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Sample records for human gynecologic samples

  1. Improvement of Gynecological Screening of Female Renal Transplant Recipients by Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinten, F.; Hilbrands, L.B.; Meeuwis, K.A.P.; Bergen-Verkuyten, M.C. van; Slangen, B.F.; Rossum, M.M. van; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Hullu, J.A. de; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Female renal transplant recipients (RTRs) have increased risk for developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related (pre)malignancies of the lower genital tract. Annual cervical screening is advised for RTRs, but the participation rate is low. The aim of this study is to investigate whether

  2. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinases in human gynecological cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schröpfer, Andrea; Kammerer, Ulrike; Kapp, Michaela; Dietl, Johannes; Feix, Sonja; Anacker, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the degradation of protein components of the extracellular matrix and thus play an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Their expression is related to the progression of gynecological cancers (e.g. endometrial, cervical or ovarian carcinoma). In this study we investigated the expression pattern of the 23 MMPs, currently known in humans, in different gynecological cancer cell lines. In total, cell lines from three endometrium carcinomas (Ishikawa, HEC-1-A, AN3 CA), three cervical carcinomas (HeLa, Caski, SiHa), three chorioncarcinomas (JEG, JAR, BeWo), two ovarian cancers (BG-1, OAW-42) and one teratocarcinoma (PA-1) were examined. The expression of MMPs was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and gelatin zymography. We demonstrated that the cell lines examined can constitutively express a wide variety of MMPs on mRNA and protein level. While MMP-2, -11, -14 and -24 were widely expressed, no expression was seen for MMP-12, -16, -20, -25, -26, -27 in any of the cell lines. A broad range of 16 MMPs could be found in the PA1 cells and thus this cell line could be used as a positive control for general MMP experiments. While the three cervical cancer cell lines expressed 10-14 different MMPs, the median expression in endometrial and choriocarcinoma cells was 7 different enzymes. The two investigated ovarian cancer cell lines showed a distinctive difference in the number of expressed MMPs (2 vs. 10). Ishikawa, Caski, OAW-42 and BeWo cell lines could be the best choice for all future experiments on MMP regulation and their role in endometrial, cervical, ovarian or choriocarcinoma development, whereas the teratocarcinoma cell line PA1 could be used as a positive control for general MMP experiments

  3. Gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Takashi; Katsumata, Noriyuki

    2008-01-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy have been the main types of treatment for gynecologic cancer. However, chemotherapy in gynecologic oncology has recently made dramatic progress and presently is becoming the most widespread treatment. After the discovery of cisplatin in the field of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, it has now become the leading treatment modality. According to the result of several important phase III randomized control trials (RCTs), the platinum-taxane combined therapy has now become the standard treatment regimen. Regarding endometrial cancer, Cisplatin-Adriamycin-Cyclophosphamide (CAP) therapy has been used as an effective adjuvant chemotherapy in Japan. The adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin-Cisplatin therapy) for the endometrial cancer has now been recognized worldwide as the standard therapy based on the findings of a phase III RCT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer has also been recommended as the standard therapy in Japan since 1999 based on the successful results of numerous RCTs which proved its efficacy. The chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers has been investigated and standardized based on the results of numerous clinical trials. These trials have been conducted by many clinical trial groups, such as the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) throughout the world, in addition to the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) and the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) in Japan. The valuable contributions of these clinical trials are helping in the development of new drug therapies, thus leading to such treatment regimens playing increasingly important and wider roles in the field of gynecologic oncology treatment in the future. (author)

  4. ACHIEVEMENTS OF PEDIATRIC ANDROLOGY/GYNECOLOGY AS THE FOUNDATION FOR PREVENTION OF REPRODUCTIVE AND SEXUAL FAILURE OF ADULT PATIENTS. THE SCIENCE ABOUT HUMAN SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Okulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors summarize the experience of management of children with different disorders of reproductive system and emphasize typical mistakes of practitioners, leading in future to decreased human fertility and to deterioration of demographical problems in Russia. Necessity of pediatric andrology/gynecology development as special area of medicine is proved and problems of its establishment are discussed. Authors bring up debatable issue about age qualification for choice of sex in patients born with malformations of externalia. Borderlines and content of new research area – science about human sex – are determined with emphasizing of its interdisciplinary character and problems of professional education which is in prevalence individual. Necessity of terminological unification in pediatric andrology/gynecology is emphasized because inaccurate terms lead to erroneous decisions and actions with long-term sequels. 

  5. Berek & Novak's gynecology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berek, Jonathan S; Novak, Emil

    2012-01-01

    .... The third section is on preventive and primary care for women, and the remaining five sections are directed at methods of diagnosis and management in general gynecology, operative general gynecology, urogynecology and pelvic reconstructive surgery, reproductive endocrinology, and gynecologic oncology"--Provided by publisher.

  6. A Shandon PapSpin liquid-based gynecological test: A split-sample and direct-to-vial test with histology follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimiene J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies for liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap tests reveal that liquid-based cytology (LBC is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional Pap smear. Although there is research on ThinPrep and SurePath systems, information is lacking to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of systems based on cytocentrifugation. This study is designed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Shandon PapSpin (ThermoShandon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA liquid-based gynecological system. We used split-sample and direct-to-vial study design. Materials and Methods: 2,945 women referred to prophylactic check-up were enrolled in this study. Split sample design was used in 1,500 women and residual cervical cytology specimen from all these cases was placed in fluid for PapSpin preparation after performing conventional smear. The direct-to-vial study was carried out in another cohort of 1,445 women in whom the entire cervical material was investigated using only the PapSpin technique. Follow up histological diagnoses for 141 women were obtained from both study arms following 189 abnormal cytology cases. 80 LBC cases from the split sample group and 61 LBC cases in the direct-to-vial group were correlated with the histology results. The sensitivity and secificity of the conventional smear and PapSpin tests in both study arms were compared. Results: In the split sample group, conventional smears showed a higher proportion of ASC-US (atypical cells undetermined significance: 31 (2.1% vs 10 (0.7% in PapSpin (P = 0.001. A higher proportion of unsatisfactory samples was found in the conventional smear group: 25 (1.7% vs 6 (0.4% cases (P = 0.001. In the split sample group, the sensitivity of the conventional and PapSpin tests was 68.7% vs 78.1%, and the specificity 93.8% vs 91.8%, respectively. In the direct to vial group PapSpin sensitivity was 75.9% and specificity 96.5%. The differences in sensitivity and specificity were not significant. The

  7. Disparities in Gynecological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna eChatterjee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Health disparities and inequalities in access to care among different socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups have been well documented in the U.S. healthcare system. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of barriers to care contributing to health disparities in gynecological oncology management and to describe site-specific disparities in gynecologic care for endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer. Methods: We performed a literature review of peer-reviewed academic and governmental publications focusing on disparities in gynecological care in the United States by searching PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases. Results: There are multiple important underlying issues that may contribute to the disparities in gynecological oncology management in the United States, namely geographic access and hospital based-discrepancies, research-based discrepancies, influence of socioeconomic and health insurance status, and finally the influence of race and biological factors. Despite the reduction in overall cancer-related deaths since the 1990s, the 5-year survival for Black women is significantly lower than for White women for each gynecologic cancer type and each stage of diagnosis. For ovarian and endometrial cancer, black patients are less likely to receive treatment consistent with evidence-based guidelines and have worse survival outcomes even after accounting for stage and comorbidities. For cervical and endometrial cancer, the mortality rate for black women remains twice that of White women. Conclusions: Health care disparities in the incidence and outcome of gynecologic cancers are complex and involve biologic factors as well as racial, socioeconomic and geographic barriers that influence treatment and survival. These barriers must be addressed to provide optimal care to women in the U.S. with gynecologic cancer.

  8. Obstetric and gynecologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Obstetric and gynecologic imaging has undergone marked changes in the past 10 years, primarily because of the influence of new imaging modalities. The single modality that has most significantly changed the diagnostic approach to obstetric and gynecologic problems is diagnostic ultrasound. The remarkable ability of this technique to display the anatomy of the gravid and nongravid female pelvis without the use of ionizing radiation motivated the development of techniques and instrumentation that have supplanted but not totally replaced many x-ray based examinations. The use of diagnostic ultrasound for the evaluation of obstetric and gynecologic problems is the dominant theme of this chapter. Areas of patient diagnosis and management in which additional imaging techniques, x-rays, or magnetic resonance are used are presented where appropriate

  9. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures...... data forms as follows: clinical data, surgery, pathology, pre- and postoperative care, complications, follow-up visits, and final quality check. DGCD is linked with additional data from the Danish "Pathology Registry", the "National Patient Registry", and the "Cause of Death Registry" using the unique...... Danish personal identification number (CPR number). DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Data from DGCD and registers are available online in the Statistical Analysis Software portal. The DGCD forms cover almost all possible clinical variables used to describe gynecological cancer courses. The only limitation...

  10. Gynecological cancer alarm symptoms:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Ravn, Pernille; dePont Christensen, René

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To determine the proportion of patients who were referred to specialist care after reporting gynecological cancer alarm symptoms to their general practitioner. To investigate whether contact with specialist care was associated with lifestyle factors or socioeconomic status. MATERIAL...... and odds ratios (ORs) for associations between specialist care contact, lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The study included 25 866 non-pregnant women; 2957 reported the onset of at least one gynecological cancer alarm symptom, and 683 of these (23.1%) reported symptoms to their general......: Educational level influence contact with specialist care among patients with gynecological cancer alarm symptoms. Future studies should investigate inequalities in access to the secondary healthcare system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  11. [Human papillomavirus infection and its correlates with clinically relevant gynecological and obstetric conditions: A cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Daniel; Beltrán-Lagunes, Luis; Brito-Aranda, Leticia; López-Hernández, Maria de la Luz

    2016-08-05

    To analyze the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the possible epidemiological association with conditions of clinical relevance in women. A cross-sectional study from Mexico City was conducted from January 2012 to December 2014. HPV molecular detection was performed on cervical samples. Data were analyzed with appropriated statistic tests. A total of 1,604 females (median 47, interquartile range 38-54) were analyzed. Global prevalence of infection for any HPV is 9.91% (95% CI 8.6-11.3). An association between infection with 16-HPV and number of abortions (NA) (OR=1.427; 95% CI 1.091-1.866), by univariate regression model (UVRM) was estimated. Moreover, menarche (OR=1.566; 95% CI 1.079-2.272), NA (OR=1.570; 95% CI 1.106-2.227) and number of pregnancies (NP) (OR=0.461; 95% CI 0.260-0.818) have a direct and inverse association with infection by genotype 18 of HPV, respectively. Also, infection with HR-HPV genotypes has an inverse association with NP (OR=0.791; 95% CI 0.707-0.884) by normal labor (OR=0.867; 95% CI 0.767-0.979) and NA (OR=0.715; 95% CI 0.534-0.959) (UVRM), and a direct association with number of sexual partners (OR=1.082; 95% CI 1.015-1.154). Onset of sexual activity has an inverse association with infection by genotype 16- (UVRM: OR=0.814; 95% CI 0.715-0.926; multinomial regression model (MNRM): OR=0.803; 95% CI 0.702-0.918) and HR-HPV (UVRM: OR=0.933; 95% CI 0.889-0.980, and MNRM: OR=0.912; 95% CI 0.867-0.959), all P values were lower than .03. Prevalence of HPV cervical infection is different according to age and it is associated with several medical conditions of clinical relevance in women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural determination and gynecological tumor diagnosis using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify markers for gynecological tumor diagnosis using antibody chip capture. Methods: Marker proteins, including cancer antigen 153 (CA153), CA125, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), were analyzed using antibody chip capture of serum samples. Fifteen agglutinin types that specifically recognized five ...

  13. Imaging of gynecologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; Kubik, Rahel A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain related to the female genital organs is frequently encountered in the emergency department. Gynecological emergencies are diseases of the female reproductive system that are potentially life-threatening and peril the sexual function and fertility. In the diagnostic work-up of acute abdominal pain, a wide variety of differential diagnoses needs to be considered depending on the age of the patient and a concomitant pregnancy. There is significant clinical overlap with gastrointestinal emergencies. Therefore, imaging plays a key role in diagnosing the cause of the pain and the planning of the therapy. The aim of this review is to illustrate the significant role of imaging in frequently encountered gynecologic emergencies.

  14. Immunoscintigraphy in gynecological oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pateisky, N.

    1987-01-01

    Immunologic and radionuclide methods are used increasingly in diagnostics and therapy. This applies especially to problems of malignant diseases. Tumor localization diagnosis has gained much from immunoscintigraphy, a non-invasive method combining immunologic and nuclear medicine techniques. Activated monoclonal antibodies against tumorous antigens make it possible to show malignant tumors scintigraphically. An introduction is given to the technique as well as first results of applying immunoscintigraphy to gynecological oncology. (author)

  15. Awareness and attitude relating to the human papilloma virus and its vaccines among pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology specialists in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolunay, Orkun; Celik, Umit; Karaman, Seyfettin Senih; Celik, Tamer; Resitoglu, Salim; Donmezer, Cigdem; Aydin, Fahri; Baspinar, Huseyin; Mert, Mustafa Kurthan; Samsa, Hasan; Arli, Sefa

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination, and the attitude towards HPV vaccination in pediatricians, obstetricians and gynecologists (OBG). Participants were administered a 40-question survey, investigating the demographic properties, the knowledge on the HPV infection-vaccination and attitudes towards vaccination. The study enrolled a total of 228 participants (131 pediatricians and 97 OBGs). At a rate of 99.6%, the participants agreed with the fact that the HPV infection was the most common sexually transmitted disease and 33.8% of the participants had the opinion that the HPV vaccination should be administered only in women. The lowest level of HPV vaccine recommendation was among the pediatrics specialists (59.4%, p=0.012). When asked whether they would have their daughters receive HPV vaccination, 79.5% of the participants answered favorably; this rate was 36.7% for the sons. At a rate of 59.5% of the participants thought that the HPV vaccine needed to be included in the national vaccine schedule. Most of the participants (91.6%) had the idea that reduction of the vaccine costs would increase the vaccination frequency. We observed that the consideration of the costs and the prejudices relating to the inefficacy of vaccination as well as the inadequate level of knowledge were involved in the physicians' resistance to HPV vaccination. We believe that the healthcare professionals should be informed adequately to overcome false beliefs, thereby ensuring success of the HPV vaccine upon inclusion in the national vaccine schedule in the future.

  16. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  17. OCT in Gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina A.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Belinson, Jerome L.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    Timely and efficient diagnosis of diseases of the female reproductivesystem is very important from the social viewpoint [1, 2]. Diagnosticefficacy of the existing techniques still needs improvement sincemalignant neoplasms of the female reproductive system organs are stableleaders among causes of death (over 35.9 %) [3]. Each year, 851.9 thousand genital cancer cases are recorded worldwide [1, 2]. However, the diagnostic efficacy of the visual examination with biopsy is limited. Correct interpretation of colposcopic features requires high skills and long-term clinical experience, which makes colposcopy very subjective and limits interobserver agreement [8-10]. OCT is known to visualize in vivo and noninvasively tissue microstructure with spatial resolution approaching the histologic level and therefore can be expected to guide biopsies and to provide real-time tissue structure information when biopsies are contraindicated or impractical. Although thorough clinical studies are required to determine if OCT can be suitable for this purpose in gynecology in general and for cervical cancer in particular, the early results look encouraging. In this chapter, we present a wide spectrum of the OCT studies of different partsof the female reproductive system and demonstrate the potential of the clinical use of this new visualization method in gynecological practice.

  18. [Secondary osteoporosis in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Y; Gorai, I

    1998-06-01

    Several diseases and medications are known to induce secondary osteoporosis. Among them, same situations are related to gynecological field. They include Turner's syndrome, anorexia nervosa, ovarian dysfunction, oophorectomy, GnRH agonist therapy, and osteoporosis associated with pregnancy. We briefly describe these secondary osteoporosis in this article as follows. Several studies have found osteoporosis to be a common complication of Turner's syndrome and hormone replacement therapy has been used as a possible management; in anorexic patient, low body weight, prolonged amenorrhea, early onset of anorexia nervosa, and hypercortisolism have been reported to be risks for bone demineralization; since oophorectomy which is a common intervention in gynecology leads osteoporosis, it is important to prevent osteoporosis caused by surgery as well as postmenopausal osteoporosis; GnRH agonist, which induces estrogen deficient state and affect bone mass, is commonly used as a management for endometriosis and leiomyoma of uterus; associated with pregnancy, post-pregnancy spinal osteoporosis and transient osteoporosis of the hip are clinically considered to be important and heparin therapy and magnesium sulfate therapy are commonly employed during pregnancy, affecting calcium homeostasis.

  19. Gynecologic cancers in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amant, Frédéric; Halaska, Michael J; Fumagalli, Monica

    2014-01-01

    insights and more experience were gained since the first consensus meeting 5 years ago. METHODS: Members of the European Society of Gynecological Oncology task force "Cancer in Pregnancy" in concert with other international experts reviewed the existing literature on their respective areas of expertise....... The summaries were subsequently merged into a complete article that served as a basis for discussion during the consensus meeting. All participants approved the final article. RESULTS: In the experts' view, cancer can be successfully treated during pregnancy in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team...... to provide throughout the pregnancy period. Diagnostic procedures, including staging examinations and imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging and sonography, are preferable. Pelvic surgery, either open or laparoscopic, as part of a treatment protocol, may reveal beneficial outcomes and is preferably...

  20. Gynecological cancer in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, M Farid

    2009-03-01

    To overview the status of gynecologic cancer in Indonesia. Information regarding Indonesia obtained from World Bank Report and Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia 2007, epidemiological data obtained from Histopathological Data of Cancer in Indonesia 2002, Department of Health-Registry Body of Indonesian Specialist of Pathology Association-Indonesian Cancer Society; Various Hospitals in big Cities in Indonesia. Indonesia is an Archipelago with a total area of 1,922,570.00 km(2), the population is 222,192,000 (2006), the fourth world rank. Female is 49.86% with life expectancy 69 years. Gross National Product per Capita is 690.00 USD. Histopathological report in 2002 revealed that cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancer were the most frequent cancer among female, which were the first (2,532 cases), the third (829 cases) and the eighth (316 cases) rank respectively. The peak age for cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer was 45-54 years. HPV 16, 18 were found in 82% of invasive cervical. Data from various academic hospitals in 2007 showed that cervical cancer is the most common malignancy followed by ovary, uterus, vulva and vagina. Five-year survival rate of stage I, II, III, IV cervical cancer were 50%, 40%, 20%, and 0% respectively. Overall five-year survival rate of carcinoma of the ovary was 54.8%. If sub-classified by stage, five-year survival rate are 94.3%, 75.0%, 31%, and 11.7% for stage I, II, III, and IV respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rate of endometrial cancer was 71.9%. Indonesia is the biggest Archipelago with a dense population but the income per capita still low (poor country). The most common gynecologic cancer is cervical cancer, followed by ovarian and uterine cancer. These cancers are included in top ten cancers in Indonesia. HPV 16, 18 were the most cause of cervical cancer. The five-year survival rates are comparable with world report.

  1. College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytology: background, rationale, and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworek, Joseph A; Henry, Michael R; Blond, Barbara; Jones, Bruce Allen

    2013-02-01

    Gynecologic cytopathology is a heavily regulated field, with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 mandating the collection of many quality metrics. There is a lack of consensus regarding methods to collect, monitor, and benchmark these data and how these data should be used in a quality assurance program. Furthermore, the introduction of human papilloma virus testing and proficiency testing has provided more data to monitor. To determine good laboratory practices in quality assurance of gynecologic cytopathology. Data were collected through a written survey consisting of 98 questions submitted to 1245 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-licensed or Department of Defense laboratories. There were 541 usable responses. Additional input was sought through a Web posting of results and questions on the College of American Pathologists Web site. Four senior authors who authored the survey and 28 cytopathologists and cytotechnologists were assigned to 5 working groups to analyze data and present statements on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytopathology at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference. Ninety-eight attendees at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference discussed and voted on good laboratory practice statements to obtain consensus. This paper describes the rationale, background, process, and strengths and limitations of a series of papers that summarize good laboratory practice statements in quality assurance in gynecologic cytopathology.

  2. Assessing human error during collecting a hydrocarbon sample of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the assessment method of the hydrocarbon sample collection standard operation procedure (SOP) using THERP. The Performance Shaping Factors (PSF) from THERP analyzed and assessed the human errors during collecting a hydrocarbon sample of a petrochemical refinery plant. Twenty-two ...

  3. A sample application of nuclear power human resources model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurgen, A.; Ergun, S.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important issues for a new comer country initializing the nuclear power plant projects is to have both quantitative and qualitative models for the human resources development. For the quantitative model of human resources development for Turkey, “Nuclear Power Human Resources (NPHR) Model” developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory was used to determine the number of people that will be required from different professional or occupational fields in the planning of human resources for Akkuyu, Sinop and the third nuclear power plant projects. The number of people required for different professions for the Nuclear Energy Project Implementation Department, the regulatory authority, project companies, construction, nuclear power plants and the academy were calculated. In this study, a sample application of the human resources model is presented. The results of the first tries to calculate the human resources needs of Turkey were obtained. Keywords: Human Resources Development, New Comer Country, NPHR Model

  4. Complications of gynecologic and obstetric management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.; Newton, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the incidence, diagnosis and management of complications associated with interventions used in gynecology and obstetrics. These are encountered in all phases of gynecologic and therapeutic procedures, radiation therapy, drug therapy and pre- and post-treatment care

  5. Specific and unspecific gynecological alarm symptoms -prevalence estimates in different age groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Ravn, Pernille; Larsen, Pia V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence estimates of gynecological alarm symptoms in different age groups and to describe common patterns of gynecological symptoms. DESIGN: Web-based cross-sectional survey study. SETTING: Nationwide in Denmark. POPULATION: A random sample of 51 090 women aged 20 years...

  6. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references

  7. Sexuality, intimacy, and gynecological cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijmar Schultz, W.C.M.; van de Wiel, H.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    On a psychological level, not all changes in sexual functioning following gynecological cancer treatment automatically lead to sexual problems or dysfunctions. Whether sexual dissatisfaction occurs will also depend on personal factors, social factors, and the context in which these negative changes

  8. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  9. Approach-Induced Biases in Human Information Sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence T Hunt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information sampling is often biased towards seeking evidence that confirms one's prior beliefs. Despite such biases being a pervasive feature of human behavior, their underlying causes remain unclear. Many accounts of these biases appeal to limitations of human hypothesis testing and cognition, de facto evoking notions of bounded rationality, but neglect more basic aspects of behavioral control. Here, we investigated a potential role for Pavlovian approach in biasing which information humans will choose to sample. We collected a large novel dataset from 32,445 human subjects, making over 3 million decisions, who played a gambling task designed to measure the latent causes and extent of information-sampling biases. We identified three novel approach-related biases, formalized by comparing subject behavior to a dynamic programming model of optimal information gathering. These biases reflected the amount of information sampled ("positive evidence approach", the selection of which information to sample ("sampling the favorite", and the interaction between information sampling and subsequent choices ("rejecting unsampled options". The prevalence of all three biases was related to a Pavlovian approach-avoid parameter quantified within an entirely independent economic decision task. Our large dataset also revealed that individual differences in the amount of information gathered are a stable trait across multiple gameplays and can be related to demographic measures, including age and educational attainment. As well as revealing limitations in cognitive processing, our findings suggest information sampling biases reflect the expression of primitive, yet potentially ecologically adaptive, behavioral repertoires. One such behavior is sampling from options that will eventually be chosen, even when other sources of information are more pertinent for guiding future action.

  10. Methods of human body odor sampling: the effect of freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenochova, Pavlina; Roberts, S Craig; Havlicek, Jan

    2009-02-01

    Body odor sampling is an essential tool in human chemical ecology research. However, methodologies of individual studies vary widely in terms of sampling material, length of sampling, and sample processing. Although these differences might have a critical impact on results obtained, almost no studies test validity of current methods. Here, we focused on the effect of freezing samples between collection and use in experiments involving body odor perception. In 2 experiments, we tested whether axillary odors were perceived differently by raters when presented fresh or having been frozen and whether several freeze-thaw cycles affected sample quality. In the first experiment, samples were frozen for 2 weeks, 1 month, or 4 months. We found no differences in ratings of pleasantness, attractiveness, or masculinity between fresh and frozen samples. Similarly, almost no differences between repeatedly thawed and fresh samples were found. We found some variations in intensity; however, this was unrelated to length of storage. The second experiment tested differences between fresh samples and those frozen for 6 months. Again no differences in subjective ratings were observed. These results suggest that freezing has no significant effect on perceived odor hedonicity and that samples can be reliably used after storage for relatively long periods.

  11. Human-Robot Site Survey and Sampling for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Edwards, Laurence; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Kunz, Clayton; Lee, Susan Y.; Park, Eric; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Ackner, Nir

    2006-01-01

    NASA is planning to send humans and robots back to the Moon before 2020. In order for extended missions to be productive, high quality maps of lunar terrain and resources are required. Although orbital images can provide much information, many features (local topography, resources, etc) will have to be characterized directly on the surface. To address this need, we are developing a system to perform site survey and sampling. The system includes multiple robots and humans operating in a variety of team configurations, coordinated via peer-to-peer human-robot interaction. In this paper, we present our system design and describe planned field tests.

  12. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakazato, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Saijyo, Eri; Saka, Akiko; Sakai, Mizuho; Simon, Christophe; Suzuki, Naoko; Tagami, Michihira; Watanabe, Shoko; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard A.; Babina, Magda; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Barnett, Timothy C.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Carlisle, Ailsa J.; Clevers, Hans C.; Davis, Carrie A.; Detmar, Michael; Dohi, Taeko; Edge, Albert S. B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ehrlund, Anna; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley M.; Fujita, Rie; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Hasegawa, Yuki; Herlyn, Meenhard; Heutink, Peter; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Hume, David A.; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Ishizu, Yuri; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klein, Sarah; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Mackay-sim, Alan; Mejhert, Niklas; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Morris, Kelly J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Qin, Xian-Yang; Rehli, Michael; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roy, Sugata; Sajantila, Antti; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schmidl, Christian; Schneider, Claudio; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sheng, Guojun; Shin, Jay W.; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Summers, Kim M.; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tomoiu, Andru; Toyoda, Hiroo; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Zhang, Peter G.; Zucchelli, Silvia; Abugessaisa, Imad; Arner, Erik; Harshbarger, Jayson; Kondo, Atsushi; Lassmann, Timo; Lizio, Marina; Sahin, Serkan; Sengstag, Thierry; Severin, Jessica; Shimoji, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawai, Jun; Kondo, Naoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples,

  13. Sampling strategy for estimating human exposure pathways to consumer chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadopoulou, Eleni; Padilla-Sanchez, Juan A.; Collins, Chris D.; Cousins, Ian T.; Covaci, Adrian; de Wit, Cynthia A.; Leonards, Pim E.G.; Voorspoels, Stefan; Thomsen, Cathrine; Harrad, Stuart; Haug, Line S.

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to consumer chemicals has become a worldwide concern. In this work, a comprehensive sampling strategy is presented, to our knowledge being the first to study all relevant exposure pathways in a single cohort using multiple methods for assessment of exposure from each exposure pathway.

  14. Monitoring human papillomavirus prevalence in urine samples: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enerly E

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Espen Enerly, Cecilia Olofsson, Mari NygårdDepartment of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer, and many countries now offer vaccination against HPV to girls by way of government-funded national immunization programs. Monitoring HPV prevalence in adolescents could offer a near-term biological measure of vaccine impact, and urine sampling may be an attractive large-scale method that could be used for this purpose. Our objective was to provide an overview of the literature on HPV DNA detection in urine samples, with an emphasis on adolescents. We searched the PubMed database using the terms “HPV” and “urine” and identified 21 female and 14 male study populations in which HPV prevalence in urine samples was reported, four of which included only asymptomatic female adolescents. We provide herein an overview of the recruitment setting, age, urine sampling procedure, lesion type, HPV assay, and HPV prevalence in urine samples and other urogenital samples for the studies included in this review. In female study populations, concordance for any HPV type and type-specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples are provided in addition to sensitivity and specificity. We concluded that few studies on HPV prevalence in urine samples have been performed in asymptomatic female adolescent populations but that urine samples may be a useful alternative to cervical samples to monitor changes in HPV prevalence in females in the post-HPV vaccination era. However, care should be taken when extrapolating HPV findings from urine samples to the cervix. In males, urine samples do not seem to be optimal for monitoring HPV prevalence due to a low human genomic DNA content and HPV DNA detection rate compared to other urogenital sites. In each situation the costs and benefits of HPV DNA detection in urine compared to alternative monitoring options should be carefully

  15. Sampling strategy for estimating human exposure pathways to consumer chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadopoulou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to consumer chemicals has become a worldwide concern. In this work, a comprehensive sampling strategy is presented, to our knowledge being the first to study all relevant exposure pathways in a single cohort using multiple methods for assessment of exposure from each exposure pathway. The selected groups of chemicals to be studied are consumer chemicals whose production and use are currently in a state of transition and are; per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs, traditional and “emerging” brominated flame retardants (BFRs and EBFRs, organophosphate esters (OPEs and phthalate esters (PEs. Information about human exposure to these contaminants is needed due to existing data gaps on human exposure intakes from multiple exposure pathways and relationships between internal and external exposure. Indoor environment, food and biological samples were collected from 61 participants and their households in the Oslo area (Norway on two consecutive days, during winter 2013-14. Air, dust, hand wipes, and duplicate diet (food and drink samples were collected as indicators of external exposure, and blood, urine, blood spots, hair, nails and saliva as indicators of internal exposure. A food diary, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and indoor environment questionnaire were also implemented. Approximately 2000 samples were collected in total and participant views on their experiences of this campaign were collected via questionnaire. While 91% of our participants were positive about future participation in a similar project, some tasks were viewed as problematic. Completing the food diary and collection of duplicate food/drink portions were the tasks most frequent reported as “hard”/”very hard”. Nevertheless, a strong positive correlation between the reported total mass of food/drinks in the food record and the total weight of the food/drinks in the collection bottles was observed, being an indication of accurate performance

  16. Determinants of women's likelihood of vaginal self-sampling for human papillomavirus to screen for cervical cancer in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Pao-Chun; Chou, Chia-Hui; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2014-11-25

    Many Taiwanese women (43.8%) did not participate in regular cervical screening in 2011. An alternative to cervical screening, self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV), has been available at no cost under Taiwan's National Health Insurance since 2010, but the extent and likelihood of HPV self-sampling were unknown. A cross-sectional study was performed to explore determinants of women's likelihood of HPV self-sampling. Data were collected by questionnaire from a convenience sample of 500 women attending hospital gynecologic clinics in central Taiwan from June to October 2012. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression. Of 500 respondents, 297 (59.4%) had heard of HPV; of these 297 women, 69 (23%) had self-sampled for HPV. Among the 297 women who had heard of HPV, 234 (78.8%) considered cost a priority for HPV self-sampling. Likelihood of HPV self-sampling was determined by previous Pap testing, high perceived risk of cervical cancer, willingness to self-sample for HPV, high HPV knowledge, and cost as a priority consideration. Outreach efforts to increase the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV testing rates should target women who have had a Pap test, perceive themselves at high risk for cervical cancer, are willing to self-sample for HPV, have a high level of HPV knowledge, and for whom the cost of self-sampling covered by health insurance is a priority.

  17. Detection of Campylobacter in human faecal samples in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Aruna; Wilkinson, Jenny; Mahony, Timothy; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2014-01-01

    Data on campylobacteriosis in developed countries are well documented; in contrast, few studies on campylobacteriosis have been conducted in developing countries. This study was undertaken to test for Campylobacter in human faecal samples sent to the two major pathology laboratories in Fiji. A total of 408 diarrhoeal faecal samples were collected from the two major hospital pathology laboratories in Central Fiji (Suva) and Western Fiji (Lautoka) between December 2012 and February 2013 and from June to July 2013. Samples were analysed for the presence of Campylobacter using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods. Campylobacter was detected in 241/408 (59.1%) of samples tested using PCR. Samples from children aged less than five accounted for 21.6% of positive cases. Campylobacter was detected in 59.1% of diarrhoeal samples collected from the two main laboratories in Fiji. A high proportion of children under five years with Campylobacter has been reported in other countries and could be due to parents being more likely to seek medical attention. Further studies are required to confirm the species of Campylobacter that are predominantly associated with gastroenteritis in Fiji.

  18. Immunoreactive LH in long-term frozen human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet Kaur Surindar; Jimenez, Mark; Newman, Ron; Handelsman, David J

    2014-04-01

    Urine provides a convenient non-invasive alternative to blood sampling for measurement of certain hormones. Urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) measurements have been used for endocrinology research and anti-doping testing. However, the commercially available LH immunoassays are developed and validated for human blood samples but not urine so that LH assays intended for use with urine samples need thorough validation. Therefore, the present study evaluated the measurement of urinary LH immunoreactivity using previously validated immunofluorometric (IF) and immunochemiluminometric (ICL) LH assays after prolonged frozen storage. LH was measured in serial urine samples following administration of a single injection of one of two doses of recombinant human chorionic hormone (rhCG) with assays run at the end of study (2008) and again after four years of frozen (-20 °C) storage where samples were stored without adding preservatives. The ICL assay showed quantitatively reproducible LH measurements after prolonged -20 °C storage. However, the IF immunoassay gave consistently lower LH levels relative to ICL (2008) with a further proportionate reduction after four years of sample storage (2012). Yet, both the assays displayed similar patterns of the time-course of urine LH measurement both before and after four years of frozen storage. In conclusion, we found that both immunoassays are suitable for urinary LH measurements with ICL assay being more robust for quantitative urinary LH measurement such as for anti-doping purposes, whereas the IF could be applicable for research studies where urine LH levels are compared within-study but not in absolute terms. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchbika, Z.; Benmensour, M.; Bourhaleb, Z.; Benchakroun, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Sahraoui, S.; Acharki, A.; Benider, A.; Boughrara, W.; Boudraa, B.; Bali, M.S.; Djemaa, A.; Metayer, Y.M.; Peiffert, D.P.; Chemin, A.C.; Malet, C.M.; Meyer, P.M.; Lisbona, A.L.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Ahmad, F.; Metayer, Y.; Haie, C.; Thomas, L.; Barillot, I.; Castelain, B.; Delannes, M.; Chilles, A.; Tournier Rangeard, L.; Buchheit, I.

    2005-01-01

    Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the cancer of the uterine cervix carcinomas, brachytherapy with pulse rate, three dimensional calculations to determine volume to irradiate and then to optimize the dosimetry are the different points tackled in this part devoted to the cervix uterine cancer. (N.C.)

