemia. These diseases not only share overlapping chromosomal abnormalities but also a number of acquired somatic mutations. Recently, mutations in a putative tumor suppressor gene, ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2 on chromosome 4q24 have been identified in 12% of patients with MPN. Additionally 4q24 chromosomal rearrangements in MPN, including TET2 deletions, have also been observed using conventional cytogenetics. The goal of this study was to investigate the frequency of genomic TET2 rearrangements in MPN using fluorescence in situ hybridization as a more sensitive method for screening and identifying genomic deletions. Among 146 MPN patients, we identified two patients (1.4% who showed a common 4q24 deletion, including TET2. Our observations also indicated that the frequency of TET2 deletion is increased in patients with an abnormal karyotype (5%.Keywords: TET2, myeloproliferative neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cytogenetics

  5. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-07

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management.

  6. Malignant neurogenic neoplasms of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczkowski, J.; Starzynska, A.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present 17 cases of malignant neurogenic neoplasms of the head and neck observed in the Department of Otolaryngology in the years 1948-1993. The latest opinions on etiopathology, diagnosis and treatment of these tumors were described. Age and sex of patients, localization of tumor, symptoms histopathology and treatment were analyzed. Progressions of the disease were estimated retrospectively. It has been proved that these tumors develop quickly, give pain and paresthesia. Their diagnosis is very difficult because of their submucosal growth and difficult histopathological interpretation. A characteristic feature of these neurogenic tumors is the ability to give distant metastases. This feature differentiates them from squamous neoplasms, which give mainly nodal metastases. All the patients were subjected to surgery combined with conventional or high voltage radiotherapy. The positive effect of combined chemotherapy in cases of esthesioneuroblastoma is worthy of note. The prognosis in these tumors is often unfavorable. In the group under discussion 13 patients died because of recurrences, two patients are considered to be cured and the remaining 2 patients have had no recurrence for 2 and 3 years. (author)

  7. Age- and weight-dependent susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to isolates of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) of varying virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, S.M.; Fichtner, D.; Skall, Helle Frank

    2003-01-01

    The virulence of 5 European and 1 North American isolate of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was compared by infecting female sibling rainbow trout ('lsle of Man' strain) of different weights and ages (2, 20 and 50 g). The fish were exposed to 104 TCID50 IHNV per ml of water...... by immersion, and the mortality was recorded for 28 d. Two new IHNV isolates from Germany were included in the investigation. One was isolated from European eels kept at 23degreesC (+/-2degreesC) and the other was not detectable by immunofluorescence with commercially available monoclonal antibodies...

  8. Challenge studies of European stocks of redfin perch, Perca fluviatilis L., and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), with epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Jensen, Ann Britt Bang

    2009-01-01

    indicate that EHNV does not pose a high risk for wild perch and trout populations in Europe by natural exposure. Mortality appears to be primarily a function of environmental factors, with temperature playing an important role, and not just the presence of the virus in the fish.......A challenge model for comparison of the virulence of epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) to European stock of redfin perch, Perca fluviatilis L., and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), was tested. The model investigated intraperitoneal (IP), bath and cohabitation routes at 10...

  9. Mumps virus encephalomyelitis in a 19-year old male patient with an undefined severe combined immunodeficiency post-haematopoietic bone marrow transplantation: a rare fatal complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Toby A; Pelosi, Emanuela; McQuaid, Stephen; Richardson, Deborah; Newman, Joan; Hill, Kate; Veys, Paul; Davies, Graham; Orchard, Kim H

    2013-06-01

    We describe a rare case of fatal mumps encephalomyelitis occurring in 19-year old male following matched unrelated donor peripheral blood haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The indication for HSCT was for an undefined form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Molecular typing of the mumps viral RNA isolated from neural tissue indicated that the infection was acquired at the time of a mumps outbreak in England and Wales that occurred between 2004 and 2006. This case highlights the importance of considering mumps in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system infection in highly immunosuppressed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of elemental concentration censored distributions in breast malignant and breast benign neoplasm tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubala-Kukus, A.; Banas, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Gozdz, S.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The total reflection X-ray fluorescence method was applied to study the trace element concentrations in human breast malignant and breast benign neoplasm tissues taken from the women who were patients of Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce (Poland). These investigations were mainly focused on the development of new possibilities of cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This systematic comparative study was based on relatively large (∼ 100) population studied, namely 26 samples of breast malignant and 68 samples of breast benign neoplasm tissues. The concentrations, being in the range from a few ppb to 0.1%, were determined for thirteen elements (from P to Pb). The results were carefully analysed to investigate the concentration distribution of trace elements in the studied samples. The measurements of concentration of trace elements by total reflection X-ray fluorescence were limited, however, by the detection limit of the method. It was observed that for more than 50% of elements determined, the concentrations were not measured in all samples. These incomplete measurements were treated within the statistical concept called left-random censoring and for the estimation of the mean value and median of censored concentration distributions, the Kaplan-Meier estimator was used. For comparison of concentrations in two populations, the log-rank test was applied, which allows to compare the censored total reflection X-ray fluorescence data. Found statistically significant differences are discussed in more details. It is noted that described data analysis procedures should be the standard tool to analyze the censored concentrations of trace elements analysed by X-ray fluorescence methods

  11. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourelahi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and risk of cancer in the oral cavity and some related factors. Evidence Acquisition Evidence suggests that oral cavity cancer is significantly more prevalent in patients with periodontal disease, poor oral hygiene or more missing teeth. Clinically, gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC usually appears as an exophytic mass with a granular, papillary or verrucous surface or presents as an ulcerative lesion. Some reported cases of GSCC mimicking periodontal disease include gingival enlargement with no bone invasion, dentoalveolar abscess, erosive erythematosus lesion with keratotic papules, root exposure and tooth mobility, verrucous leukoplakia, verruciform xanthoma and development of hyperplastic granulation tissue after tooth extraction. Greater burden of oral flora that produce carcinogenic metabolites, human papilloma virus (HPV and other viruses that are residents of periodontal pocket, increased amount of inflammatory mediators and markers and some periodontal pathogens affecting cell cycle leading to mutation and dysplasia are considered as the rational for the relationship between malignant lesions of oral cavity and periodontal disease. Results Cancer of the oral cavity and periodontal disease are related from different aspects. Periodontal disease and tooth loss are considered as independent risk factors for cancer. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can also mimic periodontal disease leading to misdiagnosis and delayed commencement of appropriate

  12. Photodynamic therapy of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms: an outcome analysis of 170 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; van Oudenaarde, Kim; Copper, Marcel P.; Klop, W. M. C.; van Veen, Robert; Wildeman, Maarten; Bing Tan, I.

    2011-01-01

    The indications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms are not well defined. The main reason is that the success rates are not well established. The current paper analyzes our institutional experience of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms (Tis-T2) to

  13. [Incidence of haematological neoplasms in Castilla y León, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, José Antonio; Vázquez, Lourdes; Ramos, Fernando; Cuevas, Beatriz; Martín, Alejandro; Smucler, Alicia; Guerola, Dulce Nombre; Cantalapiedra, Alberto; Alonso, José María; Fernández, Silvia; Díez, Eva; Rodríguez, María Jesús; Calmuntia, María José; Aguilar, Carlos; Sierra, Magdalena; Gracia, José Antonio; Cebeira, María José; Cantalejo, Rosa

    2015-06-08

    We aimed to assess the incidence of haematological neoplasms (HNs) in Castilla y León (2,5 million inhabitants) and its distribution by age, gender and histological type. The epidemiological profile based on the described variables of the 10,943 HNs diagnosed during a 10-years period was analyzed, compared with other studies. The overall age-adjusted incidence was 29.4 cases/10(5) inhabitants-year, with some geographical differences. The mean age was 67.3 years, with a turning point between the 6th-7th decades of life from which there was a very significant increase of incidence. Two relevant facts where simultaneous with advancing age: decreased lymphoid neoplasms incidence and increased low degree neoplasms incidence. Lymphoid low degree neoplasms accounted for half of the registered processes, showed the greatest preference for male and reached the mode before the rest of neoplasms. Myeloid neoplasms incidence (9.5) was higher than that reported in other European registries, specially compared to southern European countries, opposite to lymphoid neoplasms incidence (20.0). A higher myeloid neoplasms incidence and lower lymphoid one than expected was observed. The turning point of incidence is between the 6th-7th decades of life, with a preference for male that decreases with age. There is an increased incidence of HNs in the area where a higher density of potentially polluting facilities is concentrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  15. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma cell neoplasms occur when abnormal plasma cells or myeloma cells form tumors in the bones or soft tissues of the body. Multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are different types of plasma cell neoplasms. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, diagnostic tests, prognosis, and treatment for these diseases.

  16. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F...

  17. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34 + cells, CD34 + blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34 + acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO + leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO + leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells

  18. CT differentiation of mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the liver from solitary bile duct cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jung; Yu, Eun Sil; Byun, Jae Ho; Hong, Seung-Mo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, So Yeon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the CT features required for differentiating mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the liver (mucinous cystic neoplasms and cyst-forming intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct) from solitary bile duct cysts. CT images of pathologically confirmed mucinous cystic neoplasms (n = 15), cyst-forming intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct (n = 16), and solitary bile duct cysts (n = 31) were reviewed. Analysis of the CT findings included shape, presence of septa, location of septa (peripheral vs central), thickness of septa (thin vs thick), mosaic pattern, mural nodules, intracystic debris, calcification, upstream bile duct dilatation, downstream bile duct dilatation, and communication between a cystic lesion and the bile duct. The maximum size of a cystic lesion and the maximum size of the largest mural nodule were measured. The presence of septa, central septa, mural nodules, upstream bile duct dilatation, and downstream bile duct dilatation were found to be significant CT findings for differentiating mucinous cystic neoplasms and cyst-forming intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct from solitary bile duct cysts (p bile duct were 87% (27 of 31) and 87% (27 of 31), respectively. When two of these five criteria were used in combination, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing mucinous cystic neoplasms and cyst-forming intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct were 87% (27 of 31) and 87% (27 of 31), respectively [corrected]. With the use of specific CT criteria, mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the liver can be differentiated from solitary bile duct cysts with a high degree of accuracy.

  19. Clinical Significance of Colonoscopy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Polyps and Neoplasms: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Jie; Lin, Yuan; Xiao, Jun; Wu, Liu-Cheng; Liu, Jun-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Background Some authors have studied the relationship between the presence of polyps, adenomas and cancers of upper gastrointestinal tract (stomach and duodenum) and risk of colorectal polyps and neoplasms; however, the results are controversial, which may be due to study sample size, populations, design, clinical features, and so on. No meta-analysis, which can be generalized to a larger population and could provide a quantitative pooled risk estimate of the relationship, of this issue existed so far. Methods We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate risk of colorectal polyps or neoplasms in patients with polyps, adenomas or cancers in upper gastrointestinal tract comparing with controls. A search was conducted through PubMed, EMBASE, reference lists of potentially relevant papers, and practice guidelines up to 27 November 2013 without languages restriction. Odd ratios (ORs) were pooled using random-effects models. Results The search yielded 3 prospective and 21 retrospective case-control studies (n = 37152 participants). The principal findings included: (1) OR for colorectal polyps was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.04–1.26) in the gastric polyps group comparing with control groups; (2) Patients with gastric polyps and neoplasms have higher risk (OR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.06–1.62], and 1.72 [95% CI, 1.42–2.09], respectively) of colorectal neoplasms comparing with their controls; and (3) Positive association was found between the presence of colorectal neoplasms and sporadic duodenal neoplasms (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.64–4.11). Conclusions Findings from present meta-analysis of 24 case-control studies suggest that the prevalence of colorectal polyps was higher in patients with gastric polyps than in those without gastric polyps, and the risk of colorectal neoplasms increases significantly in patients with gastric polyps, neoplasms, and duodenal neoplasms. Therefore, screening colonoscopy should be considered for patients with upper gastrointestinal polyps and neoplasms. PMID

  20. Thyroid neoplasms after radiation therapy for adolescent acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloyan, E.; Lawrence, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    There is a potential hazard of thyroid cancer after exposure to external irradiation for the treatment of adolescent acne vulgaris. We noted a 60% incidence of thyroid carcinoma among 20 patients with such a history, who were operated on for thyroid nodules during a five-year period. Eighty-three percent of the patients with carcinoma had either a follicular or a mixed papillary-follicular carcinoma; 17% had a papillary carcinoma; 33% had regional node metastases; none had evidence of distant metastases. The interval between radiation exposure and thyroidectomy ranged from nine to 41 years. This association of thyroid neoplasms and a prior history of radiation for acne vulgaris may be coincidental and therefore remains to be proved by retrospective surveys of large numbers of treated patients with appropriate controls

  1. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and neoplasms: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nilza N F; Caran, Eliana M; Lee, Maria Lucia; Silva, Nasjla Saba; Rocha, André Caroli; Macedo, Carla R D

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder exhibiting high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKC), palmar and plantar pits, bifid ribs, vertebral anomalies and a variety of other malformations. Various neoplasms, such as medulloblastomas, meningiomas, ovarian and cardiac fibromas are also found in this syndrome. To describe a twelve-year-old patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, with basal cell carcinomas and promyelocytic leukemia developed after receiving craniospinal radiation for a medulloblastoma. Bifid ribs as well as mandibular and maxillar OKC were also diagnosed Conclusion: The patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome should receive close follow-up for early detection of malformations nd malignant neoplasias.

  2. [Evidence on chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms from landmark clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the JAK2 gene are thought to underlie the development of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (cMPN). Indeed, ≥95% of polycythemia vera patients, and half or more of essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients, harbor the JAK2V617F mutation. Besides the JAK2V617F mutation, the JAK2 exon 12 deletion, the MPLW515L/K, and CALR mutation have been discovered and shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Based on these advancements in the study of cMPN, the JAK2 inhibitor was developed as a new therapy for PMF. Moreover, recent advancements in our ability to diagnose cMPN have paralleled the development of large clinical trials for patients with cMPN. This article provides explanatory information from these large clinical trials that is useful for the actual clinical practice of caring for patients with cMPN in Japan.

  3. Autopsy findings of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Ito, Jun; Tatezawa, Takashi; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Niibe, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Autopsy findings in 26 cases of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation were analysed and following results were obtained. 1. Causes of death except for neoplastic extension were 58% (15/26) and infection was the single predominant cause of death (73% : 11/15) with 50% (4/8) in lung cancer. 2. Distant metastases were found in 73% (19/26). In 7 cases, no obvious metastasis was found before and after autopsy. On the other hand, the patients with metastases over 2 organs before autopsy revealed metastases in 82% (9/11) to the other organs at autopsy. 3. Radiation therapy was effective and the primary tumor disappeared completely in 71% (10/14) with curative irradiation. In metastatic lesions, tumor cells were almost disappeared with dosage over 40 Gy. (author)

  4. CT diagnosis of hyperdense intracranial neoplasms. Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Tominaga, Satoru; Nakao, Norio; Ikeda, Jouta; Takemura, Yuriko; Morikawa, Tsutomu

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to typical astrocytic tumors that show hypodense areas on computed tomographic images, some intracranial tumors show hyperdense areas on CT images. The major reasons for hyperdensity on CT images are hypercellular lesions, intratumoral calcification, and intratumoral hemorrhage. Malignant lymphomas, germinomas, and medulloblastomas show homogenous hyperdensity on CT images because of their hypercellularity. Tumorous lesions such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, central neurocytomas, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas often present with hyperdense calcified lesions on CT images. Intratumoral hemorrhage also causes hyperdensity on CT images, and is often associated with metastatic brain tumors, glioblastomas, pituitary adenomas, and rarely with any of the other intracranial tumors. Although magnetic resonance imaging is now the major diagnostic tool for diseases of the central nervous system, the first imaging studies for patients with neurologic symptoms are still CT scans. Hyperdense areas on CT images are a clue to making an accurate diagnosis of intracranial neoplasms. (author)

  5. Uterine Rupture Due to Invasive Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Bruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While complete molar pregnancies are rare, they are wrought with a host of potential complications to include invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Persistent gestational trophoblastic disease following molar pregnancy is a potentially fatal complication that must be recognized early and treated aggressively for both immediate and long-term recovery. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman with abdominal pain and presyncope 1 month after a molar pregnancy with a subsequent uterine rupture due to invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasm. We will discuss the complications of molar pregnancies including the risks and management of invasive, metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:444–447.

  6. THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF RADIOACTIVE GOLD SEEDS IN NEOPLASMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachance, Paul; Vallee, A. F.

    1963-06-15

    A method and the apparatus for the treatment of neoplasms with Au/sup 198/ seeds are described. The introducer or gun is loaded with a magazine or cartridge containing 15 radioactive gold grains and then irradiated. The grains are cylinders made of gold encased in Pt with measurements of: length, 2.1 mm; diameter, 0.4 mm; weight, 25 mgm; platinum casing, 0.2 mm. The seeds are ready for use 7 to 10 days after irradiation or when gamma activity is around 3 to 4.5 mC per seed. A permanent implant gives to the tumor an approximate dose of 6000- 7000 r in 4 to 5 days. The effectiveness and advantages of the method are also discussed. (P.C.H.)

  7. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenker, J.G.; Levinsky, R.; Ohel, G.

    1984-01-01

    The data of an epidemiologic study of multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel are presented. During the 18-year period of the study 12,302 cases of breast carcinoma were diagnosed, and, of these, 984 patients (8%) had multiple primary malignant tumors. Forty-seven of these patients developed two multiple primary cancers. A significantly higher than expected incidence of second primary cancers occurred at the following five sites: the opposite breast, salivary glands, uterine corpus, ovary, and thyroid. Cancers of the stomach and gallbladder were fewer than expected. Treatment of the breast cancer by irradiation was associated with an increased risk of subsequent cancers of lung and hematopoietic system. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the site and malignancy of the second primary cancer. The incidence of multiple primary malignancies justifies a high level of alertness to this possibility in the follow-up of breast cancer patients

  8. Non-driver mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied non-driver mutations in 62 subjects with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN-associated myelofibrosis upon diagnosis, including 45 subjects with primary myelofibrosis (PMF and 17 with post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis (post-PV/ET MF. Fifty-eight subjects had ≥1 non-driver mutation upon diagnosis. Mutations in mRNA splicing genes, especially in U2AF1, were significantly more frequent in PMF than in post-PV/ET MF (33 vs. 6%; P = 0.015. There were also striking differences in clonal architecture. These data indicate different genomic spectrums between PMF and post-PV/ET MF.

  9. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  10. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN): the cutaneous sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileri, A; Delfino, C; Grandi, V; Agostinelli, C; Pileri, S A; Pimpinelli, N

    2012-12-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDNC) is a rare tumour, which stems from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Although the aetiology is still unclear, in the last few years various reports suggested a potential role of chromosomal aberrations in the oncogenesis. The disease is currently enclosed among "acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and related precursor neoplasms" in the last WHO classification. BPDCN has an aggressive course, however, it has been suggested that an exclusive cutaneous involvement at presentation is related to a better clinical outcome. We review the literature about BPDCN, and we present a series of 11 cases, all characterised by disease limited to the skin at presentation. Furthermore, we examined all cases of the last 10 years stored in the database of the multidisciplinary study group on cutaneous lymphomas of the University of Florence. Basing on the clinical features, patient were classified into two groups: with a single-lesion or multiple eruptive-lesions presentation. The former were treated with radiotherapy (limited field, electron beam therapy). The latter were treated with different therapeutic options, depending on age and co-morbidities. All patients with a single lesion achieved complete response. Five of 6 patients with eruptive lesions achieved a clinical response (2 complete and 3 partial response). Notably, the progression free survival was higher in the single-lesion than in the eruptive-lesion group (23 vs. 9 months). However all patients relapsed and 8 of 11 died. Although the small number of selected patients, we could speculate that the concept of "cutaneous sanctuary" is particularly true in patients with a single lesion-presentation. In these patients, especially if >70 year-old aged, radiotherapy should be encouraged as the treatment of choice.

  11. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-den Braber, Jacolien; Potting, Carin M J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The primary objective of this qualitative survey was to explore the following: (1) The understanding of dental care pre- and post-HSCT (2) The subjective oral complaints of HSCT patients both short- and long-term (3) The relationship of these oral complaints to the severity of oral mucositis during hospitalization The secondary objective was to explore the opinions of dentists regarding dental care before and after HSCT. All adult patients who survived HSCT at the Radboud University Medical Centre between 2010 and 2011 (n = 101) received a questionnaire. During hospitalization, mucositis scores were recorded daily in the patient's chart. The patients' dentist (n = 88) was also sent a questionnaire after permission of the patient. Ninety-six out of 101 patients (95%) responded. The average period since HSCT was 19 months (range 8-31 months). The overall mean maximum mucositis score was 6.6 (sd = 3.3). Only eight patients reported not having visited a dentist pre-HSCT. The majority of the patients (59%) reported short-term oral complaints, and 28% reported long-term oral complaints. Fifty-two dentists responded (59%). Nine had not performed pre-HSCT screening and eight dentists reported screening their patients but could not complete the necessary treatments. Only 44 dentists succeeded in completing the required treatments. The most important advice of the dentist was to reinforce the importance of regular dental care. Most patients report short-term and/or long-term oral complaints after HSCT. Most dentists stress the importance of regular dental care before and after HSCT but report not being familiar with the particular dental care needs of this patient group. The high

  12. Trasplante no mieloablativo de células hematopoyéticas Nonmyeloablative transplantation of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valia Pavón Morán

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante de células hematopoyéticas es una opción terapéutica para muchas enfermedades. Los tratamientos preparatorios convencionales están asociados con una alta morbimortalidad por toxicidad sobre órganos y tejidos, lo que limita su indicación a individuos jóvenes y con un estado de salud competente. El papel beneficioso del efecto injerto contra tumor y ante la evidencia de inducción de una nueva remisión con infusión de linfocitos del donante, en pacientes que recayeron después de un trasplante alogénico, sentaron las bases para el desarrollo de tratamientos preparatorios menos agresivos, no mieloablativos, pero sí intensamente inmunosupresores, que permitieran lograr la toma del injerto y un estado de quimerismo mixto que pudiera ser modulado a un estado de quimera total. Los resultados demuestran que puede lograrse el implante después de un tratamiento no mieloablativo. Actualmente están por determinarse los esquemas ideales, así como la terapia inmunosupresora postraThe transplantation of haematopoietic cells is a therapeutic option for many diseases. The conventional preparatory treatments are associated with a high morbimortality due to toxicity over organs and tissues, which limits their indications to young individuals and with a competent health status.The beneficial role of the graft versus tumor effect and the evidence of induction of a new remission with infusion of lymphocytes from the donor in patients that relapsed after an allogeneic transplant, laid the foundations for the development of less aggressive and nonmyeloablative but intensively immunosupressor preparatory treatments that would allow the taking of the graft and a state of mixed chimerism that may be modulated by a state of total chimera. The results show that the implant may be attained after a nonmyeloablative treatment. At present, the ideal schemes, as well as the posttransplant immunosupressor therapy are to be determined

  13. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs - data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Methods Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). Conclusions In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans. Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a

  1. Critical effective methods to detect genotoxic carcinogens and neoplasm-promoting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburger, J H; Williams, G M

    1991-01-01

    Neoplasia in fish can result from contamination of waters with carcinogens and promoters. Cancer in fish, therefore, is a possible indicator of cancer risk to man and serves as a guide to the need for preventive approaches involving improved means of waste disposal and environmental hygiene. Moreover, cancer in fish indicates that this important food source may be contaminated. Detection of genotoxic carcinogens to which fish are exposed can be achieved quickly and efficiently by carefully selected batteries of complementary in vitro and in vivo bioassays. One such battery consists of the Ames test, a reverse mutation assay in prokaryotic Salmonella typhimurium, and the Williams test, involving DNA repair in freshly explanted metabolically highly competent liver cells from diverse species, including humans. Determination of DNA-carcinogen adducts by varied techniques, including 32P-postlabeling, as well as DNA breakage, mammalian cell mutagenicity, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, or cell transformation represent additional approaches, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. More research is needed on systems to apprehend neoplasm promoters, but tests to determine interruption of intercellular communications through gap junctions appear promising. Other approaches rely on measurement of enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase and protein kinase C. Approaches to the definition of risk to fish or humans require characterization of the genotoxic or nongenotoxic properties of a chemical, relative potency data obtained in select, limited rodent bioassays, and knowledge of prevailing environmental concentrations of specific carcinogens.

