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Sample records for human h1 subtypes

  1. Translocation of histone H1 subtypes between chromatin and cytoplasm during mitosis in normal human fibroblasts.

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    Gréen, Anna; Lönn, Anita; Peterson, Kajsa Holmgren; Ollinger, Karin; Rundquist, Ingemar

    2010-05-01

    Histone H1 is an important constituent of chromatin, which undergoes major structural rearrangements during mitosis. However, the role of H1, multiple H1 subtypes, and H1 phosphorylation is still unclear. In normal human fibroblasts, phosphorylated H1 was found located in nuclei during prophase and in both cytoplasm and condensed chromosomes during metaphase, anaphase, and telophase as detected by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, we detected remarkable differences in the distribution of the histone H1 subtypes H1.2, H1.3, and H1.5 during mitosis. H1.2 was found in chromatin during prophase and almost solely in the cytoplasm of metaphase and early anaphase cells. In late anaphase, it appeared in both chromatin and cytoplasm and again in chromatin during telophase. H1.5 distribution pattern resembled that of H1.2, but H1.5 was partitioned between chromatin and cytoplasm during metaphase and early anaphase. H1.3 was detected in chromatin in all cell cycle phases. We propose therefore, that H1 subtype translocation during mitosis is controlled by phosphorylation, in combination with H1 subtype inherent affinity. We conclude that H1 subtypes, or theirphosphorylated forms, may leave chromatin in a regulated way to give access for chromatin condensing factors or transcriptional regulators during mitosis.

  2. Fractionation of human H1 subtypes and characterization of a subtype-specific antibody exhibiting non-uniform nuclear staining.

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    Parseghian, M H; Clark, R F; Hauser, L J; Dvorkin, N; Harris, D A; Hamkalo, B A

    1993-07-01

    Four histone H1 subtypes and H1(0) were fractionated from human placental nuclei and purified to homogeneity by a combination of Bio-Rex 70 chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits against one of these subtypes designated H1-3. Antibodies reacted only against this subtype in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and Western assays; subtype specificity was documented further by Western blotting of cell and nuclear extracts. They crossreacted with monkey H1, but not with H1 from other vertebrates tested. The epitope(s) recognized were mapped by immunoblotting against peptides prepared by cleavage with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and alpha-chymotrypsin; it includes the variant amino-terminal tail of the protein as well as a portion of the globular domain. The antibody stains mitotic chromosomes weakly but uniformly and, unlike antibodies that recognize total H1 which show uniform nuclear staining after indirect immunofluorescence localization, anti-H1-3 exhibits preferential labelling of the nuclear periphery. This non-uniform staining suggests compartmentalization of this subtype which may have functional significance with respect to differential chromatin condensation.

  3. Differentiation of human influenza A viruses including the pandemic subtype H1N1/2009 by conventional multiplex PCR.

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    Furuse, Yuki; Odagiri, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Khandaker, Irona; Shimabukuro, Kozue; Sawayama, Rumi; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    April 2009 witnessed the emergence of a novel H1N1 influenza A virus infecting the human population. Currently, pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses are co-circulating in human populations. Understanding the course of the emerging pandemic virus is important. It is still unknown how the novel virus co-circulates with or outcompetes seasonal viruses. Sustainable and detailed influenza surveillance is required throughout the world including developing countries. In the present study, a multiplex PCR using four primers was developed, which was designed to differentiate the pandemic H1N1 virus from the seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses, to obtain amplicons of different sizes. Multiplex PCR analysis could clearly differentiate the three subtypes of human influenza A virus. This assay was performed using 206 clinical samples collected in 2009 in Japan. Between February and April, four samples were subtyped as seasonal H1N1 and four as seasonal H3N2. All samples collected after July were subtyped as pandemic H1N1. Currently, pandemic viruses seem to have replaced seasonal viruses almost completely in Japan. This is a highly sensitive method and its cost is low. Influenza surveillance using this assay would provide significant information on the epidemiology of both pandemic and seasonal influenza.

  4. Heterologous expression of human H1 histones in yeast.

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    Albig, W; Runge, D M; Kratzmeier, M; Doenecke, D

    1998-09-18

    The complete set of seven human H1 histone subtype genes was heterologously expressed in yeast. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks standard histone H1 we could isolate each recombinantly expressed human H1 subtype in pure form without contamination by endogenous H I histones. For isolation of the H1 histones in this expression system no tagging was needed and the isoforms could be extracted with the authentic primary structure by a single extraction step with 5%(0.74 M) perchloric acid. The isolated H1 histone proteins were used to assign the subtype genes to the corresponding protein spots or peaks after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and capillary zone electrophoresis, respectively. This allowed us to correlate transcriptional data with protein data, which was barely possible until now.

  5. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

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    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  6. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Hemagglutinin 1 Protein of Human Influenza A Virus Subtype H1N1 Circulating in Kenya During 2007-2008

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    2012-01-01

    and Mag Attract Virus Mini M48 Kit (Qiagen) according to the manufacturer’s pro- tocols. For RT- PCR amplification , 5 μL of RNA was added to a 50-μL...AAA TGA AAG-3′; and H1HA_1238_R_M13, 5′- CAG GAA ACA GCT ATG ACC AGC TGT GAA TTG RGT GTT CAT TT-3′), using the SuperScript III One-Step RT- PCR System... amplification cycles at 94°C for 15 seconds, at 52°C for 30 seconds, and at 68°C for 75 seconds, with a final extension cycle at 68°C for 5 minutes. All PCR

  7. Specificities and genomic distribution of somatic mammalian histone H1 subtypes.

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    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Jordan, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Histone H1 is a structural component of chromatin that may have a role in the regulation of chromatin dynamics. Unlike core histones, the linker histone H1 family is evolutionarily diverse and many organisms have multiple H1 variants or subtypes, distinguishable between germ-line and somatic cells. In mammals, the H1 family includes seven somatic H1 variants with a prevalence that varies between cell types and over the course of differentiation, H1.1 to H1.5 being expressed in a replication-dependent manner, whereas H1.0 and H1X are replication-independent. Until recently, it has not been known whether the different variants had specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or were differentially distributed across the genome. To address this, an increasing effort has been made to investigate divergent features among H1 variants, regarding their structure, expression patterns, chromatin dynamics, post-translational modifications and genome-wide distribution. Although H1 subtypes seem to have redundant functions, several reports point to the idea that they are also differently involved in specific cellular processes. Initial studies investigating the genomic distribution of H1 variants have started to suggest that despite a wide overlap, different variants may be enriched or preferentially located at different chromatin types, but this may depend on the cell type, the relative abundance of the variants, the differentiation state of the cell, or whether cells are derived from a neoplastic process. Understanding the heterogeneity of the histone H1 family is crucial to elucidate their role in chromatin organization, gene expression regulation and other cellular processes.

  8. Structural and Functional Analysis of NS1 and NS2 Proteins of H1N1 Subtype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parveen Salahuddin; Asad U.Khan

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus(H1N1),a genetic reassortment of endemic strains of human,avian and swine flu,has crossed species barrier to human and apparently acquired the capability of human to human transmission.Some strains of H5N1 subtype are highly virulent because NS1 protein inhibits antiviral interferon α/β production.Another protein NS2 mediates export of viral ribonucleoprotein from nucleus to the cytoplasm through export signal.In this paper,we have studied structure-function relationships of these proteins of H1N1 subtype and have determined the cause of their pathogenicity.Our results showed that non-conservative mutations slightly stabilized or destabilized structural domains of NS1 or NS1-dsRNA complex,hence slightly increased or decreased the function of NS1 protein and consequently enhanced or reduced the pathogenicity of the H1N1 virus.NS2 protein of different strains carried non-conservative mutations in different domains,resulting in slight loss of function.These mutations slightly decreased the pathogenicity of the virus.Thus,the results confirm the structure-function relation-ships of these viral proteins.

  9. [Visual detection of H1 subtype and identification of N1, N2 subtype of avian influenza virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay].

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    Peng, Yi; Xie, Zhi-Xun; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Chen-Yu; Liu, Jia-Bo; Pang, Yao-Shan; Deng, Xian-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Qin; Xie, Li-Ji; Fan, Qing; Luo, Si-Si

    2013-03-01

    In order to visually detect H1, N1 and N2 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV), three reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays were developed. According to the sequences of AIV gene available in GenBank, three degenerate primer sets specific to HA gene of H1 subtype AIV, NA gene of N1 and N2 subtype AIV were designed, and the reaction conditions were optimized. The results showed that all the assays had no cross-reaction with other subtype AIV and other avian respiratory pathogens, and the detection limit was higher than that of conventional RT-PCR. These assays were performed in water bath within 50 minutes. Without opening tube, the amplification result could be directly determined by inspecting the color change of reaction system as long as these assays were fin-ished. Fourteen specimens of H1N1 subtype and eight specimens of H1N2 subtype of AIV were identified from the 120 clinical samples by RT-LAMP assays developed, which was consistent with that of virus isolation. These results suggested that the three newly developed RT-LAMEP assays were simple, specific and sensitive and had potential for visual detection of H1, N1 and N2 subtype of AIV in field.

  10. Possible computational filter to detect proteins associated to influenza A subtype H1N1.

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    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Samaniego, José Lino

    2014-01-01

    The design of drugs with bioinformatics methods to identify proteins and peptides with a specific toxic action is increasingly recurrent. Here, we identify toxic proteins towards the influenza A virus subtype H1N1 located at the UniProt database. Our quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is based on the analysis of the linear peptide sequence with the so-called Polarity Index Method that shows an efficiency of 90% for proteins from the Uniprot Database. This method was exhaustively verified with the APD2, CPPsite, Uniprot, and AmyPDB databases as well as with the set of antibacterial peptides studied by del Rio et al. and Oldfield et al.

  11. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae modifies outcomes of infection with European swine influenza virus of H1N1, but not H1N2, subtype.

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    Deblanc, C; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Amenna, N; Cariolet, R; Simon, G

    2012-05-25

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are widespread in farms and are major pathogens involved in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The aim of this experiment was to compare the pathogenicity of European avian-like swine H1N1 and European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 viruses in naïve pigs and in pigs previously infected with Mhp. Six groups of SPF pigs were inoculated intra-tracheally with either Mhp, or H1N1, or H1N2 or Mhp+H1N1 or Mhp+H1N2, both pathogens being inoculated at 21 days intervals in these two last groups. A mock-infected group was included. Although both SIV strains induced clinical signs when singly inoculated, results indicated that the H1N2 SIV was more pathogenic than the H1N1 virus, with an earlier shedding and a greater spread in lungs. Initial infection with Mhp before SIV inoculation increased flu clinical signs and pathogenesis (hyperthermia, loss of appetite, pneumonia lesions) due to the H1N1 virus but did not modify significantly outcomes of H1N2 infection. Thus, Mhp and SIV H1N1 appeared to act synergistically, whereas Mhp and SIV H1N2 would compete, as H1N2 infection led to the elimination of Mhp in lung diaphragmatic lobes. In conclusion, SIV would be a risk factor for the severity of respiratory disorders when associated with Mhp, depending on the viral subtype involved. This experimental model of coinfection with Mhp and avian-like swine H1N1 is a relevant tool for studying the pathogenesis of SIV-associated PRDC and testing intervention strategies for the control of the disease.

  12. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

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    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  13. Genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses.

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    Lu, Lu; Yin, Yanbo; Sun, Zhongsheng; Gao, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Sidang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2010-11-01

    H1N1 is the main subtype influenza A virus circulating in human and swine population, and has long been a threat to economy and public health. To explore the genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses. Three new H1N1 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated and genomes sequencing were conducted followed by phylogenetic and molecular analysis of all swine and human H1N1 influenza viruses isolated in China in the past five years. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three isolates possessed different characteristics: the genome of A/Swine/Shandong/1112/2008 was closely related to that of classical H1N1 SIV, while A/Swine/Shandong/1123/2008 was a reassortant with NS gene from the human-like H3N2 influenza virus and other genes from the classical H1N1 SIV, and A/Swine/Fujian/0325/2008 fell into a lineage of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses. Genetically, 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses (2009 H1N1) in China were contiguous to the SIV lineages rather than the seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus's lineage. Furthermore, molecular analysis among human and swine influenza viruses provided more detail information for understanding their genetic correlation. These results suggested that in China in the past five years, the classical, avian-like and human-like H1N1 SIV existed in swine herds and the reassortment between H1N1 swine and H3N2 human influenza viruses was identified. In addition, the present data showed no evidence to support a strong correlation between the 2009 H1N1 and the swine influenza virus circulating in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Estrogenic regulation of histamine receptor subtype H1 expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus in female rats.

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    Hiroko Mori

    Full Text Available Female sexual behavior is controlled by central estrogenic action in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN. This region plays a pivotal role in facilitating sex-related behavior in response to estrogen stimulation via neural activation by several neurotransmitters, including histamine, which participates in this mechanism through its strong neural potentiating action. However, the mechanism through which estrogen signaling is linked to the histamine system in the VMN is unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between estrogen and histamine receptor subtype H1 (H1R, which is a potent subtype among histamine receptors in the brain. We show localization of H1R exclusively in the ventrolateral subregion of the female VMN (vl VMN, and not in the dorsomedial subregion. In the vl VMN, abundantly expressed H1R were mostly colocalized with estrogen receptor α. Intriguingly, H1R mRNA levels in the vl VMN were significantly elevated in ovariectomized female rats treated with estrogen benzoate. These data suggest that estrogen can amplify histamine signaling by enhancing H1R expression in the vl VMN. This enhancement of histamine signaling might be functionally important for allowing neural excitation in response to estrogen stimulation of the neural circuit and may serve as an accelerator of female sexual arousal.

  15. Isolation of Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers That Distinguish Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtype H1 from H5

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    Yim, Sanggyu; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) mediates the binding of influenza virus to host cell receptors containing sialic acid, facilitating the entry of the virus into host cells. Therefore, the HA protein is regarded as a suitable target for the development of influenza virus detection devices. In this study, we isolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers binding to the HA1 subunit of subtype H1 (H1-HA1), but not to the HA1 subunit of subtype H5 (H5-HA1), using a counter-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (counter-SELEX) procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance studies showed that the selected aptamers bind tightly to H1-HA1 with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were binding to H1-HA1 in a concentration-dependent manner, yet were not binding to H5-HA1. Interestingly, the selected aptamers contained G-rich sequences in the central random nucleotides region. Further biophysical analysis showed that the G-rich sequences formed a G-quadruplex structure, which is a distinctive structure compared to the starting ssDNA library. Using flow cytometry analysis, we found that the aptamers did not bind to the receptor-binding site of H1-HA1. These results indicate that the selected aptamers that distinguish H1-HA1 from H5-HA1 can be developed as unique probes for the detection of the H1 subtype of influenza virus. PMID:25901739

  16. Genetic and biological characterisation of an avian-like H1N2 swine influenza virus generated by reassortment of circulating avian-like H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Bragstad, Karoline; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influenza A virus subtypes H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 are the most prevalent subtypes in swine. In 2003, a reassorted H1N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) subtype appeared and became prevalent in Denmark. In the present study, the reassortant H1N2 subtype was characterised genetically...... and the infection dynamics compared to an “avian-like” H1N1 virus by an experimental infection study. METHODS: Sequence analyses were performed of the H1N2 virus. Two groups of pigs were inoculated with the reassortant H1N2 virus and an “avian-like” H1N1 virus, respectively, followed by inoculation...... with the opposite subtype four weeks later. Measurements of HI antibodies and acute phase proteins were performed. Nasal virus excretion and virus load in lungs were determined by real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the reassorted H1N2 virus contained a European “avian-like” H1-gene...

  17. Epidemiological and virological characterization of 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 in Madagascar.

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    Orelle, Arnaud; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Hoffmann, Jonathan; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Razafitrimo, Girard Marcellin; Naidoo, Dhamari; Richard, Vincent; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2012-12-15

    Madagascar was one of the first African countries to be affected by the 2009 pandemic of influenza A virus subtype H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm2009] infection. The outbreak started in the capital city, Antananarivo, and then spread throughout the country from October 2009 through February 2010. Specimens from patients presenting with influenza-like illness were collected and shipped to the National Influenza Center in Madagascar for analyses, together with forms containing patient demographic and clinical information. Of the 2303 specimens tested, 1016 (44.1%) and 131 (5.7%) yielded A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza virus, respectively. Most specimens (42.0%) received were collected from patients 50 years old to be infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-2.6; P Madagascar, no antigenic differences between A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses recovered in Madagascar and those that circulated worldwide were observed. The high proportion of respiratory specimens positive for A(H1N1)pdm09 is consistent with a widespread transmission of the pandemic in Madagascar. The age distribution of cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection suggests that children and young adults could be targeted for interventions that aim to reduce transmission during an influenza pandemic.

  18. Genome evolution of novel influenza A (H1N1)viruses in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zheng; HU SongNian; LI TianXian

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic situation of A H1N1 flu arose in North America in April 2009,which rapidly expanded to three continents of Europe,Asia and Africa,with the risk ranking up to 5.Until May 13th,the flu virus of A H1N1 had spread into 33 countries and regions,with a laboratory confirmed case number of 5728,including 61 deaths.Based on IRV and EpiFluDB database,425 parts of A H1N1 flu virus sequence were achieved,followed by sequenced comparison and evolution analysis.The results showed that the current predominant A H1N1 flu virus was a kind of triple reassortment A flu virus:(i) HA,NA,MP,NP and NS originated from swine influenza virus;PB2 and PA originated from bird influenza virus;PB1 originated from human influenza virus.(ii) The origin of swine influenza virus could be subdivided as follows:HA,NP and NS originated from classic swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype;NA and MP originated from bird origin swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype.(iii) A H1N1 flu virus experienced no significant mutation during the epidemic spread,accompanied with no reassortment of the virus genome.In the paper,the region of the representative strains for sequence analysis (A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) and A/Mexico/4486/2009 (H1N1)) included USA and Mexico and was relatively wide,which suggested that the analysis results were convincing.

  19. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

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    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  20. In silico modification of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza A virus subtype H1N1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan; Rizky Archintya Rachmania; Arli Aditya Parikesit

    2015-01-01

    This research focused on the modification of the functional groups of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor against influenza A virus subtype H1N1.Interactions of three of the best ligands were evaluated in the hydrated state using molecular dynamics simulation at two different temperatures.The docking result showed that AD3BF2D ligand (N-[(1S,6R)-5-amino-5-{[(2R,3S,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]oxy}-4-formylcyclohex-3-en-l-yl]acetamide-3-(1-ethylpropoxy)-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate) had better binding energy values than standard oseltamivir.AD3BF2D had several interactions,including hydrogen bonds,with the residues in the catalytic site of neuraminidase as identified by molecular dynamics simulation.The results showed that AD3BF2D ligand can be used as a good candidate for neuraminidase inhibitor to cope with influenza A virus subtype H1N1.

  1. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

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    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  2. 部分猪场H1和H3亚型猪流感的血清学调查%Serological Survey of H1 and H3 Subtypes of Swine Influenza in Some Pig Farms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈锦成; 张丹琳; 陈敏鸿; 张显浩; 贺东生

    2012-01-01

    To survey the epidemics of H1, H3 subtypes of swine influenza virus in some scale pig farms in some provinces, 799 swine serum samples were collected from 28 factory pig farms on 12 cities in Guangdong, Hunan and Henan provinces. The antibodies against H1 and H3 subtypes of SIV were determined by HI assay. The results showed that the positive rate of H1 subtype antibody of pigs was 0 to 83. 33% , the average positive rate of pigs was 46. 18% (369/799) and the positive rate of pig farms was 89. 29% (25/28). The positive rate of H3 subtype antibody of pigs was 0 to 100% > the average positive rate of pigs was 61. 33% (490/799) and the positive rate of pig farms was 85. 71% (24/28). The average positive rate of H1 subtype antibody of pigs of Guangdong, Hunan and Henan provinces respectively was 48. 91% , 40. 26% and 50. 67% , the rate of H3 subtype antibody was 58. 55%, 70. 78% and 78. 67%. It showed that the infection of H1 and H3 subtypes of swine influenza virus was widespread in the surveyed pigs of the 3 above regions. The infection rate of H3 subtype was higher than H1 subtype. The epidemics of swine influenza varied in different region.%为了解中国部分省市规模化猪场H1和H3亚型猪流感病毒的流行情况,采用血凝抑制试验对采集于广东、湖南、河南省12个市县28个规模化猪场的799份血清进行H1和H3亚型猪流感病毒的抗体检测.结果表明,H1亚型抗体阳性率在0~83.33%之间,猪抗体总阳性率为46.18%(369/799),猪场阳性率为89.29%(25/28).H3亚型抗体阳性率在0~100.00%之间,猪抗体总阳性率为61.33%(490/799),猪场阳性率为85.71%(24/28).广东、湖南和河南地区H1亚型抗体阳性率分别为48.91%、40.26%和50.67%,H3亚型抗体阳性率分别为58.55%、70.78%和78.67%.在被调查的上述3个地区的猪群中,H1和H3亚型猪流感病毒的感染较为普遍,其中H3亚型感染率高于H1亚型,且各地区猪流感病毒的流行情况存在地域性差异.

  3. The role of H1 linker histone subtypes in preserving the fidelity of elaboration of mesendodermal and neuroectodermal lineages during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D; Gokhan, Solen; Molero, Aldrin E; Yang, Seung-Min; Kim, Byung-Ju; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Mehler, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    H1 linker histone proteins are essential for the structural and functional integrity of chromatin and for the fidelity of additional epigenetic modifications. Deletion of H1c, H1d and H1e in mice leads to embryonic lethality by mid-gestation with a broad spectrum of developmental alterations. To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying H1 linker histone developmental functions, we analyzed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) depleted of H1c, H1d and H1e subtypes (H1-KO ESCs) by utilizing established ESC differentiation paradigms. Our study revealed that although H1-KO ESCs continued to express core pluripotency genes and the embryonic stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase and SSEA1, they exhibited enhanced cell death during embryoid body formation and during specification of mesendoderm and neuroectoderm. In addition, we demonstrated deregulation in the developmental programs of cardiomyocyte, hepatic and pancreatic lineage elaboration. Moreover, ectopic neurogenesis and cardiomyogenesis occurred during endoderm-derived pancreatic but not hepatic differentiation. Furthermore, neural differentiation paradigms revealed selective impairments in the specification and maturation of glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurons with accelerated maturation of glial lineages. These impairments were associated with deregulation in the expression profiles of pro-neural genes in dorsal and ventral forebrain-derived neural stem cell species. Taken together, these experimental observations suggest that H1 linker histone proteins are critical for the specification, maturation and fidelity of organ-specific cellular lineages derived from the three cardinal germ layers.

  4. The role of H1 linker histone subtypes in preserving the fidelity of elaboration of mesendodermal and neuroectodermal lineages during embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang D Nguyen

    Full Text Available H1 linker histone proteins are essential for the structural and functional integrity of chromatin and for the fidelity of additional epigenetic modifications. Deletion of H1c, H1d and H1e in mice leads to embryonic lethality by mid-gestation with a broad spectrum of developmental alterations. To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying H1 linker histone developmental functions, we analyzed embryonic stem cells (ESCs depleted of H1c, H1d and H1e subtypes (H1-KO ESCs by utilizing established ESC differentiation paradigms. Our study revealed that although H1-KO ESCs continued to express core pluripotency genes and the embryonic stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase and SSEA1, they exhibited enhanced cell death during embryoid body formation and during specification of mesendoderm and neuroectoderm. In addition, we demonstrated deregulation in the developmental programs of cardiomyocyte, hepatic and pancreatic lineage elaboration. Moreover, ectopic neurogenesis and cardiomyogenesis occurred during endoderm-derived pancreatic but not hepatic differentiation. Furthermore, neural differentiation paradigms revealed selective impairments in the specification and maturation of glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurons with accelerated maturation of glial lineages. These impairments were associated with deregulation in the expression profiles of pro-neural genes in dorsal and ventral forebrain-derived neural stem cell species. Taken together, these experimental observations suggest that H1 linker histone proteins are critical for the specification, maturation and fidelity of organ-specific cellular lineages derived from the three cardinal germ layers.

  5. Molecular characterization of H1N1 influenza A viruses from human cases in North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; WANG ChengMin; DONG GuoYing; LUO Jing; ZHAO BaoHua; HE HongXuan

    2009-01-01

    Subtypes of H1N1 influenza virus can be found in humans in North America,while they are also associated with the infection of swine.Characterization of the genotypes of viral strains in human populations is important to understand the source and distribution of viral strains.Genomic and protein sequences of 10 isolates of the 2009 outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) virus in North America were obtained from GenBank database.To characterize the genotypes of these viruses,phylogenetic trees of genes PB2,PB1,PA,HA,NP,NA,NS and M were constructed by Phylip3.67 program and N-Linked glycosylation sites of HA,NA,PB2,NS1 and M2 proteins were analyzed online by NetNGIyc1.0 program.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these isolates are virtually identical but may be recombinant viruses because their genomic fragments come from different viruses.The isolates also contain a characteristic lowly pathogenic amino acid motif at their HA cleavage sites (IPSIQSR↓GL),and an E residue at position 627 of the PB2 protein which shows its high affinity to humans.The homologous model of M proteins showed that the viruses had obtained the ability of anti-amantadine due to the mutation at the drug-sensitive site,while sequence analysis of NA proteins indicated that the viruses are still susceptible to the neuraminidase inhibitor drug (i.e.oseltamivir and zanamivir) because no mutations have been observed.Our results strongly suggested that the viruses responsible for the 2009 outbreaks of influenza A (H1N1) virus have the ability to cross species barriers to infect human and mammalian animals based on molecular analysis.These findings may further facilitate the therapy and prevention of possible transmission from North America to other countries.

  6. A single base-pair change in 2009 H1N1 hemagglutinin increases human receptor affinity and leads to efficient airborne viral transmission in ferrets.

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    Akila Jayaraman

    Full Text Available The 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus continues to circulate among the human population as the predominant H1N1 subtype. Epidemiological studies and airborne transmission studies using the ferret model have shown that the transmission efficiency of 2009 H1N1 viruses is lower than that of previous seasonal strains and the 1918 pandemic H1N1 strain. We recently correlated this reduced transmission efficiency to the lower binding affinity of the 2009 H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors (human receptors. Here we report that a single point mutation (Ile219→Lys; a base pair change in the glycan receptor-binding site (RBS of a representative 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus, A/California/04/09 or CA04/09, quantitatively increases its human receptor-binding affinity. The increased human receptor-affinity is in the same range as that of the HA from highly transmissible seasonal and 1918 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Moreover, a 2009 H1N1 virus carrying this mutation in the RBS (generated using reverse genetics transmits efficiently in ferrets by respiratory droplets thereby reestablishing our previously observed correlation between human receptor-binding affinity and transmission efficiency. These findings are significant in the context of monitoring the evolution of the currently circulating 2009 H1N1 viruses.

  7. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  8. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High conservation level of CD8(+) T cell immunogenic regions within an unusual H1N2 human influenza variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komadina, Naomi; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Kedzierska, Katherine; McCaw, James M; Kelso, Anne; Leder, Karin; McVernon, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines require regular updates due to antigenic drift causing loss of effectiveness and therefore providing little or no protection against novel influenza A subtypes. Next generation vaccines capable of eliciting CD8(+) T cell (CTL) mediated cross-protective immunity may offer a long-term alternative strategy. However, measuring pre- and existing levels of CTL cross-protection in humans is confounded by differences in infection histories across individuals. During 2000-2003, H1N2 viruses circulated persistently in the human population for the first time and we hypothesized that the viral nucleoprotein (NP) contained novel CTL epitopes that may have contributed to the survival of the viruses. This study describes the immunogenic NP peptides of H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from humans over the past century, 1918-2003, by comparing this historical dataset to reference NP peptides from H1N2 that circulated in humans during 2000-2003. Observed peptides sequences ranged from highly conserved (15%) to highly variable (12%), with variation unrelated to reported immunodominance. No unique NP peptides which were exclusive to the H1N2 viruses were noted. However, the virus had inherited the NP from a recently emerged H3N2 variant containing novel peptides, which may have assisted its persistence. Any advantage due to this novelty was subsequently lost with emergence of a newer H3N2 variant in 2003. Our approach has potential to provide insight into the population context in which influenza viruses emerge, and may help to inform immunogenic peptide selection for CTL-inducing influenza vaccines. J. Med. Virol. 88:1725-1732, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-09

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of the novel influenza A (H1N1 virus in the human immune system.

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    Evangelos J Giamarellos-Bourboulis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pandemic by the novel H1N1 virus has created the need to study any probable effects of that infection in the immune system of the host. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood was sampled within the first two days of the presentation of signs of infection from 10 healthy volunteers; from 18 cases of flu-like syndrome; and from 31 cases of infection by H1N1 confirmed by reverse RT-PCR. Absolute counts of subtypes of monocytes and of lymphocytes were determined after staining with monoclonal antibodies and analysis by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from patients and stimulated with various bacterial stimuli. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-18, interferon (FN-alpha and of IFN-gamma were estimated in supernatants by an enzyme immunoassay. Infection by H1N1 was accompanied by an increase of monocytes. PBMCs of patients evoked strong cytokine production after stimulation with most of bacterial stimuli. Defective cytokine responses were shown in response to stimulation with phytohemagglutin and with heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adaptive immune responses of H1N1-infected patients were characterized by decreases of CD4-lymphocytes and of B-lymphocytes and by increase of T-regulatory lymphocytes (Tregs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Infection by the H1N1 virus is accompanied by a characteristic impairment of the innate immune responses characterized by defective cytokine responses to S.pneumoniae. Alterations of the adaptive immune responses are predominated by increase of Tregs. These findings signify a predisposition for pneumococcal infections after infection by H1N1 influenza.

  12. A human monoclonal antibody with neutralizing activity against highly divergent influenza subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Clementi

    Full Text Available The interest in broad-range anti-influenza A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has recently been strengthened by the identification of anti-hemagglutinin (HA mAbs endowed with heterosubtypic neutralizing activity to be used in the design of "universal" prophylactic or therapeutic tools. However, the majority of the single mAbs described to date do not bind and neutralize viral isolates belonging to highly divergent subtypes clustering into the two different HA-based influenza phylogenetic groups: the group 1 including, among others, subtypes H1, H2, H5 and H9 and the group 2 including, among others, H3 subtype. Here, we describe a human mAb, named PN-SIA28, capable of binding and neutralizing all tested isolates belonging to phylogenetic group 1, including H1N1, H2N2, H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes and several isolates belonging to group 2, including H3N2 isolates from the first period of the 1968 pandemic. Therefore, PN-SIA28 is capable of neutralizing isolates belonging to subtypes responsible of all the reported pandemics, as well as other subtypes with pandemic potential. The region recognized by PN-SIA28 has been identified on the stem region of HA and includes residues highly conserved among the different influenza subtypes. A deep characterization of PN-SIA28 features may represent a useful help in the improvement of available anti-influenza therapeutic strategies and can provide new tools for the development of universal vaccinal strategies.

  13. Comparison of shedding characteristics of seasonal influenza virus (subtypes and influenza A(H1N1pdm09; Germany, 2007-2011.

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    Thorsten Suess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza viral shedding studies provide fundamental information for preventive strategies and modelling exercises. We conducted a prospective household study to investigate viral shedding in seasonal and pandemic influenza between 2007 and 2011 in Berlin and Munich, Germany. METHODS: Study physicians recruited index patients and their household members. Serial nasal specimens were obtained from all household members over at least eight days and tested quantitatively by qRT-PCR for the influenza virus (subtype of the index patient. A subset of samples was also tested by viral culture. Symptoms were recorded daily. RESULTS: We recruited 122 index patients and 320 household contacts, of which 67 became secondary household cases. Among all 189 influenza cases, 12 were infected with seasonal/prepandemic influenza A(H1N1, 19 with A(H3N2, 60 with influenza B, and 98 with A(H1N1pdm09. Nine (14% of 65 non-vaccinated secondary cases were asymptomatic/subclinical (0 (0% of 21 children, 9 (21% of 44 adults; p = 0.03. Viral load among patients with influenza-like illness (ILI peaked on illness days 1, 2 or 3 for all (subtypes and declined steadily until days 7-9. Clinical symptom scores roughly paralleled viral shedding dynamics. On the first day prior to symptom onset 30% (12/40 of specimens were positive. Viral load in 6 asymptomatic/subclinical patients was similar to that in ILI-patients. Duration of infectiousness as measured by viral culture lasted approximately until illness days 4-6. Viral load did not seem to be influenced by antiviral therapy, age or vaccination status. CONCLUSION: Asymptomatic/subclinical infections occur infrequently, but may be associated with substantial amounts of viral shedding. Presymptomatic shedding may arise in one third of cases, and shedding characteristics appear to be independent of (seasonal or pandemic (subtype, age, antiviral therapy or vaccination; however the power to find moderate differences

  14. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  15. Receptor binding properties of human and animal H1 influenza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, G N; D'Souza, B L

    1989-11-01

    It has been previously reported that several human H1 influenza viruses isolated prior to 1956, in contrast to human H3 isolates which are quite specific for SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences, apparently recognize both SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences (Rogers, G.N., and Paulson, J.C., Virology 127, 361-373, 1983). In this report human H1 isolates representative of two epidemic periods, from 1934 to 1957 and from 1977 to 1986, and H1 influenza isolated from pigs, ducks, and turkeys were compared for their ability to utilize sialyloligosaccharide structures containing terminal SA alpha 2,3Gal or SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences as receptor determinants. Five of the eight human isolates from the first epidemic period recognize both SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal linkages, in agreement with our previous results. Of the remaining three strains, all isolated towards the end of the first epidemic, two appear to prefer SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences while the third preferentially binds SA alpha 2,3Gal sequences. In contrast to the early isolates, 11 of 13 human strains isolated during the second epidemic period preferentially bind SA alpha 2,6Gal containing oligosaccharides. On the basis of changes in receptor binding associated with continued passage in the laboratory for some of these later strains, it seems likely that human H1 isolates preferentially bind SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences in nature, and that acquisition of SA alpha 2,3Gal-binding is associated with laboratory passage. Influenza H1 viruses isolated from pigs were predominantly SA alpha 2,6Gal-specific while those isolated from ducks were primarily SA alpha 2,3Gal-specific. Thus, as has been previously reported for H3 influenza isolates, receptor specificity for influenza H1 viruses appears to be influenced by the species from which they were isolated, human isolates binding preferentially to SA alpha 2,6Gal-containing oligosaccharides while those isolated from ducks prefer SA alpha 2,3Gal

  16. H-1 chemical shift imaging characterization of human brain tumor and edema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, PE; Oudkerk, M

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of metabolites in human brain tumor, peritumoral edema, and unaffected brain tissue were assessed from point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) H-1 chemical shift imaging results at different repetition times (TR = 1500 and 5000 ms; T1: n = 19) and

  17. The discovery of quinoline based single-ligand human H1 and H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopiou, Panayiotis A; Ancliff, Rachael A; Gore, Paul M; Hancock, Ashley P; Hodgson, Simon T; Holmes, Duncan S; Keeling, Steven P; Looker, Brian E; Parr, Nigel A; Rowedder, James E; Slack, Robert J

    2016-12-15

    A novel series of potent quinoline-based human H1 and H3 bivalent histamine receptor antagonists, suitable for intranasal administration for the potential treatment of allergic rhinitis associated nasal congestion, were identified. Compound 18b had slightly lower H1 potency (pA2 8.8 vs 9.7 for the clinical goldstandard azelastine), and H3 potency (pKi 9.1vs 6.8 for azelastine), better selectivity over α1A, α1B and hERG, similar duration of action, making 18b a good back-up compound to our previous candidate, but with a more desirable profile.

  18. 568份疑似甲型H1N1流感病例标本病原学检测结果分析%Results of detection of 568 suspected influenza A virus subtype H1N1 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽华; 唐保晖

    2011-01-01

    Aim To detect influenza A virus subtype H1N1 in Hechi City from suspected patients by nucleic acid assay. Methods The nucleic acids of influenza A and B viruses and nfluenza A virus subtype H1N1 were simultaneously detected from 568 suspected influenza A virus subtype H1N1 patients by using real time quantitative RT-PCR method (Real-time RT-PCR). Seasonal influenza virus subtype H1N1 and H3N2 would detected from the samples positive forinfluenza A virus nucleic acid,while negative for influenza B virus and influenza A virus subtype H1N1 nucleic acid.Results In the 568 suspected samples,there were 334 samples positive for influenza A H1N1 influenza virus nucleic acid and 14 positive for seasonal influenza virus subtype H1N1 nucleic acid positive,25 positive for seasonal influenza virus subtype H3N2 nucleic acid positive and 40 positive for no-differentiated influenza A virus nucleic acid. Conclusion Laboratory tests provide a basis for sensitive, specific and efficient confirmation and control of influenza A(H1N1 ).%目的 对河池市568份疑似甲型H1N1流感病例标本进行核酸检测,为甲型H1N1流感疫情的防控提供依据.方法 对疑似甲型H1N1流感病例标本用实时荧光定量RT-PCR法(Real-time RT-PCR)检测,检测项目为A型流感病毒核酸、B型流感病毒核酸和甲型H1N1流感病毒核酸,对A型流感病毒核酸阳性而B型流感病毒核酸和甲型H1N1流感病毒核酸均阴性标本再进行季节性流感病毒H1N1、H3N2亚型流感病毒核酸检测.结果 检测疑似病例标本568份,其中甲型H1N1流感病毒核酸阳性334份,季节性流感病毒H1N1亚型核酸阳性14份,季节性流感病毒H3N2亚型核酸阳性25份,A未分型流感病毒核酸阳性40份.结论 实验室检测为甲型H1N1流感疫情的确认、防控以及病人的处理提供了依据,对提高实验窒检测技术的敏感性、特异性和实效性具有重要的意义.

  19. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.

  20. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  1. An Amphibian Host Defense Peptide Is Virucidal for Human H1 Hemagglutinin-Bearing Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthausen, David J; Lee, Song Hee; Kumar, Vineeth Tv; Bouvier, Nicole M; Krammer, Florian; Ellebedy, Ali H; Wrammert, Jens; Lowen, Anice C; George, Sanil; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Jacob, Joshy

    2017-04-18

    Although vaccines confer protection against influenza A viruses, antiviral treatment becomes the first line of defense during pandemics because there is insufficient time to produce vaccines. Current antiviral drugs are susceptible to drug resistance, and developing new antivirals is essential. We studied host defense peptides from the skin of the South Indian frog and demonstrated that one of these, which we named "urumin," is virucidal for H1 hemagglutinin-bearing human influenza A viruses. This peptide specifically targeted the conserved stalk region of H1 hemagglutinin and was effective against drug-resistant H1 influenza viruses. Using electron microscopy, we showed that this peptide physically destroyed influenza virions. It also protected naive mice from lethal influenza infection. Urumin represents a unique class of anti-influenza virucide that specifically targets the hemagglutinin stalk region, similar to targeting of antibodies induced by universal influenza vaccines. Urumin therefore has the potential to contribute to first-line anti-viral treatments during influenza outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Boris M; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  3. Construction and Immunogenicity Evaluation of Recombinant Influenza A Viruses Containing Chimeric Hemagglutinin Genes Derived from Genetically Divergent Influenza A H1N1 Subtype Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Kara; Jiang, Zhiyong; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R; Langenhorst, Robert; Ransburgh, Russell; Brunick, Colin; Tracy, Miranda C; Hurtig, Heather R; Mabee, Leah M; Mingo, Mark; Li, Yanhua; Webby, Richard J; Huber, Victor C; Fang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause highly contagious diseases in a variety of hosts, including humans and pigs. To develop a vaccine that can be broadly effective against genetically divergent strains of the virus, in this study we employed molecular breeding (DNA shuffling) technology to create a panel of chimeric HA genes. Each chimeric HA gene contained genetic elements from parental swine influenza A viruses that had a history of zoonotic transmission, and also from a 2009 pandemic virus. Each parental virus represents a major phylogenetic clade of influenza A H1N1 viruses. Nine shuffled HA constructs were initially screened for immunogenicity in mice by DNA immunization, and one chimeric HA (HA-129) was expressed on both a A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone with mutations associated with a live, attenuated phenotype (PR8LAIV-129) and a A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 backbone (TX98-129). When delivered to mice, the PR8LAIV-129 induced antibodies against all four parental viruses, which was similar to the breadth of immunity observed when HA-129 was delivered as a DNA vaccine. This chimeric HA was then tested as a candidate vaccine in a nursery pig model, using inactivated TX98-129 virus as the backbone. The results demonstrate that pigs immunized with HA-129 developed antibodies against all four parental viruses, as well as additional primary swine H1N1 influenza virus field isolates. This study established a platform for creating novel genes of influenza viruses using a molecular breeding approach, which will have important applications toward future development of broadly protective influenza virus vaccines.

  4. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  5. Activation of the human immune system via toll-like receptors by the oncolytic parvovirus H-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Maike; Schäfer, Petra; Dinsart, Christiane; Galle, Peter R; Moehler, Markus

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the function of toll-like receptors (TLRs) during oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV)-induced human immune responses. First, the role of TLRs in the activation of the NFκB transcription factor was characterized; second, the immunologic effects of H-1PV-induced tumor cell lysates (TCL) on human antitumor immune responses were evaluated. A human ex vivo model was used to study immune responses with dendritic cells (DCs). Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) transfected to stably express TLRs were used as potential human DC equivalents to further investigate the role of specific TLRs during immune activation. TLR3 and TLR9 were activated by H-1PV infection, which correlated with NFκB translocation to the nucleus and a reduced cytoplasmic IκB expression. Using a TLR-signaling reporter plasmid (pNiFty-Luc), NFκB activity was increased following H-1PV infection. In addition, human DCs coincubated with H-1PV-induced TCL demonstrated increased TLR3 and TLR9 expression. These data suggest that H-1PV-induced TCL stimulate human DCs at least in part through TLR-dependent signaling pathways. Thus, DC maturation occurred through exposure to H-1PV-induced TCL through TLR-signaling leading to NFκB-dependent activation of the adaptive immune system as indicated by the increased expression of CD86, TLR3 and TLR9. Furthermore, the transcription of various cytokines indicates the activation of immune response, therefore the production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α was determined. Here, H-1PV-induced TCL significantly enhanced the TNF-α level by DCs after coculture. H-1PV oncolytic virotherapy enhances immune priming by different effects on DCs and generates antitumor immunity. These findings potentially offer a new approach to tumor therapy.

  6. Functional Evolution of Influenza Virus NS1 Protein in Currently Circulating Human 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amelia M; Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-09-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus emerged in humans, causing a global pandemic. It was previously shown that the NS1 protein from this human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus was an effective interferon (IFN) antagonist but could not inhibit general host gene expression, unlike other NS1 proteins from seasonal human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Here we show that the NS1 protein from currently circulating pH1N1 viruses has evolved to encode 6 amino acid changes (E55K, L90I, I123V, E125D, K131E, and N205S) with respect to the original protein. Notably, these 6 residue changes restore the ability of pH1N1 NS1 to inhibit general host gene expression, mainly by their ability to restore binding to the cellular factor CPSF30. This is the first report describing the ability of the pH1N1 NS1 protein to naturally acquire mutations that restore this function. Importantly, a recombinant pH1N1 virus containing these 6 amino acid changes in the NS1 protein (pH1N1/NSs-6mut) inhibited host IFN and proinflammatory responses to a greater extent than that with the parental virus (pH1N1/NS1-wt), yet virus titers were not significantly increased in cell cultures or in mouse lungs, and the disease was partially attenuated. The pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus grew similarly to pH1N1/NSs-wt in mouse lungs, but infection with pH1N1/NSs-6mut induced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, likely due to a general inhibition of gene expression mediated by the mutated NS1 protein. This lower level of inflammation induced by the pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus likely accounts for the attenuated disease phenotype and may represent a host-virus adaptation affecting influenza virus pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE Seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) are among the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans. In addition, occasional pandemics are caused when IAVs circulating in other species emerge in the human population. In 2009, a swine-origin H1N1 IAV (pH1N1) was transmitted to humans, infecting people then and up

  7. [Mutagenesis of the human histamine H1 receptor and design of new antihistamine agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differding, E; Gillard, M; Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Noyer, M; Daliers, J; Goldstein, S; Neuwels, M; Lassoie, M A; Guillaume, J P; Bascour, M; Bollen, A; Hénichart, J P

    1996-01-01

    The binding cavity of histamine and histamine antagonists is explored using site directed mutagenesis of the human histamine H1 receptor and the amino acids involved in ligand binding are identified. Whereas Asp107 and Phe199 are important for both agonists and antagonists, two additional amino acids (Asn198 and Trp103) are required for efficient histamine binding. The binding site of antagonists is best defined as resulting from a strong ionic bond to Asp107, an orthogonal interaction between one of the aromatic rings with Phe199, and probably a hydrophobic interaction between the second aromatic ring and the lipophilic amino acids of the upper part of TMIV and TMV. This is consistent with structure-activity data of most described antagonists.

  8. Severe swine influenza A (H1N1) versus severe human seasonal influenza A (H3N2): clinical comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Pherez, Francisco M; Strollo, Stephanie; Syed, Uzma; Laguerre, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    At the beginning of the swine influenza (H1N1) pandemic in the spring of 2009, there were still stories of human seasonal influenza A circulating in the New York area. Adult patients admitted with influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) (fever > 102°F, dry cough, and myalgias) presented diagnostic problems. First, clinicians had to differentiate ILIs from influenza, and then differentiate human seasonal influenza A from H1N1 in hospitalized adults with ILIs and negative chest films (no focal segmental/lobar infiltrates). Human seasonal influenza A was diagnosed by rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs), but H1N1 was often RIDT negative. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for H1N1 was restricted or not available. The Winthrop-University Hospital Infectious Disease Division developed clinical diagnostic criteria (a diagnostic weighted point score system) to rapidly and clinically diagnose H1N1 in patients with negative RIDTs. The point score system was modified and shortened for ease of use, that is, the diagnostic H1N1 triad (any 3 of 4) (ILI, see above) plus thrombocytopenia, relative lymphopenia, elevated serum transaminases, or an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Our clinical experience during the pandemic allowed us to develop the swine diagnostic H1N1 triad. In the process, similarities and differences between human seasonal influenza A and H1N1 were noted. We present 2 illustrative cases of severe influenza, one due to human seasonal influenza A and one due to H1N1, for clinical consideration reflective of our experiences early in the H1N1 pandemic in 2009.

  9. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  10. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  11. Geographic distribution of human Blastocystis subtypes in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan David; Sánchez, Angie; Hernández, Carolina; Flórez, Carolina; Bernal, María Consuelo; Giraldo, Julio Cesar; Reyes, Patricia; López, Myriam Consuelo; García, Lineth; Cooper, Philip J; Vicuña, Yosselin; Mongi, Florencia; Casero, Rodolfo D

    2016-07-01

    Blastocystis is a cosmopolitan enteric protist colonizing probably more than 1 billion people. This protozoan exhibits genetic diversity and is subdivided into subtypes (STs). The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of Blastocystis STs in symptomatic and asymptomatic human samples from different countries of South America. A total of 346 fecal samples were genotyped by SSU rDNA showing ST1 (28.3%), ST2 (22.2%), ST3 (36.7%), ST4 (2%), ST5 (2.3%), ST6 (2%), ST7 (2.3%), ST8 (0.6%), ST12 (0.9%) and a novel ST (2.7%). These findings update the epidemiology of Blastocystis in South America and expand our knowledge of the phylogeographic differences exhibited by this stramenopile.

  12. Functional characterization of serotonin receptor subtypes in human duodenal secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen Seier;

    2006-01-01

    of dyspeptic patients with or without Helicobacter pylori infection, and to determine the 5-HT receptor subtypes functionally involved. Biopsies from the second part of duodenum were obtained from 43 dyspeptic patients during routine endoscopy. Biopsies were mounted in modified Ussing chambers with air suction......: ketanserin, ondansetron, or SB-204070 (1-butyl-4 piperidinmethyl-8-amino-7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-5-carboxylate HCl). Histological examination was performed on duodenal biopsies. Helicobacter urease testing and histological examination determined Helicobacter pylori infection. 5-HT induced a dose......-dependent and bumetanide-sensitive short-circuit current, which was independent of the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection. All the three 5-HT receptor antagonists failed to significantly effect basal and 5-HT-induced short-circuit current. Our results indicate that in human duodenum 1) 5-HT is a potent stimulator...

  13. [Colorimetric detection of human influenza A H1N1 virus by reverse transcription loop mediated isothermal amplification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kai; Wang, Da-Yan; Qin, Meng; Gao, Rong-Bao; Wang, Miao; Zou, Shu-Mei; Han, Feng; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Xi-Yan; Shu, Yue-Long; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2010-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive colorimetric Reverse Transcription Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP) method was established to detect human influenza A H1N1 virus. The method employed a set of six specially designed primers that recognized eight distinct sequences of the HA gene for amplification of nucleic acid under isothermal conditions at 65 degrees C for one and half hour. The amplification process of RT-LAMP was monitored by the addition of HNB (Hydroxy naphthol blue) dye prior to amplification. A positive reaction was indicated by a color change from violet to sky blue and confirmed by agarose electrophoresis. The specificity of the RT-LAMP assay was validated by cross-reaction with different swine and human influenza virus including human seasonal influenza A /H1N1 A /H3N2, influenza B and swine A /H1N1. The sensitivity of this assay was evaluated by serial dilutions of RNA molecules from in vitro transcription of human influenza A H1N1 HA gene. The assay was further evaluated with 30 clinical specimens with suspected pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus infection in parallel with RT-PCR detection and 26 clinical specimens with seasonal influenza virus infection. Our results showed that the RT-LAMP was able to achieve a sensitivity of 60 RNA copies with high specificity, and detection rate was comparable to that of the RT-PCR with the clinical samples of pandemic influenza A H1N1 infection. The RT-LAMP reaction with HNB could also be measured at 650nm in a microplate reader for quantitative analysis. Thus, we concluded that this colorimetric RT-LAMP assay had potential for the rapid screening of the human influenza A H1N1 virus infection in National influenza monitoring network laboratories and sentinel hospitals of provincial and municipal region in China.

  14. Establishment of oligonucleotide microarray for detection of influenza virus subtypes H1N1 and H3N2%H1N1和H3N2亚型流感病毒基因芯片检测方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧煜; 梅琳; 侯义宏; 李全芬; 林祥梅; 韩雪清

    2011-01-01

    为建立同时能鉴别甲型H1N1和猪流感病毒常见亚型的新型基因芯片检测方法,根据GenBank中已发表的甲型流感病毒MP的基因序列和甲型H1N1(2009)和猪流感病毒H1N1、H3N2亚型的基因序列,设计、筛选并合成7对特异性引物和1对通用引物;根据扩增的靶序列,设计并合成14条特异性探针和3条质控探针,制备了甲型H1N1(2009)流感病毒和猪流感病毒H1N1、H3N2亚型基因芯片;并进行了特异性试验、敏感性试验和田间样品的检测。结果显示,该芯片检测方法与猪细小病毒(PPV)、猪瘟病毒(CSFV)、猪繁殖与呼吸综合征病毒(PRRSV)等猪常见病毒无交叉反应;对猪H1N1、猪H3N2和甲型H1N1(2009)流感病毒而言,最低可检测到105、104和105稀释的病毒株。结果证实,该方法特异性强、敏感性高,是一种高通量的甲型H1N1和猪流感常见亚型筛查方法。%Seven pairs of primers specific for different subtypes and a pair of universal primers were carefully designed based on the genomic sequences of A/H1N1 and swine influenza virus retrieved from GenBank database.Several multiplex RT-PCR methods were then developed.Further 14 oligonucleotide probes specific for A/H1N1 and swine influenza virus were designed according to the published gene in target cDNA domains.Then a microarray for A/H1N1 and swine influenza virus was developed with its specificity and sensitivity validated by using swine influenza virus strains and samples from different areas.The results showed that all the subtypes of swine influenza virus and A/H1N1 virus could be identified simultaneously on this microarray with high sensitivity,which could reach to 105 dilute viruses.Furthermore,there was no cross reactions with PPV,CSFV and PRRSV.Therefore the microarray is a useful diagnostic method with high specificity and sensitivity,and could be used for A/H1N1 and swine influenza surveillance.