  20. Trace-element measurement in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidian, M.R.; Ebrahimi-Fakhar, F.

    1992-01-01

    It is conceivable that some essential elements such as zinc, iron, calcium, copper, phosphorus, selenium, etc., have a major impact on biological and metabolical functions in the human body. The concentration of these elements is normally very minute and changes within a naturally set tolerance. The accurate measurement of these elements in biological samples, such as in blood, is one of the objectives of medical physics in diagnosis. There are many sophisticated methods to measure the accurate amount of each element in biological samples. The methods used in this project are a combination of proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The PIXE and NAA are fast and reliable techniques for multielement analysis at the level of parts per million and less

  1. Microparticles and Exosomes in Gynecologic Neoplasias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, Rienk; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Lok Gemma, Christianne A. R.; Kenter, G.; Sturk, Augueste

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the functions of microparticles and exosomes in gynecologic neoplasias. Growing evidence suggests that vesicles released from cancer cells in gynecologic malignancies contribute to the hypercoagulable state of these patients and contribute to tumor progression by

  2. Human Papillomavirus Detection from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Colombian Women's Paired Urine and Cervical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C.; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C.; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Patarroyo, Manuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance. PMID:23418581

  3. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei

    2017-08-29

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  4. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Sakai, Mizuho; Simon, Christophe; Suzuki, Naoko; Tagami, Michihira; Watanabe, Shoko; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard A.; Babina, Magda; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Mummery, Christine L.; Barnett, Timothy C.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Carlisle, Ailsa J.; Clevers, Hans C.; Davis, Carrie A.; Nakachi, Yutaka; Detmar, Michael; Dohi, Taeko; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ehrlund, Anna; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Nakahara, Fumio; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley M.; Fujita, Rie; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gingeras, Thomas; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Hasegawa, Yuki; Herlyn, Meenhard; Heutink, Peter; Nakamura, Yukio; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Hume, David A.; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Orlando, Valerio; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klein, Sarah; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Ogishima, Soichi; Mackay-sim, Alan; Mejhert, Niklas; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Morris, Kelly J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Kojima, Miki; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Qin, Xian-Yang; Rehli, Michael; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roy, Sugata; Sajantila, Antti; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schmidl, Christian; Schneider, Claudio; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sheng, Guojun; Shin, Jay W.; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Summers, Kim M.; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tomoiu, Andru; Toyoda, Hiroo; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Zhang, Peter G.; Zucchelli, Silvia; Abugessaisa, Imad; Arner, Erik; Harshbarger, Jayson; Nakazato, Kenichi; Kondo, Atsushi; Lassmann, Timo; Lizio, Marina; Sahin, Serkan; Sengstag, Thierry; Severin, Jessica; Shimoji, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawai, Jun; Ninomiya, Noriko; Kondo, Naoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Saijyo, Eri; Saka, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  5. Spectrophotometric assay of creatinine in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Krishnegowda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new spectrophotometric method for the analysis of creatinine concentration in human serum samples is developed. The method explores the oxidation of p-methylamino phenol sulfate (Metol in the presence of copper sulfate and creatinine which yields an intense violet colored species with maximum absorbance at 530 nm. The calibration graph of creatinine by fixed time assay ranged from 4.4 to 620 μM. Recovery of creatinine in human serum samples varied from 101% to 106%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.145 μM and 0.487 μM respectively. Sandell’s sensitivity was 0.112 μg cm−2 and molar absorptivity was 0.101 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Within day precision was 2.5–4.8% and day-to-day precision range was 3.2–7.8%. The robustness and ruggedness of the method expressed in RSD values ranged from 0.78% to 2.12% and 1.32% to 3.46% respectively, suggesting that the developed method was rugged. This method provides good sensitivity and is comparable to standard Jaffe’s method with comparatively less interference from foreign substances.

  6. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review.

  7. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Høgdall, Claus; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; T'jampens, Davy; Hellmann, Marja-Leena; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Estrid

    2008-09-01

    Because of its non-invasive sample collection method, human urine is an attractive biological material both for discovering biomarkers and for use in future screening trials for different diseases. Before urine can be used for these applications, standardized protocols for sample handling that optimize protein stability are required. In this explorative study, we examine the influence of different urine collection methods, storage temperatures, storage times, and repetitive freeze-thaw procedures on the protein profiles obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Prospectively collected urine samples from 11 women were collected as either morning or midday specimens. The effects of storage temperature, time to freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles were assessed by calculating the number, intensity, and reproducibility of peaks visualized by SELDI-TOF-MS. On the CM10 array, 122 peaks were detected and 28 peaks were found to be significantly different between urine types, storage temperature and time to freezing. On the IMAC-Cu array, 65 peaks were detected and 1 peak was found to be significantly different according to time to freezing. No significant differences were demonstrated for freeze-thaw cycles. Optimal handling and storage conditions are necessary in clinical urine proteomic investigations. Collection of urine with a single and consistently performed protocol is needed to reduce analytical bias. Collecting only one urine type, which is stored for a limited period at 4°C until freezing at -80°C prior to analysis will provide the most stable profiles. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. ASCO 2017-highlights of gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, Bianca; Mlineritsch, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    At this year's ASCO annual meeting several important studies in the field of gynecological cancer were presented. Here we report a personal selection of the most interesting and clinically relevant data.

  9. Gynecologic Malignancies Post-LeFort Colpocleisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. LeFort colpocleisis (LFC is a safe and effective obliterative surgical option for older women with advanced pelvic organ prolapse who no longer desire coital activity. A major disadvantage is the limited ability to evaluate for post-LFC gynecologic malignancies. Methods. We present the first case of endometrioid ovarian cancer diagnosed after LFC and review all reported gynecologic malignancies post-LFC in the English medical literature. Results. This is the second reported ovarian cancer post-LFC and the first of the endometrioid subtype. A total of nine other gynecologic malignancies post-LFC have been reported in the English medical literature. Conclusions. Gynecologic malignancies post-LFC are rare. We propose a simple 3-step strategy in evaluating post-LFC malignancies.

  10. Pelvic artery embolization in gynecological bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Schreyer, H.; Bodhal, H.

    2002-01-01

    The most common reasons for gynecological bleeding are pregnancy-related disorders, fibroids of the uterus, and gynecological malignances. Transarterial embolization is an effective treatment modality for gynecological bleeding regardless of its etiology. Depending on the underlying disease, a different technique of embolization is applied. In postpartal bleeding a temporary effect of embolization is desired, therefore gelatine sponge is used as embolizing agent. In fibroids and malignant tumors the effect should permanent, therefore PVA particles are used. Regardless the etiology, the technical and clinical success of transarterial embolization is at least 90%. In nearly every patient a post-embolization syndrome can be observed, represented by local pain and fever. This post-embolization syndrome usually does not last longer than 3 days. If embolization is performed with meticulous attention to angiographic technique and handling of embolic material, ischemic damage of adjacent organs is rarely observed. Transarterial embolization should be an integrative modality in the treatment of gynecological bleeding. (orig.) [de

  11. Gynecologic imaging: Current and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Common diagnostic challenges in gynecology and the role of imaging in their evaluation are reviewed. Etiologies of abnormal uterine bleeding identified on pelvic sonography and sonohysterography are presented. An algorithmic approach for characterizing an incidentally detected adnexal mass and use of magnetic resonance imaging for definitive diagnosis are discussed. Finally, the role of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the management of gynecological malignancies, and pitfalls associated with their use are examined.

  12. The place of robotics in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quemener, J; Boulanger, L; Rubod, C; Cosson, M; Vinatier, D; Collinet, P

    2012-10-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic gynecologic surgery has undergone widespread development in recent years. The surgical literature on this subject continues to grow. The goal of this article is to summarize the principal indications for robotic assistance in gynecologic surgery and to offer a general overview of the principal articles dealing with robotic surgery for both benign and malignant disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiology of gynecologic cancers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiyi; Tang, Huijuan; Chen, Tianhui

    2018-01-01

    Cancer has become a major disease burden across the globe. It was estimated that 4.29 million new incident cases and 2.81 million death cases of cancer would occur in 2015 in China, with the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) of 201.1 per 100,000 and age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) of 126.9 per 100,000, respectively. For females, 2 of the top 10 most common types of cancer would be gynecologic cancers, with breast cancer being the most prevalent (268.6 thousand new incident cases) and cervical cancer being the 7th most common cancer (98.9 thousand new incident cases). The incidence and mortality of gynecologic cancers have been constantly increasing in China over last 2 decades, which become a major health concern for women. Survival rates of gynecologic cancers are generally not satisfactory and decrease along with advancing stage, though national data on survival are still not available. It is of great importance to overview on the epidemiology of gynecologic cancers, which may provide scientific clues for strategy-making of prevention and control, and eventually lowering the incidence and mortality rate as well as improving the survival rate in the future. Copyright © 2018. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  14. Sexuality in Irish women with gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Vicki; Hegarty, Josephine; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2011-03-01

    To investigate sexual self-concept, sexual relationships, and sexual functioning, and the relationship between these and certain demographic variables of Irish women, following a diagnosis of gynecologic cancer. Descriptive, correlational. Outpatient gynecologic oncology clinic in a large university hospital in Southern Ireland. 106 women with a diagnosis of and treatment for various gynecologic cancers (cervical, ovarian, endometrial, and vulvar). The Body Image Scale, Sexual Esteem Scale, and Sexual Self-Schema Scale were administered to women a minimum of six weeks postdiagnosis of any form of gynecologic cancer to measure sexual self-concept; the Intimate Relationships Scale to measure sexual relationships; and the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale to measure sexual functioning. Sexual self-concept, body image, sexual esteem, sexual self-schema, sexual relationships, and sexual functioning. Participants reported negative changes in relation to their sexual self-concept, sexual relationships, and sexual functioning. Participants reported negative changes in relation to all stages of the sexual response cycle. Gynecologic cancer has the potential to negatively affect a woman's sexual self-concept, sexual relationships, and sexual functioning. Sexuality is a multidimensional construct and must be measured in this way. Healthcare professionals must use a holistic approach when providing information and support to patients with gynecologic cancer. Information must be provided to women on how cancer and its treatment has the potential to affect their sexual self-concept, sexual relationships, and sexual functioning, including information on how to overcome these alterations.

  15. The epidemiologic status of gynecologic cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilailak, Sarikapan; Lertchaipattanakul, Nuttapong

    2016-11-01

    Between the years of 2010-2012, it was estimated there were a total of 112,392 new cases of cancers in Thailand, thus, the total age-standardized rate (ASR) per 100,000 is 137.6. In regards to the most prevalent types of cancer in female, breast cancer has the highest ASR, followed by cervical cancer (ASR=14.4); liver and bile duct cancer; colon and rectum cancer; trachea, bronchus and lung cancer; ovarian cancer (ASR=6.0); thyroid cancer; non-Hodgkin lymphoma and uterine cancer (ASR=4.3). The trend of cervical cancer in Thailand is decreasing, one key factor in making this possible was the employment of dual tract strategy (Pap smear and visual inspection with acetic acid [VIA]) by the government in 2005. In the future, the government is also considering integrating human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into the national immunization program, which may assist in the prevention of cervical cancer. By studying the statistical data of gynecologic cancer, it will be possible to formulate measures for the prevention, control and treatment of gynecologic cancer. Eventually, it will potentially improve the quality of life (QoL) of patients as well as decrease the mortality rate caused by gynecologic cancer.

  16. Proteome profiling analysis of human ovarian cancer serum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognetti, F.; Citro, G.

    2009-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry represents a powerful tool in cancer research to discovery of potential bio markers through peak identification from serum profiling. By using high resolution MALDITOF and bioinformatic analysis almost 400 serum sample homogeneously distributed between biopsy confirmed ovarian cancer and high risk serum samples were analyzed. Each serum sample run in duplicate and whole serum sample preparation procedure has been performed by Hamilton Star Robot in order to reduce bias and the replicates with a low Pearson coefficient are removed. After automated reverse phase magnetic beads separation the samples were tested in MALDI-TOF

  17. Random vs. systematic sampling from administrative databases involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagino, C; Lo, R J

    1998-09-01

    Two sampling techniques, simple random sampling (SRS) and systematic sampling (SS), were compared to determine whether they yield similar and accurate distributions for the following four factors: age, gender, geographic location and years in practice. Any point estimate within 7 yr or 7 percentage points of its reference standard (SRS or the entire data set, i.e., the target population) was considered "acceptably similar" to the reference standard. The sampling frame was from the entire membership database of the Canadian Chiropractic Association. The two sampling methods were tested using eight different sample sizes of n (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 500, 800). From the profile/characteristics, summaries of four known factors [gender, average age, number (%) of chiropractors in each province and years in practice], between- and within-methods chi 2 tests and unpaired t tests were performed to determine whether any of the differences [descriptively greater than 7% or 7 yr] were also statistically significant. The strengths of the agreements between the provincial distributions were quantified by calculating the percent agreements for each (provincial pairwise-comparison methods). Any percent agreement less than 70% was judged to be unacceptable. Our assessments of the two sampling methods (SRS and SS) for the different sample sizes tested suggest that SRS and SS yielded acceptably similar results. Both methods started to yield "correct" sample profiles at approximately the same sample size (n > 200). SS is not only convenient, it can be recommended for sampling from large databases in which the data are listed without any inherent order biases other than alphabetical listing by surname.

  18. Utility of PET in gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Although many cancers can be detected by FDG-PET, there has been limited clinical experience with FDG-PET for the detection of gynecological cancers including malignancies in uterus and ovary. FDG-PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterization of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most gynecological cancers need to surgical management. FDG-PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG-PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. In this review, I discuss the clinical feasibility and imitations of this imaging modality in patients with gynecological cancers

  19. Reasons for diagnostic delay in gynecological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Christensen, René dePont Christensen; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    (≤ or > 60 years), performance of gynecological examination by the GP and notification of cancer suspicion on first referral from GP’s on the diagnostic delay (short delay ≤90 days and long delay >90 days). Results Across cancer type a median total delay of 101 days was observed. The 10% of women......Aim The primary aim of this study was to identify and describe different delay types in women with gynecologic cancer, and to analyze the relationship between diagnostic delay and a number of characteristics for patients, cancers and the health care system. Setting A cohort study of women newly......) and The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD). 161 women were included; ovarian cancer: 63, endometrial cancer: 50, cervical cancer: 34 and vulvar cancer: 14. Outcome measures were different delay types counted in days and the influence of four clinical important variables: Presence of alarm symptoms, age...

  20. ANALYSIS OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT OF GYNECOLOGIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kobal

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The »Quality Management Project«, prepared by the Slovene Medical Chamber, served as the basis for determination of the quality-control indicators for gynecologic surgery. The authors have created a questionnaire that enables the analysis of these indicators. A pilot data entry was carried out between April and October 2001; since January 2002 the data entry has been done regularly in all departments of obstetrics and gynecology in Slovenia. At the National Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Slovenia, the analysis of quality-control indicators for gynecologic surgery will be presented and discussed in order to determine the standards of quality management in this field.

  1. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  2. Clinical statistics of gynecologic cancers in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers, have both high morbidity and mortality among the gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. The present study was conducted using both the population-based cancer registry and the gynecologic cancer registry to elucidate the characteristics of gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. Based on nationwide estimates from the population-based cancer registry in Japan, the morbidities and mortality of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were obtained and used for analysis. Clinicopathologic factors for cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, including age, clinical stage, postsurgical stage, histological type, therapeutic strategy, and prognosis were retrieved from the gynecologic cancer registry published by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and used for analysis. The morbidities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 10,908, 13,606, and 9,384 women in 2012, respectively. The prevalence of endometrial cancer has significantly and consistently been increasing and represents the most common gynecologic malignant tumor in Japan. The mortalities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 2.1, 1.3, and 3.2 per 100,000 in 2012, respectively. In 2014, 52.2% of cervical cancer patients were classified as stage I, 22.5% as stage II, 10.2% as stage III, and 11.2% as stage IV. In addition, 71.9% of endometrial cancer patients were classified as stage I, 6.0% as stage II, 13.3% as stage III, and 7.5% as stage IV. Finally, 43.2% of ovarian cancer patients were classified as stage I, 9.1% as stage II, 27.6% as stage III, and 7.2% as stage IV. Twelve-point six percent of ovarian cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:28198168

  3. Cost and robotic surgery in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jason; Escobar, Pedro F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of robotic technology, there have been significant changes to the field of gynecology. The number of minimally invasive procedures has drastically increased, with robotic procedures rising remarkably. To date several authors have published cost analyses demonstrating that robotic hysterectomy for benign and oncologic indications is more costly compared to the laparoscopic approach. Despite being more expensive than laparoscopy, other studies have found robotics to be less expensive and more effective than laparotomy. In this review, controversies surrounding cost-effectiveness studies are explored. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Clinical treatment planning in gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.; Amendola, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment planning in gynecologic cancer is a complicated and difficult procedure. It requires an adequate preoperative assessment of the true extent of the patient's disease process and oftentimes this can be achieved not only by conventional studies but must employ surgical exploratory techniques in order to truly define the extent of the disease. However, with contemporary sophisticated treatment planning techniques that are now available in most contemporary departments of radiation oncology, radiation therapy is reemerging as an important and major treatment technique in the management of patients with gynecologic cancer

  5. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen E; Mosgaard, Berit J; Rosendahl, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Robot-assisted surgery has become more widespread in gynecological oncology. The purpose of this systematic review is to present current knowledge on robot-assisted surgery, and to clarify and discuss controversies that have arisen alongside the development and deployment. MATERIAL...... was performed by screening of titles and abstracts, and by full text scrutiny. From 2001 to 2016, a total of 76 references were included. RESULTS: Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology has increased, and current knowledge supports that the oncological safety is similar, compared with previous...

  6. Human papillomavirus self-sampling for screening nonattenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2017-01-01

    was well-accepted among nonattenders. Adopting modern technology-based platforms into the current organized screening program would serve as a convenient communication method between health authority and citizens, allowing easy access for the citizen and reducing the work load in administrating self-sampling......In organized cervical screening programs, typically 25% of the invited women do not attend. The Copenhagen Self-sampling Initiative (CSi) aimed to gain experiences on participation among screening nonattenders in the Capital Region of Denmark. Here, we report on the effectiveness of different...... communication platforms used in the pilot with suggestions for strategies prior to a full-implementation. Moreover, an innovative approach using self-sampling brushes with unique radio frequency identification chips allowed for unprecedented levels patient identification safety. Nonattenders from the capital...

  7. Sample Return in Preparation for Human Mission on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, P.

    2018-04-01

    Returned samples of martian regolith will help the science community make an informed decision in choosing the final human landing site and develop a better human mission plan to meet science criteria and IRSU and civil engineering criteria.

  8. Molecular targets in serous gynecologic cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe a series of studies assessing the effectiveness of targeted therapeutics that inhibit Notch signaling or the HER2 receptor in serous gynecologic cancers. In the first part of the thesis, we have confirmed previous data by showing expression of Notch1 and Notch3 in ovarian

  9. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in gynecologic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorvinger, B.

    1990-05-01

    The role and clinical value of the modern radiologic methods for evaluation of gynecologic tumors is not finally settled. The aims of our investigation were therefore to compare clinical examination with CT in patients with possible recurrence of cervical carcinoma; to evaluate the usefulness of CT in patients with fistulas following gynecologic tumors or their treatment; to evaluate the ability of transabdominal US and MR imaging in intrauterine staging including myometrial invasion on patients with endometrial carcinoma; to evaluate CT in the capacity of monitoring therapy response, probable recurrence or clinical remission in patients with ovarian carcinoma; and to evaluate the effect of intraarterial occlusion in facilitating surgery and in evaluating the role of the intraarterial infusion in gynecologic tumors otherwise refractory to all therapy given. CT was more accurate (91%) than clinical pelvic examination (78%) in revealing extensive disease after radiation and/ or surgical treatment. CT was also a most valuable tool in demonstrating genital fistulas following gynecologic malignancy or its treatment. Transabdominal US did not improve staging in early endometrila carcinoma while MR had potential for delineating intrauterine tumor growth (accuracy for myometrial invasion 95%). CT was most valuable in the evaluation of therapeutic response of ovarian malignancy. For possible recurrence or in clinical remission, only positive CT was of clinical significance. The potentials of transcatheter intraarterial management in order to facilitate operability are also discussed. (92 refs.)

  10. Nuclear medicine in obstetrics and gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The role of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy in obstetrics and gynecology are reviewed. A brief history of the development of nuclear medicine is given along with a discussion of basic concepts. Finally a more detailed overview with graphs and pictures is presented for specific techniques

  11. Acute gynecologic disorders in adolescents: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Gynecologic disorders that cause pelvic pain in adolescents include hemorrhagic ovarian cysts, rupture or torsion of ovarian cyst or tumors, hematocolpos caused by vaginal obstruction, endometriosis, cystic uterine adenomyosis, pelvic inflammatory diseases, and pelvic inclusion cyst. The use of CT for the evaluation of pelvic pain is increasing, and CT is useful if ultrasound findings are not decisive and the lesion is extensive.

  12. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trokhanova O V; Chijova Y A; Okhapkin M B; Korjenevsky A V; Tuykin T S

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light energy...

  14. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To participate successfully in a cytology proficiency testing program for gynecologic examinations (Pap smears...

  15. 42 CFR 493.945 - Cytology; gynecologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cytology; gynecologic examinations. 493.945 Section... Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.945 Cytology; gynecologic... gynecologic examinations (Pap smears) in cytology, a program must provide test sets composed of 10- and 20...

  16. 21 CFR 884.4120 - Gynecologic electrocautery and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic electrocautery and accessories. 884... Surgical Devices § 884.4120 Gynecologic electrocautery and accessories. (a) Identification. A gynecologic electrocautery is a device designed to destroy tissue with high temperatures by tissue contact with an...

  17. Sampling populations of humans across the world: ELSI issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Zawati, Ma'n H; Kirby, Emily S

    2012-01-01

    There are an increasing number of population studies collecting data and samples to illuminate gene-environment contributions to disease risk and health. The rising affordability of innovative technologies capable of generating large amounts of data helps achieve statistical power and has paved the way for new international research collaborations. Most data and sample collections can be grouped into longitudinal, disease-specific, or residual tissue biobanks, with accompanying ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI). Issues pertaining to consent, confidentiality, and oversight cannot be examined using a one-size-fits-all approach-the particularities of each biobank must be taken into account. It remains to be seen whether current governance approaches will be adequate to handle the impact of next-generation sequencing technologies on communication with participants in population biobanking studies.

  18. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    cultured in 'hanging drops' and effects of activin A and follistatin treatment were investigated in seminoma cultures. RESULTS: Testis fragments with normal spermatogenesis or CIS cells were cultured for 14 days with sustained proliferation of germ cells and CIS cells and without increased apoptosis....... Seminoma cultures survived 7 days, with proliferating cells detectable during the first 5 days. Activin A treatment significantly reduced KIT transcript and protein levels in seminoma cultures, thereby demonstrating a specific treatment response. CONCLUSIONS: Hanging drop cultures of human testis...

  19. Sampling Based Trajectory Planning for Robots in Dynamic Human Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Open-ended human environments, such as pedestrian streets, hospital corridors, train stations etc., are places where robots start to emerge. Hence, being able to plan safe and natural trajectories in these dynamic environments is an important skill for future generations of robots. In this work...... the problem is formulated as planning a minimal cost trajectory through a potential field, defined from the perceived position and motion of persons in the environment. A modified Rapidlyexploring Random Tree (RRT) algorithm is proposed as a solution to the planning problem. The algorithm implements a new...... for the uncertainty in the dynamic environment. The planning algorithm is demonstrated in a simulated pedestrian street environment....

  20. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of human leucocytes in relation to sampling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1980-01-01

    Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations after irradiation with X-rays of peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro were determined at different times after initiation of cultures. In each culture, the kinetics of cell multiplication was followed by using BrdU labelling and differential staining of chromosomes. The results indicate that the mixing up of first and second cell cycle cells at later sampling times cannot explain the observed variation in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations but that donor-to-donor variation is a predominant factor influencing yields of aberrations. The condition of a donor seems to be most important because repeats on the same donor also showed marked variability. (orig.)

  1. Medical prescription adherence among patient visiting gynecology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, M.; Arshad, H.; Tabassum, H.; Khan, N. U. S.; Qamar, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the level of Medical prescription adherence among gynecological patients of Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in Punjab province and data were collected from June 2015 to April 2016. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in main cities of Punjab province of Pakistan; Lahore, Gujranwala, Faisalabad and Sheikhupura. The survey data was collected from different location of cities. Patients visiting the gynecological and going to chemists for getting the prescribed medicine were selected through probability based random sampling for this study. The questionnaire consisted on the extent to which they adhere to time, dose, frequency and procedure prescribed from their doctors. The questions were asked in native language (Urdu). The data analysis was performed by using SPSS software (Ver.21). Results: Results of this study, based on sample from four big cities of Punjab province of Pakistan, showed that the level of medical prescription was associated with the age, qualification and background of the patients. Adherence level of patients reporting with rural background was observed higher than the adherence level of patients from urban areas. Conclusion: Over all the patient require counseling regarding adherence to medical prescription irrespective of the nature of the disease. (author)

  2. Your Daughter's First Gynecological Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pap smear, cells are gently scraped from the cervix using a small brush and a small spatula. The specimen is sent to a lab to check for abnormal cell changes and cervical cancer. The practitioner may recommend the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. This vaccine protects against the main types ...

  3. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  4. Diagnostic delay experienced among gynecological cancer patients: a nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine M; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine diagnostic delay among gynecological cancer patients. DESIGN: Nationwide study. SETTING: The cohort comprised all women receiving their first treatment for cervical, endometrial, or ovarian cancer between 1 October 2006 and 1 December 2007 in four of the five centers...... for gynecological cancer surgery in Denmark. SAMPLE: Of the 911 women alive, 648 participated, resulting in a response rate of 71.1%; of these, 30.1% were diagnosed with cervical cancer, 31.0% with endometrial cancer, and 38.9% with ovarian cancer. METHODS: Questionnaire survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnostic...... experiencing very long delays. Ovarian cancer patients experienced significantly shorter delays compared with other gynecological cancer patients in all parts of the health care system. CONCLUSIONS: Delays occur in all parts of the diagnostic process, suggesting that a multifaceted approach should be adopted...

  5. Advantages of robotics in benign gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Mireille; Kim, Jin Hee; Scheib, Stacey; Patzkowsky, Kristin

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature and discuss the advantages of robotics in benign gynecologic surgery. Minimally invasive surgery has become the preferred route over abdominal surgery. The laparoscopic or robotic approach is recommended when vaginal surgery is not feasible. Thus far, robotic gynecologic surgery data have demonstrated feasibility, safety, and equivalent clinical outcomes in comparison with laparoscopy and better clinical outcomes compared with laparotomy. Robotics was developed to overcome challenges of laparoscopy and has led to technological advantages such as improved ergonomics, visualization with three-dimensional capabilities, dexterity and range of motion with instrument articulation, and tremor filtration. To date, applications of robotics in benign gynecology include hysterectomy, myomectomy, endometriosis surgery, sacrocolpopexy, adnexal surgery, tubal reanastomosis, and cerclage. Though further data are needed, robotics may provide additional benefits over other approaches in the obese patient population and in higher complexity cases. Challenges that arose in the earlier adoption stage such as the steep learning curve, costs, and operative times are becoming more optimized with greater experience, with implementation of robotics in high-volume centers and with improved training of surgeons and robotic teams. Robotic laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, albeit still in its infancy where technical advantages compared with laparoscopic single-site surgery are still unclear, may provide a cost-reducing option compared with multiport robotics. The cost may even approach that of laparoscopy while still conferring similar perioperative outcomes. Advances in robotic technology such as the single-site platform and telesurgery, have the potential to revolutionize the field of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Higher quality evidence is needed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of robotic surgery in benign

  6. Evaluation of ethics education in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John; Straub, Heather; DiGiovanni, Laura; Chor, Julie

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the current status of ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was designed in conjunction with a professional survey laboratory at the University of Chicago. The survey was piloted with a convenience sample of clinical medical ethics fellows to assess question content and clarity. The survey was deployed by e-mail to all obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant responses. The University of Chicago's Institutional Review Board deemed this study exempt from institutional review board formal review. Of 242 eligible obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors, 118 (49%) completed the survey. Most respondents were from university-based programs (n = 78, 66%) that were not religiously affiliated (n = 98, 83%) and trained 4-6 residents per postgraduate year (n = 64, 70%). Although 50% of program directors (n = 60) reported having ethics as part of their core curriculum, most programs teach ethics in an unstructured manner. Fifty-seven percent of respondents (n = 66) stated their program dedicated 5 or fewer hours per year to ethics. The majority of program directors (n = 80, 73%) responded they would like more to a lot more ethics education and believed that ethics education should be required (n = 93, 85%) for residents to complete their training. Respondents identified that crowding in the curriculum was a significant barrier to increased ethics training (n = 50, 45%) and two-thirds (n = 74, 67%) reported a lack of faculty expertise as a moderate barrier to providing ethics education in the residency curriculum. This study found that a lack of structured curricula, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited time were important barriers for ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology programs across the nation. Despite these existing challenges, program directors have a strong interest in increasing ethics

  7. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gynecological pelvic pain as emergency pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Domínguez, A; Mora Jurado, A; García de la Oliva, A; de Araujo Martins-Romeo, D; Cueto Álvarez, L

    Acute pelvic pain is a common condition in emergency. The sources of acute pelvic pain are multifactorial, so it is important to be familiar with this type of pathologies. The purpose of this article is review the main causes of gynecological acute pelvic pain and their radiologic appearances to be able to make an accurate diagnosis and provide objective criteria for patient management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of a Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Curriculum on an Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Dawn M; Miladinovic, Branko; Caselnova, Petra M; Holmström, Shelly W

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a new pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) curriculum for improving obstetrics/gynecology resident physician knowledge and comfort level in patient management and to describe the current deficiencies in resident physician knowledge and comfort level in PAG. A PAG curriculum was implemented for the obstetrics/gynecology resident physicians (n = 20) at the University of South Florida in July 2013. Before and after the curriculum was introduced, resident physicians and recent graduates of the residency program completed a survey to assess their comfort level and a knowledge assessment consisting of 20 case-based questions. University-based residency program. Resident physicians and recent resident physician graduates in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Introduction of a PAG curriculum during the 2013-2014 academic year. Improvement in resident physicians' comfort level and knowledge in PAG. After the curriculum was introduced, comfort increased in examining the genitals of a pediatric gynecology patient (median difference = 1.5; P = .003) and history-taking, physical examination skills, and management (median difference = 1; P = .002) compared with before the curriculum. There was no significant difference in overall quiz score (15.5 ± 1.87 vs 15.8 ± 1.3; P = .78). A curriculum in PAG did improve resident comfort level in managing PAG patients, but did not significantly improve knowledge of this topic. Copyright © 2016.

  10. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  11. Opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy during benign gynecological surgery for ovarian cancer prevention: a survey of Gynecologic Oncology Committee of Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yamagami, Wataru; Ushijma, Kimio; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence has supported the concept that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the cells of the fallopian tube or endometrium. This study investigated current practice in Japan with respect to performing opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy (OBS) during gynecological surgery for benign disease for Ovarian Cancer Prevention. We mailed a questionnaire to 767 hospitals and clinics, comprising 628 accredited training institutions of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG), Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology (JSGO), or Japan Society of Gynecologic and Obstetric Endoscopy and Minimally Invasive Therapy (JSGOE) and 139 private institutions with at least one JSGOE-certified licensed gynecologic laparoscopist. Among the 767 institutions, 444 (57.9%) provided responses, including 91 (20.6%) that were both JSGOE and JSGO accredited, 71 (16.0%) that were only JSGO accredited, 88 (19.8%) that were only JSGOE accredited, and 194 (43.7%) that were unaccredited. It was found that awareness and performance of OBS largely depended on the JSGO and/or JSGOE accreditation status. OBS was only performed at 54.0% of responding institutions and just 6.8% of the institutions were willing to participate in randomized controlled trials to validate this method for reducing the incidence of ovarian cancer. The JSOG Gynecologic Tumor Committee will announce its opinion on salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention to all JSOG members and will develop a system for monitoring the number of OBS procedures in Japan. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  12. The influence of serial fecal sampling on the diagnosis of giardiasis in humans, dogs, and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Flávia Fernandes de Mendonça; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Macieira, Daniel de Barros; Almosny, Nádia Regina Pereira

    2017-08-24

    Giardia infection is a common clinical problem in humans and pets. The diagnosis of giardiasis is challenging as hosts intermittently excrete protozoan cysts in their feces. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated two methods of serial fecal sampling in humans, dogs, and cats from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Faust et al. technique was used to examine fecal specimens collected in triplicate from 133 patients (52 humans, 60 dogs, and 21 cats). Specimens from 74 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on consecutive days - 34 humans, 35 dogs, and 5 cats, and specimens from 59 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on non-consecutive, separate days - 18 human beings, 25 dogs, and 16 cats. G. duodenalis cysts were found in stools of 30 individuals. Multiple stool sampling resulted in an increase in the number of samples that were positive for Giardia in both groups. The authors therefore conclude that multiple stool sampling increases the sensitivity of the Faust et al . technique to detect G. duodenalis cysts in samples from humans, cats and dogs.

  13. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  15. Sexuality in gynecological patients undergoing radiation therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gynecology patient undergoing radiation therapy treatments may experience physiological and psychological problems related to sexuality. The needs of this group must be met by the radiation oncology staff by their being informed, interested, and experienced in dealing with sexual problems created by radiation therapy treatments. Opportunities to obtain information and for discussion about how the disease and its treatments will affect sexual functioning must be provided for the patient and partner. It is important to remember that the ability to seek and preserve gratifying sexual function is of great importance to almost all women, regardless of age. The patient may feel much personal distress related to the disease, the treatments, and how they affect the way she feels as a sexual human being. Opportunities must be provided to share the feelings created by the treatment process and trained therapists should be available when intensive sexual counseling is needed

  16. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecological oncology in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B

    2011-01-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries we developed an online questionnaire in cooperation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian...... (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecological oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange...

  17. Aflatoxin B1-lysine adduct in dried blood spot samples of animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kathy S; Cai, Wenjie; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) were proposed as potentially viable method for exposure assessment of environmental toxicants in infant and young children. For this study, we validated an experimental protocol to quantify AFB 1 -lysine adduct in DBS samples of AFB 1 -treated F344 rats, as well as samples from human field study. Significant dose-response relationships in AFB 1 -lysine adduct formation were found in DBS samples of rats treated with single- and repeated-dose AFB 1 . AFB 1 -lysine levels in DBS samples were highly correlated with corresponding serum sample levels. The Person coefficients were 0.997 for the single-dose exposure, and 0.996 for the repeated-dose exposure. Levels of AFB 1 -lysine adduct had also good agreement between DBS and serum samples as shown by Bland-Altman plot analysis. For human field study samples (n = 36), a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.784 was found between AFB 1 -lysine adduct levels of DBS and corresponding serum samples. Bland-Altman plots showed the distribution of the log differences between DBS and serum AFB 1 -lysine levels are within 95% confidence intervals. These results showed AFB 1 -lysine adduct levels in DBS cards and serum samples from animals and human samples are comparable, and the DBS technique and analytical protocol is a good means to assess AFB 1 exposure in infant and children populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic biomarker discovery in 1000 human plasma samples with mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John

    2016-01-01

    automated proteomic biomarker discovery workflow. Herein, we have applied this approach to analyze 1000 plasma samples from the multicentered human dietary intervention study "DiOGenes". Study design, sample randomization, tracking, and logistics were the foundations of our large-scale study. We checked...

  19. Automated multi-dimensional liquid chromatography : sample preparation and identification of peptides from human blood filtrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machtejevas, Egidijus; John, Harald; Wagner, Knut; Standker, Ludger; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; Georg Forssmann, Wolf; Bischoff, Rainer; K. Unger, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive on-line sample clean-up with an integrated two-dimensional HPLC system was developed for the analysis of natural peptides. Samples comprised of endogenous peptides with molecular weights up to 20 kDa were generated from human hemofiltrate (HF) obtained from patients with chronic

  20. MR imaging in gynecology and obstetrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Tontsch, P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.