  2. Molecular Diagnostics in the Neoplasms of Small Intestine and Appendix: 2018 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Zulfiqar, Muhammad; Bluth, Martin H; Bhalla, Amarpreet; Beydoun, Rafic

    2018-06-01

    Neoplasms of the small intestine are rare in comparison with colorectal tumors. The most common tumor types arising in the small intestine are adenocarcinomas, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and lymphoma. Primary appendiceal neoplasms are rare and found in less than 2% of appendectomy specimens with an incidence of approximately 1.2 cases per 100,000 people per year in the United States. This article explores molecular diagnostics in the neoplasms of small intestine and appendix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor registry data, Hiroshima and Nagasaki 1957-1959: malignant neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Tomin; Ide, Masao; Ishida, Morihiro; Troup, G M

    1963-10-03

    The report concerns three aspects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Tumor Registry data, 1957-1959: comparability, reliability and validity of incidence rates of malignant neoplasms obtained from the Tumor Registries and various statistical problems of registered data related to the Life Span Study sample and Adult Health Study sample; incidence rates of main site of malignant neoplasms obtained from the Tumor Registries are compared with those of the United States and Denmark; and incidence of malignant neoplasm among Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. 15 references, 7 figures, 30 tables.

  4. Simultaneous liver mucinous cystic and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzynska, Agnieszka; Hartleb, Marek; Nowakowska-Dulawa, Ewa; Krol, Robert; Remiszewski, Piotr; Mazurkiewicz, Michal

    2014-04-14

    Cystic hepatic neoplasms are rare tumors, and are classified into two separate entities: mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct (IPMN-B). We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and jaundice due to the presence of a large hepatic multilocular cystic tumor associated with an intraductal tumor. Partial hepatectomy with resection of extrahepatic bile ducts demonstrated an intrahepatic MCN and an intraductal IPMN-B. This is the first report of the simultaneous occurrence of these two histologically distinct entities in the liver.

  5. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura: a rare but usually benign intrathoracic neoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low forced expiratory volume (FEV(1)) and low performance status usually preclude surgical treatment of lung neoplasms. Earlier case reports have suggested that curative, safe surgery is possible in extrapulmonal intrathoracic neoplasms. METHODS: A case report of an 83-year-old women...... with progressing dyspnoea secondary to a huge left-side neoplasm. RESULTS: Work-up reveal an FEV(1) of 0.4 L, and a giant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura. The tumor was surgically removed in toto without complications: weighting approximately 3 kg, and benign histology. The patient was without dyspnoea...

  6. Molecular mechanisms associated with leukemic transformation of MPL-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A; Ortmann, Christina A; Stegelmann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Somatic activating mutations in MPL, the thrombopoietin receptor, occur in the myeloproliferative neoplasms, although virtually nothing is known about their role in evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, the MPL T487A mutation, identified in de novo acute myeloid leukemia......, was not detected in 172 patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm. In patients with a prior MPL W515L-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasm, leukemic transformation was accompanied by MPL-mutant leukemic blasts, was seen in the absence of prior cytoreductive therapy and often involved loss of wild-type MPL...

  7. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genetic heterogeneity in myeloid neoplasms uncovered by comprehensive mutational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While growing use of comprehensive mutational analysis has led to the discovery of innumerable genetic alterations associated with various myeloid neoplasms, the under-recognized phenomenon of genetic heterogeneity within such neoplasms creates a potential for diagnostic confusion. Here, we describe two cases where expanded mutational testing led to amendment of an initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with subsequent altered treatment of each patient. We demonstrate the power of comprehensive testing in ensuring appropriate classification of genetically heterogeneous neoplasms, and emphasize thoughtful analysis of molecular and genetic data as an essential component of diagnosis and management.

  8. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J.; Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Else, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  9. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Else, Tobias [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  10. Current approaches to challenging scenarios in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimran, Eran; Hoffman, Ronald; Kremyanskaya, Marina

    2018-06-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis are clonal hematological malignancies that originate at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell, and are characterized by excessive proliferation of cells belonging to one or more of the myeloid lineages. Central to the pathogenesis of the MPNs is constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway due to a family of driver mutations affecting JAK2, CALR or MPL. These disorders share common clinical and laboratory features, a significant burden of systemic symptoms, increased risk of developing arterial and venous thrombotic events, and the potential to progress to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. Areas covered: We identified four clinical situations which represent challenging management dilemmas for patients with MPNs. Our conclusions and recommendations are based on a literature search using MEDLINE and recent meeting abstracts using the keywords, focusing on publications directly addressing these scenarios and on recent contributions to the field. Expert commentary: Multi-center efforts to study large cohorts of MPN patients have led to more uniform and evidence-based approaches to key aspects in MPN management. However, treatment strategies to deal with specific clinical scenarios are lacking.

  11. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, I.

    1982-01-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility

  12. Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas in a male patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yoshida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs make up a morphologic family of similar appearing tumors arising in the ovary and various extraovarian organs such as pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and mesentery. MCNs of the pancreas occur almost exclusively in women. Here, we report a rare case of MCN in a male patient. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of back pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a multilocular cyctic mass 6.3 cm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. In addition, the outer wall and septae with calcification were demonstrated in the cystic lesion. On magnetic resonance imaging , the cystic fluid had low intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high intensity on T2-weighted imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP showed neither communication between the cystic lesion and the main pancreatic duct nor encasement of the main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed neither solid component nor thickness of the septae in the cystic lesion. Consequently, we performed distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy under the diagnosis of cystic neoplasia of the pancreas. Histopathologically, the cystic lesion showed two distinct component: an inner epithelial layer and an outer densely cellular ovarian-type stromal layer. Based on these findings, the cystic lesion was diagnosed as MCN.

  13. AKT is a therapeutic target in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Huang, Z; Wen, Q; Stankiewicz, M J; Gilles, L; Goldenson, B; Schultz, R; Diebold, L; Gurbuxani, S; Finke, C M; Lasho, T L; Koppikar, P; Pardanani, A; Stein, B; Altman, J K; Levine, R L; Tefferi, A; Crispino, J D

    2013-09-01

    The majority of patients with BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) harbor mutations in JAK2 or MPL, which lead to constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT, PI3K and ERK signaling pathways. JAK inhibitors by themselves are inadequate in producing selective clonal suppression in MPN and are associated with hematopoietic toxicities. MK-2206 is a potent allosteric AKT inhibitor that was well tolerated, including no evidence of myelosuppression, in a phase I study of solid tumors. Herein, we show that inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling by MK-2206 affected the growth of both JAK2V617F- or MPLW515L-expressing cells via reduced phosphorylation of AKT and inhibition of its downstream signaling molecules. Moreover, we demonstrate that MK-2206 synergizes with ruxolitinib in suppressing the growth of JAK2V617F-mutant SET2 cells. Importantly, MK-2206 suppressed colony formation from hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with primary myelofibrosis and alleviated hepatosplenomegaly and reduced megakaryocyte burden in the bone marrows, livers and spleens of mice with MPLW515L-induced MPN. Together, these findings establish AKT as a rational therapeutic target in the MPNs.

  14. Current trend of malignant neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao

    1984-01-01

    A survey was made on 7,589 admitted patients and 1,965 autopsy cases. The overall incidence of malignant neoplasms tended to decrease in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases and to increase in admitted patients. The incidence of pulmonary cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of gastric cancer tended to increase up to 1975, and thereafter tended to decrease. The incidence of liver cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients, which was marked in males. The incidence of leukemia was high in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases, and in the group within 1 km and the group which entered the city after the explosion in admitted patients. The incidence of malignant lymphoma tended to decrease, and the incidence of carcinoma of the colon tended to gradually increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of multiple carcinomas tended to increase in both atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group, being higher in atomic bomb group than in non-exposed group. The incidence of breast cancer became constant since 1970. The incidence of carcinoma of the thyroid gland tended to decrease, although it was high in the group exposed near the explosion. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Targeted cancer exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenedini, E; Bernardis, I; Artusi, V; Artuso, L; Roncaglia, E; Guglielmelli, P; Pieri, L; Bogani, C; Biamonte, F; Rotunno, G; Mannarelli, C; Bianchi, E; Pancrazzi, A; Fanelli, T; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, G; Ferrari, S; Manfredini, R; Vannucchi, A M; Tagliafico, E

    2014-01-01

    With the intent of dissecting the molecular complexity of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we designed a target enrichment panel to explore, using next-generation sequencing (NGS), the mutational status of an extensive list of 2000 cancer-associated genes and microRNAs. The genomic DNA of granulocytes and in vitro-expanded CD3+T-lymphocytes, as a germline control, was target-enriched and sequenced in a learning cohort of 20 MPN patients using Roche 454 technology. We identified 141 genuine somatic mutations, most of which were not previously described. To test the frequency of the identified variants, a larger validation cohort of 189 MPN patients was additionally screened for these mutations using Ion Torrent AmpliSeq NGS. Excluding the genes already described in MPN, for 8 genes (SCRIB, MIR662, BARD1, TCF12, FAT4, DAP3, POLG and NRAS), we demonstrated a mutation frequency between 3 and 8%. We also found that mutations at codon 12 of NRAS (NRASG12V and NRASG12D) were significantly associated, for primary myelofibrosis (PMF), with highest dynamic international prognostic scoring system (DIPSS)-plus score categories. This association was then confirmed in 66 additional PMF patients composing a final dataset of 168 PMF showing a NRAS mutation frequency of 4.7%, which was associated with a worse outcome, as defined by the DIPSS plus score. PMID:24150215

  16. Meningioma as second malignant neoplasm after oncological treatment during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.L.; Gebhardt, U. [Klinikum Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Pietsch, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Soerensen, N. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kortmann, R.D. [University Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2012-05-15

    A total of 38 patients (18 female/20 male) with childhood meningioma were recruited from the German registry HIT-Endo (1989-2009). In 5 cases meningioma occurred as second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Histologies were confirmed by reference assessment in all cases (SMN: 2 WHO I, 1 WHO II, 2 WHO III). The SMNs were diagnosed at a median age of 12.4 years with a median latency of 10.2 years after primary malignancy (PMN; 4 brain tumors, 1 lymphoblastic leukemia; median age at diagnosis 2.7 years). Meningioma occurred as SMN in the irradiated field of PMN (range 12-54 Gy). The outcome after treatment of SMN meningioma (surgery/irradiation) was favorable in terms of psychosocial status and functional capacity in 4 of 5 patients (1 death). We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who were exposed to radiation therapy at young age harbor the risk of developing meningioma as a SMN at a particularly short latency period in case of high dose exposure. (orig.)

  17. Parathyroid carcinoma: an unusual presentation of a rare neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti, Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid carcinoma is an extremely rare malignant endocrine neoplasm that is very challenging in its diagnosis as well as its treatment. Clinically the disease is detected earlier in patients who present with hyperparathyroidism with signs of profound hypercalcemia. Differentiation between benign and malignant disease of the parathyroid is challenging both for the clinician and for the pathologist. Complete surgical resection at the time of first operation offers the best chance of cure. Even after radical excision which is the standard management, local recurrence and metastases are frequent. The disease usually has a slow indolent course and most patients suffer from complications of hypercalcemia rather than tumor invasion or metastasis.We report a case of a 31-year-old woman who presented with renal colic. Various hematological, biochemical and radiological investigations were performed and a slightly enlarged right parathyroid was found. A clinical diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma was made and a right parathyroidectomy was done. Intraoperatively the surgeon had no suspicion of malignancy but microscopically the lesion was malignant and a final diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma was rendered based on the criteria of invasion. Since there is no gold standard, a multidisciplinary approach, including the entire clinical, biochemical, radiological and pathological profile of the disease aids in an accurate diagnosis. Here we are reporting a case of a functional parathyroid carcinoma presenting in a relatively young patient with all the biochemical and radiological investigations and findings pointing towards a benign parathyroid disease.

  18. Microvessel and mast cell densities in malignant laryngeal neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balica Nicolae Constantin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal neoplasm contributes to 30-40% of carcinomas of the head and neck. Mast cells are normal connective tissue residents, well represented in the respiratory tract. Experimental evidence suggests that the growth of a tumor beyond a certain size requires angiogenesis, which may also permit metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between mast cell density, microvascular density, histopathological type and histological grade. Our study included 38 laryngeal carcinomas as follows: adenoid cystic carcinoma (2 cases, malignant papilloma (2 cases and squamous cell carcinoma (34 cases. The combined technique of CD 34-alcian blue safranin (ABS was used to identify microvessel and mast cell density, which was quantified by the hot spot method. A significant correlation was found between both mast cell and microvascular density, and G1/G2 histological grade (p=0.002 and p=0.004, respectively. Squamous cell carcinoma was significantly correlated with mast cell density (p=0.003, but not with microvascular density (p=0.454.

  19. Impact of Inflammation on Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Geyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (essential thrombocythemia, ET; polycythemia vera, PV; myelofibrosis, MF are monoclonal malignancies associated with genomic instability, dysregulated signaling pathways, and subsequent overproduction of inflammatory markers. Acknowledged for their debilitating symptom profiles, recent investigations have aimed to determine the identity of these markers, the upstream sources stimulating their development, their prevalence within the MPN population, and the role they play in symptom development. Creation of dedicated Patient Reported Outcome (PRO tools, in combination with expanded access to cytokine analysis technology, has resulted in a surge of investigations evaluating the potential associations between symptoms and inflammation. Emerging data demonstrates clear relationships between individual MPN symptoms (fatigue, abdominal complaints, microvascular symptoms, and constitutional symptoms and cytokines, particularly IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. Information is also compiling on the role symptoms paradoxically play in the development of cytokines, as in the case of fatigue-driven sedentary lifestyles. In this paper, we explore the symptoms inherent to the MPN disorders and the potential role inflammation plays in their development.

  20. Defining the Thrombotic Risk in Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Vianello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycythemia vera (PV and essential thrombocythemia (ET are two Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN associated with an acquired mutation in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase gene. There is a rare incidence of progression to myelofibrosis and myeloid metaplasia in both disorders, which may or may not precede transformation to acute myeloid leukemia, but thrombosis is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of thrombosis in patients with MPN is complex. Traditionally, abnormalities of platelet number and function have been claimed as the main players, but increased dynamic interactions between platelets, leukocytes, and the endothelium do probably represent a fundamental interplay in generating a thrombophilic state. In addition, endothelial dysfunction, a well-known risk factor for vascular disease, may play a role in the thrombotic risk of patients with PV and ET. The identification of plasma markers translating the hemostatic imbalance in patients with PV and ET would be extremely helpful in order to define the subgroup of patients with a significant clinical risk of thrombosis.

  1. Cytokine Regulation of Microenvironmental Cells in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Hoermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases including not only polycythemia vera (PV, essential thrombocythemia (ET, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF, but also chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and systemic mastocytosis (SM. Despite the clinical and biological differences between these diseases, common pathophysiological mechanisms have been identified in MPN. First, aberrant tyrosine kinase signaling due to somatic mutations in certain driver genes is common to these MPN. Second, alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment are found in all MPN types and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Finally, elevated levels of proinflammatory and microenvironment-regulating cytokines are commonly found in all MPN-variants. In this paper, we review the effects of MPN-related oncogenes on cytokine expression and release and describe common as well as distinct pathogenetic mechanisms underlying microenvironmental changes in various MPN. Furthermore, targeting of the microenvironment in MPN is discussed. Such novel therapies may enhance the efficacy and may overcome resistance to established tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in these patients. Nevertheless, additional basic studies on the complex interplay of neoplastic and stromal cells are required in order to optimize targeting strategies and to translate these concepts into clinical application.

  2. Trisomy 19 as the sole chromosomal anomaly in hematologic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, B; Billström, R; Mauritzson, N; Mitelman, F

    1994-05-01

    Trisomy 19 was found as the sole chromosomal aberration in three hematologic malignancies: one chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and two cases of of immunophenotypically immature acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A compilation of previously published hematologic neoplasms with +19 as the only change reveals that this anomaly is strongly associated with myeloid malignancies; 25 of 31 cases have been myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or AML. Eight of the 11 MDS cases have been either refractory anemia (RA) or RA with excess of blasts, and four of the 14 AML cases have had preleukemic myelodysplastic cases phase, with the +19 accruing during the time of leukemic transformation. The AML cases have, in general, been either or early maturation arrest, i.e. undifferentiated or AML-M1/M2, or of myelomonocytic-monoblastic origin, i.e., AML-M4/M5. None of the MDS or AML cases with +19 had had a previous history of radio- or chemotherapy. We conclude that trisomy 19, as the sole anomaly, is a characteristic abnormality in de novo myeloid malignancies. No clinical features seem to characterize patients with +19 AML and MDS and the prognostic impact of the aberration remains to be elucidated.

  3. Interaction of Haematopoietic Tissue Cultures of the Dublin Bay Prawn,Nephrops Norvegicus(L.),with the Causal Agent of Luminous Vibriosis Vibrio Harveyi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mulford A.L.; ZHANG X.H.; XU H. S.; Austin B.

    2002-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi cells (dose = > 103 cells mL 1) and extracellular products (ECP; >25μg m L-1 of total protein concentration) destroyed haematopoietic cultures of Nephrops norvegicus within 24 h of exposure. Cytopathic effects (CPE)started after 4 h of exposure to the bacterial cells, with some granularity in the cytoplasm, mostly in cells in the outer periphery of the explant growth. At the end of the infection, a considerable number of nuclei remained attached to the substrate,apparently unaffected. Following exposure to ECP, initial deterioration was observed at 2 h with the presence of granularity in the cytoplasm of< 20% cells, and few cells displayed small vacuoles around the nuclei. Parallel results were obtained using whole animal experiments, with V. harveyi cells being lethal to nephrops within 24 h.

  4. Interaction of haematopoietic tissue cultures of the Dublin Bay Prawn, Nephrops norvegicus (L.), with the causal agent of luminous vibriosis Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulford, A. L.; Zhang, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Austin, B.

    2002-04-01

    Vibrio harveyi cells (dose—25 μmg mL-1 of total protein concentration) destroyed haematopoietic cultures of Nephrops norvegicus within 24 h of exposure. Cytopathic effects (CPE) started after 4h of exposure to the bacterial cells, with some granularity in the cytoplasm, mostly in cells in the outer periphery of the explant growth. At the end of the infection, a considerable number of nuclei remained attached to the substrate, apparently unaffected. Following exposure to ECP, initial deterioration was observed at 2 h with the presence of granularity in the cytoplasm of<20% cells, and few cells displayed small vacuoles around the nuclei. Parallel results were obtained using whole animal experiments, with V. harveyi cells being lethal to nephrops within 24 h.

  5. Microsatellite Status of Primary Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Incidence of Postoperative Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Aki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Hata, Keisuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms stratified by the nature of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we revealed it on the basis of the microsatellite (MS) status of primary CRC. We retrospectively reviewed 338 patients with CRC and calculated the risk of neoplasms during postoperative surveillance colonoscopy in association with the MS status of primary CRC. A propensity score method was applied. We identified a higher incidence of metachronous rectal neoplasms after the resection of MS stable CRC than MS instable CRC (adjusted HR 5.74, p=0.04). We also observed a higher incidence of colorectal tubular adenoma in patients with MSS CRC (adjusted hazard ratio 7.09, pcolorectal cancer influenced the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of errors during medical and computerized diagnostics of spherical lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozmogov, A.I.; Petruk, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for errors in medical and computerized diagnostics of spherical lung neoplasms are studied based on material of 212 case records and clinicoroentgenological data; it should promote improvement of their diagnostics

  7. An extremely rare neoplasm, histiocytic sarcoma: A report of two cases with an aggressive clinical course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kayikcioglu

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: HS is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm of the monocytic/macrophage lineage, with no standardized chemotherapy regimen for multisystemic disease. Metastatic patients have a more aggressive clinical course than those with unifocal disease.

  8. Increased gene expression of histone deacetylases in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Myeloproliferation, myeloaccumulation (decreased apoptosis), inflammation, bone marrow fibrosis and angiogenesis are cardinal features of the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF...

  9. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and subsequent cancer risk: a Danish population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are at increased risk of new hematologic malignancies, but their risk of nonhematologic malignancies remains unknown. In the present study, we...

  10. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for bile duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Shi-Hong; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Qi-Dong; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Chen, Feng; Xiao, Wen-Bo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct (IPMN-B).

  11. Esophageal and stomach malignant neoplasms characterization at Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Razuk Filho; Júlio César Martinez

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: the aim of this study is to collect and organize data on the incidence and prevalence of patients with malignant neoplasms of the esophagus and stomach in Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba of the past six years. Methods: we conducted a survey of data on incidence, prevalence, age and sex of patients with malignant neoplasms of the esophagus and stomach that were admitted, treated and/or surgery at Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, in the last six years. Results: we analyz...