  15. A non-VH1-69 heterosubtypic neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects mice against H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata De Marco

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses are among the most important human pathogens and are responsible for annual epidemics and sporadic, potentially devastating pandemics. The humoral immune response plays an important role in the defense against these viruses, providing protection mainly by producing antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA glycoprotein. However, their high genetic variability allows the virus to evade the host immune response and the potential protection offered by seasonal vaccines. The emergence of resistance to antiviral drugs in recent years further limits the options available for the control of influenza. The development of alternative strategies for influenza prophylaxis and therapy is therefore urgently needed. In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (PN-SIA49 that recognizes a highly conserved epitope located on the stem region of the HA and able to neutralize a broad spectrum of influenza viruses belonging to different subtypes (H1, H2 and H5. Furthermore, we describe its protective activity in mice after lethal challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses suggesting a potential application in the treatment of influenza virus infections.

  16. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  17. Swine Influenza Virus PA and Neuraminidase Gene Reassortment into Human H1N1 Influenza Virus Is Associated with an Altered Pathogenic Phenotype Linked to Increased MIP-2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugolenski, Daniel; Jones, Les; Howerth, Elizabeth; Wentworth, David; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    Swine are susceptible to infection by both avian and human influenza viruses, and this feature is thought to contribute to novel reassortant influenza viruses. In this study, the influenza virus reassortment rate in swine and human cells was determined. Coinfection of swine cells with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (huH1N1) and an endemic swine H1N2 (A/swine/Illinois/02860/09) virus (swH1N2) resulted in a 23% reassortment rate that was independent of α2,3- or α2,6-sialic acid distribution on the cells. The reassortants had altered pathogenic phenotypes linked to introduction of the swine virus PA and neuraminidase (NA) into huH1N1. In mice, the huH1N1 PA and NA mediated increased MIP-2 expression early postinfection, resulting in substantial pulmonary neutrophilia with enhanced lung pathology and disease. The findings support the notion that swine are a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortants independent of sialic acid distribution. These results show the potential for continued reassortment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus with endemic swine viruses and for reassortants to have increased pathogenicity linked to the swine virus NA and PA genes which are associated with increased pulmonary neutrophil trafficking that is related to MIP-2 expression. Influenza A viruses can change rapidly via reassortment to create a novel virus, and reassortment can result in possible pandemics. Reassortments among subtypes from avian and human viruses led to the 1957 (H2N2 subtype) and 1968 (H3N2 subtype) human influenza pandemics. Recent analyses of circulating isolates have shown that multiple genes can be recombined from human, avian, and swine influenza viruses, leading to triple reassortants. Understanding the factors that can affect influenza A virus reassortment is needed for the establishment of disease intervention strategies that may reduce or preclude pandemics. The findings from this study show that swine cells provide a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortment

  18. Blastocystis subtypes detected in humans and animals from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan David; Sánchez, Laura Viviana; Bautista, Diana Carolina; Corredor, Andrés Felipe; Flórez, Astrid Carolina; Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2014-03-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protist colonizing probably more than 1 billion people along with a large variety of non-human hosts. This protist has been linked to symptoms and diseases such as abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, flatulence and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Remarkable genetic diversity has been observed, leading to the subdivision of the genus into multiple subtypes (ST), some of which are exclusively found in non-human hosts. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of Blastocystis STs in different Colombian hosts. We obtained fecal samples positive for Blastocystis by microscopy from 277 humans, 52 birds, and 117 mammals (25 cattle, 40 opossums, 40 dogs, 10 rats and 2 howler monkeys). The samples were submitted to DNA extraction, PCR and sequencing using primers targeting the small subunit rRNA gene, and ST identification was performed according to DNA barcoding. We observed the occurrence of ST1 (34%) and ST2 (23%) and lower proportions of STs 3 (11.4%), 4 (0.8%), 6 (19.8%) and 8 (10.5%). Domesticated mammals shared the same STs as those usually seen in humans (ST1, ST2, ST3), while birds and marsupials had STs, which are usually rare in humans (ST6, ST8). Further studies implementing high-resolution molecular markers are necessary to understand the phylodynamics of Blastocystis transmission and the role of this stramenopile in health and disease in Colombian populations, and to expand on the phylogeographic differences observed so far with a view to exploring and understanding host-parasite co-evolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Agglutination of human O erythrocytes by influenza A(H1N1) viruses freshly isolated from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Kimura, T; Minoshiro, S; Shibe, K

    1991-04-01

    The hemagglutinin titers of 10 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were examined using the erythrocytes of several species. Human O erythrocytes showed the highest agglutination titer to the viruses, whereas chicken erythrocytes showed a low titer. These findings were noted for at least 10 passages by serial dilutions of the viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All influenza A(H1N1) viruses, plaque-cloned directly from throat-washing specimens of patients, also agglutinated human O but not chicken erythrocytes. The results of a hemadsorption test indicated that chicken erythrocytes possess less affinity to MDCK cells infected with the A/Osaka City/2/88(H1N1) stain than to those infected with the A/Yamagata/120/86(H1N1) strain which is used as an inactivated influenza vaccine in Japan. However, there were no significant differences between the A/Osaka City/2/88 and the A/Yamagata/120/86 strains in the hemagglutination inhibition test. Since human O erythrocytes have high agglutination activity to influenza A(H1N1) and also to A(H3N2) and B viruses in MDCK cells, these erythrocytes may be useful for the serological diagnosis of influenza.

  20. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  1. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  2. Computational design of drug candidates for influenza A virus subtype H1N1 by inhibiting the viral neuraminidase-1 enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambunan Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is critical to seek potential alternative treatments for H1N1 infections by inhibiting neuraminidase-1 enzyme. One of the viable options for inhibiting the activity of neuraminidase- 1 is peptide drug design. In order to increase peptide stability, cyclization is necessary to prevent its digestion by protease enzyme. Cyclization of peptide ligands by formation of disulfide bridges is preferable for designing inhibitors of neuraminidase-1 because of their high activity and specificity. Here we designed ligands by using molecular docking, drug scan and dynamics computational methods. Based on our docking results, short polypeptides of cystein-arginine-methionine-tyrosine- -proline-cysteine (CRMYPC and cysteine-arginine-aspargine- phenylalanine-proline-cysteine (CRNFPC have good residual interactions with the target and the binding energy ΔGbinding of -31.7402 and -31.0144 kcal mol-1, respectively. These values are much lower than those of the standards, and it means that both ligands are more accessible to ligand-receptor binding. Based on drug scan results, both of these ligands are neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic. They also show good oral bioavailability. Moreover, both ligands show relatively stable molecular dynamics progression of RMSD vs. time plot. However, based on our metods, the CRMYPC ligand has sufficient hydrogen bonding interactions with residues of the active side of neuraminidase-1 and can be therefore proposed as a potential inhibitor of neuraminidase-1

  3. Characterization of stimulus-secretion coupling in the human pancreatic EndoC-βH1 beta cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta E Andersson

    Full Text Available Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets.Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay, gene expression (Gene Chip array, metabolite levels (GC/MS, respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, glucose utilization (radiometric, lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric, ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets.Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells.Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings in isolated islets, EndoC-βH1 cells have the

  4. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  5. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  6. Molecular characterization of a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus containing genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 virus in swine from eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Haibo; Xu, Lihua; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Lu, Xiangyun; Wu, Nanping

    2016-06-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of H1N1 swine influenza virus have been reported since 2009. Reassortant H1N2 viruses that contain genes from the pandemic H1N1 virus have been isolated in Italy and the United States. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular characteristics of reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses in eastern China. Active influenza surveillance programs in Zhejiang Province identified a novel H1N2 influenza virus isolated from pigs displaying clinical signs of influenza virus infection. Whole-genome sequencing was performed and this strain was compared with other influenza viruses available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the novel strain contained genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 and swine H3N2 viruses. BALB/c mice were infected with the isolated virus to assess its virulence in mice. While the novel H1N2 isolate replicated well in mice, it was found to be less virulent. These results provide additional evidence that swine serve as intermediate hosts or 'mixing vessels' for novel influenza viruses. They also emphasize the importance of surveillance in the swine population for use as an early warning system for influenza outbreaks in swine and human populations.

  7. Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) in humans in the United States, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vivek; Bridges, Carolyn B; Uyeki, Timothy M; Shu, Bo; Balish, Amanda; Xu, Xiyan; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V; Deyde, Varough; Garten, Rebecca J; Harris, Meghan; Gerber, Susan; Vagasky, Susan; Smith, Forrest; Pascoe, Neal; Martin, Karen; Dufficy, Deborah; Ritger, Kathy; Conover, Craig; Quinlisk, Patricia; Klimov, Alexander; Bresee, Joseph S; Finelli, Lyn

    2009-06-18

    Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses--containing genes from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses--emerged and became enzootic among pig herds in North America during the late 1990s. We report the clinical features of the first 11 sporadic cases of infection of humans with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, occurring from December 2005 through February 2009, until just before the current epidemic of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) among humans. These data were obtained from routine national influenza surveillance reports and from joint case investigations by public and animal health agencies. The median age of the 11 patients was 10 years (range, 16 months to 48 years), and 4 had underlying health conditions. Nine of the patients had had exposure to pigs, five through direct contact and four through visits to a location where pigs were present but without contact. In another patient, human-to-human transmission was suspected. The range of the incubation period, from the last known exposure to the onset of symptoms, was 3 to 9 days. Among the 10 patients with known clinical symptoms, symptoms included fever (in 90%), cough (in 100%), headache (in 60%), and diarrhea (in 30%). Complete blood counts were available for four patients, revealing leukopenia in two, lymphopenia in one, and thrombocytopenia in another. Four patients were hospitalized, two of whom underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Four patients received oseltamivir, and all 11 recovered from their illness. From December 2005 until just before the current human epidemic of swine-origin influenza viruses, there was sporadic infection with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in persons with exposure to pigs in the United States. Although all the patients recovered, severe illness of the lower respiratory tract and unusual influenza signs such as diarrhea were observed in some patients, including

  8. Distinct differences in the responses of the human pancreatic β-cell line EndoC-βH1 and human islets to proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer A; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Annamalai, Mani; Chen, Jing; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Davis, Dawn B; Corbett, John A; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-01

    While insulinoma cells have been developed and proven to be extremely useful in studies focused on mechanisms controlling β-cell function and viability, translating findings to human β-cells has proven difficult because of the limited access to human islets and the absence of suitable insulinoma cell lines of human origin. Recently, a human β-cell line, EndoC-βH1, has been derived from human fetal pancreatic buds. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human EndoC-βH1 cells respond to cytokines in a fashion comparable to human islets. Unlike most rodent-derived insulinoma cell lines that respond to cytokines in a manner consistent with rodent islets, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to a combination of cytokines (IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF) in a manner consistent with human islets. Nitric oxide, produced following inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, is a major mediator of cytokine-induced human islet cell damage. We show that EndoC-βH1 cells fail to express iNOS or produce nitric oxide in response to this combination of cytokines. Inhibitors of iNOS prevent cytokine-induced loss of human islet cell viability; however, they do not prevent cytokine-induced EndoC-βH1 cell death. Stressed human islets or human islets expressing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are resistant to cytokines, and, much like stressed human islets, EndoC-βH1 cells express HSP70 under basal conditions. Elevated basal expression of HSP70 in EndoC-βH1 cells is consistent with the lack of iNOS expression in response to cytokine treatment. While expressing HSP70, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress activators, such as thapsigargin. These findings indicate that EndoC-βH1 cells do not faithfully recapitulate the response of human islets to cytokines. Therefore, caution should be exercised when making conclusions regarding the actions of cytokines on human islets when using this human-derived insulinoma cell line.

  9. Chest imaging of H7N9 subtype of human avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-ming Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The characteristic imaging demonstrations of H7N9 subtype of human avian influenza are segmental or lobar exudative lesions at lungs at the initial stage, which rapidly progress into bilateral distribution at lungs at the progressive stage.

  10. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  11. [Case report of the first world death due to a new strain of human influenza A H1N1 virus and behavior of human influenzae in pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Karchmer Krivitzky, Samuel; EsliRabadán, Martínez Cesar; Antonio Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A H1N1 is an acute respiratory illness caused by a new strain of H1N1. Human influenza is a subtype of influenza Avirus, from the family of Orthomyxoviridae. This strain is the cause of new influenza pandemic declared by the World Health Organization in June, 2009. This paper reports the first case occurred in Mexico: a 39-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2 and obesity grade II, which suffered atypical and aggressive pneumonia positive to coronavirus. Patient died 98 hours after her admission to the hospital unit. Due to the clinical presentation of the case, the doctors sent samples to the Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica that sent an aliquot of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases of theAgency of Public Health in Canada, that reported positivity to influenza virus, and catalogued it as a new global strain called influenza A virus H1N1. The notice of 229E/NL63 coronavirus and its relationship to the recent outbreaks of avian influenza in humans and the clinical presentation of the case were the epidemiological circumstances that prevented the nation epidemiology system to establish global containment strategies to prevent the spread of this emerging infection. The consequence was the declaration of WHO pandemic alert level 6. Its behavior in pregnancy, reported by Assistant General Direction of Epidemiology in Mexico, has placed this infection as a risk factor for women.

  12. Hemagglutinin protein of Asian strains of human influenza virus A H1N1 binds to sialic acid--a major component of human airway receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Chai, H C

    2012-03-16

    Hemagglutinin (HA) protein plays an important role in binding the influenza virus to infected cells and therefore mediates infection. Deposited HA sequences of 86 Asian strains of influenza A (H1N1) viruses during the first outbreak were obtained from the NCBI database and compared. Interaction of the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) virus with the human sialic acid receptor was also studied using bioinformatics. Overall, not more than three single-point amino acid variants/changes were observed in the HA protein region of influenza A (H1N1) virus from Asian countries when a selected group sequence comparison was made. The bioinformatics study showed that the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) binds to the sialic acid receptor in human airway receptors, possibly key to air-borne infection in humans.

  13. Naturally Occurring Antibodies in Humans Can Neutralize a Variety of Influenza Virus Strains, Including H3, H1, H2, and H5 ▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Asano, Yoshizo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are classified into 16 subtypes according to the serotypes of hemagglutinin (HA). It is generally thought that neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. We examined the repertoire of neutralizing Abs against influenza viruses in humans. B lymphocytes were collected from donors by apheresis, and Ab libraries were constructed by using phage-display technology. Anti-HA clones were isolated by screening with H3N2 viruses. Their binding activity was examined, and four kinds of Abs showing broad strain specificity were identified from one donor. Two of the Abs, F045-092 and F026-427, were extensively analyzed. They neutralized not only H3N2 but also H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1 viruses, although the activities were largely varied. Flow cytometry suggested that they have the ability to bind to HA and HA1 artificially expressed on the cell surface. They show hemagglutination inhibition activity and do not compete with C179, an Ab thought to bind to the stalk region. F045-092 competes with Abs that recognize sites A and B for binding to HA. Furthermore, the serine at residue 136 in site A could be a part of the epitope. Thus, it is likely that F045-092 and F026-427 bind to a conserved epitope in the head region formed by HA1. Interestingly, while the VH1-69 gene can encode MAbs against the HA stem that are group 1 specific, F045-092 and its relatives that recognize the head region also use VH1-69. The possible epitope recognized by these clones is discussed. PMID:21865387

  14. Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapeutic Characteristics in the Treatment of Influenza A Virus Subtype H1N1 Based on Data Mining%基于文本挖掘分析甲型H1N1流感的中医药治疗特色

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭洪涛; 郑光; 赵静; 姜淼; 何晓娟; 吕爱平

    2011-01-01

    Through data mining, raw data was downloaded from the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (CBM) with keyword as "H1N1". Then, the downloaded, semi-structured data set was converted into fully structured data and stored in the database. Based on the discrete derivative algorithm, the data set was mined for therapeutic char acteristics in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The data mining process revealed results as follows. (1) In TCM clinical practice on influenza A virus subtype H1N1, the therapy is focused on dispelling heat and resolving toxicity. (2) The widely used TCM patent medicines are Lian-Hua-Qing-Wen Capsule, Tan-Re-Qing Injection, Qing-Kai Ling Injection, and Shuang-Huang-Lian Injection. (3) Using TCM patent medicine, the syndrome differentiation of influenza A virus subtype H1N1 can be determined into patterns of toxicity, fire (heat), and dampness (phlegm). (4) TCM patent medicines are mainly prescribed by western medicine doctors. However, TCM syndrome differentiation is still an existing problem in the medical practice of modern medicine doctors. (5) In data mining, validating suspi cious results by reviewing them in the original literature is an irreplaceable method.%从中国生物医学文献数据库(CBM)中检索治疗甲型H1N1流感的文献数据,针对半格式化的原始数据,进行格式化转换,存储于大型关系型数据库;针对格式化的数据,采用基于敏感关键词频数统计的离散导数算法,对文献数据进行挖掘处理;针对文本挖掘的结果,结合原文献人工回溯可疑结果,得到以下结论:(1)在治疗甲型H1N1流感的过程中,中药以清热解毒为主;(2)中成药以连花清瘟胶囊、痰热清注射液、清开灵制剂、双黄连制剂为主;(3)以药测证,可推断甲型H1N1流感的发病特点是毒、火(热)、湿(痰);(4)中成药的使用以西医医生为主,但存在辩证使用问题;(5)针对文本挖掘的可疑结果,回溯原文献是一种不可替代的方法.

  15. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  16. Human Blastocystis subtyping with subtype-specific primers developed from unique sequences of the SSU rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Iwamasa, Ayana

    2016-12-01

    The genus Blastocystis is one of the most genetically diverse parasites. Blastocystis isolates from humans and animals have been classified into subtypes (STs) based on the phylogeny of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA). Although human Blastocystis isolates are limited to STs 1-9, the identification of all 9 STs remains challenging due to the lack of specific primers for several STs. The sequencing of partial SSU rDNA is therefore essential for the identification of several STs. In this study, we developed 9 sets of PCR primers to detect each of the 9 kinds of ST in humans. When these ST-specific primer pairs were examined reference Blastocystis for the 9 STs, all 9 amplified only the target ST even in a DNA mixture of all 9 STs. The specificities of the 9 primer sets were tested against several intestinal parasites and fungi found in human stool samples. No amplification with these common human intestinal eukaryotes was observed using the primer pairs for 8 STs, while the ST5 primer set gave only faint bands with some parasites. Since genomic DNA levels of these parasites extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures are expected to be markedly lower than the pure or highly concentrated DNA samples tested, the cross-amplifications with these organisms are unlikely to be detected when DNA samples are extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures. The PCR conditions for all 9 primer sets were the same, hence a one-step analysis by PCR amplification, followed by electrophoresis has potential as a simple tool for the subtyping of human Blastocystis isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Melissa offiinalis effiacy against human inflenza virus (New H1N1 in comparison with oseltamivir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvane Jalali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antiviral activity of Melissa officinalis (MO extract against the influenza virus H1N1 in vitro. Methods: The cytotoxicity of MO extract was identified on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cell culture by MTT assay. The virus was inoculated to the cells (multiplicity of infection = 0.1 in two protocols. In protocol 1, the MO extracts at concentrations of 0.005, 0.050, 0.010, 0.100 and 0.500 mg/mL were incubated with the virus for one hour preinoculation. In protocol 2, the mentioned concentrations of MO extracts were added to the cells one-hour post infection. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of oseltamivir with different concentrations was tested as the positive controls. The 50% tissue culture infective dose, neutralizing index and hemagglutination titer were determined. Results: The medicine oseltamivir and MO extracts were not toxic for MDCK at concentrations less than 1 mg/mL. All utilized concentrations of MO extracts were vigorously efficient to decrease the viral yield in both experiments. The 50% tissue culture infective dose of the groups containing up to 0.100 mg/mL of MO extracts in the first experiment in compare with 0.050 mg/mL in the second experiment reduced to 0. Although hemagglutination tests showed little titers, the viral quantity significantly decreased in both experiments. By the way, the medicine oseltamivir could completely suppress viral replication in MDCK. Conclusions: The present study suggests that MO extracts have a potent anti-influenza effect in cell culture.

  18. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  19. Analysis of HA gene sequence of a subtype H1N1 swine influenza virus isolated from Guangxi strains%H1N1猪流感病毒广西分离株HA基因序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜健华; 梁丹洁; 李春英; 徐贤坤; 胡巧云; 孙翔翔; 何奇松; 熊毅

    2013-01-01

    [目的]了解H1N1猪流感病毒广西分离株的分子特征,为广西猪流感疫情监控提供参考依据.[方法]采用RT-PCR对2011年分离获得的H1N1猪流感病毒广西分离株(A/swine/Guangxi/1/2011)的HA基因进行扩增,然后利用DNASTAR分析软件对测序基因片段进行整个阅读框架的核苷酸序列及其推导氨基酸序列同源性比对分析,并用MEGA 4.0绘制遗传进化树.[结果]广西分离株HA基因长1701 bp,编码566个氨基酸,核苷酸序列与经典SIV的同源性为88.0%~99.6%,与季节性H1N1人流感病毒的同源性为76.3%~77.3%,与欧洲类禽SⅣ分离株的同源性为72.9%~75.4%,与2009甲型H1N1流感病毒的同源性为99.2%~99.6%;从核苷酸遗传进化树可知,广西分离株与类禽H1N1流感病毒和人H1N1流感病毒分离株的亲缘关系较远,而与2009甲型H 1N l流感病毒分离株的亲缘关系最近.广西分离毒株HA基因的裂解位点序列为IPSIQSR↓G,具有典型低致病性流感病毒的分子生物学特征;共有8个糖基化位点,其中6个位于HAl区,两个位于HA2区;广西分离株HA蛋白RBS位点的氨基酸同时具有人和猪流感病毒的特点.[结论]广西分离株(A/swine/Guangxi/1/2011)属于2009甲型H1N1流感病毒.%[Objective]This study was to determine molecular biology information of HA gene of H 1N 1 swine influenza virus isolated from Guangxi strains to provide references for monitoring swine flu in Guangxi.[Method]To analyze HA gene of H1N1 from Genbank,the primer was designed,and then HA genes of A/swine/Guangxi/1/2011 (H1N1) influenza virus were cloned,sequenced and compared via DNASTAR software.A phylogenetic tree was made using MEGA 4.0.[Result]The results indicated that the length of HA gene was 1701 bp and coded for 566 amino acids.Comparing with classical swine influenza H1N1,human-like H1N1 and Eurasian avian-like H1N1,the nucleotide homologies of HA genes were from 88.0% to 99.6%,from 76.3% to

  20. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, London (England))

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  1. Antigenic and genomic characterization of human influenza A and B viruses circulating in Argentina after the introduction of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Mara L; Pontoriero, Andrea V; Benedetti, Estefania; Czech, Andrea; Avaro, Martin; Periolo, Natalia; Campos, Ana M; Savy, Vilma L; Baumeister, Elsa G

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Argentinean Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses Surveillance Network, in the context of the Global Influenza Surveillance carried out by the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective was to study the activity and the antigenic and genomic characteristics of circulating viruses for three consecutive seasons (2010, 2011 and 2012) in order to investigate the emergence of influenza viral variants. During the study period, influenza virus circulation was detected from January to December. Influenza A and B, and all current subtypes of human influenza viruses, were present each year. Throughout the 2010 post-pandemic season, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, unexpectedly, almost disappeared. The haemagglutinin (HA) of the A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied were segregated in a different genetic group to those identified during the 2009 pandemic, although they were still antigenically closely related to the vaccine strain A/California/07/2009. Influenza A(H3N2) viruses were the predominant strains circulating during the 2011 season, accounting for nearly 76 % of influenza viruses identified. That year, all HA sequences of the A(H3N2) viruses tested fell into the A/Victoria/208/2009 genetic clade, but remained antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009 (reference vaccine recommended for this three-year period). A(H3N2) viruses isolated in 2012 were antigenically closely related to A/Victoria/361/2011, recommended by the WHO as the H3 component for the 2013 Southern Hemisphere formulation. B viruses belonging to the B/Victoria lineage circulated in 2010. A mixed circulation of viral variants of both B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages was detected in 2012, with the former being predominant. A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses remained antigenically closely related to the vaccine virus A/California/7/2009; A(H3N2) viruses continually evolved into new antigenic clusters and both B lineages, B/Victoria/2/87-like and B/Yamagata/16/88-like viruses, were observed

  2. PROKARYOTIC EXPRESSION AND ANTIGENIC ANALYSIS OF HA1 GENE OF AVIAN-LIKE H1N1 SUBTYPE SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS%H1N1亚型猪流感病毒 HA1基因原核表达及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮宝阳; 陈鸿军; 滕巧泱; 童光志; 于海; 王林; 宫晓倩; 汪秀会; 刘晓敏; 汪琪; 单同领; 李泽君; 刘芹防

    2015-01-01

    本研究利用RT-PCR技术扩增禽源H1N1亚型猪流感病毒(Swine influenza virus,SIV)的HA1基因片段,将其连接至pCold-TF载体上,菌液鉴定为阳性的克隆经测序验证正确后,提取质粒转化至高表达的表达宿主菌BL21(DE3)中,经IPTG诱导并大量表达目的蛋白。表达产物经过纯化及SDS-PAGE电泳分析,表明重组蛋白以可溶性形式在上清中大量表达,大小约90 kDa,且在15℃、0.8mmol/L IPTG条件下诱导24 h 表达效果最好。通过Ni 柱纯化后,经Western blot分析表明重组表达的蛋白能与禽源H1N1亚型 SIV阳性血清发生特异性反应,具有较好的反应原性。%To express HA1 protein of H1N1 Subtype Swine influenza virus(SIV), the HA1 gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into vector pCold-TF. After being sequenced, the recombinant plasmid was transformed into expression host strain DL21(DE3) then IPTG was added to induce expression. The expressed HA1 fusion protein was purified by Nickel colum and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The results indicated that recombinant protein was expressed in soluble condition in the supernatant and was about 90 kDa in size. The optimum condition for the expres-sion was that the bacteria was induced for 24 h under the conditions (15℃ and 0.8m mol/L IPTG). The result in Western blot of purified recombi-nant protein showed that the HA1 protein had good antigenicity, and could berecognized by SIV positive serum.

  3. Human Embryonic Stem Cell derived Cardiomyocytes self-arrange with areas of different subtypes during differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maj Linea; Grubb, Søren J; Rasmussen, Karen Koefod

    2017-01-01

    The derivation of functional cardiomyocytes (CMs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) represents a unique way of studying human cardiogenesis, including the development of CM subtypes. In this study, we investigated the development and organization of CMs derived from hESCs (h...

  4. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies dominate the human B cell response against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pandemic demonstrated the global health threat of reassortant influenza strains. Herein, we report a detailed analysis of plasmablast and monoclonal antibody responses induced by pandemic H1N1 infection in humans. Unlike antibodies elicited by annual influenza vaccinations, most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk and head domain of multiple influenza strains. T...

  5. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the 2009 pandemic A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 influenza strain in human airway epithelial cells and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A novel 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV H1N1 has been transmitted among humans worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of this virus in human airway epithelial cells and mammals is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, we showed that a 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain, A/Beijing/501/2009, isolated from a human patient, caused typical influenza-like symptoms including weight loss, fluctuations in body temperature, and pulmonary pathological changes in ferrets. We demonstrated that the human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549 was susceptible to infection and that the infected cells underwent apoptosis at 24 h post-infection. In contrast to the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus, the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain A/Beijing/501/2009 induced more cell death involving caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells. Additionally, ferrets infected with the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 virus strain exhibited increased body temperature, greater weight loss, and higher viral titers in the lungs. Therefore, the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 isolate successfully infected the lungs of ferrets and caused more pathological lesions than the seasonal influenza virus. Our findings demonstrate that the difference in virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus in vitro and in vivo may have been mediated by different mechanisms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus infection in both humans and animals is broadened by our findings that apoptotic cell death is involved in the cytopathic effect observed in vitro and that the pathological alterations in the lungs of S-OIV H1N1-infected ferrets are much more severe.

  7. Molecular evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype A in Senegal: 1988-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankalé, J L; Hamel, D; Woolsey, A; Traoré, T; Dia, T C; Guèye-Ndiaye, A; Essex, M; Mboup, T; Kanki, P

    2000-01-01

    Few studies have been able to track the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses in human populations over time. We analyzed the molecular evolution of subtype A over a 10-year period, in a cohort of female sex workers with a known time of infection. We amplified and sequenced the C2-V3 region of the surface envelope glycoprotein from 73 HIV-1-infected women, infected between 1987-1997. Fifty-one patients were infected by subtype A viruses. The viruses demonstrated significant diversification (p diversification of 0.7% per year. The majority of subtype A viruses clustered with HIV-1 subtype A/G recombinant form (IbNG). The genetic diversity of HIV-1 subtype A infections doubled over the first 10 years of this high risk population's epidemic, suggesting that implementation of vaccines early in the epidemic may have a higher likelihood of success based on levels of genetic diversity. The A/G recombinant form (IbNG) has taken epidemic proportions in West Africa. This is of particular importance in understanding the epidemiology of HIV-1 subtypes in Africa and to further dissect the potential phenotypic and biological characteristics of these viruses.

  8. A phylogeny-based global nomenclature system and automated annotation tool for H1 hemagglutinin genes from swine influenza A viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H1 subtype of influenza A viruses (IAV) has been circulating in swine since the 1918 human influenza pandemic. Over time, and aided by further introductions from non-swine hosts, swine H1 have diversified into three genetic lineages. Due to limited global data, these H1 lineages were named based...

  9. Evaluation of phenotypic and genotypic methods for subtyping Campylobacter jejuni isolates from humans, poultry, and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Engberg, J.; Fussing, V.

    2000-01-01

    Six methods for subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni were compared and evaluated with a collection of 90 isolates from poultry, cattle, and sporadic human clinical cases as well as from a waterborne outbreak. The applied methods were Penner heat-stable serotyping; automated ribotyping (Ribo...

  10. Effects of Synephrine and B-Phenethylamine on Human a-Adrenoceptor Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synephrine and B-phenethylamine are structurally related to ephedrine. In this study, the effects of synephrine and B-phenethylamine are investigated on a-adrenoceptor (a-AR) subtypes expressed in human embroyonic kidney (HEK293) or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and compared to that of 1R,2S-no...

  11. Human breast cancer associated fibroblasts exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchou Julia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which prognosis and treatment strategies are largely governed by the receptor status (estrogen, progesterone and Her2 of the tumor cells. Gene expression profiling of whole breast tumors further stratifies breast cancer into several molecular subtypes which also co-segregate with the receptor status of the tumor cells. We postulated that cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs within the tumor stroma may exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles and thus contribute to the biology of the disease in a subtype specific manner. Several studies have reported gene expression profile differences between CAFs and normal breast fibroblasts but in none of these studies were the results stratified based on tumor subtypes. Methods To address whether gene expression in breast cancer associated fibroblasts varies between breast cancer subtypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of early passage primary CAFs isolated from twenty human breast cancer samples representing three main subtypes; seven ER+, seven triple negative (TNBC and six Her2+. Results We observed significant expression differences between CAFs derived from Her2+ breast cancer and CAFs from TNBC and ER + cancers, particularly in pathways associated with cytoskeleton and integrin signaling. In the case of Her2+ breast cancer, the signaling pathways found to be selectively up regulated in CAFs likely contribute to the enhanced migration of breast cancer cells in transwell assays and may contribute to the unfavorable prognosis of Her2+ breast cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in addition to the distinct molecular profiles that characterize the neoplastic cells, CAF gene expression is also differentially regulated in distinct subtypes of breast cancer.

  12. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Kaposi's Sarcoma and Human Herpesvirus 8 in Cuba: evidence of subtype B expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourí, Vivian; Martínez, Pedro A; Capó, Virginia; Blanco, Orestes; Rodríguez, María E; Jiménez, Narciso; Fleites, Gilberto; Caballero, Iraida; Dovigny, María C; Alemán, Yoan; Correa, Consuelo; Pérez, Lissette; Soto, Yudira; Cardellá, Lidia; Álvarez, Alina; Nambiar, Sandeep; Hengge, Ulrich

    2012-10-25

    To evaluate the temporal distribution (1991-2009) and associated variation of KSHV subtypes in Cuba. Phylogenetic characterization based on the KSHV K1 gene was performed using 90 KSHV positive samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the prevalence of a wide range of KSHV subtypes (A: n=48 [A5=12]; C: n=15; B: n=22; and E: n=5). In the current study, we observed a significant increase in HHV-8 subtype B after 2004 (p=0.0063). This Subtype B in Cuba was associated with: heterosexual behaviour (OR: 3.63, CI: 1,2-10,98; p=0.03), with the antecedent of acquiring HIV/KSHV in Africa (p=0.0003), with nodular stage of KS lesions (OR 4.2, CI: 1.1 to 15.7; p=0.04). Our study is the first to report KSHV Subtype B expansion in Cuba, that might be reflective of a change in human behavioural pattern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pre- and Postexposure Use of Human Monoclonal Antibody against H5N1 and H1N1 Influenza Virus in Mice: Viable Alternative to Oseltamivir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Koldijk, M.H.; Brakenhoff, J.P.J.; Cornelissen, A.H.M.; Weverling, G.J.; Friesen, R.H.E.; Goudsmit, J.

    2009-01-01

    New strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infections are urgently needed. A recently discovered class of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) neutralizing an unprecedented spectrum of influenza virus subtypes may have the potential for future use in humans. Here, we assess the efficacies of CR6261

  15. 人季节性H1N1流感病毒小鼠感染模型的建立%Establishment of a mouse infection model of human seasonal H1N1 influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑倩倩; 毕振强; 赵丽; 谢克勤; 刘倜; 姚萍; 李忠; 温红玲; 宋艳艳; 王显军; 徐爱强

    2012-01-01

    目的 制备人季节性H1N1流感病毒的小鼠感染模型,为研究流感病毒致病性、研发抗病毒药物提供模型动物.方法 将人季节性H1N1流感病毒在鸡胚尿囊腔扩增后,滴鼻接种小鼠,4d后将小鼠处死,挑选感染体征严重者进行实时荧光PCR(FQ-PCR)检测肺中的流感病毒,将检测阳性的肺上清在鸡胚尿囊腔扩增,接种于下一代小鼠.比较各代小鼠对流感病毒的适应情况,直至小鼠出现明显的感染体征,取肺研磨制成匀浆,获得流感病毒鼠肺适应株并检测其半数致死量( LD50).将10 LD50的病毒液接种于小鼠,建立人季节性H1N1流感病毒的小鼠感染模型,观察模型小鼠的一般活动状态、体质量变化、肺部病变,HE染色观察肺部病理切片,计算肺指数,FQ-PCR检测病毒RNA.结果 人季节性流感病毒在小鼠体内传代4次后,鼠肺适应株制备完成,其经鼻的LD50为10-2.41/0.05 mL.人季节性流感病毒的小鼠感染模型,一般状态差,体质量明显减轻,肺指数增大,70%出现死亡.病理切片观察病变明显,FQ-PCR显示流感病毒阳性.结论 成功建立了人季节性H1N1流感病毒的小鼠感染模型.%Objective To establish a mouse infection model of human seasonal influenza virus ( HINl), and make preparations for the study on influenza viral pathogenicity and new antiviral drugs. Methods Mice were inoculated with influenza virus (H1 N1) by the nasal cavity. After 4 days, mice with serious infectious signs were killed. A pneumonic homogenate that was confirmed with influenza virus infection by real time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was injected into the chick embryo allantoic cavity. Allantoic fluid was inoculated in to the next generation of mice. When infected mice presented obvious infectious signs, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) was calculated. The virus of 10LD50 was inoculated into mice to establish the infection model. Then, general condition, weight

  16. A Host Transcriptional Signature for Presymptomatic Detection of Infection in Humans Exposed to Influenza H1N1 or H3N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    A Host Transcriptional Signature for Presymptomatic Detection of Infection in Humans Exposed to Influenza H1N1 or H3N2 Christopher W. Woods1,2,3...patients where it discriminates between swine-origin influenza A/ H1N1 (2009) infected and non-infected individuals with 92% accuracy. The host genomic... Influenza H1N1 or H3N2. PLoS ONE 8(1): e52198. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0052198 Editor: Herman Tse, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Received

  17. Fatal acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure in an infant with pandemic human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortada H.F. El-Shabrawi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical presentation of a 10 month-old infant who succumbed with acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure associated with a virologically confirmed human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection. To date, this is the first pediatric patient presenting with this fatal combination of complications during the current H1N1 pandemic. Therefore, we recommend meticulous assessment and follow up of the cardiac status, liver enzymes and coagulation profile in all pediatric patients with severe H1N1 influenza infection.

  18. Fatal acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure in an infant with pandemic human influenza A, H1N1 (2009) virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mortada H.F. El-Shabrawi; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Hanan Zekri; Hanaa I. Rady

    2011-01-01

    We report the clinical presentation of a 10 month-old infant who succumbed with acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure associated with a virologically confirmed human influenza A, H1N1 (2009) virus infection. To date, this is the first pediatric patient presenting with this fatal combination of complications during the current H1N1 pandemic. Therefore, we recommend meticulous assessment and follow up of the cardiac status, liver enzymes and coagulation profile in all pediatric patien...

  19. 儿童甲型H1N1流感的现状、临床特点及处理%Current situation, clinical characteristics and management of human swine influenza A H1N1) in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃肇源; 陈丽植; 张玲

    2010-01-01

    目前在全球呈现大流行趋势的甲型H1N1流感病毒是具备高度传染性的病毒,儿童和年轻成年人是主要易患人群,其临床表现相对轻微,但仍有部分病例因出现严重并发症而需要住院治疗.儿童,尤其是小于5岁者,是此次甲型H1N1流感流行中较易成为重症病例的高危人群,容易发生严重并发症,尤其是伴有慢性呼吸道、心血管疾病及免疫缺陷的儿童可能面临更大的死亡危险.神经氨酸酶抑制剂奥司他韦和扎那米韦是目前推荐使用的用于预防和治疗的抗病毒药物.疫苗被认为是控制流行的有效手段.%Human swine influenza A (H1N1) is a highly transmissible infectious disease, which has spreaded globally and represented a continuous pandemic threat. The novel virus has predominantly affected the children and young adults. Clinical manifestations generally appear mild, but there are still many patients with severe complications leading to hospitalization. According to the current reports, the mortality in the early stages of the pandemic appears no more than seasonal influenza A . Children (especially less than 5years) are considered to be at higher risk of infection and complications. Pediatric patients with a underlying significant chronic disease such as chronic respiratory disease,cardiovascular disease and immunodeficiency disease, are at a higher risk of death. The neuraminidase inhibitors Oseltamivir and Zanamivir are effective for prophylaxis and treatment. Effective vaccines are regarded to be crucial for the control of influenza pandemics. This review focuses on the epidemiological situation, clinical characteristics and management of human swine influenza A (H1N1), so as to provide practical advice for clinicians.

  20. Establishment of a normal-derived estrogen receptor-positive cell line comparable to the prevailing human breast cancer subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkinson, Branden Michael; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Petersen, Ole William

    2017-01-01

    Understanding human cancer increasingly relies on insight gained from subtype specific comparisons between malignant and non-malignant cells. The most frequent subtype in breast cancer is the luminal. By far the most frequently used model for luminal breast cancer is the iconic estrogen receptor-...

  1. Continual Reintroduction of Human Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Viruses into Swine in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha I; Stratton, Jered; Killian, Mary Lea; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs) presents an important pandemic threat. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. Through phylogenetic analysis of contemporary swIAVs in the United States, we demonstrate that human-to-swine transmission of pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) viruses has occurred continuously in the years following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and has been an important contributor to the genetic diversity of U.S. swIAVs. Although pandemic H1 and N1 segments had been largely removed from the U.S. swine population by 2013 via reassortment with other swIAVs, these antigens reemerged following multiple human-to-swine transmission events during the 2013-2014 seasonal epidemic. These findings indicate that the six internal gene segments from pH1N1 viruses are likely to be sustained long term in the U.S. swine population, with periodic reemergence of pandemic hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments in association with seasonal pH1N1 epidemics in humans. Vaccinating U.S. swine workers may reduce infection of both humans and swine and in turn limit the role of humans as sources of influenza virus diversity in pigs. Swine are important hosts in the evolution of influenza A viruses with pandemic potential. Here, we analyze influenza virus sequence data generated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's national surveillance system to identify the central role of humans in the reemergence of pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza viruses in U.S. swine herds in 2014. These findings emphasize the important role of humans as continuous sources of influenza virus diversity in swine and indicate that influenza viruses with pandemic HA and NA segments are likely to continue to reemerge in U.S. swine in association with seasonal pH1N1 epidemics in humans. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. A human-like H1N2 influenza virus detected during an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in swine in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rejane; Rech, Raquel Rubia; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Mauricio Egídio; da Silva, Marcia Cristina; Silveira, Simone; Zanella, Janice Reis Ciacci

    2015-01-01

    Passive monitoring for detection of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in pigs has been carried out in Brazil since 2009, detecting mostly the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus. Since then, outbreaks of acute respiratory disease suggestive of influenza A virus infection have been observed frequently in Brazilian pig herds. During a 2010-2011 influenza monitoring, a novel H1N2 influenza virus was detected in nursery pigs showing respiratory signs. The pathologic changes were cranioventral acute necrotizing bronchiolitis to subacute proliferative and purulent bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Lung tissue samples were positive for both influenza A virus and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus based on RT-qPCR of the matrix gene. Two IAVs were isolated in SPF chicken eggs. HI analysis of both swine H1N2 influenza viruses showed reactivity to the H1δ cluster. DNA sequencing was performed for all eight viral gene segments of two virus isolates. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the HA and NA genes clustered with influenza viruses of the human lineage (H1-δ cluster, N2), whereas the six internal gene segments clustered with the A(H1N1)pdm09 group. This is the first report of a reassortant human-like H1N2 influenza virus derived from pandemic H1N1 virus causing an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs in Brazil. The emergence of a reassortant IAV demands the close monitoring of pigs through the full-genome sequencing of virus isolates in order to enhance genetic information about IAVs circulating in pigs.

  3. TEAD activity is restrained by MYC and stratifies human breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, Dana; Jaenicke, Laura A; Eilers, Martin; von Eyss, Björn

    2016-10-01

    c-Myc (MYC) is an oncogenic transcription factor that is commonly overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. In breast cancer, MYC has recently been linked to the triple-negative subtype, a subtype that lacks any targeted therapy. Previously, we demonstrated that MYC behaves as a potent repressor of YAP and TAZ, 2 transcriptional coactivators that function as downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway. In this previous study, MYC repressed YAP/TAZ not only in primary breast epithelial cells but also in mouse models of triple-negative tumors. Here, we extend our previous bioinformatic and experimental analyses and demonstrate that MYC deregulation in primary breast epithelial cells leads to a robust repression of TEAD transcription factor activity, the transcription factor family mainly responsible for YAP/TAZ recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that MYC and TEAD activity is able to stratify different breast cancer subtypes in large panels of breast cancer patients. Thus, a deep understanding of the MYC-YAP/TAZ circuitry might yield new insights into the establishment and maintenance of specific breast cancer subtypes.

  4. Establishment of a functional cell line expressing both subunits of H1a and H2c of human hepatocyte surface molecule ASGPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Yang, Yan; Liu, Jia; Ma, Zhiyong; Huang, Hongping; Liu, Shenpei; Yu, Yuan; Hao, Youhua; Wang, Baoju; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the effect of a new split variant of human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR H1b) on ASGPR ligands' binding ability, we established a functional cell line which expresses ASGPR. The full lengths of ASGPRH1a and H2c fragments from human liver were amplified by reverse transcript PCR (RT-PCR) and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2EGFP, pCDNA3.1 (Zeo+) respectively. The recombinants were co-transfected into HeLa cells. After selection by using Neocin and Zeocin, a stably transfected cell line was established, which was designated 4-1-6. The transcription and expression of ASGPRH1a and H2c in 4-1-6 were confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The endocytosis function of the artificial "ASGPR" on the surface of 4-1-6 was tested by FACS. It was found that the cell line 4-1-6 could bind ASGPR natural ligand molecular asialo-orosomucoid (ASOR). After the eukaryotic plasmid H1b/pCDNA3.1 (neo) was transfected into cell line 4-1-6, H1b did not down-regulate the ligand binding ability of ASGPR. The eukaryotic expression plasmid H1b/pcDNA3.1 (neo) and H2c/pcDNA3.1 (neo) were co-transfected transiently into Hela cell. Neither single H1b nor H1b and H2c could bind ASOR. In conclusion, a functional cell line of human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) which expresses both H1a and H2c stably was established. The new split variant H1b has no effect on ASGPR binding to ASOR. ASGPRH1b alone can't bind to ASOR, it yet can't form functional complex with ASGPRH2c.

  5. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  6. Efficacy of soap and water and alcohol-based hand-rub preparations against live H1N1 influenza virus on the hands of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, M Lindsay; Melvani, Sharmila; Druce, Julian; Barr, Ian G; Ballard, Susan A; Johnson, Paul D R; Mastorakos, Tasoula; Birch, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Although pandemic and avian influenza are known to be transmitted via human hands, there are minimal data regarding the effectiveness of routine hand hygiene (HH) protocols against pandemic and avian influenza. Twenty vaccinated, antibody-positive health care workers had their hands contaminated with 1 mL of 10(7) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)(50)/0.1 mL live human influenza A virus (H1N1; A/New Caledonia/20/99) before undertaking 1 of 5 HH protocols (no HH [control], soap and water hand washing [SW], or use of 1 of 3 alcohol-based hand rubs [61.5% ethanol gel, 70% ethanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution, or 70% isopropanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution]). H1N1 concentrations were assessed before and after each intervention by viral culture and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The natural viability of H1N1 on hands for >60 min without HH was also assessed. There was an immediate reduction in culture-detectable and PCR-detectable H1N1 after brief cutaneous air drying--14 of 20 health care workers had H1N1 detected by means of culture (mean reduction, 10(3-4) TCID(50)/0.1 mL), whereas 6 of 20 had no viable H1N1 recovered; all 20 health care workers had similar changes in PCR test results. Marked antiviral efficacy was noted for all 4 HH protocols, on the basis of culture results (14 of 14 had no culturable H1N1; (Peffective in reducing influenza A virus on human hands, although SW is the most effective intervention. Appropriate HH may be an important public health initiative to reduce pandemic and avian influenza transmission.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity and subtyping of human Hepatitis E virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazo, Santiago; Ramos, Natalia; Russi, José Carlos; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is an important public health concern in many developing countries causing waterborne outbreaks, as well as sporadic autochthonous hepatitis. It is transmitted primarily by the fecal-oral route. However, zoonotic transmission from animal reservoirs to human has also been suggested. Genotype 3 is the most frequent genotype found in South America and the HEV epidemiology in this region seems to be very complex. However, data about the molecular characterization of HEV isolates of the region is still lacking and further investigation is needed. Our study characterized human HEV strains detected in a 1-year period in Uruguay, by extensive sequence analysis of three regions of the HEV genome. Uruguayan strains were closely related to a set of European strains and in turn, were dissimilar to Brazilian, Argentinean and Bolivian isolates. Additionally, the co-circulation of viral subtypes 3i and 3h was observed. Circulation of subtype 3i had been reported in Argentina and Bolivia whereas sequences of subtype 3h are rare and had never been reported in Latin America. In order to contribute to shedding light over the molecular epidemiology of this emergent infection in the region, we thoroughly analyzed the genetic variability of HEV strains detected in Uruguay, providing the largest dataset of sequences of HEV ever reported in a country in South America.

  8. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, L.K.H. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Kashima, S.; Amarante, M.F.C.; Haddad, R.; Rodrigues, E.S. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, K.L.T.; Lima, T.A.; Castro, D.B.; Brito, F.C.; Almeida, E.G. [Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Covas, D.T. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Malheiro, A. [Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Diretoria de Ensino e Pesquisa,Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF-BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible “homogenous” subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country. Key words: HIV-1; Subtypes; Phylogenetic analysis; Blood donors; Molecular and epidemiological characterization.

  9. Protein expression of nucleophosmin, annexin A3 and nm23-H1 correlates with human nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Song; Li, Xiao-Yu; Liang, Zhong-Guo; Li, Ling; Huang, Shi-Ting; Li, Jia-Quan; Li, Dan-Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Radioresistance is a significant obstacle in the treatment of endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The present study aimed to identify proteins associated with radioresistance in NPC in vitro and in vivo. Proteomics analyses were conducted to screen for differentially-expressed proteins (DEPs) in parental CNE-2 cells and CNE-2R cells. Using proteomics approaches, 16 DEPs were identified. Of these DEPs, nucleophosmin (NPM1), annexin A3 and nm23-H1, were verified using western blot analyses. The tumorigenicity was investigated using mouse xenograft tumorigenicity assays, and tumor growth curves were generated. The protein expression of NPM1, annexin A3 and nm23-H1 was examined by immunohistochemically staining tumor tissues. NPM1 and annexin A3 protein levels were downregulated in the CNE-2R cells, whereas nm23-H1 expression was upregulated. In vivo tests showed that compared with the CNE-2 tumors, CNE-2R tumor growth was significantly retarded (PA3 expression was significantly lower in non-irradiated (NIR)-CNE-2R tumors compared with NIR-CNE-2 tumors (PA3 and nm23-H1 expression correlated with the cellular and tumor radioresponse. These proteins are involved in the regulation of intracellular functions, including stress responses, cell proliferation and DNA repair. However, further clinical evaluations are required.

  10. Binding of levomepromazine and cyamemazine to human recombinant dopamine receptor subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit K. Srivastava

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Clozapine (CLOZ and levomepromazine (LMP improve treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The superior efficacy of CLOZ compared with other antipsychotic agents has been attributed to an effect on D1-like and D4 receptors. We examined the binding of LMP, CLOZ and cyamemazine (CMZ, a neuroleptic analog of LMP, to human recombinant dopamine (rDA receptor subtypes. Methods: Binding studies were performed on frozen membrane suspensions of human rDA receptor subtypes expressed in Sf9 cells. Results: (i LMP has a high affinity (Ki, nM for rD2 receptor subtypes (rD2L 8.6; rD2S 4.3; rD3 8.3; rD4.2 7.9; (ii LMP and CLOZ have comparable affinities for the rD1 receptor (54.3 vs 34.6; (iii CMZ has high affinities for rD2-like and rD1-like receptors (rD2L 4.6; rD2S 3.3; rD3 6.2; rD4.2 8.5; rD1 3.9; rD5 10.7; (iv CMZ is 9 times more potent than CLOZ at the rD1 receptor and 5 times more potent than CLOZ at the rD4.2 receptor; (v CMZ has high affinities for rD1 and rD5 receptor subtypes compared with LMP and CLOZ. Conclusions: If D1 and D4 receptors are important sites for the unique action of CLOZ, the present study points to a need for clinical trials comparing CMZ with CLOZ in schizophrenia and in particular, treatment-resistant schizophrenia, especially given the risk for agranulocytosis with CLOZ.

  11. Binding of levomepromazine and cyamemazine to human recombinant dopamine receptor subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit K. Srivastava

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Clozapine (CLOZ and levomepromazine (LMP improve treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The superior efficacy of CLOZ compared with other antipsychotic agents has been attributed to an effect on D1-like and D4 receptors. We examined the binding of LMP, CLOZ and cyamemazine (CMZ, a neuroleptic analog of LMP, to human recombinant dopamine (rDA receptor subtypes. Methods: Binding studies were performed on frozen membrane suspensions of human rDA receptor subtypes expressed in Sf9 cells. Results: (i LMP has a high affinity (Ki, nM for rD2 receptor subtypes (rD2L 8.6; rD2S 4.3; rD3 8.3; rD4.2 7.9; (ii LMP and CLOZ have comparable affinities for the rD1 receptor (54.3 vs 34.6; (iii CMZ has high affinities for rD2-like and rD1-like receptors (rD2L 4.6; rD2S 3.3; rD3 6.2; rD4.2 8.5; rD1 3.9; rD5 10.7; (iv CMZ is 9 times more potent than CLOZ at the rD1 receptor and 5 times more potent than CLOZ at the rD4.2 receptor; (v CMZ has high affinities for rD1 and rD5 receptor subtypes compared with LMP and CLOZ. Conclusions: If D1 and D4 receptors are important sites for the unique action of CLOZ, the present study points to a need for clinical trials comparing CMZ with CLOZ in schizophrenia and in particular, treatment-resistant schizophrenia, especially given the risk for agranulocytosis with CLOZ.