    2000-01-01

    The toolbook covers the full range of indications for MRI in obstetrics and gynecology. It is the joint work of radiologists and obstetrician-gynecologists and supplies state-of-the-art information needed by doctors in the private practice or a hospital department. Examples from the Table of Contents: Physical principles of MRI, applications and performance aspects. Systematic presentation of diagnostic findings for comparative analysis and assessment. Biological effects and risks. Benign and malignant neoplasms of the mammary glands and the female genital organs. MRI for prenatal care and diagnostic evaluation. New method: MR spectroscopy. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Transcatheter intraarterial management of gynecologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorvinger, B.; Joergensen, C.W.; Samuelsson, L.; Trope, C.; Lund Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Intraarterial therapy was performed in 17 women with various gynecologic tumors in order to facilitate surgery (13 patients) and for palliation (4 patients). In the non-surgery group intraarterial chemotherapy was supplemented by occlusion in 2 patients. In the surgery group 5 women received intraarterial chemotherapy before the occlusion procedure. In the palliation group the result was poor, but 9 of 13 patients in the surgery group had radical surgery. They had all previously been found to be non-resectable at laparotomy (11 patients) or clinically (2 patients). No severe complications of using the intraarterial technique were encountered, though such are frequently reported. (orig.)

  2. Epidemiology of gynecologic cancers in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiyi; Tang, Huijuan; Chen, Tianhui

    2017-01-01

    Cancer has become a major disease burden across the globe. It was estimated that 4.29 million new incident cases and 2.81 million death cases of cancer would occur in 2015 in China, with the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) of 201.1 per 100,000 and age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) of 126.9 per 100,000, respectively. For females, 2 of the top 10 most common types of cancer would be gynecologic cancers, with breast cancer being the most prevalent (268.6 thousand new incident cases) ...

  3. Is Mars Sample Return Required Prior to Sending Humans to Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Abell, Paul; Allwood, Abigail; Baker, John; Barnes, Jeff; Bass, Deborah; Beaty, David; Boston, Penny; Brinkerhoff, Will; Budney, Charles; hide

    2012-01-01

    Prior to potentially sending humans to the surface of Mars, it is fundamentally important to return samples from Mars. Analysis in Earth's extensive scientific laboratories would significantly reduce the risk of human Mars exploration and would also support the science and engineering decisions relating to the Mars human flight architecture. The importance of measurements of any returned Mars samples range from critical to desirable, and in all cases these samples will would enhance our understanding of the Martian environment before potentially sending humans to that alien locale. For example, Mars sample return (MSR) could yield information that would enable human exploration related to 1) enabling forward and back planetary protection, 2) characterizing properties of Martian materials relevant for in situ resource utilization (ISRU), 3) assessing any toxicity of Martian materials with respect to human health and performance, and 4) identifying information related to engineering surface hazards such as the corrosive effect of the Martian environment. In addition, MSR would be engineering 'proof of concept' for a potential round trip human mission to the planet, and a potential model for international Mars exploration.

  4. Clinical outcomes research in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Alexander; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Schorge, John O

    2017-09-01

    Clinical outcomes research seeks to understand the real-world manifestations of clinical care. In particular, outcomes research seeks to reveal the effects of pharmaceutical, procedural, and structural aspects of healthcare on patient outcomes, including mortality, disease control, toxicity, cost, and quality of life. Although outcomes research can utilize interventional study designs, insightful use of observational data is a defining feature of this field. Many questions in gynecologic oncology are not amenable to investigation in randomized clinical trials due to cost, feasibility, or ethical concerns. When a randomized trial is not practical or has not yet been conducted, well-designed observational studies have the potential to provide the best available evidence about the effects of clinical care. Such studies may use surveys, medical records, disease registries, and a variety of administrative data sources. Even when a randomized trial has been conducted, observational studies can be used to estimate the real-world effect of an intervention, which may differ from the results obtained in the controlled setting of a clinical trial. This article reviews the goals, methodologies, data sources, and limitations of clinical outcomes research, with a focus on gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Bălan, Andreea; Scârneciu, Ioan; Barabaș, Barna; Pleș, Liana

    2018-04-21

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X) has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  6. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru Moga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins (BoNTs are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G. Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  7. The representations of adolescents about gynecological consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Oliveira Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the social representation of adolescents about gynecological consultation and the influence of those in searching for consultations. Method: Qualitative descriptive study based on the Social Representations Theory, conducted with 50 adolescents in their last year of middle school. The data was collected between April and May of 2010 by Evocations and a Focal Group. The software EVOC and contextual analysis were used in the data treatment. Results: The elements fear and constraint, constant in the central nucleus, can justify the low frequency of adolescents in consultations. The term embarrassment in the peripheral system reinforce current sociocultural norms, while prevention, associated with learning about sex and clarifying doubts, allows to envision an educative function. Obtained testimonies in the focal groups exemplify and reinforce those findings. Conclusion: For an effective health education, professionals, including nurses, need to clarify the youth individually and collectively about their rights to privacy, secrecy, in addition to focus the gynecological consultation as a promotion measure to sexual and reproductive health.

  8. Ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology, 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A text on obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound for radiologists, OB/GYN practitioners, and radiologic technicians. The second edition places greater emphasis on diagnosis of specific systemic disorders in the fetus, as well as the most current applications of ultrasound in gynecologic diagnosis

  9. A new method for analyzing diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Edwards, Kasper; Kragtrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    AND METHODS: Six women with a diagnostic delay of 6 weeks or more before treatment of gynecological cancer at a specialized regional department (the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark) were included in the study. Maps of existing processes were performed for each...

  10. A New Method for Analyzing Diagnostic Delay in Gynecological Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Edwards, Kasper; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    AND METHODS: Six women with a diagnostic delay of 6 weeks or more before treatment of gynecological cancer at a specialized regional department (the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark) were included in the study. Maps of existing processes were performed for each...

  11. Global epidemiology of hysterectomy: possible impact on gynecological cancer rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Kahlert, Johnny Abildgaard

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that hysterectomy is the most common surgical procedure worldwide in gynecology, national reporting of the incidence rate of gynecological cancers rarely removes the proportion no longer at risk of the disease from the population-at-risk-denominator (ie. women who have had a hyst...

  12. The impact of physician burnout on clinical and academic productivity of gynecologic oncologists: A decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Taylor B; Dilley, Sarah E; Smith, Haller J; Huh, Warner K; Modesitt, Susan C; Rose, Stephen L; Rice, Laurel W; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Straughn, J Michael

    2017-09-01

    Physician burnout is associated with mental illness, alcohol abuse, and job dissatisfaction. Our objective was to estimate the impact of burnout on productivity of gynecologic oncologists during the first half of their career. A decision model evaluated the impact of burnout on total relative value (RVU) production during the first 15years of practice for gynecologic oncologists entering the workforce from 2011 to 2015. The SGO practice survey provided physician demographics and mean annual RVUs. Published data were used to estimate probability of burnout for male and female gynecologic oncologists, and the impact of depression, alcohol abuse, and early retirement. Academic productivity was defined as annual PubMed publications since finishing fellowship. Without burnout, RVU production for the cohort of 250 gynecologic oncologists was 26.2 million (M) RVUs over 15years. With burnout, RVU production decreased by 1.6 M (5.9% decrease). Disproportionate rates of burnout among females resulted in 1.1 M lost RVUs for females vs. 488 K for males. Academic production without burnout was estimated at 9277 publications for the cohort. Burnout resulted in 1383 estimated fewer publications over 15years (14.9%). The impact of burnout on clinical and academic productivity is substantial across all specialties. As health care systems struggle with human resource shortages, this study highlights the need for effective burnout prevention and wellness programs for gynecologic oncologists. Unless significant resources are designated to wellness programs, burnout will increasingly affect the care of our patients and the advancement of our field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical coherence tomography in gynecology: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Motovilova, Tatiana; Shakhova, Natalia

    2017-12-01

    Modern gynecologic practice requires noninvasive diagnostics techniques capable of detecting morphological and functional alterations in tissues of female reproductive organs. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising tool for providing imaging of biotissues with high resolution at depths up to 2 mm. Design of the customized probes provides wide opportunities for OCT use in gynecology. This paper contains a retrospective insight into the history of OCT employment in gynecology, an overview of the existing gynecologic OCT probes, including those for combination with other diagnostic modalities, and state-of-the-art application of OCT for diagnostics of tumor and nontumor pathologies of female genitalia. Perspectives of OCT both in diagnostics and treatment planning and monitoring in gynecology are overviewed.

  14. A New Automated Method and Sample Data Flow for Analysis of Volatile Nitrosamines in Human Urine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, James A.; Seyler, Tiffany H.; McGahee, Ernest; Arnstein, Stephen; Wang, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Volatile nitrosamines (VNAs) are a group of compounds classified as probable (group 2A) and possible (group 2B) carcinogens in humans. Along with certain foods and contaminated drinking water, VNAs are detected at high levels in tobacco products and in both mainstream and sidestream smoke. Our laboratory monitors six urinary VNAs—N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR)—using isotope dilution GC-MS/MS (QQQ) for large population studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In this paper, we report for the first time a new automated sample preparation method to more efficiently quantitate these VNAs. Automation is done using Hamilton STAR™ and Caliper Staccato™ workstations. This new automated method reduces sample preparation time from 4 hours to 2.5 hours while maintaining precision (inter-run CV < 10%) and accuracy (85% - 111%). More importantly this method increases sample throughput while maintaining a low limit of detection (<10 pg/mL) for all analytes. A streamlined sample data flow was created in parallel to the automated method, in which samples can be tracked from receiving to final LIMs output with minimal human intervention, further minimizing human error in the sample preparation process. This new automated method and the sample data flow are currently applied in bio-monitoring of VNAs in the US non-institutionalized population NHANES 2013-2014 cycle. PMID:26949569

  15. A systematic review of sexual concerns reported by gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott-Anderson, Kristen; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L

    2012-03-01

    To identify physical, psychological and social sexual concerns reported by gynecological (GYN) cancer survivors. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed and PsycInfo databases. Reference lists from articles provided additional relevant literature. Only research articles from peer-reviewed journals were included. A total of 37 articles were located; 34 explored women's sexual concerns following gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment and 3 tested interventions for sexual concerns in women with gynecological cancer. Sexual concerns were identified across all dimensions of sexuality. Common concerns in the physical dimension were dyspareunia, changes in the vagina, and decreased sexual activity. In the psychological dimension, common concerns were decreased libido, alterations in body image, and anxiety related to sexual performance. And in the social dimension, common concerns were difficulty maintaining previous sexual roles, emotional distancing from the partner, and perceived change in the partner's level of sexual interest. Of the three psychoeducational intervention studies, two reported improvements in physical aspects of sexual function, and one reported improved knowledge, but without resolution of sexual concerns. Gynecological cancer survivors experience a broad range of sexual concerns after diagnosis and treatment, but the majority of studies emphasized physical aspects of sexuality, and may not adequately represent women's psychological and social sexual concerns. Health care providers should remain mindful of psychological and social sexual concerns when caring for gynecologic cancer survivors. Future research should systematically evaluate the full range of sexual concerns in large, representative samples of GYN cancer survivors and develop and test interventions to address those concerns. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor and adiponectin levels in patients with benign and malignant gynecological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalandra, Carla; Coviello, Maria; Falco, Gaetano; Divella, Rosa; Trojano, Giuseppe; Laterza, Anna Maria; Quero, Carmela; Pepe, Vito; Zito, Francesco Alfredo; Quaranta, Michele

    2010-05-01

    One of the most specific and critical regulators of angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which regulates endothelial proliferation, permeability, and survival. Vascular endothelial growth factor is an angiogenic mediator in tumors and has been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cancer. Adipose tissue is a major endocrine and it secretes hormones termed adipokines. These factors are derived from adipocytes and include proteins and metabolites such as adiponectin. Recently, adiponectin was also shown to modulate angiogenesis. This study was designed to determine the serum VEGF and adiponectin levels in patients with benign and malignant gynecological diseases and if there was a correlation between serum VEGF and adiponectin. Serum samples, collected fasting before surgery or intervention, were available for total of 114 female patients recorded between October 2006 and December 2008. Diagnosis of benign and malignant gynaecological diseases was established by biopsy. Serum levels VEGF and adiponectin were using commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (R&D Systems Inc, Minneapolis, MN), respectively. Statistical analysis was performed by using the SPSS 9.0 software package (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, IL). The correlation between serum VEGF and serum Adiponectin was calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. P values of benign and malignant gynecological diseases of the patient. Only for serum VEGF levels was a significant difference observed (P = 0.004) between patients with benign and malignant gynecological diseases. A significantly inverse correlation between serum VEGF and adiponectin levels among patients with benign and malignant gynecological diseases was found. Adiponectin level is not correlated with body mass index. This is one of the first report on adiponectin in benign and malignant gynecological diseases. Future studies are needed to address the clinical potential role of adiponectin in cancer.

  17. Human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes express a distinct RNA profile compared to human control and murine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Arora, Sonali; de Witte, Lot; Ulas, Thomas; Markovic, Darko; Schultze, Joachim L; Holland, Eric C; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. It is strongly infiltrated by microglia and peripheral monocytes that support tumor growth. In the present study we used RNA sequencing to compare the expression profile of CD11b(+) human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes (hGAMs) to CD11b(+) microglia isolated from non-tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis showed a clear separation of the two sample groups and we identified 334 significantly regulated genes in hGAMs. In comparison to human control microglia hGAMs upregulated genes associated with mitotic cell cycle, cell migration, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix organization. We validated the expression of several genes associated with extracellular matrix organization in samples of human control microglia, hGAMs, and the hGAMs-depleted fraction via qPCR. The comparison to murine GAMs (mGAMs) showed that both cell populations share a significant fraction of upregulated transcripts compared with their respective controls. These genes were mostly related to mitotic cell cycle. However, in contrast to murine cells, human GAMs did not upregulate genes associated to immune activation. Comparison of human and murine GAMs expression data to several data sets of in vitro-activated human macrophages and murine microglia showed that, in contrast to mGAMs, hGAMs share a smaller overlap to these data sets in general and in particular to cells activated by proinflammatory stimulation with LPS + INFγ or TNFα. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes and give detailed information about the validity of murine experimental models. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1416-1436. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The 4-vessel Sampling Approach to Integrative Studies of Human Placental Physiology In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ane M; Holm, Maia B; Roland, Marie C P; Horne, Hildegunn; Michelsen, Trond M; Haugen, Guttorm; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-08-02

    The human placenta is highly inaccessible for research while still in utero. The current understanding of human placental physiology in vivo is therefore largely based on animal studies, despite the high diversity among species in placental anatomy, hemodynamics and duration of the pregnancy. The vast majority of human placenta studies are ex vivo perfusion studies or in vitro trophoblast studies. Although in vitro studies and animal models are essential, extrapolation of the results from such studies to the human placenta in vivo is uncertain. We aimed to study human placenta physiology in vivo at term, and present a detailed protocol of the method. Exploiting the intraabdominal access to the uterine vein just before the uterine incision during planned cesarean section, we collect blood samples from the incoming and outgoing vessels on the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta. When combining concentration measurements from blood samples with volume blood flow measurements, we are able to quantify placental and fetal uptake and release of any compound. Furthermore, placental tissue samples from the same mother-fetus pairs can provide measurements of transporter density and activity and other aspects of placental functions in vivo. Through this integrative use of the 4-vessel sampling method we are able to test some of the current concepts of placental nutrient transfer and metabolism in vivo, both in normal and pathological pregnancies. Furthermore, this method enables the identification of substances secreted by the placenta to the maternal circulation, which could be an important contribution to the search for biomarkers of placenta dysfunction.

  19. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples at Varanasi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra K; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Durg V; Dubey, Suresh K

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, serotype identification, detection of virulence genes and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. All isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin, except two isolates, and showed variable resistance to gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. Of the 20 isolates found positive for pathogens, seven (four human and three water isolates) belong to serogroups 4b, 4d and 4e; six (one human and five water isolates) belong to serogroups 1/2c and 3c; four milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2b and 3b; and three milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2a and 3a. Two water isolates, all human isolates, except one (Pb1) lacking inlJ gene, and three milk isolates possess inlA, inlC, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA and iap genes. The remaining water and milk isolates showed variable presence of inlJ, plcA, prfA, and iap genes. ERIC- and REP-PCR based analyses collectively indicated that isolates of human clinical samples belong to identical or similar clone and isolates of water and milk samples belong to different clones. Overall study demonstrates the prevalence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes species in the environmental and clinical samples. Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PIXE elemental analysis of erythrocyte and blood plasma samples from human pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbely-Kiss, I.; Koltay, E.; Laszlo, S.; Szabo, Gy.

    1984-01-01

    Elemental concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb have been determined in erythrocyte and blood plasma samples from normal and diabetic human pregnancies. Average values, the dependence of the concentrations on the time during gestation period, the correlation coefficients for pairs of elements as well as for the same elements in plasma and erythrocyte samples are given. A marked difference appeared in a number of cases between normal and diabetic pregnancies. (author)

  1. Sample Size Bounding and Context Ranking as Approaches to the Human Error Quantification Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reer, B

    2004-03-01

    The paper describes a technique denoted as Sub-Sample-Size Bounding (SSSB), which is useable for the statistical derivation of context-specific probabilities from data available in existing reports on operating experience. Applications to human reliability analysis (HRA) are emphasised in the presentation of this technique. Exemplified by a sample of 180 abnormal event sequences, the manner in which SSSB can provide viable input for the quantification of errors of commission (EOCs) are outlined. (author)

  2. Sample Size Bounding and Context Ranking as Approaches to the Human Error Quantification Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reer, B.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes a technique denoted as Sub-Sample-Size Bounding (SSSB), which is useable for the statistical derivation of context-specific probabilities from data available in existing reports on operating experience. Applications to human reliability analysis (HRA) are emphasised in the presentation of this technique. Exemplified by a sample of 180 abnormal event sequences, the manner in which SSSB can provide viable input for the quantification of errors of commission (EOCs) are outlined. (author)

  3. PIXE elemental analysis of erythrocyte and blood plasma samples from human pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbely-Kiss, I; Koltay, E; Laszlo, S; Szabo, Gy [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen. Atommag Kutato Intezete; Goedeny, S [Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Szeged (Hungary). Szueleszeti es Noegyogyaszati Klinika; Seif El-Nasr, S [Teachers' Coll. for Women, Samia (Kuwait)

    1984-07-01

    Elemental concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb have been determined in erythrocyte and blood plasma samples from normal and diabetic human pregnancies. Average values, the dependence of the concentrations on the time during gestation period, the correlation coefficients for pairs of elements as well as for the same elements in plasma and erythrocyte samples are given. A marked difference appeared in a number of cases between normal and diabetic pregnancies. 11 refs.

  4. The Danish Gynecological Cancer Nursing Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibæk, Lene; Jakobsen, Dorthe Hjort; Høgdall, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Database (DGCD) established a nursing database in 2011. The aim of DGCD Nursing is to monitor the quality of preoperative and postoperative care and to generate data for research. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In accordance with the current data protection legislation, real-time data are entered by clinical nurses...... at all national cancer centers. The DGCD Nursing includes data of preoperative and postoperative care, and nurses are independently represented in the steering committee. The aim of the present article is to present the first results from DGCD Nursing and the national care improvements that have followed......, pain score, vital functions, and psychosocial support. CONCLUSIONS: At national level, DGCD offers a comprehensive overview of the total patient pathway within gynecological cancer surgery. The DGCD Nursing has added to the quality and implementation of evidence-based preoperative and postoperative...

  5. [Knowledge of human papilloma virus (HPV) and acceptance of vaginal self-sampling among Mexican woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Márquez, Clara I; Salinas-Urbina, Addis A; Cruz-Valdez, Aurelio; Hernández-Girón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between the level of knowledge about human papilloma virus and the acceptance of vaginal self-sampling as a cervical cancer diagnostic test among Mexican women who have already experienced vaginal self-sampling at home. A structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions was applied to 690 women in the state of Morelos who had taken a vaginal self-sample at home. The aspects explored were the level of knowledge about transmission of the human papilloma virus, identification of the virus as a necessary cause of cervical cancer, and clinical manifestations of infection and treatment. A knowledge index was constructed, identifying the relationship between the index and the women's acceptance of self-sampling, and their degree of trust in the procedure. The statistical analysis included a logistic regression with estimates of measures of association and their respective 95% confidence intervals. The level of knowledge about human papillomavirus showed a positive association with the degree of acceptance of vaginal self-sampling (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.0-5.01) and the women's level of confidence (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.8-4.67). The level of knowledge increased with level of education and was higher in younger women. In order for women with an increased risk of cervical cancer to continue participating in vaginal self-sampling, they must be well informed about the virus. This is especially true for older women, those with lower levels of education, and those in lower socioeconomic levels.

  6. Systemic Inflammatory Reaction in Operative Gynecological Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pronoza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of various methods of anesthesia and treatment on the development of a systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR in gynecological patients. Subjects and methods. The manifestations of SIR were studied in 426 patients who had undergone standard operations on the uterine appendages via traditional laparoscopic access. Ninety-seven women had unoptimized anesthetic maintenance and postoperative preventive antibacterial therapy (Group 1; 95 women had unop-timized anesthetic maintenance and pre- and postoperative massive antibacterial therapy (Group 2; 103 women had optimized anesthetic maintenance and preventive antibacterial therapy (Group 3; 131 women had optimized anesthetic maintenance and massive antibacterial therapy (Group 4. Results. Antibacterial therapy was not found to affect the manifestations of SIR significantly. The optimized anesthetic maintenance that differed from the unoptimized one in higher nociceptive defense had a considerable impact on the manifestation of SIR. Low molecular-weight heparins and preoperative hyperv-olemic hemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch preparations positively affected the study indices. The observed SIR belonged to the second stage of release of the small amount of mediators into systemic circulation. The transition of SIR to the third stage of inflammatory reaction generalization was suggested by changes in other monitored parameters, simultaneously informing about this or that degree of multiple organ dysfunction. Conclusion. Laparoscopic surgical intervention, multicom-ponent preoperative sedation, preventive preoperative analgesia with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prevention of microcirculatory disorders with low molecular-weight heparins, preoperative hypervolemic hemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch, and use of the loading doses of opioids in the period of induction to anesthesia in combination with propofol lower the level of a systemic inflammatory response

  7. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  8. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhandong; Venkatesh, Santosh S; Maley, Carlo C

    2008-01-01

    Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12) genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98%) 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to < 2% of possible oligomers in D. melanogaster (12–17 bp), C. elegans (11–17 bp), A. thaliana (11–17 bp), S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp) and E. coli (9–15 bp). Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to

  9. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Self-Taken Samples from Screening Nonattenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, J U H; Rebolj, M; Ejegod, D M

    2017-01-01

    The Copenhagen Self-Sampling Initiative (CSi) has shown how human papillomavirus (HPV)-based self-sampling can be used to increase screening participation among 23,632 nonattenders in the Capital Region of Denmark. In this study, we describe HPV prevalence and genotype frequency in 4,824 self...... study, which had been undertaken in the same screening laboratory. Nonattenders had an HPV prevalence of 11.3% as determined by the CLART assay, which was lower than that for women from the Horizon study (18.5%). One-third of the CSi women who tested HPV positive by self-sampling tested HPV negative...

  10. Workup of Human Blood Samples for Deep Sequencing of HIV-1 Genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Marion; Gall, Astrid; van der Kuyl, Antoinette; Wymant, Chris; Blanquart, François; Fraser, Christophe; Berkhout, Ben

    2018-01-01

    We describe a detailed protocol for the manual workup of blood (plasma/serum) samples from individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for deep sequence analysis of the viral genome. The study optimizing the assay was performed in the context of the BEEHIVE (Bridging

  11. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  12. Disruption of CTCF at the miR-125b1 locus in gynecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Herrera, Luis A; González-Barrios, Rodrigo; Cisneros-Soberanis, Fernanda; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Pérez, Víctor; Cantú, David; Prada, Diddier; Castro, Clementina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2012-01-01

    In cancer cells, transcriptional gene silencing has been associated with genetic and epigenetic defects. The disruption of DNA methylation patterns and covalent histone marks has been associated with cancer development. Until recently, microRNA (miRNA) gene silencing was not well understood. In particular, miR-125b1 has been suggested to be an miRNA with tumor suppressor activity, and it has been shown to be deregulated in various human cancers. In the present study, we evaluated the DNA methylation at the CpG island proximal to the transcription start site of miR-125b1 in cancer cell lines as well as in normal tissues and gynecological tumor samples. In addition, we analyzed the association of CTCF and covalent histone modifications at the miR-125b1 locus. To assess the DNA methylation status of the miR-125b1, genomic DNA was transformed with sodium bisulfite, and then PCR-amplified with modified primers and sequenced. The miR-125b1 gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR using U6 as a control for constitutive gene expression. CTCF repressive histone marks abundance was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The disruption of CTCF in breast cancer cells correlated with the incorporation of repressive histone marks such H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 as well as with aberrant DNA methylation patterns. To determine the effect of DNA methylation at the CpG island of miR-125b1 on the expression of this gene, we performed a qRT-PCR assay. We observed a significant reduction on the expression of miR-125b1 in cancer cells in comparison with controls, suggesting that DNA methylation at the CpG island might reduce miR-125b1 expression. These effects were observed in other gynecological cancers, including ovarian and cervical tumors. A reduction of miR-125b1 expression in cancers, correlated with methylation, repressive histone marks and loss of CTCF binding at the promoter region

  13. Comparing different post-mortem human samples as DNA sources for downstream genotyping and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calacal, Gayvelline C; Apaga, Dame Loveliness T; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Jimenez, Joseph Andrew D; Lagat, Ludivino J; Villacorta, Renato Pio F; Lim, Maria Cecilia F; Fortun, Raquel D R; Datar, Francisco A; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2015-11-01

    The capability of DNA laboratories to perform genotyping procedures from post-mortem remains, including those that had undergone putrefaction, continues to be a challenge in the Philippines, a country characterized by very humid and warm conditions all year round. These environmental conditions accelerate the decomposition of human remains that were recovered after a disaster and those that were left abandoned after a crime. When considerable tissue decomposition of human remains has taken place, there is no other option but to extract DNA from bone and/or teeth samples. Routinely, femur shafts are obtained from recovered bodies for human identification because the calcium matrix protects the DNA contained in the osteocytes. In the Philippines, there is difficulty in collecting femur samples after natural disasters or even human-made disasters, because these events are usually characterized by a large number of fatalities. Identification of casualties is further delayed by limitation in human and material resources. Hence, it is imperative to test other types of biological samples that are easier to collect, transport, process and store. We analyzed DNA that were obtained from body fluid, bone marrow, muscle tissue, clavicle, femur, metatarsal, patella, rib and vertebral samples from five recently deceased untreated male cadavers and seven male human remains that were embalmed, buried for ∼ 1 month and then exhumed. The bodies had undergone different environmental conditions and were in various stages of putrefaction. A DNA extraction method utilizing a detergent-washing step followed by an organic procedure was used. The utility of bone marrow and vitreous fluid including bone marrow and vitreous fluid that was transferred on FTA(®) cards and subjected to autosomal STR and Y-STR DNA typing were also evaluated. DNA yield was measured and the presence or absence of PCR inhibitors in DNA extracts was assessed using Plexor(®)HY. All samples were amplified using

  14. Rigorous Training of Dogs Leads to High Accuracy in Human Scent Matching-To-Sample Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Marchal

    Full Text Available Human scent identification is based on a matching-to-sample task in which trained dogs are required to compare a scent sample collected from an object found at a crime scene to that of a suspect. Based on dogs' greater olfactory ability to detect and process odours, this method has been used in forensic investigations to identify the odour of a suspect at a crime scene. The excellent reliability and reproducibility of the method largely depend on rigor in dog training. The present study describes the various steps of training that lead to high sensitivity scores, with dogs matching samples with 90% efficiency when the complexity of the scents presented during the task in the sample is similar to that presented in the in lineups, and specificity reaching a ceiling, with no false alarms in human scent matching-to-sample tasks. This high level of accuracy ensures reliable results in judicial human scent identification tests. Also, our data should convince law enforcement authorities to use these results as official forensic evidence when dogs are trained appropriately.

  15. [Japanese who affected modern medicine in Taiwan: obstetrics and gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Tung

    2009-12-01

    This text describes the leaders who established the modem obstetrics and gynecology for Taiwan. during the Japan-colonizing period (1895-1945). These leaders are Mr. Kawasoye, M., Mr. Mukae K., and Mr. Magara M. The lives of these leaders were different, but they all strongly contributed to the development of modem obstetrics and gynecology in Taiwan. With regard to the passage of time, Mr. Kawasoye contributed the initial efforts, Mr. Mukae worked during the flourishing period of the clinic; and Mr. Magara worked during the mature period, emphasizing research. These three periods are closely correlated with the course of the development of modem obstetrics and gynecology in Taiwan.

  16. Residues of PCDDs and PCDFs in human milk samples in Ahmedabad, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Sadhu, H.; Jhamb, N.; Karanjkar, R.; Saiyed, H. [National Inst. of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad (India)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and Polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs) represent a class of organic environmental pollutants. They are unwanted byproduct of incineration, uncontrolled burning and certain industrial processes. They are persistent in nature and bioaccumulates through food chain. These are hazardous to human health and environment. The residues of these toxicants have been detected in human adipose tissue, blood and milk. WHO has coordinated two rounds of follow up studies on levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in human milk and the data shows a decreasing trend during the last 30 years. However, in India there is no data available on the exposure and residues of these contaminants. This study presents first time the levels of dioxin and furans in human milk samples collected from the Ahmedabad city in India.

  17. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  18. Global Distribution of Human-Associated Fecal Genetic Markers in Reference Samples from Six Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, René E; Reischer, Georg H; Ixenmaier, Simone K; Derx, Julia; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Ebdon, James E; Linke, Rita; Egle, Lukas; Ahmed, Warish; Blanch, Anicet R; Byamukama, Denis; Savill, Marion; Mushi, Douglas; Cristóbal, Héctor A; Edge, Thomas A; Schade, Margit A; Aslan, Asli; Brooks, Yolanda M; Sommer, Regina; Masago, Yoshifumi; Sato, Maria I; Taylor, Huw D; Rose, Joan B; Wuertz, Stefan; Shanks, Orin C; Piringer, Harald; Mach, Robert L; Savio, Domenico; Zessner, Matthias; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2018-05-01

    Numerous bacterial genetic markers are available for the molecular detection of human sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, widespread application is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding geographical stability, limiting implementation to a small number of well-characterized regions. This study investigates the geographic distribution of five human-associated genetic markers (HF183/BFDrev, HF183/BacR287, BacHum-UCD, BacH, and Lachno2) in municipal wastewaters (raw and treated) from 29 urban and rural wastewater treatment plants (750-4 400 000 population equivalents) from 13 countries spanning six continents. In addition, genetic markers were tested against 280 human and nonhuman fecal samples from domesticated, agricultural and wild animal sources. Findings revealed that all genetic markers are present in consistently high concentrations in raw (median log 10 7.2-8.0 marker equivalents (ME) 100 mL -1 ) and biologically treated wastewater samples (median log 10 4.6-6.0 ME 100 mL -1 ) regardless of location and population. The false positive rates of the various markers in nonhuman fecal samples ranged from 5% to 47%. Results suggest that several genetic markers have considerable potential for measuring human-associated contamination in polluted environmental waters. This will be helpful in water quality monitoring, pollution modeling and health risk assessment (as demonstrated by QMRAcatch) to guide target-oriented water safety management across the globe.

  19. Comparison of Total Calcium Level during General and Spinal Anesthesia in Gynecologic Abdominal Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoun Haryalchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Calcium (Ca+2 plays an important role in many biophysiological mechanisms .The present study was carried out to assess alterations in total serum calcium level before and after operations in consider to the type of anesthesia. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 74 women who candidate for gynecological abdominal operations during one year at Al-zahra maternity Hospital in Rasht, Iran. The patients underwent General Anesthesia (GA (N=37 or Spinal Anesthesia (SA (N=37 randomly. Blood samples (2 cc, were obtained an hour before the anesthesia and two hours after that. The blood samples had been sent to the laboratory for analyzing .Total serum calcium level, magnesium (Mg and albumin level were measured by photometric methods. Inferential statistic was analyzed with the Vilkson non-parametric and Pearson's correlation test. P-values less than 0.05 have been considered as significant different. Results: There was a significant trend to decrease in calcium levels after all gynecological abdominal operations, but there was a significant correlation between General anesthesia (GA and reduction of serum calcium level (p=0.026 . Therefore, General Anesthesia (GA is accompanied by more calcium reduction than Spinal Anesthesia (SA. Conclusion: Serum Calcium levels tend to decrease after all gynecological abdominal surgeries, but General Anesthesia (GA is accompanied by more calcium reduction than Spinal one. It needs to further specific studies, to illustrate association between different methods of anesthesia and Ca+2 changes.

  20. Molecular detection of eukaryotes in a single human stool sample from Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hamad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial eukaryotes represent an important component of the human gut microbiome, with different beneficial or harmful roles; some species are commensal or mutualistic, whereas others are opportunistic or parasitic. The diversity of eukaryotes inhabiting humans remains relatively unexplored because of either the low abundance of these organisms in human gut or because they have received limited attention from a whole-community perspective. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, a single fecal sample from a healthy African male was studied using both culture-dependent methods and extended molecular methods targeting the 18S rRNA and ITS sequences. Our results revealed that very few fungi, including Candida spp., Galactomyces spp., and Trichosporon asahii, could be isolated using culture-based methods. In contrast, a relatively a high number of eukaryotic species could be identified in this fecal sample when culture-independent methods based on various primer sets were used. A total of 27 species from one sample were found among the 977 analyzed clones. The clone libraries were dominated by fungi (716 clones/977, 73.3%, corresponding to 16 different species. In addition, 187 sequences out of 977 (19.2% corresponded to 9 different species of plants; 59 sequences (6% belonged to other micro-eukaryotes in the gut, including Entamoeba hartmanni and Blastocystis sp; and only 15 clones/977 (1.5% were related to human 18S rRNA sequences. CONCLUSION: Our results revealed a complex eukaryotic community in the volunteer's gut, with fungi being the most abundant species in the stool sample. Larger investigations are needed to assess the generality of these results and to understand their roles in human health and disease.