  12. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pushpender, E-mail: pugupta@wakehealth.edu; Allen, Brian C., E-mail: bcallen2@wakehealth.edu; Chen, Michael Y., E-mail: mchen@wakehealth.edu; Childs, David D., E-mail: dchilds@wakehealth.edu; Kota, Gopi, E-mail: gkota@wakehealth.edu; Zagoria, Ronald J., E-mail: rzagoria@wakehealth.edu [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  13. A case series of clinically undiagnosed hematopoietic neoplasms discovered at autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Varsha; Guileyardo, Joseph M; Soto, Luis R; Krause, John R

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, autopsy rates have diminished to less than 5% during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century for a multitude of reasons. Many believe this results in unrecognized malignancies that could have explained a patient's death. We describe six deaths in which hematopoietic neoplasms were identified at autopsy but were not diagnosed clinically. The six undiagnosed hematopoietic malignancy cases discovered at autopsy include four men and two women ranging from 50 to 78 years of age. One patient was African American and five patients were white, all with multiple comorbidities. The tumors included diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, activated B-cell type, intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a setting of human immunodeficiency virus, and a myeloid sarcoma. These cases illustrate the importance of the traditional postmortem examination in not only confirming clinical diagnoses but also identifying previously unknown diagnoses. Hematologic malignancies may present with nonspecific clinical manifestations, and this series of cases also emphasizes the necessity for widening the differential diagnosis in patients with unexplained lactic acidosis and hepatic failure to include hematopoietic malignancies since prompt treatment may be lifesaving. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  14. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Su; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher in the stomach cancer group (35.8%) than in the control group (17.9%) (P neoplasms were more prevalent in the patients with stomach cancer (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 5.63). In particular, the difference in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was more prominent in the patients above 50 years old (OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.80 to 6.98). Conclusion The results showed that the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was higher in patients with stomach cancer than in those without stomach cancer. Therefore, patients with stomach cancer should be regarded as a high-risk group for colorectal neoplasms, and colonoscopy should be recommended for screening. PMID:22102975

  15. Impact of oral hygiene on the development of oropharyngeal neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kiparisova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the impact of oral hygiene on the development of oropharyngeal malignancies.Subjects and methods. The data of a prospective study of dental health indicators were analyzed in 586 patients (there were 76.4 % men and 23.6 % women with oropharyngeal malignancies. In the examinees, the sites of oropharyngeal neoplasms were as follows: the tongue in 195 (33 % cases, mouth floor in 147 (25 %, oropharynx in 139 (24 %, maxilla in 36 (6 %, buccal mucosa in 21 (4 %, soft palate in 18 (3 %, retromolar area in 14 (2 %, mandibula in 12 (2 %, and nose in 4 (1 %. The patients, examination employed routine dental examinations, determination of oral hygiene index, CFE index (a sum of carious, filled, and extracted teeth, and assessment of a patient, s skill and desire to perform individual oral hygiene. The patient hygiene performance (PHP index (Podshadley, Haley, 1968 was used to estimate his/her baseline ability. The rates of initial visits made by patients with oropharyngeal tumors to physicians of different specialties were also analyzed.Results. In the patients with oropharyngeal malignancies, the CFE index was high and amounted to 15 ± 0.4 с with a preponderance of carious and extracted teeth in the pattern; the PHP index was 1.4 ± 0.1, which corresponded to a satisfactory index. Thus, among the comparison group patients, satisfactory oral cavity sanitation was noted in only 4.8 % of the patients having a sanitation certificate. Consequently, 95.2 % of the patients were unready for specialized treatment. Out of the examinees, 176 (30 % made an initial visit for complaints to a dentist, 155 (26.5 % to an oncologist, 107 (18.3 % to an ENT doctor, 103 (17.7 % to a local therapist, and 43 (7.5 % to a surgeon. The collected history data also revealed that 59.2 % of the patients had self-treatment before going to specialists (according to them. Self-treatment or treatment by a noncancer specialist was ascertained to take an average of

  16. Peritoneal dissemination complicating morcellation of uterine mesenchymal neoplasms.

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    Michael A Seidman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Power morcellation has become a common technique for the minimally invasive resection of uterine leiomyomas. This technique is associated with dissemination of cellular material throughout the peritoneum. When morcellated uterine tumors are unexpectedly found to be leiomyosarcomas or tumors with atypical features (atypical leiomyoma, smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential, there may be significant clinical consequences. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency and clinical consequence of intraperitoneal dissemination of these neoplasms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From 2005-2010, 1091 instances of uterine morcellation were identified at BWH. Unexpected diagnoses of leiomyoma variants or atypical and malignant smooth muscle tumors occurred in 1.2% of cases using power morcellation for uterine masses clinically presumed to be "fibroids" over this period, including one endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS, one cellular leiomyoma (CL, six atypical leiomyomas (AL, three smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMPs, and one leiomyosarcoma (LMS. The rate of unexpected sarcoma after the laparoscopic morcellation procedure was 0.09%, 9-fold higher than the rate currently quoted to patients during pre-procedure briefing, and this rate may increase over time as diagnostically challenging or under-sampled tumors manifest their biological potential. Furthermore, when examining follow-up laparoscopies, both from in-house and consultation cases, disseminated disease occurred in 64.3% of all tumors (zero of one ESS, one of one CL, zero of one AL, four of four STUMPs, and four of seven LMS. Only disseminated leiomyosarcoma, however, was associated with mortality. Procedures are proposed for pathologic evaluation of morcellation specimens and associated follow-up specimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While additional study is warranted, these data suggest uterine morcellation carries a risk of disseminating

  17. Role of imprint/exfoliative cytology in ulcerated skin neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Babu, Ravindra; Pai, Dinker; Verma, Surendra Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Imprint cytology is a method of studying cells by taking an imprint from the cut surface of a wedge biopsy specimen or from the resected margins of a surgical specimen. It is rapid, simple and fairly accurate. Exfoliative cytology is an offshoot from the imprint cytology where in cells obtained from the surface of ulcers, either by scrape or brush, are analyzed for the presence of malignant cells. We undertook this study to see the role of imprint/exfoliative cytology in the diagnosis of ulcerated skin neoplasm and to check the adequacy of resected margins intra-operatively. This was a prospective investigative study conducted from September 2003 to July 2005. All patients presenting to surgical clinic with ulcerated skin and soft tissue tumours were included in the study. A wedge biopsy obtained from the ulcer and imprint smears were taken from the cut surface. Exfoliative cytology was analyzed from the surface smears. Wedge biopsy specimen was sent for histopathological (HPE) examination. The cytology and HPE were analyzed by a separate pathologist. Imprint cytology was also used to check the adequacy of resected margins in case of wide excision. This was compared with final HPE. Total of 107 patients was included in the present study and 474 imprint smears were done, with an average of 4.43 slides per lesion. Out of 59 wide excision samples, 132 imprint smears were prepared for assessing resected margins accounting for an average of 2.24 slides per each excised lesion. On combining imprint cytology with exfoliative cytology the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were 90.38 %, 100 % and 90.38 % respectively. Only one out of 59 cases had a positive resected margin which was not picked by imprint cytology. Imprint cytology can be used for rapid and accurate diagnosis of various skin malignancies. It can also be used to check the adequacy of the resected margin intraoperatively.

  18. Minichromosome Maintenance Expression Defines Slow-Growing Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schimmack

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm (SI-NEN proliferation is quantified by Ki67 measurements which capture G1-G2M phases of the cell cycle. G0 and early G1 phases, typical of slow-growing cells, can be detected by minichromosome maintenance protein (MCM expression. We hypothesized that these replication licensing markers may provide clinically relevant information to augment Ki67 in low-grade neuroendocrine neoplasia. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining (IHC, Western blot analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and copy number variations of MCM2, MCM3, and Ki67 were undertaken in SI-NENs (n = 22. MCM and Ki67 expression was compared by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (tissue microarray, independent set [n = 55]. Forty-three pancreatic NENs and 14 normal tissues were included as controls. RESULTS: In SI-NENs, MCM2 (mean: 21.2%: range: 16%-25% and MCM3 (28.7%: 22%-34% were detected in significantly more cells than Ki67 (2.3%: 0%-7%, P < .01. MCM2 mRNA correlated with Ki67 IHC (P < .05. MCM3 protein expression was higher in metastases (38-fold than in normal small intestine (P = .06 and was largely absent in normal neuroendocrine cells. There was considerable variation at the MCM copy number level (0-4 copies. MCM3 expression in proliferating cells significantly predicted overall survival (P < .002. Combinations of Ki67 and MCM2/3 in algorithms differentiated low and higher proliferative lesions (overall survival: 12 vs 6.1 years, P = .06. MCM expression was not informative in pancreatic NENs. CONCLUSION: MCMs are expressed in a higher proportion of NEN cells than Ki67 in slow-growing small intestinal lesions and correlate with survival. Assessment can be used to augment Ki67 to improve prognostic classification in these low-grade tumors.

  19. Thermal and epithermal neutrons in the treatment of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.H.; Wellum, G.; Tolpin, E.; Messer, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the preparation and testing of boron compounds for use as targets in the neutron capture therapy of neoplasms. The synthesis and structural confirmation of the disulfide, B 1 H 11 SSB 12 H 11 -4 is reported as well as a new structural model for its mono-oxidized derivative, B 12 H 11 SOSB 12 H 11 -4 , which showed useful tumor:blood concentration ratios in rats after three I. V. injections. The material, B 12 H 11 (SH) 2 -2 , was isolated and identified from impure Cs 2 B 12 H 11 SH. The former anion was shown to be responsible, in its oxidized form, for the excellent tumor uptake results shown by impure B 12 H 11 SH -2 in the past. As a consequence of this work, a borane polymer was synthesized which has shown extremely encouraging tumor uptake properties. The synthesis of this polymer depended on our production and characterization of the first stable thiyl radical at room temperature, B 12 H 11 -S: -2 . The retesting of certain phosphate boranes is reported. And a reagent, namely acetyl sulfenyl chloride, lSCOCH 3 , has been found which will produce B 12 H 11 SH -2 in a laboratory synthesis. The ability of sulfur derivatives of B 12 H 11 SH -2 to bind to proteins was examined, as was the blood distribution of two of these interesting boranes. The amount of non-protein bound borane was related to the rate of blood clearance of the borane in rats. Progress is also reported on dog irradiation experiments. (U.S.)

  20. Secondary myeloid neoplasms: bone marrow cytogenetic and histological features may be relevant to prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Sandra da Silva Tanizawa

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Secondary myeloid neoplasms comprise a group of diseases arising after chemotherapy, radiation, immunosuppressive therapy or from aplastic anemia. Few studies have addressed prognostic factors in these neoplasms. Method: Forty-two patients diagnosed from 1987 to 2008 with secondary myeloid neoplasms were retrospectively evaluated concerning clinical, biochemical, peripheral blood, bone marrow aspirate, biopsy, and immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic features at diagnosis as prognostic factors. The International Prognostic Scoring System was applied. Statistical analysis employed the Kaplan–Meier method, log-rank and Fisher's exact test. Results: Twenty-three patients (54.8% were male and the median age was 53.5 years (range: 4–88 years at diagnosis of secondary myeloid neoplasms. Previous diseases included hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, aplastic anemia, autoimmune diseases and conditions requiring solid organ transplantations. One third of patients (33% were submitted to chemotherapy alone, 2% to radiotherapy, 26% to both modalities and 28% to immunosuppressive agents. Five patients (11.9% had undergone autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The median latency between the primary disease and secondary myeloid neoplasms was 85 months (range: 23–221 months. Eight patients were submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to treat secondary myeloid neoplasms. Important changes in bone marrow were detected mainly by biopsy, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics. The presence of clusters of CD117+ cells and p53+ cells were associated with low survival. p53 was associated to a higher risk according to the International Prognostic Scoring System. High prevalence of clonal abnormalities (84.3% and thrombocytopenia (78.6% were independent factors for poor survival. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that cytogenetics, bone marrow biopsy and immunohistochemistry are very important

  1. Bortezomib as a new therapeutic approach for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Laure; Ceroi, Adam; Bôle-Richard, Elodie; Jenvrin, Alizée; Biichle, Sabeha; Perrin, Sophie; Limat, Samuel; Bonnefoy, Francis; Deconinck, Eric; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny

    2017-11-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a poor prognosis. No consensus regarding optimal treatment modalities is currently available. Targeting the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway is considered a promising approach since blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm has been reported to exhibit constitutive activation of this pathway. Moreover, nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines, achieved using either an experimental specific inhibitor JSH23 or the clinical drug bortezomib, interferes in vitro with leukemic cell proliferation and survival. Here we extended these data by showing that primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells from seven patients were sensitive to bortezomib-induced cell death. We confirmed that bortezomib efficiently inhibits the phosphorylation of the RelA nuclear factor-kappa B subunit in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines and primary cells from patients in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model. We then demonstrated that bortezomib can be associated with other drugs used in different chemotherapy regimens to improve its impact on leukemic cell death. Indeed, when primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells from a patient were grafted into mice, bortezomib treatment significantly increased the animals' survival, and was associated with a significant decrease of circulating leukemic cells and RelA nuclear factor-kappa B subunit expression. Overall, our results provide a rationale for the use of bortezomib in combination with other chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Based on our data, a prospective clinical trial combining proteasome inhibitor with classical drugs could be envisaged. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Imaging features of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yubao; Li Meng; Zhong Xiaomei; Liu Zaiyi; Liang Changhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT and MRI features of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB). Methods: Thirty eight patients with IPNB finally diagnosed by puncture biopsy or surgery were enrolled in this study. All the CT or MRI data were investigated retrospectively. Twenty one patients underwent CT examinations, 17 patients underwent MRI examinations. The features of IPNB including the distribution features of the nodules or masses, CT and MRI features of cholangiectasis, mucus were analyzed. The accuracy differences of CT and MRI for the preoperatively diagnosing mucus and tumor growing along mucous were compared by nonparametric test. Results: The lesions (including 5 patients with solitary lesions and 19 patients with multiple lesions) were located in intrahepatic bile duct in 24 patients, 3 patients occurred simultaneously in intrahepatic and portal bile duct, 2 lesions occurred in portal bile duct, 8 lesions occurred in common bile duct, the lesions of 1 patient occurred simultaneously in common bile duct, cystic duct and gallbladder. Seventeen and 11 patients appeared nodules locating in dilated bile duct on CT and MRI, respectively. Four and 5 patients appeared cystic lesions with multiple nodules of the liver on CT and MRI, respectively. Higher contrast enhancement on CT and MRI in arterial phase than that in portal vein and equilibrium phase were observed in 18 and 12 patients, respectively. Excluding the patients undergoing puncture, CT was better than MRI in evaluating whether the mucus was present, with the accuracies of 30.0% (6/20) and 6.3% (1/16) for CT and MRI, respectively (Z=2.58, P<0.05). CT was worse than MRI in preoperatively evaluating the features of tumor growing along mucous, with the accuracies of 77.8% (14/18) and 92.6% (13/14) for CT and MRI, respectively (Z=4.23, P<0.01). Conclusion: IPNB had the features of growing along mucous of the bile duct, nodule or mass in dilated bile duct and other features, CT and MRI are

  3. Transabdominal Ultrasound Colonography for Detection of Colorectal Neoplasms: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Ya; Chen, Li-Da; Xu, Jian-Bo; Wu, Hui; Ye, Jin-Ning; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ming-De

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using ultrasound colonography (USC) to visualize the healthy colon and rectum and detect colorectal polyps. Eight healthy volunteers underwent USC after standard bowel preparation. The feasibility and image quality of USC in different segments were evaluated. Then, USC was conducted on eight patients with known colonic neoplasms using colonoscopy as the reference standard. For volunteers, USC examinations were successfully performed on four (50.0%) ascending, three (37.5%) transverse and eight (100%) descending colons, as well as all sigmoid colons and rectums. One of four (25.0%) ascending, two of eight (25.0%) descending and all sigmoid colons and rectums were well visualized and free of artifacts. For patients, colonoscopy revealed that eight patients had 17 neoplasms in the distal sigmoid colon and rectum, which included 3 lesions ≤5 mm, 3 lesions 6-9 mm and 11 lesions ≥10 mm. USC visualized 12 of 17 (70.6%) neoplasms. Lesion detection by USC was 0% (0/3), 33.3% (1/3) and 100% (11/11) for neoplasms ≤5, 6-9 mm and ≥10 mm in size. USC can visualize the sigmoid colon and rectum well and detect distal sigmoid and rectal neoplasms ≥10 mm in diameter. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection is an independent risk factor of early and advanced colorectal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young; Kim, Kyunga; Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-06-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of colorectal neoplasm remains controversial. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasm in a large sample of healthy participants who underwent screening colonoscopy. A cross-sectional study of 8916 men, who participated in a regular health-screening examination that included an H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibody test and colonoscopy, was conducted to evaluate the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasm. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, regular aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer showed that the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for any adenoma and advanced neoplasm was 1.32 (1.07-1.61) and 1.90 (1.05-3.56) in participants with H. pylori infection and without H. pylori infection, respectively. The association persisted after further adjustment for inflammatory markers or metabolic variables including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Regarding the location, a positive association was confined to cases with proximal adenomas and was observed similarly in all the evaluated subgroups. In a large-scale study, carefully controlled for confounding factors, involving asymptomatic participants without a history of colonoscopy, H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the risk of any colorectal adenoma and advanced colorectal neoplasm. Prospective studies are necessary to determine whether H. pylori eradication can reduce this risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Classification tree analysis of second neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbec, Janez; Todorovski, Ljupčo; Jereb, Berta

    2007-01-01

    Reports on childhood cancer survivors estimated cumulative probability of developing secondary neoplasms vary from 3,3% to 25% at 25 years from diagnosis, and the risk of developing another cancer to several times greater than in the general population. In our retrospective study, we have used the classification tree multivariate method on a group of 849 first cancer survivors, to identify childhood cancer patients with the greatest risk for development of secondary neoplasms. In observed group of patients, 34 develop secondary neoplasm after treatment of primary cancer. Analysis of parameters present at the treatment of first cancer, exposed two groups of patients at the special risk for secondary neoplasm. First are female patients treated for Hodgkin's disease at the age between 10 and 15 years, whose treatment included radiotherapy. Second group at special risk were male patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were treated at the age between 4,6 and 6,6 years of age. The risk groups identified in our study are similar to the results of studies that used more conventional approaches. Usefulness of our approach in study of occurrence of second neoplasms should be confirmed in larger sample study, but user friendly presentation of results makes it attractive for further studies

  6. Haematopoietic depletion in vaccine-induced neonatal pancytopenia depends on both the titre and specificity of alloantibody and levels of MHC I expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlotte R; MacHugh, Niall D; Connelley, Timothy K; Degnan, Kathryn; Morrison, W Ivan

    2015-07-09

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a disease of calves characterised by haematopoietic depletion, mediated by ingestion of alloantibodies in colostrum. It has been linked epidemiologically to vaccination of the dams of affected calves with a particular vaccine (Pregsure) containing a novel adjuvant. Evidence suggests that BNP-alloantibodies are directed against MHC I molecules, induced by contaminant bovine cellular material from Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells used in the vaccine's production. We aimed to investigate the specificity of BNP-alloantibody for bovine MHC I alleles, particularly those expressed by MDBK cells, and whether depletion of particular cell types is due to differential MHC I expression levels. A complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay was used to assess functional serum alloantibody titres in BNP-dams, Pregsure-vaccinated dams with healthy calves, cows vaccinated with an alternative product and unvaccinated controls. Alloantibody specificity was investigated using transfected mouse lines expressing the individual MHC I alleles identified from MDBK cells and MHC I-defined bovine leukocyte lines. All BNP-dams and 50% of Pregsure-vaccinated cows were shown to have MDBK-MHC I specific alloantibodies, which cross-reacted to varying degrees with other MHC I genotypes. MHC I expression levels on different blood cell types, assessed by flow cytometry, were found to correlate with levels of alloantibody-mediated damage in vitro and in vivo. Alloantibody-killed bone marrow cells were shown to express higher levels of MHC I than undamaged cells. The results provide evidence that MHC I-specific alloantibodies play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of BNP. Haematopoietic depletion was shown to be dependent on the titre and specificity of alloantibody produced by individual cows and the density of surface MHC I expression by different cell types. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that MHC I molecules originating from MDBK cells

  7. A cell kinetic model of granulopoiesis under radiation exposure: Extension from rodents to canines and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    As significant ionising radiation exposure will occur during prolonged space travel in future, it is essential to understand their adverse effects on the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of humans, e.g. the haematopoietic system. In this paper, a bio-mathematical model of granulopoiesis is used to analyse the granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under acute and continuous radiation exposure. This is one of a set of haematopoietic models that have been successfully utilised to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. Extension to canine and human systems indicates that the results of the model are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources, implying the potential to integrate them into one united model system to monitor the haematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. The suppression of granulocytes' level of a space traveller under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation as well as the granulopoietic response when encountering a historically large solar particle event is also discussed. (authors)

  8. Influence of transcatheter hepatic artery embolization using iodized oil on radiofrequency ablation of hepatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xilin; Ma Qingjiu; Wang Yiqing; Wang Zhimin; Zhang Hongxin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of iodized oil on radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of hepatic neoplasms by using a cluster array of ten separate electrodes. Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups, group A with transcatheter hepatic artery embolization, group B without transcatheter hepatic artery embolization. All patients were undergone radiofrequency ablation of hepatic neoplasms. Results: The time of RFA for group A was (9 ± 2.1) minutes, showing the diameter of necrosis of (5.3 ± 1.4) cm. The time of RFA for group B was (16 ± 4. 6) minutes demonstrating the diameter of necrosis of (3.5 ± 1.8) cm (P<0.01). Conclusions: These findings suggest that radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatic neoplasms with transcatheter hepatic artery embolization using iodized oil might improve the safety and synergic effect

  9. Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas Presenting as a Third Primary Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Şeref Köksal

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous cystadenomas are the most common cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. They may occur solely or coexist with other neoplasms. A 10 cm mass involving the body of the pancreas was observed in the computed tomography of a 61-year-old man with a previous history of bladder and prostate carcinoma. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of the mass demonstrated multiple small cysts associated with a central calcified scar. A distal pancreatectomy was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma. This is the first report of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas with two metachronous neoplasms. This feature should be kept in mind during the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with serous cystadenoma.

  10. Pancreas developing markers expressed on human mononucleated umbilical cord blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessina, A.; Eletti, B.; Croera, C.; Savalli, N.; Diodovich, C.; Gribaldo, L.