  12. AID activity in B cells strongly correlates with polyclonal antibody affinity maturation in-vivo following pandemic 2009-H1N1 vaccination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie; Golding, Hana

    2012-09-01

    The role of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) in somatic hypermutation and polyclonal antibody affinity maturation has not been shown for polyclonal responses in humans. We investigated whether AID induction in human B cells following H1N1pdm09 vaccination correlated with in-vivo antibody affinity maturation against hemagglutinin domains in plasma of young and elderly individuals. AID was measured by qPCR in B cells from individuals of different ages immunized with the H1N1pdm09 influenza vaccine. Polyclonal antibody affinity in human plasma for the HA1 and HA2 domains of the H1N1pdm09 hemagglutinin was measured by antibody-antigen complex dissociation rates using real time kinetics in Surface Plasmon Resonance. Results show an age-related decrease in AID induction in B cells following H1N1pdm09 vaccination. Levels of AID mRNA before vaccination and fold-increase of AID mRNA expression after H1N1pdm09 vaccination directly correlated with increase in polyclonal antibody affinity to the HA1 globular domain (but not to the conserved HA2 stalk). In the younger population, significant affinity maturation to the HA1 globular domain was observed, which associated with initial levels of AID and fold-increase in AID after vaccination. In some older individuals (>65 yr), higher affinity to the HA1 domain was observed before vaccination and H1N1pdm09 vaccination resulted in minimal change in antibody affinity, which correlated with low AID induction in this age group. These findings demonstrate for the first time a strong correlation between AID induction and in-vivo antibody affinity maturation in humans. The ability to generate high affinity antibodies could have significant impact on the elucidation of age-specific antibody responses following vaccination and eventual clinical efficacy and disease outcome.

  13. Effect of human rhinovirus infection in pediatric patients with influenza-like illness on the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yu; Zhu Ru'nan; Zhao Linqing; Deng Jie; Wang Fang; Ding Yaxin; Yuan Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Some research groups have hypothesized that human rhinoviruses (HRVs) delayed the circulation of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (A(H1N1)pdm09) at the beginning of Autumn 2009 in France.This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between HRV and A(H1N1)pdm09 in pediatric patients with influenza-like illness in Beijing,China.Methods A systematic analysis to detect A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A virus (FLU A) was performed on 4 349 clinical samples from pediatric patients with influenza-like illness during the period June 1,2009 to February 28,2010,while a one-step real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assay was used to detect HRV in 1 146 clinical specimens selected from those 4 349 specimens.Results During the survey period,only one wave of A(H1N1)pdm09 was observed.The percentage of positive cases for A(H1N1)pdm09 increased sharply in September with a peak in November 2009 and then declined in February 2010.Data on the monthly distribution of HRVs indicated that more HRV-positive samples were detected in September (2.2%) and October (3.3%),revealing that the peak of HRV infection in 2009 was similar to that of other years.Among the 1 146 specimens examined for HRVs,21 (1.8%) were HRV-positive,which was significantly lower than that reported previously in Beijing (15.4% to 19.2%) (P <0.01).Overall,6 samples were positive for both A(H1N1)pdm09 and HRV,which represented a positive relative frequency of 1.60% and 2.08% HRV,considering the A(H1N1)pdm09-positive and-negative specimens,respectively.The odds ratio was 0.87 (95% CI 0.32; 2.44,P=0.80).Conclusions HRVs and A (H1N1)pdm09 co-circulated in this Chinese population during September and October 2009,and the HRV epidemic in 2009 did not affect A(H1N1)pdm09 infection rates in Beijing,China as suggested by other studies.However,the presence of A(H1N1)pdm09 might explain the unexpected reduction in the percentage of HRV positive cases during the period studied.

  14. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  15. Distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, and subtype C identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, L K H; Kashima, S; Amarante, M F C; Haddad, R; Rodrigues, E S; Silva, K L T; Lima, T A; Castro, D B; Brito, F C; Almeida, E G; Covas, D T; Malheiro, A

    2012-02-01

    Few studies have reported the molecular epidemiological characterization of HIV-1 in the Northern region of Brazil. The present study reports the molecular and epidemiological characterization of 31 HIV-1 isolates from blood donors from the State of Amazonas who donated blood between April 2006 and March 2007. Serum/plasma samples from all donors were screened for HIV antibodies by ELISA and the results confirmed by Western blot analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buffy coat using the Super Quik-Gene-DNA Isolation kit. Nested PCR was performed on the env, gag, and pol regions of HIV-1 using the Gene Amp PCR System 9700. Sequencing reactions were performed using the inner PCR primers and the DYEnamic™ ET Dye Terminator Kit, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the gag, pol, and env gene sequences. We collected samples from 31 blood donors who tested positive for HIV-1 in confirmatory experiments. The male:female ratio of blood donors was 3.4:1, and the mean age was 32.4 years (range: 19 to 61 years). Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype B is the most prevalent among Northern Brazilian HIV-1-seropositive blood donors. One HIV-1 subtype C and one circulating recombinant form (CRF_BF) of HIV-1 were identified in the State of Amazonas. This is the first study showing the occurrence of a possible "homogenous" subtype C in this region of Brazil. This finding could contribute to a better characterization of the HIV-1 strains that circulate in the country.

  16. Resistant mechanism against nelfinavir of subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Li, Lihua; Xiu, Zhilong

    2011-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery, and the subtype C HIV-1 is infecting more and more humans. In this work, we executed computational simulations of subtype B (labeled B(WT)) HIV-1 PR, D30N mutant B (labeled B(D30N)) HIV-1 PR, subtype C (labeled C(Ref)) HIV-1 PR, D30N mutant C (labeled C(D30N)) HIV-1 PR, and D30N/N83T mutant C (labeled C(D30N/N83T)) HIV-1 PR with drug nelfinavir (NFV), aiming at clarifying (1) the resistant mechanism against NFV due to D30N mutation in subtype C HIV-1 PR; (2) the reason that the emergence rate of N83T mutation in C(D30N) HIV-1 PR is higher than that in B(D30N) HIV-1 PR; (3) the affinity of NFV with C(D30N/N83T) HIV-1 PR is higher than B(D30N) and C(D30N) HIV-1 PRs. The results indicate: (1) D30N mutation in subtype C HIV-1 PR reduces the hydrogen bond between the 30th residue and NFV, and the binding free energy contributions of some residues decrease; (2) the hydrogen bonds between the 83th/83'th residue and the 34th/34'th residue exist in both B(D30N) and C(D30N/N83T) HIV-1 PRs, while they disappear in C(D30N) HIV-1 PR. Meanwhile, the binding free energy contribution of N30 in C(D30N) is lower than that in B(D30N) and C(D30N/N83T); (3) N83T mutation makes some residues dislocate, and the contributions of these residues to binding free energy in C(D30N/N83T) increase comparing to those in B(D30N) and C(D30N). Our findings suggest that despite the nonactive site mutations, the polymorphisms regulate the emergence rates of these drug-resistant mutants.

  17. PD-L1 expression induced by the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus impairs the human T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8⁺ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8⁺ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

  18. MUC1* ligand, NM23-H1, is a novel growth factor that maintains human stem cells in a more naive state.

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    Benoit J Smagghe

    Full Text Available We report that a single growth factor, NM23-H1, enables serial passaging of both human ES and iPS cells in the absence of feeder cells, their conditioned media or bFGF in a fully defined xeno-free media on a novel defined, xeno-free surface. Stem cells cultured in this system show a gene expression pattern indicative of a more "naïve" state than stem cells grown in bFGF-based media. NM23-H1 and MUC1* growth factor receptor cooperate to control stem cell self-replication. By manipulating the multimerization state of NM23-H1, we override the stem cell's inherent programming that turns off pluripotency and trick the cells into continuously replicating as pluripotent stem cells. Dimeric NM23-H1 binds to and dimerizes the extra cellular domain of the MUC1* transmembrane receptor which stimulates growth and promotes pluripotency. Inhibition of the NM23-H1/MUC1* interaction accelerates differentiation and causes a spike in miR-145 expression which signals a cell's exit from pluripotency.

  19. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1 Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

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    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1pdm09, and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1pdm09 virus.

  20. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. PMID:24187568

  1. Specific Recognition of Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Antibodies in Human Serum: A Simple Virus-Free ELISA Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mario M.; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Aguilar-Yañez, José M.; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; García-Echauri, Sergio; Freiden, Pamela; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Zertuche-Guerra, Manuel I.; Bulnes-Abundis, David; Salgado-Gallegos, Johari; Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernández-Torre, Martín

    2010-01-01

    Background Although it has been estimated that pandemic Influenza A H1N1/2009 has infected millions of people from April to October 2009, a more precise figure requires a worldwide large-scale diagnosis of the presence of Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies within the population. Assays typically used to estimate antibody titers (hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization) would require the use of the virus, which would seriously limit broad implementation. Methodology/Principal Findings An ELISA method to evaluate the presence and relative concentration of specific Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum samples is presented. The method is based on the use of a histidine-tagged recombinant fragment of the globular region of the hemagglutinin (HA) of the Influenza A H1N1/2009 virus expressed in E. coli. Conclusions/Significance The ELISA method consistently discerns between Inf A H1N1 infected and non-infected subjects, particularly after the third week of infection/exposure. Since it does not require the use of viral particles, it can be easily and quickly implemented in any basic laboratory. In addition, in a scenario of insufficient vaccine availability, the use of this ELISA could be useful to determine if a person has some level of specific antibodies against the virus and presumably at least partial protection. PMID:20418957

  2. Specific recognition of influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum: a simple virus-free ELISA method.

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    Mario M Alvarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although it has been estimated that pandemic Influenza A H1N1/2009 has infected millions of people from April to October 2009, a more precise figure requires a worldwide large-scale diagnosis of the presence of Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies within the population. Assays typically used to estimate antibody titers (hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization would require the use of the virus, which would seriously limit broad implementation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An ELISA method to evaluate the presence and relative concentration of specific Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum samples is presented. The method is based on the use of a histidine-tagged recombinant fragment of the globular region of the hemagglutinin (HA of the Influenza A H1N1/2009 virus expressed in E. coli. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ELISA method consistently discerns between Inf A H1N1 infected and non-infected subjects, particularly after the third week of infection/exposure. Since it does not require the use of viral particles, it can be easily and quickly implemented in any basic laboratory. In addition, in a scenario of insufficient vaccine availability, the use of this ELISA could be useful to determine if a person has some level of specific antibodies against the virus and presumably at least partial protection.

  3. Pharmacological and functional characterisation of the wild-type and site-directed mutants of the human H1 histamine receptor stably expressed in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Guillaume, J P; Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Daliers, J; Henichart, J P; Bollen, A

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone for the human histamine H1 receptor was isolated from a lung cDNA library and stably expressed in CHO cells. The recombinant receptor protein present in the cell membranes, displayed the functional and binding characteristics of histamine H1 receptors. Mutation of Ser155 to Ala in the fourth transmembrane domain did not significantly change the affinity of the receptor for histamine and H1 antagonists. However, mutation of the fifth transmembrane Asn198 to Ala resulted in a dramatic decrease of the affinity for histamine binding, and for the histamine-induced polyphosphoinositides breakdown, whereas the affinity towards antagonists was not significantly modified. In addition, mutation of another fifth transmembrane amino acid, Thr194 to Ala also diminished, but to a lesser extent, the affinity for histamine. These data led us to propose a molecular model for histamine interaction with the human H1 receptor. In this model, the amide moiety of Asn198 and the hydroxyl group of Thr194 are involved in hydrogen bonding with the nitrogen atoms of the imidazole ring of histamine. Moreover, mutation of Thr194 to Ala demonstrated that this residue is responsible for the discrimination between enantiomers of cetirizine.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of human serum paraoxonase 1 in DPPC bilayer reveals a critical role of transmembrane helix H1 for HDL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Rath, Surya Narayan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; De, Sachinandan

    2014-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound mammalian enzyme exhibiting antiatherosclerotic activity. Despite years of research, an accurate model for the binding interaction between PON1 and HDL has not been established. However, it is reported that anchoring of PON1 to HDL is mainly governed by an N-terminal alpha helix H1 and another short helix H2. Here, we studied the molecular association of full-length human PON1 (huPON1) with a HDL-mimetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that H1 is the highly dynamic part of huPON1, showing clockwise rotation of up to 30° within the DPPC bilayer. However, without phospholipid molecules, H1 experiences helical distortions, illustrating an incompatible HDL-anchoring conformation. Snorkeling interactions of K3, R18, and R27 together with aromatic locks formed by Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 are highly essential for anchoring of huPON1 to HDL's surface. Molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area (MM/PBSA) binding free energy calculation revealed that H1 displays greater binding affinity towards lipid molecules compared with H2 and H3, suggesting that H1 is the most probable HDL-binding domain of PON1. Binding free energy decomposition showed that K3, R18, and R27 interact with polar headgroups of DPPC membrane through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 interact with DPPC lipids mainly through van der Waals interaction. Taken together, these results show that the transmembrane helix H1 along with the interfacial positively charged and aromatic resides were crucial for PON1's association with HDL particle. The current study will be useful towards understanding the antiatherosclerotic and bioscavenging properties of this promiscuous enzyme.

  5. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Laura C.; Weems, Megan N.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62Ldim, CD16bright, CD11bbright, CD66bbright, CD63bright surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil–H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease. PMID:28148734

  6. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae induces oxidative stress that influences outcomes of a subsequent infection with a swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblanc, C; Robert, F; Pinard, T; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Garraud, J M; Cariolet, R; Brack, M; Simon, G

    2013-03-23

    The severity of swine influenza is highly variable and can be exacerbated by many factors, such as a pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp). The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative stress induced by Mhp and the impact of this stress on the evolution of an infection with the European avian-like swine H1N1 influenza virus. Two experimental trials (E1 and E2), which differed only by the feed delivered to the animals, were conducted on SPF pigs. In each trial, one group of nine 6-week-old pigs was inoculated intra-tracheally with Mhp and H1N1 at 21 days intervals and a mock-infected group (8 pigs) was included. Clinical signs were observed, blood samples were collected throughout the study and pathogens were detected in nasal swabs and lung tissues. Results indicated that Mhp infection induced an oxidative stress in E1 and E2, but its level was more important in E2 than in E1 three weeks post-Mhp inoculation, before H1N1 infection. In both trials, a strong inflammatory response and a response to the oxidative stress previously induced by Mhp appeared after H1N1 infection. However, the severity of influenza disease was significantly more marked in E2 as compared to E1, as revealed by prolonged hyperthermia, stronger reduction in mean daily weight gain and earlier viral shedding. These results suggested that severity of flu syndrome and reduction in animal performance may vary depending on the level of oxidative stress at the moment of the influenza infection, and that host responses could be influenced by the feed.

  7. A Novel H1N2 Influenza Virus Related to the Classical and Human Influenza Viruses from Pigs in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yafen; Wu, Xiaowei; Wang, Nianchen; Ouyang, Guowen; Qu, Nannan; Cui, Jin; Qi, Yan; Liao, Ming; Jiao, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Southern China has long been considered to be an epicenter of pandemic influenza viruses. The special environment, breeding mode, and lifestyle in southern China provides more chances for wild aquatic birds, domestic poultry, pigs, and humans to be in contact. This creates the opportunity for interspecies transmission and generation of new influenza viruses. In this study, we reported a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus from pigs in southern China. According to the phylogenetic trees and homology of the nucleotide sequence, the virus was confirmed to be a novel triple-reassortant H1N2 virus containing genes from classical swine (PB2, PB1, HA, NP, and NS genes), triple-reassortant swine (PA and M genes), and recent human (NA gene) lineages. It indicated that the novel reassortment virus among human and swine influenza viruses occurred in pigs in southern China. The isolation of the novel reassortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs are "mixing vessels," and swine influenza virus surveillance in southern China will provide important information about genetic evaluation and antigenic variation of swine influenza virus to formulate the prevention and control measures for the viruses.

  8. Detection of cellular senescence within human invasive breast carcinomas distinguishes different breast tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotarelo, Cristina L; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Springer, Erik; Schmidt, Marcus; Thaler, Sonja

    2016-11-15

    Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to act as a barrier to tumorigenesis by arresting cells at risk of malignant transformation. Nevertheless, numerous findings suggest that senescent cells may conversely promote tumor progression through the development of the senescence-associated secretome they produce. It is likely that the composition and the physiological consequences mediated by the senescence secretome are dependent on the oncogenes that trigger the senescence program. Breast cancer represents a heterogenous disease that can be divided into breast cancer subtypes due to different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. As tumor initiation and progression of these breast cancer subtypes is triggered by diverse oncogenic stimuli, differences in the senescence secretomes within breast tumors might be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and therapeutic response. Many studies have addressed the role of senescence as a barrier to tumor progression using murine xenograft models. However, few investigations have been performed to elucidate the degree to which senescent tumor cells are present within untreated human tumors, and if present, whether these senescent tumor cells may play a role in disease progression. In the present study we analysed the appearance of senescent cells within invasive breast cancers. Detection of cellular senescence by the use of SAβ-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) staining within invasive breast carcinoms from 129 untreated patients revealed differences in the amount of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells between breast cancer subtypes. The highest percentages of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells were found in HER2-positive and luminal A breast carcinomas whereas triple negative tumors showed either little or no positivity.

  9. Genetic diversity of the haemagglutinin (HA) of human influenza a (H1N1) virus in montenegro: Focus on its origin and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugosa, Boban; Vujosevic, Danijela; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Valli, Maria Beatrice; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; Angeletti, Silvia; Scarpa, Fabio; Terzić, Dragica; Vratnica, Zoran

    2016-11-01

    In 2009 an influenza A epidemic caused by a swine origin H1N1strain, unusual in human hosts, has been described. The present research is aimed to perform the first phylogenetic investigation on the influenza virus A (H1N1) strains circulating in Montenegro, from December 1, 2009, when the first case of death due to H1N1 was confirmed, and the epidemic began causing a total of four fatalities. The phylogenetic analysis of the strains circulating showed the absence of a pure Montenegrin cluster, suggesting the occurrence of multiple re-introductions in that population from different areas till as far as the early 2010. The time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for the complete dataset has been dated in early 2008, pre-dating the first Montenegrin identification of H1N1 infection. These data suggest that virus was spreading undetected, may be as a consequence of unidentified infections in returning travelers. Anyhow, the estimated TMRCA of Montenegrin strains is fully consistent to that found in different areas. Compatibly with the time coverage of the study period here analyzed, molecular dynamic of Montenegrin strains follows similar trend as in other countries. J. Med. Virol. 88:1905-1913, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cloning, functional expression, and characterization of the human prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, L; Sawyer, N; Grygorczyk, R; Metters, K M; Adam, M

    1994-04-22

    A cDNA clone encoding the human prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor EP2 subtype has been isolated from a human lung cDNA library. The 1.9-kilobase pair cDNA, hEP2, encodes for a 488-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 53,115 and has the seven putative transmembrane domains characteristic of G protein-coupled receptors. The specific binding of [3H]PGE2 to COS cell membranes transfected with the hEP2 cDNA was of high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 1 nM and the rank order of potency for prostaglandins in competition for [3H]PGE2 specific binding was PGE1 = PGE2 > iloprost > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. In competition studies using more selective prostanoid-receptor agonist and antagonists, the [3H]PGE2 specific binding was competed by MB28767, an EP3 agonist, but not by the EP1-preferring antagonists AH6809 and SC19220, or by the EP2 agonist butaprost. Electrophysiological studies of Xenopus oocytes co-injected with hEP2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (cAMP-activated Cl- channel) cDNAs detected PGE2-specific inward Cl- currents, demonstrating that the hEP2 cDNA encoded a functional receptor which produced an increase in cAMP levels. Thus, we have cloned the human EP2 receptor subtype which is functionally coupled to increase in cAMP. Northern blot analysis showed that hEP2 is expressed as a 3.8-kilobase mRNA in a number of human tissues with the highest expression levels present in the small intestine.

  11. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

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    Suresh K Mendu

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

  12. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus suppresses RIG-I initiated innate antiviral responses in the human lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Wu

    Full Text Available Influenza infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I is believed to play an important role in the recognition of, and response to, influenza virus and other RNA viruses. Our study focuses on the hypothesis that pandemic H1N1/09 influenza virus alters the influenza-induced proinflammatory response and suppresses host antiviral activity. We first compared the innate response to a clinical isolate of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus, OK/09, a clinical isolate of seasonal H3N2 virus, OK/06, and to a laboratory adapted seasonal H1N1 virus, PR8, using a unique human lung organ culture model. Exposure of human lung tissue to either pandemic or seasonal influenza virus resulted in infection and replication in alveolar epithelial cells. Pandemic virus induces a diminished RIG-I mRNA and antiviral cytokine response than seasonal virus in human lung. The suppression of antiviral response and RIG-I mRNA expression was confirmed at the protein level by ELISA and western blot. We performed a time course of RIG-I and interferon-β (IFN-β mRNA induction by the two viruses. RIG-I and IFN-β induction by OK/09 was of lower amplitude and shorter duration than that caused by PR8. In contrast, the pandemic virus OK/09 caused similar induction of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and IL-6, at both the transcriptional and translational level as PR8 in human lung. Differential antiviral responses did not appear to be due to a difference in cellular infectivity as immunohistochemistry showed that both viruses infected alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. These findings show that influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus suppresses anti-viral immune responses in infected human lung through inhibition of viral-mediated induction of the pattern recognition receptor, RIG-I, though proinflammatory cytokine induction was unaltered. This immunosuppression of the host antiviral response by pandemic virus may have contributed to the more

  13. Nested RT-PCR method for the detection of European avian-like H1 swine inlfuenza A virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yan-di; PEI Xing-yao; ZHANG Yuan; YU Chen-fang; SUN Hong-lei; LIU Jin-hua; PU Juan

    2016-01-01

    Swine inlfuenza A virus (swine IAV) circulates worldwide in pigs and poses a serious public health threat, as evidenced by the 2009 H1N1 inlfuenza pandemic. Among multiple subtypes/lineages of swine inlfuenza A viruses, European avian-like (EA) H1N1 swine IAV has been dominant since 2005 in China and caused infections in humans in 2010. Highly sensitive and speciifc methods of detection are required to differentiate EA H1N1 swine IAVs from viruses belonging to other lineages and subtypes. In this study, a nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed to detect EA H1 swine IAVs. Two primer sets (outer and inner) were designed speciifcaly to target the viral hemagglutinin genes. Speciifc PCR products were obtained from al tested EA H1N1 swine IAV isolates, but not from other lineages of H1 swine IAVs, other subtypes of swine IAVs, or other infectious swine viruses. The sensitivity of the nested RT-PCR was improved to 1 plaque forming unit (PFU) mL–1which was over 104 PFU mL–1 for a previously established multiplex RT-PCR method. The nested RT-PCR results obtained from screening 365 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained using conventional virus isolation methods combined with sequencing. Thus, the nested RT-PCR assay reported herein is more sensitive and suitable for the diagnosis of clinical infections and surveilance of EA H1 swine IAVs in pigs and humans.

  14. Targeted Differentiation of Regional Ventral Neuroprogenitors and Related Neuronal Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liankai Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryoid body (EB formation and adherent culture (AD paradigms are equivalently thought to be applicable for neural specification of human pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report that sonic hedgehog-induced ventral neuroprogenitors under EB conditions are fated to medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, while the AD cells mostly adopt a floor-plate (FP fate. The EB-MGE later on differentiates into GABA and cholinergic neurons, while the AD-FP favors dopaminergic neuron specification. Distinct developmental, metabolic, and adhesion traits in AD and EB cells may potentially account for their differential patterning potency. Gene targeting combined with small-molecule screening experiments identified that concomitant inhibition of Wnts, STAT3, and p38 pathways (3i could largely convert FP to MGE under AD conditions. Thus, differentiation paradigms and signaling regulators can be integrated together to specify distinct neuronal subtypes for studying and treating related neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Human rhinoviruses induce IL-35-producing Treg via induction of B7-H1 (CD274) and sialoadhesin (CD169) on DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyerl, Maria; Kirchberger, Stefanie; Majdic, Otto; Seipelt, Joachim; Jindra, Christoph; Schrauf, Catharina; Stöckl, Johannes

    2010-02-01

    IL-35 is a heterodimer of EBV-induced gene 3 and of the p35 subunit of IL-12, and recently identified as an inhibitory cytokine produced by natural Treg in mice, but not in humans. Here we demonstrate that DC activated by human rhinoviruses (R-DC) induce IL-35 production and release, as well as a suppressor function in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells derived from human peripheral blood but not in naïve T cells from cord blood. The induction of IL-35-producing T cells by R-DC was FOXP3-independent, but blocking of B7-H1 (CD274) and sialoadhesin (CD169) on R-DC with mAb against both receptors prevented the induction of IL-35. Thus, the combinatorial signal delivered by R-DC to T cells via B7-H1 and sialoadhesin is crucial for the induction of human IL-35(+) Treg. These results demonstrate a novel pathway and its components for the induction of immune-inhibitory T cells.

  16. Development and Application of a Blastocystis Subtype-Specific PCR Assay Reveals that Mixed-Subtype Infections Are Common in a Healthy Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Pauline D; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Cotter, Paul D

    2015-06-15

    The human gut is host to a diversity of microorganisms, including the single-celled microbial eukaryote Blastocystis. Research has shown that most carriers host a single Blastocystis subtype (ST), which is unusual given the considerable within-host species diversity observed for other microbial genera in this ecosystem. However, our limited knowledge of both the incidence and biological significance of Blastocystis diversity within hosts (i.e., so-called mixed infections) is likely due to problems with existing methodologies. Here, we developed and applied Blastocystis ST-specific PCRs for the investigation of the most common subtypes of Blastocystis (ST1 to ST4) to a healthy human cohort (n = 50). We detected mixed infections in 22% of the cases, all of which had been identified as single-ST infections in a previous study using state-of-the-art methods. Our results show that certain STs occur predominantly as either single (ST3 and 4) or mixed (ST1) infections, which may reflect inter alia transient colonization patterns and/or cooperative or competitive interactions between different STs. Comparative analyses with other primers that have been used extensively for ST-specific analysis found them unsuitable for detection of mixed- and, in some cases, single-ST infections. Collectively, our data shed new light on the diversity of Blastocystis within and between human hosts. Moreover, the development of these PCR assays will facilitate future work on the molecular epidemiology and significance of mixed infections in groups of interest, including health and disease cohorts, and also help identify sources of Blastocystis transmission to humans, including identifying potential animal and environmental reservoirs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Differential thermodynamic driving force of first- and second-generation antihistamines to determine their binding affinity for human H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sugawara, Kenta; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-09-15

    Differential binding sites for first- and second-generation antihistamines were indicated on the basis of the crystal structure of human histamine H1 receptors. In this study, we evaluated differences between the thermodynamic driving forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines for human H1 receptors and their structural determinants. The binding enthalpy and entropy of 20 antihistamines were estimated with the van't Hoff equation using their dissociation constants obtained from their displacement curves against the binding of [(3)H]mepyramine to membrane preparations of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human H1 receptors at various temperatures from 4°C to 37°C. Structural determinants of antihistamines for their thermodynamic binding properties were assessed by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. We found that entropy-dependent binding was more evident in second- than first-generation antihistamines, resulting in enthalpy-entropy compensation between the binding forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines. QSAR analyses indicated that enthalpy-entropy compensation was determined by the sum of degrees, maximal electrostatic potentials, water-accessible surface area and hydrogen binding acceptor count of antihistamines to regulate their affinity for receptors. In conclusion, it was revealed that entropy-dependent hydrophobic interaction was more important in the binding of second-generation antihistamines, even though the hydrophilicity of second-generation antihistamines is generally increased. Furthermore, their structural determinants responsible for enthalpy-entropy compensation were explored by QSAR analyses. These findings may contribute to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how the affinity of ligands for their receptors is regulated.

  18. Systems-level comparison of host responses induced by pandemic and seasonal influenza A H1N1 viruses in primary human type I-like alveolar epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pandemic influenza H1N1 (pdmH1N1 virus causes mild disease in humans but occasionally leads to severe complications and even death, especially in those who are pregnant or have underlying disease. Cytokine responses induced by pdmH1N1 viruses in vitro are comparable to other seasonal influenza viruses suggesting the cytokine dysregulation as seen in H5N1 infection is not a feature of the pdmH1N1 virus. However a comprehensive gene expression profile of pdmH1N1 in relevant primary human cells in vitro has not been reported. Type I alveolar epithelial cells are a key target cell in pdmH1N1 pneumonia. Methods We carried out a comprehensive gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray platform to compare the transcriptomes of primary human alveolar type I-like alveolar epithelial cells infected with pdmH1N1 or seasonal H1N1 virus. Results Overall, we found that most of the genes that induced by the pdmH1N1 were similarly regulated in response to seasonal H1N1 infection with respect to both trend and extent of gene expression. These commonly responsive genes were largely related to the interferon (IFN response. Expression of the type III IFN IL29 was more prominent than the type I IFN IFNβ and a similar pattern of expression of both IFN genes was seen in pdmH1N1 and seasonal H1N1 infection. Genes that were significantly down-regulated in response to seasonal H1N1 but not in response to pdmH1N1 included the zinc finger proteins and small nucleolar RNAs. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway over-representation analysis suggested that these genes were associated with DNA binding and transcription/translation related functions. Conclusions Both seasonal H1N1 and pdmH1N1 trigger similar host responses including IFN-based antiviral responses and cytokine responses. Unlike the avian H5N1 virus, pdmH1N1 virus does not have an intrinsic capacity for cytokine dysregulation. The differences between pdmH1N1 and seasonal H1N1 viruses

  19. Hemagglutinin-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses following 2009-pH1N1 inactivated split-vaccine inoculation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuguang; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Bin; Zhao, Yingze; Zhang, Wei; Han, Min; Wu, Ying; Shi, Guoli; Liu, Yingxia; Yan, Jinghua; Wu, Guizhen; Wang, Hua; Gao, George F; Zhu, Fengcai; Liu, William J

    2017-09-13

    Influenza A virus remains a major threat to public health, and the inactivated split-virus vaccine is the most prevalent vaccine used worldwide. However, our knowledge about cellular immune responses to the inactivated influenza virus vaccine and its correlation with humoral responses are yet limited, which has restricted our understanding of the vaccine's protective mechanisms. Herein, in two clinical trials, T-cell responses specific for both previously identified human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-I-restricted epitopes from influenza virus and hemagglutinin (HA) protein were longitudinally investigated before, during, and after a two-dose vaccination with the inactivated 2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009-pH1N1) vaccine. A robust antibody response in all of the donors after vaccination was observed. Though no CD8(+) T-cell responses to known epitopes were detected, HA-specific T-cell responses were primed following vaccination, and the responses were found to be mainly CD4(+) T-cell dependent. However, HA-specific T-cells circulating in peripheral blood dropped to baseline levels 6weeks after vaccination, but humoral immune responses maintained a high level for 4months post-vaccination. Significant correlations between the magnitude of the HA-specific T-cell responses and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were demonstrated, indicating a priming role of HA-specific T-cells for humoral immune responses. In conclusion, our study indicates that HA-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses can be primed by the inactivated 2009-pH1N1 vaccine, which may coordinate with the elicitation of antibody protection. These findings would benefit a better understanding of the immune protective mechanisms of the widely used inactivated 2009-pH1N1 vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Expression and Subcellular Distribution of Costimulatory Molecules B7-H1,B7-H3 and B7-H4 in Human Hematologic Malignancy Cell Lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan-Fang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Wan, Wen-Li; Li, Hai-Shen; Wu, Fei-Fei; Yan, Xin-Xing; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the expression and subcellular distribution of costimulatory molecules B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 in human hematologic malignancy cell lines. The expression and subcellular distribution of B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 in 13 human hematologic malignancy cell lines were determined by RT-PCR, qPCR, Western blot and flow cytometry, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB MNC) of 12 volunteers were used as control. The mRNA of B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 was widely expressed in PB MNC and hematologic malignancy cell lines, with a lower level of B7-H4. The mRNA expression of 3 molecules was highest in Maver, Z138, and HL-60, respectively, while among them the B7-H3 and B7-H4 had no expression in CZ1. The nuclear and cytoplasmic protein of 3 costimulatory molecules abnormally overexpressed only in hematologic malignancy cell lines, with the highest level in U937, Z138, and Raji, respectively, while the B7-H3 and B7-H4 had no expression in CZ1. There were differences among mRNA expression, nuclear and cytoplasmic protein expression of 3 molecules in cell lines derived from the same type of tumor, but the differences of expression in mRNA and protein levels were not exactly the same. The B7-H3 expression abundance in membrane localization was higher in U937, Maver and Z138, while the membrane protein of B7-H1 and B7-H4 had no or low expression in 13 cell lines. The mRNA expression of costimulatory molecules B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 can be widely detected. The protein level of 3 costimulatory molecules abnormally overexpressed only in hematologic malignancy cell lines, moreover the subcellular localizations mostly was found in nucleus and cytoplasm, while the membrane protein expresses in low level or had no expression. There are differences among the expression of 3 molecules in cell lines derived from the same type of tumor.

  1. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating vasoconstriction of human umbilical vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Lereis, Virginia Andrea; Hita, Francisco Javier; Gobbi, Mauro Darío; Verdi, Marcela Gomez; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempted to pharmacologically characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of human umbilical vein (HUV). HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves were constructed for acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50: 6.16±0.04; maximum response 80.00±1.98% of the responses induced by serotonin 10 μM). The absence of endothelium did not modify the contractile responses of ACh in this tissue. The role of cholinesterases was evaluated: neither neostigmine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) nor iso-OMPA (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) modified ACh responses. When both enzymes were simultaneously inhibited, a significantly but little potentiation was observed (control: pEC50 6.33±0.03; double inhibition: pEC50 6.57±0.05). Atropine, nonselective muscarinic receptors antagonist, inhibited ACh-induced contraction (pKB 9.67). The muscarinic receptors antagonists pirenzepine (M1), methoctramine (M2) and pFHHSiD (M3) also antagonized responses to ACh. The affinity values estimated for these antagonists against responses evoked by ACh were 7.58, 6.78 and 7.94, respectively. On the other hand, PD 102807 (M4 selective muscarinic receptors antagonist) was ineffective against ACh-induced contraction. In presence of a blocking concentration of pirenzepine, pFHHSiFD produced an additional antagonism activity on ACh-induced responses. The M1 muscarinic receptors agonist McN-A-343 produced similar maximum but less potent responses than ACh in HUV. The calculated pA2 for pirenzepine against McN-A-343 induced responses was 8.54. In conclusion, the data obtained in this study demonstrate the role of M1 muscarinic receptor subtypes and suggest the involvement of M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in ACh-induced vasoconstriction in HUV rings. In addition, the vasomotor activity evoked by ACh does not seem to be modulated by endothelial factors, and their enzymatic degradation appears to have little functional relevance in this

  2. Distribution of intimin subtypes among Escherichia coli isolates from ruminant and human sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Vidiya; Brett, Kim; Hornitzky, Michael A; Dowton, Mark; Bettelheim, Karl A; Walker, Mark J; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2003-11-01

    The intimin gene eae, located within the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island, distinguishes enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and some Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from all other pathotypes of diarrheagenic E. coli. EPEC is a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, and intimin-positive STEC isolates are typically associated with life-threatening diseases such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hemorrhagic colitis. Here we describe the development of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay that reliably differentiates all 11 known intimin types (alpha1, alpha2, beta, gamma, kappa, epsilon, eta, iota, lambda, theta, and zeta) and three new intimin genes that show less than 95% nucleotide sequence identity with existing intimin types. We designated these new intimin genes Int- micro, Int-nu, and Int-xi. The PCR-RFLP assay was used to screen 213 eae-positive E. coli isolates derived from ovine, bovine, and human sources comprising 60 serotypes. Of these, 82 were STEC isolates, 89 were stx-negative (stx(-)) and ehxA-positive (ehxA(+)) isolates, and 42 were stx(-) and ehxA-negative isolates. Int-beta, the most commonly identified eae subtype (82 of 213 [38.5%] isolates), was associated with 21 serotypes, followed by Int-zeta (39 of 213 [18.3%] isolates; 11 serotypes), Int-theta (25 of 213 [11.7%] isolates; 15 serotypes), Int-gamma (19 of 213 [8.9%] isolates; 9 serotypes), and Int-epsilon (21 of 213 [9.9%] isolates; 5 serotypes). Intimin subtypes alpha1, alpha2, kappa, lambda, xi, micro, nu, and iota were infrequently identified; and Int-eta was not detected. Phylogenetic analyses with the Phylip package of programs clustered the intimin subtypes into nine distinct families (alpha, beta-xi, gamma, kappa, epsilon-eta-nu, iota- micro, lambda, theta, and zeta). Our data confirm that ruminants are an important source of serologically and genetically diverse intimin-containing E. coli strains.

  3. Multiplex RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays for detection and subtyping of human influenza virus in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben M'hadheb, Manel; Harrabi, Myriam; Souii, Amira; Jrad-Battikh, Nadia; Gharbi, Jawhar

    2015-03-01

    Influenza viruses are negative stranded segmented RNA viruses belonging to Orthomyxoviridae family. They are classified into three types A, B, and C. Type A influenza viruses are classified into subtypes according to the antigenic characters of the surface glycoproteins: hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). The aim of the present study is to develop a fast and reliable multiplex RT-PCR technique for detecting simultaneously the subtypes A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 of influenza virus. Our study included 398 patients (mean age 30.33 ± 19.92 years) with flu or flu-like syndromes, consulting physicians affiliated with collaborating teams. A multiplex RT-PCR detecting A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza viruses and an examination by indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) were performed. In the optimized conditions, we diagnosed by IFI a viral infection in 90 patients (22.6 %): 85 cases of influenza type A, four cases of influenza type B, and only one case of coinfection with types A and B. An evaluation of the technique was performed on 19 clinical specimens positive in IFI, and we detected eight cases of A/H3N2, five cases of A/H1N1, one case of influenza virus type A which is not an H1N1 nor H3N2, and five negative cases. Multiplex RT-PCR is a sensitive technique allowing an effective and fast diagnosis of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in which the optimization often collides with problems of sensibility.

  4. Subtype identification of human Blastocystis spp. isolated from Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Laymanivong, Sakhone; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Phosuk, Issarapong; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2017-04-01

    Blastocystis sp. is the most common protist found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Blastocystis subtypes (STs) are classified based on the molecular phylogeny of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA). At least 17 Blastocystis STs have been reported and, of these, STs 1-9 have been found in humans. This study revealed the presence of human Blastocystis STs in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). Fecal samples were collected from apparently healthy people from the central province of Khammouane and the southern province of Champasak. Fresh fecal samples, found to be positive for Blastocystis using microscopy, were individually cultured in Jones' medium and each sample was used for the amplification and sequencing of a fragment of SSU rDNA. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the distribution of four Blastocystis STs: ST1 (64%), ST2 (8%), ST3 (24%) and ST7 (4%). This is the first report to provide molecular data revealing the prevalence of Blastocystis STs in apparently healthy people from Lao PDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Rosettes Parallel Human Differentiation Into Sensory Neural Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robin L; Gallegos-Cárdenas, Amalia; Miller, Colette N; Solomotis, Nicholas J; Liu, Hong-Xiang; West, Franklin D; Stice, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    The pig is the large animal model of choice for study of nerve regeneration and wound repair. Availability of porcine sensory neural cells would conceptually allow for analogous cell-based peripheral nerve regeneration in porcine injuries of similar severity and size to those found in humans. After recently reporting that porcine (or pig) induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs) differentiate into neural rosette (NR) structures similar to human NRs, here we demonstrate that pig NR cells could differentiate into neural crest cells and other peripheral nervous system-relevant cell types. Treatment with either bone morphogenetic protein 4 or fetal bovine serum led to differentiation into BRN3A-positive sensory cells and increased expression of sensory neuron TRK receptor gene family: TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC. Porcine sensory neural cells would allow determination of parallels between human and porcine cells in response to noxious stimuli, analgesics, and reparative mechanisms. In vitro differentiation of pig sensory neurons provides a novel model system for neural cell subtype specification and would provide a novel platform for the study of regenerative therapeutics by elucidating the requirements for innervation following injury and axonal survival.

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst1 and sst2A in human somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); Q. Liu; P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); J. Zuijderwijk; F. van der Ham (Frieda); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); A. Schonbrunn; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAlthough in situ hybridization has been used to examine the distribution of messenger RNA for somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst) in human tumors, the cellular localization of sst1 and sst2A receptors has not been reported. In this study, we describe the ce

  7. The beta(2)-subtype of adrenoceptors mediates inhibition of pro-fibrotic events in human lung fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamyel, F.; Warnken-Uhlich, M.; Seemann, W. K.; Mohr, K.; Kostenis, E.; Ahmedat, A. S.; Smit, M.; Gosens, R.; Meurs, H.; Miller-Larsson, A.; Racke, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Fibrosis is part of airway remodelling observed in bronchial asthma and COPD. Pro-fibrotic activity of lung fibroblasts may be suppressed by beta-adrenoceptor activation. We aimed, first, to characterise the expression pattern of beta-adrenoceptor subtypes in human lung fibroblasts and, second, to p

  8. Immunological responses to envelope glycoprotein 120 from subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilljam, G; Svensson, A; Ekström, A; Wahren, B

    1999-07-01

    The outer envelope glycoprotein (gp120) from subtypes A-E of HIV-1 was purified using a specific high mannose-binding lectin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. All isolates were grown in peripheral blood lymphocyte cells in order to avoid selection in cell lines. A comparison of the reactivities of the envelope proteins was made using sera from patients infected with the different subtypes. In this study, the B and C subtype envelope glycoproteins showed the strongest immunological reactivity, when reacted with sera from patients infected with the same subtype of virus. On the other hand, sera of patients infected with subtype A or C virus had the strongest and broadest reactivities, to envelope glycoproteins of many subtypes. The purified gp120 proteins from all five subtypes stimulated mononuclear cells from HIV-1 (subtype B)-infected patients, indicating conserved T cell-activating epitopes. The immunological reactivities indicate that strong antigenicity does not always predict the broadest immunogenicity of an envelope glycoprotein. Glycoprotein 120 from foreign subtypes may serve to induce strong cross-reactive immune responses.

  9. High-risk human papillomavirus infection in different histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Ali; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Sekawi, Zamberi; Rahsaz, Marjan; Sharifzadeh, Sedigheh

    2014-07-01

    Limited data exist regarding whether a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection increases the risk of developing renal cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether HPV infection has a role in the pathogenesis or development of a certain histological subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of 122 patients with histopathologically proven renal cell carcinoma and their respective peritumoral tissues were examined. The presence of HPV-DNA was determined by a combination of MY/GP+ consensus primers and HPV-16/18 type specific nested PCRs followed by direct sequencing. Catalyzed signal-amplified colorimetric in situ hybridization (CSAC-ISH) technique was applied to determine the physical status of viral genome. The expression of p16INK4a and HPV L1 capsid proteins was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. HPV genome was detected in 37 (30.3%) tumor specimens and their four (4.1%) corresponding peritumoral tissues. HPV-18 was the most common viral type identified followed by HPV-16 and 58. Immunoexpression of p16INK4a was detected in 24 (20.3%) cases. Data analysis showed a significant correlation between p16INK4a expression and the presence of HR-HPV DNA (P infection in 45% of tumors, which were previously tested positive for HPV-DNA. Diffuse signal pattern was identified in 15 (83.3%) samples whereas a mixed pattern of diffuse and punctate signals was only detectable in three cases. The results indicate an association of HR-HPV types with renal cell carcinoma. It is proposed that HPV infection in high-grade tumors might precede disease progression in a number of tumors, particularly of the papillary subtype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Perfil epidemiológico de la mortalidad por influenza humana A (H1N1 en México Epidemiological profile of mortality due to human influenza A (H1N1 in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán E Fajardo-Dolci

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Efectuar el análisis epidemiológico de 122 defunciones por influenza A (H1N1 confirmadas por laboratorio y contribuir a mejorar el diagnóstico y atención oportuna de casos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se Analizaron 122 expedientes de pacientes fallecidos por influenza A (H1N1. RESULTADOS: Una proporción de 51% correspondió a mujeres y 49% a varones. Hasta 45.1% ocurrió entre los 20 y 39 años. La letalidad general fue de 2.2% y varió entre 0.3% en el grupo de 10 a 19 años y 6.3% en el de 50 a 59. Una cifra de 43% de las defunciones se concentró en dos de las 32 entidades federativas y 5l% se atendió en instituciones de seguridad social. Sólo 17% recibió atención hospitalaria en las primeras 72 horas y 42% falleció en las primeras 72 horas de hospitalización. En 58.2% de los fallecidos había algún padecimiento asociado. DISCUSIÓN: El Nuevo virus A (H1N1 produce mayor mortalidad en personas jóvenes, al contrario de lo que sucede con la influenza estacional que muestra un mayor impacto en niños pequeños y personas de edad avanzada. El retraso de la atención médica y la morbilidad asociada fueron factores relevantes del fallecimiento.OBJECTIVE: To carry out the epidemiological analysis of 122 influenza A (H1N1 deaths confirmed by laboratory and help to improve the diagnosis and timely managing of cases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 122 clinical records were analyzed of patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1 virus infection who died. RESULTS: Fifty-one percent of patients were female and 49% were male. A total of 45.l% who died were between 20 and 39 years old. Overall fatality was 2.2% and ranged between 0.3% for the l0 to l9 year-old group to 6.3% for the 50 to 59 year-old group. Forty-three percent of deaths were concentrated in only two of the thirty-two states and 5l% received medical attention in social security institutions. Only l7% received hospital attention within 72 hours and 42% died within 72 hours of

  11. Histone H1 phosphorylation occurs site-specifically during interphase and mitosis: identification of a novel phosphorylation site on histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarg, Bettina; Helliger, Wilfried; Talasz, Heribert; Förg, Barbara; Lindner, Herbert H

    2006-03-10

    H1 histones, isolated from logarithmically growing and mitotically enriched human lymphoblastic T-cells (CCRF-CEM), were fractionated by reversed phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, subjected to enzymatic digestion, and analyzed by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. During interphase the four H1 subtypes present in these cells differ in their maximum phosphorylation levels: histone H1.5 is tri-, H1.4 di-, and H1.3 and H1.2, only monophosphorylated. The phosphorylation is site-specific and occurs exclusively on serine residues of SP(K/A)K motifs. The phosphorylation sites of histone H1.5 from mitotically enriched cells were also examined. In contrast to the situation in interphase, at mitosis there were additional phosphorylations, exclusively at threonine residues. Whereas the tetraphosphorylated H1.5 arises from the triphosphosphorylated form by phosphorylation of one of two TPKK motifs in the C-terminal domain, namely Thr137 and Thr154, the pentaphosphorylated H1.5 was the result of phosphorylation of one of the tetraphosphorylated forms at a novel nonconsensus motif at Thr10 in the N-terminal tail. Despite the fact that histone H1.5 has five (S/T)P(K/A)K motifs, all of these motifs were never found to be phosphorylated simultaneously. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of human H1 variants occurs nonrandomly during both interphase and mitosis and that distinct serine- or threonine-specific kinases are involved in different cell cycle phases. The order of increased phosphorylation and the position of modification might be necessary for regulated chromatin decondensation, thus facilitating processes of replication and transcription as well as of mitotic chromosome condensation.

  12. Apoptosis and Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses of Primary Mouse Microglia and Astrocytes Induced by Human H1N1 and Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gefei Wang; Kangsheng Li; Juan Zhang; Weizhong Li; Gang Xin; Yun Su; Yuanli Gao; Heng Zhang; Guimei Lin; Xiaoyang Jiao

    2008-01-01

    Patients with an influenza virus infection can be complicated by acute encephalopathy and encephalitis. To investigate the immune reactions involved in the neurocomplication, mouse microglia and astrocytes were isolated,infected with human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza viruses, and examined for their immune responses. We observed homogeneously distributed viral receptors, sialic acid (SA)-α2,3-Galactose (Gal) and SA-α2,6-Gal, on microglia and astrocytes. Both viruses were replicative and productive in microglia and astrocytes. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in infected cells were observed at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). Expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA examined at 6 h and 24 h p.i. Was up-regulated, and their expression levels were considerably higher in H5N1 infection. The amounts of secreted proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α at 6 h and 24 h p.i. Were also induced, with greater induction by H5N1 infection. This study is the first demonstration that both human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza viruses can infect mouse microglia and astrocytes and induce apoptosis, cytopathy, and proinflammatory cytokine production in them in vitro. Our results suggest that the direct cellular damage and the consequences of immunopathological injury in the CNS contribute to the influenza viral pathogenesis.

  13. Transfection with extracellularly UV-damaged DNA induces human and rat cells to express a mutator phenotype towards parvovirus H-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinsart, C.; Cornelis, J.J.; Klein, B.; van der Eb, A.J.; Rommelaere, J.

    1984-02-01

    Human and rat cells transfected with UV-irradiated linear double-stranded DNA from calf thymus displayed a mutator activity. This phenotype was identified by growing a lytic thermosensitive single-stranded DNA virus (parvovirus H-1) in those cells and determining viral reversion frequencies. Likewise, exogenous UV-irradiated closed circular DNAs, either double-stranded (simian virus 40) or single-stranded (phi X174), enhanced the ability of recipient cells to mutate parvovirus H-1. The magnitude of mutator activity expression increased along with the number of UV lesions present in the inoculated DNA up to a saturation level. Unirradiated DNA displayed little inducing capacity, irrespective of whether it was single or double stranded. Deprivation of a functional replication origin did not impede UV-irradiated simian virus 40 DNA from providing rat and human cells with a mutator function. Our data suggest that in mammalian cells a trans-acting mutagenic signal might be generated from UV-irradiated DNA without the necessity for damaged DNA to replicate.

  14. Acute sleep deprivation has no lasting effects on the human antibody titer response following a novel influenza A H1N1 virus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies in humans have yielded evidence that adaptive immune function, including the production of antigen-specific antibodies, is distinctly impaired when sleep is deprived at the time of first antigen exposure. Here we examined the effects of a regular 24- hour sleep-wake cycle (including 8 hours of nocturnal sleep and a 24-hour period of continuous wakefulness on the 7-week antibody production in 11 males and 13 females in response to the H1N1 (swine flu virus vaccination. The specific antibody titer in serum was assayed by the hemagglutination inhibition test on the days 5, 10, 17, and 52 following vaccination. Results In comparison to the sleep group, sleep-deprived males but not females had reduced serum concentration of H1N1-specific antibodies five days after vaccination, whereas antibody titers at later time points did not differ between the conditions. Conclusions These findings concur with the notion that sleep is a supportive influence in the very early stage of an adaptive immune response to a viral antigen. However, our results do not support the view that acute sleep deprivation has lasting effects on the human antibody titer response to influenza vaccination.