  1. The study of chemical forms of mercury in human hair and other bio-environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzer, K.; Benes, P.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the continued studies on methods of analysis for forms of mercury in hair, and of the distribution of mercury among inorganic and organic forms in human hair are described. A new method for determining methylmercury has been developed, based on the selective leaching of methylmercury from hair using 2M hydrochioric acid. This method was used, in combination with the determination of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry, for the analysis of mercury forms in three samples of human hair and two samples of fish homogenate. Good reproducibility of parallel determinations was obtained. The results were compared with literature data for the samples, or with the results of the analysis of the same samples by extraction method described earlier. Good agreement was also found between these methods. Further experiments were concerned with the study of the effect of radiation sterilization on the forms of mercury in hair, of the speciation of 203 Hg formed by irradiation of hair in nuclear reactor and with the labelling of a large batch of human hair with methylmercury. (author)

  2. Patients' Evaluations of Gynecologic Services Provided by Nurse Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, J. Mark; Carter, Glenna

    1978-01-01

    The development, operating principles, and users' evaluations of a broad based gynecologic program emphasizing effective birth control on a university campus are discussed. A major feature explored is the use of nurse practitioners as the primary service providers. (JMF)

  3. Review of the afterloading techniques in gynecologic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, K.

    1975-01-01

    A review of clinically used afterloading techniques - remote controlled and manually operated ones - is given by tables. The advantages of afterloading techniques are discussed with regard to radiation protection as well as to the therapy of gynecologic carcinomas. (orig.) [de

  4. EMMPRIN in gynecologic cancers: pathologic and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan-tong

    2015-07-01

    The highly glycosylated transmembrane protein extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is associated with several pathological conditions, including various types of cancers. In different gynecological malignancies, such as ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancers, EMMPRIN plays significant roles in cell adhesion modulation, tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis by inducing the production of various molecules, including matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor. Because of its high level of expression, EMMPRIN can possibly be used as a diagnostic marker of gynecological cancers. Recent studies have showed that targeting EMMPRIN, especially by RNA interference (RNAi) technology, has promising therapeutic potential in basic research on gynecological cancer treatments, which make a platform for the future clinical success. This review study focused on the association of EMMPRIN in gynecological cancers in the perspectives of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutics.

  5. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) self-sampling: do women accept it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nik Nairan; Daud, Suzanna; Wang, Seok Mui; Mahmud, Zamalia; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Al-Kubaisy, Waqar

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to determine the acceptability of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) self-sampling and the factors associated with willingness to buy HPV self-sampling kit in the future. A total of 164 women aged 28-60 years old from Obstetrics & Gynaecology clinics at a teaching hospital performed HPV self-sampling using the Digene HC2 DNA collection kit. After samples were taken, the participants were given self-administered questionnaires. The majority of the participants were Malay (93.9%), had attained tertiary education (65.2%) and were employed (70.1%). The acceptability was good. More than half of the participants felt that self-sampling was easy. Only 1.2% felt that the procedure was difficult to perform. Most reported no pain at all during the procedure (66.9%). The commonest concern was getting a good sample (90.1%). A number of Pap smears were found to be significantly associated with the willingness to buy the HPV self-sampling kit. HPV self-sampling has the potential to be included in the cervical cancer screening programme. Impact Statement What is already known on this subject: HPV self-sampling is acceptable in some developed and developing countries. It is acceptable because it was easy to perform with very minimal pain or discomfort. Studies on the acceptance of self-screening are needed to plan a policy on self-sampling in the future. What the results of this study add: Our study adds new findings to the body of knowledge on self-sampling in the local population. We found that more women are willing to do the self-sampling at the clinic rather than at home. Although more than 90% expressed willingness to do self-sampling in the future, only 70% of them were willing to purchase the kit. Cost is a potential barrier to women who have the interest to perform the self-sampling. Given the global economic challenges, cost is inevitably an important predictor that we have to consider. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and

  6. Proteomic Biomarker Discovery in 1000 Human Plasma Samples with Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John; Oller Moreno, Sergio; Irincheeva, Irina; Valsesia, Armand; Astrup, Arne; Saris, Wim H M; Hager, Jörg; Kussmann, Martin; Dayon, Loïc

    2016-02-05

    The overall impact of proteomics on clinical research and its translation has lagged behind expectations. One recognized caveat is the limited size (subject numbers) of (pre)clinical studies performed at the discovery stage, the findings of which fail to be replicated in larger verification/validation trials. Compromised study designs and insufficient statistical power are consequences of the to-date still limited capacity of mass spectrometry (MS)-based workflows to handle large numbers of samples in a realistic time frame, while delivering comprehensive proteome coverages. We developed a highly automated proteomic biomarker discovery workflow. Herein, we have applied this approach to analyze 1000 plasma samples from the multicentered human dietary intervention study "DiOGenes". Study design, sample randomization, tracking, and logistics were the foundations of our large-scale study. We checked the quality of the MS data and provided descriptive statistics. The data set was interrogated for proteins with most stable expression levels in that set of plasma samples. We evaluated standard clinical variables that typically impact forthcoming results and assessed body mass index-associated and gender-specific proteins at two time points. We demonstrate that analyzing a large number of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery with MS using isobaric tagging is feasible, providing robust and consistent biological results.

  7. Comparison of chlorzoxazone one-sample methods to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Iza; Dalhoff, Kim; Clemmesen, Jens O

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comparison of a one-sample with a multi-sample method (the metabolic fractional clearance) to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans. METHODS: Healthy, male Caucasians ( n=19) were included. The multi-sample fractional clearance (Cl(fe)) of chlorzoxazone was compared with one...... estimates, Cl(est) at 3 h or 6 h, and MR at 3 h, can serve as reliable markers of CYP2E1 activity. The one-sample clearance method is an accurate, renal function-independent measure of the intrinsic activity; it is simple to use and easily applicable to humans.......-time-point clearance estimation (Cl(est)) at 3, 4, 5 and 6 h. Furthermore, the metabolite/drug ratios (MRs) estimated from one-time-point samples at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h were compared with Cl(fe). RESULTS: The concordance between Cl(est) and Cl(fe) was highest at 6 h. The minimal mean prediction error (MPE) of Cl...

  8. Efficient discrimination and removal of phospholipids during electromembrane extraction from human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vårdal, Linda; Gjelstad, Astrid; Huang, Chuixiu

    2017-01-01

    to be highly efficient for providing phospholipid-free extracts. CONCLUSION: Ultra-HPLC-MS/MS analysis of the donor solutions revealed that the phospholipids principally remained in the plasma samples. This proved that the phospholipids did not migrate in the electrical field and they were prevented from......AIM: For the first time, extracts obtained from human plasma samples by electromembrane extraction (EME) were investigated comprehensively with particular respect to phospholipids using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Thhe purpose...

  9. Human mixed lymphocyte cultures. Evaluation of microculture technique utilizing the multiple automated sample harvester (MASH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, G. B.; Strong, D. M.; Ahmed, A.; Green, S. S.; Sell, K. W.; Hartzman, R. J.; Bach, F. H.

    1973-01-01

    Use of lymphocyte cultures for in vitro studies such as pretransplant histocompatibility testing has established the need for standardization of this technique. A microculture technique has been developed that has facilitated the culturing of lymphocytes and increased the quantity of cultures feasible, while lowering the variation between replicate samples. Cultures were prepared for determination of tritiated thymidine incorporation using a Multiple Automated Sample Harvester (MASH). Using this system, the parameters that influence the in vitro responsiveness of human lymphocytes to allogeneic lymphocytes have been investigated. PMID:4271568

  10. Proposals for common definitions of reference points in gynecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassagne, D.; Horiot, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    In May 1975 the report of European Curietherapy Group recommended in gynecological Dosimetry by computer. Use of reference points = lymphatic trapezoid figure with 6 points, Pelvic wall, all points are refering to bony structures. Use of critical organ reference points = maximum rectum dose, bladder dose mean rectal dose. Use of 6,000 rads reference isodose described by height, width, and thickness dimensions. These proposals are the basis of a common language in gynecological brachytherapy [fr

  11. Immunoscintigraphy of recurrences of gynecologic carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Fumoleau, P.; Saccavini, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    In a first, retrospective study, 15 patients with known ovarian carcinoma were injected with 131 I-OC 125 F(ab')2 monoclonal antibody (MAb). The sensitivity of immunoscintigraphy based on the number of the tumor sites was 67% (12/18). In a second, prospective study, 29 patients with gynecologic carcinoma were injected with 131 I-OC 125 F(ab')2 (24) or 131 I-19-9 F(ab')2 (5) MAbs according to the histologic type. Based on the number of tested anatomic sites, sensitivity was 72% and specificity 86%. In two patients injected with both 131 I-OC-125 F(ab')2 and 125 I-NS F(ab')2 (nonspecific immunoglobulin) 1 and 4 days before tumor resection, tumor uptake of the specific antibody was 2.2 and 4.5 times greater than that of NS. Immunoscintigraphic results were complementary with those of ultrasonography and computed tomography. Finally, in one patient injected successively with 131 I-OC 125 F(ab')2 and 111 In-DTPA-OC 125 F(ab')2, the recurrent tumor was visualized with both radionuclides, with 111 In providing better abdominal tumor contrast but causing much greater liver radioactivity than 131 I

  12. Role of interstitial implantation in gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recurrent cancer at any site carries a gloomy prognosis. Cancer of the cervix that recurs after radical surgery or curative radiation therapy is a perplexing problem confronting both gynecological and radiation oncologists. In the authors' series, 45% of the patients survived disease-free at 1 year and 10% survived without disease at 5 years or longer following interstitial implantation for recurrent cervical cancer. The optimal utilization of this procedure seems to depend on the site of recurrence, the extent of the disease in the pelvis, and the status of para-aortic node involvement. This retrospective analysis enabled the authors to identify the prognostic factors. The most favorable group benefited by this technique were those who presented with either central recurrence or unilateral, localized pelvic side wall recurrent disease. The least morbidity was noticed in those patients with minimal surgical manipulations at the time of the interstitial implantation. The authors recommended that only a limited and essential surgical procedure should accompany interstitial implantation, since the associated morbidity and mortality is high and survival brief

  13. Comprehensive MR imaging of acute gynecologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohke, M; Watanabe, Y; Okumura, A; Amoh, Y; Hayashi, T; Yoshizako, T; Yasui, M; Nakashita, S; Nakanishi, J; Dodo, Y

    2000-01-01

    Rapid advances in techniques of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have enabled diagnosis of acute gynecologic conditions, which are characterized by sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, fever, genital bleeding, intraperitoneal bleeding, or symptoms of shock. The chemical-selective fat-suppression technique not only helps establish the characteristics of lesions that contain fat components but also increases the conspicuity of inflammatory lesions. When a T2-weighted image is obtained with a very long effective echo time (>250 msec), even a small amount of ascites can be easily identified and the contrast between urine and complex fluid becomes more conspicuous. T2*-weighted images are useful for identification of hemorrhagic lesions by demonstrating deoxyhemoglobin and hemosiderin. Contrast material-enhanced dynamic subtraction MR imaging performed with a three-dimensional fast field-echo sequence and a rapid bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine allows evaluation of lesion vascularity and the anatomic relationship between pelvic vessels and a lesion and allows identification of the bleeding point by demonstrating extravasation of contrast material. To optimize the MR imaging examination, attention should be given to the parameters of each pulse sequence and proper combination of the sequences.

  14. Bulimia from a gynecological view: hormonal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, M; Szendei, G; Haász, P

    2004-11-01

    Gynecological problems are one of the most frequent somatic complications of eating disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of improper eating habits in the aetiology of menstrual disturbances, anovulation and hormonal related changes. Bulimia nervosa is the focus of attention since amenorrhea is considered a diagnostic criterium in anorexia nervosa. Subjects of the BITE (Bulimia Investigation Test, Edinburgh) test who were infertile were studied (n = 58) In the studied population there were 6 cases of clinical and 8 cases of subclinical bulimia nervosa. Symptoms and severity subscales of the BITE test significantly correlated with body mass index (p = 0.003). All 14 patients suffering from clinical and subclinical bulimia nervosa had pathologically low FSH and LH hormone levels. In those with clinical bulimia nervosa (n = 6) we diagnosed 4 cases of multicystic ovary (MCO) and in the eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) group (n = 22) there were 2 cases of MCO and 5 cases of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The results suggest that unsatisfactory nutrition (binges and "crash diet") in bulimia nervosa results in hormonal dysfunction, menstrual disturbances and infertility. The authors question the necessity for immediately estrogen replacement: they consider the reversibility of the hormonal status by early treatment of eating disorders is more appropriate. Excessive use of hormonal contraceptives in therapy has to be questioned.

  15. Nuclear medicine in gynecologic oncology: Recent practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamki, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear medicine tests tell more about the physiological function of an organ that about its anatomy. This is in contrast to several other modalities in current use in the field of diagnostic imaging. Some of these newer modalities, such as computerized tomography (CT), offer a better resolution of the anatomy of the organ being examined. This has caused physicians to drift away from certain nuclear medicine tests, specifically those that focus primarily on the anatomy. When CT scanning is available, for instance, it is no longer advisable to perform a scintigraphic brain scan in search of metastasis;CT scanning is more accurate overall and more likely than a nuclear study to result in a specific diagnosis. In certain cases of diffuse cortical infections like herpes encephalitis, however, a scintiscan is still superior to a CT scan. Today's practice of nuclear medicine in gynecologic oncology may be divided into the three categories - (1) time-tested function-oriented scintiscans, (2) innovations of established nuclear tests, and (3) newer pathophysiological scintistudies. The author discusses here, briefly, each of these categories, giving three examples of each

  16. Characteristics of team briefings in gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Katherine L; Hildebrand, Emily A; Hallbeck, M Susan; Branaghan, Russell J; Blocker, Renaldo C

    2018-02-24

    Preoperative briefings have been proven beneficial for improving team performance in the operating room. However, there has been minimal research regarding team briefings in specific surgical domains. As part of a larger project to develop a briefing structure for gynecological surgery, the study aimed to better understand the current state of pre-operative team briefings in one department of an academic hospital. Twenty-four team briefings were observed and video recorded. Communication was analyzed and social network metrics were created based on the team member verbal interactions. Introductions occurred in only 25% of the briefings. Network analysis revealed that average team briefings exhibited a hierarchical structure of communication, with the surgeon speaking the most frequently. The average network for resident-led briefings displayed a non-hierarchical structure with all team members communicating with the resident. Briefings conducted without a standardized protocol can produce variable communication between the role leading and the team members present. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Gynecology and obstetrics in Ancient Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M

    1992-10-01

    Gods and Goddesses were invoked by the Romans for the termination of a good delivery. Diana, Juno, Lucina and Cybele were the preferred ones. Sterility was sometimes treated by the whip of the Lupercali of ministers of Pan. The first doctors in Rome were coming from Greece. Celsus, Pliny the Elder were encyclopedists, Rufus an anatomist, Dioscorides a pharmacologist. Archigenes, Aretaeus and Antyllus surgeons. Soranus from Ephesus, was the first to recommend podalic version. His works was a long time buried in a profound oblivion and discovered by scholars during the nineteenth century. Galen was looked as the most famous medical man after Hippocrates. During the Roman Empire of Occident (Byzantine Empire), Oribasius, Aurelianus Caelius, Moschion and above all Aetius and Paul of Aegina wrote many works which were many times plagiarized. Roman laws concerning public health were severe. Midwives took an important action in the care of pregnant women. Roman poets as Plautus, Terence, Lucilius, Catullus, Virgil, Tibullus, Ovid and Martial were many times concerned in their writings with gynecologic or obstetric subjects. Children were easily forsaken. Three Emperors, Trajan, Marcus-Aurelius and Alexander Severius, a writer, Aulu-Gelles, and a rhetor, Quintilian, took protection of them.

  18. Quality assesment for the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Ecotechnologies, Lab. of Dioxins; Abad, E; Llerena, J J; Caixach, J; Rivera, J

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work was to optimise a relevant methodology for the ultratrace analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples. In order to carry out the study, different strategies including the elaboration of quality control samples, parallel sample analysis, control blanks and a number of quality assurance measures were implemented as analytical current practices. Some of the main drawbacks in the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in these kind of samples come from two conflicting aspects: the small sample size and the low levels expected to be found. Taking this into account, an unavoidable compromise between the sample amount and the minimum analytical requirements, mainly the detection limit (LOD), is mandatory. To reach this goal C{sub 18} solid phase extraction was used to remove the analytes from the matrix. Clean up was performed by solid-liquid adsorption chromatography using a variety of adsorbents. Instrumental analysis was achieved by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Finally, the optimised methodology was applied to evaluate the potential impact in general population living in the surroundings of an obsolete municipal waste incinerator plant (MWI). Thus, more than 400 individuals serum samples potentially exposed to the emission of the incinerator and people not exposed were considered in this study.

  19. Barriers to acceptance of self-sampling for human papillomavirus across ethnolinguistic groups of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Lytwyn, Alice; Lohfeld, Lynne; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Fowler, Nancy; Karwalajtys, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Immigrant and low socio-economic (SES) women in North America underutilize Papanicolaou screening. Vaginal swab self-sampling for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has the potential to increase cervical cancer screening participation. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the perceptions of lower SES and immigrant women regarding self-sampling for HPV. Eleven focus-group interviews were conducted: one with Canadian-born English-speaking lower SES women, and two groups each with Arabic, Cantonese, Dari (Afghani), Somali and Spanish (Latino)-speaking women (one group conducted in English, the other in the native language) recently immigrated to Canada. Five to nine women aged 35 to 65 years and married with children participated in each group. Themes included 1) who might use self-sampling and why; 2) aversion to self-sampling and reasons to prefer physician; 3) ways to improve the appeal of self-sampling. Women generally perceived benefits of self-sampling and a small number felt they might use the method, but all groups had some reservations. Reasons included: uncertainty over performing the sampling correctly; fear of hurting themselves; concern about obtaining appropriate material; and concerns about test accuracy. Women preferred testing by a health care professional because they were accustomed to pelvic examinations, it was more convenient, or they trusted the results. Perceptions of self-sampling for HPV were similar across cultures and pertained to issues of confidence in self-sampling and need for physician involvement in care. These findings can inform programs and studies planning to employ self-sampling as a screening modality for cervical cancer.

  20. Integrity of the Human Faecal Microbiota following Long-Term Sample Storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Kia

    Full Text Available In studies of the human microbiome, faecal samples are frequently used as a non-invasive proxy for the study of the intestinal microbiota. To obtain reliable insights, the need for bacterial DNA of high quality and integrity following appropriate faecal sample collection and preservation steps is paramount. In a study of dietary mineral balance in the context of type 2 diabetes (T2D, faecal samples were collected from healthy and T2D individuals throughout a 13-day residential trial. These samples were freeze-dried, then stored mostly at -20°C from the trial date in 2000/2001 until the current research in 2014. Given the relative antiquity of these samples (~14 years, we sought to evaluate DNA quality and comparability to freshly collected human faecal samples. Following the extraction of bacterial DNA, gel electrophoresis indicated that our DNA extracts were more sheared than extracts made from freshly collected faecal samples, but still of sufficiently high molecular weight to support amplicon-based studies. Likewise, spectrophotometric assessment of extracts revealed that they were of high quality and quantity. A subset of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were sequenced using Illumina MiSeq and compared against publicly available sequence data representing a similar cohort analysed by the American Gut Project (AGP. Notably, our bacterial community profiles were highly consistent with those from the AGP data. Our results suggest that when faecal specimens are stored appropriately, the microbial profiles are preserved and robust to extended storage periods.

  1. Use of monoclonal antibody B72.3 in the management of gynecologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Schlom, J.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are currently used in the diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies by way of immunohistochemical assays, serum assays, and in situ radiolocalization of carcinoma lesions. Among them is MAb B72.3, generated against a human tumor-associated antigen (TAG-72). Using immunohistochemical techniques, MAb B72.3 has shown reactivity with 100 percent of common epithelial ovarian carcinomas and endometrial carcinomas and non-reactivity with normal adult tissues, with the exception of normal secretory endometrium. B72.3 appears to be a valuable immunocytologic adjunct, with greater than 90 percent of effusions and fine-needle aspiration biopsies from gynecologic carcinomas showing reactivity. Using a serum assay developed to detect the presence of the TAG-72 antigen, 48 percent of patients with ovarian carcinoma demonstrated TAG-72-positive sera versus 1 percent of control sera. 131 I-labeled MAb B72.3 IgG and gamma scanning have been used for the in situ detection of metastatic carcinoma. Twelve of 15 patients with ovarian carcinoma showed positive gamma scans, and approximately 80 percent of the lesions demonstrated specific localization of the antibody. These studies indicate the potential utility of MAb B72.3 in the diagnosis of gynecologic carcinoma. 57 references

  2. Ergonomic deficits in robotic gynecologic oncology surgery: a need for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Renatta; Franasiak, Jason; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate surgeon strain using validated ergonomic assessment tools. Observational study (Canadian Task Force classification III). Academic medical center. Robotic surgeons performing gynecologic oncology surgical procedures. Videotape footage of surgeons performing robotic gynecologic oncology procedures was obtained. A human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics analyzed the video recordings and performed ergonomic evaluations of the surgeons. An initial evaluation was conducted using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) survey, an ergonomic assessment and prioritization method for determining posture, force, and frequency concerns with focus on the upper limbs. A more detailed analysis followed using the Strain Index (SI) method, which uses multiplicative interactions to identify jobs that are potentially hazardous. Seventeen hours of video recordings were analyzed, and descriptive data based on RULA/SI analysis were collected. Ergonomic evaluation of surgeon activity resulted in a mean RULA score of 6.46 (maximum possible RULA score, 7), indicating a need for further investigation. The mean SI grand score was 24.34. SI scores >10 suggest a potential for hazard to the operator. Thus, the current use of the surgical robot is potentially dangerous with regards to ergonomic positioning and should be modified. At a high-volume robotics center, there are ergonomics deficits that are hazardous to gynecologic surgeons and suggest the need for modification and intervention. A training strategy must be developed to address these ergonomic issues and knowledge deficiencies. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A rapid and efficient DNA extraction protocol from fresh and frozen human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Pokhraj; Das, Avishek; Dutta, Somit; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Different methods available for extraction of human genomic DNA suffer from one or more drawbacks including low yield, compromised quality, cost, time consumption, use of toxic organic solvents, and many more. Herein, we aimed to develop a method to extract DNA from 500 μL of fresh or frozen human blood. Five hundred microliters of fresh and frozen human blood samples were used for standardization of the extraction procedure. Absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, respectively, (A 260 /A 280 ) were estimated to check the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA sample. Qualitative assessment of the extracted DNA was checked by Polymerase Chain reaction and double digestion of the DNA sample. Our protocol resulted in average yield of 22±2.97 μg and 20.5±3.97 μg from 500 μL of fresh and frozen blood, respectively, which were comparable to many reference protocols and kits. Besides yielding bulk amount of DNA, our protocol is rapid, economical, and avoids toxic organic solvents such as Phenol. Due to unaffected quality, the DNA is suitable for downstream applications. The protocol may also be useful for pursuing basic molecular researches in laboratories having limited funds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neutron activation analysis for the optimal sampling and extraction of extractable organohalogens in human hari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Chai, Z.F.; Sun, H.B.; Xu, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    Many persistent organohalogen compounds such as DDTs and polychlorinated biphenyls have caused seriously environmental pollution problem that now involves all life. It is know that neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a very convenient method for halogen analysis and is also the only method currently available for simultaneously determining organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in one extract. Human hair is a convenient material to evaluate the burden of such compounds in human body and dan be easily collected from people over wide ranges of age, sex, residential areas, eating habits and working environments. To effectively extract organohalogen compounds from human hair, in present work the optimal Soxhelt-extraction time of extractable organohalogen (EOX) and extractable persistent organohalogen (EPOX) from hair of different lengths were studied by NAA. The results indicated that the optimal Soxhelt-extraction time of EOX and EPOX from human hair was 8-11 h, and the highest EOX and EPOX contents were observed in hair powder extract. The concentrations of both EOX and EPOX in different hair sections were in the order of hair powder ≥ 2 mm > 5 mm, which stated that hair samples milled into hair powder or cut into very short sections were not only for homogeneous. hair sample but for the best hair extraction efficiency.

  5. The association of gynecological symptoms with psychological distress in women of reproductive age: a survey from gynecology clinics in Beirut, Lebanon

    OpenAIRE

    Chaaya, M. M.; Bogner, H. R.; Gallo, J. J.; Leaf, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    To date there has been no previous research into a possible association between psychological distress and gynecologic symptoms in the Arab world. We hypothesized that psychological distress would be associated with specific gynecologic complaints as well as with psychosocial factors.

  6. C-14 bomb peak dating of human DNA samples at the microgram level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebl, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C, t 1/2 = 5700 ± 30 years) is probably the radionuclide with the most versatile applications, spanning from archaeology to geoscience and medicine. Many of these applications are finally limited by the minimum amount of carbon in which the isotopic ratio 14C/12C can be measured. The required carbon sample size has dramatically decreased with the development of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), typically from gram amounts for the classical beta counting method to about 1 milligram for AMS. The current work presents a further reduction into the few-μg carbon range. This means a decrease by a factor of one million compared to classical beta counting and is essential for the field of retrospective birth dating of human cells by means of radiocarbon from above-ground nuclear weapons testing between 1955 and 1963. The determination of 14C levels in genomic DNA can be used to retrospectively establish the birth date of cells in the human body. The main motive of the current work was to reduce the amount of carbon required for reliable 14C measurements to such an extent that investigations of neurons of particularly interesting small sections of the human brain (e.g. the olfactory bulb, bulbus olfactorius) were possible. In-depth investigations and development of 14C AMS sample preparation and measurement methods for μg-size DNA samples were carried out in close collaboration with the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. As the most significant result, 14C measurements of 4.6 μg carbon DNA samples were performed with an overall precision of 2.3%. This allowed to study neurogenesis in the human olfactory bulb, which turned out to take place primarily at birth. Assuming throughout life a constant annual renewal rate of neurons in the human olfactory bulb, an upper limit of 0.34% for the renewal rate (95% confidence) was determined. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) the μg carbon

  7. Sampling methods for recovery of human enteric viruses from environmental surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, Nicole L; Gibson, Kristen E

    2017-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis causes the second highest infectious disease burden worldwide. Human enteric viruses have been identified as leading causative agents of acute gastroenteritis as well as foodborne illnesses in the U.S. and are generally transmitted by fecal-oral contamination. There is growing evidence of transmission occurring via contaminated fomite including food contact surfaces. Additionally, human enteric viruses have been shown to remain infectious on fomites over prolonged periods of time. To better understand viral persistence, there is a need for more studies to investigate this phenomenon. Therefore, optimization of surface sampling methods is essential to aid in understanding environmental contamination to ensure proper preventative measures are being applied. In general, surface sampling studies are limited and highly variable among recovery efficiencies and research parameters used (e.g., virus type/density, surface type, elution buffers, tools). This review aims to discuss the various factors impacting surface sampling of viruses from fomites and to explore how researchers could move towards a more sensitive and standard sampling method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Preservation and rapid purification of DNA from decomposing human tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Amy; Rahman, Elizabeth; Canela, Cassandra; Gangitano, David; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2016-11-01

    One of the key features to be considered in a mass disaster is victim identification. However, the recovery and identification of human remains are sometimes complicated by harsh environmental conditions, limited facilities, loss of electricity and lack of refrigeration. If human remains cannot be collected, stored, or identified immediately, bodies decompose and DNA degrades making genotyping more difficult and ultimately decreasing DNA profiling success. In order to prevent further DNA damage and degradation after collection, tissue preservatives may be used. The goal of this study was to evaluate three customized (modified TENT, DESS, LST) and two commercial DNA preservatives (RNAlater and DNAgard ® ) on fresh and decomposed human skin and muscle samples stored in hot (35°C) and humid (60-70% relative humidity) conditions for up to three months. Skin and muscle samples were harvested from the thigh of three human cadavers placed outdoors for up to two weeks. In addition, the possibility of purifying DNA directly from the preservative solutions ("free DNA") was investigated in order to eliminate lengthy tissue digestion processes and increase throughput. The efficiency of each preservative was evaluated based on the quantity of DNA recovered from both the "free DNA" in solution and the tissue sample itself in conjunction with the quality and completeness of downstream STR profiles. As expected, DNA quantity and STR success decreased with time of decomposition. However, a marked decrease in DNA quantity and STR quality was observed in all samples after the bodies entered the bloat stage (approximately six days of decomposition in this study). Similar amounts of DNA were retrieved from skin and muscle samples over time, but slightly more complete STR profiles were obtained from muscle tissue. Although higher amounts of DNA were recovered from tissue samples than from the surrounding preservative, the average number of reportable alleles from the "free DNA" was

  10. Milk and serum standard reference materials for monitoring organic contaminants in human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, Michele M; Eppe, Gauthier; Focant, Jean-François; Hamilton, Coreen; Heckert, N Alan; Heltsley, Rebecca M; Hoover, Dale; Keller, Jennifer M; Leigh, Stefan D; Patterson, Donald G; Pintar, Adam L; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E; Vander Pol, Stacy S; Wise, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of chemical contaminant measurements required for human biomonitoring studies, SRM 1953 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1954 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum. These materials were developed as part of a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with both agencies contributing data used in the certification of mass fraction values for a wide range of organic contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners. The certified mass fractions of the organic contaminants in unfortified samples, SRM 1953 and SRM 1957, ranged from 12 ng/kg to 2200 ng/kg with the exception of 4,4'-DDE in SRM 1953 at 7400 ng/kg with expanded uncertainties generally <14 %. This agreement suggests that there were no significant biases existing among the multiple methods used for analysis.

  11. Precuneus proportions and cortical folding: A morphometric evaluation on a racially diverse human sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Emiliano; Pereira-Pedro, Ana Sofia; Chen, Xu; Rilling, James K

    2017-05-01

    Recent analyses have suggested that the size and proportions of the precuneus are remarkably variable among adult humans, representing a major source of geometrical difference in midsagittal brain morphology. The same area also represents the main midsagittal brain difference between humans and chimpanzees, being more expanded in our species. Enlargement of the upper parietal surface is a specific feature of Homo sapiens, when compared with other fossil hominids, suggesting the involvement of these cortical areas in recent modern human evolution. Here, we provide a survey on midsagittal brain morphology by investigating whether precuneus size represents the largest component of variance within a larger and racially diverse sample of 265 adult humans. Additionally, we investigate the relationship between precuneus shape variation and folding patterns. Precuneus proportions are confirmed to be a major source of human brain variation even when racial variability is considered. Larger precuneus size is associated with additional precuneal gyri, generally in its anterior district. Spatial variation is most pronounced in the dorsal areas, with no apparent differences between hemispheres, between sexes, or among different racial groups. These dorsal areas integrate somatic and visual information together with the lateral elements of the parietal cortex, representing a crucial node for self-centered mental imagery. The histological basis and functional significance of this intra-specific variation in the upper precuneus remains to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Levels of PCBs, DDT, DDE and DDD in Italian human blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, C. La; Abate, V.; Alivernini, S.; Iacovella, N.; Mantovani, A.; Turrio-Baldassarri, L. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita, Roma (Italy); Silvestroni, L.; Spera, G. [Dept. of Medical Pathophysiology, Univ. (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    The environmental contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is effecting the exposure of the general population in a direct way through air inhalation, ingestion of particulate matter and dermal absorption and, most of all, in an indirect way through diet. Diet represents, in fact, the main way of human exposure to PCBs. PCBs have potential teratogenic, carcinogenic, hormonal and immunological effects. An association between endometriosis and high levels of PCB in plasma has also been reported3. Moreover, some congeners (PCB 105, PCB 118, PCB 153) have effects on thyroid hormones in animal models, although the PCB dose used in these experiments was an order of magnitude higher than the estimated human exposure. Humans are, however, exposed to a complex mixtures of PCB congeners. In this study identification and quantification of 60 PCB congeners and 3 chlorinated pesticides in human whole blood samples are presented. The subjects examined in this pilot study were a small group of patients with possible endocrine-related problems and unknown specific exposure. The aim of this study was to increase the present understanding about the distribution of the PCBs in human whole blood. The levels of DDT and metabolites were measured as well, since these compounds are consistently reported to contribute to the whole body burden of persistent chlorinated compounds, together with PCBs.

  13. Dioxin and PCB levels in human samples from the Greek population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leondiadis, L.; Vassiliadou, I.; Costopoulou, D.; Papadopoulos, A. [Mass Spectrometry and Dioxin Analysis Lab. - NCSR Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are commercial chemical substances produced in a large scale since 1930, with a wide range of applications in industry, such as for coolant fluids in transformers and dielectric fluids in capacitors. After their health effects became apparent, PCB production was banned in the late 1970s. However, humans are still exposed through PCB leakage of old capacitors and transformers and disposal of contaminated materials. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs)), are formed as undesirable by-products mainly during the production of chlorinated chemicals and during the combustion of municipal and hazardous waste. Due to potential health hazard (dermal toxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive effects, teratogenicity, endocrine disruption and carcinogenicity), their monitoring in humans is of high general concern. Enough information on POP presence in human tissues from industrialized countries is available to suggest that the concentration of these compounds has decreased during the last 10 years. Monitoring of human exposure to PCBs and dioxins, contaminants that accumulate in lipid tissue, is most conveniently performed by analysis of blood plasma or blood serum. Monitoring of dioxins in human milk is of also great importance, since it is especially feared that lactational exposure to dioxins and related compounds may adversely affect brain development and the immune system of infants and children. The present study includes the analyses of non-ortho, mono-ortho, indicator PCBs, and PCDD/Fs in human blood and human milk samples collected between November 2002 and February 2004 and is the first study of this kind to be undertaken in Greece.

  14. Self-sampling for human papillomavirus in a community setting: feasibility in Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alba, Israel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Hubbell, F Allan; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hess, James R; Bracho, America; Arias, Caleb; Manetta, Alberto

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was (a) to assess sensitivity and specificity of self-sampling in a community setting for identifying high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smears and (b) to assess satisfaction with this collection method among Hispanic women. Lay health workers distributed self-collection kits to Hispanic women in the community. Participants collected an unsupervised vaginal sample at home or in the place and time of their preference. A total of 1,213 Hispanics were included and provided a self-sample for HPV testing and were invited for a Pap smear; 662 (55%) of them had a Pap smear and the first 386 of these also had a physician-collected sample for HPV retesting. Using physician collection as the gold standard, unsupervised self-collection had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 88% for identifying high-risk HPV. Compared with physician sampling, self-sampling in a community setting had comparable sensitivity for identifying a low-grade lesions or greater in the Pap smear (50% versus 55%; P = 0.45) but lower specificity (94% versus 79%). Overall experience with self-sampling was reported as excellent or very good by 64% and only 2.6% reported a poor or fair experience. Unsupervised self-collection of vaginal samples for HPV testing in a community setting has a high sensitivity for identifying high-risk HPV and a high satisfaction among Hispanics. This approach may benefit populations with limited access to health care or with cultural barriers to cervical cancer screening.

  15. Direct RNA-based detection of CTX-M β-lactamases in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstream infections with ESBL-producers are associated with increased mortality, which is due to delayed appropriate treatment resulting in clinical failure. Current routine diagnostics for detection of bloodstream infections consists of blood culture followed by species identification and susceptibility testing. In attempts to improve and accelerate diagnostic procedures, PCR-based methods have been developed. These methods focus on species identification covering only a limited number of ESBL coding genes. Therefore, they fail to cover the steadily further evolving genetic diversity of clinically relevant β-lactamases. We have recently designed a fast and novel RNA targeting method to detect and specify CTX-M alleles from bacterial cultures, based on an amplification-pyrosequencing approach. We further developed this assay towards a diagnostic tool for clinical use and evaluated its sensitivity and specificity when applied directly to human blood samples. An optimized protocol for mRNA isolation allows detection of specific CTX-M groups from as little as 100 CFU/mL blood via reverse transcription, amplification, and pyrosequencing directly from human EDTA blood samples as well as from pre-incubated human blood cultures with a turnaround time for test results of <7 h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian

    2003-01-01

    The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized...... and applied for monitoring levels of dioxins in human milk samples. Combination effects of dioxin-like compounds were evaluated by testing potential mechanisms of interaction between seven of the major dioxin-like compounds in human milk using the isobole method. Results showed that the compounds acted...... lower REP in CALUX. The total dioxin-like activity was determined in 16 Danish human milk samples and was in the range 20.5-55.8 pg TEQ g(-1) fat. These values were compared with TEQs obtained from GC/MS analysis (range 14.8-43.6 pg TEQ-g(-1) fat) that overall were a little lower than CALUX TEQs...