    2004-01-01

    Haematopoietic system represents the main source of haematopoietic stem cells and probably of multipotential adult progenitor cells and mesenchimal stem cells at first described as colony forming unit-fibroblast. Whereas there are many studies on the gene expression profile of the different precursors along their haematopoietic differentiation, few data (sometimes conflicting) have been reported about the phenotype of the cells (present in bone marrow and possibly in cord blood) able to differentiate into non-haematopoietic cells. As both postnatal bone marrow and umbilical cord blood contain nestin positive cells able to proliferate and differentiate into the main neural phenotype (neuron, astroglia and oligodendroglia) many authors considered nestin a neuroepithelial precursor marker that seems to be essential also in multipotential progenitor cells of pancreas present both in rat and in human pancreatic islets (called nestin positive islet derived progenitors). Although the importance of nestin in these cells appears to be evident, it remains yet to clarify the number and the sequential expression of the genes coding all the transcription factors essential for beta cells differentiation and therefore the conditions able to induce the expression of many important transcription factors genes such as isl-1, pax-4, pdx-1 and ngn-3. Among them pdx-1 is a gene essential for pancreas development which is able to control ngn-3 in activating the expression of other differentiation factors for endocrine cells. Here, we describe for the first time in human umbilical cord blood cells (UCB) the pattern of expression of a panel of markers (nestin, CK-8, CK-18) and transcription factors (Isl-1, Pdx-1, Pax-4, Ngn-3) considered important for beta cells differentiation. Our data demonstrate that UCB contains a cell population having a phenotype very similar to endocrine cell precursors in transition to beta cells

  11. Inverse expression of somatostatin and CXCR4 chemokine receptors in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms of different malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Träger, Tina; Hoffmeister, Maike; Sipos, Bence; Hommann, Merten; Sänger, Järg; Schulz, Stefan; Lupp, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are widely distributed in well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) and serve as primary targets for diagnostics and treatment. An overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, in contrast, is considered to be present mainly in highly proliferative and advanced tumors. Comparative data are still lacking, however, for neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Methods SSTR subtype (1, 2A, 3, 5) and CXCR4 expression was evaluated in G1 (n = 31), G2 (n = 47), and low (G3a; Ki-67: 21–49%; n = 21) and highly proliferative (G3b; Ki-67: >50%, n = 22) G3 (total n = 43) gastroenteropancreatic NEN samples by performing immunohistochemistry with monoclonal rabbit anti-human anti-SSTR and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively, and was correlated with clinical data. Results Both CXCR4 and SSTR were widely expressed in all tumors investigated. CXCR4 expression differed significantly between the G1 and G3 specimens and within the G3 group (G3a to G3b), and was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression. SSTR2A, in contrast, exhibited an inverse association with Ki-67. SSTR2A was highly expressed in G1 and G2 tumors, but was significantly less abundant in G3 carcinomas. Additionally, SSTR1 expression was higher in G3a than in G3b tumors. Conclusion We observed an elevation in CXCR4 and a decrease in SSTR2A expression with increasing malignancy. Interestingly, 23% of the G3 specimens had strong SSTR2A expression. Because CXCR4 was strongly expressed in highly proliferative G3 carcinomas, it is an interesting new target and needs to be validated in larger studies. PMID:26259237

  12. Dietary patterns and risk of advanced colorectal neoplasms: A large population based screening study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, Vanessa; Carr, Prudence R; Holleczek, Bernd; Stegmaier, Christa; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2018-06-01

    Specific components of the diet such as red and processed meat have been associated with the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, evidence on the association of dietary patterns with colorectal neoplasms is sparse. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of dietary patterns with prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasms among older adults in Germany. A cross-sectional study was conducted among participants of screening colonoscopy in Saarland, Germany, who were enrolled in the KolosSal study (Effektivität der Früherkennungs-Koloskopie: eine Saarland-weite Studie) from 2005 to 2013. Information on diet and lifestyle factors was obtained through questionnaires and colonoscopy results were extracted from physicians' reports. Associations of a priori defined dietary patterns (vegetarian or adapted versions of the Healthy Eating Index [HEI] and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] index) with the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasms were assessed by multiple logistic regression analyses with comprehensive adjustment for potential confounders. A total of 14,309 participants were included (1561 with advanced colorectal neoplasms). Healthier eating behavior was associated with lower prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasms in a dose-response manner. Adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest with the lowest categories of adapted HEI and DASH were 0.61 (0.50, 0.76) and 0.70 (0.55, 0.89), respectively. No significant associations were observed for a vegetarian eating pattern (adjusted OR 0.80 (0.55, 1.17)). Healthy dietary patterns, as described by a high HEI or DASH score, but not a vegetarian diet alone, are associated with reduced risk of advanced colorectal neoplasms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunomodifying effect of VCG vaccine in treatment of urinary bladder neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neprina, G.S.; Panteleeva, E.S.; Vatin, O.E.; Karyakin, O.B.; Kurasova, V.G.; Filatov, P.P.; Dunchik, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that immunotherapy realization using VCG vaccine after completion of PCT (polychemotherapy) course in patients suffering from later stages of urinary bladder neoplasm, allowed one to maximally connect stages of chemo- and radiation therapy at the expense of sufficient increase of the quantity of main groups of immunocompetent cells. Introduction of incometacin to immunocorrection scheme allowed one to remove disbalance in immunoregulating lymphocyte system which testifies to advisability of combined applicaion of VCG vaccine and indometacin in complex treatment of cerinary bladder neoplasms. 5 refs

  14. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo for diagnosing melanocytic skin neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo (CLSM for diagnosing melanocytic skin neoplasms and its value for early diagnostics of melanoma. CLSM is an innovation noninvasive visual examination method for real-time multiple and painless examinations of the patient’s skin without injuring the skin integument. The method ensures early diagnostics of skin melanomas with high sensitivity and specificity, which makes it possible to use CLSM for screening melanocytic skin neoplasms for the sake of the early onset of treatment to save patient life and health.

  15. Malignant Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Neoplasm of the Pancreas in a 10-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Marwan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas are extremely rare in children and only represent a small percentage of pediatric cancer-related deaths. The paucity of cases reported in the literature, in addition to the lack of understanding of biologic behavior, has led to a lack of consensus concerning optimal management strategy. Presentation differs compared to adult counterparts and generally prognosis is improved even when lymph node metastases occur. Here we review the literature and report the case of a 10-year-old autistic female with a malignant nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine neoplasm of the head of the pancreas successfully extirpated via pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  16. Vertical transmission of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum): isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IIHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisherics and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of lHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973, Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe 1977. Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IEEN epizootic in an cffort to climinate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingficid & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  17. Oral DNA vaccination of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus using PLGA [Poly(D,L-Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid)] nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomako, M; St-Hilaire, S; Zheng, Y; Eley, J; Marcum, R D; Sealey, W; Donahower, B C; Lapatra, S; Sheridan, P P

    2012-03-01

    A DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is effective at protecting rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, against disease, but intramuscular injection is required and makes the vaccine impractical for use in the freshwater rainbow trout farming industry. Poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved polymer that can be used to deliver DNA vaccines. We evaluated the in vivo absorption of PLGA nanoparticles containing coumarin-6 when added to a fish food pellet. We demonstrated that rainbow trout will eat PLGA nanoparticle coated feed and that these nanoparticles can be detected in the epithelial cells of the lower intestine within 96 h after feeding. We also detected low levels of gene expression and anti-IHNV neutralizing antibodies when fish were fed or intubated with PLGA nanoparticles containing IHNV G gene plasmid. A virus challenge evaluation suggested a slight increase in survival at 6 weeks post-vaccination in fish that received a high dose of the oral vaccine, but there was no difference when additional fish were challenged at 10 weeks post-vaccination. The results of this study suggest that it is possible to induce an immune response using an orally delivered DNA vaccine, but the current system needs improvement. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Virulence of a chimeric recombinant infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus expressing the spring viraemia of carp virus glycoprotein in salmonid and cyprinid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, Eveline; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Mérour, Emilie; Glenn, Jolene. A; Palmer, Alexander D.; Brémont, Michel; Kurath, Gael

    2018-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) are both rhabdoviruses of fish, listed as notifiable disease agents by the World Organization for Animal Health. Recombinant rhabdoviruses with heterologous gene substitutions have been engineered to study genetic determinants and assess the potential of these recombinant viruses for vaccine development. A recombinant IHNV (rIHNV), containing the full-length genome of a European IHNV strain, was modified by deleting the glycoprotein (G) gene and replacing it with a European SVCV G-gene to make the rIHNV-Gsvcv. The chimeric rIHNV-Gsvcv level of virulence in rainbow trout, common carp and koi was assessed, and its ability to induce a protective immune response in surviving koi against wild-type SVCV infection was tested. The rIHNV-Gsvcv infection of trout led to high mortality, ranging from 78% to 92.5%, after immersion. In contrast, no deaths occurred in juvenile common carp after infection with rIHNV-Gsvcv by either immersion or intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Similarly, koi infected with rIHNV-Gsvcv via IP injection had little to no mortality (≤9%). Koi that survived initial infection with a high dose of recombinant virus rIHNV-Gsvcv were protected against a virulent SVCV challenge resulting in a high relative per cent survival of 82.5%.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Pediatric Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis of Life Experiences and Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Lahaye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT improves the survival rate of children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant conditions; however, the physical, psychological and social burden of such a procedure is considerable both during and after treatment. The present qualitative study investigated the long-term effects of HSCT after pediatric cancer. Thirty adolescent and young adult (AYA survivors (Mage = 23.61 years, SD = 5.21 participated in individual interviews and were invited to speak about their life experiences following their treatment and strategies they use to deal with their past medical experiences and the long-term sequelae. Our results showed the presence of ongoing physical and psychosocial consequences of their past illness and its treatments with wide ranging psychosocial impacts, such as affected self-image, social withdrawal, sense of lack of choice, and need for specific attention. Different strategies were reported to overcome these consequences, such as talking about illness, giving a sense to their past medical experiences, and developing meaningful social relationships. Clinical and research implications are also discussed.

  20. Imaging of hepatic toxicity of systemic therapy in a tertiary cancer centre: chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, molecular targeted therapies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrino, F; Tirumani, S H; Krajewski, K M; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J P; Ramaiya, N H; Di Salvo, D N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the spectrum of hepatic toxicity seen in the oncology setting, in view of the different systemic therapies used in cancer patients. Drug-induced liver injury can manifest in various forms, and anti-neoplastic agents are associated with different types of hepatotoxicity. Although chemotherapy-induced liver injury can present as hepatitis, steatosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, and chronic parenchymal damages, molecular targeted therapy-associated liver toxicity ranges from mild liver function test elevation to fulminant life-threatening acute liver failure. The recent arrival of immune checkpoint inhibitors in oncology has introduced a new range of immune-related adverse events, with differing mechanisms of liver toxicity and varied imaging presentation of liver injury. High-dose chemotherapy regimens for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are associated with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Management of hepatic toxicity depends on the clinical scenario, the drug in use, and the severity of the findings. In this article, we will (1) present the most common types of oncological drugs associated with hepatic toxicity and associated liver injuries; (2) illustrate imaging findings of hepatic toxicities and the possible differential diagnosis; and (3) provide a guide for management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Histologic and Immunohistochemical classification of 41 bovine adrenal gland neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Anette Blak; Leifsson, Páll S.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2013-01-01

    . An immunohistochemistry panel consisting of antibodies against melan A, synaptophysin, and CNPase was considered most useful to classify bovine adrenal tumors. However, the distinction between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors was based on histologic features as in human medicine....

  2. Surgical management of neoplasms of the ampulla of Vater: Local resection or pancreatoduodenectomy and prognostic factors for survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; van Heek, N. T.; Kuhlmann, K. F. D.; Busch, O. R. C.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    yBackground. Neoplasms of the ampulla of Vater have a better 5-year survival than pancreatic and bile duct neoplasms after resection. This study was Performed to analyze the outcome after local resection and pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and to identify predictive factors for survival. Methods. We used

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine-Needle Aspiration Characteristics of Primary Adenocarcinoma versus Other Malignant Neoplasms of The Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Gagovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS with fine-needle aspiration (FNA is often used to assist in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and may help to diagnose benign versus malignant neoplasms. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding comparative EUS characteristics of various malignant pancreatic neoplasms (primary and metastatic.

  4. Nodular fasciitis: A pseudomalignant clonal neoplasm characterized by USP gene rearrangements and spontaneous regression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennebry, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing, self-limited, myofibroblastic neoplasm that typically arises in subcutaneous tissues of young adults and regresses spontaneously. Nodular fasciitis mimics sarcoma on clinical, radiological, and histological grounds and is usually, diagnosed following excision.\\r\

  5. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violari, Elena G., E-mail: eviolari@live.com; Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Service (United States); Reidy, Diane L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service (United States); Jarnagin, William R. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Hepatopancreatobiliary Service (United States); Brown, Karen T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Service (United States)

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  6. Evaluation of a selective management strategy of patients with primary cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; Houwert, J. T.; van der Gaag, N. A.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a selective group of patients with primary cystic neoplasms of the pancreas can be managed conservatively by radiological follow-up. The aim of this study was to analyze if such a strategy is efficient and safe. A retrospective analyses was performed of patients who

  7. Diagnostic yield of combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion weighted imaging in intracranial neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayat E. El Sherbeny

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: MRS has a robust diagnostic accuracy in cases of well defined high or low grade brain neoplasms. ADC value had the ability to confirm and differentiate low from high grade tumors in many situations where there were diagnostic confusions with MRS due to borderline values.

  8. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A revision of the nearly 8-year-old World Health Organization classification of the lymphoid neoplasms and the accompanying monograph is being published. It reflects a consensus among hematopathologists, geneticists, and clinicians regarding both updates to current entities as well as the addition of a limited number of new provisional entities.

  9. Smell and taste in patients with neoplasms tumors of palatine tonsils treated by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korytowska, A.; Szmeja, Z.; Wojtowicz, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The smell and taste investigations were made in group of 47 subjects with neoplasms of palatine tonsils surgical treated with radiation and in group of 7 subjects treated only by radiation. The investigation presents mostly quantitative disturbance of smell in both groups but with temporary character. (author)

  10. Preparation of {sup 125}I-labeled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm using lactoperoxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huaifen, Li; Huisheng, Niu; Mingyue, Yuan; Yongzhi, Huang [Chinese Acaolemy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin (China). Inst. of Radiation Medicine

    1994-11-01

    {sup 125}I-labelled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm ({sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4}) is prepared using lactoperoxidase. The in-vivo radioactive distribution of {sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4} in bare mice shows that {sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4} concentrates in the tumour.

  11. Preparation of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm using lactoperoxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huaifen; Niu Huisheng; Yuan Mingyue; Huang Yongzhi

    1994-01-01

    125 I-labelled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm ( 125 I-L 4 B 4 ) is prepared using lactoperoxidase. The in-vivo radioactive distribution of 125 I-L 4 B 4 in bare mice shows that 125 I-L 4 B 4 concentrates in the tumour

  12. Synthetic display of three-dimensional CT and MPR for gastric neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Masakazu

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to obtain synthesized three dimensional (3D) and MPR (Multi Planar Reconstruction) helical CT scans (3D-MPR-CT) of gastric neoplasm by using the air as a contrast medium, and we assessed the usefulness of 3D-MPR-CT gastroendoscopy in the diagnosis of gastric neoplasm. Five minutes before the scan, 20 mg Scopolamine Butylbromide (Buscopan) was injected intramuscularly to minimize gastric peristalsis. An effervescent agent (bubble-make granules) was fed to extend the stomach wall. Non-ionic contrast material (100 mL) was power injected immediately before the scan start. Axial images were obtained with an intersection gap of 5-mm, a 5-mm/sec table speed, and 1-mm reconstruction intervals. 3D-MPR-CT images were reconstructed from these images. In abdominal study, 3D-MPR-CT images enabled the visualization of neoplasm and its adjacent structures in versatile directions, including a view similar to endoscopic observation, proximal aspect of narrowing by tumor and also could get the information about invasive depth of gastric neoplasm. Reports on some clinical cases and the advantages and disadvantages of 3D-MPR-CT gastroendoscopy were discussed. (author)

  13. Histologically benign but clinically malignant neoplasms in the thorax: CT–pathological overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.Y.; Kim, T.S.; Han, J.; Kim, H.; Choi, Y.S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the computed tomography (CT) and histopathological features of uncommon primary neoplasms of the thorax that can manifest clinically malignant features (multiplicity of pulmonary nodules, an invasive nature, and metastases or recurrence after surgery) with little evidence of histological malignancy.

  14. Molecular genetics of intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toru

    2007-01-01

    Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas show characteristic clinicopathological and molecular pathobiological features which are distinct from those of conventional ductal adenocarcinomas. Alterations of KRAS, AKT/PKB, CDKN2A, TP53, SMAD4, STK11/LKB1, and DUSP6, and other molecular alterations, including global expression studies as well as their clinical implications, are discussed.

  15. Fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of metastatic neoplasms of the breast. A three-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Garza-Guajardo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastases to the breast are unusual lesions that make up approximately 2% of all malignant mammary neoplasms and may mimic both benign and malignant primary neoplasms from a clinical point of view, as well as in imaging studies. Arriving at a correct diagnosis is therefore essential in order to establish appropriate management. We present three cases of metastatic neoplasms diagnosed through fine needle aspiration biopsy and immunocytochemistry. The cytological diagnoses were: medulloblastoma in an 18-year-old woman, melanoma in a 26-year-old man, and an exceptional case of ovarian sarcoma originating from a granulosa cell tumor with metastases to both breasts. A metastatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a palpable mass in the breast, especially if there is a history of an extramammary malignant neoplasm. Fine needle aspiration biopsy is the method of choice for the management of these cases. Whenever possible the exam of the material obtained should be compared to the previous biopsy, which is usually enough to arrive at a correct diagnosis, thus preventing unnecessary surgical procedures.

  16. Agreement Between Cytology and Histopathology for Regional Lymph Node Metastasis in Dogs With Melanocytic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Janet A; Matz, Brad M; Christopherson, Pete W; Koehler, Jey W; Cappelle, Kelsey K; Hlusko, Katelyn C; Smith, Annette

    2017-07-01

    Melanocytic neoplasms are common in dogs and frequently occur within the oral cavity or in haired skin. The behavior of melanocytic neoplasms is variable and depends on tumor location, size, and histopathologic features. This study compared cytopathology and histopathology of 32 lymph nodes from 27 dogs diagnosed with melanocytic neoplasms. Agreement between the original cytology report, cytology slide review, original histopathology report, and histopathology slide review was determined for each lymph node. A subset of lymph nodes was subjected to immunohistochemistry (Melan-A) and additional histochemical stains/techniques (Prussian blue, bleach) to assist in differentiation of melanocytes and melanophages. Agreement ranged from slight to fair for each of the variables evaluated with weighted kappa (κ w ) or kappa (κ) analysis (original cytology vs cytology review κ w = 0.24; original cytology vs original histopathology κ w = 0.007; original cytology vs histopathology review κ w = 0.23; cytology review vs original histopathology κ w = 0.008; cytology review vs histopathology review κ w = 0.006; and original histopathology vs histopathology review κ = 0.18). The diagnoses (metastatic, equivocal, or negative for metastasis) of the original report and slide review for both cytology and histopathology were not significantly correlated with survival in this population of patients. Overall, agreement between cytology and histopathology was poor even with a single clinical or anatomic pathologist performing slide review. Consensus between routine cytology and histopathology for staging of lymph nodes in patients with melanocytic neoplasms is poor and does not correlate with survival.

  17. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  18. Myeloid neoplasm with prominent eosinophilia and PDGFRA rearrangement treated with imatinib mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Møller, Michael Boe

    2010-01-01

    of FIP1L1-PDGFRA positive disease has been reported. We report a 2-year-old female with a myeloid neoplasm associated with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA. Treatment with imatinib resulted in complete and durable clinical, hematological, and molecular remission within 3 months after starting...

  19. Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William’s. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; ; sarcoid (; a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

  20. Single-incision laparoscopic cecectomy for low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm after laparoscopic rectectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Noura, Shingo; Shingai, Tatsushi; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Ohue, Masayuki; Yano, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we discuss single-incision laparoscopic cecectomy for low-grade appendiceal neoplasm after laparoscopic anterior resection for rectal cancer. The optimal surgical therapy for low-grade appendiceal neoplasm is controversial; currently, the options include appendectomy, cecectomy, right hemicolectomy, and open or laparoscopic surgery. Due to the risk of pseudomyxoma peritonei, complete resection without rupture is necessary. We have encountered 5 cases of low-grade appendiceal neoplasm and all 5 patients had no lymph node metastasis. We chose the appendectomy or cecectomy without lymph node dissection if preoperative imaging studies did not suspect malignancy. In the present case, we performed cecectomy without lymph node dissection by single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), which is reported to be a reduced port surgery associated with decreased invasiveness and patient stress compared with conventional laparoscopic surgery. We are confident that SILS is a feasible alternative to traditional surgical procedures for borderline tumors, such as low-grade appendiceal neoplasms. PMID:24868331

  1. The Disruption of Geniculocalcarine Tract in Occipital Neoplasm: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Investigate the disruption of geniculocalcarine tract (GCT in different occipital neoplasm by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Methods. Thirty-two subjects (44.1 ± 3.6 years who had single occipital neoplasm (9 gliomas, 6 meningiomas, and 17 metastatic tumors with ipsilateral GCT involved and thirty healthy subjects (39.2 ± 3.3 years underwent conventional sequences scanning and diffusion tensor imaging by a 1.5T MR scanner. The diffusion-sensitive gradient direction is 13. Compare the fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD values of healthy GCT with the corresponding values of GCT in peritumoral edema area. Perform diffusion tensor tractography (DTT on GCT by the line propagation technique in all subjects. Results. The FA values of GCT in peritumoral edema area decreased (P=0.001 while the MD values increased (P=0.002 when compared with healthy subjects. There was no difference in the FA values across tumor types (P=0.114 while the MD values of GCT in the metastatic tumor group were higher than the other groups (P=0.001. GCTs were infiltrated in all the 9 gliomas cases, with displacement in 2 cases and disruption in 7 cases. GCTs were displaced in 6 meningiomas cases. GCTs were displaced in all the 7 metastatic cases, with disruption in 7 cases. Conclusions. DTI represents valid markers for evaluating GCT’s disruption in occipital neoplasm. The disruption of GCT varies according to the properties of neoplasm.