  15. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörmann, Xenia [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Lesch, Markus [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Steinbeis Innovation gGmbH, Center for Systems Biomedicine, Falkensee (Germany); Welke, Robert-William [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Sieben, Christian [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Geissner, Andreas [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Brinkmann, Volker [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Kastner, Markus [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Karner, Andreas [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Linz (Austria); Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Anish, Chakkumkal [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Seeberger, Peter H. [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Andreas [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); and others

    2016-05-15

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA{sub 1} D130E, HA{sub 2} I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  16. TLR-9 contributes to the antiviral innate immune sensing of rodent parvoviruses MVMp and H-1PV by normal human immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Raykov

    Full Text Available The oncotropism of Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp is partially related to the stimulation of an antiviral response mediated by type-I interferons (IFNs in normal but not in transformed mouse cells. The present work was undertaken to assess whether the oncotropism displayed against human cells by MVMp and its rat homolog H-1PV also depends on antiviral mechanisms and to identify the pattern recognition receptor (PRR involved. Despite their low proliferation rate which represents a drawback for parvovirus multiplication, we used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs as normal model specifically because all known PRRs are functional in this mixed cell population and moreover because some of its subsets are among the main IFN producers upon infections in mammals. Human transformed models consisted in lines and tumor cells more or less permissive to both parvoviruses. Our results show that irrespective of their permissiveness, transformed cells do not produce IFNs nor develop an antiviral response upon parvovirus infection. However, MVMp- or H-1PV-infected hPBMCs trigger such defense mechanisms despite an absence of parvovirus replication and protein expression, pointing to the viral genome as the activating element. Substantial reduction of an inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (iODN of the latter IFN production identified TLR-9 as a potential PRR for parvoviruses in hPBMCs. However, neither the iODN treatment nor an antibody-induced neutralization of the IFN-triggered effects restored parvovirus multiplication in these cells as expected by their weak proliferation in culture. Finally, given that a TLR-9 activation could also not be observed in parvovirus-infected human lines reported to be endowed with a functional TLR-9 pathway (Namalwa, Raji, and HEK293-TLR9(+/+, our data suggest that transformed human cells do not sense MVMp or H-1PV either because of an absence of PRR expression or an intrinsic, or virus-driven defect in the endosomal

  17. Growth regulation of primary human keratinocytes by prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP3 subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, R L; Malaviya, R; Pentland, A P

    1998-02-04

    We examined the contribution of specific EP receptors in regulating cell growth. By RT-PCR and northern hybridization, adult human keratinocytes express mRNA for three PGE2 receptor subtypes associated with cAMP signaling (EP2, EP3, and small amounts of EP4). In actively growing, non-confluent primary keratinocyte cultures, the EP2 and EP4 selective agonists, 11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1, caused complete reversal of indomethacin-induced growth inhibition. The EP3/EP2 agonist (misoprostol), and the EP1/EP2 agonist (17-phenyl trinor PGE2), showed less activity. Similar results were obtained with agonist-induced cAMP formation. The ability of exogenous dibutyryl cAMP to completely reverse indomethacin-induced growth inhibition support the conclusion that growth stimulation occurs via an EP2 and/or EP4 receptor-adenylyl cyclase coupled response. In contrast, activation of EP3 receptors by sulprostone, which is virtually devoid of agonist activity at EP2 or EP4 receptors, inhibited bromodeoxyuridine uptake in indomethacin-treated cells up to 30%. Although human EP3 receptor variants have been shown in other cell types to markedly inhibit cAMP formation via a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanisms, EP3 receptor activation and presumably growth inhibition was independent of adenylyl cyclase, suggesting activation of other signaling pathways.

  18. Blastocystis sp. subtype 3 triggers higher proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells, HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Kuppusamy, Umah R; Samudi, Chandramathi; Kumar, Suresh

    2013-10-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a commonly found intestinal microorganism and was reported to cause many nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Various subtypes have been previously reported, and the pathogenicity of different subtypes of Blastocystis is unclear and remains as a controversial issue. A recent study has shown that the Blastocystis antigen isolated from an unknown subtype could facilitate the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Current study was conducted to compare the effect of solubilized antigen isolated from five different subtypes of Blastocystis on colon cancer cells, HCT116. A statistically significant proliferation of these cells was observed when exposed to 1.0 μg/ml solubilized antigen isolated from subtype 3 Blastocystis (37.22%, p Blastocystis antigen also caused a significantly higher upregulation of cathepsin B (subtypes 1 and 2, p Blastocystis as a proponent of carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is very likely for subtype 3 Blastocystis to have higher pathogenic potential as it caused an increased propagation of cancer cells and substantial amount of inflammatory reaction compared to other subtypes.

  19. Systems-level comparison of host-responses elicited by avian H5N1 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suki M Y; Gardy, Jennifer L; Cheung, C Y; Cheung, Timothy K W; Hui, Kenrie P Y; Ip, Nancy Y; Guan, Y; Hancock, Robert E W; Peiris, J S Malik

    2009-12-14

    Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1) or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-beta and TNF-alpha results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease.

  20. Systems-level comparison of host-responses elicited by avian H5N1 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses in primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki M Y Lee

    Full Text Available Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1 or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1 virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-beta and TNF-alpha results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease.

  1. [11C]Doxepin binding to histamine H1 receptors in living human brain: reproducibility during attentive waking and circadian rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Funaki, Yoshihito; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Naganuma, Fumito; Miyake, Masayasu; Watanuki, Shoichi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging in neuroscience is a new research field that enables visualization of the impact of molecular events on brain structure and function in humans. While magnetic resonance-based imaging techniques can provide complex information at the level of system, positron emission tomography (PET) enables determination of the distribution and density of receptor and enzyme in the human brain. Previous studies using [11C]raclopride and [11C]FLB457 revealed that the release of neuronal dopamine was increased in human brain by psychostimulants or reward stimuli. Following on from these previous [11C]raclopride studies, we examined whether the levels of neuronal release of histamine might change [11C]doxepin binding to the H1 receptors under the influence of physiological stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the test–retest reliability of quantitative measurement of [11C]doxepin binding between morning and afternoon and between resting and attentive waking conditions in healthy human subjects. There was a trend for a decrease in [11C]doxepin binding during attentive calculation tasks compared with that in resting conditions, but the difference (less than 10%) was not significant. Similarly, the binding potential of [11C]doxepin in the cerebral cortex was slightly higher in the morning than that in the afternoon, but it was also insignificant. These data suggest that higher histamine release during wakefulness could not decrease the [11C]doxepin binding in the brain. This study confirmed the reproducibility and reliability of [11C]doxepin in the previous imaging studies to measure the H1 receptor. PMID:22701403

  2. Preparation and identification of polyclonal antibody against protein H1b: the variant of major subunit of human ASGPR%抗人ASGPR大亚基异构体蛋白H1b多克隆抗体的制备和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘嘉; 丁红晖; 杨燕; 胡斌; 余源; 黄红平; 陆蒙吉; 杨东亮

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prepare and identify mouse polyclonal antibody against protein Hlb, which is the variant of major subunit of human ASGPR. METHODS: Hlb specific peptide was synthesized and coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) for immunization. Then H1b-KLH conjugation was injected into mouse subcutaneously to produce polyclonal antibody. ELISA assay was used to detect the titer of the antibody. Antibody was also identified by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. RESULTS: Mouse antibody against Hlb was prepared after injection of H1bKLH conjugation. The titer of H1b antibody was about 1:10~5.Western blot confirmed its high specificity. This antibody could also be used for immunohistochemistry analysis. CONCLUSION: The successful preparation of the polyclonal antibody against protein H1b, which can discriminate the two variants of the major subunit of ASGPR with high specificity, will provide an efficient reagent for further study of the physiologic functions of H1b and its role in the pathogenesis of human disease.%目的:制备小鼠抗人ASGPR大亚基异构体蛋白H1b的多克隆抗体,并鉴定其特异性.方法:合成H1b特异性多肽,以匙孔血蓝蛋白(KLH)作为载体构建多肽免疫原,通过致敏小鼠,制备小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体;ELISA法检测抗体效价,通过Western blot和免疫组织化学检测,鉴定抗体的特异性与适用范围.结果:得到小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体,效价达1:10~5.纯化后的抗体用于Western blot可高特异性识别真核表达的H1b蛋白,并可用于免疫组织化学实验.结论:成功制备小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体,该抗体具有较高的效价以及特异性,能区分ASG-PR大亚基的两种剪接异构体,从而为进一步研究H1b蛋白的生理功能及其在人类疾病中的意义提供了有利工具.

  3. Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes is caused by their sequestration/internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-10-01

    Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) stably expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells was measured as decreases in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity in membrane preparations after pre-treatment of cells with carbamylcholine. The extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was found to decrease to 64% following pretreatment of cells with 10 microM carbamylcholine for 30 min, and under the same conditions 51-59% of hm2 receptors were sequestered/internalized as assessed by decreases in the [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity on the cell surface. A similar reduction in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was observed by pretreatment of cells with 5 nM propylbenzylylcholine mustard, which irreversibly bound to and inactivated 58% of the hm2 receptors. When the cells were pretreated with 10 microM carbamylcholine in the presence of 0.32 M sucrose, which is known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, no sequestration/internalization of hm2 receptors was observed, and the extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity did not change. These results indicate that desensitization of hm2 receptors may be caused by reduction of receptor number on the cell surface through sequestration/internalization rather than by loss of the function of receptors.

  4. Rules of co-occurring mutations characterize the antigenic evolution of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haifen; Zhou, Xinrui; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-12-05

    The human influenza viruses undergo rapid evolution (especially in hemagglutinin (HA), a glycoprotein on the surface of the virus), which enables the virus population to constantly evade the human immune system. Therefore, the vaccine has to be updated every year to stay effective. There is a need to characterize the evolution of influenza viruses for better selection of vaccine candidates and the prediction of pandemic strains. Studies have shown that the influenza hemagglutinin evolution is driven by the simultaneous mutations at antigenic sites. Here, we analyze simultaneous or co-occurring mutations in the HA protein of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses to predict potential mutations, characterizing the antigenic evolution. We obtain the rules of mutation co-occurrence using association rule mining after extracting HA1 sequences and detect co-mutation sites under strong selective pressure. Then we predict the potential drifts with specific mutations of the viruses based on the rules and compare the results with the "observed" mutations in different years. The sites under frequent mutations are in antigenic regions (epitopes) or receptor binding sites. Our study demonstrates the co-occurring site mutations obtained by rule mining can capture the evolution of influenza viruses, and confirms that cooperative interactions among sites of HA1 protein drive the influenza antigenic evolution.

  5. Cloning, structural characterization, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human prostaglandin E(2) receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, S L; Pan, L C; Castleberry, T A; Lu, B; Mather, R J; Owen, T A

    1999-09-17

    Northern blot analysis of human placental RNA using a probe to the 5' end of the human prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) EP2 receptor subtype coding region revealed the existence of a high abundance, low molecular weight transcript. To investigate the origin of this transcript, and its possible relationship to the human EP2 mRNA, we have cloned and characterized the gene encoding the human PGE(2) EP2 receptor subtype, identified transcriptional initiation and termination sites in two tissues (spleen and thymus), and determined its chromosomal localization. The human EP2 gene consists of two exons separated by a large intron, utilizes a common initiation site in both spleen and thymus at 1113 bp upstream of the translation initiation site, and has 3' transcript termini at 1140 bp and 1149 bp downstream of the translation stop site in spleen and thymus respectively. Southern and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the human EP2 gene to be a single copy gene located in band 22 of the long arm of chromosome 14 (14q22). Though our initial interest in this gene was to investigate potential differential splicing of the human EP2 gene in placenta, this work demonstrates that the atypical transcript observed in placenta probably arises from a distinct, yet related, gene. Knowledge of the sequence, structure, and transcription events associated with the human EP2 gene will enable a broader understanding of its regulation and potential role in normal physiology and disease.

  6. Evolution of the hemagglutinin expressed by human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedde, Marianne; Biere, Barbara; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the evolution of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Germany between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of both subtypes revealed similar evolution of the HA variants that were also seen worldwide with minor exceptions. The analysis showed seven distinct HA clades for A(H1N1)pdm09 and six HA clades for A(H3N2) viruses. Herald strains of both subtypes appeared sporadically since 2008-2009. Regarding A(H1N1)pdm09, herald strains of HA clade 3 and 4 were detected late in the 2009-2010 season. With respect to A(H3N2), we found herald strains of HA clade 3, 4 and 7 between 2009 and 2012. Those herald strains were predominantly seen for minor and not for major HA clades. Generally, amino acid substitutions were most frequently found in the globular domain, including substitutions near the antigenic sites or the receptor binding site. Differences between both influenza A subtypes were seen with respect to the position of the indicated substitutions in the HA. For A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, we found more substitutions in the stem region than in the antigenic sites. In contrast, in A(H3N2) viruses most changes were identified in the major antigenic sites and five changes of potential glycosylation sites were identified in the head of the HA monomer. Interestingly, we found in seasons with less influenza activity a relatively high increase of substitutions in the head of the HA in both subtypes. This might be explained by the fact that mutations under negative selection are subsequently compensated by secondary mutations to restore important functions e.g. receptor binding properties. A better knowledge of basic evolution strategies of influenza viruses will contribute to the refinement of predictive mathematical models for identifying novel antigenic drift variants.

  7. Two serine residues of non-metastasis protein 23-H1 are critical in inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity in human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Guo, Lili; Ge, Jiangnan; Zhang, Zhijian; Wei, Huijun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in numerous cancers, including lung cancer, is one of the major mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis. The authors previously reported that the metastasis suppressor non-metastasis protein 23-H1 (Nm23-H1) negatively regulates STAT3 activity by inhibiting its phosphorylation on Tyr705. Nm23-H1 is a multifunction protein that has three different kinase activities. By transfecting the five mutants that inactivated three different kinase activities respectively into Nm23-H1 deficient lung cancer cell lines, it was identified that Nm23-H1S44A (Ser44 to Ala) and Nm23-H1S120G (Ser120 to Gly) mutant forms were unable to suppress STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, resulting in increased expression of fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Notably, protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 was also involved in Nm23-H1S44A- and Nm23-H1S120G-mediated suppression of STAT3 phosphorylation. The present results indicated that Ser44 and Ser120 sites of Nm23-H1 may be responsible for its biological suppressive effects of STAT3 and tumor metastasis, which may contribute to illuminate the metastasis suppression function of Nm23-H1 in lung cancer. PMID:28781685

  8. H1N1 Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions H1N1 Influenza H1N1 Influenza Condition Family HealthKids and Teens Share H1N1 ... Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Prevention4. Treatment What is H1N1 influenza?H1N1 influenza (also known as swine flu) is an ...

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-09-30

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies.

  10. Halogenated cytisine derivatives as agonists at human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Y E; Houlihan, L M; Maskell, P D; Exley, R; Bermúdez, I; Lukas, R J; Valdivia, A C; Cassels, B K

    2003-03-01

    Cytisine (cy) is a potent and competitive partial agonist at alpha4 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors while at homomeric alpha7-nACh receptors it behaves as a full agonist with a relatively lower potency. In the present study, we assessed the effects of bromination or iodination of the pyridone ring of cy and N-methylcytisine (N-Me-cy) on the effects of these compounds on recombinant human (h) alpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh receptors expressed in clonal cell lines and Xenopus oocytes. Halogenation at C(3) of cy or N-Me-cy usually brings about a marked increase in both affinity and efficacy at halpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh, the extent of which depends on whether the halogen is bromine or iodine, and upon receptor subtype. The effects of halogenation at C(5) are strongly influenced by the specific halogen substituent so that bromination causes a decrease in both affinity and efficacy while iodination decreases affinity but its effects on efficacy range from a decrease (halpha7, halpha4beta4 nACh receptors) to a marked increase (halpha4beta2 nACh receptors). Based on these findings, which differ from those showing that neither the affinity nor efficacy of nicotine, 3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)-pyridine or epibatidine are greatly affected by halogenation, dehalogenation or halogen exchange at equivalent positions, we suggest that cy, N-Me-cy and their halo-isosteres bind to neuronal nACh receptors in a different orientation allowing the halogen atom to interact with a hydrophobic halogen-accepting region within the predominantly hydrophobic agonist-binding pocket of the receptors.

  11. Stable expression of human H1-histamine-receptor cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pharmacological characterisation of the protein, tissue distribution of messenger RNA and chromosomal localisation of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Guillaume, J P; Garcia, L; Szpirer, C; Szpirer, J; Bollen, A

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA clone for the histamine H1 receptor was isolated from a human lung cDNA library; it encoded a protein of 487 amino acids which showed characteristic features of G-protein-coupled receptors. The percentages of identity of the deduced amino acid sequence with bovine, rat and guinea pig H1 histamine receptors were 82.6%, 79.4% and 73.3%, respectively, whereas these percentages decreased to 74.6%, 66% and 56.7% for the amino acid sequence of the third intracellular loop. The human H1-receptor cDNA was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) via an eukaryotic expression vector; the receptor protein present on cell membranes specifically bound [3H]mepyramine with a Kd of 3.7 nM. The binding was displaced by H1-histamine-receptor antagonists and histamine. Northern blot analysis indicated the presence of two histamine H1 receptor mRNAs of 3.5 kb and 4.1 kb in various human tissues and an additional mRNA of 4.8 kb restricted to the human brain. Finally, by means of somatic cell hybrids segregating either human or rat chromosomes, the gene for histamine H1 receptor was found to reside on human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 4.

  12. Development and characterization of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated using H1N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chun-yan; Tang, Yi-gui; Qi, Zong-li; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Xiang-rong; Huo, Xue-ping; Li, Yan; Feng, Qing; Zhao, Peng-hua; Wang, Xin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Hai-fang; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-jian

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the antigenic epitopes of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of H1N1 influenza virus, a panel consisting of 84 clones of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated using the HA proteins from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine lysate and the seasonal influenza H1N1(A1) vaccines. Thirty-three (39%) of the 84 mAbs were found to be strain-specific, and 6 (7%) of the 84 mAbs were subtype-specific. Twenty (24%) of the 84 mAbs recognized the common HA epitopes shared by 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1), and A3 (H3N2) influenza viruses. Twenty-five of the 84 clones recognized the common HA epitopes shared by the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1) and A3 (H3N2) human influenza viruses, and H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. We found that of the 16 (19%) clones of the 84 mAbs panel that were cross-reactive with human respiratory pathogens, 15 were made using the HA of the seasonal A1 (H1N1) virus and 1 was made using the HA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue microarray (TMA) showed that 4 of the 84 mAb clones cross-reacted with human tissue (brain and pancreas). Our results indicated that the influenza virus HA antigenic epitopes not only induce type-, subtype-, and strain-specific monoclonal antibodies against influenza A virus but also cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies against human tissues. Further investigations of these cross-reactive (heterophilic) epitopes may significantly improve our understanding of viral antigenic variation, epidemics, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and adverse effects of influenza vaccines.

  13. Detection of Seasonal Influenza H1N1 and H3N2 Viruses using RT-PCR Assay during 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhand, S. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The emergence of a novel H1N1influenza A virus of animal origin with transmissibility from human to human poses pandemic concern. Current subtypes of Seasonal influenza A viruses spread in human are influenza A H1N1 influenza A H3N2 and influenza type B viruses. The aim of this study was to determine current strains of the H3N2 and new H1N1 subtypes of influenza A virus from patients suspected influenza infection in 2009 flu pandemic in Golestan province, Iran. Material and Methods: In this descriptive study, respiratory samples (n = 153 from patients with acute respiratory symptoms were collected in 2009 flu pandemic applied during 2009 pandemic influenza in Golestan province. After reverse transcription of extracted viral RNA, PCR was developed for both H1N1and H3N2subtypes using CDC specific primers. Results: The mean age of patients was 16.59. Of them 45.1% were male. Thirteen (8.49% were infected with seasonal influenza H1N1 and 25(16.33% with seasonal H3N2influenza. Conclusion: The rate of infection with seasonal H1N1and H3N2is similar to other studies reported from Iran, but lower than the rate reported from other parts of the world

  14. What happened after the initial global spread of pandemic human influenza virus A (H1N1? A population genetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Hernandez Fernando

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral population evolution dynamics of influenza A is crucial for surveillance and control. In this paper we analyzed viral genetic features during the recent pandemic caused by the new influenza human virus A H1N1, using a conventional population genetics approach based on 4689 hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sequences available in GenBank submitted between March and December of 2009. This analysis showed several relevant aspects: a a scarce initial genetic variability within the viral isolates from some countries that increased along 2009 when influenza was dispersed around the world; b a worldwide virus polarized behavior identified when comparing paired countries, low differentiation and high gene flow were found in some pairs and high differentiation and moderate or scarce gene flow in others, independently of their geographical closeness, c lack of positive selection in HA and NA due to increase of the population size of virus variants, d HA and NA variants spread in a few months all over the world being identified in the same countries in different months along 2009, and e containment of viral variants in Mexico at the beginning of the outbreak, probably due to the control measures applied by the government.

  15. Increase in IFNγ(-IL-2(+ cells in recent human CD4 T cell responses to 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Weaver

    Full Text Available Human CD4 T cell recall responses to influenza virus are strongly biased towards Type 1 cytokines, producing IFNγ, IL-2 and TNFα. We have now examined the effector phenotypes of CD4 T cells in more detail, particularly focusing on differences between recent versus long-term, multiply-boosted responses. Peptides spanning the proteome of temporally distinct influenza viruses were distributed into pools enriched for cross-reactivity to different influenza strains, and used to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells representing recent or long-term memory. In the general population, peptides unique to the long-circulating influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1 induced Th1-like responses biased toward the expression of IFNγ(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells. In contrast, peptide pools enriched for non-cross-reactive peptides of the pandemic influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1 induced more IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ T cells, similar to the IFNγ(-IL-2(+ non-polarized, primed precursor T cells (Thpp that are a predominant response to protein vaccination. These results were confirmed in a second study that compared samples taken before the 2009 pandemic to samples taken one month after PCR-confirmed A/California/04/09 infection. There were striking increases in influenza-specific TNFα(+, IFNγ(+, and IL-2(+ cells in the post-infection samples. Importantly, peptides enriched for non-cross-reactive A/California/04/09 specificities induced a higher proportion of Thpp-like IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells than peptide pools cross-reactive with previous influenza strains, which induced more Th1 (IFNγ(+TNFα(+ responses. These IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells may be an important target population for vaccination regimens, as these cells are induced upon infection, may have high proliferative potential, and may play a role in providing future effector cells during subsequent infections.

  16. Theoretical analysis of the neuraminidase epitope of the Mexican A H1N1 influenza strain, and experimental studies on its interaction with rabbit and human hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Paola Kinara Reyes; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Bello, Martiniano; Rojas-Hernández, S; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Tolentino-López, Luis; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-05-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) epitope from the Mexican AH1N1 influenza virus was identified by using sequences registered at the GenBank during the peak of a pandemic (from April 2009 to October 2010). First, NA protein sequences were submitted for multiple alignment analysis, and their three-dimensional models (3-D) were then built by using homology modeling. The most common sequence (denominated wild-type) and its mutants were submitted to linear and nonlinear epitope predictors, which included the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II) and B-cell peptides. The epitope prediction was in accordance with evolutionary behavior and some protein structural properties. The latter included a low NA mutation rate, NA 3-D surface exposure, and the presence of high hindrance side chain residues. After selecting the epitope, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore interactions between the epitope and MHC II. Afterward, several experimental assays were performed to validate the theoretical study by using antibodies from humans (infected by pandemic H1N1) and rabbits (epitope vaccination). The results show 119 complete sequences that were grouped into 28 protein sequences according to their identity (one wild-type and 27 representative mutants (1-5 mutations)). The predictors yielded several epitopes, with the best fit being the one located in the C-terminal region. Theoretical methods demonstrated that the selected epitope reached the P4, P6, P7, and P9 pockets of MHC II, whereas the experimental evidence indicates that the epitope is recognized by human antibodies and also by rabbit antibodies immunized with the peptide.

  17. Subtype distribution of human papillomavirus in HIV-infected women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stages 2 and 3 in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; McGrath, Cindy M; Barnhart, Kurt T; Friedman, Harvey M; Zetola, Nicola M

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines containing types 16 and 18 are likely to be effective in preventing cervical cancer associated with these HPV types. No information currently exists in Botswana concerning the HPV types causing precancerous or cancerous lesions. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of HPV types associated with precancerous cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) stages 2 and 3 in HIV-infected women in Gaborone, Botswana. HIV-infected women referred to our clinic with high-grade intraepithelial lesion on the Pap smear were enrolled in the study. HPV typing was only performed if the histopathology results showed CIN stage 2 or 3 disease using linear array genotyping (CE-IVD, Roche Diagnostics). One hundred HIV-infected women were identified with CIN stages 2 or 3 between August 11, 2009 and September 29, 2010. Eighty-two of 100 women enrolled had coinfection by multiple HPV subtypes (range, 2 to 12). Of the remaining 18 women, 14 were infected with a single high-risk subtype and 4 had no HPV detected. Overall, 92 (92%) women were infected with at least 1 high-risk HPV subtype, and 56 were coinfected with more than 1 high-risk HPV type (range, 2 to 5). Fifty-one (51%) women had HPV subtypes 16, 18, or both. HPV 16 and 18 are the most common types in HIV-infected women with CIN 2 or 3 in Gaborone, Botswana, suggesting that the implementation of HPV vaccination programs could have a significant impact on the reduction of cervical cancer incidence. However, given the relative lack of knowledge on the natural history of cervical cancer in HIV-infected women and the significant prevalence of infection and coinfection with other high-risk HPV types in our sample, the true impact and cost-effectiveness of such vaccination programs need to be evaluated.

  18. High-resolution phylogenetics and phylogeography of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C epidemic in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véras, Nazle Mendonca Collaço; Gray, Rebecca R; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Rodrigues, Rosângela; Salemi, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C (HIV-1C) represents 30-65% of HIV infections in southern Brazil, and isolated cases of HIV-1C infection have also been reported in Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Venezuela. Phylogenetic studies have suggested that the Brazilian subtype C epidemic was initiated by the introduction of closely related strains. Nevertheless, because of sampling limitations, the point of entry and the timing of subtype C introduction into Brazil, as well as the origin of the founder lineage, remain controversial. The present study investigated the origin, spread and phylogeography of HIV-1C in South America. Phylogenetic analysis showed a well-supported monophyletic clade including all available strains from Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. Only one lineage from Venezuela was unrelated to the epidemic involving the other three countries. Molecular clock and likelihood mapping analysis showed that HIV-1C introduction in Brazil dated back to the period 1960-1970, much earlier than previously thought, and was followed by a nearly simultaneous star-like outburst of viral lineages, indicating a subsequent rapid spread. Phylogeographic patterns suggested Paraná or Rio Grande do Sul as the possible entrance points of subtype C and an asymmetrical gene flow from Paraná to Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul, as well as from Rio Grande do Sul to Sao Paulo fostered by the strong inter-connectivity between population centres in southern Brazil. The study illustrates how coupling phylogeography inference with geographical information system data is critical to understand the origin and dissemination of viral pathogens and potentially predict their future spread.

  19. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  20. Within-Farm Changes in Dairy Farm-Associated Salmonella Subtypes and Comparison to Human Clinical Isolates in Michigan, 2000-2001 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, Greg G; Manning, Shannon; Bolin, Carole; Cui, Yuehua; Rudrik, James; Dietrich, Stephen; Kaneene, John B

    2015-09-01

    Temporal changes in the distribution of Salmonella subtypes in livestock populations may have important impacts on human health. The first objective of this research was to determine the within-farm changes in the population of subtypes of Salmonella on Michigan dairy farms that were sampled longitudinally in 2000-2001 and again in 2009. The second objective was to determine the yearly frequency (2001 through 2012) of reported human illnesses in Michigan associated with the same subtypes. Comparable sampling techniques were used to collect fecal and environmental samples from the same 18 Michigan dairy farms in 2000-2001 and 2009. Serotypes, multilocus sequence types (STs), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) banding patterns were identified for isolates from 6 farms where >1 Salmonella isolate was recovered in both 2000-2001 and 2009. The distribution of STs was significantly different between time frames (P Salmonella were due to recovery of MDR subtypes of S. enterica serotypes Senftenberg and Typhimurium in 2000-2001 and genetically distinct, pansusceptible subtypes of the same serotypes in 2009. The annual frequency of human illnesses between 2001 and 2012 with a PFGE pattern matching a bovine strain decreased for patterns recovered from dairy farms in 2000-2001 and increased for patterns recovered in 2009. These data suggest important changes in the population of Salmonella on dairy farms and in the frequency of human illnesses associated with cattle-derived subtypes.

  1. Clinical features of human salmonellosis caused by bovine-associated subtypes in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Warnick, Lorin D; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Hoelzer, Karin; Root, Timothy P; Siler, Julie D; McGuire, Suzanne M; Wright, Emily M; Zansky, Shelley M; Wiedmann, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify patient symptoms and case outcomes that were more likely to occur as a result of Salmonella infections caused by bovine-associated subtypes (isolates that matched contemporary bovine isolates from New York by serovar and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern), as compared to salmonellosis caused by non-bovine-associated subtypes. Data were collected in 34 counties of New York that comprise the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) catchment area of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program. Patients with specimen collection dates between March 1, 2008 and March 1, 2010 were included. Symptoms and outcomes of 40 cases infected with bovine-associated Salmonella subtypes were compared to those of 379 control-cases infected with Salmonella isolates that were not bovine-associated. Cases were significantly more likely to have invasive salmonellosis (odds ratio, 3.8; p-value=0.02), after adjusting for age group, gender, and race. In addition, there was a marginal association between case status and the presence of blood in the stool (p-value=0.1) while ill. These findings might have implications for patient management, as a history of consuming undercooked foods of bovine origin or having direct contact with cattle in the few days prior to illness could be useful for suggesting a more proactive diagnostic approach as well as close monitoring for the need to implement more aggressive therapy.

  2. Subtyping of type A influenza by sequencing the variable regions of HA gene specifically amplified with RT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN An; DING GuoHui; ZHOU ZhenFeng; DONG Hui; ZHANG YaKun; ZHU Lei; HE YunGang; ZHANG GuoQing; LI YiXue; SUN Bing; HUANG Zhong; LAN Ke; JIN Li; WANG HongYan; WANG XiaoNing; YANG Zhong; ZHONG Yang; DAI JianXin; GUO YaJun; WANG Hao; CHE XiaoYan; WU Fan; YUAN ZhenGan; ZHANG Xi; CAO ZhiWei; ZHOU XiaoNong; ZHOU JiaHai; MA ZhiYong; TONG GuangZhi; ZHAO GuoPing; JIN WeiRong; XIONG Hui

    2009-01-01

    The outbreak of a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus across the globe poses a threat to human health.It is of paramount importance to develop a rapid,reliable and inexpensive diagnostic procedure.Based on the bioinformatic information from public database,primers specific for influenza A virus surface protein haemagglutinin (HA) of several subtypes (including H1,H2,H3,H5,H7 and H9) were designed.Primer-specific PCR products were subjected to sequencing for accurately distinguishing H1 and H3 subtypes from others.This sequencing-based detection method will not only be applied to rapid detection and simultaneous subtype identification of new influenza A virus H1N1,but also provide the strategies to monitor other new types of influenza virus with explosive potential.

  3. Evaluation of a fully human monoclonal antibody against multiple influenza A viral strains in mice and a pandemic H1N1 strain in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aihua; Myojo, Kensuke; Laudenslager, John; Harada, Daisuke; Miura, Toru; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kuni-Kamochi, Reiko; Soloff, Rachel; Ohgami, Kinya; Kanda, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. Frequent mutations of surface molecules, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), contribute to low efficacy of the annual flu vaccine and therapeutic resistance to standard antiviral agents. The populations at high risk of influenza virus infection, such as the elderly and infants, generally mount low immune responses to vaccines, and develop severe disease after infection. Novel therapeutics with high effectiveness and mutation resistance are needed. Previously, we described the generation of a fully human influenza virus matrix protein 2 (M2) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), Z3G1, which recognized the majority of M2 variants from natural viral isolates, including highly pathogenic avian strains. Passive immunotherapy with Z3G1 significantly protected mice from the infection when administered either prophylactically or 1-2days post infection. In the present study, we showed that Z3G1 significantly protected mice from lethal infection when treatment was initiated 3days post infection. In addition, therapeutic administration of Z3G1 reduced lung viral titers in mice infected with different viral strains, including amantadine and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Furthermore, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Z3G1 sustained O2 saturation and reduced lung pathology in monkeys infected with a pandemic H1N1 strain. Finally, de-fucosylated Z3G1 with an IgG1/IgG3 chimeric Fc region was generated (AccretaMab® Z3G1), and showed increased ADCC and CDC in vitro. Our data suggest that the anti-M2 mAb Z3G1 has great potential as a novel anti-flu therapeutic agent.

  4. Possible basis for the emergence of H1N1 viruses with pandemic potential from avian hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Krauss, Scott; Zanin, Mark; Danner, Angela; Gulati, Shelly; Jones, Jeremy C; Friedman, Kimberly; Graham, Allison; Forrest, Heather; Seiler, Jon; Air, Gillian M; Webster, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Influenza A viruses of the H1N1 subtype have emerged from the avian influenza gene pool in aquatic birds and caused human pandemics at least twice during the past century. Despite this fact, surprisingly little is known about the H1N1 gene pool in the aquatic bird reservoir. A preliminary study showed that an H1N1 virus from a shorebird of the Charadriiformes order was transmitted between animals through the airborne route of infection, whereas an H1N1 virus from a bird of the Anseriformes order was not. Here we show that two of the three H1N1 viruses isolated from Charadriiformes species in 2009 were transmitted between animals through the airborne route of infection, and five H1N1 isolates from Anseriformes species were not. The one H1N1 virus from a Charadriiformes species that failed to transmit through the airborne route was a reassortant possessing multiple internal gene segments from Anseriformes species. The molecular differences between the airborne-transmissible and non-airborne-transmissible H1N1 viruses were multigenic, involving the selection of virus with human-like receptor-binding specificity (α2-6 sialic acid) and multiple differences in the polymerase complex, mainly in the PB2, PB1-F2, and nonstructural genes.

  5. H1 at HERA Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    H1 is one of the two large detectors installed at HERA, the first electron-proton accelerator, located at DESY in Hamburg. The H1 collaboration regroups physicists from 32institutes of 11countries all over the world.

  6. Influence of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1, CTLA-4 antibody tremelimumab and cytostatic drugs on the human immune system in a human in vitro model of colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich B

    2013-08-01

    viability of the colon carcinoma cell line. There was no maturation of iDCs after coculture with SW480; instead, H-1PV-infected or drug pretreated SW480 induced maturation. Cytokine production was higher for H-1PV-infected cells but was not significantly enhanced by tremelimumab treatment alone or in combination. Addition of tremelimumab did not interfere with the maturation process as measured by markers of maturation as well as by determination of cytokine levels.Conclusion: By enhancing both cell death and immunogenicity of tumors, H-1PV is of special interest for tumor-directed therapy. These features make it a promising candidate for clinical application in human colorectal cancer. As tremelimumab does not significantly interfere with this process, an interesting therapeutic combination of active enhancement of tumor immunogenicity and independent masking of the CTLA-4 silencing process on tumor cells is highlighted.Keywords: dendritic cells, SW480

  7. Endemicity and phylogeny of the human T cell lymphotropic virus type II subtype A from the Kayapo Indians of Brazil: evidence for limited regional dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, W M; Black, F L; Pieniazek, D; Biggar, R J; Lal, R B; Heneine, W

    1996-05-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of human T cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) from 17 seropositive Kayapo Indians from Brazil showed that all 17 samples contained a unique HTLV-IIa subtype (A-II). Additional RFLP screening demonstrated the presence of this subtype in two of three Brazilian blood donors and a Mexican prostitute and her child. In contrast, 129 samples from blood donors and intravenous drug users (IDUs) from the United States, two Pueblo Indian samples, five samples from Norwegian IDUs, and two samples from blood donors from Denmark were all found to be a different HTLV-IIa subtype (A-III). Phylogenetic analysis of two Kayapo and one Mexican LTR sequences showed that they cluster with a subtype A-II sequence from a Brazilian blood donor and with sequences from two prostitutes from Ghana and Cameroon. These results demonstrate that infection with the A-II subtype is endemic among the Kayapo Amerindians, has disseminated to non-Indian populations in Brazil, and is also present in Mexico. Furthermore, the A-II subtype does not appear to represent an origin for the HTLV-IIa infection in urban areas of the United States and Europe. This study provides evidence that HTLV-IIa may be a Paleo-Indian subtype as previously suggested for HTLV-IIb.

  8. EBIO Does Not Induce Cardiomyogenesis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells but Modulates Cardiac Subtype Enrichment by Lineage-Selective Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Jara-Avaca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Subtype-specific human cardiomyocytes (CMs are valuable for basic and applied research. Induction of cardiomyogenesis and enrichment of nodal-like CMs was described for mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs in response to 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (EBIO, a chemical modulator of small-/intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (SKs 1–4. Investigating EBIO in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, we have applied three independent differentiation protocols of low to high cardiomyogenic efficiency. Equivalent to mPSCs, timed EBIO supplementation during hPSC differentiation resulted in dose-dependent enrichment of up to 80% CMs, including an increase in nodal- and atrial-like phenotypes. However, our study revealed extensive EBIO-triggered cell loss favoring cardiac progenitor preservation and, subsequently, CMs with shortened action potentials. Proliferative cells were generally more sensitive to EBIO, presumably via an SK-independent mechanism. Together, EBIO did not promote cardiogenic differentiation of PSCs, opposing previous findings, but triggered lineage-selective survival at a cardiac progenitor stage, which we propose as a pharmacological strategy to modulate CM subtype composition.

  9. Extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch impact human cardiac fibroblast responses to transforming growth factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Chris J; Phelan, Dermot; Collier, Patrick; Horgan, Stephen; Glezeva, Nadia; Cooke, Gordon; Xu, Maojia; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Baugh, John A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the impact of extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch on cardiac fibroblast activity is required to help unravel the pathophysiology of myocardial fibrotic diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate pro-fibrotic responses of primary human cardiac fibroblast cells exposed to different extracellular matrix components, including collagen sub-types I, III, IV, VI and laminin. The impact of mechanical cyclical stretch and treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) on collagen 1, collagen 3 and alpha smooth muscle actin mRNA expression on different matrices was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results revealed that all of the matrices studied not only affected the expression of pro-fibrotic genes in primary human cardiac fibroblast cells at rest but also affected their response to TGFβ1. In addition, differential cellular responses to mechanical cyclical stretch were observed depending on the type of matrix the cells were adhered to. These findings may give insight into the impact of selective pathological deposition of extracellular matrix proteins within different disease states and how these could impact the fibrotic environment.

  10. Effect of Maillard reaction on biochemical properties of peanut 7S globulin (Ara h 1) and its interaction with a human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodorowicz, M.; Fiedorowicz, E.; Kostyra, H.; Wichers, H.J.; Kostyra, E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Maillard reaction (MR, glycation) on biochemical and biological properties of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1. Methods Three different time/temperature conditions of treatment were applied (37, 60, and 145 °C). The extent of MR wa

  11. Effect of Maillard reaction on biochemical properties of peanut 7S globulin (Ara h 1) and its interaction with a human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodorowicz, M.; Fiedorowicz, E.; Kostyra, H.; Wichers, H.J.; Kostyra, E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Maillard reaction (MR, glycation) on biochemical and biological properties of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1. Methods Three different time/temperature conditions of treatment were applied (37, 60, and 145 °C). The extent of MR wa

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia similar to human subtype 2A in a dog: Medullary thyroid carcinoma, bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, E.A. Soler; Castillo, V.A.; Trigo, R.H.; Caneda Aristarain, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Human multiple endocrine neoplasia subtype 2A (MEN 2A) is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and parathyroid hyperplasia or adenoma in the same individual. In this report, a case of a female Rottweiler with medullary thyroid carcinoma, bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma was described. Clinical manifestations of muscle weakness, polydipsia, polyuria, diarrhea and weight loss were observed. Two adrenal neoplasms were identified incidentally by ultrasonography, and tumor in the left thyroid lobe was identified by palpation. Primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed by biochemical testing. Histopathology report was consistent with diagnosis of bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for calcitonin and synaptophysin, and negative for thyroglobulin, which confirmed medullary thyroid carcinoma. This case in a dog is presenting neoplastic characteristics similar to human MEN 2A and emphasizing the importance of using immunohistochemistry for confirmation. PMID:27822452

  13. Seroprevalence of antibodies to Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex (subtypes IAB and VI in humans from General Belgrano Island, Formosa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cámara Alicia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the detection of antibodies (immunoglobulin G for subtypes I and VI of VEE viruses complex (Togaviridae family in people from the General Belgrano island, Formosa province (Argentina. The prevalence of neutralizing (NT antibodies for subtype VI was from 30% to 70% and the prevalence of antibodies inhibitory of hemagglutination (HI was of 0% in the first and second inquiry respectively. For the subtype IAB the prevalence of NT antibodies was from 13% to 3.6%, similar to the prevalence total for both subtypes. HI antibodies were not detected in any inquiries for any subtype. It was observed that both subtypes circulate simultaneously, while subtype VI remains constant with some peaks, subtype I was found in low level.

  14. The application of the human beta-globin gene locus control region and murine erythroleukemia cell system to the expression and pharmacological characterization of human endothelin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Whiting, E; Bath, C; Tang, E; Brennand, J

    1995-06-01

    The cDNAs encoding both A and B subtypes of the human endothelin receptor have been inserted into mammalian cell expression vectors that utilize the human globin gene, locus control region. These constructs have been introduced into murine erythroleukemia cells and inducible high level expression of the receptors has been achieved (approximately 1.5-pM/mg membrane protein and approximately 13,500 binding sites/cell for both receptor subtypes). Cell lines expressing these receptors were obtained on a rapid time scale (3-4 weeks), facilitated by the need for the analysis of only small numbers of cell clones/receptor (approximately 6). Competitive binding assays with endothelin-1 gave IC50s of 130 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-A receptor and 160 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-B receptor. Similar studies with the different isoforms of endothelin, sarafatoxin-S6b and -S6c, BQ123 and BQ3020, all gave the expected selectivity profiles. The IC50s for all compounds were in close agreement with those reported for native receptors. Thus, this expression system, which has several advantages over other described expression systems, is capable of rapidly providing large quantities of receptor for detailed pharmacological analyses or drug screening. In addition, the expressed receptors display the expected pharmacological profiles in the absence of any complicating, competing interactions from other subtypes or binding sites.

  15. A Multiplex RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Avian-Origin Canine H3N2, Equine-Origin H3N8, Human-Origin H3N2, and H1N1/2009 Canine Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Virological and serological surveys have documented that H1N1/2009, avian-origin canine H3N2 (cH3N2), seasonal human-origin H3N2 (hH3N2), and equine-origin H3N8 influenza viruses are consistently circulating in dogs. In the present study, a multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these influenza viruses. Four primer sets were designed to target the hemagglutinin genes of H1N1/2009, cH3N2, hH3N2, and H3N8 canine influenza viruses (CIVs). This mRT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the four CIV subtypes. Additionally, mRT-PCR results obtained from 420 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained by the conventional virus isolation method. Our mRT-PCR assay is reliable for clinical diagnosis and rapid identification of CIVs. PMID:28107507

  16. Subtyping and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078/126 isolates of human and animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, José L; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed; García, Marta E

    2017-02-01

    The Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype complex 078/126 (RT078/126) is often involved in human disease and is also frequently isolated from diverse animal species. The high genetic relatedness between human and animal RT078/126 isolates found in different regions has encouraged discussion about the zoonotic potential of this lineage. We compared for the first time the genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of human and animal C. difficile RT078/126 isolates from Spain. A collection of 96 isolates (50 of human and 46 of animal origin; 63 and 33 of ribotypes 078 and 126, respectively) was subtyped by an improved amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting method and tested for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 67 genotypes were distinguished, three of which grouped together isolates of human and animal origin. Furthermore, two main groups of isolates that mostly correlated with PCR ribotypes could be distinguished in the AFLP dendrogram. Human origin was significantly associated with resistance to ertapenem, erythromycin and moxifloxacin; resistance to clindamycin and erythromycin was associated with RT126 and AFLP group 1. Twenty-nine isolates (30.2% of total) displayed heteroresistance to metronidazole. Substantial differences were observed in the susceptibility profiles of isolates belonging to a same genotype. Altogether, these results provide a valuable baseline for future studies on the epidemiology of C. difficile RT078/126. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Distributed Subtyping

    OpenAIRE

    Baehni, Sébastien; Barreto, Joao; Guerraoui, Rachid

    2006-01-01

    One of the most frequent operations in object-oriented programs is the "instanceof" test, also called the "subtyping" test or the "type inclusion" test. This test determines if a given object is an instance of some type. Surprisingly, despite a lot of research on distributed object-oriented languages and systems, almost no work has been devoted to the implementation of this test in a distributed environment. This paper presents the first algorithm to implement the "subtyping" test on an obje...

  18. Triple-reassortant influenza A virus with H3 of human seasonal origin, NA of swine origin, and internal A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 genes is established in Danish pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Michael Albin

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a triple-reassortant influenza A virus with a HA that resembles H3 of human seasonal influenza from 2004 to 2005, N2 from influenza A virus already established in swine, and the internal gene cassette from A(H1N1)pdm09 has spread in Danish pig herds. The virus has been detec...

  19. Triple-reassortant influenza A virus with H3 of human seasonal origin, NA of swine origin, and internal A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 genes is established in Danish pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Michael Albin

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a triple-reassortant influenza A virus with a HA that resembles H3 of human seasonal influenza from 2004 to 2005, N2 from influenza A virus already established in swine, and the internal gene cassette from A(H1N1)pdm09 has spread in Danish pig herds. The virus has been detec...

  20. The impact of antigenic drift of influenza A virus on human herd immunity: Sero-epidemiological study of H1N1 in healthy Thai population in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yuta; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Bai, Guirong; Li, Yonggang; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Jampangern, Wipawee; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom

    2010-07-26

    To examine the effect of the antigenic drift of H1N1 influenza viruses on herd immunity, neutralization antibodies from 744 sera from Thai healthy volunteers in 2008-2009, who had not been vaccinated for at least the last 5 years, were investigated by microneutralization (MN) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Significantly higher MN titers were observed for the H1N1 Thai isolate in 2006 than in 2008. The results indicate that the antigenically drifted virus effectively escaped herd immunity. Since the low neutralization activity of herd immunity against drifted viruses is an important factor for viruses to spread efficiently, continuous sero-epidemiological study is required for public health.

  1. The 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) ’Swine Flu’ Outbreak: U.S. Responses to Global Human Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-26

    treatable with two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir ( brand name Tamiflu®) and zanamivir ( brand name Relenza®), though there is no available vaccine. WHO...www.who.int/ csr /disease/swineflu/en/ index.html and CRS Report R40554, The 2009 H1N1 “Swine Flu” Outbreak: An Overview, by Sarah A. Lister and C...the virus 5 See WHO, Swine influenza - update 3, April 27, 2009, http://www.who.int/ csr /don

  2. Whole genome characterization of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from Kenya during the 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachara, George; Symekher, Samuel; Otieno, Michael; Magana, Japheth; Opot, Benjamin; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-06-01

    An influenza pandemic caused by a novel influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 spread worldwide in 2009 and is estimated to have caused between 151,700 and 575,400 deaths globally. While whole genome data on new virus enables a deeper insight in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and drug sensitivities of the circulating viruses, there are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from African countries. We describe herein the full genome analysis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Kenya between June 2009 and August 2010. A total of 40 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated during the pandemic were selected. The segments from each isolate were amplified and directly sequenced. The resulting sequences of individual gene segments were concatenated and used for subsequent analysis. These were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and also to reconstruct the time of most recent ancestor, time of introduction into the country, rates of substitution and to estimate a time-resolved phylogeny. The Kenyan complete genome sequences clustered with globally distributed clade 2 and clade 7 sequences but local clade 2 viruses did not circulate beyond the introductory foci while clade 7 viruses disseminated country wide. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated between April and June 2009, and distinct clusters circulated during the pandemic. The complete genome had an estimated rate of nucleotide substitution of 4.9×10(-3) substitutions/site/year and greater diversity in surface expressed proteins was observed. We show that two clades of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were introduced into Kenya from the UK and the pandemic was sustained as a result of importations. Several closely related but distinct clusters co-circulated locally during the peak pandemic phase but only one cluster dominated in the late phase of the pandemic suggesting that it possessed greater adaptability.

  3. Novel reassortant influenza viruses between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and other influenza viruses pose a risk to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weili; Wang, Feibing; Dong, Bin; Ou, Changbo; Meng, Demei; Liu, Jinhua; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is characterized by eight single-stranded, negative sense RNA segments, which allows for gene reassortment among different IAV subtypes when they co-infect a single host cell simultaneously. Genetic reassortment is an important way to favor the evolution of influenza virus. Novel reassortant virus may pose a pandemic among humans. In history, three human pandemic influenza viruses were caused by genetic reassortment between avian, human and swine influenza viruses. Since 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm/09 H1N1) influenza virus composed of two swine influenza virus genes highlighted the genetic reassortment again. Due to wide host species and high transmission of the pdm/09 H1N1 influenza virus, many different avian, human or swine influenza virus subtypes may reassert with it to generate novel reassortant viruses, which may result in a next pandemic among humans. So, it is necessary to understand the potential threat of current reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses to public health. This study summarized the status of the reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses of different species origins in natural and experimental conditions. The aim of this summarization is to facilitate us to further understand the potential threats of novel reassortant influenza viruses to public health and to make effective prevention and control strategies for these pathogens.

  4. Env sequence determinants in CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 subtype C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nina H; Becerril, Carlos; Giguel, Francoise; Novitsky, Vladimir; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Lockman, Shahin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2012-11-25

    HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) CXCR4-using virus is isolated infrequently and is poorly characterized. Understanding HIV-1C env characteristics has implications for the clinical use of antiretrovirals that target viral entry. A total of 209 env clones derived from 10 samples with mixed CCR5-(R5), CXCR4-using (X4) or dual-tropic HIV-1C were phenotyped for coreceptor usage. Intra-patient X4 and R5 variants generally formed distinct monophyletic phylogenetic clusters. X4 compared to R5 envs had significantly greater amino acid variability and insertions, higher net positive charge, fewer glycosylation sites and increased basic amino acid substitutions in the GPGQ crown. Basic amino acid substitution and/or insertion prior to the crown are highly sensitive characteristics for predicting X4 viruses. Chimeric env functional studies suggest that the V3 loop is necessary but often not sufficient to impart CXCR4 utilization. Our studies provide insights into the unique genotypic characteristics of X4 variants in HIV-1C.

  5. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. H1抗组胺药%H1-antihistamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张罗; 韩德民

    2013-01-01

    While histamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases, such as allergic rhinitis, H1-antihistamines, which have been using in the treatment of allergic diseases for more than 70 years, are considered as the cornerstone of the medication of allergic diseases. In this review, we discuss the history of histamine studies and anti - histamine discovery, the histamine receptors, as well as the mechanisms and the safety of H1-antihistamines.