  17. New sorbent materials for selective extraction of cocaine and benzoylecgonine from human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Nowaczyk, Alicja; Raczak-Gutknecht, Joanna; Kordalewska, Marta; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Waszczuk-Jankowska, Małgorzata; Tomczak, Ewa; Kaliszan, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2016-02-20

    An increase in cocaine consumption has been observed in Europe during the last decade. Benzoylecgonine, as a main urinary metabolite of cocaine in human, is so far the most reliable marker of cocaine consumption. Determination of cocaine and its metabolite in complex biological samples as urine or blood, requires efficient and selective sample pretreatment. In this preliminary study, the newly synthesized sorbent materials were proposed for selective extraction of cocaine and benzoylecgonine from urine samples. Application of these sorbent media allowed to determine cocaine and benzoylecgonine in urine samples at the concentration level of 100ng/ml with good recovery values as 81.7%±6.6 and 73.8%±4.2, respectively. The newly synthesized materials provided efficient, inexpensive and selective extraction of both cocaine and benzoylecgonine from urine samples, which can consequently lead to an increase of the sensitivity of the current available screening diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Detection of herpes virus and human enterovirus in pathology samples using low-density arrays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen Martínez, Sofía; Gervás Ríos, Ruth; Franco Rodríguez, Yoana; González Velasco, Cristina; Cruz Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Abad Hernández, María Del Mar

    Despite the frequency of infections with herpesviridae family, only eight subtypes affect humans (Herpex Simplex Virus types 1 and 2, Varicella Zoster Virus, Epstein-Barr Virus, Citomegalovirus and Human Herpes Virus types 6, 7 and 8). Amongst enteroviruses infections, the most important are Poliovirus, Coxackievirus and Echovirus. Symptoms can vary from mild to severe and early diagnosis is of upmost importance. Nowadays, low-density arrays can detect different types of viruses in a single assay using DNA extracted from biological samples. We analyzed 70 samples of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue, searching for viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, CMV, EBV, HHV-6, HHV-7 y HHV-8, Poliovirus, Echovirus and Coxsackievirus) using the kit CLART ® ENTHERPEX. Out of the total of 70 samples, 29 were positive for viral infection (41.43%), and only 4 of them showed cytopathic effect (100% correlation between histology and the test). 47.6% of GVHD samples were positive for virus; 68.75% of IBD analyzed showed positivity for viral infection; in colitis with ulcers (neither GVHD nor IBD), the test was positive in 50% of the samples and was also positive in 50% of ischemic lesions. The high sensitivity of the technique makes it a useful tool for the pathologist in addition to conventional histology-based diagnosis, as a viral infection may affect treatment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitation of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in human serum samples by using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Shiraishi, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of human pharmacokinetics is important for development of new drugs. Microdosing studies have been proposed as means of obtaining human pharmacokinetics information at early stages of drug development. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has high detection sensitivity and is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we used the AMS microdosing facility at Yamagata University to measure the concentration of 14 C in 14 C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum samples. The calibration curve of 14 C concentration in serum was linear, and the correlation coefficient was 0.9994. The precision, accuracy, and stability values obtained (freeze and thaw cycles, and short- and long-term stability) satisfied the criteria. The mean background 14 C concentrations in samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers were 1.635dpm/mL in blood and 0.56dpm/mL in plasma. These results suggest the suitability of AMS-based quantitation for analyzing samples from microdosing studies. (author)

  20. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Unselected SurePath Samples Using the APTIMA HPV mRNA Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte M

    2013-01-01

    The APTIMA Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay detects E6/E7 mRNA from 14 human papillomavirus genotypes. Horizon was a population-based split-sample study among well-screened women, with an aim to compare APTIMA, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and liquid-based cytology (LBC) using SurePath samples. APTIMA...

  1. Sample preparation and storage can change arsenic speciation in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, J; Lai, V W; Cullen, W R; Ma, M; Lu, X; Le, X C

    1999-11-01

    Stability of chemical speciation during sample handling and storage is a prerequisite to obtaining reliable results of trace element speciation analysis. There is no comprehensive information on the stability of common arsenic species, such as inorganic arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, and arsenobetaine, in human urine. We compared the effects of the following storage conditions on the stability of these arsenic species: temperature (25, 4, and -20 degrees C), storage time (1, 2, 4, and 8 months), and the use of additives (HCl, sodium azide, benzoic acid, benzyltrimethylammonium chloride, and cetylpyridinium chloride). HPLC with both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection techniques were used for the speciation of arsenic. We found that all five of the arsenic species were stable for up to 2 months when urine samples were stored at 4 and -20 degrees C without any additives. For longer period of storage (4 and 8 months), the stability of arsenic species was dependent on urine matrices. Whereas the arsenic speciation in some urine samples was stable for the entire 8 months at both 4 and -20 degrees C, other urine samples stored under identical conditions showed substantial changes in the concentration of As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid. The use of additives did not improve the stability of arsenic speciation in urine. The addition of 0.1 mol/L HCl (final concentration) to urine samples produced relative changes in inorganic As(III) and As(V) concentrations. Low temperature (4 and -20 degrees C) conditions are suitable for the storage of urine samples for up to 2 months. Untreated samples maintain their concentration of arsenic species, and additives have no particular benefit. Strong acidification is not appropriate for speciation analysis.

  2. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  3. Flow induced dispersion analysis rapidly quantifies proteins in human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Andersen, Nina Z; Østergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive quantification of protein based biomarkers and drugs is a substantial challenge in diagnostics and biopharmaceutical drug development. Current technologies, such as ELISA, are characterized by being slow (hours), requiring relatively large amounts of sample and being subject...... to cumbersome and expensive assay development. In this work a new approach for quantification based on changes in diffusivity is presented. The apparent diffusivity of an indicator molecule interacting with the protein of interest is determined by Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in a hydrodynamic flow system...... in a blood plasma matrix), fully automated, and being subject to a simple assay development. FIDA is demonstrated for quantification of the protein Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in human plasma as well as for quantification of an antibody against HSA. The sensitivity of the FIDA assay depends on the indicator...

  4. Comparison of dioxin and PCB concentrations in human breast milk samples from Hong Kong and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soechitram, S.D.; Chan, S.M.; Nelson, E.A.; Brouwer, A.; Sauer, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The adverse effects of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on human health are of increasing concern. These lipophilic compounds are concentrated through the food chain and are present in human milk. This study compares PCB levels in human milk samples from Hong Kong and Dutch mothers. Ten

  5. An Improved Method for High Quality Metagenomics DNA Extraction from Human and Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bag, Satyabrata; Saha, Bipasa; Mehta, Ojasvi

    2016-01-01

    and human origin samples. We introduced a combination of physical, chemical and mechanical lysis methods for proper lysis of microbial inhabitants. The community microbial DNA was precipitated by using salt and organic solvent. Both the quality and quantity of isolated DNA was compared with the existing...... methodologies and the supremacy of our method was confirmed. Maximum recovery of genomic DNA in the absence of substantial amount of impurities made the method convenient for nucleic acid extraction. The nucleic acids obtained using this method are suitable for different downstream applications. This improved...

  6. Imaging of gynecological disorders in infants and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Gurdeep S. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology; Blair, Joanne C. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Endocrinology; Garden, Anne S. (eds.) [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Gynaecology; Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Lancaster Medical School

    2012-07-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive review of gynecological imaging in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Experts from the disciplines of pediatric radiology, gynecology, surgery, and endocrinology have come together to produce a textbook that, while written primarily from the perspective of the radiologist, will be of interest to all professionals involved in the management of these patients. The normal development of the female reproductive tract is described in detail through embryological development, normal childhood appearances, and puberty. Congenital abnormalities are addressed in chapters reviewing structural abnormalities of the reproductive tract and disorders of sex development. A symptoms-based approach is followed in chapters devoted to the assessment of the patient with gynecological pain and disorders of menstruation. Disorders of the breast and the imaging of patients with gynecological neoplasia are considered in dedicated chapters. The specialty of pediatric gynecology is evolving rapidly, drawing on the skills and expertise of professionals from a wide range of specialties. This textbook should prove valuable to all who are involved in this new field of medicine. (orig.)

  7. Simulation laboratories for training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian R; Gherman, Robert B; Satin, Andrew J

    2003-08-01

    Simulations have been used by the military, airline industry, and our colleagues in other medical specialties to educate, evaluate, and prepare for rare but life-threatening scenarios. Work hour limits for residents in obstetrics and gynecology and decreased patient availability for teaching of students and residents require us to think creatively and practically on how to optimize their education. Medical simulations may address scenarios in clinical practice that are considered important to know or understand. Simulations can take many forms, including computer programs, models or mannequins, virtual reality data immersion caves, and a combination of formats. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to a potential role for medical simulation in obstetrics and gynecology. We briefly describe an example of how simulation may be incorporated into obstetric and gynecologic residency training. It is our contention that educators in obstetrics and gynecology should be aware of the potential for simulation in education. We hope this commentary will stimulate interest in the field, lead to validation studies, and improve training in and the practice of obstetrics and gynecology.

  8. Imaging of gynecological disorders in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Gurdeep S.; Blair, Joanne C.; Garden, Anne S.; Lancaster Univ.

    2012-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive review of gynecological imaging in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Experts from the disciplines of pediatric radiology, gynecology, surgery, and endocrinology have come together to produce a textbook that, while written primarily from the perspective of the radiologist, will be of interest to all professionals involved in the management of these patients. The normal development of the female reproductive tract is described in detail through embryological development, normal childhood appearances, and puberty. Congenital abnormalities are addressed in chapters reviewing structural abnormalities of the reproductive tract and disorders of sex development. A symptoms-based approach is followed in chapters devoted to the assessment of the patient with gynecological pain and disorders of menstruation. Disorders of the breast and the imaging of patients with gynecological neoplasia are considered in dedicated chapters. The specialty of pediatric gynecology is evolving rapidly, drawing on the skills and expertise of professionals from a wide range of specialties. This textbook should prove valuable to all who are involved in this new field of medicine. (orig.)

  9. Metagenomic Characterization of the Human Intestinal Microbiota in Fecal Samples from STEC-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Gigliucci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota is a homeostatic ecosystem with a remarkable impact on human health and the disruption of this equilibrium leads to an increased susceptibility to infection by numerous pathogens. In this study, we used shotgun metagenomic sequencing and two different bioinformatic approaches, based on mapping of the reads onto databases and on the reconstruction of putative draft genomes, to investigate possible changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in samples from patients with Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli (STEC infection compared to healthy and healed controls, collected during an outbreak caused by a STEC O26:H11 infection. Both the bioinformatic procedures used, produced similar result with a good resolution of the taxonomic profiles of the specimens. The stool samples collected from the STEC infected patients showed a lower abundance of the members of Bifidobacteriales and Clostridiales orders in comparison to controls where those microorganisms predominated. These differences seemed to correlate with the STEC infection although a flexion in the relative abundance of the Bifidobacterium genus, part of the Bifidobacteriales order, was observed also in samples from Crohn's disease patients, displaying a STEC-unrelated dysbiosis. The metagenomics also allowed to identify in the STEC positive samples, all the virulence traits present in the genomes of the STEC O26 that caused the outbreak as assessed through isolation of the epidemic strain and whole genome sequencing. The results shown represent a first evidence of the changes occurring in the intestinal microbiota of children in the course of STEC infection and indicate that metagenomics may be a promising tool for the culture-independent clinical diagnosis of the infection.

  10. Metagenomic Characterization of the Human Intestinal Microbiota in Fecal Samples from STEC-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliucci, Federica; von Meijenfeldt, F. A. Bastiaan; Knijn, Arnold; Michelacci, Valeria; Scavia, Gaia; Minelli, Fabio; Dutilh, Bas E.; Ahmad, Hamideh M.; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Friedrich, Alex W.; Rossen, John W. A.; Morabito, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a homeostatic ecosystem with a remarkable impact on human health and the disruption of this equilibrium leads to an increased susceptibility to infection by numerous pathogens. In this study, we used shotgun metagenomic sequencing and two different bioinformatic approaches, based on mapping of the reads onto databases and on the reconstruction of putative draft genomes, to investigate possible changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in samples from patients with Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection compared to healthy and healed controls, collected during an outbreak caused by a STEC O26:H11 infection. Both the bioinformatic procedures used, produced similar result with a good resolution of the taxonomic profiles of the specimens. The stool samples collected from the STEC infected patients showed a lower abundance of the members of Bifidobacteriales and Clostridiales orders in comparison to controls where those microorganisms predominated. These differences seemed to correlate with the STEC infection although a flexion in the relative abundance of the Bifidobacterium genus, part of the Bifidobacteriales order, was observed also in samples from Crohn's disease patients, displaying a STEC-unrelated dysbiosis. The metagenomics also allowed to identify in the STEC positive samples, all the virulence traits present in the genomes of the STEC O26 that caused the outbreak as assessed through isolation of the epidemic strain and whole genome sequencing. The results shown represent a first evidence of the changes occurring in the intestinal microbiota of children in the course of STEC infection and indicate that metagenomics may be a promising tool for the culture-independent clinical diagnosis of the infection. PMID:29468143

  11. Just add water: Accuracy of analysis of diluted human milk samples using mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R W; Adamkin, D H; Farris, A; Radmacher, P G

    2017-01-01

    To determine the maximum dilution of human milk (HM) that yields reliable results for protein, fat and lactose when analyzed by mid-infrared spectroscopy. De-identified samples of frozen HM were obtained. Milk was thawed and warmed (40°C) prior to analysis. Undiluted (native) HM was analyzed by mid-infrared spectroscopy for macronutrient composition: total protein (P), fat (F), carbohydrate (C); Energy (E) was calculated from the macronutrient results. Subsequent analyses were done with 1 : 2, 1 : 3, 1 : 5 and 1 : 10 dilutions of each sample with distilled water. Additional samples were sent to a certified lab for external validation. Quantitatively, F and P showed statistically significant but clinically non-critical differences in 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 dilutions. Differences at higher dilutions were statistically significant and deviated from native values enough to render those dilutions unreliable. External validation studies also showed statistically significant but clinically unimportant differences at 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 dilutions. The Calais Human Milk Analyzer can be used with HM samples diluted 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 and return results within 5% of values from undiluted HM. At a 1 : 5 or 1 : 10 dilution, however, results vary as much as 10%, especially with P and F. At the 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 dilutions these differences appear to be insignificant in the context of nutritional management. However, the accuracy and reliability of the 1 : 5 and 1 : 10 dilutions are questionable.

  12. Prevalence of the integration status for human papillomavirus 16 in esophageal carcinoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Shen, Haie; Li, Ji; Hou, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ke; Li, Jintao

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the etiology of esophageal cancer (EC) related with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Fresh surgically resected tissue samples and clinical information were obtained from 189 patients. Genomic DNA was extracted, and HPV was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with HPV L1 gene primers of MY09/11; HPV16 was detected using HPV16 E6 type-specific primer sets. Copies of HPV16 E2, E6, and the human housekeeping gene β-actin were tested using quantitative PCR to analyze the relationship between HPV16 integration and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the relationship between the HPV16 integration status and clinical information of patients. Of the 189 samples, 168 HPV-positive samples were detected, of which 76 were HPV16 positive. Among the HPV16 positive samples, 2 cases (E2/E6 ratio>1) were 2.6% (2/76) purely episomal, 65 (E2/E6 ratio between 0 and 1) were 85.6% (65/76) mixture of integrated and episomal, and 9 (E2/E6 ratio=0) were 11.8% (9/76) purely integrated. The results indicate that integration of HPV16 was more common in the host genome than in the episome genome. The prevalence rate of HPV16 integration is increasing with the pathological stage progression of esophageal carcinoma (EC). A high prevalence of HPV16 suggested that HPV16 has an etiological effect on the progress of EC. Integration of HPV16 is more common than episome genome in the host cells, indicating that continuous HPV infection is the key to esophageal epithelial cell malignant conversion and canceration.

  13. High-throughput miRNA profiling of human melanoma blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rass Knuth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA signatures are not only found in cancer tissue but also in blood of cancer patients. Specifically, miRNA detection in blood offers the prospect of a non-invasive analysis tool. Methods Using a microarray based approach we screened almost 900 human miRNAs to detect miRNAs that are deregulated in their expression in blood cells of melanoma patients. We analyzed 55 blood samples, including 20 samples of healthy individuals, 24 samples of melanoma patients as test set, and 11 samples of melanoma patients as independent validation set. Results A hypothesis test based approch detected 51 differentially regulated miRNAs, including 21 miRNAs that were downregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients and 30 miRNAs that were upregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients as compared to blood cells of healthy controls. The tets set and the independent validation set of the melanoma samples showed a high correlation of fold changes (0.81. Applying hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis we found that blood samples of melanoma patients and healthy individuals can be well differentiated from each other based on miRNA expression analysis. Using a subset of 16 significant deregulated miRNAs, we were able to reach a classification accuracy of 97.4%, a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 98.9% by supervised analysis. MiRNA microarray data were validated by qRT-PCR. Conclusions Our study provides strong evidence for miRNA expression signatures of blood cells as useful biomarkers for melanoma.

  14. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimization of a Pre-MEKC Separation SPE Procedure for Steroid Molecules in Human Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Olędzka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many steroid hormones can be considered as potential biomarkers and their determination in body fluids can create opportunities for the rapid diagnosis of many diseases and disorders of the human body. Most existing methods for the determination of steroids are usually time- and labor-consuming and quite costly. Therefore, the aim of analytical laboratories is to develop a new, relatively low-cost and rapid implementation methodology for their determination in biological samples. Due to the fact that there is little literature data on concentrations of steroid hormones in urine samples, we have made attempts at the electrophoretic determination of these compounds. For this purpose, an extraction procedure for the optimized separation and simultaneous determination of seven steroid hormones in urine samples has been investigated. The isolation of analytes from biological samples was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE with dichloromethane and compared to solid phase extraction (SPE with C18 and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB columns. To separate all the analytes a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECK technique was employed. For full separation of all the analytes a running buffer (pH 9.2, composed of 10 mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax, 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, and 10% methanol was selected. The methodology developed in this work for the determination of steroid hormones meets all the requirements of analytical methods. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of urine samples collected from volunteers—both men and women (students, amateur bodybuilders, using and not applying steroid doping. The data obtained during this work can be successfully used for further research on the determination of steroid hormones in urine samples.

  16. Season of sampling and season of birth influence serotonin metabolite levels in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen J Luykx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF monoamine (MA turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA, dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75. The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050, with predicted maximum (PC(max and minimum (PC(min concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PC(max = 172 and PC(min = 126. The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. CONCLUSION: In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall.

  17. Mammary candidiasis: molecular-based detection of Candida species in human milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschlechner, W; Karall, D; Hartmann, C; Streiter, B; Baumgartner-Sigl, S; Orth-Höller, D; Lass-Flörl, C

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective and monocentric study, we investigated the performance of a commercialized real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test system for the specific detection of DNA from Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. lusitaniae, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis in human milk samples of patients suspicious of mammary candidiasis. For this purpose, 43 breast-feeding women with characteristic symptoms of mammary candidiasis and 40 asymptomatic controls were enrolled. By culture, Candida spp. were detected in 8.8 % (4/46) and 9.3 % (4/43) of patient and control samples, respectively. Candida albicans (2/46), C. parapsilosis (1/46), and C. guilliermondii (1/46) were present in patient samples, and C. lusitaniae (3/43) and C. guilliermondii (1/43) were present in the controls. After RT-PCR was applied, Candida spp. were found to be present in 67.4 % (31/46) and 79.1 % (34/43) of patient and control samples investigated, respectively. PCR detection of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis revealed only a low sensitivity and specificity of 67.4 % and 41.9 %, respectively. Our data do not support the use of Candida RT-PCR for sensitive and specific diagnosis of mammary candidiasis.

  18. Hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction of amphetamine-type stimulants in human hair samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento Pantaleão, Lorena; Bismara Paranhos, Beatriz Aparecida Passos; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-09-07

    A fast method was optimized and validated in order to quantify amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, AMP; methamphetamine, MAMP; fenproporex, FPX; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA; and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, MDA) in human hair samples. The method was based in an initial procedure of decontamination of hair samples (50 mg) with dichloromethane, followed by alkaline hydrolysis and extraction of the amphetamines using hollow-fiber liquid-phase micro extraction (HF-LPME) in the three-phase mode. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for identification and quantification of the analytes. The LoQs obtained for all amphetamines (around 0.05 ng/mg) were below the cut-off value (0.2 ng/mg) established by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT). The method showed to be simple and precise. The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 10.6% and 11.4%, respectively, with the use of only two deuterated internal standards (AMP-d5 and MDMA-d5). By using the weighted least squares linear regression (1/x²), the accuracy of the method was satisfied in the lower concentration levels (accuracy values better than 87%). Hair samples collected from six volunteers who reported regular use of amphetamines were submitted to the developed method. Drug detection was observed in all samples of the volunteers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Sample Storage Temperature and Time Delay on Blood Gases, Bicarbonate and pH in Human Arterial Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadhoseini, Elham; Safavi, Enayat; Seifi, Sepideh; Seifirad, Soroush; Firoozbakhsh, Shahram; Peiman, Soheil

    2015-03-01

    Results of arterial blood gas analysis can be biased by pre-analytical factors, such as time interval before analysis, temperature during storage and syringe type. To investigate the effects of samples storage temperature and time delay on blood gases, bicarbonate and PH results in human arterial blood samples. 2.5 mL arterial blood samples were drawn from 45 patients via an indwelling Intraarterial catheter. Each sample was divided into five equal samples and stored in multipurpose tuberculin plastic syringes. Blood gas analysis was performed on one of five samples as soon as possible. Four other samples were divided into two groups stored at 22°C and 0°C. Blood gas analyses were repeated at 30 and 60 minutes after sampling. PaO2 of the samples stored at 0°C was increased significantly after 60 minutes (P = 0.007). The PaCO2 of the samples kept for 30 and 60 minutes at 22°C was significantly higher than primary result (P = 0.04, P samples stored at 22°C, pH decreased significantly after 30 and 60 minutes (P = 0.017, P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in other results of samples stored at 0°C or 22°C after 30 or 60 minutes. In samples stored in plastic syringes, overestimation of PaO2 levels should be noted if samples cooled before analysis. In samples stored in plastic syringes, it is not necessary to store samples in iced water when analysis delayed up to one hour.

  20. Cervical neoplasia and human papilloma virus infection in prostitutes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gitsch, G; Kainz, C; Reinthaller, A; Kopp, W; Tatra, G; Breitenecker, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the prevalence and incidence of PAP smears indicating cervical dysplasia as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in prostitutes. DESIGN--Prevalence and incidence study of cervical dysplasia and HPV infection in prostitutes. For detection and typing of HPV-DNA In Situ Hybridisation (ISH) was performed in tissue samples with CIN gained by colposcopically directed punch biopsies. SETTING--Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Vienna Medical...

  1. Pregnancy - associated human listeriosis: Virulence and genotypic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Durg Vijai; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a life-threatening pathogen, poses severe risk during pregnancy, may cause abortion, fetal death or neonatal morbidity in terms of septicemia and meningitis. The present study aimed at characterizing L. monocytogenes isolated from pregnant women based on serotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, virulence genes, in vivo pathogenicity test and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. The results revealed that out of 3700 human clinical samples, a total of 30 (0.81%) isolates [12 (0.80%) from placental bit (1500), 18 (0.81%) from vaginal swab (2200)] were positive for L. monocytogenes. All the isolates belonged to serogroup 4b, and were + ve for virulence genes tested i.e. inlA, inlC, inlJ, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA, and iap. Based on the mice inoculation tests, 20 isolates showed 100% and 4 isolates 60% relative virulence while 6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Moreover, 2 and 10 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefoxitin, respectively, while the rest susceptible to other antibiotics used in this study. ERIC- and REP-PCR collectively depicted that the isolates from placental bit and vaginal swab had distinct PCR fingerprints except a few isolates with identical patterns. This study demonstrates prevalence of pathogenic strains mostly resistant to cefoxitin and/or ciprofloxacin. The results indicate the importance of isolating and characterizing the pathogen from human clinical samples as the pre-requisite for accurate epidemiological investigations.

  2. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  3. MALDI Q-TOF CID MS for Diagnostic Ion Screening of Human Milk Oligosaccharide Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Jovanović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO represent the bioactive components of human milk, influencing the infant’s gastrointestinal microflora and immune system. Structurally, they represent a highly complex class of analyte, where the main core oligosaccharide structures are built from galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, linked by 1-3 or 1-4 glycosidic linkages and potentially modified with fucose and sialic acid residues. The core structures can be linear or branched. Additional structural complexity in samples can be induced by endogenous exoglycosidase activity or chemical procedures during the sample preparation. Here, we show that using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF collision-induced dissociation (CID as a fast screening method, diagnostic structural information about single oligosaccharide components present in a complex mixture can be obtained. According to sequencing data on 14 out of 22 parent ions detected in a single high molecular weight oligosaccharide chromatographic fraction, 20 different oligosaccharide structure types, corresponding to over 30 isomeric oligosaccharide structures and over 100 possible HMO isomers when biosynthetic linkage variations were taken into account, were postulated. For MS/MS data analysis, we used the de novo sequencing approach using diagnostic ion analysis on reduced oligosaccharides by following known biosynthetic rules. Using this approach, de novo characterization has been achieved also for the structures, which could not have been predicted.

  4. Multi-elemental imaging of paraffin-embedded human samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Trichard, F.; Busser, B.; Sabatier-Vincent, M.; Pelascini, F.; Pinel, N.; Templier, I.; Charles, J.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical elements play central roles for physiological homeostasis in human cells, and their dysregulation might lead to a certain number of pathologies. Novel imaging techniques that improve the work of pathologists for tissue analysis and diagnostics are continuously sought. We report the use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to perform multi-elemental images of human paraffin-embedded skin samples on the entire biopsy scale in a complementary and compatible way with microscope histopathological examination. A specific instrumental configuration is proposed in order to detect most of the elements of medical interest (i.e. P, Al, Mg, Na, Zn, Si, Fe, and Cu). As an example of medical application, we selected and analysed skin biopsies, including healthy skin tissue, cutaneous metastasis of melanoma, Merkel-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Clear distinctions in the distribution of chemical elements are observed from the different samples investigated. This study demonstrates the high complementarity of LIBS elemental imaging with conventional histopathology, opening new opportunities for any medical application involving metals.

  5. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified

  6. [Impact of hypoxen therapy on postoperative course in gynecologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugieva, M Z; Kotenko, K V; Morozova, K V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the use of hypoxen (antihypoxant) during the early postoperative course in gynecologic patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to the treatment scheme. 339 patients of the control group were under the routine therapy after the laparatomic gynecologic operations. 52 patients were additionally treated with hypoxen (antioxidant) (the main group). The impact of hypoxen on the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation and its preventive effect on prolongation of the postoperative pain syndrom were estimated. The results of the study showed that hypoxen inhibited lipid peroxidation and activated the antioxidant system in the postoperative patients vs. the control group. It was also observed that among the patients additionally treated with hypoxen the percentage of those with prolonged postoperative pains was statistically lower (pgynecologic operations. The additional use of hypoxen in the routine therapy of the gynecologic patients prevented prolongation of the postoperative pain syndrom.

  7. Diagnostic imaging in the staging of gynecologic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstner, R.; Graf, A.

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis in patients with gynecologic cancers depends not only on the stage but also on a wide spectrum of other findings. Cross-sectional imaging modalities, including sonography, CT and MRI, have increasingly been used for optimal treatment planning in gynecologic cancers. Their staging criteria are based on the well-established FIGO staging system. CT and MRI compete with sonography, which plays a pivotal role in the valuation of the female pelvis. This paper reviews the role of sonography, CT and MRI in the staging of gynecologic malignancies. It puts the emphasis on MRI, which has been established as imaging modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of cervical and endometrial cancer, and which seems slightly superior to CT in the staging of ovarian cancer. (orig.) [de

  8. Fermentation of mucin by bifidobacteria from rectal samples of humans and rectal and intestinal samples of animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Marounek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2011), s. 85-89 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : mucin * bifidobacteria * rectal samples Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  9. Tracking human footprints in Antarctica through passive sampling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wang, Feng; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-06-01

    Freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in seven inland lakes of Antarctica by a polyethylene (PE)-based passive sampling technique, with the objective of tracking human footprints. The measured concentrations of PAHs were in the range of 14-360 ng L(-1) with the highest values concentrated around the Russian Progress II Station, indicating the significance of human activities to the loading of PAHs in Antarctica. The concentrations of PAHs in the inland lakes were in the upper part of the PAHs levels in aquatic environments from remote and background regions across the globe. The composition profiles of PAHs indicated that PAHs in the inland lakes were derived mainly from local oil spills, which was corroborated by a large number of fuel spillage reports from ship and plane crash incidents in Antarctica during recent years. Clearly, local human activities, rather than long-range transport, are the dominant sources of PAH contamination to the inland lakes. Finally, the present study demonstrates the efficacy of PE-based passive samplers for investigating PAHs in the aquatic environment of Antarctica under complex field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Smoking cessation alters intestinal microbiota: insights from quantitative investigations on human fecal samples using FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Luc; Brülisauer, Karin; Zeitz, Jonas; Frei, Pascal; Scharl, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fried, Michael; Loessner, Martin J; Rogler, Gerhard; Schuppler, Markus

    2014-09-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in investigations on the potential mechanistic role of the intestinal microbiota in various diseases and factors modulating intestinal microbial composition. We recently reported on intestinal microbial shifts after smoking cessation in humans. In this study, we aimed to conduct further microbial analyses and verify our previous results obtained by pyrosequencing using a direct quantitative microbial approach. Stool samples of healthy smoking human subjects undergoing controlled smoking cessation during a 9-week observational period were analyzed and compared with 2 control groups, ongoing smoking and nonsmoking subjects. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to quantify specific bacterial groups. Intestinal microbiota composition was substantially altered after smoking cessation as characterized by an increase in key representatives from the phyla of Firmicutes (Clostridium coccoides, Eubacterium rectale, and Clostridium leptum subgroup) and Actinobacteria (HGC bacteria and Bifidobacteria) as well as a decrease in Bacteroidetes (Prevotella spp. and Bacteroides spp.) and Proteobacteria (β- and γ-subgroup of Proteobacteria). As determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, an independent direct quantitative microbial approach, we could confirm that intestinal microbiota composition in humans is influenced by smoking. The characteristics of observed microbial shifts suggest a potential mechanistic association to alterations in body weight subsequent to smoking cessation. More importantly, regarding previously described microbial hallmarks of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, a variety of observed microbial alterations after smoking cessation deserve further consideration in view of the divergent effect of smoking on the clinical course of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  11. FDG-PET Assessment of Other Gynecologic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Silvana; Devine, Catherine; Viswanathan, Chitra; Javadi, Sanaz; Korivi, Brinda Rao; Bhosale, Priya R

    2018-04-01

    PET and PET/computed tomography play a role in the staging, monitoring of response to therapy, and surveillance for cervical and ovarian cancers. Currently, it is also an integral part of the assessment of patients with endometrial cancer and other gynecologic malignancies, such as vaginal and vulvar cancers and uterine sarcomas. In this article, we discuss in detail and highlight the potential role of PET and PET/computed tomography in evaluating these gynecologic malignancies using illustrative cases with relevant imaging findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Present state and perspectives of RIA in obstetrics and gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talas, M.; Fingerova, H.

    1979-01-01

    A survey is presented of RIA methods introduced by the authors in their laboratory in the course of the last eight years. The results obtained by these methods in various physiological and pathological states are evaluated. The authors point to the possibilities of effective use of RIA for diagnostic purposes in obstetrics and gynecology taking into account also economic and organizational aspects. The most important trends of the use of RIA are accentuated not only in gynecological endocrinology and obstetrics but also in some other related fields, especially in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant diseases. (author)

  13. Present state and perspectives of RIA in obstetrics and gynecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talas, M; Fingerova, H [Palackeho Univ., Olomouc (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta

    1979-01-01

    A survey is presented of RIA methods introduced by the authors in their laboratory in the course of the last eight years. The results obtained by these methods in various physiological and pathological states are evaluated. The authors point to the possibilities of effective use of RIA for diagnostic purposes in obstetrics and gynecology taking into account also economic and organizational aspects. The most important trends of the use of RIA are accentuated not only in gynecological endocrinology and obstetrics but also in some other related fields, especially in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant diseases.

  14. Studies on cellular distribution of elements in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples by molecular activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Guilong; Chen Chunying; Zhang Peiqun; Zhao Jiujiang; Chai Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The distribution patterns of 17 elements in the subcellular fractions of nuclei, mitochondria, lysosome, microsome and cytosol of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver samples were investigated by using molecular activation analysis (MAA) and differential centrifugation. Their significant difference was checked by the Studient's t-test. These elements exhibit inhomogeneous distributions in each subcellular fraction. Some elements have no significant difference between hepatocellular carcinoma and normal liver samples. However, the concentrations of Br, Ca, Cd and Cs are significantly higher in each component of hepatocarcinoma than in normal liver. The content of Fe in microsome of HCC is significantly lower, almost half of normal liver samples, but higher in other subcellular fractions than in those of normal tissues. The rare earth elements of La and Ce have the patterns similar to Fe. The concentrations of Sb and Zn in nuclei of HCC are obviously lower (P<0.05, P<0.05). The contents of K and Na are higher in cytosol of HCC (P<0.05). The distributions of Ba and Rb show no significant difference between two groups. The relationships of Fe, Cd and K with HCC were also discussed. The levels of some elements in subcellular fractions of tumor were quite different from those of normal liver, which suggested that trace elements might play important roles in the occurrence and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  15. [Detection and typing by molecular biology of human papillomavirus in genital samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Moya, A; Esquivias Gómez, J I; Vidart Aragón, J A; Picazo de la Garza, J J

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the etiological relationship between some HPV genotypes and genital cancer has been confirmed. Therefore, we used current molecular biology techniques to evaluate the prevalence of these viruses and their genotype in genital samples. We processed 401 genital samples from 281 women and 120 men, all with a diagnosis compatible with HPV infection. Virus was detected using PCR, and positive samples were typed using an array technique which enabled us to detect the 35 most common types of mucous-associated HPV. Of the 401 patients studied, 185 (46.1%) were positive, and only one type of HPV was detected in 133 cases. We found that 41.6% of the women and 56.7% of the men were positive. A total of 260 HPVs were typed; 154 were high oncogenic risk. They infected 16 men (23.5%) and 88 women (75.2%). The difference was statistically significant (pHVP 16 in 52 cases. We found a 46% prevalence of HPV infection. More than half of these patients were infected by high-risk HPV. The presence of high-risk HPV was significantly higher in women.