  2. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasm among patients with newly diagnosed coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Annie On On; Jim, Man Hong; Lam, Kwok Fai; Morris, Jeffrey S; Siu, David Chun Wah; Tong, Teresa; Ng, Fook Hong; Wong, Siu Yin; Hui, Wai Mo; Chan, Chi Kuen; Lai, Kam Chuen; Cheung, Ting Kin; Chan, Pierre; Wong, Grace; Yuen, Man Fung; Lau, Yuk Kong; Lee, Stephen; Szeto, Ming Leung; Wong, Benjamin C Y; Lam, Shiu Kum

    2007-09-26

    Colorectal neoplasm and coronary artery disease (CAD) share similar risk factors, and their co-occurrence may be associated. To investigate the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm in patients with CAD in a cross-sectional study and to identify the predisposing factors for the association of the 2 diseases. Patients in Hong Kong, China, were recruited for screening colonoscopy after undergoing coronary angiography for suspected CAD during November 2004 to June 2006. Presence of CAD (n = 206) was defined as at least 50% diameter stenosis in any 1 of the major coronary arteries; otherwise, patients were considered CAD-negative (n = 208). An age- and sex-matched control group was recruited from the general population (n = 207). Patients were excluded for use of aspirin or statins, personal history of colonic disease, or colonoscopy in the past 10 years. The prevalence of colorectal neoplasm in CAD-positive, CAD-negative, and general population participants was determined. Bivariate logistic regression was performed to study the association between colorectal neoplasm and CAD and to identify risk factors for the association of the 2 diseases after adjusting for age and sex. The prevalence of colorectal neoplasm in the CAD-positive, CAD-negative, and general population groups was 34.0%, 18.8%, and 20.8% (P < .001 by chi2 test), prevalence of advanced lesions was 18.4%, 8.7%, and 5.8% (P < .001), and prevalence of cancer was 4.4%, 0.5%, and 1.4% (P = .02), respectively. Fifty percent of the cancers in CAD-positive participants were early stage. After adjusting for age and sex, an association still existed between colorectal neoplasm and presence of CAD (odds ratio [OR], 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-2.70; P = .002) and between advanced lesions and presence of CAD (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.43-4.35; P = .001). The metabolic syndrome (OR, 5.99; 95% CI, 1.43-27.94; P = .02) and history of smoking (OR, 4.74; 95% CI, 1.38-18.92; P = .02) were independent factors for the

  3. Modern classification of neoplasms: reconciling differences between morphologic and molecular approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Jules

    2005-01-01

    For over 150 years, pathologists have relied on histomorphology to classify and diagnose neoplasms. Their success has been stunning, permitting the accurate diagnosis of thousands of different types of neoplasms using only a microscope and a trained eye. In the past two decades, cancer genomics has challenged the supremacy of histomorphology by identifying genetic alterations shared by morphologically diverse tumors and by finding genetic features that distinguish subgroups of morphologically homogeneous tumors. The Developmental Lineage Classification and Taxonomy of Neoplasms groups neoplasms by their embryologic origin. The putative value of this classification is based on the expectation that tumors of a common developmental lineage will share common metabolic pathways and common responses to drugs that target these pathways. The purpose of this manuscript is to show that grouping tumors according to their developmental lineage can reconcile certain fundamental discrepancies resulting from morphologic and molecular approaches to neoplasm classification. In this study, six issues in tumor classification are described that exemplify the growing rift between morphologic and molecular approaches to tumor classification: 1) the morphologic separation between epithelial and non-epithelial tumors; 2) the grouping of tumors based on shared cellular functions; 3) the distinction between germ cell tumors and pluripotent tumors of non-germ cell origin; 4) the distinction between tumors that have lost their differentiation and tumors that arise from uncommitted stem cells; 5) the molecular properties shared by morphologically disparate tumors that have a common developmental lineage, and 6) the problem of re-classifying morphologically identical but clinically distinct subsets of tumors. The discussion of these issues in the context of describing different methods of tumor classification is intended to underscore the clinical value of a robust tumor classification. A

  4. Clinicopathologic features of hepatic neoplasms in explanted livers: a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourad, W.; Tulbah, A.; Al-Omari, M.; Al-Mana, H.; Khalaf, H.; Neiamatallah, M.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic neoplasms can be the primary indication for hepatic transplantation. The tumors can also be incidentally identified in explanted livers. We explored the clinicopathologic features of hepatic neoplasms identified in explanted livers. All explanted livers resected between 2001 and 2006 were evaluated for the presence of neoplasms and their clinicopathologic features were examined. In 198 liver transplants, 15 neoplasms (15.3%) were identified. Patient ages ranged from 5 to 63 years (median, 56 years). The primary etiology of hepatic disease was hepatitis C virus in 12 cases, hepatitis B virus in 1 case, cryptogenic cirrhosis in 1 case and congenital hepatic fibrosis in 1 case. Serum alpha-fetoprotein was significantly elevated (>400 U/L) in only 2 cases. CA19-9 was not elevated in any of the cases. The tumors included hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 13 cases, 1 case of cholangiocarcinoma and 1 case of combined HCC and hepatoblastoma. The tumors ranged in size from 0.5 to 5 cm (median 1.4 cm) and were multifocal in 5 of the cases (33%). Tissue alpha-fetoprotein expression was only seen in the cases associated with elevated serum levels. In our institution hepatic neoplasma are seen in more than 15% of explanted livers. They can be incidentally identified, are frequently not associated with elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and CA19-9, are commonly multifocal but small and are associated with good prognosis. Elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein, albeit specific, is not a very sensitive marker in the detection of hepatic neoplasms. (author)

  5. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas : radiologic pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Cho, Nam Hoon

    1996-01-01

    To report variable radiologic manifestastions and to accomplish detailed radiologic-pathologic correlation of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas. In 23 patients with surgically confirmed solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm, retrospective examination of operative records, gross and micropathologic findings, and radiologic findings including US(n=17), CT(n=23), ERCP(n=9), MRI(n=3) were carried out. On the basis of pathologic findings, detailed analysis of radiologic findings of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm was then performed. Most pancreatic solid and papillary epithelial neoplasms(n=17) were seen as a mass with heterogeneous internal density consisting of cystic change, hemorrhagic necrosis, and tumor tissue, although the mass con also be seen to be homogeneous(n=6). On gross specimens, a capsule which showed enhancement on the delayed phase of the enhanced CT scan was demonstrated in 22 cases. In was seen as an echogenic rim on the ultrasound images and a low signal rim on the MR images. Calcification of the mass was seen in ten cases, nine of which showed peripheral calcification along the tumor capsule ; five cases showed calcifications within the mass. On pathologic examination, ten cases had a single or multiple cystic appearance ; in seven of these cases, this appeared on CT scan. In addition to usual mixed internal density caused by hemorrhagic necrosis of the tumor, enhanced capsule and internal multicystic appearance on CT scan were other characteristics of pancreatic solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm. These could be useful findings in the radiologic approach and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses

  6. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Colorectal Neoplasms: Clinical Experience in a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yu Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is a promising technique to treat early colorectal neoplasms by facilitating en bloc resection without size limitations. Although ESD for early gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasms has been popular in Japan, clinical experience with colorectal ESD has been rarely reported in Taiwan. Methods. From March 2006 to December 2011, 92 consecutive patients with early colorectal neoplasms resected by ESD at Tri-Service General Hospital were included. ESD was performed for colorectal epithelial neoplasms with a noninvasive pit pattern which had the following criteria: (1 lesions difficult to remove en bloc with a snare, such as laterally spreading tumors-nongranular type (LST-NG ≧20 mm and laterally spreading tumors-granular type (LST-G ≧30 mm; (2 lesions with fibrosis or which had recurred after endoscopic mucosal resection with a nonlifting sign. Results. The mean age of the patients was 66.3±12.9 years, and the male-female ratio was 1.8 : 1. The mean tumor size was 37.2±17.9 mm. The en bloc resection rate was 90.2% and the R0 resection rate was 89.1%. Perforations during ESD occurred in 11 patients (12.0% and all of them were effectively treated by endoscopic closure with hemoclips. No delayed perforation or postoperative bleeding was recorded. There were no procedure-related morbidities or mortalities. Conclusion. ESD is an effective method for en bloc resection of large early colorectal neoplasms and those with a nonlifting sign. An endoscopic technique to close perforations is essential for colorectal ESD.

  7. Risk of malignant neoplasms in acromegaly: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, K; Stangierski, A; Dyrda, K; Nowicka, K; Pelka, M; Iqbal, A; Car, A; Lazizi, M; Bednarek, N; Czarnywojtek, A; Gurgul, E; Ruchala, M

    2017-03-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease resulting from pathological oversecretion of growth hormone and subsequently insulin growth factor-1. Several complications of the disease have been reported, including cardiovascular diseases, respiratory disorders but also increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of malignant neoplasms in the patients with acromegaly in comparison with the control group. Medical documentation of acromegalic patients treated in one medical center between 2005 and 2016 has been analyzed. Results were compared with sex- and age-matched group of subjects with prolactinomas and hormonally inactive pituitary lesions hospitalized in the same department. Two hundred patients with acromegaly were included. Control group was composed of 145 patients. Any malignant neoplasm in anamnesis was present in 27 (13.5 %) patients with acromegaly and six (4.1 %) subjects from control group (p = 0.003). Thyroid cancer was present in 14 (7.0 %) patients with acromegaly and two (1.4 %) in control group (p = 0.02). Breast cancer was present in seven women (5.4 % of women) in acromegaly group but none of subjects in control group (p = 0.02). Colon cancer-4 (2.0 %) patients in acromegaly group and 0 in control group (p = 0.14). Malignant neoplasms are significantly more common in patients with acromegaly. Particularly, risk of thyroid cancer was increased over fivefold. Systematic screening for neoplastic diseases should be important part of follow-up in these patients. Further case-control studies are strongly indicated to evaluate which neoplasms are more common in acromegalic patients and what is the exact risk of malignancy.

  8. Goblet cell carcinoid neoplasm of the appendix: Clinical and CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.S.; Tang, L.H.; Shia, J.; Paty, P.B.; Weiser, M.R.; Guillem, J.G.; Temple, L.K.; Nash, G.M.; Reidy, D.; Saltz, L.; Gollub, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the clinical and CT imaging features of goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) neoplasm of the appendix. Methods and materials: A computer search of pathology and radiology records over a 19-year period at our two institutions was performed using the search string “goblet”. In the patients with appendiceal GCC neoplasms who had abdominopelvic CT, imaging findings were categorized, blinded to gross and surgical description, as: “Appendicitis”, “Prominent appendix without peri-appendiceal infiltration”, “Mass” or “Normal appendix”. The CT appearance was correlated with an accepted pathological classification of: low grade GCC, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC group. Results: Twenty-seven patients (age range, 28–80 years; mean age, 52 years; 15 female, 12 male) with pathology-proven appendiceal GCC neoplasm had CT scans that were reviewed. Patients presented with acute appendicitis (n = 12), abdominal pain not typical for appendicitis (n = 14) and incidental finding (n = 1). CT imaging showed 9 Appendicitis, 9 Prominent appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration, 7 Masses and 2 Normal appendices. Appendicitis (8/9) usually correlated with typical low grade GCC on pathology. In contrast, the majority of Masses and Prominent Appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration were pathologically confirmed to be signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex GCC. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC was seen in only a small minority of patients. Hyperattenuation of the appendiceal neoplasm was seen in a majority of cases. Conclusions: GCC neoplasm of the appendix should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with primary appendiceal malignancy. Our cases demonstrated close correlation between our predefined CT pattern and the pathological classification

  9. Goblet cell carcinoid neoplasm of the appendix: Clinical and CT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S., E-mail: kyungmouklee@alum.mit.edu [Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Tang, L.H., E-mail: tangl@mskc.org [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Shia, J., E-mail: shiaj@mskcc.org [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Paty, P.B., E-mail: patyp@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Weiser, M.R., E-mail: weiser1@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Guillem, J.G., E-mail: guillemj@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Temple, L.K., E-mail: temple@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Nash, G.M., E-mail: nashg@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Reidy, D., E-mail: reidyd@mskcc.org [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Saltz, L., E-mail: saltzl@mskcc.org [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Gollub, M.J., E-mail: gollubm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the clinical and CT imaging features of goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) neoplasm of the appendix. Methods and materials: A computer search of pathology and radiology records over a 19-year period at our two institutions was performed using the search string “goblet”. In the patients with appendiceal GCC neoplasms who had abdominopelvic CT, imaging findings were categorized, blinded to gross and surgical description, as: “Appendicitis”, “Prominent appendix without peri-appendiceal infiltration”, “Mass” or “Normal appendix”. The CT appearance was correlated with an accepted pathological classification of: low grade GCC, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC group. Results: Twenty-seven patients (age range, 28–80 years; mean age, 52 years; 15 female, 12 male) with pathology-proven appendiceal GCC neoplasm had CT scans that were reviewed. Patients presented with acute appendicitis (n = 12), abdominal pain not typical for appendicitis (n = 14) and incidental finding (n = 1). CT imaging showed 9 Appendicitis, 9 Prominent appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration, 7 Masses and 2 Normal appendices. Appendicitis (8/9) usually correlated with typical low grade GCC on pathology. In contrast, the majority of Masses and Prominent Appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration were pathologically confirmed to be signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex GCC. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC was seen in only a small minority of patients. Hyperattenuation of the appendiceal neoplasm was seen in a majority of cases. Conclusions: GCC neoplasm of the appendix should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with primary appendiceal malignancy. Our cases demonstrated close correlation between our predefined CT pattern and the pathological classification.

  10. [Cardiac transplantation and neoplasms: experiences at Escola Paulista de Medicina of the Federal University of São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello Junior, Walter Teixeira de; Branco, João Nelson R; Catani, Roberto; Aguiar, Luciano de Figueiredo; Paez, Rodrigo Pereira; Buffolo, Enio

    2006-02-01

    To study the occurrence and types of neoplasms developed by patients who underwent an orthotopic cardiac transplantation under the Program of Cardiac Transplantation of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Federal University of São Paulo. This is an observational study of 106 patients who underwent orthotopic cardiac transplantation from November 1986 to September 2002 and survived at least thirty days following the procedure. The triple immunosuppressive regimen given included cyclosporin A, azathioprine and a corticosteroid agent. Only two patients received OKT3 in addition to the regimen established. Mean follow-up was 61.4 months (ranging from two months to 192 months). Twenty-three patients (21.3%) developed neoplasms--56.5% of these were skin neoplasm, 30.1%, solid tumors, and 13.4% of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Mean interval between transplantation and diagnosis of neoplasm was: 54.9 months for skin neoplasm; 24.8 months for solid tumors and 70.3 months for PTLD. Malignant neoplasms are relatively common in the population studied. Skin cancer was the most common type compared to the other types of neoplasms. Solid tumors were more frequently diagnosed than the lymphoproliferative diseases in the population examined.

  11. Spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaozhu; Chen Kemin; Wu Zhiyuan; Tao Ran; Guo Yan; Zhang Jing; Li Jianying; Shen Yun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT spectral imaging features of pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms and to assess the value of spectral CT in differentiating between pancreatic serous oligocystic adenoma and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Methods: From Feb. 2010 to Dec. 2010, 27 patients with cystic neoplasms of the pancreas (group one with 15 serous oligocystic adenomas and group two with 12 mucinous cystic neoplasms) underwent dual-phase CT spectral imaging followed by surgery. Quantitative values (age, tumor size, CT value change as function of photon energy, effective-Z, iodine-water concentration, and calcium-water concentration) were compared with independent samples t test and Mann-Whitney test and non-quantitative parameters (gender, symptom, and tumor location) were compared with Chi-square test (Fisher exact). The parameters with significant differences between two groups were analyzed further and the performance of multiple parameters for joint differential diagnosis was evaluated with discriminant analysis. Results: Compared to patients with mucinous cystic neoplasms, patients with serous oligocystic adenoma had younger age, lower frequency of being symptomatic and smaller tumor size. The CT values on 40 keV to 60 keV (with 10 keV increment) in late arterial phase [(36±13) HU vs. (62±23) HU, (26±8) HU vs. (40±15) HU, and (19±6) HU vs. (27±10) HU respectively] and 40 keV to 50 keV (with 10 keV increment) in portal venous phase [(43±14) HU vs. (61±25) HU and (30±10) HU vs. (40±16) HU respectively], effective-Z (late arterial phase 7.80± 0.16 vs. 8.05±0.21, and portal venous phase 7.87±0.15 vs 8.02±0.22), concentration of calcium (water) [late arterial phase (5±3) g/L vs. (11±4) g/L, t=-3.836, P=0.001 and portal venous phase (7±3) g/L vs. (10±5) g/L, t=-2.071, P=0.049] and iodine (water) [late arterial phase (0.38±0.24) g/L vs. (0.78±0.32) g/L, t=-3.755, P=0.001 and portal venous phase (0.48± 0.24) g/L vs. (0

  12. [Skin biopsy in diagnosis of chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: pathologist's point of view on quantitative scoring system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzanka, Dariusz; Styczyński, Jan; Debski, Robert; Krenska, Anna; Pacholska, Małgorzata; Prokurat, Andrzej I; Wysocki, Mariusz; Marszałek, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Pathology diagnosis of chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is an important issue in clinical follow-up, in spite of frequent difficulties in interpretation., related to dynamic changes occurring in the skin during the disease, as well as to sequelae of basic disease and immunosuppressive therapy. Recently presented Consensus NIH (National Health Institute, Bethesda, USA) of histopathologic (HP) analysis is still complex and intrinsically divergent, thus clinically difficult to implement. Analysis of clinical value of histological evaluation results of skin biopsy in children after allo-HSCT and its correlation with clinical status. Ten skin biopsies were taken from 7 patients (4 boys, 3 girls, age 3-15 years) after allo-HSCT (6 MFD, 1 MMUD) and analyzed after hematoxylin/eosine and immunohistochemical (CD3, CD45T, CD20) staining. Pathology analysis was based on commonly accepted criteria enabling simple and unambiguous interpretation. Results were compared with clinical data and indications for immunosuppressive therapy. It was found that reliable and coherent interpretation can be made when following parameters were taken into account: 1. in epithelium: the presence of apoptosis, archetypical changes and vacuolar degeneration in the basilar layer, presence of CD3/CD45 in the epidermis; 2. in the dermis: the extent of collagenization, presence of melanophages and lymphocyte infiltrations; 3. in the eccrine glands epithelium: eccrine glands atrophy and presence of lymphocytes. A new scoring system of skin biopsy analysis in patients with chronic GVHD based on the modified NIH Consensus was proposed. The preliminary clinical value of histological results was assessed. Skin biopsy evaluation based on limited qualitative and quantitative analysis of lymphocyte infiltrates together with studies on intensity of apoptosis, collagenization and archetypical changes is a valuable diagnostic method

  13. Reduced Haematopoietic Output in Automobile Mechanics and Sprayers with Chronic Exposure to Petrochemicals: A Case-Control Study in Cape Coast, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Patrick; Pobee, Richard; Awuah, Aaron; Asiamah, Paul B; Amoani, Festus; Gyabaa, Sampson

    2018-01-01

    Automobile mechanics and sprayers are at a higher risk of exposure to hazardous chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals which may cause adverse health outcomes. This study aimed to use reticulocyte count as an indirect measure of the haematological output in automobile mechanics and sprayers in the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana. This cross-sectional study recruited 130 participants: 90 cases (57 automobile mechanics and 33 automobile sprayers) and 40 controls (nonautomobile workers). Venous blood samples were drawn from the participants and examined for full blood count and absolute reticulocyte count. Semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect demographic and occupational safety information from participants. 75.6% of cases had never received occupational safety training. Whereas 35.1% of automobile mechanics routinely siphoned fuel, 36.4% of automobile sprayers never used nose masks in the discharge of their duties. Controls had significantly higher WBC counts compared to mechanics ( p = 0.0001; 5.04 ± 1.7 versus 3.81 ± 1.1), or sprayers ( p = 0.0004; 5.04 ± 1.7 versus 3.74 ± 0.9). Lymphocyte, monocyte, and platelet counts were also significantly higher in controls compared to cases. Whereas RBC counts were significantly higher in controls compared to automobile mechanics (4.85 versus 4.66; p = 0.034), haemoglobin levels were significantly higher in automobile sprayers compared to controls (15.13 versus 14.1 g/dl; p = 0.0126). Absolute reticulocyte count was significantly higher in controls compared to cases [ p mechanics)]. Among the cases however, only RBC counts were significantly lower in automobile mechanics compared to automobile sprayers ( p = 0.0088; 4.66 ± 0.4 versus 4.85 ± 0.5). It was evident that both automobile mechanics and sprayers had significantly reduced haematopoietic output. Occupational safety training is not given priority and must be addressed.

  14. Earlier defibrotide initiation post-diagnosis of veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome improves Day +100 survival following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Paul G; Smith, Angela R; Triplett, Brandon M; Kernan, Nancy A; Grupp, Stephan A; Antin, Joseph H; Lehmann, Leslie; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin; Hannah, Alison L; Nejadnik, Bijan; Soiffer, Robert J

    2017-07-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) is a progressive, potentially fatal complication of conditioning for haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The VOD/SOS pathophysiological cascade involves endothelial-cell activation and damage, and a prothrombotic-hypofibrinolytic state. Severe VOD/SOS (typically characterized by multi-organ dysfunction) may be associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide is approved for treating severe hepatic VOD/SOS post-HSCT in the European Union, and for hepatic VOD/SOS with renal or pulmonary dysfunction post-HSCT in the United States. Previously, defibrotide (25 mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses for a recommended ≥21 days) was available through an expanded-access treatment protocol for patients with VOD/SOS. Data from this study were examined post-hoc to determine if the timing of defibrotide initiation post-VOD/SOS diagnosis affected Day +100 survival post-HSCT. Among 573 patients, defibrotide was started on the day of VOD/SOS diagnosis in approximately 30%, and within 7 days in >90%. The relationship between Day +100 survival and treatment initiation before/after specific days post-diagnosis showed superior survival when treatment was initiated closer to VOD/SOS diagnosis with a statistically significant trend over time for better outcomes with earlier treatment initiation (P defibrotide should not be delayed after diagnosis of VOD/SOS. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Guideline for the prevention of oral and oropharyngeal mucositis in children receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Lillian; Robinson, Paula; Treister, Nathaniel; Baggott, Tina; Gibson, Paul; Tissing, Wim; Wiernikowski, John; Brinklow, Jennifer; Dupuis, L Lee

    2017-03-01

    To develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the prevention of oral mucositis in children (0-18 years) receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The Mucositis Prevention Guideline Development Group was interdisciplinary and included internationally recognised experts in paediatric mucositis. For the evidence review, we included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in either children or adults evaluating the following interventions selected according to prespecified criteria: cryotherapy, low level light therapy (LLLT) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). We also examined RCTs of any intervention conducted in children. For all systematic reviews, we synthesised the occurrence of severe oral mucositis. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to describe quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. We suggest cryotherapy or LLLT may be offered to cooperative children receiving chemotherapy or HSCT conditioning with regimens associated with a high rate of mucositis. We also suggest KGF may be offered to children receiving HSCT conditioning with regimens associated with a high rate of severe mucositis. However, KGF use merits caution as there is a lack of efficacy and toxicity data in children, and a lack of long-term follow-up data in paediatric cancers. No other interventions were recommended for oral mucositis prevention in children. All three specific interventions evaluated in this clinical practice guideline were associated with a weak recommendation for use. There may be important organisational and cost barriers to the adoption of LLLT and KGF. Considerations for implementation and key research gaps are highlighted. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Molecular Diagnostics in the Neoplasms of the Pancreas, Liver, Gallbladder, and Extrahepatic Biliary Tract: 2018 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Bluth, Martin H; Bhalla, Amarpreet

    2018-06-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms, including ductal adenocarcinoma, solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, pancreatic endocrine neoplasms, acinar cell carcinoma, and pancreatoblastoma, are associated with different genetic abnormalities. Hepatic adenomas with beta-catenin exon 3 mutation are associated with a high risk of malignancy. Hepatic adenoma with arginosuccinate synthetase 1 expression or sonic hedgehog mutations are associated with a risk of bleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma and choangiocarcinoma display heterogeneity at both morphologic and molecular levels Cholangiocellular carcinoma is most commonly associated with IDH 1/2 mutations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation, for pancreatic cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Madhava; Habib, Nagy; Senturk, Hakan; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, Nageshwar; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kaba, Iyad; Beckebaum, Susanne; Drymousis, Panagiotis; Kahaleh, Michel; Brugge, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To outline the feasibility, safety, adverse events and early results of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in pancreatic neoplasms using a novel probe. METHODS: This is a multi-center, pilot safety feasibility study. The intervention described was radiofrequency ablation (RF) which was applied with an innovative monopolar RF probe (1.2 mm Habib EUS-RFA catheter) placed through a 19 or 22 gauge fine needle aspiration (FNA) needle once FNA was performed in patients with a tumor in the head of the pancreas. The Habib™ EUS-RFA is a 1 Fr wire (0.33 mm, 0.013”) with a working length of 190 cm, which can be inserted through the biopsy channel of an echoendoscope. RF power is applied to the electrode at the end of the wire to coagulate tissue in the liver and pancreas. RESULTS: Eight patients [median age of 65 (range 27-82) years; 7 female and 1 male] were recruited in a prospective multicenter trial. Six had a pancreatic cystic neoplasm (four a mucinous cyst, one had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and one a microcystic adenoma) and two had a neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the head of pancreas. The mean size of the cystic neoplasm and NET were 36.5 mm (SD ± 17.9 mm) and 27.5 mm (SD ± 17.7 mm) respectively. The EUS-RFA was successfully completed in all cases. Among the 6 patients with a cystic neoplasm, post procedure imaging in 3-6 mo showed complete resolution of the cysts in 2 cases, whilst in three more there was a 48.4% reduction [mean pre RF 38.8 mm (SD ± 21.7 mm) vs mean post RF 20 mm (SD ± 17.1 mm)] in size. In regards to the NET patients, there was a change in vascularity and central necrosis after EUS-RFA. No major complications were observed within 48 h of the procedure. Two patients had mild abdominal pain that resolved within 3 d. CONCLUSION: EUS-RFA of pancreatic neoplasms with a novel monopolar RF probe was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary data suggest that the procedure is straightforward and safe. The

  18. Giant kidney worm (Dioctophyma renale) infection mimicking retroperitoneal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T; Turnbull, A; Lieberman, P H; Sternberg, S S

    1986-07-01

    A 50-year-old Chinese man was found by ultrasound and computed tomography to have a retroperitoneal mass in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. At operation, a hemorrhagic cyst was detected at the upper pole of the right kidney adjacent to the adrenal gland. Microscopic examination revealed that the cyst wall was composed of granulomatous tissue loaded with eggs and cross-sections of parasites, identified as Dioctophyma renale. The eggs were characterized by a birefringent striated double wall. The presence of cross sections of adult worms of D. renale in human tissue has not been previously described. Another unique feature of this case was that the right kidney was intact, as examined grossly at laparotomy and by intravenous pyelography. Eggs were not detected in the urine.