  7. Subtype analysis of Blastocystis sp. isolates from human and canine hosts in an urban community in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleza, Maria Luz B; Reyes, John Carlo B; Tongol-Rivera, Pilarita N; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-06-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a common gut-dwelling protist of both humans and animals. A cross-sectional survey among humans and their dogs was conducted to determine the prevalence of Blastocystis infection and to characterize the subtype (ST) distribution in an urban community in the Philippines. Fecal specimens from 1,271 humans and 145 dogs were collected and inoculated in diphasic culture medium. Prevalence of Blastocystis by culture was 13.0% (95% CI = 11.2-15.0) and 14.5% (95% CI = 9.6-21.2) for humans and dogs, respectively. A total of 168 culture isolates were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with seven pairs of ST-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) primers. In humans, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 22.6% (95% CI = 17.2-29.0), ST2 with 3.1% (95% CI = 1.3-6.7), ST3 with 41.4% (95% CI= 34.9-48.6), ST4 with 14.8% (95% CI = 10.5-20.6), ST5 with 4.1% (95% CI = 2.0-8.0), and unknown ST with 13.9% (95% CI = 9.6-19.4). In dogs, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 4.3% (95% CI = 0.0-29.0), ST2 with 8.7% (95% CI = 1.3-28.0), ST3 with 17.4% (95% CI = 6.4-37.7), ST4 with 13.0% (95% CI = 3.7-33.0), ST5 with 13.0% (95% CI = 3.7-33.0), and unknown ST with 47.8% (95% CI = 29.2-67.0). This is the first study that reported Blastocystis ST4 in human and canine hosts in the Philippines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between th

  9. Global dispersal pattern of HIV type 1 subtype CRF01-AE : A genetic trace of human mobility related to heterosexual sexual activities centralized in southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01-AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01-AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. Methods. We assembled a global data set

  10. Inhibitory effect of human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of gastric cancer cell lines in variant tumor pathological subtype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ye; Yun-Lin Wu; Shu Zhang; Zi Chen; Li-Xia Guo; Ruo-Yu Zhou; Hong Xie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of well (MKN-28), moderately (SGC-7901)and poorly (MKN-45) differentiated gastric cancer cell lines under specific conditions and its inhibition mechanism,and to observe the correlation between the growth inhibition ratio and the tumor pathologic subtype of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Telomerase activity in three gastric cancer cell lines of variant tumor pathologic subtype was determined by modified TRAP assay before and after the specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides were dealt with under specific conditions. Effect of antisense oligomer under specific conditions of the growth and viability of gastric cancer cell lines was explored by using trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and cell apoptosis was detected by cell morphology observation, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Telomerase activity was detected in well,moderately and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell lines (the quantification expression of telomerase activity was 43.7TPG, 56.5TPG, 76.7TPG, respectively).Telomerase activity was controlled to 30.2TPG, 36.3TPG and 35.2TPG for MKN-28, SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cell lines respectively after treatment with human telomerase antisense oligomers at the concentration of 5 μmol/L, and was entirely inhibited at 10 μmol/L, against the template region of telomerase RNA component, whereas no inhibition effect was detected in missense oligomers (P<0.05). After treatment with antisense oligomers at different concentrations under specific conditions for 96 h, significant growth inhibition effects were found in MKN-45 and SGC-7901gastric cancer cell lines (the inhibition ratio was 40.89%and 71.28%), but not in MKN-28 cell lines (15.86%). The ratio of inactive SGC-7901 cells increased according to the prolongation of treatment from 48 to 96 h. Missense oligomers could not lead to the same effect (P<0

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  12. Same-Single-Cell Analysis of Pacemaker-Specific Markers in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Subtypes Classified by Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechikov, Sergey; Copaciu, Raul; Gluck, Jessica M; Deng, Wenbin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Chan, James W; Lieu, Deborah K

    2016-07-19

    Insights into the expression of pacemaker-specific markers in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes can facilitate the enrichment and track differentiation and maturation of hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. To date, no study has directly assessed gene expression in each pacemaker-, atria-, and ventricular-like cardiomyocyte subtype derived from hiPSCs since currently the subtypes of these immature cardiomyocytes can only be identified by action potential profiles. Traditional acquisition of action potentials using patch-clamp recordings renders the cells unviable for subsequent analysis. We circumvented these issues by acquiring the action potential profile of a single cell optically followed by assessment of protein expression through immunostaining in that same cell. Our same-single-cell analysis for the first time revealed expression of proposed pacemaker-specific markers-hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN)4 channel and Islet (Isl)1-at the protein level in all three hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes. HCN4 expression was found to be higher in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes than atrial- and ventricular-like subtypes but its downregulation over time in all subtypes diminished the differences. Isl1 expression in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes was initially not statistically different than the contractile subtypes but did become statistically higher than ventricular-like cells with time. Our observations suggest that although HCN4 and Isl1 are differentially expressed in hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like relative to ventricular-like cardiomyocytes, these markers alone are insufficient in identifying hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. Stem Cells 2016.

  13. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Caiming; Zhang, Rongfu; Cai, Qixu; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; (U. Hong Kong); (Inter. Inst. Infect. Imm.); (Xiamen)

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptor binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.

  14. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  15. SSEA-4 and YKL-40 positive progenitor subtypes in the subventricular zone of developing human neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid SSEA-4 and the glycoprotein YKL-40 have both been associated with human embryonic and neural stem cell differentiation. We investigated the distribution of SSEA-4 and YKL-40 positive cells in proliferative zones of human fetal forebrain using immunohistochemistry and double-...... characterized by immunohistochemical combination of antibodies against SSEA-4 and YKL-40 and devoid of neuronal and microglial markers represent a yet unexplored astrogenic lineage illustrating the complexity of astroglial development. GLIA 2015....

  16. Anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity of lycopene against three subtypes of human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Mikako; Ono, Misaki; Higuchi, Takako; Chen, Chen; Hara, Takayuki; Nakano, Shuji

    2014-03-01

    Although lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomatoes, has been suggested to attenuate the risk of breast cancer, the underlying preventive mechanism remains to be determined. Moreover, it is not known whether there are any differences in lycopene activity among different subtypes of human breast cancer cells. Using ER/PR positive MCF-7, HER2-positive SK-BR-3 and triple-negative MDA-MB-468 cell lines, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of lycopene. Lycopene treatment for 168 consecutive hours exhibited a time-dependent and dose-dependent anti-proliferative activity against these cell lines by arresting the cell cycle at the G0 /G1 phase at physiologically achievable concentrations found in human plasma. The greatest growth inhibition was observed in MDA-MB-468 where the sub-G0 /G1 apoptotic population was significantly increased, with demonstrable cleavage of PARP. Lycopene induced strong and sustained activation of the ERK1/2, with concomitant cyclin D1 suppression and p21 upregulation in these three cell lines. In triple negative cells, lycopene inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream molecule mTOR, followed by subsequent upregulation of proapoptotic Bax without affecting anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL. Taken together, these data indicate that the predominant anticancer activity of lycopene in MDA-MB-468 cells suggests a potential role of lycopene for the prevention of triple negative breast cancer.

  17. The subtypes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors expressed by human podocytes and their role in decreasing podocyte injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglio, Gianluca; Rosa, Arianna Carolina; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Grange, Cristina; Collino, Massimo; Camussi, Giovanni; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, and three subtypes (α, β and γ) have been identified. PPAR activation has been reported to decrease renal injury and markers of glomerular dysfunction in models of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). However, both the I/R effects and the effects of PPAR agonists on podocytes, an integral cellular part of the glomerular filtration barrier, remain to be established. By using oxygen/glucose deprivation-reoxygenation as an in vitro model that mimics in vivo I/R, the effects of PPAR agonists on podocyte death were compared. Human immortalized podocytes were treated with gemfibrozil, GW0742, pioglitazone or rosiglitazone, as a single or repeated challenge. Cell loss, necrotic and apoptotic cell death were measured. Only the repeated treatment with each PPAR agonist significantly prevented cell death, mainly by decreasing apoptosis. In comparison, in a model of serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, both treatments were effective, although the repeated treatment achieved the more pronounced effect. Finally, our results showed that preservation of Bcl-2, Bax and nephrin expression accompanied the anti-apoptotic effects exerted by PPAR agonists in human podocytes. These findings contribute to clarification of the pathophysiological role of renal PPARs and suggest that selective PPARα, PPARβ or PPARγ agonists may exert similar protective effects on podocytes by decreasing apoptotic cell death. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Efficient and rapid derivation of primitive neural stem cells and generation of brain subtype neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiping; Shin, Soojung; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Liu, Qiuyue; Sheng, Jianting; Li, Fuhai; Zhan, Ming; Davis, Janine; Bharti, Kapil; Zeng, Xianmin; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Vemuri, Mohan C

    2013-11-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, are unique cell sources for disease modeling, drug discovery screens, and cell therapy applications. The first step in producing neural lineages from hPSCs is the generation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Current methods of NSC derivation involve the time-consuming, labor-intensive steps of an embryoid body generation or coculture with stromal cell lines that result in low-efficiency derivation of NSCs. In this study, we report a highly efficient serum-free pluripotent stem cell neural induction medium that can induce hPSCs into primitive NSCs (pNSCs) in 7 days, obviating the need for time-consuming, laborious embryoid body generation or rosette picking. The pNSCs expressed the neural stem cell markers Pax6, Sox1, Sox2, and Nestin; were negative for Oct4; could be expanded for multiple passages; and could be differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, in addition to the brain region-specific neuronal subtypes GABAergic, dopaminergic, and motor neurons. Global gene expression of the transcripts of pNSCs was comparable to that of rosette-derived and human fetal-derived NSCs. This work demonstrates an efficient method to generate expandable pNSCs, which can be further differentiated into central nervous system neurons and glia with temporal, spatial, and positional cues of brain regional heterogeneity. This method of pNSC derivation sets the stage for the scalable production of clinically relevant neural cells for cell therapy applications in good manufacturing practice conditions.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits mast cell-dependent bronchoconstriction in human small airways through the E prostanoid subtype 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, Jesper; Manson, Martijn L; Bood, Johan; Delin, Ingrid; Orre, Ann-Charlotte; Bergman, Per; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Adner, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled prostaglandin (PG) E2 might inhibit asthmatic responses, but the mechanisms involved remain undefined. We sought to characterize the direct and indirect effects of PGE2 on human small airways with particular reference to the receptors mediating the responses. Contraction and relaxation were studied in isolated human bronchi with an inner diameter of 1 mm or less. Low concentrations of PGE2 (0.01-1 μmol/L) relaxed the bronchi precontracted by histamine. The bronchodilator response was inhibited by the E prostanoid (EP) subtype 4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208 but unaffected by the EP2 receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Higher concentrations of PGE2 (10-100 μmol/L) contracted the small airways. However, the TP receptor agonists U-46,619, PGF2α, and PGD2 were more potent than PGE2. Moreover, the bronchoconstrictor responses to PGE2 and all other tested prostanoids, including the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 and the partial FP receptor agonist AL-8810, were uniformly abolished by the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29,548. In the presence of TP and EP4 antagonists, PGE2 inhibited the mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction resulting from anti-IgE challenge. Measurement of the release of histamine and cysteinyl leukotrienes documented that this bronchoprotective action of PGE2 was mediated by the EP2 receptor, unrelated to bronchodilation, and increased with time of exposure. The pharmacology of PGE2 in isolated human small airways was different from its profile in animal models. This first demonstration of powerful EP2 receptor-mediated inhibition of IgE-dependent contractions in human airways introduces a new selective target for the treatment of asthma. This EP2 control of mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction is presumably exaggerated in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

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    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  1. Distribution and function of sodium channel subtypes in human atrial myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, Susann G.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Maass, Alexander H.; Lange, Volkmar; Renner, Andre; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Bonz, Andreas; Muck, Jenny; Ertl, Georg; Catterall, William A.; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K. G.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels composed of a pore-forming alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiac muscle. However, their localization and expression patterns in human myocardium have not yet been clearly defined. We used immunohist

  2. Development of a new PCR protocol to detect and subtype Blastocystis spp. from humans and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blastocystis spp. is commonly found in the feces of humans worldwide. Infection has been reported as asymptomatic, acute symptomatic, and chronic symptomatic. This wide range of responses to infection could be related to the genetic diversity of morphologically indistinguishable specimens obtained...

  3. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  4. Influenza A Viruses Detected in Swine in Southern Germany after the H1N1 Pandemic in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippig, J; Ritzmann, M; Büttner, M; Neubauer-Juric, A

    2016-11-01

    Infections with influenza A viruses (IAV) are highly prevalent in swine populations, and stable cocirculation of at least three lineages has been well documented in European swine - till 2009. However, since the emergence of the human pandemic pdmH1N1 virus in 2009, which has been (re)introduced into individual swine herds worldwide, the situation has been changing. These variations in the respective IAV pools within pig populations are of major interest, and the zoonotic potential of putative emerging viruses needs to be evaluated. As data on recent IAV in swine from southern Germany were relatively sparse, the purpose of this study was to determine the major IAV subtypes actually present in this region. To this aim, from 2010 to 2013, 1417 nasal swabs or lung tissue samples from pigs with respiratory disease were screened for IAV genomes. Overall, in 130 holdings IAV genomes were detected by real-time RT-PCR targeting the matrix protein gene. For further analyses, several PCR protocols were adapted to quickly subtype between H1, pdmH1, H3, N1 and N2 sequences. Taken together, cocirculation of the three stable European lineages of IAV was confirmed for Bavaria. H1N1 sequences were identified in 59, whereas H1N2 genomes were only diagnosed in 14, and H3N2 in 9 of the holdings analysed. However, pdmH1 in combination with N1 was detected in 2010, 2012 and 2013 confirming a presence, albeit in low prevalence, likewise pdmH1N2 reassortant viruses. Interestingly, individual cases of coinfections with more than one subtype were diagnosed. Partial genome sequences were determined and phylogenetic analyses performed. Clearly other than in the human population classically circulating IAV have not been displaced by pdmH1N1 in Bavarian swine. However, some interesting viruses were detected. Further surveillance of these viruses in the Bavarian pig population will be of major importance, to monitor future developments. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. A Subtype of Inhibitory Interneuron with Intrinsic Persistent Activity in Human and Monkey Neocortex

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    Bo Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in understanding the neural basis of human cognitive functions is to identify neuronal types in the neocortex. In this study, we performed whole-cell recording from human cortical slices and found a distinct subpopulation of neurons with intrinsic persistent activity that could be triggered by single action potentials (APs but terminated by bursts of APs. This persistent activity was associated with a depolarizing plateau potential induced by the activation of a persistent Na+ current. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that these neurons were inhibitory interneurons. This type of neuron was found in different cortical regions, including temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal cortices in human and also in frontal and temporal lobes of nonhuman primate but not in rat cortical tissues, suggesting that it could be unique to primates. The characteristic persistent activity in these inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the regulation of pyramidal cell activity and participate in cortical processing.

  6. Evaluation of the antigenic relatedness and cross-protective immunity of the neuraminidase between human influenza A (H1N1) virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Zeng, Hui; Sheu, Tiffany; Achenbach, Jenna E; Veguilla, Vic; Gubareva, Larisa V; Garten, Rebecca; Smith, Catherine; Yang, Hua; Stevens, James; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-04-01

    To determine the genetic and antigenic relatedness as well as the cross-protective immunity of human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase (NA), we immunized rabbits with either a baculovirus-expressed recombinant NA from A/Beijing/262/95 (BJ/262) H1N1 or A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) H5N1 virus. Cross-reactive antibody responses were evaluated by multiple serological assays and cross-protection against H5N1 virus challenge was evaluated in mice. In a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) test, the antisera exhibited substantial inhibition of NA activity of the homologous virus, but failed to inhibit the NA activity of heterologous virus. However, these antisera exhibited low levels of cross-reactivity measured by plaque size reduction, replication inhibition, single radial hemolysis, and ELISA assays. Passive immunization with HK/483 NA-specific antisera significantly reduced virus replication and disease, and afforded almost complete protection against lethal homologous virus challenge in mice. However, passive immunization with BJ/262 (H1N1) NA-specific antisera was ineffective at providing cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus challenge and only slightly reduced weight loss. Substantial amino acid variation among the NA antigenic sites was observed between BJ/262 and HK/483 virus, which was consistent with the lack of cross-reactive NI activity by the antibody and limited cross-protective immunity in mice. These results show a strong correlation between the lack of cross-protective immunity and low structural similarities of NA from a human seasonal H1N1 virus and an avian H5N1 influenza virus.

  7. High Prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection in Diabetes Type 2 Patients and Detection of a New Virus Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Enrica; Madeddu, Maria A; Palmieri, Giuseppina; Angius, Fabrizio; Contini, Pierpaolo; Pompei, Raffaello; Ingianni, Angela

    2016-11-19

    The prevalence of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) DNA and antiviral antibodies in Diabetes type 2 (DM2) and control subjects was studied, in order to confirm a possible link between DM2 and HHV8 infection. The HHV8-DNA from diabetic patients was typed for detecting possible genomic differences with known HHV8 reference viruses.DM2 patients and healthy controls were examined for the presence of HHV8 DNA into the peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both anti-lytic and latent phase antibodies were detected in HHV8 positive and negative diabetic patients, as well in a number of controls. The HHV8 ORF K1 and ORF 26 genes from DM2 patients were typed and matched to reference strains.A significant prevalence of HHV8 DNA in DM2 subjects versus healthy controls was detected (about 58 % against 27 %). Anti-lytic phase, but not anti-latent phase antibodies, were significantly increased in DM2 patients versus controls. In addition, about 30 % of HHV8 strains isolated from DM2 lymphocytes showed consistent differences in the ORF 26 gene sequence, so that a new HHV8 subtype was proposed. These findings give additional support to the hypothesis that HHV8 could be considered an additional risk factor for DM2 onset.

  8. Sensitivity of Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Subtypes to Chemotherapeutics and Molecular Targeted Agents: A Study on Primary Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraveto, Alice; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Giuliante, Felice; De Rose, Agostino Maria; Grazi, Gian Luca; Napoletano, Chiara; Semeraro, Rossella; Lustri, Anna Maria; Costantini, Daniele; Nevi, Lorenzo; Di Matteo, Sabina; Renzi, Anastasia; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCCA) subtypes to chemotherapeutics and molecular targeted agents. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were prepared from surgical specimens (N. 18 IHCCA patients) and evaluated for cell proliferation (MTS assay) and apoptosis (Caspase 3) after incubation (72 hours) with increasing concentrations of different drugs. In vivo, subcutaneous human tumor xenografts were evaluated. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were characterized by a different pattern of expression of cancer stem cell markers, and by a different drug sensitivity. Gemcitabine and the Gemcitabine-Cisplatin combination were more active in inhibiting cell proliferation in mixed-IHCCA while Cisplatin or Abraxane were more effective against mucin-IHCCA, where Abraxane also enhances apoptosis. 5-Fluoracil showed a slight inhibitory effect on cell proliferation that was more significant in mixed- than mucin-IHCCA primary cultures and, induced apoptosis only in mucin-IHCCA. Among Hg inhibitors, LY2940680 and Vismodegib showed slight effects on proliferation of both IHCCA subtypes. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Imatinib Mesylate and Sorafenib showed significant inhibitory effects on proliferation of both mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib, inhibited proliferation of only mucin-IHCCA while the aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, Bestatin was more active against mixed-IHCCA. The c-erbB2 blocking antibody was more active against mixed-IHCCA while, the Wnt inhibitor, LGK974, similarly inhibited proliferation of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. Either mucin- or mixed-IHCCA showed high sensitivity to nanomolar concentrations of the dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235. In vivo, in subcutaneous xenografts, either NVP-BEZ235 or Abraxane, blocked tumor growth. In conclusion, mucin- and mixed-IHCCA are characterized by a different drug sensitivity. Cisplatin, Abraxane and the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib were more

  9. Sensitivity of Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Subtypes to Chemotherapeutics and Molecular Targeted Agents: A Study on Primary Cell Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fraveto

    Full Text Available We investigated the sensitivity of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCCA subtypes to chemotherapeutics and molecular targeted agents. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were prepared from surgical specimens (N. 18 IHCCA patients and evaluated for cell proliferation (MTS assay and apoptosis (Caspase 3 after incubation (72 hours with increasing concentrations of different drugs. In vivo, subcutaneous human tumor xenografts were evaluated. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were characterized by a different pattern of expression of cancer stem cell markers, and by a different drug sensitivity. Gemcitabine and the Gemcitabine-Cisplatin combination were more active in inhibiting cell proliferation in mixed-IHCCA while Cisplatin or Abraxane were more effective against mucin-IHCCA, where Abraxane also enhances apoptosis. 5-Fluoracil showed a slight inhibitory effect on cell proliferation that was more significant in mixed- than mucin-IHCCA primary cultures and, induced apoptosis only in mucin-IHCCA. Among Hg inhibitors, LY2940680 and Vismodegib showed slight effects on proliferation of both IHCCA subtypes. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Imatinib Mesylate and Sorafenib showed significant inhibitory effects on proliferation of both mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib, inhibited proliferation of only mucin-IHCCA while the aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, Bestatin was more active against mixed-IHCCA. The c-erbB2 blocking antibody was more active against mixed-IHCCA while, the Wnt inhibitor, LGK974, similarly inhibited proliferation of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. Either mucin- or mixed-IHCCA showed high sensitivity to nanomolar concentrations of the dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235. In vivo, in subcutaneous xenografts, either NVP-BEZ235 or Abraxane, blocked tumor growth. In conclusion, mucin- and mixed-IHCCA are characterized by a different drug sensitivity. Cisplatin, Abraxane and the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib

  10. Protective efficacy of an inactivated Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza vaccine against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jinyu; Yang, Dawei; Qiao, Chuanling; Xu, Huiyang; Xu, Bangfeng; Wu, Yunpu; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Chen, Hualan

    2016-07-19

    Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EA H1N1) swine influenza viruses are prevalent in pigs in Europe and Asia, but occasionally cause human infection, which raises concern about their pandemic potential. Here, we produced a whole-virus inactivated vaccine with an EA H1N1 strain (A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011, SW/GX/18/11) and evaluated its efficacy against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 influenza viruses in mice. A strong humoral immune response, which we measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN), was induced in the vaccine-inoculated mice upon challenge. The inactivated SW/GX/18/11 vaccine provided complete protection against challenge with homologous SW/GX/18/11 virus in mice and provided effective protection against challenge with heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses with distinctive genomic combinations. Our findings suggest that this EA H1N1 vaccine can provide protection against both homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 or H1N2 virus infection. As such, it is an excellent vaccine candidate to prevent H1N1 swine influenza.

  11. SSEA-4 and YKL-40 positive progenitor subtypes in the subventricular zone of developing human neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid SSEA-4 and the glycoprotein YKL-40 have both been associated with human embryonic and neural stem cell differentiation. We investigated the distribution of SSEA-4 and YKL-40 positive cells in proliferative zones of human fetal forebrain using immunohistochemistry and double-labeling immunofluorescence. A few small rounded SSEA-4 and YKL-40 labeled cells were present in the radial glial BLBP positive proliferative zones adjacent to the lateral ganglionic eminence from 12th week post conception. With increasing age, a similarly stained cell population appeared more widespread in the subventricular zone. At midgestation, the entire subventricular zone showed patches of SSEA-4, YKL-40, and BLBP positive cells. Co-labeling with markers for radial glial cells (RGCs) and neuronal, glial, and microglial markers tested the lineage identity of this subpopulation of radial glial descendants. Adjacent to the ventricular zone, a minor fraction showed overlap with GFAP but not with nestin, Olig2, NG2, or S100. No co-localization was found with neuronal markers NeuN, calbindin, DCX or with markers for microglial cells (Iba-1, CD68). Moreover, the SSEA-4 and YKL-40 positive cell population in subventricular zone was largely devoid of Tbr2, a marker for intermediate neuronal progenitor cells descending from RGCs. YKL-40 has recently been found in astrocytes in the neuron-free fimbria, and both SSEA-4 and YKL-40 are present in malignant astroglial brain tumors. We suggest that the population of cells characterized by immunohistochemical combination of antibodies against SSEA-4 and YKL-40 and devoid of neuronal and microglial markers represent a yet unexplored astrogenic lineage illustrating the complexity of astroglial development.

  12. Cloning and expression of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor H1 subunit and preliminary application%去唾液酸糖蛋白受体H1亚单位基因片段的克隆表达及其检测自身免疫性肝炎的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妍; 李永哲; 吴琳; 刘国振; 张蜀澜; 胡朝军; 佟大伟

    2009-01-01

    Objective To clone and express the human asialoglycoprotein receptor(ASGPR) H1 subunit, purify and identify the immunoreactivity of the recombinant protein, and establish the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect anti-ASGPR antibodies in diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Methods The CRDHI cDNA (435 bp) was subcloned into eukaryotic vector PEGH, and the recombinant protein expression was induced by D (+)-Galactose. The recombinant CRDH1 was purified with Glutathione Sepharose 4B, and its immunoreactivity was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot as well as MALDI-TOF. ELISA was established to detect the anti-ASGPR antibodies in serum samples of 45 patients with AIH, 30 patients with SLE, 30 patients with RA, 10 patients with SS and 30 normal controls. Results The sequencing of recombinant plasmid showed the CRDH1 gene was successfully inserted to the eukaryotic expression vector with correct sequence and open reading frame. The fusion protein showed a molecular weight of 42 500 Da on SDS-PAGE gel and confirmed to be the human ASGPR by MALDI-MS through peptide mass fingerprint analysis with Mascot in human protein database. It shared 98. 34% homology with ASGPR H1 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that the fusion protein had the same immunoreactivity as human ASGPR. The results of ELISA indicated that the positive rate of anti-ASGPR was 35.6% ( 16/45 ), but the ELISA was negative in other control. There was significant difference of positivity of the autoantibodies between AIH and non-AIH controls (χ2 = 31.85,P < 0. 01 ). Conclusions The human plasmid containing ASGPR is successfully clone into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y258. The recombinant autoantigen owns good antigenicity and specificity. ELISA established with the purified protein shows good specificity for diagnosis of AIH.%目的 克隆去唾液酸糖蛋白受体(asialoglycoprotein reeeptor,ASGPR)H1亚单位显性表位435 bp基因片段,构建表达重组质粒,进行表达、纯化,以

  13. Deciphering the complex distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes among different cohorts in Northern Tanzania.

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    Harr F Njai

    Full Text Available Increased understanding of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 is challenging but important in the development of an effective vaccine. We aimed to describe the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in northern Tanzania among women enrolled in studies preparing for HIV-1 prevention trials (hospitality facility-worker cohorts, and among men and women in an open cohort demographic surveillance system (Kisesa cohort.The polymerase encompassing partial reverse transcriptase was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed and subtype determined. Questionnaires documented demographic data. We examined factors associated with subtype using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for study, age, and sex.Among 140 individuals (125 women and 15 men, subtype A1 predominated (54, 39%, followed by C (46, 33%, D (25, 18% and unique recombinant forms (URFs (15, 11%. There was weak evidence to suggest different subtype frequencies by study (for example, 18% URFs in the Kisesa cohort versus 5-9% in the hospitality facility-worker cohorts; adjusted relative-risk ratio (aRR = 2.35 [95% CI 0.59,9.32]; global p = 0.09. Compared to men, women were less likely to have subtype D versus A (aRR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02,0.76]; global p = 0.05. There was a trend to suggest lower relative risk of subtype D compared to A with older age (aRR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23,0.85] per 10 years; global p = 0.05.We observed multiple subtypes, confirming the complex genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in northern Tanzania, and found some differences between cohorts and by age and sex. This has important implications for vaccine design and development, providing opportunity to determine vaccine efficacy in diverse HIV-1 strains.

  14. A novel sequence-based antigenic distance measure for H1N1, with application to vaccine effectiveness and the selection of vaccine strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Subieta, Krystina C.; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    H1N1 influenza causes substantial seasonal illness and was the subtype of the 2009 influenza pandemic. Precise measures of antigenic distance between the vaccine and circulating virus strains help researchers design influenza vaccines with high vaccine effectiveness. We here introduce a sequence-based method to predict vaccine effectiveness in humans. Historical epidemiological data show that this sequence-based method is as predictive of vaccine effectiveness as hemagglutination inhibition assay data from ferret animal model studies. Interestingly, the expected vaccine effectiveness is greater against H1N1 than H3N2, suggesting a stronger immune response against H1N1 than H3N2. The evolution rate of hemagglutinin in H1N1 is also shown to be greater than that in H3N2, presumably due to greater immune selection pressure. PMID:21123189

  15. N- and C-terminal domains determine differential nucleosomal binding geometry and affinity of linker histone isotypes H1(0) and H1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Payal; Brown, David T

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic linker or H1 histones modulate DNA compaction and gene expression in vivo. In mammals, these proteins exist as multiple isotypes with distinct properties, suggesting a functional significance to the heterogeneity. Linker histones typically have a tripartite structure composed of a conserved central globular domain flanked by a highly variable short N-terminal domain and a longer highly basic C-terminal domain. We hypothesized that the variable terminal domains of individual subtypes contribute to their functional heterogeneity by influencing chromatin binding interactions. We developed a novel dual color fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay system in which two H1 proteins fused to spectrally separable fluorescent proteins can be co-expressed and their independent binding kinetics simultaneously monitored in a single cell. This approach was combined with domain swap and point mutagenesis to determine the roles of the terminal domains in the differential binding characteristics of the linker histone isotypes, mouse H1(0) and H1c. Exchanging the N-terminal domains between H1(0) and H1c changed their overall binding affinity to that of the other variant. In contrast, switching the C-terminal domains altered the chromatin interaction surface of the globular domain. These results indicate that linker histone subtypes bind to chromatin in an intrinsically specific manner and that the highly variable terminal domains contribute to differences between subtypes. The methods developed in this study will have broad applications in studying dynamic properties of additional histone subtypes and other mobile proteins.

  16. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter.

  17. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  18. Transformation of human fibroblasts by ionizing radiation, a chemical carcinogen, or simian virus 40 correlates with an increase in susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and minute virus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, J.J.; Becquart, P.; Duponchel, N.; Salome, N.; Avalosse, B.L.; Namba, M.; Rommelaere, J.

    1988-05-01

    Morphologically altered and established human fibroblasts, obtained either by /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation, treatment with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, or simian virus 40 (SV40) infection, were compared with their normal finite-life parental strains for susceptibility to the autonomous parvoviruses H-1 virus and the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp). All transformed cells suffered greater virus-induced killing than their untransformed progenitors. The cytotoxic effect of H-1 virus was more severe than that of MVMp. Moreover, the level of viral DNA replication was much (10- to 85-fold) enhanced in the transformants compared with their untransformed parent cells. Thus, in this system, cell transformation appears to correlate with an increase in both DNA amplification and cytotoxicity of the parvoviruses. However, the accumulation of parvovirus DNA in the transformants was not always accompanied by the production of infectious virus. Like in vitro-transformed fibroblasts, a fibrosarcoma-derived cell line was sensitive to the killing effect of both H-1 virus and MVMp and amplified viral DNA to high extents. The results indicate that oncogenic transformation can be included among cellular states which modulate permissiveness to parvoviruses under defined growth conditions.

  19. H-1 Upgrades (4BW/4BN) (H-1 Upgrades)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Nautical Miles R&M - Reliability and Maintainability RM - Reference Model TV-1 - Technical Standards Profile Univ . - Universal H-1 Upgrades December 2015...Speed (kts) 165 165 135 139 139 Payload (Hot Day) (lbs) 3500 lbs 3500 lbs 2500 lbs 6 Wing Stations 4 Universal Under Wing Stations 3429 3429 Weapon...Stations Universal Mounts 6 6 4 4 4 Precision Guided Munitions 16 16 12 16 16 Maneuverability/Agility (G’s) -0.5 to +2.5 -0.5 to +2.5 -0.5 to +2.5 -0.5 to

  20. Histone H1c decreases markedly in postreplicative stages of chicken spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, J; Mezquita, C

    1991-03-01

    The relative proportions of four major chicken histone H1 subtypes (referred to as H1a, H1b, H1c and H1d) change markedly in different chicken tissues. The relative amount of H1c is higher in nonreplicating somatic tissues, such as liver, than in replicating immature testis. The proportion of H1c sharply decreases as spermatogenesis proceeds, being much lower in mature than in immature testis. It has been proposed that the relative increment of H1c correlates with low rates of cell division in chicken tissues. It was assumed that the sharp decrease in H1c observed during maturation of chicken testis was a consequence of the intensification of proliferative activity in spermatogonia (Berdnikov et al., 1976). Our results, however, clearly show that the decrease of H1c during maturation is due to the low levels of this protein in postreplicative stages of spermatogenesis, where H1c is barely detectable. These results suggest that the presence of the arginine-rich H1c subtype would neither be compatible with the relaxed structure of acetylated chromatin present in active replicating cells nor with the hyperacetylated chromatin characteristic of postreplicative late spermatids undergoing the nucleohistone nucleoprotamine transition.

  1. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Nancy A; Khan, Salah Uddin; Zanders, Natosha; Balish, Amanda; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Rahman, Mahmudur Ziaur; Haque, Ainul; Hosseini, Parviez; Gurley, Emily S; Luby, Stephen P; Wentworth, David E; Donis, Ruben O; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Davis, C Todd

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50) were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the seven year

  2. Genetically Diverse Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza A Virus Subtypes Co-Circulate among Poultry in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Gerloff

    Full Text Available Influenza virus surveillance, poultry outbreak investigations and genomic sequencing were assessed to understand the ecology and evolution of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI A viruses in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2013. We analyzed 506 avian specimens collected from poultry in live bird markets and backyard flocks to identify influenza A viruses. Virus isolation-positive specimens (n = 50 were subtyped and their coding-complete genomes were sequenced. The most frequently identified subtypes among LPAI isolates were H9N2, H11N3, H4N6, and H1N1. Less frequently detected subtypes included H1N3, H2N4, H3N2, H3N6, H3N8, H4N2, H5N2, H6N1, H6N7, and H7N9. Gene sequences were compared to publicly available sequences using phylogenetic inference approaches. Among the 14 subtypes identified, the majority of viral gene segments were most closely related to poultry or wild bird viruses commonly found in Southeast Asia, Europe, and/or northern Africa. LPAI subtypes were distributed over several geographic locations in Bangladesh, and surface and internal protein gene segments clustered phylogenetically with a diverse number of viral subtypes suggesting extensive reassortment among these LPAI viruses. H9N2 subtype viruses differed from other LPAI subtypes because genes from these viruses consistently clustered together, indicating this subtype is enzootic in Bangladesh. The H9N2 strains identified in Bangladesh were phylogenetically and antigenically related to previous human-derived H9N2 viruses detected in Bangladesh representing a potential source for human infection. In contrast, the circulating LPAI H5N2 and H7N9 viruses were both phylogenetically and antigenically unrelated to H5 viruses identified previously in humans in Bangladesh and H7N9 strains isolated from humans in China. In Bangladesh, domestic poultry sold in live bird markets carried a wide range of LPAI virus subtypes and a high diversity of genotypes. These findings, combined with the

  3. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 subtype C molecular variants among indigenous australians: new insights into the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 in Australo-Melanesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cassar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HTLV-1 infection is endemic among people of Melanesian descent in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Molecular studies reveal that these Melanesian strains belong to the highly divergent HTLV-1c subtype. In Australia, HTLV-1 is also endemic among the Indigenous people of central Australia; however, the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 infection in this population remains poorly documented. FINDINGS: Studying a series of 23 HTLV-1 strains from Indigenous residents of central Australia, we analyzed coding (gag, pol, env, tax and non-coding (LTR genomic proviral regions. Four complete HTLV-1 proviral sequences were also characterized. Phylogenetic analyses implemented with both Neighbor-Joining and Maximum Likelihood methods revealed that all proviral strains belong to the HTLV-1c subtype with a high genetic diversity, which varied with the geographic origin of the infected individuals. Two distinct Australians clades were found, the first including strains derived from most patients whose origins are in the North, and the second comprising a majority of those from the South of central Australia. Time divergence estimation suggests that the speciation of these two Australian clades probably occurred 9,120 years ago (38,000-4,500. CONCLUSIONS: The HTLV-1c subtype is endemic to central Australia where the Indigenous population is infected with diverse subtype c variants. At least two Australian clades exist, which cluster according to the geographic origin of the human hosts. These molecular variants are probably of very ancient origin. Further studies could provide new insights into the evolution and modes of dissemination of these retrovirus variants and the associated ancient migration events through which early human settlement of Australia and Melanesia was achieved.

  4. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  5. Development and validation of fluorescent receptor assays based on the human recombinant estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de boer, T; Otjens, D; Muntendam, A; Meulman, E; van Oostijen, M; Ensing, K

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of two fluorescent receptor assays for the hRec-estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta. As a labelled ligand an autofluorescent phyto-estrogen (coumestrol) has been used. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the nuclear receptor family, a cla

  6. UCLA1 aptamer inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates in macrophages and selection of resistance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the aptamer, UCLA1, is able to inhibit HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by binding to residues in gp120. In this study we examined whether UCLA1 was effective against HIV-1 subtype C...

  7. Inducible expression and pharmacology of the human excitatory amino acid transporter 2 subtype of L-glutamate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, J; Lou, Z; Zhang, Y; McIlvain, H B

    1999-12-01

    1. In this study we have examined the use of the ecdysone-inducible mammalian expression system (Invitrogen) for the regulation of expression of the predominant L-glutamate transporter EAAT2 (Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter) in HEK 293 cells. 2. HEK 293 cells which were stably transformed with the regulatory vector pVgRXR (EcR 293 cells) were used for transfection of the human EAAT2 cDNA using the inducible vector pIND and a clone designated HEK/EAAT2 was selected for further characterization. 3. Na+-dependent L-glutamate uptake activity (3.2 pmol min-1 mg-1) was observed in EcR 293 cells and this was increased approximately 2 fold in the uninduced HEK/EAAT2 cells, indicating a low level of basal EAAT2 activity in the absence of exogenous inducing agent. Exposure of HEK/EAAT2 cells to the ecdysone analogue Ponasterone A (10 microM for 24 h) resulted in a > or = 10 fold increase in the Na+-dependent activity. 4. L-glutamate uptake into induced HEK/EAAT2 cells followed first-order Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Eadie-Hofstee transformation of the saturable uptake data produced estimates of kinetic parameters as follows; Km 52.7+/-7.5 microM, Vmax 3.8+/-0.9 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein. 5. The pharmacological profile of the EAAT2 subtype was characterized using a series of L-glutamate transport inhibitors and the rank order of inhibitory potency was similar to that described previously for the rat homologue GLT-1 and in synaptosomal preparations from rat cortex. 6. Addition of the EAAT2 modulator arachidonic acid resulted in an enhancement (155+/-5% control in the presence of 30 microM) of the L-glutamate transport capacity in the induced HEK/EAAT2 cells. 7. This study demonstrates that the expression of EAAT2 can be regulated in a mammalian cell line using the ecdysone-inducible mammalian expression system.

  8. A comparison of the effects of a subtype selective and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonist in two CO(2) models of experimental human anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J E; Papadopoulos, A; Seddon, K; Nutt, D J

    2009-03-01

    Studies in human volunteers that can demonstrate proof of concept are attractive in that possible mechanisms and potential new drug treatments can be examined. We have been developing models of anxiety disorders using the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min to model generalised anxiety disorder, as well as using the previously reported 35% CO(2) as a model for panic anxiety. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover study in 12 healthy volunteer subjects, we compared a full agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor that binds to four alpha-subtypes of the receptor (alpha-1,-2,-3,-5) (alprazolam 1 mg), with zolpidem (5 mg), an agonist selective for the alpha-1 subtype of the gamma amino butyric acid-receptor subtype A (GABA-A) receptor, which is a widely used hypnotic drug. Compared with placebo, both drugs significantly attenuated peak CO(2)-induced changes in subjective feelings after the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min. However, there were fewer significant differences after a single vital capacity inhalation of 35% CO(2), where zolpidem was less efficacious than alprazolam at reducing CO(2)-induced symptoms. In conclusion, our results show that zolpidem shows some anxiolytic efficacy in the 7.5% CO(2) model, similar to alprazolam, and this is the first report of such an effect of zolpidem in a model of anxiety. These and other studies of benzodiazepines in clinical and volunteer studies suggest a definite role of the GABA-A receptor in CO(2)-induced anxiety, and it would be of interest to examine other GABA-A receptor subtype selective drugs, which are now in early phase clinical studies and are showing selective efficacy in pharmacodynamic studies.

  9. Changes in and shortcomings of control strategies, drug stockpiles, and vaccine development during outbreaks of avian influenza A H5N1, H1N1, and H7N9 among humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Song, Peipei; Tang, Qi; Shan, Ke; Tobe, Ruoyan Gai; Selotlegeng, Lesego; Ali, Asghar Hammad; Cheng, Yangyang; Xu, Lingzhong

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a reference for the future prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases by summarizing the control strategies, the status of drugs and vaccines, and shortcomings during three major outbreaks of avian influenza among humans (H5N1 in 2003, H1N1 in 2009, and H7N9 in 2013). Data on and documents regarding the three influenza outbreaks have been reviewed. Results indicated that the response to pandemic influenza outbreaks has improved markedly in terms of control strategies, stockpiles of antivirals, and vaccine development. These improvements also suggest advances in disease surveillance, transparency in reporting, and regional collaboration and cooperation. These trends also foreshadow better prospects for prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases. However, there are shortcomings since strategies failed to focus on high-risk groups, quantitative and measurable results (both direct and indirect) were unclear, and quantitative assessment is still lacking.

  10. nm23-H1基因和增殖细胞核抗原在肝癌组织中的表达及其与癌细胞DNA含量的关系%Relationship between nm23-H1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and DNA content of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新; 丛文铭; 谭璐; 吴孟超

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨转移抑制基因nm23-H1在肝癌组织中的表达和癌细胞增殖及DNA含量间的关系。方法 应用免疫组织化学染色法检测56例肝癌组织标本中nm23-H1基因和增殖细胞核抗原(PCNA)的表达,应用图像分析系统测定癌细胞DNA含量,分析与肝癌病理生物学行为之间的关系。结果 nm23-H1表达阳性率无包膜组肝癌(29.6%)比包膜完整(64.3%)和包膜突破组肝癌(66.7%)明显减低(P<0.05)。DNA指数(DI)与肝癌包膜情况、组织类型、组织分级也有显著相关性(P<0.05)。nm23-H1表达阴性的肝癌P CNA标记指数(LI)高于nm23-H1阳性者(P<0.05);PCNA标记指数高增殖组肝癌D I值(2.30±0.90)较低增殖组肝癌DI值(1.86±0.7)明显增高(P<0.05)。结论 nm23-H1表达与肝癌包膜形成具有一定关系,并与肝癌增殖活性相关。DNA含量测定结合PCNA免疫组织化学染色可较为准确的反映肝癌浸润侵袭特征和增殖活性。%Objective To evaluate the relationship be tween expressions of nm23-H1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in hepa tocellular carcinoma and DNA content of cancer cells. Methods The expression of nm23-H1 and PCNA were detected in 56 cases of HCC by us ing immunohistochemistry technique and DNA content of cancer cells were analyzed by DNA imaging analyses system as well in order to find their relationship with biopathologic characters of HCC. Results The expression levels of nm23-H1 in HCC without encapsulation (29.6%) were significantly reduc ed when compared with that with encapsulation (64.3%) or with incomplete capsula tion (66.7%,P<0.05). The increased DNA content of HCC was correlated with n on-encapsulation, compact type and high grade of the tumor (P<0.05). The labeling indexes of PCNA in the group with negative nm23-H1 expression of HCC w ere significantly higher than those in the group with positive nm23-H1 expressi on of HCC (P<0.05). The DI in

  11. Strategies for subtyping influenza viruses circulating in the Danish pig population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    in the Danish pig population functional and rapid subtyping assays are required. The conventional RT-PCR influenza subtyping assays developed by Chiapponi et al. (2003) have been implemented and used for typing of influenza viruses found positive in a pan influenza A real time RT-PCR assay. The H1 and N1 assays...... assays based on RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing were implemented for the four subtypes H1, H3, N1, and N2. The assays were based on primer sets published by the WHO, but slightly modified for improved detection of Danish subtype variants. Sequencing of circulating influenza viruses is beneficial since......Influenza viruses are endemic in the Danish pig population and the dominant circulating subtypes are H1N1, a Danish H1N2 reassortant, and H3N2. Here we present our current and future strategies for influenza virus subtyping. For diagnostic and surveillance of influenza subtypes circulating...

  12. Consensus classification of human prion disease histotypes allows reliable identification of molecular subtypes: an inter-rater study among surveillance centres in Europe and USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boni, Laura; Saverioni, Daniela; Cohen, Mark L.; Ferrer, Isidro; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Gelpi, Ellen; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Höftberger, Romana; Ironside, James W.; Jansen, Casper; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Seilhean, Danielle; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giese, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The current classification of human sporadic prion diseases recognizes six major phenotypic subtypes with distinctive clinicopathological features, which largely correlate at the molecular level with the genotype at the polymorphic codon 129 (methionine, M, or valine, V) in the prion protein gene and with the size of the protease-resistant core of the abnormal prion protein, PrPSc (i.e. type 1 migrating at 21 kDa and type 2 at 19 kDa). We previously demonstrated that PrPSc typing by Western blotting is a reliable means of strain typing and disease classification. Limitations of this approach, however, particularly in the interlaboratory setting, are the association of PrPSc types 1 or 2 with more than one clinicopathological phenotype, which precludes definitive case classification if not supported by further analysis, and the difficulty of fully recognizing cases with mixed phenotypic features. In this study, we tested the inter-rater reliability of disease classification based only on histopathological criteria. Slides from 21 cases covering the whole phenotypic spectrum of human sporadic prion diseases, and also including two cases of variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD), were distributed blindly to 13 assessors for classification according to given instructions. The results showed good-to-excellent agreement between assessors in the classification of cases. In particular, there was full agreement (100 %) for the two most common sporadic CJD subtypes and variant CJD, and very high concordance in general for all pure phenotypes and the most common subtype with mixed phenotypic features. The present data fully support the basis for the current classification of sporadic human prion diseases and indicate that, besides molecular PrPSc typing, histopathological analysis permits reliable disease classification with high interlaboratory accuracy. PMID:22744790

  13. Influenza A Viruses of Swine (IAV-S) in Vietnam from 2010 to 2015: Multiple Introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses into the Pig Population and Diversifying Genetic Constellations of Enzootic IAV-S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Harada, Michiyo; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Nguyen, Tung; Nguyen, Tien Ngoc; To, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tho Dang; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Vu Tri; Do, Hoa Thi; Vo, Hung Van; Le, Quang Vinh Tin; Tran, Tan Minh; Nguyen, Thanh Duy; Thai, Phuong Duy; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Le, Anh Quynh Thi; Nguyen, Diep Thi; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Active surveillance of influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) involving 262 farms and 10 slaughterhouses in seven provinces in northern and southern Vietnam from 2010 to 2015 yielded 388 isolates from 32 farms; these viruses were classified into H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Whole-genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates represented 15 genotypes, according to the genetic constellation of the eight segments. All of the H1N1 viruses were entirely A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, whereas all of the H1N2 and H3N2 viruses were reassortants among 5 distinct ancestral viruses: H1 and H3 triple-reassortant (TR) IAV-S that originated from North American pre-2009 human seasonal H1, human seasonal H3N2, and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Notably, 93% of the reassortant IAV-S retained M genes that were derived from A(H1N1)pdm09, suggesting some advantage in terms of their host adaptation. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis revealed that multiple introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 and TR IAV-S into the Vietnamese pig population have driven the genetic diversity of currently circulating Vietnamese IAV-S. In addition, our results indicate that a reassortant IAV-S with human-like H3 and N2 genes and an A(H1N1)pdm09 origin M gene likely caused a human case in Ho Chi Minh City in 2010. Our current findings indicate that human-to-pig transmission as well as cocirculation of different IAV-S have contributed to diversifying the gene constellations of IAV-S in Vietnam.

  14. Use of pcr-rflp of thefla a gene for detection and subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni strains Potentially related to Guillain-barré syndrome, isolated from humans and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scarcelli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were the subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni strains obtained from humans and different animal species using PCR-RFLP, and the detection, by means of the same technique, of strains related to serotype PEN O19:LIO 7, the main C. jejuni serotype linked to Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS. Seventy C. jejuni strains isolated from human feces (n=33, primates (n=15, dogs (n=5, swine (n=2, bovines (n=1, abortion material from goats (n=2 and poultry carcasses (n=12, all collected in the state of São Paulo, were subtyped by means of PCR-RFLP of fla A gene, using restriction endonucleases Hae III, Afa I and Mbo I. Seven subtypes were observed when using the enzyme Hae III; eight when using Mbo I; and seven when using Afa I. The combination of the three endonucleases led to 16 fla-RFLP subtypes, from which ten subtypes shared strains of human and animal origin. From these, seven subtypes were observed in human and broiler strains. In eight subtypes, the other animal species shared patterns with human strains. It was inferred that, besides broilers, swine, goats, dogs and primates may be sources of infection for human in São Paulo. PCR-RFLP is a highly discriminatory technique that may be applied to molecular epidemiology studies of samples from different origins. Besides, the study also enabled the detection of two human strains and two primate strains related to serotype PEN O19: LIO 7.

  15. Transcription of the Human Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase Gene (EPHX1) Is Regulated by PARP-1 and Histone H1.2. Association with Sodium-Dependent Bile Acid Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zhu, Qin-shi; Zhong, Shuping; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a central role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics as well as mediating the sodium-dependent transport of bile acids into hepatocytes. These compounds are involved in cholesterol homeostasis, lipid digestion, excretion of xenobiotics and the regulation of several nuclear receptors and signaling transduction pathways. Previous studies have demonstrated the critical role of GATA-4, a C/EBPα-NF/Y complex and an HNF-4α/CAR/RXR/PSF complex in the transcriptional regulation of the mEH gene (EPHX1). Studies also identified heterozygous mutations in human EPHX1 that resulted in a 95% decrease in mEH expression levels which was associated with a decrease in bile acid transport and severe hypercholanemia. In the present investigation we demonstrate that EPHX1 transcription is significantly inhibited by two heterozygous mutations observed in the Old Order Amish population that present numerous hypercholanemic subjects in the absence of liver damage suggesting a defect in bile acid transport into the hepatocyte. The identity of the regulatory proteins binding to these sites, established using biotinylated oligonucleotides in conjunction with mass spectrometry was shown to be poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) bound to the EPHX1 proximal promoter and a linker histone complex, H1.2/Aly, bound to a regulatory intron 1 site. These sites exhibited 71% homology and may represent potential nucleosome positioning domains. The high frequency of the H1.2 site polymorphism in the Amish population results in a potential genetic predisposition to hypercholanemia and in conjunction with our previous studies, further supports the critical role of mEH in mediating bile acid transport into hepatocytes.

  16. Single Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differential Identification of Human and Avian Influenza Virus Types, Subtypes, and Emergent Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    novel A/H1N1 outbreak strain, raising immediate concerns for public health as well as for pork and poultry production industries worldwide. As with...outbreak management have reviewed the pathology of influenza with respect to rapid deterioration and patient deaths attributable to secondary

  17. 无偿献血者接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗效果的初步评价%Preliminary evaluation of the effect of Human Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination in blood donors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车嘉琳; 梁兵; 王德文; 师玲玲; 陈少彬; 刘赴平

    2010-01-01

    目的 初步评价无偿献血者接种甲型H1N1型流感(简称甲流)疫苗的效果,为临床采集、储备甲流抗体血浆提供依据.方法 对2010年1月-2010年2月的1 027名东莞市无偿献血者分为甲流疫苗接种组(n=899)和对照组(n=128),应用ELISA法检测2组的人H1N1 IgG抗体,并对检测结果进行统计分析.结果 抗-H1N1阳性率:甲流疫苗接种组为77.53%(697/899),对照组为15.63%(20/128),2组比较具统计学意义(X2>=203.76,P<0.01);抗-H1N1阳性结果S/CO值,甲流疫苗接种组为1.27±0.18,对照组为1.08±0.07(t=4.71,P<0.01);甲流疫苗接种者中,接种时间71-80d组的抗-H1N1阳性率、S/CO值均高于接种时间小干70 d的各组.在甲流疫苗接种组中37例自诉有接种副反应,占4.12%,但无严重副反应.结论 无偿献血者接种甲流疫苗安全且能有效产生抗-H1N1 IgG,建议在接种疫苗70 d后采集甲流抗体血浆.