  16. Rare earth analysis in human biological samples by atomic absorption using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citron, I.M.; Holtzman, R.B.; Leiman, J.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of Sc and seven rare earth elements, Nd, Sm, Dy, Ho, Eu, Tm, and Yb, in biological samplesby atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) using electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytic graphite tube is shown to be rapid, precise and accurate. The technique utilizes the method of standard additions and linear regression analysis to determine results from peak area data. Inter-elemental interferences are negligible. The elements found sensitive enough for this type of analysis are, in order of decreasing sensitivity, Yb, Eu, Tm, Dy, Sc, Ho, Sm and Nd. The determination in these types of materials of Gd and elements less sensitive to AAS detection than Gd does not appear to be feasible. Results are presented on the concentrations of these elements in 41 samples from human subjects, cows and vegetables with normal environmental exposure to the rare earth elements. The composite percent mean deviation in peak-area readings for all samples and all elements examined was 4%. The mean standard error in the results among samples was about 6.5%

  17. PERT: A Method for Expression Deconvolution of Human Blood Samples from Varied Microenvironmental and Developmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Elizabeth; Yu, Mei; Morris, Quaid; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells). Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity. PMID:23284283

  18. The more frequent types of human papillomavirus in Cuban samples of cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Hernandez, Maria de los Angeles; Hernandez Menendez, Maite; Aguilar Vela de Oro, Francisco Orlando

    2010-01-01

    Cervix cancer (UCC) is considered a sexually transmitted disease due to factors involved in its appearance and development and this infection is recognized as the main etiological agent of this entity. In Cuba this type of tumor is placed in 2nd category in incidence and in 4th place in mortality among the malignant disease affecting the female sex. The objective of present study is to determine the types of human virus papilloma (HVP) present in samples of cervix tumors in Cuban women, as well as to describe the behavior of different risk factors associated with this disease. Forty five samples of cervix cancer were analyzed and the presence of 20 types of HVP was determined by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers founding in them a 91,1% of positivity. Genotype 16 was the more prevalent, followed by the 18, 45, 31, 39, 51, 56, 59, PAP23A. The low risk type 6 and 11 weren't founded in samples. Promiscuity was the more interesting risk factor in our study. Knowledge of the viral types present in cervix cancer in our patients is very important when we approach the development and the use of prophylactic and therapeutical vaccines

  19. Studies on cellular distribution of elements in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples by molecular activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilong, Deng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques; Department of General Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Chunying, Chen; Peiqun, Zhang; Jiujiang, Zhao; Zhifang, Chai [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques; Yingbin, Liu; Jianwei, Wang; Bin, Xu; Shuyou, Peng [Department of General Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China)

    2005-07-15

    The distribution patterns of 17 elements in the subcellular fractions of nuclei, mitochondria, lysosome, microsome and cytosol of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver samples were investigated by using molecular activation analysis (MAA) and differential centrifugation. Their significant difference was checked by the Studient's t-test. These elements exhibit inhomogeneous distributions in each subcellular fraction. Some elements have no significant difference between hepatocellular carcinoma and normal liver samples. However, the concentrations of Br, Ca, Cd and Cs are significantly higher in each component of hepatocarcinoma than in normal liver. The content of Fe in microsome of HCC is significantly lower, almost half of normal liver samples, but higher in other subcellular fractions than in those of normal tissues. The rare earth elements of La and Ce have the patterns similar to Fe. The concentrations of Sb and Zn in nuclei of HCC are obviously lower (P<0.05, P<0.05). The contents of K and Na are higher in cytosol of HCC (P<0.05). The distributions of Ba and Rb show no significant difference between two groups. The relationships of Fe, Cd and K with HCC were also discussed. The levels of some elements in subcellular fractions of tumor were quite different from those of normal liver, which suggested that trace elements might play important roles in the occurrence and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  20. Development of paradigm for the study of amino acid neurotransmitter release in human autopsy brain samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, K.-W.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This study attempted to establish a release protocol to characterize both the vesicular and cytoplasmic components of amino acid transmitter release in human synaptosomes. Experiments with rat synaptosomes showed that, with depolarizing concentrations of K + ions, vesicular release could be successfully differentiated from cytoplasmic release for preloaded L-[ 3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA. However, human tissue studies did not give clear-cut results. Experiments were carried out to optimize the release paradigm as well as to improve the vesicular uptake of labeled transmitters. A 'pulse- chase' protocol, with an unlabelled D-aspartate chase, was performed in human tissue samples in order to enhance the L-[ 3 H ] glutamate release signal derived from exocytosis by removing the cytoplasmic pool of L-[ 3 H ] glutamate first. However, the results showed that total release was not enhanced effectively in comparison with the non-pulse-chase protocol. In brief, the pulse-chase protocol did not build up the vesicular pool of L-[ 3 H ]glutamate, though the cytoplasmic L- [ 3 H ] glutamate pool was effectively depressed by D-aspartate. Further studies applied 4- aminopyridine (4-AP) to trigger release, to circumvent the problem of the reversal of plasma membrane transporters caused by raised K + ion concentrations. The results showed that the application of 4-AP elicited the release of amino acid transmitters from rat synaptosomes, but failed to produce successful release signals in the human tissue experiments. Our findings suggest that the vesicular compartment may be impaired by freezing and affected by post-mortem delay (PMD). Rat studies showed that the freezing step had a major effect on Ca 2+-dependent release, as less L- [3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA were released from the frozen rat tissue preparations. Moreover, there was an indication of a decline in L-[ 3 H ]glutamate release with increasing PMD. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  1. Randomized comparison of vaginal self-sampling by standard vs. dry swabs for Human papillomavirus testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eperon, Isabelle; Vassilakos, Pierre; Navarria, Isabelle; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Gauthier, Aude; Pache, Jean-Claude; Boulvain, Michel; Untiet, Sarah; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate if human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (Self-HPV) using a dry vaginal swab is a valid alternative for HPV testing. Women attending colposcopy clinic were recruited to collect two consecutive Self-HPV samples: a Self-HPV using a dry swab (S-DRY) and a Self-HPV using a standard wet transport medium (S-WET). These samples were analyzed for HPV using real time PCR (Roche Cobas). Participants were randomized to determine the order of the tests. Questionnaires assessing preferences and acceptability for both tests were conducted. Subsequently, women were invited for colposcopic examination; a physician collected a cervical sample (physician-sampling) with a broom-type device and placed it into a liquid-based cytology medium. Specimens were then processed for the production of cytology slides and a Hybrid Capture HPV DNA test (Qiagen) was performed from the residual liquid. Biopsies were performed if indicated. Unweighted kappa statistics (κ) and McNemar tests were used to measure the agreement among the sampling methods. A total of 120 women were randomized. Overall HPV prevalence was 68.7% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 59.3–77.2) by S-WET, 54.4% (95% CI 44.8–63.9) by S-DRY and 53.8% (95% CI 43.8–63.7) by HC. Among paired samples (S-WET and S-DRY), the overall agreement was good (85.7%; 95% CI 77.8–91.6) and the κ was substantial (0.70; 95% CI 0.57-0.70). The proportion of positive type-specific HPV agreement was also good (77.3%; 95% CI 68.2-84.9). No differences in sensitivity for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade one (CIN1) or worse between the two Self-HPV tests were observed. Women reported the two Self-HPV tests as highly acceptable. Self-HPV using dry swab transfer does not appear to compromise specimen integrity. Further study in a large screening population is needed. ClinicalTrials.gov: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01316120

  2. Serial Sampling of Serum Protein Biomarkers for Monitoring Human Traumatic Brain Injury Dynamics: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Zeiler, Frederick Adam; Ercole, Ari; Mondello, Stefania; Büki, András; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Helmy, Adel; Menon, David K; Nelson, David W

    2017-01-01

    The proteins S100B, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), and neurofilament light (NF-L) have been serially sampled in serum of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to assess injury severity and tissue fate. We review the current literature of serum level dynamics of these proteins following TBI and used the term "effective half-life" ( t 1/2 ) in order to describe the "fall" rate in serum. Through searches on EMBASE, Medline, and Scopus, we looked for articles where these proteins had been serially sampled in serum in human TBI. We excluded animal studies, studies with only one presented sample and studies without neuroradiological examinations. Following screening (10,389 papers), n  = 122 papers were included. The proteins S100B ( n  = 66) and NSE ( n  = 27) were the two most frequent biomarkers that were serially sampled. For S100B in severe TBI, a majority of studies indicate a t 1/2 of about 24 h, even if very early sampling in these patients reveals rapid decreases (1-2 h) though possibly of non-cerebral origin. In contrast, the t 1/2 for NSE is comparably longer, ranging from 48 to 72 h in severe TBI cases. The protein GFAP ( n  = 18) appears to have t 1/2 of about 24-48 h in severe TBI. The protein UCH-L1 ( n  = 9) presents a t 1/2 around 7 h in mild TBI and about 10 h in severe. Frequent sampling of these proteins revealed different trajectories with persisting high serum levels, or secondary peaks, in patients with unfavorable outcome or in patients developing secondary detrimental events. Finally, NF-L ( n  = 2) only increased in the few studies available, suggesting a serum availability of >10 days. To date, automated assays are available for S100B and NSE making them faster and more practical to use. Serial sampling of brain-specific proteins in serum reveals different temporal trajectories that should be

  3. Serial Sampling of Serum Protein Biomarkers for Monitoring Human Traumatic Brain Injury Dynamics: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Thelin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proteins S100B, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, and neurofilament light (NF-L have been serially sampled in serum of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI in order to assess injury severity and tissue fate. We review the current literature of serum level dynamics of these proteins following TBI and used the term “effective half-life” (t1/2 in order to describe the “fall” rate in serum.Materials and methodsThrough searches on EMBASE, Medline, and Scopus, we looked for articles where these proteins had been serially sampled in serum in human TBI. We excluded animal studies, studies with only one presented sample and studies without neuroradiological examinations.ResultsFollowing screening (10,389 papers, n = 122 papers were included. The proteins S100B (n = 66 and NSE (n = 27 were the two most frequent biomarkers that were serially sampled. For S100B in severe TBI, a majority of studies indicate a t1/2 of about 24 h, even if very early sampling in these patients reveals rapid decreases (1–2 h though possibly of non-cerebral origin. In contrast, the t1/2 for NSE is comparably longer, ranging from 48 to 72 h in severe TBI cases. The protein GFAP (n = 18 appears to have t1/2 of about 24–48 h in severe TBI. The protein UCH-L1 (n = 9 presents a t1/2 around 7 h in mild TBI and about 10 h in severe. Frequent sampling of these proteins revealed different trajectories with persisting high serum levels, or secondary peaks, in patients with unfavorable outcome or in patients developing secondary detrimental events. Finally, NF-L (n = 2 only increased in the few studies available, suggesting a serum availability of >10 days. To date, automated assays are available for S100B and NSE making them faster and more practical to use.ConclusionSerial sampling of brain-specific proteins in serum reveals

  4. Self- versus physician-collected samples for the follow-up of human papillomavirus-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviano M

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Manuela Viviano,1,* Phuong Lien Tran,1,* Bruno Kenfack,2 Rosa Catarino,1 Mohamed Akaaboune,1,† Liliane Temogne,2 Eveline Tincho Foguem,2 Pierre Vassilakos,3 Patrick Petignat1 1Gynecology Division, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland; 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon; 3Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Geneva, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to the work †MA passed away on July 31, 2017 Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV testing is a suitable tool for primary cervical cancer (CC screening and follow-up in low-resource settings. Vaginal samples taken by women themselves (Self-HPV are an interesting alternative to physician-performed sampling (Dr-HPV. Our aim was to assess the performance of Self-HPV and Dr-HPV at 6 and 12 months following a CC screening campaign. Methods: This study was carried out at the Dschang District Hospital, Cameroon. Women aged 30–49 years were recruited in a CC screening campaign. HPV-positive women, of whom 2/3 were treated with thermoablation because of abnormal results at baseline screening, were invited to participate in a follow-up study. Self- and Dr-HPV, as well as cytology, were performed at 6 and 12 months. HPV samples were analyzed using the Xpert HPV assay. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse and of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse were calculated for Self-HPV and Dr-HPV, using cytology as the reference diagnosis. Results: Overall, 188 HPV-positive women were invited to attend follow-up. The obtained follow-up visits’ attendance was 154 (81.9% and 131 (69.7% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. While the overall performance of Dr-HPV at 6 months was slightly superior, Self-HPV showed an improved sensitivity for HSIL+ detection at 12 months when compared with Dr-HPV (83.3% [95% CI 41.8–98.9] versus 71.4% [95% CI 21.5–95

  5. Insights into the processes behind the contamination of degraded human teeth and bone samples with exogenous sources of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M. T. P.; Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, E.

    2006-01-01

    A principal problem facing human DNA studies that use old and degraded remains is contamination from other sources of human DNA. In this study we have attempted to contaminate deliberately bones and teeth sampled from a medieval collection excavated in Trondheim, Norway, in order to investigate......, prior to assaying for the residual presence of the handler's DNA. Surprisingly, although our results suggest that a large proportion of the teeth were contaminated with multiple sources of human DNA prior to our investigation, we were unable to contaminate the samples with further human DNA. One...

  6. Does a robotic surgery approach offer optimal ergonomics to gynecologic surgeons?: a comprehensive ergonomics survey study in gynecologic robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mija Ruth; Lee, Gyusung Isaiah

    2017-09-01

    To better understand the ergonomics associated with robotic surgery including physical discomfort and symptoms, factors influencing symptom reporting, and robotic surgery systems components recommended to be improved. The anonymous survey included 20 questions regarding demographics, systems, ergonomics, and physical symptoms and was completed by experienced robotic surgeons online through American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL) and Society of Robotic Surgery (SRS). There were 289 (260 gynecology, 22 gynecology-oncology, and 7 urogynecology) gynecologic surgeon respondents regularly practicing robotic surgery. Statistical data analysis was performed using the t-test, χ² test, and logistic regression. One hundred fifty-six surgeons (54.0%) reported experiencing physical symptoms or discomfort. Participants with higher robotic case volume reported significantly lower physical symptom report rates (pergonomic settings not only acknowledged that the adjustments were helpful for better ergonomics but also reported a lower physical symptom rate (pergonomic settings (32.7%), took a break (33.3%) or simply ignored the problem (34%). Fingers and neck were the most common body parts with symptoms. Eye symptom complaints were significantly decreased with the Si robot (pergonomics were microphone/speaker, pedal design, and finger clutch. More than half of participants reported physical symptoms which were found to be primarily associated with confidence in managing ergonomic settings and familiarity with the system depending on the volume of robotic cases. Optimal guidelines and education on managing ergonomic settings should be implemented to maximize the ergonomic benefits of robotic surgery. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  7. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers includes information on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants (breast and ovarian cancer) and Lynch syndrome (endometrial cancer). Get more information about hereditary breast and gynecologic cancer syndromes in this clinician summary.

  8. Temporal availability of obstetrics and gynecology clinics in Taiwan: A nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Chang

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Obstetrics–gynecology clinics in Taiwan offered great temporal availability. In addition to the remarkable urban–rural disparity in the distribution of obstetrics–gynecology clinics, the availability of services on Sundays in rural areas demands special attention.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of beta human papillomavirus detection in fingernail samples from mid-adult women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Winer

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs have not been evaluated in fingernails from healthy individuals. To determine prevalence and correlates of β-HPVs in fingernails from healthy mid-adult women, we tested archived samples collected from 2011 to 2012 using a multiplex PCR combined with Luminex technology for 46 β-HPV genotypes. One hundred thirteen (61.1% of 185 fingernail samples were positive for β-HPV, and the median number of types detected in positive samples was 2 (interquartile range: 1–4. The most common genotypes detected were HPV-23 (β−2 (13.5%, HPV-38 (β−2 (13.0%, HPV-5 (β−1 (9.2%, HPV-107 (β−2 (8.7%, and HPV-120 (β−2 (8.7%. In multivariate analysis, β-HPV detection was associated with age (prevalence ratio [PR] for women 40–51 years versus 30–39 years = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.05–1.62 and race (PR for non-white versus white race = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45–0.94. The prevalence of β-HPV in fingernail samples from healthy mid-adult women was similar to the prevalence of β-HPV reported at other cutaneous sites in prior studies. We did not identify any significant health or sexual behavior predictors of β-HPV detection in fingernails. Our results support the hypothesis that fingers may serve as a source of transmission or autoinoculation of cutaneous HPVs to other anatomic sites. Keywords: Fingernails, Women, Beta-HPV, Prevalence, Mid-adult, Risk factor

  10. Ethics and law in research with human biological samples: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    During the last century a large number of documents (regulations, ethical codes, treatises, declarations, conventions) were published on the subject of ethics and clinical trials, many of them focusing on the protection of research participants. More recently various proposals have been put forward to relax some of the constraints imposed on research by these documents and regulations. It is important to distinguish between risks deriving from direct interventions on human subjects and other types of risk. In Italy the Data Protection Authority has acted in the question of research using previously collected health data and biological samples to simplify the procedures regarding informed consent. The new approach may be of help to other researchers working outside Italy.

  11. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  12. Urinary Arsenic in Human Samples from Areas Characterized by Natural or Anthropogenic Pollution in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichilli, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Ronchi, Anna Maria; Gorini, Francesca; Bustaffa, Elisa

    2018-02-09

    Arsenic is ubiquitous and has a potentially adverse impact on human health. We compared the distribution of concentrations of urinary inorganic arsenic plus methylated forms (uc(iAs+MMA+DMA)) in four Italian areas with other international studies, and we assessed the relationship between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and various exposure factors. We conducted a human biomonitoring study on 271 subjects (132 men) aged 20-44, randomly sampled and stratified by area, gender, and age. Data on environmental and occupational exposure and dietary habits were collected through a questionnaire. Arsenic was speciated using chromatographic separation and inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Associations between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and exposure factors were evaluated using the geometric mean ratio (GMR) with a 90% confidence interval by stepwise multiple regression analysis. The 95th percentile value of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) for the whole sample (86.28 µg/L) was higher than other national studies worldwide. A statistical significant correlation was found between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and occupational exposure (GMR: 2.68 [1.79-4.00]), GSTT gene (GMR: 0.68 [0.52-0.80]), consumption of tap water (GMR: 1.35 [1.02-1.77]), seafood (GMR: 1.44 [1.11-1.88]), whole milk (GMR: 1.34 [1.04-1.73]), and fruit/vegetables (GMR: 1.37 [1.03-1.82]). This study demonstrated the utility of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) as a biomarker to assess environmental exposure. In a public health context, this information could be used to support remedial action, to prevent individuals from being further exposed to environmental arsenic sources.

  13. Urinary Arsenic in Human Samples from Areas Characterized by Natural or Anthropogenic Pollution in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Minichilli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is ubiquitous and has a potentially adverse impact on human health. We compared the distribution of concentrations of urinary inorganic arsenic plus methylated forms (uc(iAs+MMA+DMA in four Italian areas with other international studies, and we assessed the relationship between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA and various exposure factors. We conducted a human biomonitoring study on 271 subjects (132 men aged 20–44, randomly sampled and stratified by area, gender, and age. Data on environmental and occupational exposure and dietary habits were collected through a questionnaire. Arsenic was speciated using chromatographic separation and inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Associations between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA and exposure factors were evaluated using the geometric mean ratio (GMR with a 90% confidence interval by stepwise multiple regression analysis. The 95th percentile value of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA for the whole sample (86.28 µg/L was higher than other national studies worldwide. A statistical significant correlation was found between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA and occupational exposure (GMR: 2.68 [1.79–4.00], GSTT gene (GMR: 0.68 [0.52–0.80], consumption of tap water (GMR: 1.35 [1.02–1.77], seafood (GMR: 1.44 [1.11–1.88], whole milk (GMR: 1.34 [1.04–1.73], and fruit/vegetables (GMR: 1.37 [1.03–1.82]. This study demonstrated the utility of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA as a biomarker to assess environmental exposure. In a public health context, this information could be used to support remedial action, to prevent individuals from being further exposed to environmental arsenic sources.

  14. Urinary Arsenic in Human Samples from Areas Characterized by Natural or Anthropogenic Pollution in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichilli, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Ronchi, Anna Maria; Gorini, Francesca; Bustaffa, Elisa

    2018-01-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitous and has a potentially adverse impact on human health. We compared the distribution of concentrations of urinary inorganic arsenic plus methylated forms (uc(iAs+MMA+DMA)) in four Italian areas with other international studies, and we assessed the relationship between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and various exposure factors. We conducted a human biomonitoring study on 271 subjects (132 men) aged 20–44, randomly sampled and stratified by area, gender, and age. Data on environmental and occupational exposure and dietary habits were collected through a questionnaire. Arsenic was speciated using chromatographic separation and inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Associations between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and exposure factors were evaluated using the geometric mean ratio (GMR) with a 90% confidence interval by stepwise multiple regression analysis. The 95th percentile value of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) for the whole sample (86.28 µg/L) was higher than other national studies worldwide. A statistical significant correlation was found between uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) and occupational exposure (GMR: 2.68 [1.79–4.00]), GSTT gene (GMR: 0.68 [0.52–0.80]), consumption of tap water (GMR: 1.35 [1.02–1.77]), seafood (GMR: 1.44 [1.11–1.88]), whole milk (GMR: 1.34 [1.04–1.73]), and fruit/vegetables (GMR: 1.37 [1.03–1.82]). This study demonstrated the utility of uc(iAs+MMA+DMA) as a biomarker to assess environmental exposure. In a public health context, this information could be used to support remedial action, to prevent individuals from being further exposed to environmental arsenic sources. PMID:29425136

  15. Trace samples of human blood in mosquitoes as a forensic investigation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Oliveira, N C L; Crovella, S

    2015-11-23

    Investigations of any type of crime invariably starts at the crime scene by collecting evidence. Thus, the purpose of this research was to collect and analyze an entomological trace from an environment that is similar to those of indoor crime scenes. Hematophagous mosquitoes were collected from two residential units; saliva of volunteers that were residents in the units was also collected for genetic analysis as reference samples. We examined the allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) and amelogenin. A total of 26 female hematophagous mosquitoes were identified as Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus; we were able to obtain 11 forensically valid genetic profiles, with a minimum of 0.028203 ng/μL of human DNA. Thus, the results of this study showed that it was possible to correlate human genetic information from mosquitoes with the volunteer reference samples, which validates the use of this information as forensic evidence. Furthermore, we observed mixed genetic profiles from one mosquito. Therefore, it is clearly important to collect these insects indoors where crimes were committed, because it may be possible to find intact genetic profiles of suspects in the blood found in the digestive tract of hematophagous mosquitoes for later comparison to identify an offender and/or exclude suspects.

  16. Clinical evaluation of human papillomavirus detection by careHPV™ test on physician-samples and self-samples using the indicating FTA Elute® card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Ming; Hu, Shang-Ying; Chen, Feng; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Fang-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Ma, Xin-Ming; Qiao, You-Lin

    2014-01-01

    To make the clinical evaluation of a solid-state human papillomavirus (HPV) sampling medium in combination with an economical HPV testing method (careHPV™) for cervical cancer screening. 396 women aged 25-65 years were enrolled for cervical cancer screening, and four samples were collected. Two samples were collected by woman themselves, among which one was stored in DCM preservative solution (called "liquid sample") and the other was applied on the Whatman Indicating FTA Elute® card (FTA card). Another two samples were collected by physician and stored in DCM preservative solution and FTA card, respectively. All the samples were detected by careHPV™ test. All the women were administered a colposcopy examination, and biopsies were taken for pathological confirmation if necessary. FTA card demonstrated a comparable sensitivity of detecting high grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) with the liquid sample carrier for self and physician-sampling, but showed a higher specificity than that of liquid sample carrier for self-sampling (FTA vs Liquid: 79.0% vs 71.6%, p=0.02). Generally, the FTA card had a comparable accuracy with that of Liquid-based medium by different sampling operators, with an area under the curve of 0.807 for physician and FTA, 0.781 for physician and Liquid, 0.728 for self and FTA, and 0.733 for self and Liquid (p>0.05). FTA card is a promising sample carrier for cervical cancer screening. With appropriate education programmes and further optimization of the experimental workflow, FTA card based self-collection in combination with centralized careHPV™ testing can help expand the coverage of cervical cancer screening in low-resource areas.

  17. Determination of human albumin in serum and urine samples by constant-energy synchronous fluorescence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive spectrofluorimetric method using constant-energy synchronous fluorescence technique is proposed for the determination of human albumin without separation. In this method, no reagent was used for enhancement of the fluorescence signal of albumin in the solution. Effects of some parameters, such as energy difference between excitation and emission monochromators (ΔE), emission and excitation slit widths and scan rate of wavelength were studied and the optimum conditions were established. For this purpose factorial design and response surface method were employed for optimization of the effective parameters on the fluorescence signal. The results showed that the scan rate of the wavelength has no significant effect on the analytical signal. The calibration curve was linear in the range 0.1-220.0 µg mL(-1) of albumin with a detection limit of 7.0 × 10(-3)  µg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSD) for six replicate measurements of albumin were calculated as 2.2%, 1.7% and 1.3% for 0.5, 10.0 and 100.0 µg mL(-1) albumin, respectively. Furthermore the proposed method has been employed for the determination of albumin in human serum and urine samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A new protoparvovirus in human fecal samples and cutaneous T cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung G; Dreno, Brigitte; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Li, Linlin; Orlandi, Patricia; Deng, Xutao; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Siqueira, Juliana; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Halary, Franck; Dantal, Jacques; Alexander, Kathleen A; Pesavento, Patricia A; Delwart, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We genetically characterized seven nearly complete genomes in the protoparvovirus genus from the feces of children with diarrhea. The viruses, provisionally named cutaviruses (CutaV), varied by 1-6% nucleotides and shared ~76% and ~82% amino acid identity with the NS1 and VP1 of human bufaviruses, their closest relatives. Using PCR, cutavirus DNA was found in 1.6% (4/245) and 1% (1/100) of diarrhea samples from Brazil and Botswana respectively. In silico analysis of pre-existing metagenomics datasets then revealed closely related parvovirus genomes in skin biopsies from patients with epidermotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL or mycosis fungoides). PCR of skin biopsies yielded cutavirus DNA in 4/17 CTCL, 0/10 skin carcinoma, and 0/21 normal or noncancerous skin biopsies. In situ hybridization of CTCL skin biopsies detected viral genome within rare individual cells in regions of neoplastic infiltrations. The influence of cutavirus infection on human enteric functions and possible oncolytic role in CTCL progression remain to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanistic Insights on Human Phosphoglucomutase Revealed by Transition Path Sampling and Molecular Dynamics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brás, Natércia F; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2018-02-06

    Human α-phosphoglucomutase 1 (α-PGM) catalyzes the isomerization of glucose-1-phosphate into glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) through two sequential phosphoryl transfer steps with a glucose-1,6-bisphosphate (G16P) intermediate. Given that the release of G6P in the gluconeogenesis raises the glucose output levels, α-PGM represents a tempting pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide the first theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of human α-PGM. We performed transition-path sampling simulations to unveil the atomic details of the two catalytic chemical steps, which could be key for developing transition state (TS) analogue molecules with inhibitory properties. Our calculations revealed that both steps proceed through a concerted S N 2-like mechanism, with a loose metaphosphate-like TS. Even though experimental data suggests that the two steps are identical, we observed noticeable differences: 1) the transition state ensemble has a well-defined TS region and a late TS for the second step, and 2) larger coordinated protein motions are required to reach the TS of the second step. We have identified key residues (Arg23, Ser117, His118, Lys389), and the Mg 2+ ion that contribute in different ways to the reaction coordinate. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the G16P intermediate may reorient without leaving the enzymatic binding pocket, through significant conformational rearrangements of the G16P and of specific loop regions of the human α-PGM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. Care must be exercised in associating previous therapy and a subsequent malignancy. Naturally occurring second cancers must be separated from those which are iatrogenic. Associations in the literature have been made involving malignancies as a sequelae of prior gynecologic therapy. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. Irradiation therapy, however, has not yet been shown to be related to leukemia in cervical cancer patients. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified

  1. Pain Management for Gynecologic Procedures in the Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Luu Doan; Allen, Rebecca H

    2016-02-01

    Satisfactory pain control for women undergoing office gynecologic procedures is critical for both patient comfort and procedure success. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to be aware of the safety and efficacy of different pain control regimens. This article aimed to review the literature regarding pain control regimens for procedures such as endometrial biopsy, intrauterine device insertion, colposcopy and loop electrosurgical excisional procedure, uterine aspiration, and hysteroscopy. A search of published literature using PubMed was conducted using the following keywords: "pain" or "anesthesia." These terms were paired with the following keywords: "intrauterine device" or "IUD," "endometrial biopsy," "uterine aspiration" or "abortion," "colposcopy" or "loop electrosurgical excisional procedure" or "LEEP," "hysteroscopy" or "hysteroscopic sterilization." The search was conducted through July 2015. Articles were hand reviewed and selected by the authors for study quality. Meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials were prioritized. Although local anesthesia is commonly used for gynecologic procedures, a multimodal approach may be more effective including oral medication, a dedicated emotional support person, and visual or auditory distraction. Women who are nulliparous, are postmenopausal, have a history of dysmenorrhea, or suffer from anxiety are more likely to experience greater pain with gynecologic procedures. Evidence for some interventions exists; however, the interpretation of intervention comparisons is limited by the use of different regimens, pain measurement scales, patient populations, and procedure techniques. There are many options for pain management for office gynecologic procedures, and depending on the procedure, different modalities may work best. The importance of patient counseling and selection cannot be overstated.

  2. Immunotherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakish, Janelle B; Jazaeri, Amir A

    2017-08-24

    Immune-targeted therapies have demonstrated durable responses in many tumor types with limited treatment options and poor overall prognosis. This has led to enthusiasm for expanding such therapies to other tumor types including gynecologic malignancies. The use of immunotherapy in gynecologic malignancies is in the early stages and is an active area of ongoing clinical research. Both cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy continue to be extensively studied in gynecologic malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, hold promising potential in specific subsets of endometrial cancer that express microsatellite instability. The key to successful treatment with immunotherapy involves identification of the subgroup of patients that will derive benefit. The number of ongoing trials in cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer will help to recognize these patients and make treatment more directed. Additionally, a number of studies are combining immunotherapy with standard treatment options and will help to determine combinations that will enhance responses to standard therapy. Overall, there is much enthusiasm for immunotherapy approaches in gynecologic malignancies. However, the emerging data shows that with the exception of microsatellite unstable tumors, the use of single-agent immune checkpoint inhibitors is associated with response rates of 10-15%. More effective and likely combinatorial approaches are needed and will be informed by the findings of ongoing trials.

  3. Remote-controlled afterloading for intracavitary brachytherapy in gynecological carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, K.

    1983-01-01

    Classical radiotherapy is gradually being replaced by remote-controlled afterloading procedures in the intracavitary treatment of tumors found during gynecological examination. These new procedures practically eliminate the exposure of the clinic staff to radiation. The possibilities of this new method are discussed with regard to the physics and biology of radiation. Our own results with this new method are reported. (orig.)

  4. First Nordic Conference on Obesity in Gynecology and Obstetrics (NOCOGO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Stener; Vinter, Christina A; Lamont, Ronald F

    2013-01-01

    The First Nordic Conference in Obesity in Gynecology and Obstetrics (NOCOGO) took place in Billund, Denmark between 22(nd) and 24(th) October 2012. The goal of the meeting was to encourage attendance and interaction between obstetricians, gynecologists, nurses and midwives with regard to obesity...

  5. Pelvic floor disorders in gynecological malignancies. An overlooked problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana M. Bodean

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vulvar, and vaginal cancers affect women of a broad age spectrum. Many of these women are still sexually active when their cancer is diagnosed. Treatment options for gynecological malignancies, such as gynecological surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, are proven risk factors for pelvic floor dysfunction. The prevalence of urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction before cancer treatment is still unclear. Hypotheses have been raised in the literature that these manifestations could represent early symptoms of pelvic cancers, but most remain overlooked even in cancer surviving patients. The primary focus of therapy is always cancer eradication, but as oncological and surgical treatment options become more successful, the number of cancer survivors increases. The quality of life of patients with gynecological cancers often remains an underrated subject. Pelvic floor disorders are not consistently reported by patients and are frequently overlooked by many clinicians. In this brief review we discuss the importance of pelvic floor dysfunction in patients with gynecological malignant tumors.

  6. Gynecologic ultrasonography: recent advances and research in various technical modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Drobný

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Juraj DrobnýFirst Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Cyril and Method University Hospital, Bratislava, Slovak RepublicAbstract: This paper reviews clinical research in gynecologic sonography, focussing on uterine cavity lesions, endometrial abnormalities and adnexal masses (including endometriosis, and ectopic pregnancy. For each topic, detection of sonographic pathologic features and sonographic mode are discussed, as well as the latest applications of sonodiagnostic methods, and relevant topics in clinical research. A new approach to evaluation of sonographic structures can be seen, including for borderline mucinous and serous ovarian tumors, in mean gray value, evaluation of grade of tissue echogenicity, evaluation of intact endometrial midline echo in ectopic pregnancy, and application of gel instillation sonography. Novel sonographic three-dimensional modalities, such as virtual navigation through three orthogonal planes, multislice tomosonography, volumetry by a virtual organ computer-aided analysis system, three-dimensional power Doppler, and space reconstruction of structures enable gynecologic diagnoses to be made more exactly. Clinical research investigates different sonographic features in benign and malignant gynecologic pathology. For studies of typical signs of benign uterine fibroids, endometrial volume, and vascularization of malignant endometrial tumors, as well as typical benign adnexal structures, the ovarian crescent sign were performed. At this time, no exact sonographic features for distinguishing between benign and malignant gynecologic tumors are available.Keywords: sonography, uterine cavity lesions, endometrial abnormalities, adnexal masses

  7. [Observation on analgesia effect of electroacupuncture during gynecologic outpatient operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Xue-Lei; Jin, Ping-Lin; Wang, Lu-Dong; Zhao, Zhi-En; Qin, Xue-Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Yan; Hu, Xue-Zhu; Cai, Zhen-Lin

    2012-10-01

    To verify the feasibility of electroacupuncture analgesia applied to gynecologic outpatient operation. Two hundred patients were randomly divided into an electroacupuncture analgesia group and an intravenous anesthesia group, 100 cases in each group. Operation types included artificial abortion, diagnostic curettage and remove of intrauterine divice. The electroacupuncture analgesia group was treated with electroacupuncture at bilateral Hegu (LI 4) and Neiguan (PC 6), and the routine gynecologic outpatient operation was performed under patients' waking state. The intravenous anesthesia group was treated with routine gynecologic outpatient operation after intravenous injection of fentanyl and propofol. The excellent rate and the effective rate of analgesia were 88.0% (88/100) and 100.0% (100/100) in the electroacupuncture analgesia group, and 94.0% (94/100) and 100.0% (100/100) in the intravenous anesthesia group, with no statistically significant differences between the two groups (all P > 0.05). There was no adverse reaction in the electroacupuncture anesthesia group, but 11 cases of adverse reactions in the intravenous anesthesia group. Electroacupuncture analgesia can effectively alleviate the pain during gynecologic outpatient operation and it is simple and safe without adverse reactions.

  8. Frequency and Pattern of Gynecological Cancers in Federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among women worldwide. ... the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer over the past ... using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS), IBM SPSS statistics Version 20, IBM incorporation and ... gynecological cancer menace through actions like health ... The study covered a period of 2 years from 1st January 2012.