  19. Specific Cytotoxicity Against Autologous Tumour and Proliferative Responses of Human Lymphocytes Grown in Interleukin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-11

    reactivity against tumour cells. These cellular reagents will be useful in defining the antigenicity of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . S, N 0) 02...Stjernswird. of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . 1979; Vose et al., 1978; Vinky et al., 1979). Purifica- The derivation of cultured T cells...mononuclear cells were sepa- had increased 100- to 200-fold. Cells were cultured in rated by floatation on Ficoll-Hypaque (LSM, Litton- medium without IL-2 for

  20. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Liver or Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Bile Duct? A Case Report and a Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunovsky, Lumir; Kala, Zdenek; Svaton, Roman; Moravcik, Petr; Mazanec, Jan; Husty, Jakub; Prochazka, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver (MCN-L) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct (IPMN-B) are diagnoses that were classified by the World Health Organization in 2010 as mucin-producing bile duct tumors of the hepatobiliary system. The preoperative differential diagnosis between these two entities is difficult; the presence of a communication with the bile duct is usually considered as a typical sign of IPMN-B. However, the presence of an ovarian-like stroma (OLS) has been established to define the diagnosis of MCN-L. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a rapid progression of a cystic tumor of the liver. In 2 years, the lesion increased from 27 to 64 mm and a dilation of the left hepatic duct appeared. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage with a biopsy was performed. No malignant cells were found on biopsy. Because of the rapid progression of the cystic tumor and unclear malignant potential, left hemihepatectomy was performed. Even though tumor masses were present in the biliary duct, on the basis of the presence of OLS, histology finally confirmed MCN-L with intermediate-grade intraepithelial dysplasia to high-grade intraepithelial dysplasia. The patient is currently under oncologic follow-up with no signs of recurrence of the disease. We present a rare case where MCN-L caused a dilation of the left hepatic duct, a sign that is usually a characteristic of IPMN-B.

  1. A comparative study of 99Tcm (V)-DMSA imaging with histopathological examination in ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinming; Wang Jianfang; Xu Fang; Yin Jie; Wei Lanxiu; Sun Li

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of 99 Tc m (V)-Dmsa imaging in detecting the ovarian and the pelvic cavity neoplasms. Methods: 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA imaging was performed on 24 patients with diagnosed ovarian neoplasms which were pathologically confirmed after operation. Results: 14 of the 15 patients with malignant ovarian tumors had positive 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA scintigraphy. However, 7 of 9 cases with benign ovarian tumors had negative 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA scintigraphy. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, false positive rate, false negative rate, and accuracy of 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA imaging for detecting malignant ovarian tumors were 93.33%, 77.78%, 87.50%, 87.50%, 14.29%, 6.67% and 87.50%, respectively. Conclusions: 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA imaging is of important value in detecting malignant and benign ovarian and pelvic tumors

  2. WHO Grade IV Gliofibroma: A Grading Label Denoting Malignancy for an Otherwise Commonly Misinterpreted Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A. Escalante Abril

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a 50-year-old woman with no relevant clinical history who presented with headache and loss of memory. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a left parieto-temporal mass with annular enhancement after contrast media administration, rendering a radiological diagnosis of high-grade astrocytic neoplasm. Tumour sampling was performed but the patient ultimately died as a result of disease. Microscopically, the lesion had areas of glioblastoma mixed with a benign mesenchymal constituent; the former showed hypercellularity, endothelial proliferation, high mitotic activity and necrosis, while the latter showed fascicles of long spindle cells surrounded by collagen and reticulin fibers. With approximately 40 previously reported cases, gliofibroma is a rare neoplasm defined as either glio-desmoplastic or glial/benign mesenchymal. As shown in our case, its prognosis is apparently determined by the degree of anaplasia of the glial component.

  3. Imaging findings of neuroendocrine neoplasm in biliary duct with liver metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Hwa; Chung, Dong Jin; Hahn, Sung Tae; Lee, Jae Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    A 64-year-old man was transferred to our hospital because of indigestion and jaundice. The initial abdominal CT and MRI revealed a 2.0 cm enhancing mass in the proximal common bile duct (CBD) with several enlarged lymph nodes. The mass was presumed to be a cholangiocarcinoma, and a CBD segmental resection and choledochojejunostomy was performed. However, the final diagnosis was that of a mixed endocrine-exocrine carcinoma, a high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm. Seven months after the operation, a follow-up abdominal CT study revealed multiple small arterial enhancing nodules in both hepatic lobes. A sono-guided liver biopsy confirmed these as metastastic mixed endocrine-exocrine carcinoma. This case is unique in that the imaging study regarding the neuroendocrine neoplasm of biliary duct has not been previously reported.

  4. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: reporting clinically relevant features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas can exhibit a wide spectrum of macroscopic and microscopic appearances. This not only causes occasional difficulties for the reporting pathologist in distinguishing these tumours from other lesions, but is also relevant clinically. As evidence accumulates, it becomes clear that multiple macroscopic and histological features of these neoplasms are relevant to the risk for malignant transformation and, consequently, of prime importance for clinical patient management. The need for detailed reporting is therefore increasing. This review discusses the panoply of gross and microscopic features of IPMN as well as the recommendations from recent consensus meetings regarding the pathology reporting on this tumour entity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Positron imaging feasibility studies: characteristics of 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rodent and canine neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Weiden, P.L.; Grunbaum, J.

    1981-01-01

    Uptake of [ 3 H]2-deoxyglucose was studied in BALB/c mice with EMT-6 sarcoma, in Buffalo rats with Morris 7777 hepatoma, and in eight dogs with spontaneous neoplasms: five osteosarcomas and three diffuse lymphomas. High tumor-to-tissue ratios were observed for all tumor types studies. In rodents, peak levels of uptake occurred between 30 min and 1 hr, with a slow loss from the tumor of about 10% per hour thereafter. In dogs there was considerable variability in uptake, both between individuals and at different tumor sites within an individual. Necrotic tumor did not take up the radiotracer. Absolute uptakes, when normalized for body weight, were similar for spontaneous and transplanted neoplasms. These studies provide additional support for the concept that positron emission tomography can be used to obtain functional images of important metabolic processes of tumors, including glycolysis

  6. Low-Grade Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasm Involving the Endometrium and Presenting with Mucinous Vaginal Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavinskaya, Vera; Baumgartner, Joel M; Ko, Albert; Saenz, Cheryl C; Valasek, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Primary appendiceal mucinous lesions are uncommon and represent a spectrum from nonneoplastic mucous retention cysts to invasive adenocarcinoma. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) represent an intermediate category on this spectrum and can be classified according to whether or not they are confined to the appendix. Although LAMNs are frequently confined to the appendix, they can also spread to the peritoneum and clinically progress as pseudomyxoma peritonei (i.e., mucinous ascites). Thus, the appropriate classification of appendiceal primary neoplasia is essential for prognosis and influences clinical management. In addition, the precise classification, management, and clinical outcome of patients with disseminated peritoneal disease remain controversial. Here, we report an unusual case of LAMN with pseudomyxoma peritonei that initially presented with mucinous and bloody vaginal discharge. Pathological evaluation revealed low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm with secondary involvement of the peritoneum, ovaries, and endometrial surface. Therefore, LAMN should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mucinous vaginal discharge.

  7. Low-Grade Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasm Involving the Endometrium and Presenting with Mucinous Vaginal Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Vavinskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary appendiceal mucinous lesions are uncommon and represent a spectrum from nonneoplastic mucous retention cysts to invasive adenocarcinoma. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs represent an intermediate category on this spectrum and can be classified according to whether or not they are confined to the appendix. Although LAMNs are frequently confined to the appendix, they can also spread to the peritoneum and clinically progress as pseudomyxoma peritonei (i.e., mucinous ascites. Thus, the appropriate classification of appendiceal primary neoplasia is essential for prognosis and influences clinical management. In addition, the precise classification, management, and clinical outcome of patients with disseminated peritoneal disease remain controversial. Here, we report an unusual case of LAMN with pseudomyxoma peritonei that initially presented with mucinous and bloody vaginal discharge. Pathological evaluation revealed low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm with secondary involvement of the peritoneum, ovaries, and endometrial surface. Therefore, LAMN should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mucinous vaginal discharge.

  8. Role of intraoperative imprint cytology in diagnosis of suspected ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soumit; Misra, Vatsala; Singh, P A; Mishra, Sanjay; Sharma, Nishant

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess whether cytology can help in rapid diagnosis of ovarian neoplasms and thus facilitate individualised treatment. A prospective investigation was performed on 30 cases of suspected ovarian neoplasms. Imprint smears were made intraperatively from fresh samples from various representative areas, and stained with Leishman Giemsa for air-dried smears, and with hematoxylin and eosin and Papanicolaou for alcohol-fixed smears. A rapid opinion regarding the benign or malignant nature of the lesion and the type of tumour was given. The overall sensitivity was 96.2%, specificity 75%, positive predictive value 96.3%, and diagnostic accuracy of 83.3%. Characteristic cytological patterns were noted in various epithelial and germ cell tumours. Imprint cytology can be used as an adjunct to histopathology for rapid and early diagnosis in the operation theatre, thus helping better management of patients.

  9. Hidradenocarcinoma: A Rare Sweat Gland Neoplasm Presenting as Small Turban Tumor of the Scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Dinesh P; Brahmachari, Swagata; Kudligi, Chandramohan; Gupta, Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenocarcinomas are very rare malignant sweat gland tumors that possess an infiltrative and/or low metastatic potential. Here we describe an interesting case of hidradenoma on the fronto-parietal region of the scalp of an elderly female, part of which had developed carcinomatous changes, infiltrating up to the pericranium. She developed intense itching, pain, spontaneous ulceration and rapid increase in the size of the tumor correlating with the expression of malignant behavior of the neoplasm. An initial incision biopsy suggested features of benign poroid hidradenoma, while the histology from the excised tumor exhibited a fairly well circumscribed epithelial neoplasm in dermis consisting of interconnected nodules as well as differentiated ducts, the neoplastic cells showing mild pleomorphism of nuclei, mitotic figures and abundant pale cytoplasm. Clefts, sclerotic stroma and foci of necrosis en mass were also seen. The final diagnosis was a well differentiated and slow growing hidradenocarcinoma. The tumor recurred locally despite total excision.

  10. Hidradenocarcinoma: A rare sweat gland neoplasm presenting as small turban tumor of the scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh P Asati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenocarcinomas are very rare malignant sweat gland tumors that possess an infiltrative and/or low metastatic potential. Here we describe an interesting case of hidradenoma on the fronto-parietal region of the scalp of an elderly female, part of which had developed carcinomatous changes, infiltrating up to the pericranium. She developed intense itching, pain, spontaneous ulceration and rapid increase in the size of the tumor correlating with the expression of malignant behavior of the neoplasm. An initial incision biopsy suggested features of benign poroid hidradenoma, while the histology from the excised tumor exhibited a fairly well circumscribed epithelial neoplasm in dermis consisting of interconnected nodules as well as differentiated ducts, the neoplastic cells showing mild pleomorphism of nuclei, mitotic figures and abundant pale cytoplasm. Clefts, sclerotic stroma and foci of necrosis en mass were also seen. The final diagnosis was a well differentiated and slow growing hidradenocarcinoma. The tumor recurred locally despite total excision.

  11. Malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950 - 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuoka, Shoji; Kawai, Kioko; Shimizu, Yukiko; Inai, Kouki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Fujikura, Toshio; Kato, Hiroo.

    1988-09-01

    For 1950 - 80, 194 ovarian cancer cases were ascertained among the 70,030 females of the RERF Life Span Study (LSS-E85) sample, and 106 autopsied cases with benign ovarian neoplasms were ascertained among all 3,046 autopsies performed in the same sample. On the basis of microscopic review, 66 % of the cancer and 84 % of the benign tumor cases were classified by histological type. The age-adjusted ovarian cancer incidence rates showed a statistically significant increase with increased exposure dose, both in the entire exposed group (P 0.10). The distribution of histological types of both cancer and benign tumor of the ovary did not vary significantly with radiation dose. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that radiation injury of ovaries with secondary excess of gonadotrophic hormones are important causative factors in the development of ovarian neoplasms. (author)

  12. Lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase in human testis and in germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Lindegaard, M L; Friis-Hansen, L

    2009-01-01

    . The results suggest that both EL and LPL participate in the supply of nutrients and steroidogenesis in the testes, and that especially EL may be important for the supply of cholesterol for testosterone production in the Leydig cells. The partial cellular separation of the expression of the two lipases...

  13. Follicular neoplasms of the thyroid: importance of clinical and cytological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-García, Martín; Cortés-Flores, Ana Olivia; del Carmen González-Ramírez, Imelda; Cano-Valdez, Ana María; Flores-Hernández, Lorena; Aguilar-Ponce, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid cancer presents as nodules. Thyroid nodules are frequent, but only 5-30% are malignant. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is useful for initial evaluation; nevertheless, malignancy is uncertain when follicular neoplasm is reported. Some factors can be associated with malignancy. Therefore, we analyzed our follicular neoplasms in order to identify those factors associated with a higher risk of malignancy. We analyzed the clinical files of consecutive patients with cytological diagnoses of follicular neoplasm. From 1,005 cases of thyroid nodules, 121 were follicular neoplasms according to cytology. Of these, 75 were surgically treated. Definitive report showed 45 benign (60%) and 30 malignant (40%) cases. Benign cases included 29 goiters, 11 follicular adenomas, and 5 cases of thyroiditis. Malignant cases were comprised of 12 papillary carcinomas, 4 follicular carcinomas, 3 papillary carcinomas-follicular variant, 1 lymphoma, 1 teratoma, 5 medullary carcinomas, 2 insular carcinomas, 1 anaplastic carcinoma and 1 metastatic breast carcinoma. Tumor size of benign lesions was 3.43 ± 2.04 cm, and 4.67 ± 2.78 (p = 0.049) for malignant lesions. Age was 46.95 ± 15.39 years for benign lesions and 48.67 ± 17.28 for malignant lesions (p = 0.66). Fifty percent of males showed malignancy vs. 37.7% of females (p < 0.005). Our results suggest that size and gender, but not age, are associated with cytological pattern. Ultrasonographic characteristics may be useful discriminating patients with a higher risk of malignancy. FNAB is a useful tool for initial evaluation of thyroid nodules, but clinical evaluation can enhance predictive value.

  14. Second malignant neoplasms after childhood cancer: a report of three cases of osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ironside, J.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The rising incidence of second malignant neoplasms after childhood cancer, whilst due in part to increasing numbers of survivors, is also thought to be related to increasingly more intensive combined modality treatment schedules. Three illustrative cases are reported in which radiation therapy in childhood for the first cancer is thought to have been a significant aetiological factor in the pathogenesis of the second malignancy (which in all three patients was an osteogenic sarcoma). (author)

  15. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Su; Jung, Woon Tae; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of...

  16. Canine ovarian neoplasms: a clinicopathologic study of 71 cases, including histology of 12 granulosa cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, A K; Greenlee, P G

    1987-11-01

    In a retrospective study of 71 primary ovarian tumors in the dog, epithelial tumors (46%) were more common than sex cord stromal (34%) and germ cell tumors (20%). There were more adenocarcinomas (64%) than adenomas. Sex cord stromal tumors were equally divided into Sertoli-Leydig (12/24) and granulosa cell tumors (12/24). There were equal numbers (7/14) of dysgerminomas and teratomas among the germ cell tumors. Most teratomas (6/7) were malignant. Most granulosa cell tumors were solid; two were mostly cystic. Patterns included sheets of round and ovoid to spindle-shaped cells separated by thin, fibrovascular stroma; neoplastic cells formed rosettes or Call-Exner bodies. In some areas, neoplastic cells were in cords or columns and formed cyst-like structures. Four granulosa cell tumors were macrofollicular, having cysts lined with granulosa cells. Median ages of dogs with different ovarian neoplasms were similar; all were more than 10 years old, except the dogs with teratoma (mean age, 4 years). Most neoplasms were unilateral (84%), except the Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, many of which were bilateral (36%). Size of ovarian neoplasms varied (2 cm3 to 15,000 cm3). Twenty-nine percent of neoplasms metastasized; adenocarcinomas (48%) and malignant teratomas (50%) had the highest rates, and distant metastasis was more common in malignant teratoma. Endometrial hyperplasia was in 67% of the dogs; it was most common in dogs with sex cord stromal tumors (95%). Uterine malignancy was not seen in dogs with granulosa cell tumors, although hyperplasia endometrium was in all dogs with this tumor. Cysts in the contralateral ovaries were most common in dogs with sex cord stromal tumors.

  17. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Nourelahi; Roshannia; Kameli; Hormozi

    2016-01-01

    Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodonta...

  18. Spectrum of myeloid neoplasms and immune deficiency associated with germline GATA2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Mir, Muhammad A; Kochuparambil, Samith T; Abraham, Roshini S; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Howard, Matthew; Hsu, Amy P; Jackson, Amie E; Holland, Steven M; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2015-01-01

    Guanine-adenine-thymine-adenine 2 (GATA2) mutated disorders include the recently described MonoMAC syndrome (Monocytopenia and Mycobacterium avium complex infections), DCML (dendritic cell, monocyte, and lymphocyte deficiency), familial MDS/AML (myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia) (myeloid neoplasms), congenital neutropenia, congenital lymphedema (Emberger's syndrome), sensorineural deafness, viral warts, and a spectrum of aggressive infections seen across all age groups. While c...

  19. Low-Grade Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasm Involving the Endometrium and Presenting with Mucinous Vaginal Discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Vavinskaya, Vera; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Ko, Albert; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Valasek, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary appendiceal mucinous lesions are uncommon and represent a spectrum from nonneoplastic mucous retention cysts to invasive adenocarcinoma. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) represent an intermediate category on this spectrum and can be classified according to whether or not they are confined to the appendix. Although LAMNs are frequently confined to the appendix, they can also spread to the peritoneum and clinically progress as pseudomyxoma peritonei (i.e., mucinous ascit...

  20. Non-squamous cell neoplasms of the larynx: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M; Moulin, G; Kurt, A M; Dulgerov, P; Vukanovic, S; Zbären, P; Marchal, F; Rüfenacht, D A; Terrier, F

    1998-01-01

    A variety of benign and malignant non-squamous cell neoplasms may affect the larynx. Most of these uncommon laryngeal neoplasms are located beneath an intact mucosa, making diagnosis difficult with endoscopy alone, and sampling errors may occur if only traditional superficial biopsies are performed. In some laryngeal neoplasms, radiologic evaluation allows the correct diagnosis. Hemangiomas have very high signal intensity at T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and strong enhancement at both computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging after administration of contrast material. Phleboliths, which are pathognomonic for hemangiomas, are easily identified at CT. Chondrogenic tumors typically manifest with coarse or stippled calcifications at CT. Because of their high water content, chondrogenic tumors have very high signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images, whereas only moderate enhancement is observed after administration of contrast material. Lipomas typically manifest at both CT and MR imaging as homogeneous nonenhancing lesions. They are isoattenuating to subcutaneous fat at CT and isointense relative to subcutaneous fat with all MR pulse sequences. Metastases from renal adenocarcinoma typically demonstrate strong contrast enhancement and flow voids at MR imaging, and metastases from melanotic melanoma usually have high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted images owing to the paramagnetic properties of melanin. Although radiologic findings are nonspecific in most other non-squamous cell neoplasms of the larynx (eg, Kaposi sarcoma, hematopoietic tumors, tumors of the minor salivary glands, metastases from amelanotic melanoma), cross-sectional imaging can play an important role in the diagnostic work-up of these unusual tumors by delineating the extent of submucosal tumor spread and directing the endoscopist to the appropriate site for the deep, transmucosal biopsies needed to establish the diagnosis. In addition, CT

  1. Dietary One-Carbon Nutrient Intake and Risk of Lymphoid and Myeloid Neoplasms: Results of the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, H.C.; Verhage, B.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous epidemiologic research suggests a protective role of one-carbon nutrients in carcinogenesis. Folate, however, may play a dual role in neoplasms development: protect early in carcinogenesis and promote carcinogenesis at a later stage. We prospectively examined associations

  2. Study of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and Angiogenesis in Urothelial neoplasms: Correlation with tumor grade and stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojan Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: PCNA and CD31 when used together are valuable markers to help classify urothelial neoplasms in limited tumor material. However, larger prospective studies are required for better prognostication.