  18. A coupling of homology modeling with multiple molecular dynamics simulation for identifying representative conformation of GPCR structures: a case study on human bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, Amin; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a computational pipeline was therefore devised to overcome homology modeling (HM) bottlenecks. The coupling of HM with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is useful in that it tackles the sampling deficiency of dynamics simulations by providing good-quality initial guesses for the native structure. Indeed, HM also relaxes the severe requirement of force fields to explore the huge conformational space of protein structures. In this study, the interaction between the human bombesin receptor subtype-3 and MK-5046 was investigated integrating HM, molecular docking, and MD simulations. To improve conformational sampling in typical MD simulations of GPCRs, as in other biomolecules, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions can be employed rather than a single long trajectory. Multiple MD simulations of human bombesin receptor subtype-3 with different initial atomic velocities are applied to sample conformations in the vicinity of the structure generated by HM. The backbone atom conformational space distribution of replicates is analyzed employing principal components analysis. As a result, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the twenty-one trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Brazilian subtype B variant showed an increasing avidity of the anti-V3 antibodies over time compared to the subtype B US/European strain in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtype B, (serotype B"-GWGR, has a tryptophan replacing the proline in position 328 the HIV-1 envelope. A longer median time period from infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS for serotype B (B"-GWGR infected subjects compared to the B-GPGR US/European strain was reported. In a cohort study, in São Paulo city, 10 B"-GWGR patients had a statistically significant increased avidity of the anti-V3 antibodies, from 79% ± 33% to 85% ± 75%, versus from 48% ± 59% to 32% ± 17% for the 10 B-GPGR subjects (p = 0.02. The T CD4+ cells showed a mean increase of + 0.45 cells/month for the B-GPGR subjects and for B"-GWGR the slope was + 1.24 cells/month (p = 0.06, for 62 and 55 months of follow up, respectively. RNA plasma viral load decreased from 3.98 ± 1.75 to 2.16 ± 1.54 log10 in the B"-GWGR group while B-GPGR patients showed one log10 reduction in viral load from 4.09 ± 0.38 to 3.17 ± 1.47 log10 over time (p = 0.23, with a decreasing slope of 0.0042 ± log10,/month and 0.0080 ± log10/month, for B-GPGR and B"-GWGR patients, respectively (p = 0.53. Neither group presented any AIDS defining events during the study, according to Center for Diseases Control criteria. Although the sample size is small, these results may indicate that differences in the pathogenicity of the 2 HIV-1 B serotypes which co-circulate in Brazil may be correlated to the avidity of anti-V3 antibodies.

  20. Outbreak of influenza A(H1N1) in a school in southern England.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddard, N.; Paynter, S.; Paget, J.

    2004-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza A (subtype H1N1) has occurred in a primary school in West Sussex, southern England [1]. The first cases of illness occurred during the first week of May 2004. One child was admitted to hospital during that week with symptoms of fever, confusion, headache, and conjunctivitis.

  1. The ectodomains but not the transmembrane domains of the fusion proteins of subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus are conserved to a similar extent as those of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, C J; Britton, P; Cavanagh, D

    1998-06-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F(B)) gene of five strains of the B subtype of avian pneumovirus (APV; turkey rhinotracheitis virus) has been sequenced. The length of the F(B) protein was 538 amino acids, identical to that of the F protein of subtype A virus, with which it had 74% and 83% overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities, respectively. The F(B) and F(A) ectodomains had 90% amino acid identity, very similar to the 91% identity between the ectodomains of the F proteins of subtype A and B human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As with HRSV, the F2 polypeptide was less conserved (83% identity) than F1 (94%). In contrast to the ectodomain, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two APV subtypes were much less conserved (30% and 48% identity, respectively) than those of HRSV (92% and 87%, respectively). Comparisons within all the genera of the Paramyxoviridae (Pneumovirus, Morbillivirus, Paramyxovirus and Rubullavirus) show that low amino acid identity between F protein transmembrane domains is a feature of different species of virus rather than of strain differences. This may indicate that the two subtypes of APV have evolved in different geographical regions and/or different avian species. This is the first report of an F gene sequence from a subtype B APV.

  2. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in captive cheetah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Beate; Hietala, Sharon; Hunt, Tania; Benjamin, Glenn; Martinez, Marie; Darnell, Daniel; Rubrum, Adam; Webby, Richard

    2012-02-01

    We describe virus isolation, full genome sequence analysis, and clinical pathology in ferrets experimentally inoculated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus recovered from a clinically ill captive cheetah that had minimal human contact. Evidence of reverse zoonotic transmission by fomites underscores the substantial animal and human health implications of this virus.

  3. Human T-cells directed to seasonal influenza A virus cross-react with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and swine-origin triple-reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); S.E. Vogelzang-van Trierum (Stella ); J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractVirus-specific CD8+ T-cells contribute to protective immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) infections. As the majority of these cells are directed to conserved viral proteins, they may afford protection against IAVs of various subtypes. The present study assessed the cross-reactivity

  4. What is the role of histone H1 heterogeneity? A functional model emerges from a 50 year mystery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missag Hagop Parseghian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For the past 50 years, understanding the function of histone H1 heterogeneity has been mired in confusion and contradiction. Part of the reason for this is the lack of a working model that tries to explain the large body of data that has been collected about the H1 subtypes so far. In this review, a global model is described largely based on published data from the author and other researchers over the past 20 years. The intrinsic disorder built into H1 protein structure is discussed to help the reader understand that these histones are multi-conformational and adaptable to interactions with different targets. We discuss the role of each structural section of H1 (as we currently understand it, but we focus on the H1's C-terminal domain and its effect on each subtype's affinity, mobility and compaction of chromatin. We review the multiple ways these characteristics have been measured from circular dichroism to FRAP analysis, which has added to the sometimes contradictory assumptions made about each subtype. Based on a tabulation of these measurements, we then organize the H1 variants according to their ability to condense chromatin and produce nucleosome repeat lengths amenable to that compaction. This subtype variation generates a continuum of different chromatin states allowing for fine regulatory control and some overlap in the event one or two subtypes are lost to mutation. We also review the myriad of disparate observations made about each subtype, both somatic and germline specific ones, that lend support to the proposed model. Finally, to demonstrate its adaptability as new data further refines our understanding of H1 subtypes, we show how the model can be applied to experimental observations of telomeric heterochromatin in aging cells.

  5. Histamine H1 receptor occupancy and pharmacodynamics of second generation H1-antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, M; Benedetti, M Strolin; Chatelain, P; Baltes, E

    2005-09-01

    The predictive efficacy of drugs in humans is frequently estimated from both a high affinity for their receptor as measured in vitro and a long plasmatic half-life. This is grossly misleading since one key parameter is missing: drug concentration at the receptor site in vivo. As a case study we compared the efficacies of three H(1) antihistamines in inhibiting histamine-induced wheal and flare in humans at two different time points with the above mentioned parameters. It is concluded that estimating in vivo receptor occupancy, which takes into account both the affinity of the drug for the receptor and its free plasma concentration, is a far better predictor for human pharmacodynamics and hence antihistamine potency, than considering in vitro affinity and plasmatic half-life only.

  6. Extreme evolutionary conservation of functionally important regions in H1N1 influenza proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Warren

    Full Text Available The H1N1 subtype of influenza A virus has caused two of the four documented pandemics and is responsible for seasonal epidemic outbreaks, presenting a continuous threat to public health. Co-circulating antigenically divergent influenza strains significantly complicates vaccine development and use. Here, by combining evolutionary, structural, functional, and population information about the H1N1 proteome, we seek to answer two questions: (1 do residues on the protein surfaces evolve faster than the protein core residues consistently across all proteins that constitute the influenza proteome? and (2 in spite of the rapid evolution of surface residues in influenza proteins, are there any protein regions on the protein surface that do not evolve? To answer these questions, we first built phylogenetically-aware models of the patterns of surface and interior substitutions. Employing these models, we found a single coherent pattern of faster evolution on the protein surfaces that characterizes all influenza proteins. The pattern is consistent with the events of inter-species reassortment, the worldwide introduction of the flu vaccine in the early 80's, as well as the differences caused by the geographic origins of the virus. Next, we developed an automated computational pipeline to comprehensively detect regions of the protein surface residues that were 100% conserved over multiple years and in multiple host species. We identified conserved regions on the surface of 10 influenza proteins spread across all avian, swine, and human strains; with the exception of a small group of isolated strains that affected the conservation of three proteins. Surprisingly, these regions were also unaffected by genetic variation in the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viral population data obtained from deep sequencing experiments. Finally, the conserved regions were intrinsically related to the intra-viral macromolecular interaction interfaces. Our study may provide further insights

  7. Identification of a subtype-specific ENC1 gene related to invasiveness in human pituitary null cell adenoma and oncocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Hong, Lichuan; Wu, Yonggang; Li, Chuzhong; Wan, Hong; Li, Guilin; Sun, Yilin; Yu, Shenyuan; Chittiboina, Prashant; Montgomery, Blake; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-09-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) may be locally invasive. Surgery is a treatment option, but unlike the case for functional pituitary adenomas, there are almost no drug treatments available for NFPAs. Markers of invasiveness are needed to guide therapeutic decision-making and identify potential adjuvant drugs. Owing to the highly heterogeneous nature of NFPAs, little is known regarding the subtype-specific gene expression profiles associated with invasiveness. To identify important biomarkers of invasiveness, we selected 23 null cell adenomas and 20 oncocytomas. These tumors were classified as invasive or non-invasive adenomas based on magnetic resonance imaging, pathology slides and surgical findings. Firstly, we observed that there were significant differences in expression between invasive (n = 3) and non-invasive (n = 4) adenomas by gene expression microarray. A total of 1,188 genes were differentially expressed in the invasive and non-invasive adenomas. Among these 1,188 genes, 578 were upregulated and 610 were downregulated in invasive adenomas. Secondly, the expression of ENC1, which displayed the significant alterations, was further confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis in all 43 tumor samples and three normal pituitary glands. Low levels of ENC1 were found in tumor samples, while high levels were detected in normal pituitary glands. Interestingly, the ENC1 expression level was low in invasive null cell adenomas compared with non-invasive adenomas, but this relationship was not observed in invasive oncocytomas. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated that the staining of ENC1 was different between invasive and non-invasive null cell adenomas. In addition, bioinformatics studies, including gene ontology and protein interaction analyses, were also performed to better understand the critical role of ENC1 in the development and progression of null cell adenomas and oncocytomas. Consequently, ENC1 may be an important biomarker for null cell

  8. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand, {sup 18}F-SP203, to image metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Simeon, Fabrice G.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hatazawa, Jun [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mozley, P.D. [Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A new PET ligand, 3-fluoro-5-(2-(2-{sup 18}F-(fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile ({sup 18}F-SP203), is a positron emission tomographic radioligand selective for metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors. The purposes of this study were to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses of {sup 18}F-SP203 in humans and to determine from the distribution of radioactivity in bone structures with various proportions of bone and red marrow whether {sup 18}F-SP203 undergoes defluorination. Whole-body images were acquired for 5 h after injecting {sup 18}F-SP203 in seven healthy humans. Urine was collected at various time points. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. After injecting {sup 18}F-SP203, the two organs with highest radiation exposure were urinary bladder wall and gallbladder wall, consistent with both urinary and fecal excretion. In the skeleton, most of the radioactivity was in bone structures that contain red marrow and not in those without red marrow. Although the dose to red marrow (30.9 {mu}Sv/MBq) was unusually high, the effective dose (17.8 {mu}Sv/MBq) of {sup 18}F-SP203 was typical of that of other {sup 18}F radiotracers. {sup 18}F-SP203 causes an effective dose in humans typical of several other {sup 18}F radioligands and undergoes little defluorination. (orig.)

  9. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  10. Different muscarinic receptor subtypes modulate proliferation of primary human detrusor smooth muscle cells via Akt/PI3K and map kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Zani, Danilo; Michel, Martin C; Simeone, Claudio; Cosciani Cunico, Sergio; Spano, Pierfranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    While acetylcholine (ACh) and muscarinic receptors in the bladder are mainly known for their role in the regulation of smooth muscle contractility, in other tissues they are involved in tissue remodelling and promote cell growth and proliferation. In the present study we have used primary cultures of human detrusor smooth muscle cells (HDSMCs), in order to investigate the role of muscarinic receptors in HDSMC proliferation. Samples were obtained as discarded tissue from men >65 years undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer and cut in pieces that were either immediately frozen or placed in culture medium for the cell culture establishment. HDSMCs were isolated from samples, propagated and maintained in culture. [(3)H]-QNB radioligand binding on biopsies revealed the presence of muscarinic receptors, with a Kd of 0.10±0.02nM and a Bmax of 72.8±0.1fmol/mg protein. The relative expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes, based on Q-RT-PCR, was similar in biopsies and HDSMC with a rank order of M2≥M3>M1>M4>M5. The cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh, 1-100μM) concentration-dependently increased [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation (up to 46±4%). This was concentration-dependently inhibited by the general muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and by subtype-preferring antagonists with an order of potency of darifenacin >4-DAMP>AF-DX 116. The CCh-induced cell proliferation was blocked by selective PI-3 kinase and ERK activation inhibitors, strongly suggesting that these intracellular pathways mediate, at least in part, the muscarinic receptor-mediated cell proliferation. This work shows that M2 and M3 receptors can mediate not only HDSM contraction but also proliferation; they may also contribute bladder remodelling including detrusor hypertrophy.

  11. European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs: Surveillance Programs, Diagnostic Tools and Swine Influenza Virus Subtypes Identified in 14 European Countries from 2010 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, Gaelle; Larsen, Lars Erik; Duerrwald, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs......, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs......: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence...

  12. 去唾液酸糖蛋白受体H1亚单位的表达、纯化及其单链抗体的筛选与鉴定%Expression and purification of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor H1 subunit and selection of anti-CRDH1 scFv

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹利民; 司进; 朱荫昌; 王炜煜; 赵晓蓉; 叶庆; 李文涵; 朱慧芬; 沈关心

    2005-01-01

    目的去唾液酸糖蛋白受体(ASGPR)H1亚单位的重组、表达、纯化及其单链抗体的筛选与鉴定.方法将ASGPR H1亚单位糖识别区基因(CRDH1)定向克隆至原核表达载体pET-32c经IPTG诱导表达,表达产物用Ni2+螯合柱亲和纯化,免疫印迹技术(WB)检测;用纯化的CRDH1对人源噬菌体抗体库进行4轮固相筛选,阳性克隆用表达标记(Trx-His-s tag)进行差异筛选.取阳性噬菌体C3感染宿主菌HB2151,37℃振荡培养过夜,终浓度为1 mmol/L的IPTG诱导表达,12%SDS-PAGE与Western blot鉴定以及免疫组化鉴定纯化的单链抗体C3与肝细胞结合的特性.结果CRDH1/pET-32c在原核系统经诱导表达出相对分子质量(Mr)约35×103大小的融合蛋白,以包涵体的形式存在;通过Ni2+亲和柱纯化获得CRDH1融合蛋白;经4轮筛选和差异筛选后,有2株可分泌性表达与CRDH1特异性结合的单链抗体,DNA序列分析表明单链抗体重链基因和轻链基因分别属于人免疫球蛋白VH3家族和VKI家族.噬菌体C3经诱导表达出Mr约28×103大小的融合蛋白,可溶性分泌表达于培养基中;通过Ni2+亲和柱纯化获得单链抗体,ELISA、Western blot表明单链抗体C3能较好结合rCRDH1,免疫组化显示该单链抗体可与肝癌细胞、肝细胞特异结合.结论成功表达ASGPR并筛选出其人源单链抗体.该单链抗体可与表达的rCRDH1以及肝细胞和肝癌细胞特异性结合,提示对肝脏疾病的靶向治疗有潜在的应用价值.

  13. Genetic structure of human A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza virus on Corsica Island: phylogenetic analysis and vaccine strain match, 2006-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Falchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic patterns of Hemagglutinin (HA genes of influenza A strains circulating on Corsica Island during the 2006-2009 epidemic seasons and the 2009-2010 pandemic season. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal samples from 371 patients with influenza-like illness (ILI were collected by General Practitioners (GPs of the Sentinelles Network through a randomised selection routine. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis of HA revealed that A/H3N2 strains circulating on Corsica were closely related to the WHO recommended vaccine strains in each analyzed season (2006-2007 to 2008-2009. Seasonal Corsican influenza A/H1N1 isolated during the 2007-2008 season had drifted towards the A/Brisbane/59/2007 lineage, the A/H1N1 vaccine strain for the 2008-2009 season. The A/H1N1 2009 (A/H1N1pdm strains isolated on Corsica Island were characterized by the S220T mutation specific to clade 7 isolates. It should be noted that Corsican isolates formed a separate sub-clade of clade 7 as a consequence of the presence of the fixed substitution D222E. The percentages of the perfect match vaccine efficacy, estimated by using the p(epitope model, against influenza viruses circulating on Corsica Island varied substantially across the four seasons analyzed, and tend to be highest for A/H1N1 compared with A/H3N2 vaccines, suggesting that cross-immunity seems to be stronger for the H1 HA gene. CONCLUSION: The molecular analysis of the HA gene of influenza viruses that circulated on Corsica Island between 2006-2010 showed for each season the presence of a dominant lineage characterized by at least one fixed mutation. The A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm isolates were characterized by multiples fixation at antigenic sites. The fixation of specific mutations at each outbreak could be explained by the combination of a neutral phenomenon and a founder effect, favoring the presence of a dominant lineage in a closed environment such as Corsica Island.

  14. Cellular transcriptional profiling in human lung epithelial cells infected by different subtypes of influenza A viruses reveals an overall down-regulation of the host p53 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bruno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza viruses can modulate and hijack several cellular signalling pathways to efficiently support their replication. We recently investigated and compared the cellular gene expression profiles of human lung A549 cells infected by five different subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses (Josset et al. Plos One 2010. Using these transcriptomic data, we have focused our analysis on the modulation of the p53 pathway in response to influenza infection. Results Our results were supported by both RT-qPCR and western blot analyses and reveal multiple alterations of the p53 pathway during infection. A down-regulation of mRNA expression was observed for the main regulators of p53 protein stability during infection by the complete set of viruses tested, and a significant decrease in p53 mRNA expression was also observed in H5N1 infected cells. In addition, several p53 target genes were also down-regulated by these influenza viruses and the expression of their product reduced. Conclusions Our data reveal that influenza viruses cause an overall down-regulation of the host p53 pathway and highlight this pathway and p53 protein itself as important viral targets in the altering of apoptotic processes and in cell-cycle regulation.

  15. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Dhawan

    Full Text Available More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well.

  16. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Deepika; Paoloni, Melissa; Shukradas, Shweta; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Craig, Bruce A; Ramos-Vara, José A; Hahn, Noah; Bonney, Patty L; Khanna, Chand; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-01-01

    More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC) this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well.

  17. H1N1 Message from the Acting Surgeon General

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-13

    In this podcast, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Steven Galson discusses what you can do to protect yourself from H1N1 flu.  Created: 5/13/2009 by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/13/2009.

  18. Multiple H1-antihistamine-induced urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Naoko; Tatewaki, Satoko; Ikezawa, Zenro

    2009-04-01

    H(1)-antihistamines are widely used in the treatment of various allergic diseases. Particularly, a cornerstone of the management of chronic idiopathic urticaria is treatment with H(1)-antihistamines. However, a few cases of H(1)-antihistamine-induced urticaria have been reported. A 34-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of recurrent urticaria, which was prominently exacerbated by the administration of H(1)-antihistamines. The patient consented to a provocation test of fexofenadine among drugs including cetirizine and hydroxyzine, which were suspected of inducing severe symptoms in episodes. One hour after challenge with 12 mg fexofenadine (one-fifth of the therapeutic dose), a urticarial reaction rapidly developed on nearly the entire body with remarkably increased levels of plasma histamine (190 nmol/L) and plasma leukotriene B4 (150 pg/mL). In challenge tests with other antihistamines, generalized urticaria occurred 5 and 1 h after intake of 10 mg loratadine and 10 mg bepotastine, respectively, whereas challenges with chlorpheniramine, mequitazine and azelastine were all negative. Skin prick tests with H(1)-antihistamines used in the challenges were all negative, indicating that the urticarial reactions after challenges with the causative drugs might not be immunoglobulin E-mediated. Among the causative drugs in our case, cetirizine and hydroxyzine are the piperazine derivatives, whereas fexofenadine, bepotastine, ebastine and loratadine are the piperidine derivatives. The chemical structures of both derivatives are very similar. Therefore, in this case, H(1)-antihistamine-induced urticaria may have been due to cross-reactivity between metabolites of these drugs, but not to drugs before metabolization. Hypersensitivity to H(1)-antihistamines should be considered when urticarial lesions worsen after H(1)-antihistamine treatment.

  19. Quantification and distribution of α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs in human vas deferens: comparison with those of epididymal and pelvic portions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Nobuo; Nasu, Kimio; Takeuchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Katsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Yano, Junichi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1997-01-01

    This study was intended to quantify the amounts of the α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs in human vas deferens, and demonstrate the receptor subtype responsible for the vas contraction. The RNase protection assay showed that the mean total amount of α1a mRNA was 7.4±2.2 pg/5 μg of poly (A)+ RNA (97.0% of the total α1 mRNA) in the epididymal portion (E-vas) and 4.9±0.8 pg/5 μg of poly (A)+ RNA (96.3% of the total) in the pelvic portion (P-vas). The E-vas showed a tendency to have a greater α1a mRNA abundance than the P-vas (P=0.11). The α1b and α1d mRNAs were absent or of extremely low abundance. By an in situ hybridization, the α1a and α1d mRNAs were recognized in the smooth muscle cells of the E-vas and the P-vas, and the distribution pattern the same in both tissues. The α1b mRNA positive site was scarcely detectable in both vas portions. In a functional study, l-phenylephrine produced concentration-dependent contraction in the E-vas (Emax=2.24±0.70 g; pD2=5.32±0.09) and the P-vas (Emax=2.46±0.46 g; pD2=5.07±0.12). KMD-3213, a novel α1A-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist, caused parallel rightward shifts of the concentration–response curves for l-phenylephrine. Apparent pKB values were 9.90±0.16 for the E-vas and 9.71±0.17 for the P-vas. There was no significant difference in Emax, pD2 or pKB estimates between the two portions. We have found that α1a mRNA is predominant in the human vas deferens, and confirmed that contraction of this organ is mediated by the α1A-adrenoceptor. PMID:9401762

  20. Seroprevalence of three influenza A viruses (H1N1, H3N2, and H3N8) in pet dogs presented to a veterinary hospital in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyesun; Jackson, Yasmine K; Daniels, Joshua B; Ali, Ahmed; Kang, Kyung-Il; Elaish, Mohamed; Lee, Chang-Won

    2017-08-31

    The prevalence of canine H3N8 influenza and human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza in dogs in Ohio was estimated by conducting serologic tests on 1,082 canine serum samples. In addition, risk factors, such as health status and age were examined. The prevalences of human H1N1, H3N2, and canine H3N8 influenzas were 4.0%, 2.4%, and 2.3%, respectively. Two samples were seropositive for two subtypes (H1N1 and H3N2; H1N1 and canine influenza virus [CIV] H3N8). Compared to healthy dogs, dogs with respiratory signs were 5.795 times more likely to be seropositive against H1N1 virus (p = 0.042). The prevalence of human flu infection increased with dog age and varied by serum collection month. The commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay used in this study did not detect nucleoprotein-specific antibodies from many hemagglutination inhibition positive sera, which indicates a need for the development and validation of rapid tests for influenza screening in canine populations. In summary, we observed low exposure of dogs to CIV and human influenza viruses in Ohio but identified potential risk factors for consideration in future investigations. Our findings support the need for establishment of reliable diagnostic standards for serologic detection of influenza infection in canine species.

  1. Immunohistochemical localisation of cholinergic muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1r) in the guinea pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding the location of cholinergic muscarinic receptor 1 (M1r) in the ENS, even though physiological data suggest that M1rs are central to cholinergic neurotransmission. This study localised M1rs in the ENS of the guinea pig ileum and human colon using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR in human colon. Double labelling using antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify neuron subytpes bearing M1r. M1r immunoreactivity (IR) was present on neurons in the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. The two antibodies gave similar M1r-IR patterns and M1r-IR was abolished upon antibody preabsorption. M1r-IR was present on cholinergic and nNOS-IR nerve cell bodies in both guinea pig and human myenteric neurons. Presynaptic M1r-IR was present on NOS-IR and VAChT-IR nerve fibres in the circular muscle in the human colon. In the submucosal ganglia, M1r-IR was present on a population of neurons that contained cChAT-IR, but did not contain NPY-IR or calretinin-IR. M1r-IR was present on endothelial cells of blood vessels in the submucosal plexus. The localisation of M1r-IR in the guinea pig and human ENS shown in this study agrees with physiological studies. M1r-IR in cholinergic and nitrergic neurons and nerve fibres indicate that M1rs have a role in both cholinergic and nitrergic transmission. M1r-IR present in submucosal neurons suggests a role in mediating acetylcholine's effect on submucosal sensory and secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. M1r-IR present on blood vessel endothelial cells suggests that M1rs may also mediate acetylcholine's direct effect on vasoactivation.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro cross-reactivity to avian H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza following prime boost regimens of seasonal influenza vaccination in healthy human subjects: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Bethell

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have demonstrated that inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines (IIV may elicit production of heterosubtypic antibodies, which can neutralize avian H5N1 virus in a small proportion of subjects. We hypothesized that prime boost regimens of live and inactivated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines (LAIV and IIV would enhance production of heterosubtypic immunity and provide evidence of cross-protection against other influenza viruses. METHODS: In an open-label study, 26 adult volunteers were randomized to receive one of four vaccine regimens containing two doses of 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccines administered 8 (±1 weeks apart: 2 doses of LAIV; 2 doses of IIV; LAIV then IIV; IIV then LAIV. Humoral immunity assays for avian H5N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1, and seasonal vaccine strains were performed on blood collected pre-vaccine and 2 and 4 weeks later. The percentage of cytokine-producing T-cells was compared with baseline 14 days after each dose. RESULTS: Subjects receiving IIV had prompt serological responses to vaccine strains. Two subjects receiving heterologous prime boost regimens had enhanced haemagglutination inhibition (HI and neutralization (NT titres against pH1N1, and one subject against avian H5N1; all three had pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies detected at baseline. Significantly elevated titres to H5N1 and pH1N1 by neuraminidase inhibition (NI assay were observed following LAIV-IIV administration. Both vaccines elicited cross-reactive CD4+ T-cell responses to nucleoprotein of avian H5N1 and pH1N1. All regimens were safe and well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Neither homologous nor heterologous prime boost immunization enhanced serum HI and NT titres to 2009 pH1N1 or avian H5N1 compared to single dose vaccine. However heterologous prime-boost vaccination did lead to in vitro evidence of cross-reactivity by NI; the significance of this finding is unclear. These data support the strategy of

  3. Molecular Identification and Subtype Analysis of Blastocystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Clark, C Graham

    2016-11-18

    Several typing methods have been used in studies aiming to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis, which is one of the most common intestinal parasites in human and many non-human hosts. Such studies have the potential to add to knowledge on Blastocystis transmission, host specificity, phylogeography, and clinical and public health significance, but rely on robust, standardized methods by which data can be generated and compared directly between studies. One of the most used methods is "barcoding,", which involves single-round PCR amplification and sequencing of partial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of the parasites. Recently, a publicly available online facility was developed for quick and standardized identification of subtypes (ribosomal lineages) and subtype alleles (variation within subtypes) based on sequence data obtained by barcoding PCR. Moreover, a modified barcoding approach is now available using nested PCR, which enables detection of mixed subtype infections. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 2: evidence for distinct sequence subtypes with differences in virus biology.

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F; Yue, L; Robertson, D L; Hill, S C; Hui, H.; Biggar, R J; Neequaye, A E; Whelan, T M; Ho, D D; Shaw, G M

    1994-01-01

    The virulence properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are known to vary significantly and to range from relative attenuation in certain individuals to high-level pathogenicity in others. These differences in clinical manifestations may, at least in part, be determined by genetic differences among infecting virus strains. Evaluation of the full spectrum of HIV-2 genetic diversity is thus a necessary first step towards understanding its molecular epidemiology, natural history ...

  5. Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 2:evidence for distinct sequence subtypes with differences in virus biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F; Yue, L; ROBERTSON, DL; Hill, SC; Hui, HX; BIGGAR, RJ; NEEQUAYE, AE; WHELAN, TM; Ho, DD; Shaw, GM; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, BH

    1994-01-01

    The virulence properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are known to vary significantly and to range from relative attenuation in certain individuals to high level pathogenicity in others. These differences in clinical manifestations may, at least in part, be determined by genetic differences among infecting virus strains. Evaluation of the full spectrum of HIV-2 genetic diversity is thus a necessary first step towards understanding its molecular epidemiology, natural history ...

  6. Simian-Human immunodeficiency viruses expressing chimeric subtype B/C Vpu proteins demonstrate the importance of the amino terminal and transmembrane domains in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Autumn; Schmitt, Kimberly; Culley, Nathan; Stephens, Edward B

    2013-01-20

    Previously, we reported that simian-human immunodeficiency viruses expressing either the lab adapted subtype B (SHIV(KU-1bMC33)) or subtype C (SHIV(SCVpu)) Vpu proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) had different rates of CD4(+) T cell loss following inoculation into macaques. In this study, we have generated SHIVs that express either the subtype B or subtype C N-terminal (NTD) and transmembrane (TMD) domains and the opposing cytoplasmic domain (SHIV(VpuBC), SHIV(VpuCB)). In culture systems, SHIV(VpuBC) replicated faster than SHIV(VpuCB) while both proteins exhibited similar ability to down-modulate CD4 surface expression. Following inoculation into macaques, SHIV(VpuBC) resulted in rapid CD4(+) T cell loss similar to the parental SHIV(KU-1bMC33), while the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in those inoculated with SHIV(VpuCB) was intermediate of SHIV(SCVpu) and SHIV(KU-1bMC33). These results emphasize the importance of the Vpu NTD/TMD region in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in the pathogenic X4 SHIV/macaque model.

  7. Characterization of the EP receptor subtype that mediates the inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on IgE-dependent secretion from human lung mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, L J; Gilbert, M; Pullen, N; Skerratt, S; Farrington, J; Seward, E P; Peachell, P T

    2013-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) has been shown to inhibit IgE-dependent histamine release from human lung mast cells. This effect of PGE2 is believed to be mediated by EP2 receptors. However, definitive evidence that this is the case has been lacking in the absence of EP2 -selective antagonists. Moreover, recent evidence has suggested that PGE2 activates EP4 receptors to inhibit respiratory cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the receptor by which PGE2 inhibits human lung mast cell responses by using recently developed potent and selective EP2 and EP4 receptor antagonists alongside other established EP receptor ligands. The effects of non-selective (PGE2 , misoprostol), EP2 -selective (ONO-AE1-259, AH13205, butaprost-free acid) and EP4 -selective (L-902,688, TCS251) agonists on IgE-dependent histamine release and cyclic-AMP generation in mast cells were determined. The effects of EP2 -selective (PF-04418948, PF-04852946) and EP4 -selective (CJ-042794, L-161,982) antagonists on PGE2 responses of mast cells were studied. The expression of EP receptor subtypes was determined by RT-PCR. Prostaglandin E2 , EP2 agonists and EP4 agonists inhibited IgE-dependent histamine release from mast cells. PGE2 and EP2 agonists, but not EP4 agonists, increased cyclic-AMP levels in mast cells. EP4 -selective antagonists did not affect the PGE2 inhibition of histamine release, whereas EP2 -selective antagonists caused rightward shifts in the PGE2 concentration-response curves. RT-PCR studies indicated that mast cells expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors. Although human lung mast cells may express both EP2 and EP4 receptors, the principal mechanism by which PGE2 inhibits mediator release in mast cells is by activating EP2 receptors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Protection of guinea pigs by vaccination with a recombinant swinepox virus co-expressing HA1 genes of swine H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiarong; Yang, Deji; Huang, Dongyan; Xu, Jiaping; Liu, Shichao; Lin, Huixing; Zhu, Haodan; Liu, Bao; Lu, Chengping

    2013-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory infectious disease of swine caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). SIV is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a potent threat to human health. Here, we report the construction of a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV/H3-2A-H1) co-expressing hemagglutinin (HA1) of SIV subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. Immune responses and protection efficacy of the rSPV/H3-2A-H1 were evaluated in guinea pigs. Inoculation of rSPV/H3-2A-H1 yielded neutralizing antibodies against SIV H1N1 and H3N2. The IFN-γ and IL-4 concentrations in the supernatant of lymphocytes stimulated with purified SIV HA1 antigen were significantly higher (P guinea pigs against SIV H1N1 or H3N2 challenge was observed. No SIV shedding was detected from guinea pigs vaccinated with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 after challenge. Most importantly, the guinea pigs immunized with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 did not show gross and micrographic lung lesions. However, the control guinea pigs experienced distinct gross and micrographic lung lesions at 7 days post-challenge. Our data suggest that the recombinant swinepox virus encoding HA1 of SIV H1N1 and H3N2 might serve as a promising candidate vaccine for protection against SIV H1N1 and H3N2 infections.

  10. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE: A Genetic Trace of Human Mobility Related to Heterosexual Sexual Activities Centralized in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE sequences by pooling sequences from public databases and patient-cohort studies. We estimated viral dispersal patterns, using statistical phylogeographic analysis run over bootstrap trees estimated by the maximum likelihood method. We show that Thailand has been the source of viral dispersal to most areas worldwide, including 17 of 20 sampled countries in Europe. Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, and other Asian countries have played a secondary role in the viral dissemination. In contrast, China and Taiwan have mainly imported strains from neighboring Asian countries, North America, and Africa without any significant viral exportation. The central role of Thailand in the global spread of CRF01_AE can be probably explained by the popularity of Thailand as a vacation destination characterized by sex tourism and by Thai emigration to the Western world. Our study highlights the unique case of CRF01_AE, the only globally distributed non-B clade whose global dispersal did not originate in Africa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Full-length clone and characterization of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype B' isolated from Hubei Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Jian-xin; KANG Xian-jiang; ZHANG Wei; LIU Ping-ping; TONG Xiao; YANG Rong-ge

    2007-01-01

    @@ There are two types of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 dominates epidemics in many different parts of the world, and HIV-2 is principally responsible for the epidemic in western Africa. In China, Zeng et al1 have reported the first individual infected with HIV-1 in 1985. And in the 1990s,there was a severe epidemic involving the HIV-1 B' strain among people who sold blood and plasma in Henan,Hubei and adjacent provinces.2 To further study in HIV/AIDS vaccines and HIV-1 drug resistance for people in these regions, we need to construct an infectious HIV-1 B' molecular clone which is representative of the virus in these areas.3 To this end, we have isolated a HIV-1 B' virus from a child who was infected with HIV-1 from his mother in Hubei province, and have constructed a full-length clone from this genome.

  12. [Study of the association between polymorphism of persistent obesity, human leptin gene/leptin receptor gene and molecular subtypes of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X L; Xu, Z P; Liu, C R; Yan, L P; Tao, P; Xiong, P; Li, Q; Zhou, M; Li, H; Zhao, M; Li, J Y

    2017-06-06

    Objectives: To explore the association between the polymorphism of persistent obesity and genetic variations in the LEP (human leptin gene, LEP) and LEPR (leptin receptor gene, LEPR) genes and different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods: All 703 female patients of breast cancer diagnosed by histopathology in the Sichuan Cancer Hospital or the West China Hospital, excluding patients with metastatic breast cancer or mental disease, were selected as cases from April 2014 to May 2015. At the same time, 805 healthy women received physical examination in medical examination center of Sichuan People Hospital or Shuangliu maternal and child health care hospital, excluding those with therioma, breast disease, and mental disease, were enrolled in control group. A uniform questionnaire was used to collect general information including demographic characteristic, reproductive history height, weight, and so on. And the obesity status in recent 10 years was judged. Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer was used to determine the genotypes of LEP rs7799039, LEPR rs1137100 and LEPR rs1137101, while the multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the effect of risk factors related to breast cancer in different molecular subtypes; and then, the association between polymorphism of persistent obesity, the LEP, LEPR genes and breast cancer of different molecular subtypes was analyzed by binary logistic regression models. Results: The average age of controls was (48.98±8.83) years old, while the age of cases of TNBC, Luminal A, Luminal B, and HER-2+ were (51.43±11.33), (49.94±10.10), (49.73±9.38), (50.50±9.04) years old, respectively. The frequency of genotype LEP rs7799039, LEPR rs1137100 and LEPR rs1137101 in control group was separately 74.8%(1 157/1 546), 83.6%(1 339/1 602) and 88.4%(1 416/1 602); while 77.6% (1 074/1 384), 82.4% (1 155/1 402) and 87.9% (1 232/1 402) respectively in case group. Compared with non-persistent obesity subjects, the

  13. Suppression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2 by PPARgamma ligands inhibits human lung carcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, ShouWei; Roman, Jesse

    2004-02-20

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), a major cyclooxygenase (COX-2) metabolite, plays important roles in tumor biology and its functions are mediated through one or more of its receptors EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. We have shown that the matrix glycoprotein fibronectin stimulates lung carcinoma cell proliferation via induction of COX-2 expression with subsequent PGE(2) protein biosynthesis. Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) inhibited this effect and induced cellular apoptosis. Here, we explore the role of the PGE(2) receptor EP2 in this process and whether the inhibition observed with PPARgamma ligands is related to effects on this receptor. We found that human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines (H1838 and H2106) express EP2 receptors, and that the inhibition of cell growth by PPARgamma ligands (GW1929, PGJ2, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and rosiglitazone [also known as BRL49653]) was associated with a significant decrease in EP2 mRNA and protein levels. The inhibitory effects of BRL49653 and ciglitazone, but not PGJ2, were reversed by a specific PPARgamma antagonist GW9662, suggesting the involvement of PPARgamma-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PPARgamma ligand treatment was associated with phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (Erk), and inhibition of EP2 receptor expression by PPARgamma ligands was prevented by PD98095, an inhibitor of the MEK-1/Erk pathway. Butaprost, an EP2 agonist, like exogenous PGE(2) (dmPGE(2)), increased lung carcinoma cell growth, however, GW1929 and troglitazone blocked their effects. Our studies reveal a novel role for EP2 in mediating the proliferative effects of PGE(2) on lung carcinoma cells. PPARgamma ligands inhibit human lung carcinoma cell growth by decreasing the expression of EP2 receptors through Erk signaling and PPARgamma-dependent and -independent pathways.

  14. Prostaglandin E receptor subtype EP3 expression in human conjunctival epithelium and its changes in various ocular surface disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Ueta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In our earlier genome-wide association study on Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and its severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, we found that in Japanese patients with these severe ocular surface complications there was an association with prostaglandin E receptor 3 (EP3 gene (PTGER3 polymorphisms. We also reported that EP3 is dominantly expressed in the ocular surface-, especially the conjunctival epithelium, and suggested that EP3 in the conjunctival epithelium may down-regulate ocular surface inflammation. In the current study we investigated the expression of EP3 protein in the conjunctiva of patients with various ocular surface diseases such as SJS/TEN, chemical eye burns, Mooren's ulcers, and ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conjunctival tissues were obtained from patients undergoing surgical reconstruction of the ocular surface due to SJS/TEN, chemical eye burns, and OCP, and from patients with Mooren's ulcers treated by resection of the inflammatory conjunctiva. The controls were nearly normal human conjunctival tissues acquired at surgery for conjunctivochalasis. We performed immunohistological analysis of the EP3 protein and evaluated the immunohistological staining of EP3 protein in the conjunctival epithelium of patients with ocular surface diseases. EP3 was expressed in the conjunctival epithelium of patients with chemical eye burns and Mooren's ulcer and in normal human conjunctival epithelium. However, it was markedly down-regulated in the conjunctival epithelium of SJS/TEN and OCP patients. CONCLUSIONS: We posit an association between the down-regulation of EP3 in conjunctival epithelium and the pathogenesis and pathology of SJS/TEN and OCP, and suggest a common mechanism(s in the pathology of these diseases. The examination of EP3 protein expression in conjunctival epithelium may aid in the differential diagnosis of various ocular surface diseases.

  15. Cuba vs H1N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Reed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El Comité Editorial de MediSur agradece a Gail Reed, editora de Medicc Review la autorización expresa, para reproducir el artículo titulado “Cuba vs H1N1 Influenza”. Este trabajo resume el esfuerzo realizado por todos los organismos en Cuba y en especial el Ministerio de Salud Pública en la lucha para disminuir los efectos de la influenza H1N1 en la población. El artículo original se puede encontrar en: Reed G. Faceoff: Cuba vs H1N1 Influenza. MEDICC Review. 2010; 12(1:6-12. Disponible en: http://www.medicc.org/mediccreview/index.php?issue=11

  16. 尖锐湿疣患者宫颈高危型人乳头状瘤病毒分布%Distribution of human papilloma virus high risk subtypes in patients with condyioma acuminatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 李炎; 吴韶清; 涂青翠; 石莹

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析广州市区尖锐湿疣(CA)患者宫颈高危型人乳头状瘤病毒(HPV)感染分布情况.方法 采用核酸扩增、快速导流杂交和低密度基因芯片分型检测HPV亚型.结果 249例CA患者宫颈标本HPV检出率100%,除1例仅HPV43阳性外,都可以检出HPV6或HPV11亚型;单1、2、3种和≥4种亚型感染分别为154例占61.85%,68例占27.31%,19例占7.63%和8例占3.21%,CA组合并感染高危亚型HPV者76例占30.52%,最常见合并的高危HPV亚型依次是HPV-52、16、59、18、33、39、58和68;2039例普通生殖道感染(RTI)患者宫颈标本中,单1、2、3种和≥4种亚型感染者,分别为484例占23.74%,114例占7.95%,34例占1.67%和14例占0.69%,与RTI组比较,CA组的HPV检出率较高,平均年龄较小,而且感染高危亚型的比例更高(P<0.05).结论 CA患者应选择敏感的试验方法进行HPV分型,需注意潜在宫颈病变追踪.%OBJECTIVE To evaluate prevalence of high risk subtypes of human papilloma virus ( HPV) in outpatient cervical samples with condyloma acuminate (CA) in Guangzhou. METHODS Genotyping for HPV was done by nucleic acid amplification, flow-through hybridization and low-density gene chip. RESULTS HPV was detected in 249 cervical samples in CA group (100%). All were HPV 6 and/or 11 positive except for one case which was only positive for HPV 43. One subtype, two subtypes, three subtypes, and four or more subtypes co-infections were found in 154 (61. 85%), 68 (27. 31%), 19 (7. 63%), and 8 (3. 21%) cases, respectively. There were 76 (30.52%) cases co-infected with high-risk subtypes in CA group. The most prevalent high-risk subtypes were HPV 52 and HPV16, followed by HPV-59 ,-18,-33,-39,-58 and -68. Among cervical samples from 2039 patients with reproductive tract infection (RTI), one subtype, two subtypes, three subtypes, and four or more subtypes co-infections were 484(23. 74%), 114(5. 59%), 34(1. 67%) and 14 (0. 69%), respectively. Patients in

  17. Clinical profile of the first 1000 fatalities for influenza A (H1N1 in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germ and aacute;n Fajardo-Dolci

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influenza is an acute respiratory disease responsible for several episodes of high mortality throughout human history. In 2009, Mexico experienced an atypical influenza outbreak caused by a mutant strain of the influenza A (H1N1 subtype, which generated significant mortality. The aim of this paper was to analyze the clinical and sociodemographic conditions of the first 1000 fatalities recorded during this outbreak. Methods: We conducted a study based on an analysis of the clinical files of patients positive for influenza A (H1N1 using Real-Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR to conduct an analysis of deaths compared to deaths in the general population. Results: The majority of deaths occurred in patients aged 35-84 years (65.8%. Average time between symptom onset and death was 13.8 days, with an average of 7.8 days from time of hospitalization until death. Ca. 25% of deaths occurred in residents from Mexico City and from the nearby State of Mexico. In the majority of cases, we found that patients who died had a low educational and socioeconomic status along with co-morbidities such as metabolic syndrome and its individual components, as well as respiratory illnesses. In 80% of cases, patients received mechanical ventilation, and a similar percentage received antiviral therapy (oseltamivir, zanamivir. Conclusions: The primary-care level was not utilized by patients who died from influenza. The higher prevalence of chronic degenerative diseases among deaths compared with the general population indicates that these groups of patients should be considered and prioritized in the event of future outbreaks. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3008-3014

  18. Molecular characterization of an H1N2 swine influenza virus isolated in Miyazaki, Japan, in 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehiko; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Maeda, Koji; Inai, Koji; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) was isolated from a farm in Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan in July 2006. An isolate was genetically subtyped as H1N2 and was designated A/swine/Miyazaki/1/2006 (H1N2). The nucleotide sequences of all eight viral RNA segments were determined, and then phylogenetic analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method. All segments were shown to be closely related to those of Japanese SIV H1N2 isolates, which have been circulating since the 1980s. The results indicate the persistence of the SIV H1N2 subtype in the Japanese pig population for more than two decades and emphasize the importance of continuous surveillance for SIV.

  19. Specific human astrocyte subtype revealed by affinity purified GFAP antibody; unpurified serum cross-reacts with neurofilament-L in Alzheimer.

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    Jinte Middeldorp

    Full Text Available The human GFAP splice variants GFAPDelta164 and GFAPDeltaexon6 both result in a GFAP protein isoform with a unique out-of-frame carboxy-terminus that can be detected by the GFAP+1 antibody. We previously reported that GFAP+1 was expressed in astrocytes and in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer's disease brains. In this study we aimed at further investigating the neuronal GFAP+1 expression and we started by affinity purifying the GFAP+1 antibody. The purified antibody resulted in a loss of neuronal GFAP+1 signal, although other antibodies directed against the amino- and carboxy-terminus of GFAPalpha still revealed GFAP-immunopositive neurons, as described before. With an in-depth analysis of a western blot, followed by mass spectrometry we discovered that the previously detected neuronal GFAP+1 expression was due to cross-reactivity of the antibody with neurofilament-L (NF-L. This was confirmed by double-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry and western blotting with the unpurified GFAP+1 antibody and an antibody against NF-L. Our data imply that NF-L can accumulate in some tangle-like structures in Alzheimer brains. More importantly, the purified GFAP+1 antibody clearly revealed a specific subtype of astrocytes in the adult human brain. These large astrocytes are present throughout the brain, e.g., along the subventricular zone, in the hippocampus, in the striatum and in the spinal cord of controls, Alzheimer, and Parkinson patients. The presence of a specific GFAP-isoform suggests a specialized function of these astrocytes.

  20. Specific Human Astrocyte Subtype Revealed by Affinity Purified GFAP+1 Antibody; Unpurified Serum Cross-Reacts with Neurofilament-L in Alzheimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Jinte; van den Berge, Simone A.; Aronica, Eleonora; Speijer, Dave; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    The human GFAP splice variants GFAPΔ164 and GFAPΔexon6 both result in a GFAP protein isoform with a unique out-of-frame carboxy-terminus that can be detected by the GFAP+1 antibody. We previously reported that GFAP+1 was expressed in astrocytes and in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer's disease brains. In this study we aimed at further investigating the neuronal GFAP+1 expression and we started by affinity purifying the GFAP+1 antibody. The purified antibody resulted in a loss of neuronal GFAP+1 signal, although other antibodies directed against the amino- and carboxy-terminus of GFAPα still revealed GFAP-immunopositive neurons, as described before. With an in-depth analysis of a western blot, followed by mass spectrometry we discovered that the previously detected neuronal GFAP+1 expression was due to cross-reactivity of the antibody with neurofilament-L (NF-L). This was confirmed by double-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry and western blotting with the unpurified GFAP+1 antibody and an antibody against NF-L. Our data imply that NF-L can accumulate in some tangle-like structures in Alzheimer brains. More importantly, the purified GFAP+1 antibody clearly revealed a specific subtype of astrocytes in the adult human brain. These large astrocytes are present throughout the brain, e.g., along the subventricular zone, in the hippocampus, in the striatum and in the spinal cord of controls, Alzheimer, and Parkinson patients. The presence of a specific GFAP-isoform suggests a specialized function of these astrocytes. PMID:19888461

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nawaz-Tipu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1 protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine’s candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Threealleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens moreprevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  3. Evaluation of In Vitro Cross-Reactivity to Avian H5N1 and Pandemic H1N1 2009 Influenza Following Prime Boost Regimens of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Healthy Human Subjects: A Randomised Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    washed, and specific enzyme substrate added. The reactions were stopped with 1 N sulphuric acid . The absorbance was measured at 490 nm. The average A490...California/04/2009 (H1N1) (122 15 mer peptide overlapping by 11 amino acids ) or A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) (121 15 mer peptide overlapping by 11 amino... acids ) at a final concentration of each peptide of 1 mg/ml. NP is the main viral protein recognized by cross reactive T cells [12]. All stimulated PBMC

  4. Overlapping gene structure of the human neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes Y1 and Y5 suggests coordinate transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.; Darby, K.; Ball, H. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Sydney (Australia)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    The human y1 and y5 receptor genes are transcribed in opposite directions from a common promoter region on chromosome 4q31-q32. One of the alternately spliced 5{prime} exons of the y1 receptor gene (1C) is also an integral part of the coding region of a novel neuropeptide Y receptor, Y5. Exon 1C of the y1 receptor gene, if translated from the opposite strand, encodes sequences corresponding to the large third intracellular loop of the Y5 receptor. The close proximity of the two neuropeptide Y receptor genes suggests that they have evolved from a gene duplication event with the small intron interrupting the coding sequence of the y1 gene being converted into a functional sequence within the y5 gene, while the reverse complementary sequence was utilized as an alternatively spliced 5{prime} exon for the y1 gene. The transcription of both genes from opposite strands of the same DNA sequence suggests that transcriptional activation of one will have an effect on the regulation of gene expression of the other. As both Y1 and Y5 receptors are thought to play an important role in the regulation of food intake, coordinate expression of their specific genes may be important in the modulation of NPY activity. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from human outbreaks and poultry in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, C S L; Streck, A F; Michael, G B; Marks, F S; Rodrigues, D P; Dos Reis, E M F; Cardoso, M R I; Canal, C W

    2010-07-01

    To investigate antimicrobial resistance, 96 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis strains isolated from salmonellosis outbreaks and poultry-related products obtained in southern Brazil were analyzed. Macrorestriction patterns, obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phage types, were assessed. Although 43.75% of samples were sensitive to all drugs tested, resistance to sulfonamide (34.37%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (25.00%), nalidixic acid (14.58%), streptomycin (2.08%), gentamicin, and tetracycline (1.04%) was identified. Furthermore, 89.60% of strains belonged to phage type 4, and a predominant pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotype represented by 82.29% of the strains was identified, suggesting that a clonal group was distributed in poultry, food, and human isolates. Although it was not possible to associate strains from different sources, the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis strains supports the need to establish monitoring programs to identify the emergence of potential resistance patterns and to direct policies for use of these drugs in food-producing animals.

  6. Pathogenic infection of Macaca nemestrina with a CCR5-tropic subtype-C simian-human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruijiang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina have been used in AIDS research for years, less is known about the early immunopathogenic events in this species, as compared to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Similarly, the events in early infection are well-characterized for simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV, but less so for chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV, although the latter have been widely used in HIV vaccine studies. Here, we report the consequences of intrarectal infection with a CCR5-tropic clade C SHIV-1157ipd3N4 in pig-tailed macaques. Results Plasma and cell-associated virus was detectable in peripheral blood and intestinal tissues of all four pig-tailed macaques following intrarectal inoculation with SHIV-1157ipd3N4. We also observed a rapid and irreversible loss of CD4+ T cells at multiple mucosal sites, resulting in a marked decrease of CD4:CD8 T cell ratios 0.5–4 weeks after inoculation. This depletion targeted subsets of CD4+ T cells expressing the CCR5 coreceptor and having a CD28-CD95+ effector memory phenotype, consistent with the R5-tropism of SHIV-1157ipd3N4. All three animals that were studied beyond the acute phase seroconverted as early as week 4, with two developing cross-clade neutralizing antibody responses by week 24. These two animals also demonstrated persistent plasma viremia for >48 weeks. One of these animals developed AIDS, as shown by peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell depletion starting at 20 weeks post inoculation. Conclusion These findings indicate that SHIV-1157ipd3N4-induced pathogenesis in pig-tailed macaques followed a similar course as SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Thus, R5 SHIV-C-infection of pig-tailed macaques could provide a useful and relevant model for AIDS vaccine and pathogenesis research.