  9. Robotics in Gynecology: Why is this Technology Worth pursuing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ayala-Yáñez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic laparoscopy in gynecology, which started in 2005 when the Da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in gynecologic procedures, represents today a modern, safe, and precise approach to pathology in this field. Since then, a great deal of experience has accumulated, and it has been shown that there is almost no gynecological surgery that cannot be approached with this technology, namely hysterectomy, myomectomy, sacrocolpopexia, and surgery for the treatment of endometriosis. Albeit no advantages have been observed over conventional laparoscopy and some open surgical procedures, robotics do seem to be advantageous in highly complicated procedures when extensive dissection and proper anatomy reestablishment is required, as in the case of oncologic surgery. There is no doubt that implementation of better logistics in finance, training, design, and application will exert a positive effect upon robotics expansion in gynecological medicine. Contrary to expectations, we estimate that a special impact is to be seen in emerging countries where novel technologies have resulted in benefits in the organization of health care systems.

  10. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  11. Analysis of Fluconazole in Human Urine Sample by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermawan, D; Ali, N A Md; Ibrahim, W A Wan; Sanagi, M M

    2013-01-01

    A method for determination of fluconazole, antifungal drug in human urine by using reversed-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed. Optimization HPLC conditions were carried out by changing the flow rate and composition of mobile phase. The optimum separation conditions at a flow rate 0.85 mL/min with a composition of mobile phase containing methanol:water (70:30, v/v) with UV detection at a wavelength 254 nm was able to analyze fluconazole within 3 min. The excellent linearity was obtained in the range of concentration 1 to 10 μg/mL with r 2 = 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.39 μg/mL and 1.28 μg/mL, respectively. Solid phase extraction (SPE) method using octadecylsilane (C18) as a sorbent was used to clean-up and pre-concentrated of the urine sample prior to HPLC analysis. The average recoveries of fluconazole in spiked urine sample was 72.4% with RSD of 3.21% (n=3).

  12. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji H Harada

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults.Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  13. Will patients benefit from regionalization of gynecologic cancer care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F Brookfield

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patient chances for cure and palliation for a variety of malignancies may be greatly affected by the care provided by a treating hospital. We sought to determine the effect of volume and teaching status on patient outcomes for five gynecologic malignancies: endometrial, cervical, ovarian and vulvar carcinoma and uterine sarcoma. METHODS: The Florida Cancer Data System dataset was queried for all patients undergoing treatment for gynecologic cancers from 1990-2000. RESULTS: Overall, 48,981 patients with gynecologic malignancies were identified. Endometrial tumors were the most common, representing 43.2% of the entire cohort, followed by ovarian cancer (30.9%, cervical cancer (20.8%, vulvar cancer (4.6%, and uterine sarcoma (0.5%. By univariate analysis, although patients treated at high volume centers (HVC were significantly younger, they benefited from an improved short-term (30-day and/or 90-day survival for cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancers. Multivariate analysis (MVA, however, failed to demonstrate significant survival benefit for gynecologic cancer patients treated at teaching facilities (TF or HVC. Significant prognostic factors at presentation by MVA were age over 65 (HR = 2.6, p<0.01, African-American race (HR = 1.36, p<0.01, and advanced stage (regional HR = 2.08, p<0.01; advanced HR = 3.82, p<0.01, respectively. Surgery and use of chemotherapy were each significantly associated with improved survival. CONCLUSION: No difference in patient survival was observed for any gynecologic malignancy based upon treating hospital teaching or volume status. Although instances of improved outcomes may occur, overall further regionalization would not appear to significantly improve patient survival.

  14. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2016: 10-year special edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Miseon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Jae Weon

    2017-05-01

    In 2016, 13 topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, study results supporting previous ones regarding surgical preventive strategies were reported. There were several targeted agents that showed comparable responses in phase III trials, including niraparib, cediranib, and nintedanib. On the contrary to our expectations, dose-dense weekly chemotherapy regimen failed to prove superior survival outcomes compared with conventional triweekly regimen. Single-agent non-platinum treatment to prolong platinum-free-interval in patients with recurrent, partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer did not improve and even worsened overall survival (OS). For cervical cancer, we reviewed robust evidences of larger-scaled population-based study and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent vaccine for expanding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage. Standard of care treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) was briefly reviewed. For uterine corpus cancer, new findings about appropriate surgical wait time from diagnosis to surgery were reported. Advantages of minimally invasive surgery over conventional laparotomy were reconfirmed. There were 5 new gene regions that increase the risk of developing endometrial cancer. Regarding radiation therapy, Post-Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer (PORTEC)-3 quality of life (QOL) data were released and higher local control rate of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy was reported in LACC. In addition, 4 general oncology topics followed: chemotherapy at the end-of-life, immunotherapy with reengineering T-cells, actualization of precision medicine, and artificial intelligence (AI) to make personalized cancer therapy real. For breast cancer, adaptively randomized trials, extending aromatase inhibitor therapy, and ribociclib and palbociclib were introduced. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  15. Comparing the proteome of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Large biobanks exist worldwide containing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and samples stored in RNAlater. However, the impact of tissue preservation on the result of a quantative proteome analysis remains poorly described.Human colon mucosal biopsies were extracted from the sigmoideum...

  16. Gynecological complaints and their associated factors among women in a family health-care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus de Paula von Glehn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the most common gynecological complaints and possible associated factors among women of reproductive age attended at a family health-care clinic. Methodology: A transversal study conducted with a sample of an outpatient population consisting of women of reproductive age. Pregnant women and minors were excluded. The final sample consisted of women between 18 and 49 years of age. The participants answered a questionnaire in which the complaints of the last 4 weeks were registered. They were examined, had the vaginal pH assessed, and secretion was tested using a 10% potassium hydroxide solution to verify the presence of amine odor (whiff test. Results: Most participants were black or of mixed races. Considering the frequency of complaints, there were no significant differences between white and nonwhite women. There was an association between vaginal pH and discharge complaints as well as unpleasant odor, positive test of amines, smoking, and performing vaginal douches. Conclusions: Vaginal complaints were common among participants; the practice of vaginal douches was also frequent and was associated with higher pH values. The use of hormonal contraceptives was associated with lower pH values. There was no significant association between condom use and gynecological complaints, vaginal pH, or the whiff test.

  17. Practice Patterns, Attitudes, and Barriers to Palliative Care Consultation by Gynecologic Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley de Meritens, Alexandre; Margolis, Benjamin; Blinderman, Craig; Prigerson, Holly G; Maciejewski, Paul K; Shen, Megan J; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Wright, Jason D; Tergas, Ana I

    2017-09-01

    We sought to describe practice patterns, attitudes, and barriers to the integration of palliative care services by gynecologic oncologists. Members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology were electronically surveyed regarding their practice of incorporating palliative care services and to identify barriers for consultation. Descriptive statistics were used, and two-sample z-tests of proportions were performed to compare responses to related questions. Of the 145 respondents, 71% were attending physicians and 58% worked at an academic medical center. The vast majority (92%) had palliative care services available for consultation at their hospital; 48% thought that palliative care services were appropriately used, 51% thought they were underused, and 1% thought they were overused. Thirty percent of respondents thought that palliative care services should be incorporated at first recurrence, whereas 42% thought palliative care should be incorporated when prognosis for life expectancy is ≤ 6 months. Most participants (75%) responded that palliative care consultation is reasonable for symptom control at any stage of disease. Respondents were most likely to consult palliative care services for pain control (53%) and other symptoms (63%). Eighty-three percent of respondents thought that communicating prognosis is the primary team's responsibility, whereas the responsibilities for pain and symptom control, resuscitation status, and goals of care discussions were split between the primary team only and both teams. The main barrier for consulting palliative care services was the concern that patients and families would feel abandoned by the primary oncologist (73%). Ninety-seven percent of respondents answered that palliative care services are useful to improve patient care. The majority of gynecologic oncologists perceived palliative care as a useful collaboration that is underused. Fear of perceived abandonment by the patient and family members was identified as a

  18. [Genetic profiling of Giardia intestinalis by polimerase chain in human and dogs samples of Colombian Caribean Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Salgado, Bárbara; Buelvas-Montes, Yaleyvis; Villalba-Vizcaíno, Vivian; Salomón-Arzuza, Octavio

    2014-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis (G. Intestinalis) is a protozoan that causes diarrheal disease and malabsorption syndrome in humans and other mammals. It presents a high genetic diversity evidenced in the recognition of 7 genotypes (A-G). Genotypes A and B are commonly associated to humans and domestic animals such as dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary genetic characterization of G. intestinalis in humans and dogs from two cities on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Sampling areas were selected according to the highest numbers of acute diarrheal disease. Stool samples were collected from children under 7 years old, with positive medical tests for G. intestinalis. Cysts were purified by sucrose gradient and DNA samples were isolated by extraction with organic solvents. Molecular characterization was performed by amplifying the gene triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) by using a semi-nested PCR. A total of 202 samples of DNA were obtained; of these, 111 were positive in coproparasitological analysis (13 dogs and 98 children). Genotype distribution in positive samples was: 5.1% belonged to genotype A and 92.3% to genotype B. Genotype B was present in humans and animals. The most common genotype in both human and animal samples was genotype B, suggesting a zoonotic transmission cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of total and methylmercury compounds in the IAEA human hair intercomparison samples - Experience of the IAEA-MEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, M.; Liang, L.; Mandic, V.

    1995-01-01

    The programme of this CRP is focused on the analyses of human hair samples. There are only two human hair samples certified for total mercury, and no RMs for methylmercury compounds is available. One of the main objectives of this CRP is to produce, through the IAEA AQCS Programme, a human hair intercomparison material for quality assurance requirements in population monitoring programmes for total and methylmercury exposure. Through the reporting period, MESL has introduced a new method for simultaneous determination of total and methylmercury in biological samples. As the laboratory has close collaboration with the CRP's Reference Laboratory in Ljubljana, Slovenia, it has also been actively involved in the quality assurance component of this CRP. This report represents a summary on the results for total and methylmercury in two intercomparison samples, IAEA-085 and IAEA-086 using newly developed method

  20. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (pbacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov., a slowly growing mycobacterium isolated from human respiratory samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Marola, Jamie L; Buss, Sarah; Jones, Victoria; McNeil, Michael R; Freifeld, Alison G; Elaine Epperson, L; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Jackson, Mary; Iwen, Peter C; Salfinger, Max; Strong, Michael

    2017-08-01

    A novel slowly growing, non-chromogenic species of the class Actinobacteria was isolated from a human respiratory sample in Nebraska, USA, in 2012. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence supported placement into the genus Mycobacterium with high sequence similarity to a previously undescribed strain isolated from a patient respiratory sample from Oregon, USA, held in a collection in Colorado, USA, in 2000. The two isolates were subjected to phenotypic testing and whole genome sequencing and found to be indistinguishable. The bacteria were acid-fast stain-positive, rod-shaped and exhibited growth after 7-10 days on solid media at temperatures ranging from 25 to 42°C. Colonies were non-pigmented, rough and slightly raised. Analyses of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight profiles showed no matches against a reference library of 130 mycobacterial species. Full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical for the two isolates, the average nucleotide identity (ANI) between their genomes was 99.7 % and phylogenetic comparisons classified the novel mycobacteria as the basal most species in the slowly growing Mycobacterium clade. Mycobacterium avium is the most closely related species based on rpoB gene sequence similarity (92 %), but the ANI between the genomes was 81.5 %, below the suggested cut-off for differentiating two species (95 %). Mycolic acid profiles were more similar to M. avium than to Mycobacterium simiae or Mycobacterium abscessus. The phenotypic and genomic data support the conclusion that the two related isolates represent a novel Mycobacterium species for which the name Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE-TNMC-100812T (=ATCC BAA-2683T=DSM 46873T).

  2. Clinical performance of LOCI™-based tumor marker assays for tumor markers CA 15-3, CA 125, CEA, CA 19-9 and AFP in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolscheid-Pommerich, Ramona C; Keyver-Paik, Mignon; Hecking, Thomas; Kuhn, Walther; Hartmann, Gunther; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is sparse regarding the clinical performance of luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassays-based tumor marker assays in gynecological cancer. Analyzing serum samples of 336 patients with Dimension™Vista1500, we investigated the diagnostic power of carbohydrate antigen 15-3, carbohydrate antigen 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and alpha-fetoprotein in patients suffering from different types of gynecological cancer and precancerous gynecological diseases and compared findings to appropriate control groups. The cohort comprised 177 female patients with gynecological cancers (73 breast, 22 cervical, 16 endometrial, 17 vulva, and 49 ovarian cancers), 26 patients with precancerous gynecological diseases (11 vulva, 4 cervical, and 10 breast), 109 patients with benign gynecological diseases, and 24 healthy controls. Discriminative power was assessed by areas under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curves, and sensitivities were determined at a fixed specificity of 95%. Levels of biomarkers in healthy controls were in the expected ranges and a discriminative power between gynecological cancers and healthy controls was observed for several tumor markers. Established tumor type-associated markers were elevated in specific gynecological cancers and benign controls as well as within precancerous gynecological diseases and healthy control group. In ovarian cancer, carbohydrate antigen 125 and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly elevated compared to the respective benign diseases. Carbohydrate antigen 125 was the most conclusive marker (area under the curve = 0.86% and 77.6% sensitivity at 95% specificity). In breast cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly higher than in the respective benign diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen achieved the most conclusive area under the curve (0.65) with 31.5% sensitivity at 95% specificity. None of the investigated markers was found to be of

  3. Exposure of Surgeons to Magnetic Fields during Laparoscopic and Robotic Gynecologic Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee Soo; Chung, Jai Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Kim, Deok Won; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sang Wun; Nam, Eun Ji; Cho, Hee Young

    2015-01-01

    To measure and compare levels of extremely-low-frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) exposure to surgeons during laparoscopic and robotic gynecologic surgeries. Prospective case-control study. Canadian Task Force I. Gynecologic surgeries at the Yonsei University Health System in Seoul, Korea from July to October in 2014. Ten laparoscopic gynecologic surgeries and 10 robotic gynecologic surgeries. The intensity of ELF-MF exposure to surgeons was measured every 4 seconds during 10 laparoscopic gynecologic surgeries and 10 robotic gynecologic surgeries using portable ELF-MF measuring devices with logging capability. The mean ELF-MF exposures were .1 ± .1 mG for laparoscopic gynecologic surgeries and .3 ± .1 mG for robotic gynecologic surgeries. ELF-MF exposure levels to surgeons during robotic gynecologic surgery were significantly higher than those during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery (p gynecologic surgery and conventional laparoscopic surgery, hoping to alleviate concerns regarding the hazards of MF exposure posed to surgeons and hospital staff. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of human serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: improved sample preparation and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorukhina, N I; Reijmers, T H; Nyangoma, S O; van der Zee, A G J; Jansen, R C; Bischoff, R

    2006-07-07

    Discovery of biomarkers is a fast developing field in proteomics research. Liquid chromatography coupled on line to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has become a powerful method for the sensitive detection, quantification and identification of proteins and peptides in biological fluids like serum. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins often masks those of lower abundance and thus generally prevents their detection and identification in proteomics studies. To perform future comparative analyses of samples from a serum bank of cervical cancer patients in a longitudinal and cross-sectional manner, methodology based on the depletion of high-abundance proteins followed by tryptic digestion and LC-MS has been developed. Two sample preparation methods were tested in terms of their efficiency to deplete high-abundance serum proteins and how they affect the repeatability of the LC-MS data sets. The first method comprised depletion of human serum albumin (HSA) on a dye ligand chromatographic and immunoglobulin G (IgG) on an immobilized Protein A support followed by tryptic digestion, fractionation by cation-exchange chromatography, trapping on a C18 column and reversed-phase LC-MS. The second method included depletion of the six most abundant serum proteins based on multiple immunoaffinity chromatography followed by tryptic digestion, trapping on a C18 column and reversed-phase LC-MS. Repeatability of the overall procedures was evaluated in terms of retention time and peak area for a selected number of endogenous peptides showing that the second method, besides being less time consuming, gave more repeatable results (retention time: <0.1% RSD; peak area: <30% RSD). Application of an LC-MS component detection algorithm followed by principal component analysis (PCA) enabled discrimination of serum samples that were spiked with horse heart cytochrome C from non-spiked serum and the detection of a concentration trend, which correlated to the amount of spiked horse heart

  5. Gene expression profiling of human breast tissue samples using SAGE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua Jeremy; Meyer, Clifford A; Choudhury, Sibgat; Shipitsin, Michail; Maruyama, Reo; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Sukumar, Saraswati; Schwartzman, Armin; Liu, Jun S; Polyak, Kornelia; Liu, X Shirley

    2010-12-01

    We present a powerful application of ultra high-throughput sequencing, SAGE-Seq, for the accurate quantification of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping of sense and antisense strands of mitochondrial and RefSeq genes, the normalization between libraries, and the identification of differentially expressed genes. We find that the diversity of cancer transcriptomes is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10 million reads/sample, and suggests a minimum desired sequencing depth around five million reads. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity of SAGE-Seq to detect less-abundant genes, including those encoding for known breast cancer-related transcription factors and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). SAGE-Seq is able to identify genes and pathways abnormally activated in breast cancer that traditional SAGE failed to call. SAGE-Seq is a powerful method for the identification of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  6. Validation of endogenous reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis of human visceral adipose samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rohini; Birerdinc, Aybike; Hossain, Noreen; Afendy, Arian; Chandhoke, Vikas; Younossi, Zobair; Baranova, Ancha

    2010-05-21

    Given the epidemic proportions of obesity worldwide and the concurrent prevalence of metabolic syndrome, there is an urgent need for better understanding the underlying mechanisms of metabolic syndrome, in particular, the gene expression differences which may participate in obesity, insulin resistance and the associated series of chronic liver conditions. Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is the standard method for studying changes in relative gene expression in different tissues and experimental conditions. However, variations in amount of starting material, enzymatic efficiency and presence of inhibitors can lead to quantification errors. Hence the need for accurate data normalization is vital. Among several known strategies for data normalization, the use of reference genes as an internal control is the most common approach. Recent studies have shown that both obesity and presence of insulin resistance influence an expression of commonly used reference genes in omental fat. In this study we validated candidate reference genes suitable for qRT-PCR profiling experiments using visceral adipose samples from obese and lean individuals. Cross-validation of expression stability of eight selected reference genes using three popular algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper found ACTB and RPII as most stable reference genes. We recommend ACTB and RPII as stable reference genes most suitable for gene expression studies of human visceral adipose tissue. The use of these genes as a reference pair may further enhance the robustness of qRT-PCR in this model system.

  7. Validation of endogenous reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis of human visceral adipose samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afendy Arian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the epidemic proportions of obesity worldwide and the concurrent prevalence of metabolic syndrome, there is an urgent need for better understanding the underlying mechanisms of metabolic syndrome, in particular, the gene expression differences which may participate in obesity, insulin resistance and the associated series of chronic liver conditions. Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR is the standard method for studying changes in relative gene expression in different tissues and experimental conditions. However, variations in amount of starting material, enzymatic efficiency and presence of inhibitors can lead to quantification errors. Hence the need for accurate data normalization is vital. Among several known strategies for data normalization, the use of reference genes as an internal control is the most common approach. Recent studies have shown that both obesity and presence of insulin resistance influence an expression of commonly used reference genes in omental fat. In this study we validated candidate reference genes suitable for qRT-PCR profiling experiments using visceral adipose samples from obese and lean individuals. Results Cross-validation of expression stability of eight selected reference genes using three popular algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper found ACTB and RPII as most stable reference genes. Conclusions We recommend ACTB and RPII as stable reference genes most suitable for gene expression studies of human visceral adipose tissue. The use of these genes as a reference pair may further enhance the robustness of qRT-PCR in this model system.

  8. Sensitivity of PCR assays for murine gammaretroviruses and mouse contamination in human blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Gammaretroviruses related to murine leukemia virus (MLV have variously been reported to be present or absent in blood from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME patients and healthy controls. Using subjects from New York State, we have investigated by PCR methods whether MLV-related sequences can be identified in nucleic acids isolated from whole blood or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or following PBMC culture. We have also passaged the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP following incubation with plasma from patients and controls and assayed nucleic acids for viral sequences. We have used 15 sets of primers that can effectively amplify conserved regions of murine endogenous and exogenous retrovirus sequences. We demonstrate that our PCR assays for MLV-related gag sequences and for mouse DNA contamination are extremely sensitive. While we have identified MLV-like gag sequences following PCR on human DNA preparations, we are unable to conclude that these sequences originated in the blood samples.

  9. Association of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis with intraepithelial alterations in cervix samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Wohlmeister

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different infectious agents and their association with human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical carcinogenesis have not been completely elucidated. This study describes the association between cytological changes in cervical epithelium and the detection of the most relevant aetiological agents of sexually transmitted diseases. Samples collected from 169 patients were evaluated by conventional cytology followed by molecular analysis to detect HPV DNA, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2,Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, andTreponema pallidum, besides genotyping for most common high-risk HPV. An association between cytological lesions and different behavioural habits such as smoking and sedentariness was observed. Intraepithelial lesions were also associated with HPV and C. trachomatis detection. An association was also found between both simple and multiple genotype infection and cytological changes. The investigation of HPV and C. trachomatisproved its importance and may be considered in the future for including in screening programs, since these factors are linked to the early diagnosis of patients with precursor lesions of cervical cancer.

  10. Human sexuality education in the middle grades classroom: A review of curricula in a sample of Florida school districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Melinda D.

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the extent to which human sexuality topics are covered in Florida middle school science classrooms and the process by which curricular decisions are made regarding human sexuality education on a county-wide basis. Primary data included interviews with county-level administrators who oversee curricular decisions related to the middle-grades science curriculum or health curriculum in twelve school districts within the state. These districts represented four geographic locations and districts of various sizes. Administrators from four of the twelve studies in the sample chose to provide information regarding their human sexuality education curriculum. In two cases, teacher leads were identified and were interviewed to understand the implementation of the curriculum within the classroom. Additional data were collected from the district curriculum guides for human sexuality education and the adopted middle-grades science textbook for each county. The interview and documentary data were analyzed by comparison to established criteria for a comprehensive human sexuality education curriculum. The analysis revealed that the scope of human sexuality education varied considerably within the sample and that much of the curricula in place failed to include topics and activities that have been identified as important in a successful human sexuality education program. These findings are limited because few counties chose to fully participate. Additional research is clearly needed to examine the effectiveness of existing human sexuality education curricula in Florida. In addition, research is needed to understand the characteristics, values, and beliefs of successful human sexuality education instructors across the state.

  11. Xenosurveillance reflects traditional sampling techniques for the identification of human pathogens: A comparative study in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Fauver

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel surveillance strategies are needed to detect the rapid and continuous emergence of infectious disease agents. Ideally, new sampling strategies should be simple to implement, technologically uncomplicated, and applicable to areas where emergence events are known to occur. To this end, xenosurveillance is a technique that makes use of blood collected by hematophagous arthropods to monitor and identify vertebrate pathogens. Mosquitoes are largely ubiquitous animals that often exist in sizable populations. As well, many domestic or peridomestic species of mosquitoes will preferentially take blood-meals from humans, making them a unique and largely untapped reservoir to collect human blood.We sought to take advantage of this phenomenon by systematically collecting blood-fed mosquitoes during a field trail in Northern Liberia to determine whether pathogen sequences from blood engorged mosquitoes accurately mirror those obtained directly from humans. Specifically, blood was collected from humans via finger-stick and by aspirating bloodfed mosquitoes from the inside of houses. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing of RNA and DNA derived from these specimens was performed to detect pathogen sequences. Samples obtained from xenosurveillance and from finger-stick blood collection produced a similar number and quality of reads aligning to two human viruses, GB virus C and hepatitis B virus.This study represents the first systematic comparison between xenosurveillance and more traditional sampling methodologies, while also demonstrating the viability of xenosurveillance as a tool to sample human blood for circulating pathogens.

  12. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) destabilizes p62 and inhibits autophagy in gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Angel; Lin, Chiao-Yun; Chao, An-Ning; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chen, Ming-Yu; Lee, Li-Yu; Chang, Ting-Chang; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Hsin-Shih

    2017-09-26

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) - also known as KDM1A - is the first identified histone demethylase. LSD1 is highly expressed in numerous human malignancies and has recently emerged as a target for anticancer drugs. Owing to the presence of several functional domains, we speculated that LSD1 could have additional functions other than histone demethylation. P62 - also termed sequestasome 1 (SQSTM1) - plays a key role in malignant transformation, apoptosis, and autophagy. Here, we show that a high LSD1 expression promotes tumorigenesis in gynecologic malignancies. Notably, LSD1 inhibition with either siRNA or pharmacological agents activates autophagy. Mechanistically, LSD1 decreases p62 protein stability in a demethylation-independent manner. Inhibition of LSD1 reduces both tumor growth and p62 protein degradation in vivo . The combination of LSD1 inhibition and p62 knockdown exerts additive anticancer effects. We conclude that LSD1 destabilizes p62 and inhibits autophagy in gynecologic cancers. LSD1 inhibition reduces malignant cell growth and activates autophagy. The combinations of LSD1 inhibition and autophagy blockade display additive inhibitory effect on cancer cell viability. A better understanding of the role played by p62 will shed more light on the anticancer effects of LSD1 inhibitors.

  13. Traveling through the cancer trajectory: social support perceived by women with gynecologic cancer in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C W; Molassiotis, A; Yam, B M; Chan, S J; Lam, C S

    2001-10-01

    A qualitative research design was selected to gather data on the experiences of social support for Chinese women with gynecologic cancer. Eighteen women were recruited and interviewed at an oncology unit of a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Content analysis of the interview data showed Chinese women with gynecologic cancer placed enormous emphasis on their human relationships. Family members were especially significant to them although not all identified their family relations as satisfactory or helpful. Their social network comprised 4 major sources, including family and friends, work and colleagues, health professionals, and religion and spiritual beliefs. Each network offered significant reciprocal relations, authoritative relations, or entrusting relations. The positive appraisal of the support function was linked to the Chinese value of food, work ethics, the Confucian and religious philosophy, whereas negative aspects of support, such as the stress of maintaining relationships and inadequate information, conjoined with the Chinese suppression of emotion and the busyness of health professionals. Future studies, including social relations as a determinant, should ensure a broad and multifunctional view of social support and acknowledge the cultural influences on the perspective of support.

  14. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery

  15. Imaging of gynecologic emergencies; Bildgebende Diagnostik gynaekologischer Notfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Matthias W. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Imaging and Imaging Science; John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Pediatrc Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology; Kubik, Rahel A. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Baden (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-09-15

    Acute abdominal pain related to the female genital organs is frequently encountered in the emergency department. Gynecological emergencies are diseases of the female reproductive system that are potentially life-threatening and peril the sexual function and fertility. In the diagnostic work-up of acute abdominal pain, a wide variety of differential diagnoses needs to be considered depending on the age of the patient and a concomitant pregnancy. There is significant clinical overlap with gastrointestinal emergencies. Therefore, imaging plays a key role in diagnosing the cause of the pain and the planning of the therapy. The aim of this review is to illustrate the significant role of imaging in frequently encountered gynecologic emergencies.

  16. Radiation associated hyperthyroidism in patients with gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, S.; Shimaoka, K.; Piver, M.S.; Osman, G.; Tsukada, Y.; Suh, O.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of abdominal and/or pelvic irradiation for gynecological malignancies on the later development of hyperthyroidism, 1,884 medical records of the patients diagnoses as carcinomas of cervix and corpus uteri, and of ovary were reviewed. Among 1,269 patients with radiation therapy, 5 patients developed hyperthyroidism after irradiation to the abdomen and/or pelvis. This is a statistically significant increase when compared with an epidemiological study. Radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 30 to 200 rads. Two other patients who were irradiated to the nose or supraclavicular region in addition to the abdomen also developed hyperthyroidism. However, none of 581 patients without radiation therapy became hyperthyroid. The results indicate that radiation therapy for treatment of gynecological malignancy gives a significant radiation exposure with an increase in the incidence of subsequent hyperthyroidism

  17. On use of ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Kwang Suk; Lee, Yong Woo

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonography is playing an very important in diagnosis of normal pregnancy and the other diseases in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology. It is mainly used B-mode and Real time linear scan for pregnancy such as fetal movement during its early stage, fetal position, placenta location and biparietal diameter during its middle stage, and amniotic fluid and placenta previa during its late stage, as well as tumor accompanying pregnancy. Ultrasonography has been extensively used in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology for obtaining detailed images of soft tissues without hazard to the fetus and pregnant woman. In view of the need for its professionalism of high degree of skill, this treatise will introduce clinical instances and images obtained in the sonography room of the Seoul National University Hospital

  18. Proportion of gynecologic cancer patients using complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supoken, Amornrat; Chaisrisawatsuk, Thitima; Chumworathayi, Bandit

    2009-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of cancer and for supportive care of cancer patients must be clearly separated. There is encouraging evidence for CAM in the latter area, such as acupuncture and progressive muscle relaxation for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, and aromatherapy for decreasing anxiety and increasing quality of life. However, there are limited data about CAM used by gynecologic cancer patients, especially in Thai women. Therefore, the authors aimed to investigate the proportion and types of CAM using in our gynecologic cancer patients. This cross-sectional survey was conducted between October to December, 2008. Totals of 50 admitted and 50 walk-in gynecologic cancer patients 1 month after diagnosis, aged more than 20 years and able to give informed consent, were selected for one-by-one interview by random walking survey. Among the 100 interviewed patients, aged 21-69 (mean=50.12), there were 46 cases of cervical cancers, 35 of ovarian cancers, 18 of endometrial cancers (two of these also had ovarian cancers), 2 of malignant gestational trophoblastic diseases, 1 of vulvar cancer, and 1 liver cancer (in a patient with ovarian cancer). Some 67% (95% CI, 57.8-76.2%) of them used CAM. As diet modifications, 11 used Chinese vegetarian, 8 common vegetarian, 5 Cheewajit, and 1 macrobiotics. Five of them used dietary supplements while colonic detoxification was emplyed in three. As herbal medicines, 27 used Thai herbs, 4 Chinese herbs, and 1 a herbal sauna. Twelve were receiving Thai massage. As exercises, 23 used aerobics and 5 stretching. Interestingly, 62 of them used Buddhist praying while only 3 employed native magic. The three most common forms of CAM used by our gynecologic cancer patients were Buddhist praying (62/67, 92.5%), followed by herbal medicines (27/67, 40.3%) and exercises (25/67, 37.3%).

  19. Equal Pay for Equal Work in Academic Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Kacey Y

    2018-02-01

    The most compelling data suggest women in academic obstetrics and gynecology earn approximately $36,000 less than male colleagues per year in regression models correcting for commonly cited explanatory variables. Although residual confounding may exist, academic departments in the United States should consider rigorous examination of their own internal metrics around salary to ensure gender-neutral compensation, commonly referred to as equal pay for equal work.

  20. CT and MR imaging of gynecological emergency disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Shinya; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Tahara, Takatoshi; Matsusue, Eiji; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2004-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings of gynecologic emergency diseases: pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, ovarian hemorrhage, ovarian torsion, rupture of ovarian tumor, eclampsia, and HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome. Diagnostic keys to these diseases are presented in this review. CT and MRI play a complementary role to sonography in accurately diagnosing these diseases. In situations that require an exact, immediate diagnosis, radiologists should be familiar with the key imaging findings. (author)

  1. How virtual reality may enhance training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letterie, Gerard S

    2002-09-01

    Contemporary training in obstetrics and gynecology is aimed at the acquisition of a complex set of skills oriented to both the technical and personal aspects of patient care. The ability to create clinical simulations through virtual reality (VR) may facilitate the accomplishment of these goals. The purpose of this paper is 2-fold: (1) to review the circumstances and equipment in industry, science, and education in which VR has been successfully applied, and (2) to explore the possible role of VR for training in obstetrics and gynecology and to suggest innovative and unique approaches to enhancing this training. Qualitative assessment of the literature describing successful applications of VR in industry, law enforcement, military, and medicine from 1995 to 2000. Articles were identified through a computer-based search using Medline, Current Contents, and cross referencing bibliographies of articles identified through the search. One hundred and fifty-four articles were reviewed. This review of contemporary literature suggests that VR has been successfully used to simulate person-to-person interactions for training in psychiatry and the social sciences in a variety of circumstances by using real-time simulations of personal interactions, and to launch 3-dimensional trainers for surgical simulation. These successful applications and simulations suggest that this technology may be helpful and should be evaluated as an educational modality in obstetrics and gynecology in two areas: (1) counseling in circumstances ranging from routine preoperative informed consent to intervention in more acute circumstances such as domestic violence or rape, and (2) training in basic and advanced surgical skills for both medical students and residents. Virtual reality is an untested, but potentially useful, modality for training in obstetrics and gynecology. On the basis of successful applications in other nonmedical and medical areas, VR may have a role in teaching essential elements

  2. Strategies for Introducing Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-09-01

    Concern that patients will react negatively to the idea of palliative care is cited as a barrier to timely referral. Strategies to successfully introduce specialty palliative care to patients have not been well described. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists introduce outpatient specialty palliative care. We conducted a national qualitative interview study at six geographically diverse academic cancer centers with well-established palliative care clinics between September 2015 and March 2016. Thirty-four gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focusing on attitudes, experiences, and practices related to outpatient palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop and refine a coding framework. This analysis focuses on practices for introducing palliative care. Mean participant age was 47 years (standard deviation, 10 years). Mean interview length was 25 minutes (standard deviation, 7 minutes). Gynecologic oncologists described the following three main strategies for introducing outpatient specialty palliative care: focus initial palliative care referral on symptom management to dissociate palliative care from end-of-life care and facilitate early relationship building with palliative care clinicians; use a strong physician-patient relationship and patient trust to increase acceptance of referral; and explain and normalize palliative care referral to address negative associations and decrease patient fear of abandonment. These strategies aim to decrease negative patient associations and encourage acceptance of early referral to palliative care specialists. Gynecologic oncologists have developed strategies for introducing palliative care services to alleviate patient concerns. These strategies provide groundwork for developing system-wide best practice approaches to the presentation of palliative care referral.

  3. Cost assessment of robotics in gynecologic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Papadopoulou, Eleni K; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2014-11-01

    The application of robotics is an innovation in the field of gynecologic surgery. Our objective was to evaluate the currently available literature on the cost assessment of robotic surgery of various operations in the field of gynecologic surgery. PubMed and Scopus databases were systematically searched in order to retrieve the included studies in our review. We retrieved 23 studies on a variety of gynecologic operations. The mean cost for robotic, open and laparoscopic surgery ranged from 1731 to 48,769, 894 to 20,277 and 411 to 41,836 Euros, respectively. Operative charges, in hysterectomy, for robotic, open and laparoscopic technique ranged from 936 to 33,920, 684 to 25,616 and 858 to 25,578 Euros, respectively. In sacrocolpopexy, these costs ranged from 2067 to 7275, 2904 to 69,792 and 1482 to 2000 Euros, respectively. Non-operative charges ranged from 467 to 39,121 Euros. The mean total costs for myomectomy ranged from 27,342 to 42,497 and 13,709 to 20,277 Euros, respectively, for the robotic and open methods, while the mean total cost of the laparoscopic technique was 26,181 Euros. Conversions to laparotomy were present in 79/36,185 (0.2%) cases of laparoscopic surgery and in 21/3345 (0.62%) cases of robotic technique. Duration of robotic, open and laparoscopic surgery ranged from 50 to 445, 83.7 to 701 and 74 to 330 min, respectively. Robotic surgery has the potential to become cost-effective in centers with many patients while industry competition could reduce the cost of the robotic instrumentation, making robotic technology more affordable and cost-effective. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Determinants of suicidal ideation in gynecological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G X; Yan, P P; Yan, C L; Fu, B; Zhu, S J; Zhou, L Q; Huang, X; Wang, Y; Lei, J

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancer survivors are at increased risk of psychological problems including suicide risk. Suicidal ideation, which was thought to be precursor to suicide attempts, has not been well studied. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, and determinants of suicidal ideation for women with gynecological cancer, and then to assess the effect of coping style and social support on suicidal ideation. Patients with cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancers seen at Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital from September 2012 to June 2013 were consecutively recruited and were asked to complete the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Suicidal Ideation of Self-rating Scale, Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire and Social Support Rating Scale. Path analysis was used to examine the relationship among coping style, social support, depression symptoms and suicidal ideation. A total of 579 (579/623, 93.0%) gynecological cancer patients were enrolled in this study and completed all investigations between September 2012 and June 2013. Among them, 105 (18.1%) patients reported suicidal ideation, with the highest rate in patients with ovarian cancer (30.16%). Suicidal ideation was associated with depression symptoms, care providers, chemotherapy history and acceptance-resignation. Path analysis showed that the acceptance-resignation affected suicidal ideation directly as well as mediated by social support and depression symptoms, while confrontation and avoidance affected suicidal ideation entirely through social support and depression symptoms. Suicidal ideation is high among patients with gynecological cancer, especially among ovarian cancer patients. Coping strategies such as confrontation and avoidance, and social support may be helpful for preventing suicidal ideation among them. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local ...