  3. The impact of interferon-alpha2 on HLA genes in patients with polycythemia vera and related neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression profiling in Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have unraveled significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes of potential importance for clonal evolution. Other mechanisms might be downregulation of major histocompatibility class ...

  4. Clinical evaluation of neoplasms with localized P-31 spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, H.C.; Sostman, H.D.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Leopold, K.A.; Oleson, J.; Harrelson, J.

    1988-01-01

    Forty integrated P-31 MR spectroscopy and H-1 MR imaging studies were accomplished in eight humans and four dogs with soft-tissue sarcomas on a 1.5-T Signa MR system (General Electric) with the H-1 body coil and a 6-cm diameter P-31 surface coil. Proton MR imaging studies (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and GRASS) were performed prior to the spectroscopic study. Phosphorus studies (repetition time = 1,500 msec) were acquired with both simple B1 localization and 1D-chemical shift imaging (FOV = 128 cm, no. of views = 128, TX = 12.8 min). Patients were treated with fractionated radiation therapy and radio-frequency hyperthermia over 1 month. Patients underwent definitive resection 3 weeks after completion of radiation therapy, while canines were followed clinically. Of note was significant variation in PCr, PME, Pi, and PDE with spatial location in the tissue. The metabolic profile of these tumors as measured by P-31 spectroscopy altered significantly during therapy

  5. Cruciferous vegetables and risk of colorectal neoplasms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Genevieve; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-01-01

    Evidence shows cruciferous vegetables exhibit chemoprotective properties, commonly attributed to their rich source of isothiocyanates. However, epidemiological data examining the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and colorectal neoplasms have been inconclusive. This meta-analysis examines the epidemiological evidence to characterize the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and risk of developing colorectal neoplasms. Thirty-three articles were included in the meta-analysis after a literature search of electronic databases. Subgroup analysis for individual cruciferae types (n = 8 studies) and GST polymorphism (n = 8 studies) were performed. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (ORs) comparing highest and lowest categories of dietary pattern scores were calculated. Results show a statistically significant inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and colon cancer [OR = 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72-0.98; P value heterogeneity colorectal (CRC) neoplasms (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.65-0.99; P value heterogeneity = 0.02). Stratification by GST genotype reveals that the GSTT1 null genotype confers a reduction in CRC risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.64-0.95; P value heterogeneity = 0.32). This study provides support to the hypothesis that cruciferous vegetable intake protects against cancer of the colon. This study also demonstrates the significance of gene-diet interactions and the importance of assessing individual cruciferous vegetables.

  6. Positron imaging feasibility studies: characteristics of [3H]thymidine uptake in rodent and canine neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Weiden, P.L.; Grunbaum, J.

    1981-01-01

    Uptake [ 3 H]thymidine was studied in BALB/c mice with EMT-6 sarcoma, in Buffalo rats with Morris 7777 hepatoma, and in nine dogs with spontaneous neoplasms: four lymphomas, two osteosarcomas, two soft-tissue sarcomas, and a thyroid carcinoma. High tumor-to-tissue ratios were observed for all tumor types assayed, and absolute uptakes, when computed as percent dose per gram tumor normalized for body weight, were similar for transplanted and spontaneous tumors. In the rodent tumors, radiothymidine was retained for at least 3 hr in the tumor without appreciable loss. In canine neoplasms, although the highest uptakes were observed in cellular tumors with many mitotic figures, tumor uptake showed significant variability that did not correlate with any obvious histologic change, and thus may reflect true biologic differences in metabolism among tumors at different sites in the same animal. These studies provide additional experimental evidence that the ratios of neoplastic to normal tissue and the kinetics of thymidine uptake by tumors are suitable for positron emission tomography of neoplasms in small and large, animals, including both transplanted and spontaneous tumors

  7. Coccidiomycosis infection of the patella mimicking a neoplasm – two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yi-Chen; Calvert, George; Hanrahan, Christopher J; Jones, Kevin B; Randall, Robert Lor

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an endemic fungal infection in the southwestern of United States. Most infections are asymptomatic or manifest with mild respiratory complaints. Rare cases may cause extrapulmonary or disseminated disease. We report two cases of knee involvement that presented as isolated lytic lesions of the patella mimicking neoplasms. The first case, a 27 year-old immunocompetent male had progressive left anterior knee pain for four months. The second case was a 78 year-old male had left anterior knee pain for three months. Both of them had visited general physicians without conclusive diagnosis. A low attenuation lytic lesion in the patella was demonstrated on their image studies, and the initial radiologist’s interpretation was suggestive of a primary bony neoplasm. The patients were referred for orthopaedic oncology consultation. The first case had a past episode of pulmonary coccioidomycosis 2 years prior, while the second case had no previous coccioidal infection history but lived in an endemic area, the central valley of California. Surgical biopsy was performed in both cases due to diagnostic uncertainty. Final pathologic examination revealed large thick walled spherules filled with endospores establishing the final diagnosis of extrapulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Though history and laboratory findings are supportive, definitive diagnosis still depends on growth in culture or endospores identified on histology. We suggest that orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists keep in mind that chronic fungal infections can mimic osseous neoplasm by imaging

  8. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Mera, Kiyomi; Doi, Toshihiko; Sano, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed our clinical experiences of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer (EC) in 44 patients with multiple primary malignant neoplasms. Among them, 34 were accompanied with synchronous tumors, 8 were accompanied with antecedent tumors and 8 with subsequent tumors. The sites of primary malignant neoplasms were as follows; stomach 24 (43.6%), head and neck 17 (30.9%), colon and rectum 4 (7.3%). Among the 19 patients with synchronous cancer in the stomach, 6 patients underwent gastrectomy or endoscopic mucosal resection before CRT, and the others received definitive CRT as initial treatment. While 5 patients were alive without recurrence of EC and gastric cancer, more than half of the patients died of EC. Among 11 patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), 9 patients underwent surgery for HNC before CRT, because the clinical stages of the HNC was more progressive than that of EC. Only 3 patients achieved complete cure of both EC and HNC. The number of patients who developed subsequent tumors after CRT for EC was too small for us to draw definitive conclusions from our discussion, so further long-term follow-up and analysis based on large-scale surveys are required. Although CRT has become one of the standard treatments for EC, there is no treatment strategy for patients with both EC and other malignant primary neoplasms. Our results suggest that we should consider the curability of EC by CRT when we treat such patients. (author)

  9. Clinicopathological characteristics of synchronous and metachronous gastric neoplasms after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi Young; Oh, Wang Guk; Ko, Sung Jun; Han, Shang Hoon; Baek, Hoon Ki; Lee, Young Jae; Kim, Ji Woong; Jung, Gum Mo; Cho, Yong Keun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become accepted as a minimally invasive treatment for gastric neoplasms. However, the development of synchronous or metachronous gastric lesions after endoscopic resection has become a major problem. We investigated the characteristics of multiple gastric neoplasms in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC) or gastric adenoma after ESD. Methods In total, 512 patients with EGC or gastric adenoma who had undergone ESD between January 2008 and December 2011 participated in this study. The incidence of and factors associated with synchronous and metachronous gastric tumors were investigated in this retrospective study. Results In total, 66 patients (12.9%) had synchronous lesions, and 13 patients (2.5%) had metachronous lesions. Older (> 65 years) subjects had an increased risk of multiple gastric neoplasms (p = 0.012). About two-thirds of the multiple lesions were similar in macroscopic and histological type to the primary lesions. The median interval from the initial lesions to the diagnosis of metachronous lesions was 31 months. The annual incidence rate of metachronous lesions was approximately 3%. Conclusions We recommend careful follow-up in patients of advanced age (> 65 years) after initial ESD because multiple lesions could be detected in the remnant stomach. Annual surveillance might aid in the detection of metachronous lesions. Large-scale, multicenter, and longer prospective studies of appropriate surveillance programs are needed. PMID:24307844

  10. Neoplasms in dogs receiving low-level gamma radiation during pre- and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Thomassen, R.W.; Hargis, A.M.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    Mortality because of neoplasia was examined in Segment III dogs exposed to 0,20, or 100 R of 60 Co gamma radiation in prenatal and early postnatal life. During the inital 10 years of the experiment (through January 31, 1978) 20 dogs died or were killed because of neoplasia, 19 having been irradiated. Tumors in these 19 irradiated dogs included 5 malignant lymphomas, 8 carcinomas (2 of mammary origin, 2 of prostatic origin, and 1 each or oral mucosa, ovary, urinary bladder, and thyroid origin), 4 sarcomas (2 hemangiosarcomas, 1 fibrosarcoma and 1 mast cell sarcoma), 1 astrocytoma, and 1 hepatocellular adenoma. Neoplasms occurred in all irradiated groups except 8 dpc (20 and 100R) and 70 dpp (100R). Eleven neoplasms developed in dogs irradiated perinatally (55 dpc or 2 dpp) with 20 or 100R. Four of the tumors in the perinatally irradiated dogs were detected before 2 years of age. The earliest death was at 3 months, because of an astrocytoma. A single sham-irradiated dog died or a malignant tumor, a mammary carcinoma. Preliminary analyses point to three findings of particular interest: the preponderance of neoplasms causing death or euthanasia occurred in irradiated dogs, the unusual finding of four deaths because of neoplasia prior to 2 years of age in perinatally irradiated dogs, and the occurrence of five malignant lymphomas in this relatively small irradiated population

  11. The Utilization of Imaging Features in the Management of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palmucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs represent a group of cystic pancreatic neoplasms with large range of clinical behaviours, ranging from low-grade dysplasia or borderline lesions to invasive carcinomas. They can be grouped into lesions originating from the main pancreatic duct, main duct IPMNs (MD-IPMNs, and lesions which arise from secondary branches of parenchyma, denominated branch-duct IPMNs (BD-IPMNs. Management of these cystic lesions is essentially based on clinical and radiological features. The latter have been very well described in the last fifteen years, with many studies published in literature showing the main radiological features of IPMNs. Currently, the goal of imaging modalities is to identify “high-risk stigmata” or “worrisome feature” in the evaluation of pancreatic cysts. Marked dilatation of the main duct (>1 cm, large size (3–5 cm, and intramural nodules have been associated with increased risk of degeneration. BD-IPMNs could be observed as microcystic or macrocystic in appearance, with or without communication with main duct. Their imaging features are frequently overlapped with cystic neoplasms. The risk of progression for secondary IPMNs is lower, and subsequently an imaging based follow-up is very often proposed for these lesions.

  12. Pelvic exenteration for locally advanced primary and recurrent pelvic neoplasm: a series of 54 resectable cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Renato Pais Costa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report on a series of 54 patients with pelvic neoplasms submitted to curative pelvic exenteration at a tertiary hospital and describe the results (morbidity, mortality, and long-term survival. Methods: The complete data of 54 patients submitted to pelvic exenteration between 1999 and 2007 were evaluated. Sixteen men and 38 women with a mean age of 65 years and median age of 66 years (36 to 77 were studied. Surgical procedures included total pelvic exenteration (n = 26, anterior pelvic exenteration(n = 5, and posterior pelvic exenteration (n = 23. Rresults: The mean operative time was 402 minutes (280 to 585. The average volume of intraoperative bleeding was 2,013 ml (300 to 5,800. Postoperative mortality was 5% (n = 3. The overall morbidity rate was 46%(n = 25. Histological evaluation demonstrated that 47 resections were R0 (87% while seven were R1 (13%. The overall survival rate in five years was 23.5% (n = 12. Cconclusions: Despite its aggressive nature and high morbidity, pelvic exenteration is still justified in locally advanced pelvic neoplasms or even in isolated pelvic recurrence, since it affords a greater long-term control of the neoplasm.

  13. Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma: synchronous and metachronous occurrence with neoplasms other than mesenchymal liver hamartoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasljevic, Gorana; Lamovec, Janez; Jancar, Janez

    2011-08-01

    Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma (UELS) is a rare tumor that typically occurs in children. The association of UELS with neoplasm other than mesenchymal liver hamartoma is exceedingly rare. The aim of the study was to report 3 cases of UELS, 2 of them being interesting because of their association with another neoplasm, vaginal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a teenage girl and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a middle-aged woman. Besides, one of our cases of UELS, in a 58-year-old woman, is an extremely rare presentation of such a tumor in a middle-aged adult. The patient's clinical features, therapy, and pathologic results were reviewed; immunohistochemical analysis and, in 2 cases, electron microscopy were performed. In this study, all 3 patients were females aged 13, 13, and 58 years. Histopathologic evaluation of resected liver tumors confirmed the diagnosis of UELS in all of them. In 2 of the cases, metachronous occurrence of UELS with vaginal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a teenage girl and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a middle-aged woman is described. Careful clinical analysis, histologic studies, and immunohistochemistry are mandatory to distinguish UELS from other hepatic malignancies with similar or overlapping features and to exclude the possibility of other tumors that may be considered in the differential diagnosis. The association of UELS with another neoplasm is exceedingly rare. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Wallace, S. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1998-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of {sup 111}In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. {sup 111}In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  15. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A.; Wallace, S.

    1998-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of 111 In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. 111 In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  16. Endoscopic surgery and photodynamic therapy for behign and malignant neoplasms of colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Razzhivina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature for current methods of endoscopic treatment for colon epithelial neoplasms is represented. Such types of endoscopic interventions as loop electroresection, submucosal dissection, coagulation and destruction of tumors and combination of several options depending on efficiency of previous therapy is analyzed. Limitations of every method, its special aspects and possible complications are described. Special focus is on specifics of neoplasms for which selected methods may be the most effective. Thus, hot biopsy and destruction using high-energy laser is efficient for small flat neoplasms, endoscopic electroexcision – far small pedunculated lesions, and fragmentation is adequate for exophytic tumors more than 2.0 cm. Long-term results of endoscopic treatment, recurrence rates after different options are represented. The literature for photodynamic therapy consists mostly articles about development (on pre-clenecal stage of new photosensitizers which are effective for colon cancer, new methods of treatment including combination with hyperthermia in low-dose light irradiation etc. The literature data shows the prospectivity of subsequent developments in this field. 

  17. Diagnostic radiology for head and neck neoplasms with emphasis on computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.L.; Manzione, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The radiologic evaluation of head and neck neoplasms constitutes an important part in their diagnosis and treatment. The introduction of computerized tomography (CT) and the further development of this modality since 1972 have contributed significantly to the staging of these neoplasms. CT not only demonstrates soft tissue densities, but also bony structures, muscles, fascial planes, opacified vascular structures, and enlarged lymph nodes. CT, however, fails to differentiate the various histologic types of lesions in the majority of cases. Features such as size of the lesion, marginal definition, lytic bone destruction, sclerotic bony reaction, bony expansion, calcific densities, fat content, and obliteration of fascial planes are utilized to delimit the spectrum of diagnostic possibilities. Conventional films including tomography are also indicated as preliminary examinations in the investigation of head and neck neoplasms. They provide a survey of the abnormality in question and form the basis for special studies such as CT and angiography. They are often the first examination to demonstrate a lesion that may be suspected from the history and clinical examination. 13 refs.; 11 figs

  18. [Therapeutic effect of cervical Jiaji electroacupuncture on postoperative intractable hiccup of liver neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S K; Gao, W B; Liu, Y; He, H

    2018-02-23

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of cervical Jiaji electroacupuncture on postoperative intractable hiccup of liver neoplasms. Methods: A total of 39 patients with postoperative intractable hiccup of liver neoplasms in The First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine from May 2013 to May 2017 were collected and divided into 2 groups randomly. The electroacupuncture group included 20 cases, the control group included 19 cases. Patients in the electroacupuncture group were treated by cervical Jiaji electroacupuncture (located in C3-5, sympathetic ganglion), while the control group were treated by metoclopramide combined with chlorpromazine for three days. The therapeutic effects of two groups were compared and the onset time were recorded. Results: Total effective rates of electroacupuncture group and control group were 95.0% and 47.4%, respectively. The onset time in electroacupuncture group and control group were (14.8±3.3) h and (30.5±3.1) h, respectively ( P electroacupuncture for 3 days, 6 cases were recovered, 3 cases became better, while 1 case demonstrated no response. No serious adverse reactions were appeared in each group. Conclusion: Cervical Jiaji electroacupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for postoperative intractable hiccup of liver neoplasms, and it can be used as a remedy for intractable hiccup patients who don't respond to drug treatment.

  19. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2013 for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Kato, Hidenori; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The third version of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms was published in 2013. The guidelines comprise nine chapters and nine algorithms. Each chapter includes a clinical question, recommendations, background, objectives, explanations, and references. This revision was intended to collect up-to-date international evidence. The highlights of this revision are to (1) newly specify costs and conflicts of interest; (2) describe the clinical significance of pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, including variant histologic types; (3) describe more clearly the indications for laparoscopic surgery as the standard treatment; (4) provide guidelines for post-treatment hormone replacement therapy; (5) clearly differentiate treatment of advanced or recurrent cancer between the initial treatment and the treatment carried out after the primary operation; (6) collectively describe fertility-sparing therapy for both atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrioid adenocarcinoma (corresponding to G1) and newly describe relapse therapy after fertility-preserving treatment; and (7) newly describe the treatment of trophoblastic disease. Overall, the objective of these guidelines is to clearly delineate the standard of care for uterine body neoplasms in Japan with the goal of ensuring a high standard of care for all Japanese women diagnosed with uterine body neoplasms.

  20. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas: radiologic and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ik; Lim, Joo Won; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Jae Hoon; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jeong Ho

    1994-01-01

    Computed tomographic(CT), ultrasonographic(US) findings of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas were correlated with pathologic findings for the better understanding of this disease entity. A retrospective review of CT and US of 14 cases of solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas was carried out in terms of the margin, internal architecture, calcification and septation, and this was correlated with gross pathologic findings. CT and US findings were well defined round masses consisting of both solid and cystic components. Five cases were cystic, four cases were solid and five cases were mixed. Cystic portion of the tumor represented variable degree of hemorrhagic necrosis. Six cases contained foci of calcification, which were linear, marginal and amorphous. Marginal calcification interfered US examination of the mass in three cases. Internal septum was demonstrated in four cases on CT, one case on US and three cases on gross specimen. Our results indicate that calcification and internal septum were considered as a part of radiologic findings in solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

  1. DNA mismatch repair deficiency accelerates lung neoplasm development in K-rasLA1/+ mice: a brief report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Inherited as well as acquired deficiencies in specific DNA mismatch repair (MMR) components are associated with the development of a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms. Loss of key members such as MSH2 and MLH1 severely cripples the ability of the cell to recognize and correct such lesions as base:base mismatches and replicative DNA polymerase errors such as slippages at repetitive sequences. Genomic instability resulting from MMR deficiency not only predisposes cells to malignant transformation but may also promote tumor progression. To test the latter, we interbred Msh2 −/− mice with the K-ras LA1/+ transgenic line that spontaneously develops a range of premalignant and malignant lung lesions. Compared to K-ras LA1/+ mice, K-ras LA1/+ ; Msh2 −/− mice developed lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas at an increased frequency and also demonstrated evidence of accelerated adenocarcinoma growth. Since MMR defects have been identified in some human lung cancers, the mutant mice may not only be of preclinical utility but they will also be useful in identifying gene alterations able to act in concert with Kras mutants to promote tumor progression

  2. Clinical experience with the new tumor-associated antigen CA 19-9 compared with CEA in different neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, R.; Dimitriadis, K.; Giesche, U.; Aulbert, E.; Hoffmann, B.; Schmidt, C.G.; Balzer, K.

    1984-10-01

    A new tumour-associated antigen was recently reported by Koprowski. It can be detected in human serum by a monoclonal antibody. This antigen CA 19-9 was determined in 498 patients, and simultaneous determinations of CEA were performed in 468 patients. The patients were divided into five groups: 77 non-malignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, 55 gastrointestinal cancer, 174 breast cancer, 101 lung cancer, and 61 other neoplasms. We found nearly the same frequency of positive CA 19-9 and CEA specimens. In the group of gastrointestinal cancer with clinically confirmed tumour 56.5% of the serum specimens were CEA positive and 54.3% were CA 19-9 positive. No patient with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11) was CA 19-9 positive, but three were CEA positive. In female breast cancer we found 48.7% CEA positive and 15.4% CA 19-9 positive, in lung cancer 40.6% CEA positive and only 11.5% CA 19-9 positive. CA 19-9 appears to be superior to CEA with respect to the discrimination of non-malignant and malignant diseases of the pancreas. The sensitivity is not sufficient for the early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. In the other gastrointestinal malignomas discordant levels of both markers were detected in 10% of the patients. This means an improvement of cancer detection. The sensitivity of CA 19-9 is apparently not sufficient for breast and lung cancer.

  3. Heterozygous and homozygous JAK2(V617F states modeled by induced pluripotent stem cells from myeloproliferative neoplasm patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Saliba

    Full Text Available JAK2(V617F is the predominant mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. Modeling MPN in a human context might be helpful for the screening of molecules targeting JAK2 and its intracellular signaling. We describe here the derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell lines from 2 polycythemia vera patients carrying a heterozygous and a homozygous mutated JAK2(V617F, respectively. In the patient with homozygous JAK2(V617F, additional ASXL1 mutation and chromosome 20 allowed partial delineation of the clonal architecture and assignation of the cellular origin of the derived iPS cell lines. The marked difference in the response to erythropoietin (EPO between homozygous and heterozygous cell lines correlated with the constitutive activation level of signaling pathways. Strikingly, heterozygous iPS cells showed thrombopoietin (TPO-independent formation of megakaryocytic colonies, but not EPO-independent erythroid colony formation. JAK2, PI3K and HSP90 inhibitors were able to block spontaneous and EPO-induced growth of erythroid colonies from GPA(+CD41(+ cells derived from iPS cells. Altogether, this study brings the proof of concept that iPS can be used for studying MPN pathogenesis, clonal architecture, and drug efficacy.

  4. Estimating the impact of natural and technogenic factors on the incidence of malignant neoplasms in Altai krai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, A. N.; Kovrigin, A. O.; Lazarev, A. F.; Lubennikov, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollution by industry and motor vehicles, the use of coal ash for the construction of residential and nonresidential buildings, and the presence of dead zones in the residential sector are the main factors of carcinogenic risk to human health. Natural factors (such as topography and prevailing wind directions) can weaken or strengthen technogenic factors. Based on the estimate of pollutant concentrations in the snow cover of Barnaul, we reveal residential areas that are located at the crossroads of atmospheric transport of carcinogenic substances and characterized by concentrations considerably exceeding the maximum allowable concentration. These areas are characterized by the integral accumulation of carcinogenic substances concurrently from multiple sources; for almost any wind rose, the impact of one of the pollution sources is observed throughout the year. The assessment of the carcinogenic risk for a territory depends much on the correlation between local topography and the height of apartments above ground level. Using cancer register data for Barnaul, we reveal an increased level of the incidence of malignant neoplasms in people living in high-rise buildings located in areas with a sharp change in topography (such as ledges, hills, and lowlands). This may occur due to stagnant zones and wind shadows; under certain correlation between topography and the height and shape of buildings, carcinogenic substances accumulate maximally.