  7. 成都地区人乳头瘤病毒感染现状及其亚型分布的回顾性分析%Retrospective Analysis of Infection and Subtype Distribution of Human Papilloma Virus in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽; 王文娟; 刘成桂

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the infection status and the distribution of gene subtypes of cervical human papilloma virus ( HPV) in Chengdu. Methods We used gene chip typing technique to detect the gene subtypes of cervical HPV infection of 9075 cases of women. Results In the 9075 cases,the total positive rate of HPV infection was 32. 88% (2984/9075), containing high risk subtypes 25. 51% (2315/9075),and low risk subtypes 7. 37% (669/9075), and the difference was statistically signifi-cant (P55 years old group. Compared with other groups, the difference was statistically significant (P55岁组,与其他组比较,差异有统计学意义( P<0.01)。结论成都地区妇女以高危型HPV感染为主,感染的主要型别是52、16、58、53和51型,对高危型感染患者要加强随访,HPV基因分型检测有利于宫颈癌的早期发现和早期治疗,对HPV疫苗的研究也有很大的价值。

  8. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  9. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  10. H1N1 viral proteome peptide microarray predicts individuals at risk for H1N1 infection and segregates infection versus Pandemrix(®) vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Aditya; Valentini, Davide; Montomoli, Emanuele; Lapini, Guilia; Biuso, Fabrizio; Wenschuh, Holger; Magalhaes, Isabelle; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-07-01

    A high content peptide microarray containing the entire influenza A virus [A/California/08/2009(H1N1)] proteome and haemagglutinin proteins from 12 other influenza A subtypes, including the haemagglutinin from the [A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1)] strain, was used to gauge serum IgG epitope signatures before and after Pandemrix(®) vaccination or H1N1 infection in a Swedish cohort during the pandemic influenza season 2009. A very narrow pattern of pandemic flu-specific IgG epitope recognition was observed in the serum from individuals who later contracted H1N1 infection. Moreover, the pandemic influenza infection generated IgG reactivity to two adjacent epitopes of the neuraminidase protein. The differential serum IgG recognition was focused on haemagglutinin 1 (H1) and restricted to classical antigenic sites (Cb) in both the vaccinated controls and individuals with flu infections. We further identified a novel epitope VEPGDKITFEATGNL on the Ca antigenic site (251-265) of the pandemic flu haemagglutinin, which was exclusively recognized in serum from individuals with previous vaccinations and never in serum from individuals with H1N1 infection (confirmed by RNA PCR analysis from nasal swabs). This epitope was mapped to the receptor-binding domain of the influenza haemagglutinin and could serve as a correlate of immune protection in the context of pandemic flu. The study shows that unbiased epitope mapping using peptide microarray technology leads to the identification of biologically and clinically relevant target structures. Most significantly an H1N1 infection induced a different footprint of IgG epitope recognition patterns compared with the pandemic H1N1 vaccine.

  11. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obadan, Adebimpe O; Kimble, Brian J; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J S; Vincent, Amy; Perez, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza.

  12. Relationship between open reading frame 26 subtypes in human herpesvirns-8 and Kaposi's sarcoma%人类疱疹病毒8型ORF26基因亚型与Kaposi肉瘤的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秀娟; 普雄明; 吴卫东

    2008-01-01

    Objective To learn the subtypes of open reading frame 26 (ORF26) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, and to evaluate the relationship of ORF26 subtypes to clinical types and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma. Methods Thirty-two paraffin-embeded tissue speci-mens of Kaposi's sarcoma were collected in the Department of Dermatology, People's Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, from 1996 to 2007. DNA was extracted from these specimens, nested-PCR was used to amplify HHV-8 DNA. PCR products were subjected to bi-directional sequencing after extraction from agarose gels. Phylogenetic analysis was carded out by using the software DNAStar, program Clustal W and PHYLIP package for the determination of ORF26 subtype. Fisher's exact test was performed to evaluate the relationship of ORF26 subtypes to clinical types and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma. Results Of the 32 specimens, 30 were positive for HHV-8 DNA with a positivity rate of 93.75%, and 6 specimens of AIDS related Kaposi's sarcoma were all positive. ORF26 A subtype was detected in the HHV-8 DNA of 17 posi-tive specimens, and C subtype in that of other 13 specimens. Neither the incidence of mucosal lesions nor the distribution of clinical subtypes was of significant difference between patients with ORF26 A subtype and those with ORF26 C subtype (both P > 0.05). Conclusions A and C may be the predominate subtypes of ORF 26 in HHV-8 of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, and the ORF26 subtype is unrelated to the presence of mucosal lesions in or the clinical types of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma.%目的 明确Kaposi肉瘤患者感染的人类疱疹病毒8型(HHV-8)ORF26基因亚型分类,初步探讨其与Kaposi肉瘤不同临床分型及侵袭性的相关性.方法 对32例Kaposi肉瘤石蜡包埋组织进行HHV-8 DNA抽提、扩增、双向测序,使用DNAStar软件、Clustal W软件和PHYLIP软件包对测序结果进行系统发生学分析,从而确定HHV-8 ORF26基因亚型,

  13. H1N1: pandemia e perspectiva atual H1N1: overview and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Bellei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O vírus influenza de origem suína, A/California/04/2009 (H1N1, foi inicialmente detectado no México e determinou a pandemia de influenza de 2009. Em agosto de 2010, a Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS declarou o início da fase pós-pandêmica. As características dessa última pandemia foram marcadamente diferentes das anteriores. O vírus emergiu de rearranjos genéticos originários em hospedeiro mamífero não humano, demonstrou transmissibilidade interespécies e afetou a população humana de forma diferente dos vírus pandêmicos anteriores (1918, 1957 e 1968 com maior morbidade e mortalidade em crianças e adultos jovens. Atualmente, o vírus apresenta padrão sazonal da mesma forma que o influenza A H3N2 e o influenza B, mantendo, até o momento, o mesmo perfil de patogenicidade, espectro clínico e sensibilidade a antivirais. A cepa foi incluída na vacina sazonal trivalente anual recomendada, principalmente para proteção dos grupos de risco mais vulneráveis a complicações pelas diferentes cepas de influenza.The swine origin influenza virus A/CALIFORNIA/04/2009 (H1N1 was first detected in Mexico and determined the 2009 influenza pandemic. In August 2010, World Health Organization (WHO declared the beginning of the post-pandemic period. This last pandemic was distinctly different from previous ones. The virus emerged from genetic rearrangement in non-human mammalian host. Moreover, its inter-species transmission is fully reported. However, it affected human population differently from previous pandemic viruses (1918, 1957, 1968, with increased morbidity and mortality among children and young adults. Currently, the virus has a seasonal pattern in the same way as influenza A H3N2 and influenza B, maintaining the same pathogenicity profile, clinical spectrum and sensitivity to antiviral agents. The strain was included in the annual trivalent seasonal vaccine formulation, mainly for risk groups, which are more vulnerable to

  14. Mutations in polymerase genes enhanced the virulence of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfei Zhu

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus can infect a wide variety of animal species with illness ranging from mild to severe, and is a continual cause for concern. Genetic mutations that occur either naturally or during viral adaptation in a poorly susceptible host are key mechanisms underlying the evolution and virulence of influenza A virus. Here, the variants containing PA-A36T or PB2-H357N observed in the mouse-adapted descendants of 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1, A/Sichuan/1/2009 (SC, were characterized. Both mutations enhanced polymerase activity in mammalian cells. These effects were confirmed using recombinant SC virus containing polymerase genes with wild type (WT or mutant PA or PB2. The PA-A36T mutant showed enhanced growth property compared to the WT in both human A549 cells and porcine PK15 cells in vitro, without significant effect on viral propagation in murine LA-4 cells and pathogenicity in mice; however, it did enhance the lung virus titer. PB2-H357N variant demonstrated growth ability comparable to the WT in A549 cells, but replicated well in PK15, LA-4 cells and in mice with an enhanced pathogenic phenotype. Despite such mutations are rare in nature, they could be observed in avian H5 and H7 subtype viruses which were currently recognized to pose potential threat to human. Our findings indicated that pH1N1 may adapt well in mammals when acquiring these mutations. Therefore, future molecular epidemiological surveillance should include scrutiny of both markers because of their potential impact on pathogenesis.

  15. [Immune Protection against H9N2 Provided by H1N1 Pre-infection in Pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Maocai; Hong, Wenshan; Zheng, Zuoyi; Chen, Rirong

    2015-07-01

    To explore the impact of the history of infection by the influenza A virus subtype H1N1 on secondary infection by the influenza A virus subtype H9N2, pigs non-infected and pre-infected with H1N1 were inoculated with H9N2 in parallel to compare nasal shedding and seroconversion patterns. Unlike pigs without a background of H1N1 infection, nasal shedding was not detected in pigs pre-infected with H1N1. Both groups generated antibodies against H9N2. However, levels of H1N1 antibodies in pigs pre-infected with H1N1 increased quickly and dramatically after challenge with H9N2. Cross-reaction was not observed between H1N1 antibodies and H9N2 viruses. These findings suggest that circulation of the H1N1 virus might be a barrier to the introduction and transmission of the avian H9N2 virus, thereby delaying its adaptation in pigs.

  16. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynun N. Begum

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in a supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared with those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the “neurosphederm”. The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared with the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42–60 days. With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse brains compared with the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays.

  17. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Medeiros, Rúbia Marília de; Leite, Thaysse Cristina Neiva Ferreira; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Gräf, Tiago; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2013-09-01

    Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3) loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08) and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08). Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  18. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Maletich Junqueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3 loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08 and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08. Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  19. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Aynun N; Guoynes, Caleigh; Cho, Jane; Hao, Jijun; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Hong, Yiling

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in a supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM) with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared with those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP) was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the "neurosphederm". The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR) structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared with the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42-60 days). With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse brains compared with the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays.

  20. Human APOBEC3G-mediated hypermutation is associated with antiretroviral therapy failure in HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Shet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human APOBEC3G/F (hA3G/F restricts retroviral replication through G-to-A hypermutations, which can generate drug-resistant progenies in vitro. The clinical relevance is still inconclusive. To bridge this gap, we aim to study the role of these hypermutations in evolution of drug resistance; we characterised hA3G/F-mediated hypermutations in the RT region of the pol gene of patients with or without antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methods: In 88 HIV-1-positive individuals, drug resistance genotyping was carried out in plasma virus and provirus by population sequencing. Hypermutations were determined by three different approaches using Hypermut 2.0 software, cluster analysis and APOBEC3G-mediated defectives indices. Clinical and demographic characteristics of these individuals were studied in relation to these hypermutations. Results: hA3G/F-mediated hypermutated sequences in proviral DNA, but not in plasma virus, were identified in 11.4% (10/88 subjects. Proviral hypermutations were observed more frequently in patients with ART failure than in ART-naïve individuals (p=0.03. In therapy failure patients, proviral hypermutation were associated with greater intra-compartmental genetic diversity (p<0.001. In therapy-naïve individuals, hypermutated proviral DNA with M184I and M230I mutations due to the editing of hA3G, had stop codons in the open reading frames and the same mutations were absent in the plasma virus. Only a limited concordance was found between the drug resistance mutations in plasma RNA and proviral DNA. Conclusions: hA3G lethal hypermutation was significantly associated with ART failure in Indian HIV-1 subtype C patients. It is unlikely that viral variants, which exhibit hypermutated sequences and M184I and/or M230I, will mature and expand in vivo.

  1. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  2. Effects of toluene exposure on signal transduction: toluene reduced the signaling via stimulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, Hirofumi; Haga, Tatsuya; Honma, Takeshi

    2002-07-01

    The organic solvent toluene is used widely in industry and is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). To clarify the mechanisms of CNS toxicity following toluene exposure, especially with respect to the G protein-coupling of receptors, we determined the effects of toluene on the activation of Gi by stimulating human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We first examined whether toluene affects the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by Gi. The attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was reduced in a medium containing toluene. Next, we determined the effects of toluene on carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding using membrane fractions of CHO cell expressing hm2 receptors. Carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was markedly reduced when assayed using reaction buffers containing toluene. However, carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was essentially unchanged following pretreatment of the cells with a toluene-saturated medium prior to membrane isolation. Toluene pretreatment and the toluene itself did not alter the characteristics of the binding of carbamylcholine and [3H]N-methylscopolamine to hm2 receptors. On the contrary of the effect of toluene for [35S]GTPgammaS binding, the effect of toluene for attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was irreversible. These observations indicate that toluene acts as an inhibitor of the signal transduction via hm2 receptor stimulation in CHO cells, and at least two mechanisms exist in the inhibition mechanisms by toluene.

  3. H1 histones: current perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, Sean W; Young, Nicolas L; Parthun, Mark R; Freitas, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    H1 and related linker histones are important both for maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure and for the regulation of gene expression. The biology of the linker histones is complex, as they are evolutionarily variable, exist in multiple isoforms and undergo a large variety of posttranslational modifications in their long, unstructured, NH2- and COOH-terminal tails. We review recent progress in understanding the structure, genetics and posttranslational modifications of linker histones, with an emphasis on the dynamic interactions of these proteins with DNA and transcriptional regulators. We also discuss various experimental challenges to the study of H1 and related proteins, including limitations of immunological reagents and practical difficulties in the analysis of posttranslational modifications by mass spectrometry.

  4. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Grgić

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1pdm09. One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA, polymerase A (PA and non-structural (NS genes closely related to A(H1N1pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA, matrix (M, polymerase B1 (PB1, polymerase B2 (PB2, and nucleoprotein (NP genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2. The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors.

  5. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada) in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA), polymerase A (PA) and non-structural (NS) genes closely related to A(H1N1)pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA), matrix (M), polymerase B1 (PB1), polymerase B2 (PB2), and nucleoprotein (NP) genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2). The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1)pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa) changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors.

  6. Origin and future distribution of the new A (H1N1) influenza virus emerging in North America in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JiMing; SUN YingXue; LIU Shuo; JIANG WenMing; CHEN Jie; HOU GuangYu; LI JinPing

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the new A (H1N1) influenza virus recently emerging in North America is a hot controversial topic of significance in disease control and risk assessment.Some experts claimed that it was an unusually mongrelized mix of human,avian and swine influenza viruses,while some others concluded that it was totally a simple re-assortment hybrid of two lineages of swine influenza viruses.Here the phylogenetic diversity of the viral PB1,PA and PB2 gene sequences using online web servers,and the results suggest that all the 8 genetic segments of the new virus were possibly from two lineages of swine influenza viruses,and one of the lineage was a mongrelized mix of human,avian and swine influenza viruses emerging in the world approximately 10 years ago.Considering the recent epidemiological trends of the new virus,we believe it will spread more widely in the world and persist long in human populations.It also could spread among swine populations.The future wide spreading of the new virus may coincide the disappearance of a subtype of previous human influenza A virus.

  7. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

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    Elena Delgado

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  8. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Pinilla, Milagros; García, Valentina; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss) used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  9. Subtyping Stuttering II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  10. Seroepidemiologic Investigation of an Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009 Aboard a U.S. Navy Vessel - San Diego, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Naval Health Research Center Seroepidemiologic Investigation of An Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009 Aboard A US Navy Vessell – San...Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (from – to) 2009 4. TITLE Seroepidemiologic Investigation of an Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009...outbreaks. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Adolescent; adult; Disease Outbreaks; H1N1 Subtype/genetics; epidemiology; Influenza A Virus; military personnel 16

  11. Interaktionen von Histamin H1-Rezeptoragonisten und –antagonisten mit dem humanen Histamin H4-Rezeptor

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Der humane Histamin H(4)-Rezeptor (hH(4)R) zeichnet sich durch hohe konstitutive Aktivität aus und ist wie der humane H(1)-Rezeptor (hH(1)R) in die Pathogenese von allergischen Reaktionen vom Typ I involviert. Die Ziele der Untersuchungen waren die Evaluierung des Wertes von dualen H(1)/H(4)R Antagonisten als antiallergische Medikamente und die Klärung der Frage, ob H(1)R Liganden an den hH(4)R binden. Am in Sf9-Insektenzellen exprimierten hH(4)R zeigten 18 H(1)R Antagonisten und 22 H(1)R Ago...

  12. UCLA1, a synthetic derivative of a gp120 RNA aptamer, inhibits entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available aptamers and showed that they neutralized the infectivity of HIV-1. In this study, we assessed the activity of a shortened synthetic derivative of the B40 aptamer, called UCLA1, against a large panel of HIV-1 subtype C viruses. UCLA1 tightly bound to a...

  13. Identification of Multiple Subtypes of Campylobacter jejuni in Chicken Meat and the Impact on Source Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Hudson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Most source attribution studies for Campylobacter use subtyping data based on single isolates from foods and environmental sources in an attempt to draw epidemiological inferences. It has been suggested that subtyping only one Campylobacter isolate per chicken carcass incurs a risk of failing to recognise the presence of clinically relevant, but numerically infrequent, subtypes. To investigate this, between 21 and 25 Campylobacter jejuni isolates from each of ten retail chicken carcasses were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE using the two restriction enzymes SmaI and KpnI. Among the 227 isolates, thirteen subtypes were identified, the most frequently occurring subtype being isolated from three carcasses. Six carcasses carried a single subtype, three carcasses carried two subtypes each and one carcass carried three subtypes. Some subtypes carried by an individual carcass were shown to be potentially clonally related. Comparison of C. jejuni subtypes from chickens with isolate subtypes from human clinical cases (n = 1248 revealed seven of the thirteen chicken subtypes were indistinguishable from human cases. None of the numerically minor chicken subtypes were identified in the human data. Therefore, typing only one Campylobacter isolate from individual chicken carcasses may be adequate to inform Campylobacter source attribution.

  14. In silico characterization of the functional and structural modules of the hemagglutinin protein from the swine-origin influenza virus A (H1N1)-2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher; VAVRICKA; GAO; George; F

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV,H1N1 subtype) has developed into a new pandemic influenza as announced by the World Health Organization.In order to uncover clues about the determinants for virulence and pathogenicity of the virus,we characterized the functional modules of the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA),the most important protein in molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of influenza viruses.We analyzed receptor binding sites,basic patch,neutralization antibody epitopes and T cell epitopes in the HA protein of the current S-OIV according to the corresponding functional and structural modules previously characterized in other H1 HA molecules or HA molecules of other subtypes.We compared their differences and similarities systematically.Based on the amino acids defined as the functional and structural modules,the HA protein of 2009 S-OIV should specifically bind to the human 2,6-receptor.The D225G/E mutation in HA,which is found in some isolates,may confer dual binding specificity to the 2,3and 2,6-receptor based on previously reported work.This HA variant contains two basic patches,one of which results in increased basicity,suggesting enhanced membrane fusion function.The 2009 S-OIV HA also has an extra glycosylation site at position 276.Four of the five antibody neutralization epitopes identified in A/RP/8/34(H1N1) were exposed,but the other was hidden by a glycosylation site.The previously identified cytotoxic T cell epitopes in various HA molecules were summarized and their corresponding sequences in 2009 S-OIV HA were defined.These results are critical for understanding the pathogenicity of the virus and host immune response against the virus.

  15. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  16. Influenza Stigma during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Quinn, Diane M

    2013-06-01

    The current study examines the extent to which H1N1 was stigmatized at the height of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the U.S. and explores the role that H1N1 stigma played in people's desire for physical distance from others with H1N1. H1N1 was the most stigmatized disease, with participants endorsing greater prejudice towards people with H1N1 than people with cancer or HIV/AIDS. Further, H1N1 stigma partially mediated the relationship between participants' perceptions that H1N1 was threatening and their desire for physical distance from people with H1N1. Therefore, H1N1 stigma played a role in, but was not entirely responsible for, the relationship between perceptions that H1N1 was threatening and desire for distance from others with H1N1.

  17. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  18. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Simon

    Full Text Available Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013 aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%, human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13% and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%, as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm virus (10.3%. Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  19. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Gaëlle; Larsen, Lars E; Dürrwald, Ralf; Foni, Emanuela; Harder, Timm; Van Reeth, Kristien; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Reid, Scott M; Dan, Adam; Maldonado, Jaime; Huovilainen, Anita; Billinis, Charalambos; Davidson, Irit; Agüero, Montserrat; Vila, Thaïs; Hervé, Séverine; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Chiapponi, Chiara; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Brown, Ian H; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013) aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  20. Protection of mice against lethal challenge with 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus by 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manicassamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus infection in humans has resulted in nearly 5,000 deaths worldwide. Early epidemiological findings indicated a low level of infection in the older population (>65 years with the pandemic virus, and a greater susceptibility in people younger than 35 years of age, a phenomenon correlated with the presence of cross-reactive immunity in the older population. It is unclear what virus(es might be responsible for this apparent cross-protection against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. We describe a mouse lethal challenge model for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain, used together with a panel of inactivated H1N1 virus vaccines and hemagglutinin (HA monoclonal antibodies to dissect the possible humoral antigenic determinants of pre-existing immunity against this virus in the human population. By hemagglutinination inhibition (HI assays and vaccination/challenge studies, we demonstrate that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is antigenically similar to human H1N1 viruses that circulated from 1918-1943 and to classical swine H1N1 viruses. Antibodies elicited against 1918-like or classical swine H1N1 vaccines completely protect C57B/6 mice from lethal challenge with the influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 virus isolate. In contrast, contemporary H1N1 vaccines afforded only partial protection. Passive immunization with cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs raised against either 1918 or A/California/04/2009 HA proteins offered full protection from death. Analysis of mAb antibody escape mutants, generated by selection of 2009 H1N1 virus with these mAbs, indicate that antigenic site Sa is one of the conserved cross-protective epitopes. Our findings in mice agree with serological data showing high prevalence of 2009 H1N1 cross-reactive antibodies only in the older population, indicating that prior infection with 1918-like viruses or vaccination against the 1976 swine H1N1 virus in the USA are likely to provide protection against the 2009

  1. Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE and subtype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Oyomopito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 epidemics in Asian countries are driven by varying exposures. The epidemiology of the regional pandemic has been changing with the spread of HIV-1 to lower-risk populations through sexual transmission. Common HIV-1 genotypes include subtype B and circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE. Our objective was to use HIV-1 genotypic data to better quantify local epidemics. TASER-M is a multicenter prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients. Associations between HIV exposure, patient sex, country of sample origin and HIV-1 genotype were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Phylogenetic methods were used on genotypic data to investigate transmission relationships. A total of 1086 patients from Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Philippines were included in analyses. Proportions of male patients within countries varied (Thailand: 55.6%, Hong Kong: 86.1%, Malaysia: 81.4%, Philippines: 93.8%; p < 0.001 as did HIV exposures (heterosexual contact: Thailand: 85.7%, Hong Kong, 46.2%, Malaysia: 47.8%, Philippines: 25.0%; p < 0.001. After adjustment, we found increased subtype B infection among men who have sex with men, relative to heterosexual-reported exposures (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.001. We further describe four transmission clusters of eight to 15 treatment naïve, predominantly symptomatic patients (two each for subtype B and CRF01_AE. Risk-group subpopulations differed with respect to the infecting HIV-1 genotype. Homosexual exposure patients had higher odds of being infected with subtype B. Where HIV-1 genotypes circulate within countries or patient risk-groups, local monitoring of genotype-specific transmissions may play a role in focusing public health prevention strategies. Phylogenetic evaluations provide complementary information for surveillance and monitoring of viruses with high mutation rates such as HIV-1 and Ebola.

  2. Co-circulation of pandemic 2009 H1N1, classical swine H1N1 and avian-like swine H1N1 influenza viruses in pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Qiao, Chuanling; Yang, Huanliang; Zhang, Ying; Xin, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hualan

    2013-01-01

    The pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses emerged in both Mexico and the United States in March 2009, and were transmitted efficiently in the human population. They were transmitted occasionally from humans to other mammals including pigs, dogs and cats. In this study, we report the isolation and genetic analysis of novel viruses in pigs in China. These viruses were related phylogenetically to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses isolated from humans and pigs, which indicates that the pandemic virus is currently circulating in swine populations, and this hypothesis was further supported by serological surveillance of pig sera collected within the same period. Furthermore, we isolated another two H1N1 viruses belonging to the lineages of classical swine H1N1 virus and avian-like swine H1N1 virus, respectively. Multiple genetic lineages of H1N1 viruses are co-circulating in the swine population, which highlights the importance of intensive surveillance for swine influenza in China.

  3. Recombination analysis and homology alignment of full-length genome sequences of die novel A/H1N1 influenza virus in 2009%2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒全基因组序列重组分析及同源性比对

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿文英; 殷建华; 李淑华; 韩磊; 韩一芳; 苏彤; 曹广文

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the genetic variation and recombination of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009. Methods Full-length sequence of typical novel A/H1N1 influenza virus was downloaded from NCBI database. MEGA4.0 software was used to connect and align the eight fragments of the virus. Then the fragments of different subtypes such as H1N1, H5N1 and H3N2 of the historical strains from different hosts, including human, poultry and pigs, were connected and aligned in the same way. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by NJ method. The recombination analysis of 2009 pandemic virus was made with Simplot 3. 5.1 software. Results There was no clear variation (identity was 99.69% - 99. 93%) in the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus from April to September, 2009. Simplot and MEGA analysis indicated that the PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NP and NS of the novel A/H1N1 virus might originally evolve from the swine and human H1N1 virus isolated in North America (identity was 95. 25%, 95.08%, 95.21%, 93.52%, 95.23% and 94.78%, respectively). NA and MP showed high homology with the European swine H1N1 virus, the identity was 90.21% and 94.43%, respectively. Full-length sequence of the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus had a highest similarity with swine H1N1 virus isolated from North America (identity was 92.22%). Conclusions The novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009 was originated from the reassortment and evolution of swine H1N1 2005 pandemic virus in North America, and the NA and MP fragments of European swine H1N1. There is no clear variation in novel influenza virus up to now. The novel A/H1N1 influenza vaccine possesses protective effect.%目的 分析2009年新型甲型H1N1流感爆发以来流感病毒的全基因组进化变异及重组情况.方法 从NCBI基因数据库下载2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒(A/H1N1)代表性全基因组序列,先用MEGA4.0软件对8个基因序列片段进行比对和拼接;然后将历史上流行的H1N1、H5N1、H3N2等不同宿

  4. Salmonella source attribution based on microbial subtyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barco, Lisa; Barrucci, Federica; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2013-01-01

    Source attribution of cases of food-borne disease represents a valuable tool for identifying and prioritizing effective food-safety interventions. Microbial subtyping is one of the most common methods to infer potential sources of human food-borne infections. So far, Salmonella microbial subtyping...... source attribution models have been implemented by using serotyping and phage-typing data. Molecular-based methods may prove to be similarly valuable in the future, as already demonstrated for other food-borne pathogens like Campylobacter. This review assesses the state of the art concerning Salmonella...... in the context of their potential applicability for Salmonella source attribution studies....

  5. Antifungal properties of wheat histones (H1-H4) and purified wheat histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucca, Anthony J; Heden, Lars-Olof; Ingber, Bruce; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-07-13

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) histones H1, H2, H3, and H4 were extracted, and H1 was further purified. The effect of these histones on specific fungi that may or may not be pathogenic to wheat was determined. These fungi included Aspergillus flavus , Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus niger , Fusarium oxysporum , Fusarium verticillioides , Fusarium solani , Fusarium graminearum , Penicillium digitatum , Penicillium italicum , and Greeneria uvicola . Non-germinated and germinating conidia of these fungi were bioassayed separately. The non-germinated and germinating conidia of all Fusarium species were highly susceptible to the mixture (H1-H4) as well as pure H1, with viability losses of 99-100% found to be significant (p histone mixture and pure H1. F. graminearum was the most sensitive to histone activity. The histones were inactive against all of the non-germinated Penicillium spp. conidia. However, they significantly reduced the viability of the germinating conidia of the Penicillium spp. conidia, with 95% loss at 2.5 μM. Non-germinated and germinating conidia viability of the Aspergillus spp. and G. uvicola were unaffected when exposed to histones up to 10 μM. Results indicate that Fusarium spp. pathogenic to wheat are susceptible to wheat histones, indicating that these proteins may be a resistance mechanism in wheat against fungal infection.

  6. The progress of research on influenza A(H1N1)%甲型H1N1流感的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷晓燕; 孙永红

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)virus is a re-mixed strains of human influenza virus genes,avian influenza virus gene and swine influenza virus gene.Influenza A(H1N1)pandemic influenza has spread around the world,which has drawn worldwide attention.In order to early discovery,early diagnosis,early treatment and effective prevention of Influenza A(H1N1),we describe the characteristics of linfluenza A(H1N1)virus,epidemiology,pathogenesis,clinical manifestations,laboratory examination and effective treatment and preventive measures.%甲型H1N1流感病毒是人流感病毒基因、禽流感病毒基因和猪流感病毒基因混合的重配株,其造成的疫情来势凶猛,引起世界各国的广泛关注.为了早发现、早诊断、早治疗及有效地预防甲型H1N1流感,本文综述了甲型H1N1流感病毒的特点、流行病学、致人发病的机制、甲型H1N1流感患者的临床表现、实验室检查及有效的治疗和预防措施.

  7. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeberg, Christine, E-mail: christine.oberg@ki.se [Karolinska Institute, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, P.O. Box 285, SE-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Belikov, Sergey, E-mail: sergey.belikov@ki.se [Karolinska Institute, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, P.O. Box 285, SE-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  8. GABAA receptor subtype involvement in addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D N; King, S L; Lambert, J J; Belelli, D; Duka, T

    2017-01-01

    GABAA receptors form the major class of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain. This review sets out to summarize the evidence that variations in genes encoding GABAA receptor isoforms are associated with aspects of addictive behaviour in humans, while animal models of addictive behaviour also implicate certain subtypes of GABAA receptor. In addition to outlining the evidence for the involvement of specific subtypes in addiction, we summarize the particular contributions of these isoforms in control over the functioning of brain circuits, especially the mesolimbic system, and make a first attempt to bring together evidence from several fields to understanding potential involvement of GABAA receptor subtypes in addictive behaviour. While the weight of the published literature is on alcohol dependency, the underlying principles outlined are relevant across a number of different aspects of addictive behaviour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  10. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure......About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...

  11. Antibody titers against swine influenza subtypes determined by the hemagglutination inhibition test are highly dependent on the strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Nielsen, Jens; Bøtner, Anette

    In Denmark there are three circulating strains of swine influenza H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2. The H1N2 is different from the H1N2 subtypes circulating in other European countries. The Danish subtype is a reassortment between the two Danish circulating swine influenza subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. From...... a diagnostic and epidemiological point of view it is crucial to clarify whether the immunological response to one subtype protects against infection with the other subtype. The hemagglutination inhibition test (HI-test) has been used widely to determine the presence of antibodies in serum against influenza...... viruses. In the present study the HI-test was used to determine antibody response from experimental infected pigs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibody response against the new Danish influenza subtype H1N2 (H1N2dk) and to examine the level of crossprotection/reaction between the two...

  12. Replication, Pathogenesis and Transmission of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Non-Immune Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookes, S.M.; Nunez, A.; Choudhury, B.; Matrosovich, M.; Essen, S.C.; Clifford, D.; Slomka, M.J.; Kuntz-Simon, G.; Garcon, F.; Nash, B.; Hanna, A.; Heegaard, P.M.H.; Queguiner, S.; Chiapponi, C.; Bublot, M.; Garcia, J.M.; Gardner, R.; Foni, E.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Larsen, L.; Reeth, K.; Banks, J.; Irvine, R.M.; Brown, I.H.

    2010-01-01

    The declaration of the human influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1/09) raised important questions, including origin and host range [1,2]. Two of the three pandemics in the last century resulted in the spread of virus to pigs (H1N1, 1918; H3N2, 1968) with subsequent independent establishment and evo

  13. Replication, Pathogenesis and Transmission of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Non-Immune Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brookes, Sharon M; Nunez, Alejandor; Choudhury, Bhudipa

    2010-01-01

    The declaration of the human influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1/09) raised important questions, including origin and host range [1,2]. Two of the three pandemics in the last century resulted in the spread of virus to pigs (H1N1, 1918; H3N2, 1968) with subsequent independent establishment...

  14. Subtype- and antigenic site-specific differences in biophysical influences on evolution of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stray Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus undergoes rapid evolution by both antigenic shift and antigenic drift. Antibodies, particularly those binding near the receptor-binding site of hemagglutinin (HA or the neuraminidase (NA active site, are thought to be the primary defense against influenza infection, and mutations in antibody binding sites can reduce or eliminate antibody binding. The binding of antibodies to their cognate antigens is governed by such biophysical properties of the interacting surfaces as shape, non-polar and polar surface area, and charge. Methods To understand forces shaping evolution of influenza virus, we have examined HA sequences of human influenza A and B viruses, assigning each amino acid values reflecting total accessible surface area, non-polar and polar surface area, and net charge due to the side chain. Changes in each of these values between neighboring sequences were calculated for each residue and mapped onto the crystal structures. Results Areas of HA showing the highest frequency of pairwise changes agreed well with previously identified antigenic sites in H3 and H1 HAs, and allowed us to propose more detailed antigenic maps and novel antigenic sites for H1 and influenza B HA. Changes in biophysical properties differed between HAs of different subtypes, and between different antigenic sites of the same HA. For H1, statistically significant differences in several biophysical quantities compared to residues lying outside antigenic sites were seen for some antigenic sites but not others. Influenza B antigenic sites all show statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities for all antigenic sites, whereas no statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities were seen for any antigenic site is seen for H3. In many cases, residues previously shown to be under positive selection at the genetic level also undergo rapid change in biophysical properties. Conclusions The biophysical

  15. Influenza virus A(H1N1)2009 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in young children prior to the H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Annelies W; Westerhuis, Brenda M; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Jacobi, Ronald H; de Bruin, Erwin; van Beek, Josine; Buisman, Annemarie M; Koopmans, Marion P; van Binnendijk, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    Pre-existing immunity played a significant role in protection during the latest influenza A virus H1N1 pandemic, especially in older age groups. Structural similarities were found between A(H1N1)2009 and older H1N1 virus strains to which humans had already been exposed. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing the A(H1N1)2009 virus have been implicated in this immune protection in adults. We investigated the serological profile of a group of young children aged 9 years (n=55), from whom paired blood samples were available, just prior to the pandemic wave (March 2009) and shortly thereafter (March 2010). On the basis of A(H1N1)2009 seroconversion, 27 of the 55 children (49 %) were confirmed to be infected between these two time points. Within the non-infected group of 28 children (51 %), high levels of seasonal antibodies to H1 and H3 HA1 antigens were detected prior to pandemic exposure, reflecting past infection with H1N1 and H3N2, both of which had circulated in The Netherlands prior to the pandemic. In some children, this reactivity coincided with specific antibody reactivity against A(H1N1)2009. While these antibodies were not able to neutralize the A(H1N1)2009 virus, they were able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro upon interaction with the A(H1N1)2009 virus. This finding suggests that cross-reactive antibodies could contribute to immune protection in children via ADCC.

  16. 2009 H1N1 Influenza 2009 H1N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth J. Sullivan, MD; Robert M. Jacobson, MD; Walter R. Dowdle, PhD; and Gregory A. Poland

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within 2 months of its discovery last spring, a novel influenza A (H1N1 virus, currently referred to as 2009 H1N1, caused the first influenza pandemic in decades. The virus has caused disproportionate disease among young people with early reports of virulence similar to that of seasonal influenza. This clinical review provides an update encompassing the virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the 2009 H1N1 virus. Because information about this virus, its prevention,and treatment are rapidly evolving, readers are advised to seek additional information. We performed a literature search of PubMed using the following keywords: H1N1, influenza, vaccine, pregnancy, children, treatment, epidemiology, and review. Studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of their relevance. Recent studies and articles were preferred.

    El Editor de este número especial agradece la autorización expresa, mediante comunicación escrita en nuestro poder, de los autores del trabajo “2009 H1N1 Influenza”, así como de los editores de la revista Mayo Clinic Proceedings, para su reproducción, como publicación secundaria en Medisur, artículo de revisión seleccionado por nosotros, que resume buena parte de los nuevos conocimientos adquiridos a partir de la literatura médica reciente relacionada con esta pandemia, durante el año 2009.

    De este modo, el artículo que a continuación de reproduce para los lectores de Medisur, está basado íntegramente en el estudio previamente publicado como: Sullivan SJ, Jacobson RM, Dowdle WR, Poland GA. 2009 H1N1 Influenza. Mayo Clin Proc. 2010;85(1:64-76.

    A continuación el resumen:

    Within 2 months of its discovery last spring, a novel influenza A (H1N1 virus, currently referred to as 2009 H1N1, caused the first influenza pandemic in decades. The virus has caused disproportionate disease among young people with early reports of virulence similar

  17. Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

  18. H1-antihistamines for chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Maulina; Bennett, Cathy; Cohen, Stuart N; Carter, Ben

    2014-11-14

    Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is characterised by the development of crops of red, itchy, raised weals or hives with no identifiable external cause.Objectives To assess the effects of H1-antihistamines for CSU.Search methods We searched the following databases up to June 2014: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE(from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and PsycINFO (from 1806). We searched five trials registers and checked articles for references to relevant randomised controlled trials.Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of H1-antihistamines for CSU. Interventions included single therapy or a combination of H1-antihistamines compared with no treatment (placebo) or another active pharmacological compound at any dose.Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.Our primary outcome measures were proportion of participants with complete suppression of urticaria: 'good or excellent' response,50% or greater improvement in quality of life measures, and adverse events.We present risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals(CIs). Main results We identified 73 studies (9759 participants); 34 studies provided data for 23 comparisons. The duration of the intervention was up to two weeks (short-term) or longer than two weeks and up to three months (intermediate-term).Cetirizine 10mg once daily in the short term and in the intermediate term led to complete suppression of urticaria by more participants than was seen with placebo (RR 2.72, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.91). For this same outcome, comparison of desloratadine versus placebo in the intermediate term (5 mg) (RR 37.00, 95% CI 2.31 to 593.70) and in the short term (20 mg) (RR 15.97, 95% CI 1.04 to 245.04)favoured desloratadine, but no differences were seen between 5 mg and 10 mg for short-term treatment.Levocetirizine 20 mg per day (short-term) was more effective for complete suppression of

  19. Molecular Characterization of Avian-like H1N1 Swine Influenza A Viruses Isolated in Eastern China, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Qi; Yuning Pan; Yuanfang Qin; Rongqiang Zu; Fengyang Tang; Minghao Zhou; Hua Wang; Yongchun Song

    2012-01-01

    Currently,three predominant subtypes of influenza virus are prevalent in pig populations worldwide:H1N1,H3N2,and H1N2.European avian-like H1N1 viruses,which were initially detected in European pig populations in 1979,have been circulating in pigs in eastern China since 2007.In this study,six influenza A viruses were isolated from 60 swine lung samples collected from January to April 2011 in eastern China.Based on whole genome sequencing,molecular characteristics of two isolates were determined.Phylogenetic analysis showed the eight genes of the two isolates were closely related to those of the avian-like H1N1 viruses circulating in pig populations,especially similar to those found in China.Four potential glycosylation sites were observed at positions 13,26,198,277 in the HA1 proteins of the two isolates.Due to the presence of a stop codon at codon 12,the isolates contained truncated PB1-F2 proteins.In this study,the isolates contained 591Q,627E and 701N in the polymerase subunit PB2,which had been shown to be determinants of virulence and host adaptation.The isolates also had a D rather than E at position 92 of the NS1,a marker of mammalian adaptation.Both isolates contained the GPKV motif at the PDZ ligand domain of the 3' end of the NS1,a characteristic marker of the European avian-like swine viruses since about 1999,which is distinct from those of avian,human and classical swine viruses.The M2 proteins of the isolates have the mutation (S31N),a characteristic marker of the European avian-like swine viruses since about 1987,which may confer resistance to amantadine and rimantadine antivirals.Our findings further emphasize the importance of surveillance on the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses in pigs,and raise more concerns about the occurrence of cross-species transmission events.

  20. Factors associated with vaccination against Influenza A (H1N1 in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Fonseca Victor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic, clinical and behavioral factors and receiving information about the vaccine against pandemic influenza A (H1N1 associated with vaccination of elderly people. Study of quantitative and transversal nature, in which 286 elderly residents in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil participated. The association between variables was analyzed by the Pearson chi-square test, considering a 95% confidence interval and significance level (p≤0.05. The results revealed that, unlike the sociodemographic characteristics, many clinical, behavioral and informational aspects correlated significantly with adherence to Influenza A (H1N1 vaccination. It is believed that the findings can be used in strategies to control and prevent infection by viral subtypes within the elderly population, extensible even to other vaccine-preventable diseases, especially in light of possible future pandemics.

  1. Plant-based rapid production of recombinant subunit hemagglutinin vaccines targeting H1N1 and H5N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, Mark; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Damon, Emily; Mett, Vadim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Bi, Hong; Farrance, Christine; Shamloul, Moneim; Kushnir, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 swine influenza virus was isolated from infected humans in Mexico and the United States, and rapidly spread around the world. Another virus, a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype, identified by the World Health Organization as a potential pandemic threat in 1997, continues to be a significant risk. While vaccination is the preferred strategy for the prevention and control of influenza infections, the traditional egg-based approach to producing influenza vaccines does not provide sufficient capacity and adequate speed to satisfy global needs to combat newly emerging strains, seasonal or potentially pandemic. Significant efforts are underway to develop and implement new cell substrates with improved efficiency for influenza vaccine development and manufacturing. In recent years, plants have been used to produce recombinant proteins including subunit vaccines and antibodies. The main advantages of using plant systems for the production of vaccine antigens against influenza are their independence from pathogenic viruses, and cost and time efficiency. Here, we describe the large-scale production of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strains of influenza virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and their immunogenicity (serum hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibodies), and safety in animal models. These results support the testing of these candidate vaccines in human volunteers and also the utility of our plant expression system for large-scale recombinant influenza vaccine production.

  2. The character and significance of the subtypes of human papillomaviruses in the cervical lesions%宫颈病变中HPV亚型感染特点及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶琨; 杨静; 杨华; 郭振华; 陈向宇; 孟晓彦; 王春蕾; 唐龙英; 左绪磊

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the character and significance of the subtypes of human papillomaviruses in the cervical lesions. Methods: The genotypes of the HPVs in the samples of 277 cases were collected and measured by colposcopic biopsy, the HPVs in the cervical cells were analyzed and quantitatively measured by using the Hybrid Capture Ⅱ. Results: The single infection of the HPV in creased as the cervical lesions became more seriously, but the multi - infections decreased. The difference between CIN Ⅰ and CIN Ⅲ and squamous cell carcinoma were statistically significant ( P <0.05 ) . The most common subtypes of the HPVs were type 16, type 58, type 33,type 52, type 31 and type 18. Both the classification of the HPVs and the detective of the Hybrid Capture Ⅱ demonstrated that the infection rate of the HPVs increased as the cervical lesions became seriously, but the difference between the two detective methods was not statistically significant (P > 0.05) . Conclusion: The detectives of the HPV subtypes can be used in scanning the cervical lesions of the high risk population for the early diagnosis and management. The understanding of the distribution of the subtypes of the HPVs will aid the research and development of the vaccines of the human papilloma viruses.%目的:探讨宫颈病变中HPV亚型感染特点及意义.方法:收集277例阴道镜活检病例行HPV基因型测定;相应的宫颈细胞行HPV杂交捕获定量(HCⅡ)检测.结果:随着宫颈病变程度加重,HPV一重感染逐步上升,多重感染逐步下降,CIN Ⅰ组与CINⅢ组、鳞癌组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);HPV亚型感染频度前六位依次为16、58、33、52、31、18;HPV分型与HCⅡ均显示随着宫颈病变程度的加重,HPV感染率上升,但两种方法检测结果差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:HPV亚型检测可以用于高危人群的宫颈病变筛查,可达到早发现、早治疗的目的,并且明确HPV亚型的分布特点,有助于HPV疫苗的开发应用.

  3. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of a series of 4-substituted glutamate analogues and pharmacological characterization at human glutamate transporters subtypes 1-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alaux, Sebastien; Kusk, Mie; Sagot, Emanuelle;

    2005-01-01

    compounds were evaluated as potential ligands for the glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 (excitatory amino acid transporter, subtypes 1-3) in the FLIPR membrane potential (FMP) assay. We found a distinct change in the pharmacological profile when the 4-methyl group (compound 1a, an EAAT1......A series of nine L-2,4-syn-4-alkylglutamic acid analogues (1a-i) were synthesized in high yield and high enantiomeric excess (>99% ee) from their corresponding 4-substituted ketoglutaric acids (2a-i), using the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) from pig heart or E. coli. The synthesized...... substrate and EAAT2,3 inhibitor) was extended to a 4-ethyl group, compound 1b, as this analogue is an inhibitor at all three subtypes, EAAT1-3. Furthermore, we conclude that both large and bulky hydrophobic substituents in the 4-position of L-2,4-syn Glu are allowed by all three glutamate transporter...

  4. Crystalline 1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy; Gulsado-Barrios, Gregorio; Bouffard, Jean; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides novel and stable crystalline 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of making 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of using 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes in catalytic reactions.

  5. Genetic analysis of HIV-1 subtypes in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Khoja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis of a viral infection helps in following its spread in a given population, in tracking the routes of infection and, where applicable, in vaccine design. Additionally, sequence analysis of the viral genome provides information about patterns of genetic divergence that may have occurred during viral evolution. OBJECTIVE: In this study we have analyzed the subtypes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus -1 (HIV-1 circulating in a diverse sample population of Nairobi, Kenya. METHODOLOGY: 69 blood samples were collected from a diverse subject population attending the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. Total DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and used in a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to amplify the HIV gag gene. The PCR amplimers were partially sequenced, and alignment and phylogenetic analysis of these sequences was performed using the Los Alamos HIV Database. RESULTS: Blood samples from 69 HIV-1 infected subjects from varying ethnic backgrounds were analyzed. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed 39 isolates to be subtype A, 13 subtype D, 7 subtype C, 3 subtype AD and CRF01_AE, 2 subtype G and 1 subtype AC and 1 AG. Deeper phylogenetic analysis revealed HIV subtype A sequences to be highly divergent as compared to subtypes D and C. CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that HIV-1 subtypes in the Nairobi province of Kenya are dominated by a genetically diverse clade A. Additionally, the prevalence of highly divergent, complex subtypes, intersubtypes, and the recombinant forms indicates viral mixing in Kenyan population, possibly as a result of dual infections.

  6. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  7. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan MM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manoj M Narayanan,1,2 Chandrasekhar B Nair,2 Shilpa K Sanjeeva,2 PV Subba Rao,2 Phani K Pullela,1,2 Colin J Barrow11Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 2Bigtec Pvt Ltd, Rajajinagar, Bangalore, IndiaAbstract: Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1. The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present.Keywords: neuraminidase, influenza, H1N1, multiligand, binding energy, molecular docking, virus

  8. Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease: the role of H1N1 infection and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partinen, Markku; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Julkunen, Ilkka; Vaarala, Outi

    2014-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterised by loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. The prevalence of narcolepsy is about 30 per 100 000 people, and typical age at onset is 12-16 years. Narcolepsy is strongly associated with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 genotype, and has been thought of as an immune-mediated disease. Other risk genes, such as T-cell-receptor α chain and purinergic receptor subtype 2Y11, are also implicated. Interest in narcolepsy has increased since the epidemiological observations that H1N1 infection and vaccination are potential triggering factors, and an increase in the incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination in 2010 from Sweden and Finland supports the immune-mediated pathogenesis. Epidemiological observations from studies in China also suggest a role for H1N1 virus infections as a trigger for narcolepsy. Although the pathological mechanisms are unknown, an H1N1 virus-derived antigen might be the trigger.

  9. 人疱疹病毒8型ORF75基因亚型与Kaposi肉瘤的相关性研究%Study on the ORF75 subtypes of human herpesvirus-8 in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春雷; 普雄明; 吴卫东; 张德志; 吴秀娟

    2009-01-01

    Objective To profile the subtypes of open reading frame 75(ORF75)of human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma,and to evaluate their relationship with clinical phenotypes and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma.Methods Twenty-five paraffin-embeded tissue specimens of Kaposi's sarcoma were collected in the Department of Dermatology.People's Hospiml of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.DNA was extracted from these specimens.and nested-PCR was performed to amplify HHV-8 DNA followed bv bi-directional sequencing.Phylogenetic analysis was carried out by using the software DNASTAR,Clustal W program and PHYLIP package so as to identify the ORF75 subtyoe of HHV-8.Results HHV-8 DNA was detected in 21(84%)out of the 25 samples,and 7 cases of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma were all positive for HHV-8.Among the 21 patients carrying HHV-8 DNA,18 were positive for subtype A ORF75.3 for subtype C ORF75.The ORF75 subtypes had no significant correlation with the presence of mucosal lesions or clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma.Conclusions The majority of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang are infected with HHV-8 of ORF 75 subtype A and C.The ORF75 subtypes of HHV-8 have no correlation with the presence of mucosal lesions or clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma.%目的 探讨人类疱疹病毒8型(HHV-8)ORF75基因亚型,与Kaposi肉瘤不同临床分型及侵袭性的相关性.方法 对25例新疆Kaposi肉瘤石蜡包埋组织进行HHV-8 DNA抽提、扩增及双向测序,使用Clustal W软件和PHYLIP软件包对测序结果进行发生学分析,从而确定HHV-8 ORF75基因哑型.结果 25例Kaposi肉瘤中,21例HHV-8阳性,阳性率为84%,其中7例AIDS相关型Kaposi肉瘤患者HHV-8均阳性.21例HHV-8阳性患者中,18例为HHV-8 ORF75 A亚型,3例为C亚型;不同亚型间Kaposi肉瘤患者有无黏膜损害及临床分型的分布差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 新疆Kaposi肉瘤患者感染HHV-8 ORF75

  10. Analysis list: Suv39h1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Suv39h1 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv...39h1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Suv39h

  11. Construction of a High Titer Infectious HIV-1 Subtype C Proviral Clone from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Bodem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtype C is currently the predominant subtype worldwide. Cell culture studies of Sub-Saharan African subtype C proviral plasmids are hampered by the low replication capacity of the resulting viruses, although viral loads in subtype C infected patients are as high as those from patients with subtype B. Here, we describe the sequencing and construction of a new HIV-1 subtype C proviral clone (pZAC, replicating more than one order of magnitude better than the previous subtype C plasmids. We identify the env-region for being the determinant for the higher viral titers and the pZAC Env to be M-tropic. This higher replication capacity does not lead to a higher cytotoxicity compared to previously described subtype C viruses. In addition, the pZAC Vpu is also shown to be able to down-regulate CD4, but fails to fully counteract CD317.

  12. Evidence for a common pharmacological interaction site on K(Ca)2 channels providing both selective activation and selective inhibition of the human K(Ca)2.1 subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Charlotte; Hammami, Sofia; Eriksen, Birgitte L;

    2012-01-01

    ]pyrimidines, act either as activators or as inhibitors of the human K(Ca)2.1 channel. Whereas (-)-CM-TPMF activates K(Ca)2.1 with an EC(50) value of 24 nM, (-)-B-TPMF inhibits the channel with an IC(50) value of 31 nM. In contrast, their (+)-enantiomers are 40 to 100 times less active. Both (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B......-TPMF are subtype-selective, with 10- to 20-fold discrimination toward other K(Ca)2 channels and the K(Ca)3 channel. Coapplication experiments reveal competitive-like functional interactions between the effects of (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B-TPMF. Despite belonging to a different chemical class than GW542573X, the K(Ca)2......-TPMF is 10 times more potent on K(Ca)2.1 than NS309 (6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime), an unselective but hitherto the most potent K(Ca)3/K(Ca)2 channel activator. (-)-B-TPMF is the first small-molecule inhibitor with significant selectivity among the K(Ca)2 channel subtypes. In contrast to peptide...