  5. Plasma protein profiling of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas as potential precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilies, Maria; Sappa, Praveen Kumar; Iuga, Cristina Adela; Loghin, Felicia; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Beyer, Georg; Lerch, Markus M; Völker, Uwe; Mayerle, Julia; Hammer, Elke

    2018-02-01

    Efforts for the early diagnosis of the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have recently been driven to one of the precursor lesions, namely intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN). Only a few studies have focused on IPMN molecular biology and its overall progression to cancer. Therefore, IPMN lacks comprehensive characterization which makes its clinical management controversial. In this study, we characterized plasma proteins in the presence of IPMNs in comparison to healthy controls, chronic pancreatitis, and PDAC by a proteomics approach using data-independent acquisition based mass spectrometry. We describe several protein sets that could aid IPMN diagnosis, but also differentiation of IPMN from healthy controls, as well as from benign and malignant diseases. Among all, high levels of carbonic anhydrases and hemoglobins were characteristic for the IPMN group. By employing ELISA based quantification we validated our results for human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1). We consider IPMN management directed towards an early potential cancer development a crucial opportunity before PDAC initiation and thus its early detection and cure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. THE EFFECT OF POLYMORPHISM IN GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES ON THE DEVELOPING SECOND MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS AFTER LEUKEMIA TREATMENT IN CHILDHOOD

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    Janez Jazbec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Survivors of childhood leukemia have an increased risk of developing second malignant neoplasms and specific treatment factors such as alkylating agents, topoisomerase inhibitors and radiation have been associated with their occurrence. Genetic polymorphism in drug-metabolizing enzymes may result in impared detoxification of chemotherapeutics and may lead to increased risk for cancer.Methods. To test if polymorphism in glutathione S-transferases (GST genes is associated with occurrence of secondary malignant neoplasms, we compared GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes among 16 patients treated for childhood leukemia in whom second neoplasm occurred and matched the control group.Results. GSTM1 null genotype was found in 44% of patients with second neoplasms and in 50% in control group (p = 0.768, GSTT1 null genotype in 19% of cases and in 29% of controls (p = 0.729 and GSTP1 105 Ile/ile in 50% of cases and 37% of controls (p = 0.537. Differences in distribution of GST genotypes in patients with second neoplasms after childhood leukemia, compared to a matched control group of patients were not statistically significant.Conclusions. In our study we were not able to show relation between GST genotype and occurrence of second neoplasms after the childhood acute leukemia.

  7. Prognostic value of C-reactive protein levels in patients with bone neoplasms: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyi; Luo, Xujun; Liu, Zhongyue; Chen, Yanqiao; Li, Zhihong

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of retrospective studies that investigated the association of preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels with the overall survival (OS) of patients with bone neoplasms. A detailed literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Embase and PubMed databases up to August 28, 2017, for related research publications written in English. We extracted the data from these studies and combined the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the correlation between CRP levels and OS in patients with bone neoplasms. Five studies with a total of 816 participants from several countries were enrolled in this current meta-analysis. In a pooled analysis of all the publications, increased serum CRP levels had an adverse prognostic effect on the overall survival of patients with bone neoplasms. However, the combined data showed no significant relationship between the level of CRP and OS in Asian patients (HR = 1.73; 95% CI: 0.86-3.49; P = 0.125). Similar trends were observed in patients with bone neoplasms when stratified by ethnicity, histology, metastasis and study sample size. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that increased CRP expression indicates a poorer prognosis in patients with bone neoplasms. More prospective studies are needed to confirm the prognostic significance of CRP levels in patients with bone neoplasms.

  8. Rate of detection of advanced neoplasms in proximal colon by simulated sigmoidoscopy vs fecal immunochemical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni; Quintero, Enrique; Álvarez, Cristina; Bujanda, Luis; Cubiella, Joaquín; Salas, Dolores; Lanas, Angel; Carballo, Fernando; Morillas, Juan Diego; Hernández, Cristina; Jover, Rodrigo; Hijona, Elizabeth; Portillo, Isabel; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Turnes, Alfonso; Menéndez-Villalva, Carlos; González-Mao, Carmen; Sala, Teresa; Ponce, Marta; Andrés, Mercedes; Teruel, Gloria; Peris, Antonio; Sopeña, Federico; González-Rubio, Francisca; Seoane-Urgorri, Agustín; Grau, Jaume; Serradesanferm, Anna; Pozo, Àngels; Pellisé, Maria; Balaguer, Francesc; Ono, Akiko; Cruzado, José; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Carrillo-Palau, Marta; de la Vega-Prieto, Mariola; Iglesias, Rosario; Amador, Javier; Blanco, José Manuel; Sastre, Rocio; Ferrándiz, Juan; González-Hernández, Ma José; Andreu, Montserrat; Bessa, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    We compared the ability of biennial fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and one-time sigmoidoscopy to detect colon side-specific advanced neoplasms in a population-based, multicenter, nationwide, randomized controlled trial. We identified asymptomatic men and women, 50-69 years old, through community health registries and randomly assigned them to groups that received a single colonoscopy examination or biennial FIT. Sigmoidoscopy yield was simulated from results obtained from the colonoscopy group, according to the criteria proposed in the UK Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Trial for colonoscopy referral. Patients who underwent FIT and were found to have ≥75 ng hemoglobin/mL were referred for colonoscopy. Data were analyzed from 5059 subjects in the colonoscopy group and 10,507 in the FIT group. The main outcome was rate of detection of any advanced neoplasm proximal to the splenic flexure. Advanced neoplasms were detected in 317 subjects (6.3%) in the sigmoidoscopy simulation group compared with 288 (2.7%) in the FIT group (odds ratio for sigmoidoscopy, 2.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.93-2.70; P = .0001). Sigmoidoscopy also detected advanced distal neoplasia in a higher percentage of patients than FIT (odds ratio, 2.61; 95% confidence interval, 2.20-3.10; P = .0001). The methods did not differ significantly in identifying patients with advanced proximal neoplasms (odds ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.76; P = .44). This was probably due to the lower performance of both strategies in detecting patients with proximal lesions (sigmoidoscopy detected these in 19.1% of patients and FIT in 14.9% of patients) vs distal ones (sigmoidoscopy detected these in 86.8% of patients and FIT in 33.5% of patients). Sigmoidoscopy, but not FIT, detected proximal lesions in lower percentages of women (especially those 50-59 years old) than men. Sigmoidoscopy and FIT have similar limitations in detecting advanced proximal neoplasms, which depend on patients' characteristics

  9. Mechanisms of adhesion and subsequent actions of a haematopoietic stem cell line, HPC-7, in the injured murine intestinal microcirculation in vivo.

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    Dean P J Kavanagh

    Full Text Available Although haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs migrate to injured gut, therapeutic success clinically remains poor. This has been partially attributed to limited local HSC recruitment following systemic injection. Identifying site specific adhesive mechanisms underpinning HSC-endothelial interactions may provide important information on how to enhance their recruitment and thus potentially improve therapeutic efficacy. This study determined (i the integrins and inflammatory cyto/chemokines governing HSC adhesion to injured gut and muscle (ii whether pre-treating HSCs with these cyto/chemokines enhanced their adhesion and (iii whether the degree of HSC adhesion influenced their ability to modulate leukocyte recruitment.Adhesion of HPC-7, a murine HSC line, to ischaemia-reperfused (IR injured mouse gut or cremaster muscle was monitored intravitally. Critical adhesion molecules were identified by pre-treating HPC-7 with blocking antibodies to CD18 and CD49d. To identify cyto/chemokines capable of recruiting HPC-7, adhesion was monitored following tissue exposure to TNF-α, IL-1β or CXCL12. The effects of pre-treating HPC-7 with these cyto/chemokines on surface integrin expression/clustering, adhesion to ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and recruitment in vivo was also investigated. Endogenous leukocyte adhesion following HPC-7 injection was again determined intravitally.IR injury increased HPC-7 adhesion in vivo, with intestinal adhesion dependent upon CD18 and muscle adhesion predominantly relying on CD49d. Only CXCL12 pre-treatment enhanced HPC-7 adhesion within injured gut, likely by increasing CD18 binding to ICAM-1 and/or CD18 surface clustering on HPC-7. Leukocyte adhesion was reduced at 4 hours post-reperfusion, but only when local HPC-7 adhesion was enhanced using CXCL12.This data provides evidence that site-specific molecular mechanisms govern HPC-7 adhesion to injured tissue. Importantly, we show that HPC-7 adhesion is a modulatable event in IR injury and

  10. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

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    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  11. PATHOLOGIC EVALUATION AND REPORTING OF INTRADUCTAL PAPILLARY MUCINOUS NEOPLASMS (IPMNs) OF THE PANCREAS AND OTHER TUMORAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASMS OF PANCREATOBILIARY TRACT: RECOMMENDATIONS OF VERONA CONSENSUS MEETING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsay, Volkan; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Furukawa, Toru; Basturk, Olca; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Bassi, Claudio; Salvia, Roberto; Malleo, Giuseppe; Paiella, Salvatore; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Matthaei, Hanno; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Adham, Mustapha; Bruno, Marco J.; Reid, Michelle; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Klöppel, Günter; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Tajiri, Takuma; Jang, Kee-Taek; Roa, Juan Carlos; Allen, Peter; Castillo, Carlos Fernández-del; Jang, Jin-Young; Klimstra, David S.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are no established guidelines for pathologic diagnosis/reporting of IPMNs. Design An international multidisciplinary group brought together by the Verona Pancreas Group in Italy-2013, was tasked to devise recommendations. Results 1) Crucial to rule out invasive carcinoma with extensive (if not complete) sampling. 2) Invasive component is to be documented in a full synoptic report including its size, type, grade, stage. 3) The term “minimally invasive” should be avoided; instead, invasion size with stage and substaging of T1 (1a, b, c; ≤0.5, >0.5–≤1, >1 cm), is to be documented. 4) Largest diameter of the invasion, not the distance from the nearest duct, is to be used. 5) A category of “indeterminate/(suspicious) for invasion” is acceptable for rare cases. 6) The term “malignant” IPMN should be avoided. 7) The highest grade of dysplasia in the non-invasive component is to be documented separately. 8) Lesion size is to be correlated with imaging findings in cysts with rupture. 9) The main duct diameter, and if possible, its involvement is to be documented; however, it is not required to provide main vs branch duct classification in the resected tumor. 10) Subtyping as gastric/intestinal/pancreatobiliary/oncocytic/mixed is of value. 11) Frozen section is to be performed highly selectively, with appreciation of its shortcomings. 12) These principles also apply to other similar tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms (mucinous cystic neoplasms, intra-ampullary, intra-biliary/cholecystic). Conclusion These recommendations will ensure proper communication of salient tumor characteristics to the management teams, accurate comparison of data between analyses, and development of more effective management algorithms. PMID:25775066

  12. Neoplasms in persons treated with x-rays in infancy: fourth survey in 20 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempelmann, L.H.; Hall, W.J.; Phillips, M.; Cooper, R.A.; Ames, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    The incidence of neoplastic disease was determined by a mail survey of 2,872 young adults given x-ray treatments in infancy and of their 5,005 nonirradiated siblings. Newly diagnosed benign and malignant neoplasms appeared more frequently in the irradiated subjects than in their siblings or the age- and sex-matched general population of upstate New York. Only thyroid neoplasms occurred in sufficient numbers to permit statistical analysis for the effects on incidence of sex, age, and dose, and of being in a high-risk group (sub-group C). Thyroid cancers developed earlier in life than did benign neoplasms, especially in boys; benign goiters occurred after smaller doses, predominantly in females. Females had a greater risk of developing thyroid cancer than males--2.3 times for females of all ages and 5 times for young adults. Except for young adult females, there was no definite age effect. The risk of cancer (but not of benign goiter) was proportional to the thyroid dose, with a linear risk coefficient of 2.5/year/million people exposed to 1 rad for the entire irradiated population and 4.0 for subgroup C. The high risk of thyroid cancer in subgroup C may be the result of the high percentage of Jews, who had a 3.4-fold greater risk than non-Jews. Young adult Jewish females had a 17-fold increased risk. An incidental observation was an apparent increased incidence of asthma and rare diseases with abnormal immunologic features in the irradiated population. (auth)

  13. Morbid obesity increases risk of morbidity and reoperation in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Porter, Amanda; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel; Rayan, Tarek; Maloney, Patrick R; Carter, Bob S; Bydon, Mohamad; Gompel, Jamie J Van; Link, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased risk for postoperative CSF leak in patients with benign cranial nerve tumors. Other measures of postoperative morbidity associated with obesity have not been well characterized. Patients enrolled in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) from 2007 to 2013 with a diagnosis code of a benign neoplasm of a cranial nerve were included. The primary outcome of postoperative morbidity was analyzed as well as secondary outcomes of readmission and reoperation. The main covariate of interest was body mass index (BMI). A total of 561 patients underwent surgery for a benign cranial nerve neoplasm between 2007 and 2013. Readmission data, available for 2012-2013(n=353), revealed hydrocephalus, facial nerve injury, or CSF leak requiring readmission or reoperation occurred in 0.85%, 1.42%, and 3.12%, respectively. Composite morbidity included wound complications, infection, respiratory insufficiency, transfusion requirement, stroke, venous thromboembolism, coma and cardiac arrest. On multivariable analysis patients with class I (BMI 30-34.9) and II (BMI 35-39.9) obesity showed trends towards increasing return to operating room, though not significant, but there was no trend for composite complications in class I and II obesity patients. However, class III obesity, BMI≥40, was associated with increased odds of composite morbidity (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.24-15.88) and return to the operating room (OR 5.97, 95% CI 1.20-29.6) relative to patients with a normal BMI, 18.5-25. Obesity is an independent and important risk factor for composite morbidity in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms, and as such, merits discussion during preoperative counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neoplasms in dogs receiving low-level gamma radiation during pre- and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, R.W.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.; Phemister, R.D.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Beagle dogs were given whole-body exposure to 60 Co gamma radiation at one of six ages of pre- or postnatal life. Four-hundred and eighty dogs, 120 for each age at exposure, received 20 R at 8, 28 or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or at 2 days postpartum (dpp). Similarity 480 dogs, in groups of 120, were exposed to 100 R at these same ages. Exposures of 100 R were also given to 118 dogs at 70 dpp and 231 dogs at 365 dpp. An additional 359 dogs were sham-irradiated. Mean values for each age at exposure ranged from 15.6 to 17.5 rads for 20 R exposures and from 80.8 to 88.3 rads for exposure to 100 R. Mortality due to neoplasia during the initial ten years of the experiment was examined. Twenty dogs died or were killed because of neoplasia, 19 having been irradiated. Tumours in these 19 irradiated dogs included five malignant lymphomas, eight carcinomas (two of mammary origin, two of prostatic origin, and one each of oral mucosa, ovary, urinary bladder, and thyroid origin), four sarcomas (two haemangiosarcomas, one fibrosarcoma and one mast cell sarcoma), one astrocytoma, and one hepatocellular adenoma. Neoplasms occurred in all irradiated groups except 8 dpc (20 and 100 R) and 70 dpp (100 R). Eleven neoplasms developed in dogs irradiated perinatally (55 dpc or 2 dpp) with 20 or 100 R. Four of the tumours in the perinatally irradiated dogs were detected before two years of age. The earliest death was at three months, due to an astrocytoma. Preliminary analyses point to findings of particular interest: (1) the preponderance of neoplasms causing death or euthanasia occurred in irradiated dogs; (2) the unusual finding of four deaths due to neoplasia before two years of age in perinatally irradiated dogs; and (3) the occurrence of five malignant lymphomas in this relatively small irradiated population

  15. A THREE YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF OVARIAN NEOPLASMS WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON SURFACE EPITHELIAL TUMOURS

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    Krishna Bharathi Yarlagadda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ovarian tumours being second most common gynaecological cancer in India account for 30% of all cancers of female genital tract. Study conducted to determine relative frequencies of various histological types based on WHO classification and their age distribution with particular emphasis on surface epithelial tumours. This study is undertaken to find out the frequency of incidence of different histopathological subtypes with particular emphasis on surface epithelial tumours and age distribution of ovarian tumours in our institute located in coastal Andhra Pradesh. METHODS This is a retrospective study of 100 cases of ovarian neoplasms collected during a period of 3 years from June 2013 to May 2016 from the Department of Pathology, Katuri Medical College and Hospital, Chinakondrupadu, Guntur, A. P, India. The patients attending our hospital are mostly from rural areas around. Paraffin blocks of all 100 ovarian neoplasms retrieved. Complete clinical and radiological findings analysed from our records. RESULTS The tumours are grouped according to the nature of tumour whether benign or borderline or malignant according to cell of origin, histological subtyping, and age group. Surface epithelial tumours are the most common. Benign tumours outnumber the malignant tumours. Benign ovarian tumours showed a peak in 21-40 Yrs. age group and malignant in the age group of 41- 60 Yrs. Results of our study compared with other studies. CONCLUSION Because of the geographic location, poverty, and illiteracy, patients seek medical advice late. So, awareness among public by health education, passive surveillance, and community screening facility will be helpful in early detection of ovarian neoplasms.

  16. Clinical outcomes of myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, Kento; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Toda, Yumiko; Ito, Shoko; Mashima, Kiyomi; Minakata, Daisuke; Nakano, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Sato, Kazuya; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2018-02-28

    Myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) rearrangement are hematopoietic stem cell disorders with a poor prognosis, but no established standard therapy. We experienced a patient with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) associated with FGFR1 rearrangement who underwent cord blood transplantation, but died of pulmonary complication. We collected the clinical data of patients with FGFR1 rearrangement from the medical literature and analyzed 45 patients, including our patient. The primary diagnoses were myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in 14 and acute leukemia or LBL in 31. In MPN and MDS patients, the cumulative incidence of transformation to blast phase (BP) at 12 months was 46.2%. The 1-year overall survival (OS) from diagnosis in all cases was 43.1%. With regard to the impact of treatment response on survival, the achievement of complete response with a landmark at 2 months after diagnosis of BP was associated with a superior OS (40.0% vs. 26.0% P = 0.011 for 1-year OS from BP). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was performed in 13 patients, and the 1-year OS from allogeneic HSCT was 61.5%. The hazard ratio for mortality was 0.34 (95% CI, 0.08-1.51, P = 0.15) for allogeneic HSCT treated as a time-dependent covariate, which suggests that allogeneic HSCT may confer a clinical benefit. The further accumulation of clinical data is needed to determine the optimal therapeutic approach for these neoplasms.

  17. Prospective Evaluation of Germline Alterations in Patients With Exocrine Pancreatic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; Wong, Winston; Jordan, Emmet J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kemel, Yelena; Vijai, Joseph; Mandelker, Diana; Zehir, Ahmet; Capanu, Marinela; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Arnold, Angela G; Yu, Kenneth H; Varghese, Anna M; Kelsen, David P; Brenner, Robin; Kaufmann, Erica; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Mukherjee, Semanti; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Klimstra, David S; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Tjan, Catherine; Covington, Christina; Maynard, Hannah; Allen, Peter J; Askan, Gokce; Leach, Steven D; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth; Stadler, Zsofia K; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2018-02-28

    Identification of pathogenic germline alterations (PGAs) has important clinical and therapeutic implications in pancreas cancer. We performed comprehensive germline testing (GT) in an unselected prospective cohort of patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms with genotype and phenotype association to facilitate identification of prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers and examine potential therapeutic implications. Six hundred fifteen unselected patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms were prospectively consented for somatic tumor and matched sample profiling for 410-468 genes. GT for PGAs in 76 genes associated with cancer susceptibility was performed in an "identified" manner in 356 (57.9%) patients and in an "anonymized" manner in 259 (42.1%) patients, using an institutional review board-approved protocol. Detailed clinical and pathological features, response to platinum, and overall survival (OS) were collected for the identified cohort. OS was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves. PGAs were present in 122 (19.8%) of 615 patients involving 24 different genes, including BRCA1/2, ATM, PALB2, and multiple additional genes associated with the DNA damage response pathway. Of 122 patients with germline alterations, 41.8% did not meet current guidelines for GT. The difference in median OS was not statistically significant between patients with and without PGA (50.8 months, 95% confidence interval = 34.5 to not reached, two-sided P = .94). Loss of heterozygosity was found in 60.0% of BRCA1/2. PGAs frequently occur in pancreas exocrine neoplasms and involve multiple genes beyond those previously associated with hereditary pancreatic cancer. These PGAs are therapeutically actionable in about 5% to 10% of patients. These data support routinely offering GT in all pancreatic ductal adenocarcimona patients with a broad panel of known hereditary cancer predisposition genes.

  18. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas in Young Male Patients: Three Case Reports

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    Akira Aso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A preoperative diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs in young male patients is difficult to achieve using radiological images. We herein present three cases of young male patients with relatively small SPNs. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS showed well-encapsulated, smooth-surfaced, heterogeneous solid lesions in all patients, and all preoperative diagnoses were achieved by EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA. The final pathological diagnosis after surgery was an SPN with a Ki-67 labeling index of <2%. SPNs should be considered even in young male patients. EUS with EUS-FNA could be a useful diagnostic modality for SPNs even in young male patients.

  19. Refined staging in hilar bronchial neoplasms with ECG-gated multislice-CT. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlmann, S.; Daliri, A.; Froelich, J.J.; Nowak, R.; Michulla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Equivocal initial CT-based staging in 2 patients with hilar bronchial neoplasms was reassessed with retrospective ECG-gated Multislice-CT and optimized examination parameters prior to definition of treatment. An initially suspected irresectable T 4 tumor with mediastinal infiltration was downstaged to T 2 in one case, while tumor infiltration into the left atrium could be confirmed in the other case. In doubtful conditions, ECG-gated multislice CT with optimized examination parameters may be helpful for refined staging in patients with hilar bronchial neoplasma, thus possibly influencing treatment strategies. (orig.)

  20. Second malignancies in hydroxyurea and interferon-treated Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Iben Onsberg; Sørensen, Anders Lindholm; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an era of controversy in regard to 'hydroxyurea-leukaemogenicity' and when interferon-alfa2 (IFN) is being revived in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), we aim in this single-centre observational study to describe the frequencies of second...... malignancies in a cohort of MPN patients treated with hydroxyurea (HU) or IFN monotherapy or the combination of these agents. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Records of a MPN cohort of 196 patients were reviewed, and a retrospective analysis was performed on 90 patients treated with HU, 38 patients treated with IFN...