  13. Human pDCs display sex-specific differences in type I interferon subtypes and interferon α/β receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Susanne M; Beisel, Claudia; Sutter, Kathrin; Griesbeck, Morgane; Hildebrandt, Heike; Hagen, Sven H; Dittmer, Ulf; Altfeld, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    The outcomes of many diseases differ between women and men, with women experiencing a higher incidence and more severe pathogenesis of autoimmune and some infectious diseases. It has been suggested that this is partially due to activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), the main producers of interferon (IFN)-α, in response to toll-like receptor (TLR)7 stimulation. We investigated the induction of type I IFN (IFN-I) subtypes upon TLR7 stimulation on isolated pDCs. Our data revealed a sex-specific differential expression of IFN-Is, with pDCs from females showing a significantly higher mRNA expression of all 13 IFN-α subtypes. In addition, pDCs from females had higher levels of IFN-β mRNA after stimulation, indicating that sex differences in IFN-I production by pDCs were mediated by a signaling event upstream of the first loop of IFN-I mRNA transcription. Furthermore, the surface expression levels of the common IFN-α/β receptor subunit 2 were significantly higher on pDCs from females in comparison to males. These data indicate that higher IFN-α production is already established at the mRNA level and propose a contribution of higher IFN-α/β receptor 2 expression on pDCs to the immunological differences in IFN-I production observed between females and males. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Prevalence of influenza A and variation of H1N1 influenza A virus in Shanghai area in 2009%2009年上海地区甲型流行性感冒流行及甲型H1N1病毒分离株变异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕锡宏; 谈逸云; 居丽雯; 申惠国; 高颖阳; 熊海燕; 姜庆五

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand epidemic characteristics of human influenza A and the genetic and antigenic variations of H1N1 influenza A isolates in Shanghai area in 2009. Methods Throat swabs were collected from patients with influenza-like illness in the sentinel surveillance clinic in Shanghai area in 2009, then inoculated in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines. The types of influenza were identified by direct immunofluorescence assay (DIF) and the subtypes were determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Segments of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of some 2009 H1N1 influenza A isolates were amplified and sequenced. HA and NA gene mutations of 2009 H1N1 influenza A isolates were analyzed. Results Seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses co-circulated during the spring of 2009 in Shanghai area. Seasonal H3N2 began to co-circulate with 2009 H1N1 in August (the 32nd week) and finally2009 H1N1 became dominate since the 40th week. The phylogenetic tree of 2009 H1N1 HA segment revealed that the isolates from different regions and months were interspersed with each other, but all were clustered into one branch which closed to strains in Spain, Russia, Denmark and other European countries. Mutations were found in some HA amino acid sites, but none of them was in the antigenic determinant region. No change was observed in the 274 NA amino acid residues which were related to the drug resistance to oseltamivir. PB2 protein analysis showed that the 627 and 701 amino acid residues were glutamic acid and aspartic acid respectively, which were the same encoded amino acid with avian flu PB2 protein. Conclusions Seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 co-circulated in the spring of 2009, then both 2009 H1N1 and seasonal H3N2 were prevalent in Summer and Autumn, and 2009 H1N1 finally became dominate in Autumn. Compared to early 2009 H1N1 strains, variations are detected in H1N1 influenza A viruses, but none of them has epidemiological influence, and

  15. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... the H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials conducted ...

  16. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Michael; Ji, Lexiang; Santos, Alex M; Kamei, Masayuki; Sasaki, Takahiko; Basenko, Evelina Y; Schmitz, Robert J; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lewis, Zachary A

    2016-07-07

    Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the [Formula: see text]hH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq). Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq) revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the [Formula: see text]hH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa.

  17. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seymour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the ΔhH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq. Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the ΔhH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa.

  18. Role of H1 linker histones in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chenyi; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-03-01

    H1 linker histones are key chromatin architectural proteins facilitating the formation of higher order chromatin structures. The H1 family constitutes the most heterogeneous group of histone proteins, with eleven non-allelic H1 variants in mammals. H1 variants differ in their biochemical properties and exhibit significant sequence divergence from one another, yet most of them are highly conserved during evolution from mouse to human. H1 variants are differentially regulated during development and their cellular compositions undergo dramatic changes in embryogenesis, gametogenesis, tissue maturation and cellular differentiation. As a group, H1 histones are essential for mouse development and proper stem cell differentiation. Here we summarize our current knowledge on the expression and functions of H1 variants in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation. Their diversity, sequence conservation, complex expression and distinct functions suggest that H1s mediate chromatin reprogramming and contribute to the large variations and complexity of chromatin structure and gene expression in the mammalian genome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sequence Characterization of matrix protein (M1 in influenza A viruses (H1, H3 and H5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study brings the analysis of amino acid sequences of matrix protein (M1 from the influenza virus A (H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 during 2007-2208. 741 sequences of M1 were compared, of them, H1N1 388; H3N2 251 and H5N1 102. Even though, the M1 is relatively conserved among the influenza A viruses, we found some variations in the M1 among the viruses, H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1. The nuclear localization signal at amino acid 101 to 105 is RKLKR for H1N1 and H3N2, but for H5N1 is KKLKR. All differences of amino acid in M1 of H1, H3 and H5 were listed. 80 sequences of M1 of H1N1 H3N2 and H5N1 were used for phylogenetic analysis. There is no reasontantment found in the M1 among these subtypes. Further study is needed to study the differences of the function of M1 among H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1. The M1 of H5N1 may contribute to the high pathogenesis to this virus.

  20. Subtyping Animal Influenza Virus with General Multiplex RT-PCR and Liquichip High Throughput (GMPLex)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-feng Qin; Bing Cheng; Zhou-xi Ruan; Ying-zuo Bi; Joseph J Giambrone; Hong-zhuan Wu; Jie Sun; Ti-kang Lu; Shao-ling Zeng; Qun-yi Hua; Qing-yan Ling; Shu-kun Chen; Jian-qiang Lv; Cai-hong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a multiplex RT-PCR integrated with luminex technology to rapidly subtype simultaneously multiple influenza viruses.Primers and probes were designed to amplify NS and M genes of influenza A viruses HA gene of H1,H3,H5,H7,H9 subtypes,and NA gene of the N1 and N2 subtypes.Universal super primers were introduced to establish a multiplex RT-PCR (GM RT-PCR).It included three stages of RT-PCR amplification,and then the RT-PCR products were further tested by LiquiChip probe,combined to give an influenza virus (Ⅳ) rapid high throughput subtyping test,designated as GMPLex.The IV GMPLex rapid high throughput subtyping test presents the following features:high throughput,able to determine the subtypes of 9 target genes in H1,H3,H5,H7,H9,N1,and N2 subtypes of the influenza A virus at one time; rapid,completing the influenza subtyping within 6 hours; high specificity,ensured the specificity of the different subtypes by using two nested degenerate primers and one probe,no cross reaction occurring between the subtypes,no non-specific reactions with other pathogens and high sensitivity.When used separately to detect the product of single GM RT-PCR for single H5 or N1 gene,the GMPLex test showed a sensitivity of 105(=280ELD50) forboth tests and the Luminex qualitative ratio results were 3.08 and 3.12,respectively.When used to detect the product of GM RT-PCR for HSN1 strain at the same time,both showed a sensitivity of 10-4(=2800 ELD50).The GMPLex rapid high throughput subtyping test can satisfy the needs of influenza rapid testing.

  1. 鼻内翻性乳头状瘤与人乳头状瘤病毒感染及其亚型的关系%Relationship between nasal inverted papilloma and human papillomavirus subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙璞; 陈晓平; 裴斐; 马瑞霞; 张燚; 陈群; 董维刚; 陈维香; 黄惠丽

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨人乳头状瘤病毒(human papillomavims,HPV)在鼻内翻性乳头状瘤(nasal inverted papilloma,NIP)中感染亚型的分布及其在病变发生、发展中的作用.方法 取101例NIP石蜡包埋组织标本(其中单纯NIP组77例,伴不典型增生NIP组22例,NIP癌变组2例),采用核酸分子快速导流杂交基因芯片分型技术(HybriMax)对21种HPV亚型(并区分高危亚型和低危亚型)同步进行检测和病毒分型,并以24例健康志愿者鼻腔黏膜组织为健康对照组.结果 NIP石蜡包埋组织标本HPV总阳性率为64.4%(65/101),对照组HPV均为阴性(0/24),两组比较差异有统计学意义(χ~2=32.178,P<0.05).单纯NIP组、伴不典型增生NIP组、NIP癌变组HPV阳性率分别为59.7%(46/77)、81.8%(18/22)和50.0%(1/2),单纯NIP组与伴不典型增生NIP组比较,HPV阳性率差异无统计学意义(χ~2=3.649,P=0.056).单纯NIP组与伴不典型增生NIP组的HPV高危亚型、低危亚型的构成比差异有统计学意义(χ~2=10.412,P<0.05).结论 NIP的发病与HPV感染密切相关,HPV高危亚型可能促使NIP向不典型增生发展.明确NIP中HPV亚型的分布情况对肿瘤临床行为的预测有一定指导意义.%Objective To study the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes in nasal inverted papilloma (NIP) ,and to evaluate tlle relationship between HPV and NIP.Methods Twenty-one HPV subtypes were detected in parafffin-embedded tissues of 101 cases of NIP by flow through hybridization and gene chip (HybriMax) ,24 cases of normal nagal mucosa were used as controls.Results HPV positive rates of NIP were 64.36% (65/101) .Benign NIP group,NIP with atypical hyperplasia group,NIP with Cancerous group of HPV positive rates were 59.7% (46/77) ,81.8% (18/22) and 50% (1/2) respectively.The control group was negative (0/24) .The comparison between NIP group and control group was statistically significant (χ~2=32.178,P<0.05) .Benign NIP group and NIP with atypical hyperplasia group

  2. Basaloid Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Subclassification into Basal, Ductal, and Mixed Subtypes Based on Comparison of Clinico-pathologic Features and Expression of p53, Cyclin D1, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, p16, and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ja Cho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma with distinct pathologic characteristics. The histogenesis of BSCC is not fully understood, and the cancer has been suggested to originate from a totipotent primitive cell in the basal cell layer of the surface epithelium or in the proximal duct of secretory glands. Methods Twenty-six cases of head and neck BSCC from Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, reported during a 14-year-period were subclassified into basal, ductal, and mixed subtypes according to the expression of basal (cytokeratin [CK] 5/6, p63 or ductal markers (CK7, CK8/18. The cases were also subject to immunohistochemical study for CK19, p53, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and p16 and to in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus (HPV, and the results were clinico-pathologically compared. Results Mixed subtype (12 cases was the most common, and these cases showed hypopharyngeal predilection, older age, and higher expression of CK19, p53, and EGFR than other subtypes. The basal subtype (nine cases showed frequent comedo-necrosis and high expression of cyclin D1. The ductal subtype (five cases showed the lowest expression of p53, cyclin D1, and EGFR. A small number of p16- and/or HPV-positive cases were not restricted to one subtype. BSCC was the cause of death in 19 patients, and the average follow-up period for all patients was 79.5 months. Overall survival among the three subtypes was not significantly different. Conclusions The results of this study suggest a heterogeneous pathogenesis of head and neck BSCC. Each subtype showed variable histology and immunoprofiles, although the clinical implication of heterogeneity was not determined in this study.

  3. Psychopathy subtypes and psychopathic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Koshkina Ekaterina Nikolaevna

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses two main subtypes of psychopathy and its characteristic traits that allow to differ them from each other. Following that, the existence of more specific subtypes of psychopathy and sociopathy is argued on the basis of the recent researches. Also, the inclination of psychopaths and sociopaths to various kinds of violence is examined.

  4. A differentiation-based phylogeny of cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Riester

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological classification of human tumors relies in part on the degree of differentiation of the tumor sample. To date, there is no objective systematic method to categorize tumor subtypes by maturation. In this paper, we introduce a novel computational algorithm to rank tumor subtypes according to the dissimilarity of their gene expression from that of stem cells and fully differentiated tissue, and thereby construct a phylogenetic tree of cancer. We validate our methodology with expression data of leukemia, breast cancer and liposarcoma subtypes and then apply it to a broader group of sarcomas. This ranking of tumor subtypes resulting from the application of our methodology allows the identification of genes correlated with differentiation and may help to identify novel therapeutic targets. Our algorithm represents the first phylogeny-based tool to analyze the differentiation status of human tumors.

  5. Diverse antigenic site targeting of influenza hemagglutinin in the murine antibody recall response to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason R; Guo, Zhu; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Garten, Rebecca J; Xiyan, Xu; Blanchard, Elisabeth G; Blanchfield, Kristy; Stevens, James; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2015-11-01

    Here we define the epitopes on HA that are targeted by a group of 9 recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) isolated from memory B cells of mice, immunized by infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus followed by a seasonal TIV boost. These rmAbs were all reactive against the HA1 region of HA, but display 7 distinct binding footprints, targeting each of the 4 known antigenic sites. Although the rmAbs were not broadly cross-reactive, a group showed subtype-specific cross-reactivity with the HA of A/South Carolina/1/18. Screening these rmAbs with a panel of human A(H1N1)pdm09 virus isolates indicated that naturally-occurring changes in HA could reduce rmAb binding, HI activity, and/or virus neutralization activity by rmAb, without showing changes in recognition by polyclonal antiserum. In some instances, virus neutralization was lost while both ELISA binding and HI activity were retained, demonstrating a discordance between the two serological assays traditionally used to detect antigenic drift.

  6. An equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) vectored H1 vaccine protects against challenge with swine-origin influenza virus H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Abdelrahman; Damiani, Armando; Ma, Guanggang; Kalthoff, Donata; Beer, Martin; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-12-29

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus (S-OIV), antigenically and genetically divergent from seasonal H1N1, caused a flu pandemic in humans. Development of an effective vaccine to limit transmission of S-OIV in animal reservoir hosts and from reservoir hosts to humans and animals is necessary. In the present study, we constructed and evaluated a vectored vaccine expressing the H1 hemagglutinin of a recent S-OIV isolate using equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. Expression of the recombinant protein was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting and the in vitro growth properties of the modified live vector were found to be comparable to those of the parental virus. The EHV-1-H1 vaccine induced an influenza virus-specific antibody response when inoculated into mice by both the intranasal and subcutaneous routes. Upon challenge infection, protection of vaccinated mice could be demonstrated by reduction of clinical signs and faster virus clearance. Our study shows that an EHV-1-based influenza H1N1 vaccine may be a promising alternative for protection against S-OIV infection.

  7. The neutralization sensitivity of viruses representing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants of diverse subtypes from early in infection is dependent on producer cell, as well as characteristics of the specific antibody and envelope variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Nicholas M; Cortez, Valerie; Chohan, Vrasha; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-05-25

    Neutralization properties of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) are often defined using pseudoviruses grown in transformed cells, which are not biologically relevant HIV-1 producer cells. Little information exists on how these viruses compare to viruses produced in primary lymphocytes, particularly for globally relevant HIV-1 strains. Therefore, replication-competent chimeras encoding envelope variants from the dominant HIV-1 subtypes (A, C, and D) obtained early after infection were generated and the neutralization properties explored. Pseudoviruses generated in 293T cells were the most sensitive to antibody neutralization. Replicating viruses generated in primary lymphocytes were most resistant to neutralization by plasma antibodies and most monoclonal antibodies (b12, 4E10, 2F5, VRC01). These differences were not associated with differences in envelope content. Surprisingly, the virus source did not impact neutralization sensitivity of most viruses to PG9. These findings suggest that producer cell type has a major effect on neutralization sensitivity, but in an antibody dependent manner.

  8. Rational design and enantioselective synthesis of (1R,4S,5R,6S)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid - a novel inhibitor at human glutamate transporter subtypes 1, 2, and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Nielsen, Birgitte; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2006-01-01

    The natural product kainic acid is used as template for the rational design of a novel conformationally restricted (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) analogue, (1R,4S,5R,6S)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (1a). The target structure 1a was synthesized from commercially available (S......)-pyroglutaminol, in an enantioselective fashion, in 14 steps. Pharmacological characterization of 1a at human glutamate transporter subtypes 1, 2, and 3 yielded K(i) values of 127, 52, and 46 microM, respectively. Furthermore, binding studies at native ionotropic Glu (iGlu) receptors revealed low affinity for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5...

  9. The development of a GeXP-based multiplex reverse transcription-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of sixteen human respiratory virus types/subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing standard non-molecular diagnostic methods such as viral culture and immunofluorescent (DFA are time-consuming, labor intensive or limited sensitivity. Several multiplex molecular assays are costly. Therefore, there is a need for the development of a rapid and sensitive diagnosis of respiratory viral pathogens. Methods A GeXP-based multiplex RT-PCR assay (GeXP assay was developed to detect simultaneously sixteen different respiratory virus types/subtypes. Seventeen sets of chimeric primers were used to initiate the RT-PCR, and one pair of universal primers was used for the subsequent cycles of the RT-PCR. The specificity of the GeXP assay was examined with positive controls for each virus type/subtype. The sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial ten-fold dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA of all RNA viruses and the plasmids containing the Adv and HBoV target sequence. GeXP assay was further evaluated using 126 clinical specimens and compared with Luminex xTAG RVP Fast assay. Results The GeXP assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 1000 copies when all of the 16 pre-mixed viral targets were present. Analyses of 126 clinical specimens using the GeXP assay demonstrated that GeXP assay and the RVP Fast assay were in complete agreement for 109/126 (88.51% of the specimens. GeXP assay was more sensitive than the RVP Fast assay for the detection of HRV and PIV3, and slightly less sensitive for the detection of HMPV, Adv, RSVB and HBoV. The whole process of the GeXP assay for the detection of 12 samples was completed within 2.5 hours. Conclusions In conclusion, the GeXP assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific and high throughput method for the detection of respiratory virus infections.

  10. Cross-reactivity between avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and divergent H7 subtypic- and heterosubtypic influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Gao, Xin; Xiao, Yan; Ren, Lili; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Shu, Yuelong; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-02-24

    The number of human avian H7N9 influenza infections has been increasing in China. Understanding their antigenic and serologic relationships is crucial for developing diagnostic tools and vaccines. Here, we evaluated the cross-reactivities and neutralizing activities among H7 subtype influenza viruses and between H7N9 and heterosubtype influenza A viruses. We found strong cross-reactivities between H7N9 and divergent H7 subtypic viruses, including H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7. Antisera against H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7 could also effectively neutralize two distinct H7N9 strains. Two-way cross-reactivities exist within group 2, including H3 and H4, whereas one-way cross-reactivities were found across other groups, including H1, H10, H9, and H13. Our data indicate that the hemaglutinins from divergent H7 subtypes may facilitate the development of vaccines for distinct H7N9 infections. Moreover, serologic diagnoses for H7N9 infections need to consider possible interference from the cross-reactivity of H7N9 with other subtype influenza viruses.

  11. Luminosity measurement in H1; Mesure de la luminosite pour l'experience H1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisson, T

    2006-10-15

    At HERA, luminosity is determined on-line and bunch by bunch by measuring the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from e-p collisions. The Hl collaboration has built a completely new luminosity system in order to sustain the harsh running conditions after the fourfold luminosity increase. Namely, the higher synchrotron radiation doses and the increased event pile-up have governed the design of the two major components, a radiation resistant quartz-fibre electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a fast read-out electronic with on-line energy histogram loading at a rate of 500 kHz. The group was in charge of the electronic and the on-line data analysis of the new luminosity system. In this thesis, I present analysis tools and methods to improve the precision of the luminosity measurement. The energy scale and acceptance calculation methods set out in this thesis permit these values to be determined every four minutes, to an accuracy of 0.5 parts per thousand for the energy scale and 2 parts per thousand for the acceptance. From these results, the degree of accuracy obtained on the luminosity measurement is between 6.5 and 9.5 parts per thousand. These results are currently undergoing validation, with the aim of becoming the standard H1 method. I also studied quasi-elastic Compton events to cross-check the luminosity measurement using the 2003- 2004 and 2005 data. Indeed, this process has a well calculable cross section and a clear experimental signature. The leptonic final state consists of a coplanar e-gamma system, both observable in the central H1 detector. (author)

  12. An H1 histone gene from rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Connor, W; Winkfein, R J; Dixon, G H

    A 1.7-kbp DNA region from the 10.2-kb cluster containing the five rainbow trout histone genes has been subcloned in pBR322 and completely sequenced. It contains a trout histone H1 gene together with its 5' and 3' flanking sequences. This H1 gene codes for a H1 variant different from the major trout testis H1 previously sequenced by Macleod et al. (1977). Northern blots of total RNA from trout testis, kidney, and liver indicate that this H1 gene is expressed in all three tissues but that the level of H1 mRNA is much higher in testis than in other tissues. The lack of heterogeneity in the sizes and 5' initiation sites of trout H1 mRNAs is surprising in view of the substantial heterogeneity of H1 variant proteins observed previously. The coding sequence of the H1 gene shows strong evidence of repeated partial duplications of a hexapeptide motif of the form Ala.Ala.Ala.Lys.Lys.Pro and of a pentapeptide phosphorylation-site sequence, Lys.Ser.Pro.Lys.Lys, during its evolution. Comparisons are drawn between this gene and the coding sequences of other vertebrate H1 genes from chicken and Xenopus, and a strong homology is seen in the region of amino acids 22-101, which form the hydrophobic "head" of the H1 molecule. The 5' and 3' regulatory signals in the trout H1 are also compared with those of H1 genes from other sequences.

  13. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shen, Tongye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynch, Rebecca M [NON LANL; Derdeyn, Cynthia A [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  14. Selective brain gray matter atrophy associated with APOE ε4 and MAPT H1 in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Joaquín; Cervantes, Sebastián; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Lamet, Isabel; Pastor, Pau; Pastor, María A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to elucidate whether specific patterns of gray matter loss were associated with apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)-H1) genetic variants in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at a baseline visit. Gray matter voxel-based morphometry analysis of T1 magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed in 65 amnestic-MCI subjects. MCI APOE ε4 carriers compared with non-carriers showed increased brain atrophy in right hippocampus and rostral amygdala, superior and middle temporal gyrus, and right parietal operculum, including inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal, and supramarginal gyrus. MAPT-H1/H1 MCI carriers showed an increased bilateral atrophy in superior frontal gyri (including frontal eye fields and left prefrontal cortex) and precentral gyrus but also unilateral left atrophy in the inferior temporal gyrus and calcarine gyrus. In addition, MCI subjects carrying both APOE ε4 and MAPT-H1/H1 variants showed gray matter loss in the supplementary motor area and right pre- and postcentral gyri. The effect of APOE ε4 on gray matter loss in right hippocampus suggests that, at least in some AD sub-types, the neuronal vulnerability could be increased in the right hemisphere. The pattern of frontal gray matter loss observed among MCI MAPT H1/H1 carriers has also been found in other tauopathies, suggesting that MCI may share etiological factors with other tauopathies. Frontal and parietal cortex vulnerability was found when adding MAPT H1/H1 and APOE ε4 effects, suggesting a synergistic effect of these variants. These results could be due to changes in APOE ε4 and MAPT expression.

  15. Linker histone H1 and protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kalashnikova, Anna A; Rogge, Ryan A.; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones H1 are ubiquitous chromatin proteins that play important roles in chromatin compaction, transcription regulation, nucleosome spacing and chromosome spacing. H1 function in DNA and chromatin structure stabilization is well studied and established. The current paradigm of linker histone mode of function considers all other cellular roles of linker histones to be a consequence from H1 chromatin compaction and repression. Here we review the multiple processes regulated by linker h...

  16. H1N1快速治疗计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗炯尧; 陈艳莲

    2010-01-01

    近来,因为H1N1的流行,使得好多大型聚会都取消了,人们出行的活动也有所减少,大家都有点谈H1N1色变。如果我们能制造出一种H1N1快速治疗仪,那该多好啊!

  17. Prevalence of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus in Japanese wild raccoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Emi; Sashika, Mariko; Fujii, Kei; Kobayashi, Kohei; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2014-08-30

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor), which are not native to Japan, have been suspected to transmit various pathogens by frequent intrusion into agricultural and residential areas. To determine influenza A virus seropositivity in raccoons in Japan, we examined a total of 634 raccoons captured in 19 towns (A-S) from 2009 to 2012. Agar gel precipitation tests showed that the antibody prevalence was 1.89% (12/634). All positive raccoons were captured in three towns (A-C) located within a radius of approximately 30km, and 75% had antibodies to multiple subtypes (H1, H3-5, N1, N6, and N8). H3 and N8 antibodies were most frequently detected (75%). Among all the raccoons captured, 67% (8/12) were found in town A in 2009 and 2010, and all five raccoons captured in 2010 had H3 and N8 antibodies, suggesting that transmission of the subtype might occur. H5 and N1 antibodies were also detected in two raccoons captured in town A. Virus neutralization tests examining the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 subtype (four isolates of which have been detected in Japan to date) and the low PAIV (LPAIV) H5N3 subtype showed that raccoon sera highly cross-reacted with three H5N1 strains (clade 2.5: Ck/Yamaguchi/7/04; clade 2.3.2.1: Whooper swan/Hokkaido/1/08 and Whooper swan/Hamanaka/11), while they displayed a low cross-reactivity with the antisera to the clade 2.2 virus (Ck/Miyazaki/K11/07) and H5N3 LPAIV (Whistling swan/Shimane/499/83). Thus, the origin of the H5N1 virus was not clearly defined. The viral M gene was detected in four antibody-negative raccoons captured in three towns by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) with high Ct values, although no virus was isolated. This study is the first report showing that raccoons of Japan were infected with multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H5N1. It remains to be elucidated how raccoons play a role in persistence of influenza A virus in nature and if they could pose risks to animal

  18. Enamelin (Enam) is essential for amelogenesis: ENU-induced mouse mutants as models for different clinical subtypes of human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kunihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Junko; Shimizu, Aya; Fujimoto, Naomi; Kawai, Akiko; Miura, Ikuo; Kaneda, Hideki; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ishijima, Junko; Maeda, Takahide; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2005-03-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of commonly inherited defects of dental enamel formation, which exhibits marked genetic and clinical heterogeneity. The genetic basis of this heterogeneity is still poorly understood. Enamelin, the affected gene product in one form of AI (AIH2), is an extracellular matrix protein that is one of the components of enamel. We isolated three ENU-induced dominant mouse mutations, M100395, M100514 and M100521, which caused AI-like phenotypes in the incisors and molars of the affected individuals. Linkage analyses mapped each of the three mutations to a region of chromosome 5 that contained the genes encoding enamelin (Enam) and ameloblastin (Ambn). Sequence analysis revealed that each mutation was a single-base substitution in Enam. M100395 (Enam(Rgsc395)) and M100514 (Enam(Rgsc514)) were putative missense mutations that caused S to I and E to G substitutions at positions 55 and 57 of the translated protein, respectively. Enam(Rgsc395) and Enam(Rgsc514) heterozygotes showed severe breakage of the enamel surface, a phenotype that resembled local hypoplastic AI. The M100521 mutation (Enam(Rgsc521)) was a T to A substitution at the splicing donor site in intron 4. This mutation resulted in a frameshift that gave rise to a premature stop codon. The transcript of the Enam(Rgsc521) mutant allele was degraded, indicating that Enam(Rgsc521) is a loss-of-function mutation. Enam(Rgsc521) heterozygotes showed a hypomaturation-type AI phenotype in the incisors, possibly due to haploinsufficiency of Enam. Enam(Rgsc521) homozygotes showed complete loss of enamel on the incisors and the molars. Thus, we report here that the Enam gene is essential for amelogenesis, and that mice with different point mutations at Enam may provide good animal models to study the different clinical subtypes of AI.

  19. Significance of Epstein-Barr virus (HHV-4 and CMV (HHV-5 infection among subtype-C human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sachithanandham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Opportunistic viral infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection and their molecular detection in the whole blood could be a useful diagnostic tool. Objective: The frequency of opportunistic DNA virus infections among HIV-1-infected individuals using multiplex real-time PCR assays was studied. Materials and Methods: The subjects were in two groups; group 1: Having CD4 counts 350 cells/µl (n = 173. Individuals were classified by WHO clinical staging system. Samples from 70 healthy individuals were tested as controls. In-house qualitative multiplex real-time PCR was standardised and whole blood samples from 291 were tested, followed by quantitative real-time PCR for positives. In a proportion of samples genotypes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and CMV were determined. Results: The two major viral infections observed were EBV and CMV. The univariate analysis of CMV load showed significant association with cryptococcal meningitis, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL, CMV retinitis, CD4 counts and WHO staging (P < 0.05 while the multivariate analysis showed an association with OHL (P = 0.02 and WHO staging (P = 0.05. Univariate analysis showed an association of EBV load with CD4 counts and WHO staging (P < 0.05 and multivariate analysis had association only with CD4 counts. The CMV load was significantly associated with elevated SGPT and SGOT level (P < 0.05 while the EBV had only with SGOT. Conclusion: This study showed an association of EBV and CMV load with CD4+ T cell counts, WHO staging and elevated liver enzymes. These viral infections can accelerate HIV disease and multiplex real-time PCR can be used for the early detection. Genotype 1 and 2 of EBV and genotype gB1 and gB2 of CMV were the prevalent in the HIV-1 subtype C-infected south Indians.

  20. Main: 1H1Y [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1H1Y イネ Rice Oryza sativa L. D-Ribulose-5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase Oryza Sativa Molecu...V. 326 127 2003 3-Epimerase, Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway, Isomerase SWS:Q9SE42,Q9SE42|EMBL; AF189365; AAF01048.1; -.|PDB; 1H...1Y; X-ray; A/B=1-228.|PDB; 1H1Z; X-ray; A/B=1-228.|Gramene; Q9SE42; -.|GO; GO:001685...ELIQSIKAKGMRPGVSLRPGTPVEEVFPLVEAENPVELVLVMTVEPGFGGQKFMPEMMEKVRALRKKYPSLDIEVDGGLGPSTIDVAASAGANCIVAGSSIFGAAEPGEVISALRKSVEGSQNKS rice_1H1Y.jpg ...

  1. Pityriasis rosea following influenza (H1N1 vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a distinct papulosquamous skin eruption that has been attributed to viral reactivation, certain drug exposures or rarely, vaccination. Herein, we reported a clinicopathlogically typical case of pityriasis rosea that developed after the H1N1 vaccination. With a global H1N1 vaccination program against the pandemic H1N1 influenza, patients should be apprised of the possibility of such rare but benign skin reaction to avoid unnecessary fear. Furthermore, a brief review of the current reported skin adverse events related to the novel H1N1 vaccination in Taiwan is presented here.

  2. Structural Basis of Preexisting Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; Ekiert, Damian C.; Krause, Jens C.; Hai, Rong; Crowe, Jr., James E.; Wilson, Ian A. (Sinai); (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-05-25

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first influenza pandemic in decades. The crystal structure of the hemagglutinin from the A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus shows that its antigenic structure, particularly within the Sa antigenic site, is extremely similar to those of human H1N1 viruses circulating early in the 20th century. The cocrystal structure of the 1918 hemagglutinin with 2D1, an antibody from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu that neutralizes both 1918 and 2009 H1N1 viruses, reveals an epitope that is conserved in both pandemic viruses. Thus, antigenic similarity between the 2009 and 1918-like viruses provides an explanation for the age-related immunity to the current influenza pandemic.

  3. Chalcones as novel influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza inflata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Lee, Hong Sik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic influenza A virus strains, such as the new H1N1 swine influenza (novel influenza), represents a serious threat to global human health. During our course of an anti-influenza screening program on natural products, one new licochalcone G (1) and seven known (2......-8) chalcones were isolated as active principles from the acetone extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata. Compounds 3 and 6 without prenyl group showed strong inhibitory effects on various neuraminidases from influenza viral strains, H1N1, H9N2, novel H1N1 (WT), and oseltamivir-resistant novel H1N1 (H274Y) expressed...... in 293T cells. In addition, the efficacy of oseltamivir with the presence of compound 3 (5 μM) was increased against H274Y neuraminidase. This evidence of synergistic effect makes this inhibitor to have a potential possibility for control of pandemic infection by oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus....

  4. VTEC O157 subtypes associated with the most severe clinical symptoms in humans constitute a minor part of VTEC 0157 isolates from Danish Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldgaard, Bemt Bjørn; Scheutz, Flemming; Boel, Jeppe;

    2004-01-01

    -positive VTEC 0 157 isolates (63 of bovine origin and 86 from human clinical cases) isolated between 1987 and 2001. All were analysed by vtx-PCR-RFLP and phage typing. The vtx-PCR-RFLP showed that isolates carrying the vtx2 gene was more than four times as prevalent among the human clinical isolates (55...

  5. The Neurological Manifestations of H1N1 Influenza Infection; Diagnostic Challenges and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Asadi-Pooya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Health Organization declared pandemic phase of human infection with novel influenza A (H1N1 in April 2009. There are very few reports about the neurological complications of H1N1 virus infection in the literature. Occasionally, these complications are severe and even fatal in some individuals. The aims of this study were to report neurological complaints and/or complications associated with H1N1 virus infection. Methods: The medical files of all patients with H1N1 influenza infection admitted to a specified hospital in the city of Shiraz, Iran from October through November 2009 were reviewed. More information about the patients were obtained by phone calls to the patients or their care givers. All patients had confirmed H1N1 virus infection with real-time PCR assay. Results: Fifty-five patients with H1N1 infection were studied. Twenty-three patients had neurological signs and/or symptoms. Mild neurological complaints may be reported in up to 42% of patients infected by H1N1 virus. Severe neurological complications occurred in 9% of the patients. The most common neurological manifestations were headache, numbness and paresthesia, drowsiness and coma. One patient had a Guillain-Barre syndrome-like illness, and died in a few days. Another patient had focal status epilepticus and encephalopathy. Conclusions: The H1N1 infection seems to have been quite mild with a self-limited course in much of the world, yet there appears to be a subset, which is severely affected. We recommend performing diagnostic tests for H1N1influenza virus in all patients with respiratory illness and neurological signs/symptoms. We also recommend initiating treatment with appropriate antiviral drugs as soon as possible in those with any significant neurological presentation accompanied with respiratory illness and flu-like symptoms

  6. Chronic Inhibition of STAT3/STAT5 in Treatment-Resistant Human Breast Cancer Cell Subtypes: Convergence on the ROS/SUMO Pathway and Its Effects on xCT Expression and System xc- Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linher-Melville, Katja; Nashed, Mina G; Ungard, Robert G; Haftchenary, Sina; Rosa, David A; Gunning, Patrick T; Singh, Gurmit

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologically targeting activated STAT3 and/or STAT5 has been an active area of cancer research. The cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc-, contributes to redox balance and export of intracellularly produced glutamate in response to up-regulated glutaminolysis in cancer cells. We have previously shown that blocking STAT3/5 using the small molecule inhibitor, SH-4-54, which targets the SH2 domains of both proteins, increases xCT expression, thereby increasing system xc- activity in human breast cancer cells. The current investigation demonstrates that chronic SH-4-54 administration, followed by clonal selection of treatment-resistant MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells, elicits distinct subtype-dependent effects. xCT mRNA and protein levels, glutamate release, and cystine uptake are decreased relative to untreated passage-matched controls in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells, with the inverse occurring in estrogen-responsive T47D cells. This "ying-yang" effect is linked with a shifted balance between the phosphorylation status of STAT3 and STAT5, intracellular ROS levels, and STAT5 SUMOylation/de-SUMOylation. STAT5 emerged as a definitive negative regulator of xCT at the transcriptional level, while STAT3 activation is coupled with increased system xc- activity. We propose that careful classification of a patient's breast cancer subtype is central to effectively targeting STAT3/5 as a therapeutic means of treating breast cancer, particularly given that xCT is emerging as an important biomarker of aggressive cancers.

  7. T rypanosoma brucei histone H1 inhibits RNA polymerase I transcription and is important for parasite fitness in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Ana C.; Pimentel, Mafalda R; Manso, Helena; Vaz-Drago, Rita; Pinto-Neves, Daniel; Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Guegan, Fabien; Pedro Coelho, Luis; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Figueiredo, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    T rypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. Most of its transcription is constitutive and driven by RNA polymerase II. RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes not only ribosomal RNA genes, but also protein-encoding genes, including variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) and procyclins. In T . brucei, histone H1 (H1) is required for VSG silencing and chromatin condensation. However, whether H1 has a genome-wide role in transcription is unknown. Here, using...

  8. Protection against divergent influenza H1N1 virus by a centralized influenza hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available Influenza poses a persistent worldwide threat to the human population. As evidenced by the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, current vaccine technologies are unable to respond rapidly to this constantly diverging pathogen. We tested the utility of adenovirus (Ad vaccines expressing centralized consensus influenza antigens. Ad vaccines were produced within 2 months and protected against influenza in mice within 3 days of vaccination. Ad vaccines were able to protect at doses as low as 10(7 virus particles/kg indicating that approximately 1,000 human doses could be rapidly generated from standard Ad preparations. To generate broadly cross-reactive immune responses, centralized consensus antigens were constructed against H1 influenza and against H1 through H5 influenza. Twenty full-length H1 HA sequences representing the main branches of the H1 HA phylogenetic tree were used to create a synthetic centralized gene, HA1-con. HA1-con minimizes the degree of sequence dissimilarity between the vaccine and existing circulating viruses. The centralized H1 gene, HA1-con, induced stronger immune responses and better protection against mismatched virus challenges as compared to two wildtype H1 genes. HA1-con protected against three genetically diverse lethal influenza challenges. When mice were challenged with 1934 influenza A/PR/8/34, HA1-con protected 100% of mice while vaccine generated from 2009 A/TX/05/09 only protected 40%. Vaccination with 1934 A/PR/8/34 and 2009 A/TX/05/09 protected 60% and 20% against 1947 influenza A/FM/1/47, respectively, whereas 80% of mice vaccinated with HA1-con were protected. Notably, 80% of mice challenged with 2009 swine flu isolate A/California/4/09 were protected by HA1-con vaccination. These data show that HA1-con in Ad has potential as a rapid and universal vaccine for H1N1 influenza viruses.

  9. Immunization with live virus vaccine protects highly susceptible DBA/2J mice from lethal influenza A H1N1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengler Leonie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse represents an important model system to study the host response to influenza A infections and to evaluate new prevention or treatment strategies. We and others reported that the susceptibility to influenza A virus infections strongly varies among different inbred mouse strains. In particular, DBA/2J mice are highly susceptible to several influenza A subtypes, including human isolates and exhibit severe symptoms after infection with clinical isolates. Findings Upon intra-muscular immunization with live H1N1 influenza A virus (mouse-adapted PR8M, and 2009 pandemic human HA04, DBA/2J mice mounted virus-specific IgG responses and were protected against a subsequent lethal challenge. The immune response and rescue from death after immunization in DBA/2J was similar to those observed for C57BL/6J mice. Conclusions DBA/2J mice represent a suitable mouse model to evaluate virulence and pathogenicity as well as immunization regimes against existing and newly emerging human influenza strains without the need for prior adaptation of the virus to the mouse.

  10. 1918 pandemic H1N1 DNA vaccine protects ferrets against 2007 H1N1 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent;

    of the H1N1 pandemic virus from 1918 induce protection in ferrets against infection with a H1N1 (A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)) virus which was included in the conventional vaccine for the 2006-2007 season. The viruses are separated by a time interval of 89 years and differ by 21.2% in the HA1 protein...

  11. 多种HPV亚型检测在宫颈病变诊治中的意义%Significances of detections of multiple human papillomavirus subtypes in diagnosis and treatment of cervical lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟; 尹格平; 陈铭; 朱彤宇; 崔晓宁; 提松梅

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过研究不同HPV亚型与宫颈病变之间的关系,为宫颈病变的筛查和防治提供理论基础.方法:采用导流杂交基因芯片技术对1 430例宫颈病变患者进行21种HPV亚型检测,包括16种高危亚型(HR - HPV)和5种低危亚型(LR- HPV),对阳性患者行宫颈多点活体组织检查(活检),以组织病理学诊断作为宫颈病变确诊的金标准.结果:①1 430例宫颈病变患者中检测到HPV阳性患者210例,阳性率为14.68%,其中,感染HR - HPV 174例(82.86%),感染LR - HPV 36例(17.14%);居前6位的感染亚型是:HPV 16 (43.81%)、52 (15.71%)、11 (10.00%)、58 (8.57%)、31 (7.62%)、33(7.14%).其中单一感染176例(83.81%),多重感染34例(16.19%).②HR - HPV感染致CIN和宫颈癌的发病率明显高于LR - HPV; HR - HPV的感染率随宫颈病变程度的加重而逐渐增高,其中,宫颈癌组HR - HPV感染率与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).③宫颈癌组HPV多重感染率与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:不同HPV亚型感染可导致不同的宫颈病变,并且与宫颈病变的不同程度密切相关.HPV多重感染与宫颈癌的发病密切相关.多种HPV亚型检测在宫颈病变筛查和防治过程中具有重要意义.%Objective: To provide theoretical basis for screening, prevention, and treatment of cervical lesions by investigating the relationship between different human papillomavirus ( HPV) subtypes and cervical lesions. Methods; Flow - through hybridization gene chip technique was used to detect 21 kinds of HPV subtypes among 1 430 patients with cervical lesions, 16 kinds of high risk HPV subtypes and 5 kinds of low risk HPV subtypes were included, the positive patients received multiple punch cervical biopsy, histopathological diagnosis was used as gold standard of cervical lesions. Results; Among 1 430 patients with cervical lesions, 210 patients were found with HPV, the positive rate was 14. 68

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs.

  13. Chromatin structure-dependent conformations of the H1 CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Lee, Tae-Hee; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2016-11-02

    Linker histones are an integral component of chromatin but how these proteins promote assembly of chromatin fibers and higher order structures and regulate gene expression remains an open question. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approaches we find that association of a linker histone with oligonucleosomal arrays induces condensation of the intrinsically disordered H1 CTD in a manner consistent with adoption of a defined fold or ensemble of folds in the bound state. However, H1 CTD structure when bound to nucleosomes in arrays is distinct from that induced upon H1 association with mononucleosomes or bare double stranded DNA. Moreover, the H1 CTD becomes more condensed upon condensation of extended nucleosome arrays to the contacting zig-zag form found in moderate salts, but does not detectably change during folding to fully compacted chromatin fibers. We provide evidence that linker DNA conformation is a key determinant of H1 CTD structure and that constraints imposed by neighboring nucleosomes cause linker DNAs to adopt distinct trajectories in oligonucleosomes compared to H1-bound mononucleosomes. Finally, inter-molecular FRET between H1s within fully condensed nucleosome arrays suggests a regular spatial arrangement for the H1 CTD within the 30 nm chromatin fiber. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Swine Influenza Virus (H1N2) Characterization and Transmission in Ferrets, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Vasquez, Nicolás; Karlsson, Erik A.; Jimenez-Bluhm, Pedro; Meliopoulos, Victoria; Kaplan, Bryan; Marvin, Shauna; Cortez, Valerie; Freiden, Pamela; Beck, Melinda A.

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the influenza hemagglutinin gene (HA) has suggested that commercial pigs in Chile harbor unique human seasonal H1-like influenza viruses, but further information, including characterization of these viruses, was unavailable. We isolated influenza virus (H1N2) from a swine in a backyard production farm in Central Chile and demonstrated that the HA gene was identical to that in a previous report. Its HA and neuraminidase genes were most similar to human H1 and N2 viruses from the early 1990s and internal segments were similar to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo and transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. Antigenically, it was distinct from other swine viruses. Hemagglutination inhibition analysis suggested that antibody titers to the swine Chilean H1N2 virus were decreased in persons born after 1990. Further studies are needed to characterize the potential risk to humans, as well as the ecology of influenza in swine in South America. PMID:28098524

  15. Initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus into European pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, M D; Baird, P M; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo, M P; Hanna, A; Reid, S M; Essen, S; Russell, C; Thomas, S; Barrass, L; McNeilly, F; McKillen, J; Todd, D; Harkin, V; McDowell, S; Choudhury, B; Irvine, R M; Borobia, J; Grant, J; Brown, I H

    2010-05-22

    The initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1) into a European pig population is reported. Diagnosis of swine influenza caused by pandemic virus was made during September 2009 following routine submission of samples for differential diagnosis of causative agents of respiratory disease, including influenza A virus. All four pigs (aged six weeks) submitted for investigation from a pig herd of approximately 5000 animals in Northern Ireland, experiencing acute-onset respiratory signs in finishing and growing pigs, were positive by immunofluorescence for influenza A. Follow-up analysis of lung tissue homogenates by real-time RT-PCR confirmed the presence of pH1N1. The virus was subsequently detected on two other premises in Northern Ireland; on one premises, detection followed the pre-export health certification testing of samples from pigs presumed to be subclinically infected as no clinical signs were apparent. None of the premises was linked to another epidemiologically. Sequencing of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes revealed high nucleotide identity (>99.4 per cent) with other pH1N1s isolated from human beings. Genotypic analyses revealed all gene segments to be most closely related to those of contemporary pH1N1 viruses in human beings. It is concluded that all three outbreaks occurred independently, potentially as a result of transmission of the virus from human beings to pigs.

  16. Serologic cross-reactivity among humans and birds infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 viruses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Chi; Liu, Zhonghua; He, Wei

    2011-03-30

    To study immunogenicity and serologic cross-reactivity of hemagglutinins (HAs) among humans and birds infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, four representative H5N1 HA genes from humans and birds infected with distinct genetic clusters of H5N1 viruses in China were cloned, and several H5N1 infected human serum and H5N1 positive bird serum samples were used. Recombinant HA proteins were generated for ELISA assays and pseudotype viruses containing HAs were produced for neutralization assays and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests. We found significant differences among clades compared to species in binding, neutralization and HI activity of H5N1 strains isolated from birds. While significant differences were observed among species in H5N1 isolated from humans, investigation of H5N1 infected human and avian sera provided evidence that the pressure from nAb may be a driving force for positive selection. Therefore, improved anti-viral nAb therapies could block avian influenza transmission in humans.

  17. Fitness of Pandemic H1N1 and Seasonal influenza A viruses during Co-infection: Evidence of competitive advantage of pandemic H1N1 influenza versus seasonal influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Daniel Roberto; Sorrell, Erin; Angel, Matthew; Ye, Jianqiang; Hickman, Danielle; Pena, Lindomar; Ramirez-Nieto, Gloria; Kimble, Brian; Araya, Yonas

    2009-08-24

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a new H1N1 influenza pandemic. This pandemic strain is as transmissible as seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses. Major concerns facing this pandemic are whether the new virus will replace, co-circulate and/or reassort with seasonal H1N1 and/or H3N2 human strains. Using the ferret model, we investigated which of these three possibilities were most likely favored. Our studies showed that the current pandemic virus is more transmissible than, and has a biological advantage over, prototypical seasonal H1 or H3 strains.

  18. Transcriptional repression of Hox genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Studencka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1 and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2 and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5, which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males.

  19. Impact on pregnancies in south Brazil from the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic: cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Anjos da Silva

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The emergence of a new subtype of the influenza virus in 2009 generated interest in the international medical community, the media, and the general population. Pregnant women are considered to be a group at risk of serious complications related to the H1N1 influenza virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and teratogenic effects of pregnancies exposed to the H1N1 virus during the Influenza A epidemic that occurred in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in 2009. METHODS: This is an uncontrolled prospective cohort study of pregnant women with suspected symptoms of Influenza A who were reported in the Information System for Notifiable Diseases-Influenza (SINAN-Influenza during the epidemic of 2009 (database from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. There were 589 cases of pregnant women with suspected infection. Among these, 243 were tested by PCR and included in the analysis. The main outcome measures were: maternal deaths, pregnancy outcome, stillbirths, premature births, low birth weight, congenital malformations, and odds ratios for H1N1+ and non-H1N1 pregnant women. RESULTS: There were one hundred and sixty-three (67% confirmed cases of H1N1, 34 cases (14% of seasonal Influenza A and 46 (19% who were negative for Influenza A. There was no difference between the three groups in clinical parameters of the disease. There were 24 maternal deaths--18 of them had H1N1. There were 8 stillbirths--5 were children of H1N1 infected mothers. There were no differences in perinatal outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The present data do not indicate an increase in teratogenic risk from exposure to the influenza A (H1N1 virus. These results will help to strengthen the data and clarify the health issues that arose after the pandemic.

  20. Monitoring of Biodistribution and Persistence of Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer Using Capsid-Incorporated mCherry and Expression of Human Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor P. Dmitriev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant limiting factor to the human clinical application of conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd-based virotherapy is the inability to noninvasively monitor these agents and their potential persistence. To address this issue, we proposed a novel imaging approach that combines transient expression of the human somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtype 2 reporter gene with genetic labeling of the viral capsid with mCherry fluorescent protein. To test this dual modality system, we constructed the Ad5/3Δ24pIXcherry/SSTR CRAd and validated its capacity to generate fluorescent and nuclear signals in vitro and following intratumoral injection. Analysis of 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE biodistribution in mice revealed reduced uptake in tumors injected with the imaging CRAd relative to the replication-incompetent, Ad-expressing SSTR2 but significantly greater uptake compared to the negative CRAd control. Optical imaging demonstrated relative correlation of fluorescent signal with virus replication as determined by viral genome quantification in tumors. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies demonstrated that we can visualize radioactive uptake in tumors injected with imaging CRAd and the trend for greater uptake by standardized uptake value analysis compared to control CRAd. In the aggregate, the plasticity of our dual imaging approach should provide the technical basis for monitoring CRAd biodistribution and persistence in preclinical studies while offering potential utility for a range of clinical applications.

  1. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer subtypes: the hormone receptor/HER2-positive subtype is associated with the most favorable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; van Kampen, Roel J W; Voogd, Adri C; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Smilde, Tineke J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Peters, Frank P J; van Riel, Johanna M G H; Peters, Natascha A J B; de Boer, Maaike; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to the situation in early breast cancer, little is known about the prognostic relevance of the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to present survival estimates and to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes based on HR and HER2 status in a recent cohort of metastatic breast cancer patients, which is representative of current clinical practice. Patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2009 were included. Information regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment was collected. Patients were categorized in four subtypes based on the HR and HER2 status of the primary tumor: HR positive (+)/HER2 negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtype, adjusted for possible confounders. Median follow-up was 21.8 months for the 815 metastatic breast cancer patients included; 66 % of patients had the HR+/HER2- subtype, 8 % the HR-/HER2+ subtype, 15 % the TN subtype and 11 % the HR+/HER2+ subtype. The longest survival was observed for the HR+/HER2+ subtype (median 34.4 months), compared to 24.8 months for the HR+/HER2- subtype, 19.8 months for the HR-/HER2+ subtype and 8.8 months for the TN subtype (P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, subtype was an independent prognostic factor, as were initial site of metastases and metastatic-free interval. The HR+/HER2+ subtype was associated with the longest survival after diagnosis of distant metastases.

  2. Serologic evidence of human influenza virus infections in swine populations, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Sorn, San; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mey, Channa; Holl, Davun; Goutard, Flavie; Y, Bunthin; Fenwick, Stan; Robertson, Ian; Roger, François; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted from 2006 to 2010 and investigated the seroprevalence of influenza A viruses in Cambodian pigs, including human H1N1, H3N2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09), and highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A viruses. A total of 1147 sera obtained from pigs in Cambodia were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays for antibody to human influenza A viruses along with both HI and microneutralization (MN) tests to assess immunological responses to H5N1 virus. The results were compared by year, age, and province. Antibodies against a human influenza A virus were detected in 14·9% of samples. A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were dominant over the study period (23·1%), followed by those to human H1N1 (17·3%) and H3N2 subtypes (9·9%). No pigs were serologically positive for avian H5 influenza viruses. The seroprevalence of human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses peaked in 2008, while that of A(H1N1)pdm09 reached a peak in 2010. No significant differences in seroprevalence to human influenza subtypes were observed in different age groups. Cambodian pigs were exposed to human strains of influenza A viruses either prior to or during this study. The implications of these high prevalence rates imply human-to-swine influenza virus transmission in Cambodia. Although pigs are mostly raised in small non-commercial farms, our preliminary results provide evidence of sustained human influenza virus circulation in pig populations in Cambodia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. 2009甲型H1N1流感研究进展%Progress in the 2009 H1N1 influenza A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宇红; 申昆玲

    2010-01-01

    In March 2009,a new influenza A H1N1 virus was identified in Mexico.It is a quadruple-reassortant influenza A virus, which is composed of a combination of swine, avian strains and human. The clinical symptoms of the 2009 new influenza A (H1N1)