  6. The 80-hour work week for residents: views from obstetric and gynecology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoo, Jabin; Hashmi, Mahreen; Seybold, Dara J; Shapiro, Robert; Calhoun, Byron C; Bush, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated an 80-hour work week restriction for residency programs. We examined program directors' views on how this mandate affects the education of Obstetrics and Gynecology residents. A 25 question survey was administered via Survey Monkey to Obstetrics and Gynecology program directors in the United States over three months in 2011. Fifty program directors (response rate of 28%) completed it with more men (62%) than women (38%) respondents. Overall, only 28% (14/50) responded that the program had improved, with significantly fewer men (5/14; 16.1%) than women (47.4% 9/19; p performance objectives and in the CREOG scores, with the improvement ranging from 8% to 12%. In fact, while we observed the percentage of women directors reporting improvement in patient care and interpersonal and communication skills significantly higher compared with their male counterparts, the majority of women still reported either no improvement or a decline in these areas. Though our sample size was small, we found some significant difference between the views of male and female program directors. Both groups nonetheless responded with the majority with a decline or no change rather than a perceived improvement in any of the educational endeavors studied.

  7. Structured imaging technique in the gynecologic office for the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Margit; Hjorth, Ina Marie D

    2017-04-01

    The aim in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is to identify the bleeding cause, which can be classified by the PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system. In a gynecologic setting, the first step is most often to identify structural abnormalities (PALM causes). Common diagnostic options for the identification of the PALM include ultrasonography, endometrial sampling, and hysteroscopy. These options alone or in combination are sufficient for the diagnosis of most women with AUB. Contrast sonography with saline or gel infusion, three-dimensional ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging may be included. The aim of this article is to describe how a simple structured transvaginal ultrasound can be performed and implemented in the common gynecologic practice to simplify the diagnosis of AUB and determine when additional invasive investigations are required. Structured transvaginal ultrasound for the identification of the most common endometrial and myometrial abnormalities and the most common ultrasound features are described. Moreover, situations where magnetic resonance imaging may be included are described. This article proposes a diagnostic setup in premenopausal women for the classification of AUB according to the PALM-COEIN system. Moreover, a future diagnostic setup for fast-track identification of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women based on a structured evaluation of the endometrium is described. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Domestic sexual violence and sexual problems among gynecology outpatients: an example from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipekten Alaman, Mehtap; Yıldız, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence is a universal problem, and sexual violence in marriage, in particular, is a hidden form of it. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to determine to the prevalence of domestic sexual violence by husbands, the prevalence of sexual problems, and the relation of these among married women attending a gynecology outpatient clinic. This study was performed in a university hospital in Turkey and data were collected February-April 2009. The study sample consisted of 200 married women, 53% of whom reported having been exposed to at least one type of domestic sexual violence behaviors by their husbands. Among those behaviors, the rate of marital rape was 33%. The frequency of experiencing any sexual problem was 82%. Women expressed that they mostly had orgasmic problems, and their husbands had premature ejaculation problems. The majority of women who reported sexual violence reported experiencing sexual problems; the frequency of sexual problems was higher in the participants who did (94.3%) than in those who did not report (68.1%) sexual violence (p violence in marriage. The results also revealed that the prevalence of sexual violence and sexual problems among those married women who attended gynecology clinics was considerable, even though they did not report this to the health care provider as a problem.

  9. Metal retention in human transferrin: consequences of solvent composition in analytical sample preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Randunu, K Manoj; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of metal-binding proteins requires careful sample manipulation to ensure that the metal-protein complex remains in its native state and the metal retention is preserved during sample preparation or analysis. Chemical analysis for the metal content in proteins typically involves some type of liquid chromatography/electrophoresis separation step coupled with an atomic (i.e., inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy or -mass spectrometry) or molecular (i.e., electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) analysis step that requires altered-solvent introduction techniques. UV-VIS absorbance is employed here to monitor the iron content in human holo-transferrin (Tf) under various solvent conditions, changing polarity, pH, ionic strength, and the ionic and hydrophobic environment of the protein. Iron loading percentages (i.e. 100% loading equates to 2 Fe(3+):1 Tf) were quantitatively determined to evaluate the effect of solvent composition on the retention of Fe(3+) in Tf. Maximum retention of Fe(3+) was found in buffered (20 mM Tris) solutions (96 ± 1%). Exposure to organic solvents and deionized H(2)O caused release of ~23-36% of the Fe(3+) from the binding pocket(s) at physiological pH (7.4). Salt concentrations similar to separation conditions used for ion exchange had little to no effect on Fe(3+) retention in holo-Tf. Unsurprisingly, changes in ionic strength caused by additions of guanidine HCl (0-10 M) to holo-Tf resulted in unfolding of the protein and loss of Fe(3+) from Tf; however, denaturing and metal loss was found not to be an instantaneous process for additions of 1-5 M guanidinium to Tf. In contrast, complete denaturing and loss of Fe(3+) was instantaneous with ≥6 M additions of guanidinium, and denaturing and loss of iron from Tf occurred in parallel proportions. Changes to the hydrophobicity of Tf (via addition of 0-14 M urea) had less effect on denaturing and release of Fe(3+) from the Tf binding pocket compared to changes

  10. Clinical application of pelvic MR angiography for gynecologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Takeshi [Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the second most important method next to the ultrasound for the diagnosis of gynecological disorders. MR angiography provides a new noninvasive method for evaluating vascular occlusive disease of the lower extremities and the branches of abdominal aorta. To our knowledge, no determinant of efficacy of MR angiography and images of gynecological diseases have yet been made. Maximum intensity projection image was obtained from the data set by the three dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography (3D-CE MRA) with newly designed fat suppression method. MR angiogram reveals well visualization of lower abdominal aorta and its branches. Furthermore, uterine arteries were identified in 49.3% of the cases, branching from the internal iliac artery. Leiomyoma of the uterus showed an enhanced uterus in 53.7% of the eases. All cases of endometriosis demonstrated a homogeneous, high signal intensity being a specific finding. In conclusion, maximum intensity projection image of pelvis showed a good visualization of the lower abdominal aorta and its branches. Uterine artery and, in a few cases, ovarian artery can be demonstrated on MR angiography. All cases of endometriosis showed a significant, high signal intensity. This technique is noninvasive and be a supplementary method for diagnosis and follow up of vasculature of gynecological disorders. (author)

  11. Clinical application of pelvic MR angiography for gynecologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeshi

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the second most important method next to the ultrasound for the diagnosis of gynecological disorders. MR angiography provides a new noninvasive method for evaluating vascular occlusive disease of the lower extremities and the branches of abdominal aorta. To our knowledge, no determinant of efficacy of MR angiography and images of gynecological diseases have yet been made. Maximum intensity projection image was obtained from the data set by the three dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography (3D-CE MRA) with newly designed fat suppression method. MR angiogram reveals well visualization of lower abdominal aorta and its branches. Furthermore, uterine arteries were identified in 49.3% of the cases, branching from the internal iliac artery. Leiomyoma of the uterus showed an enhanced uterus in 53.7% of the eases. All cases of endometriosis demonstrated a homogeneous, high signal intensity being a specific finding. In conclusion, maximum intensity projection image of pelvis showed a good visualization of the lower abdominal aorta and its branches. Uterine artery and, in a few cases, ovarian artery can be demonstrated on MR angiography. All cases of endometriosis showed a significant, high signal intensity. This technique is noninvasive and be a supplementary method for diagnosis and follow up of vasculature of gynecological disorders. (author)

  12. Gynecologic and Obstetric Consequences of Obesity in Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia; Lara-Torre, Eduardo; Nieblas, Bianca; Gómez-Carmona, Merith

    2017-04-01

    In the past few decades, there has been an overwhelming increase in childhood and adolescent obesity worldwide. Besides the well recognized cardiometabolic complications and other physical conditions associated with obesity, during adolescence, it causes psychological and social distress in a period of life that is already sensitive for a girl. This in turn increases their risk of low self-esteem and depression. Furthermore, obesity diminishes health-related quality of life and years of life. Overweight and obese teenagers are more likely to have gynecologic and obstetric complications, during adolescence and also later in life. Consequences of obese and overweight childhood and adolescence include sexual maturation and reproductive dysfunction, alterations in menstruation, dysmenorrhea, risky sexual behavior, and inefficient use of contraception, polycystic ovary syndrome, bone density abnormalities, macromastia, and an increased risk of breast and endometrial cancer. Obese adolescents are at greater risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications, such as preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, primary cesarean delivery, and induction of labor, to mention a few. Evidence shows that infants born to obese teenagers are also more likely to have complications including preterm or post-term delivery, small-for-gestational age newborns, macrosomia, meconium aspiration, respiratory distress, and even stillbirth, among others. This comprehensive review focuses on the gynecological and obstetric consequences of obesity in adolescent girls. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gynecological Surgery and Low Back Pain in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, Jeffery; Pidcoe, Peter E.; Ketchum-McKinney, Jessica M.; Burnet, Evie N.; Huang, Emily; Wilson, James C.; Hoogstad, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine sacroiliac joint compliance characteristics and pelvic floor movements in older women relative to gynecological surgery history and back pain complaints. Design: Single-visit laboratory measurement. Setting: University clinical research center. Participants: Twenty-five women aged 65 years or older. Outcome Measures: Sacroiliac joint compliance measured by Doppler imaging of vibrations and ultrasound measures of pelvic floor motion during the active straight leg raise test. Results: Doppler imaging of vibrations demonstrated test reliability ranging from 0.701 to 0.898 for detecting vibration on the ilium and sacrum sides of the sacroiliac joint. The presence of low-back pain or prior gynecological surgery was not significantly associated with a difference in the compliance or laxity symmetry of the sacroiliac joints. No significant difference in pelvic floor movement was found during the active straight leg raise test between subject groups. All P values were ≥.4159. Conclusions: Prior gynecological surgery and low-back pain were not significantly associated with side-to-side differences in the compliance of the sacroiliac joints or in significant changes in pelvic floor movement during a loading maneuver in a group of older women. PMID:23569659

  14. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide.

  15. [Clinical competence evaluation in undergraduate gynecology and obstetrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios Mendoza, Heriberto; Trejo Mejía, Juan Andrés; Gaviño Ambriz, Salvador; Cortés Gutiérrez, Ma Teresa

    2002-11-01

    Assess the clinical competence in Gynecology and obstetrics to the Internship students of the Faculty of Medicine, UNAM. The study design was descriptive, transverse type. We assessed 64 students, which had finished their gynecology field rotation with the objective structured clinical examination. The criteria to consider a competent performance level, was arbitrarily set up in 60%, both for individual problems and for the exam's global result. In 15 stations, the result was a 56.2 global average. The best performances were achieved in the following stations: take the pap smear (74.7), Pregnancy diagnostic (67.9), history of Gynecology and obstetrics (67.1), self examination of breast explanation (62.2) preclampsia (61.7) and cervicovaginitis (60). All the rest got a mark lower than 60. The results are lower than the ones obtained in written exams, because these cannot assess clinical skills. It could be observed that a student's performance in a clinical problem does not certainly predict his performance in other, so it seems to be determined more by the specific knowledge and the student's experience related to the case, than by a general problem-solving skill. The results show the advantages of this instrument to assess clinical skills, that justify its application in the formative process. This work evidences that its necessary to improve the acquisition of basic clinical skills trough systematic instructionals strategies and greater opportunities of learning.

  16. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers.

  17. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers.

  18. Radioisotopic method for the measurement of lipolysis in small samples of human adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J.; Berry, E.M.; Gruen, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    To facilitate the study of adrenoreceptor response in small needle biopsy samples of human subcutaneous adipose tissue, we developed a dual radioisotopic technique for measuring lipolysis rate. Aliquots (20-75 mg) of adipose tissue fragments were incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [ 3 H]palmitate and [ 14 C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In neutral glycerides synthesized in this system, [ 14 C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety and 3 H appears solely in the esterified fatty acid. Alpha-2 and beta-1 adrenoreceptor activation of tissue incubated in this system does not alter rates of 14 C-labeled glyceride accumulation, but does produce a respective increase or decrease in the specific activity of fatty acids esterified into newly synthesized glycerides. This alteration in esterified fatty acid specific activity is reflected in the ratio of 14 C: 3 H in newly synthesized triglycerides extracted from the incubated adipose tissue. There is a high correlation (r . 0.90) between the 14 C: 3 H ratio in triglycerides and the rate of lipolysis as reflected in glycerol release into the incubation medium. The degree of adrenoreceptor activation by various concentrations of lipolytic and anti-lipolytic substances can be assessed by comparing this ratio in stimulated tissue to that characterizing unstimulated tissue or the incubation medium. This technique permits the study of very small, unweighed tissue biopsy fragments, the only limitation on sensitivity being the specific activity of the medium glucose and palmitate. It is, therefore, useful for serial examinations of adipose tissue adrenoreceptor dose-response characteristics under a variety of clinical circumstances

  19. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in human serum and urine samples from a residentially exposed community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Moore, Susan McAfee; Tierney, Bruce C; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M; Campbell, Sean; Woudneh, Million B; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are considered chemicals of emerging concern, in part due to their environmental and biological persistence and the potential for widespread human exposure. In 2007, a PFAS manufacturer near Decatur, Alabama notified the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) it had discharged PFAS into a wastewater treatment plant, resulting in environmental contamination and potential exposures to the local community. To characterize PFAS exposure over time, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) collected blood and urine samples from local residents. Eight PFAS were measured in serum in 2010 (n=153). Eleven PFAS were measured in serum, and five PFAS were measured in urine (n=45) from some of the same residents in 2016. Serum concentrations were compared to nationally representative data and change in serum concentration over time was evaluated. Biological half-lives were estimated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) using a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model. In 2010 and 2016, geometric mean PFOA and PFOS serum concentrations were elevated in participants compared to the general U.S. In 2016, the geometric mean PFHxS serum concentration was elevated compared to the general U.S. Geometric mean serum concentrations of PFOA, PFOS, and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were significantly (p≤0.0001) lower (49%, 53%, and 58%, respectively) in 2016 compared to 2010. Half-lives for PFOA, PFOS, and PFHxS were estimated to be 3.9, 3.3, and 15.5years, respectively. Concentrations of PFOA in serum and urine were highly correlated (r=0.75) in males. Serum concentrations of some PFAS are decreasing in this residentially exposed community, but remain elevated compared to the U.S. general population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Large contribution of human papillomavirus in vaginal neoplastic lesions: a worldwide study in 597 samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Tinoco, L; Quirós, B; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Alejo, M; Joura, E A; Maldonado, P; Klaustermeier, J; Salmerón, J; Bergeron, C; Petry, K U; Guimerà, N; Clavero, O; Murillo, R; Clavel, C; Wain, V; Geraets, D T; Jach, R; Cross, P; Carrilho, C; Molina, C; Shin, H R; Mandys, V; Nowakowski, A M; Vidal, A; Lombardi, L; Kitchener, H; Sica, A R; Magaña-León, C; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Bravo, I G; Muñoz, N; de Sanjosé, S; Bosch, F X

    2014-11-01

    This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16(INK4a) expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. XRF and TXRF techniques for multi-element determination of trace elements in whole blood and human hair samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuder, A.; Karjou, J.; Sawan, M.Kh.; Bakir, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    XRF and TXRF were established as useful techniques for multi-element analysis of whole blood and human head hair samples. Direct-XRF with different collimation units and different X-ray excitation modes was successfully used for the determination of S, P, K, Ca, Fe, and Br elements in blood samples and K, Ca, Mn, Fe elements in human hair samples. Direct analysis by TXRF was used for the determination of Rb and Sr in digested blood and human hair samples, respectively, while, the co-precipitation method using APDC for TXRF analysis was used for the determination of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb elements in both matrices. As a result, the improved XRF and TXRF methods were applied for multi-element determination of elements in whole blood and human hair samples in non-occupational exposed population living in Damascus city. The mean concentrations of analyzed elements in both matrices were on the reported range values for non-occupational population in other countries. (author)

  2. XRF and TXRF techniques for multi-element determination of trace elements in whole blood and human hair samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuder, A.; Karjou, J.; Sawan, M.Kh.; Bakir, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    XRF and TXRF were established as useful techniques for multi-element analysis of whole blood and human head hair samples. Direct-XRF with different collimation units and different X-ray excitation modes was successfully used for the determination of S, P, K, Ca, Fe, and Br elements in blood samples and K, Ca, Mn, Fe elements in human hair samples. Direct analysis by TXRF was used for the determination of Rb and Sr in digested blood and human hair samples, respectively, while, the co-precipitation method using APDC for TXRF analysis was used for the determination of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb elements in both matrices. As a result, the improved XRF and TXRF methods were applied for multi-element determination of elements in whole blood and human hair samples in non-occupational exposed population living in Damascus city. The mean concentrations of analyzed elements in both matrices were on the reported range values for non-occupational population in other countries. (author)

  3. Communications Relay and Human-Assisted Sample Return from the Deep Space Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichan, T.; Hopkins, J. B.; Bierhaus, B.; Murrow, D. W.

    2018-02-01

    The Deep Space Gateway can enable or enhance exploration of the lunar surface through two capabilities: 1. communications relay, opening up access to the lunar farside, and 2. sample return, enhancing the ability to return large sample masses.

  4. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge

    OpenAIRE

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Fr?d?ric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. Methods A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed f...

  5. Ectopic pregnancy: a life-threatening gynecological emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawani OL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Osaheni L Lawani, Okechukwu B Anozie, Paul O Ezeonu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria Background: Ectopic pregnancy is a life-threatening gynecological emergency, and a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. Objective: The aim of this work was to determine and evaluate the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, and management outcomes of ectopic pregnancies at Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH in Abakaliki. Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive study of ectopic pregnancies managed in EBSUTH during the study period (June 1, 2002 to May 31, 2012. The medical records of the patients managed for ectopic pregnancy as well as the total birth record and gynecological admission records during the period under review were retrieved, and data were collected with the aid of data-entry forms designed for this purpose. There were 4,610 gynecological admissions and 9,828 deliveries, with 215 cases of ectopic pregnancies. A total of 205 cases were suitable for analysis after excluding cases with incomplete records. The relevant data collected were analyzed with SPSS version 15.0 for Windows. Results: Ectopic pregnancy constituted 4.5% of all gynecological admissions, and its incidence was 2.1%. The mean age of the patients was 27 ± 2 years, 196 of 205 (95.6% had ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and the remaining nine (4.4% were unruptured. The commonest (166 of 205, 80.0% clinical presentation was abdominal pain, and the commonest (105 of 205, 51.2% identified risk factor was a previous history of induced abortion. Three deaths were recorded, giving a case-fatality rate of 1.4% (three of 205. Conclusion: Ectopic pregnancy is a recognized cause of maternal morbidity and mortality and has remained a reproductive health challenge to Nigerian women, as well as a threat to efforts in achieving the UN's Millennium Development Goal 5 in sub-Saharan Africa

  6. pH adjustment of human blood plasma prior to bioanalytical sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, G.; Uges, D. R. A.; Franke, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    pH adjustment in bioanalytical sample preparation concerning ionisable compounds is one of the most common sample treatments. This is often done by mixing an aliquot of the sample with a proper buffer adjusted to the proposed pH. The pH of the resulting mixture however, does not necessarily have to

  7. Current management of gynecologic cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Minis, Evelyn Eleni; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2018-04-27

    Cancer during pregnancy is a particularly challenging complication. The incidence has increased in recent years due to childbering at an advanced maternal age due to career choices and/or the development of reproductive technology. Approximately two thirds of cancer cases during pregnancy are comprised of invasive cervical cancers and breast cancer. Cancer during gestation is characterized by a need for specialized treatment due to major changes in the hormonal profile (estrogen-progesterone), metabolism (enhancement of anabolism), hemodynamic changes (hyperdynamic circulation), immunologic changes (cell mediated and humoral immunity), increased angiogenesis (increased blood flow towards the uterus). Moreover, the management of such patients is based on the trimester of pregnancy, type and stage of cancer and informed consent of the mother based on her wishes. The optimal treatment of cancer during pregnancy remains elusive, as there are limited data from retrospective studies with small samples. As a result, it is crucial that data regarding survival of the women and long-term follow up of the children from different cancer centres and registries be shared. This need is dictated by the fact that the incidence of cancer during pregnancy will continue to rise as child-bearing age continues to increase.

  8. Multi-disciplinary summit on genetics services for women with gynecologic cancers: A Society of Gynecologic Oncology White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Leslie M; Pothuri, Bhavana; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Diaz, John P; Buchanan, Adam; Witkop, Catherine T; Bethan Powell, C; Smith, Ellen Blair; Robson, Mark E; Boyd, Jeff; Coleman, Robert L; Lu, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To assess current practice, advise minimum standards, and identify educational gaps relevant to genetic screening, counseling, and testing of women affected by gynecologic cancers. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) organized a multidisciplinary summit that included representatives from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Society Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), and patient advocacy groups, BrightPink and Facing our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE). Three subject areas were discussed: care delivery models for genetic testing, barriers to genetic testing, and educational opportunities for providers of genetic testing. The group endorsed current SGO, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), and NSGC genetic testing guidelines for women affected with ovarian, tubal, peritoneal cancers, or DNA mismatch repair deficient endometrial cancer. Three main areas of unmet need were identified: timely and universal genetic testing for women with ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers; education regarding minimum standards for genetic counseling and testing; and barriers to implementation of testing of both affected individuals as well as cascade testing of family members. Consensus building among all stakeholders resulted in an action plan to address gaps in education of gynecologic oncology providers and delivery of cancer genetics care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Reliability and Validity of Objective Structured Clinical Examination for Residents of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE is used for the evaluation of the clinical competence in medicine for which it is essential to measure validity and reliability. This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: A descriptive-correlation study was designed and the data of OSCE for obstetrics and gynecology were collected via learning behavior checklists in method stations and multiple choice questions in question stations. The data were analyzed through Pearson correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha, using SPSS software (version 16. To determine the criterion validity, correlation of OSCE scores with scores of resident promotion test, direct observation of procedural skills, and theoretical knowledge was determined; for reliability, however, Cronbach's alpha was used. Total sample consisted of 25 participants taking part in 14 stations. P value of less than 0.05 was considered as significant.Results: The mean OSCE scores was 22.66 (±6.85. Criterion validity of the stations with resident promotion theoretical test, first theoretical knowledge test, second theoretical knowledge, and direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS was 0.97, 0.74, 0.49, and 0.79, respectively. In question stations, criterion validity was 0.15, and total validity of OSCE was 0.77.Conclusion: Findings of the present study indicated acceptable validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology.

  10. Exploring the effectiveness of obstetrics and gynecology information systems in hospitals of a developing country: A qualitative content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Babamohamadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrics and gynecology information systems are designed to replace paper charts, interact with other clinical wards of hospital, and to better care for patients. This qualitative study was performed to explore the perception of midwives about the effectiveness of information systems. In this qualitative study, data were collected through semistructured and in-depth interviews and analyzed by content analysis and constant comparison method. Participants were 15 midwives from obstetrics and gynecology units of affiliated hospitals of Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Purposeful sampling method was used and continued until data saturation. The several themes that emerged from the interviews were divided into strength and weak points. Strength points included the facilitating the recording of information, reduction of costs and time, and the weakness points were repetition of tasks, low computer literacy of the staff, system restrictions on recording and editing, the unavailability of system and reduced the role of midwives in patient care. Midwives were faced with challenges in the use of information systems indicating the lack of quality of the information system. It seems that reinforcing strength points and resolving hardware and software problems can increase obstetrics and gynecology staff’s acceptance of this information system and reduce their cultural resistance toward it.

  11. One Sample, One Shot - Evaluation of sample preparation protocols for the mass spectrometric proteome analysis of human bile fluid without extensive fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megger, Dominik A; Padden, Juliet; Rosowski, Kristin; Uszkoreit, Julian; Bracht, Thilo; Eisenacher, Martin; Gerges, Christian; Neuhaus, Horst; Schumacher, Brigitte; Schlaak, Jörg F; Sitek, Barbara

    2017-02-10

    The proteome analysis of bile fluid represents a promising strategy to identify biomarker candidates for various diseases of the hepatobiliary system. However, to obtain substantive results in biomarker discovery studies large patient cohorts necessarily need to be analyzed. Consequently, this would lead to an unmanageable number of samples to be analyzed if sample preparation protocols with extensive fractionation methods are applied. Hence, the performance of simple workflows allowing for "one sample, one shot" experiments have been evaluated in this study. In detail, sixteen different protocols implying modifications at the stages of desalting, delipidation, deglycosylation and tryptic digestion have been examined. Each method has been individually evaluated regarding various performance criteria and comparative analyses have been conducted to uncover possible complementarities. Here, the best performance in terms of proteome coverage has been assessed for a combination of acetone precipitation with in-gel digestion. Finally, a mapping of all obtained protein identifications with putative biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) revealed several proteins easily detectable in bile fluid. These results can build the basis for future studies with large and well-defined patient cohorts in a more disease-related context. Human bile fluid is a proximal body fluid and supposed to be a potential source of disease markers. However, due to its biochemical composition, the proteome analysis of bile fluid still represents a challenging task and is therefore mostly conducted using extensive fractionation procedures. This in turn leads to a high number of mass spectrometric measurements for one biological sample. Considering the fact that in order to overcome the biological variability a high number of biological samples needs to be analyzed in biomarker discovery studies, this leads to the dilemma of an unmanageable number of

  12. Metagenomic Characterization of the Human Intestinal Microbiota in Fecal Samples from STEC-Infected Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigliucci, Federica; von Meijenfeldt, F A Bastiaan; Knijn, Arnold; Michelacci, Valeria; Scavia, Gaia; Minelli, Fabio; Dutilh, Bas E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304546313; Ahmad, Hamideh M; Raangs, Gerwin C; Friedrich, Alex W; Rossen, John W A; Morabito, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a homeostatic ecosystem with a remarkable impact on human health and the disruption of this equilibrium leads to an increased susceptibility to infection by numerous pathogens. In this study, we used shotgun metagenomic sequencing and two different bioinformatic

  13. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing among Non-Attenders Increases Attendance to the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enerly, Espen; Bonde, Jesper; Schee, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attendance to screening offers the best potential for improving the effectiveness of well-established cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling at home for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as an alternative to a clinical sampling can be a useful policy to increase attendance....... To determine whether self-sampling improves screening attendance for women who do not regularly attend the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP), 800 women aged 25-69 years in the Oslo area who were due to receive a 2nd reminder to attend regular screening were randomly selected and invited...... alternative for increasing cervical cancer screening coverage in Norway....

  14. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  15. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism profiles in clinical samples by the Trofile and MT-2 assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the

  16. High-throughput genotyping assay for the large-scale genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium parasites from human and bovine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abal-Fabeiro, J L; Maside, X; Llovo, J; Bello, X; Torres, M; Treviño, M; Moldes, L; Muñoz, A; Carracedo, A; Bartolomé, C

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiological study of human cryptosporidiosis requires the characterization of species and subtypes involved in human disease in large sample collections. Molecular genotyping is costly and time-consuming, making the implementation of low-cost, highly efficient technologies increasingly necessary. Here, we designed a protocol based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the high-throughput genotyping of a panel of 55 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) selected as markers for the identification of common gp60 subtypes of four Cryptosporidium species that infect humans. The method was applied to a panel of 608 human and 63 bovine isolates and the results were compared with control samples typed by Sanger sequencing. The method allowed the identification of species in 610 specimens (90·9%) and gp60 subtype in 605 (90·2%). It displayed excellent performance, with sensitivity and specificity values of 87·3 and 98·0%, respectively. Up to nine genotypes from four different Cryptosporidium species (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis and C. felis) were detected in humans; the most common ones were C. hominis subtype Ib, and C. parvum IIa (61·3 and 28·3%, respectively). 96·5% of the bovine samples were typed as IIa. The method performs as well as the widely used Sanger sequencing and is more cost-effective and less time consuming.

  17. Self-sampling for human papillomavirus DNA detection: a preliminary study of compliance and feasibility in BOLIVIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surriabre, Pedro; Allende, Gustavo; Prado, Marcela; Cáceres, Leyddy; Bellot, Diego; Torrico, Andrea; Ustariz, Karina; Rojas, Shirley; Barriga, Jaime; Calle, Pamela; Villarroel, Ligia; Yañez, Rosse Mary; Baay, Marc; Rodriguez, Patricia; Fontaine, Véronique

    2017-12-22

    Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in Bolivia are among the highest in Latin America. This investigation aims to evaluate the possibility of using simple devices, e.g. a cotton swab and a glass slide, for self-sampling in order to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by PCR in cervico-vaginal cells. In the first phase of our study we evaluated the use of a glass slide as a transport medium for cervical cells. A physician took paired-cervical samples from 235 women. One sample was transported in Easyfix® solution and the other sample was smeared over a glass slide. Both were further analyzed and compared for human DNA recovery and HPV detection. A kappa value was determined to evaluate the agreement between the HPV DNA detection rates. In the second phase of the study, 222 women from the urban, peri-urban and rural regions of Cochabamba were requested to perform self-sampling using the following devices: a cotton swab combined with a glass slide, and a vaginal tampon. Women gave their opinion about the self-sampling technique. Finally, the agreement for high risk-HPV detection between self- and physician-collected samples was performed in 201 samples in order to evaluate the self-sampling technique. Firstly, the comparison between Easyfix® solution and the glass slide to transport clinical samples gave a good agreement for HPV DNA detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.60-0.81). Secondly, self-sampling, especially with cotton swab combined with glass slide, would generally be preferred over clinician sampling for a screening program based on HPV detection. Finally, we showed a good agreement between self- and physician collected samples for high risk-HPV detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.88). Simple devices such as a cotton swab and a glass slide can be used to perform self-sampling and HPV DNA detection. Furthermore, most Bolivian women preferred self-sampling over clinician-sampling for cervical cancer screening.

  18. Statistical analysis of fluoride levels in human urine and drinking water samples of fluorinated area of punjab (pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Zaman, W.U.; Rehman, R.; Ahmad, B.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, S.; Murtaza, S

    2013-01-01

    Increasing fluoride levels in drinking water of fluorinated areas of world leading to fluorosis. For bio-monitoring of fluorosis patients, fluoride levels were determined in drinking water and human urine samples of different individuals having dental fluorosis and bony deformities from fluorotic area of Punjab (Sham Ki Bhatiyan, Pakistan) and then compared with reference samples of non fluorotic area (Queens Road, Lahore, Pakistan) using ion selective electrode methodology. Fluoride levels in fluorinated area differ significantly from control group (p < 0.05). In drinking water and human urine samples, fluoride levels in fluorinated areas were: 136.192 +- 67.836 and 94.484 +- 36.572 micro molL/sup -1/ respectively, whereas in control samples, fluoride concentrations were: 19.306 +- 2.109 and 47.154 +- 22.685 micro molL/sup -1/ in water and urine samples correspondingly. Pearson's correlation data pointed out the fact that that human urine and water fluoride concentrations have a significant positive dose response relationship with the prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis in fluorotic areas having higher fluoride levels in drinking water. (author)

  19. Developmental validation of the Quantifiler(®) HP and Trio Kits for human DNA quantification in forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Allison; Wootton, Sharon Chao; Mulero, Julio J; Brzoska, Pius M; Langit, Emanuel; Green, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    The quantification of human genomic DNA is a necessary first step in the DNA casework sample analysis workflow. DNA quantification determines optimal sample input amounts for subsequent STR (short tandem repeat) genotyping procedures, as well as being a useful screening tool to identify samples most likely to provide probative genotypic evidence. To better mesh with the capabilities of newest-generation STR analysis assays, the Quantifiler(®) HP and Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA Quantification Kits were designed for greater detection sensitivity and more robust performance with samples that contain PCR inhibitors or degraded DNA. The new DNA quantification kits use multiplex TaqMan(®) assay-based fluorescent probe technology to simultaneously quantify up to three human genomic targets, allowing samples to be assessed for total human DNA, male contributor (i.e., Y-chromosome) DNA, as well as a determination of DNA degradation state. The Quantifiler HP and Trio Kits use multiple-copy loci to allow for significantly improved sensitivity compared to earlier-generation kits that employ single-copy target loci. The kits' improved performance provides better predictive ability for results with downstream, newest-generation STR assays, and their shortened time-to-result allows more efficient integration into the forensic casework analysis workflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in Viking-age settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen

    2015-02-01

    Ancient parasite eggs were recovered from environmental samples collected at a Viking-age settlement in Viborg, Denmark, dated 1018-1030 A.D. Morphological examination identified Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp., and Fasciola sp. eggs, but size and shape did not allow species identification. By carefully selecting genetic markers, PCR amplification and sequencing of ancient DNA (aDNA) isolates resulted in identification of: the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura , using SSUrRNA sequence homology; Ascaris sp. with 100% homology to cox1 haplotype 07; and Fasciola hepatica using ITS1 sequence homology. The identification of T. trichiura eggs indicates that human fecal material is present and, hence, that the Ascaris sp. haplotype 07 was most likely a human variant in Viking-age Denmark. The location of the F. hepatica finding suggests that sheep or cattle are the most likely hosts. Further, we sequenced the Ascaris sp. 18S rRNA gene in recent isolates from humans and pigs of global distribution and show that this is not a suited marker for species-specific identification. Finally, we discuss ancient parasitism in Denmark and the implementation of aDNA analysis methods in paleoparasitological studies. We argue that when employing species-specific identification, soil samples offer excellent opportunities for studies of human parasite infections and of human and animal interactions of the past.

  1. Daily self-sampling for high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Karin; Wikström, Ingrid; Gustavsson, Inger; Wilander, Erik; Lindberg, Julia Hedlund; Gyllensten, Ulf; Olovsson, Matts

    2015-12-01

    Self-sampling for HPV as part of primary screening is a well-tolerated method for women not attending organized Pap smear screening and could increase coverage of cervical cancer screening. To investigate if the prevalence of HR-HPV varies from day to day in infected women and if one single sample is reliable for detecting an ongoing infection. This is a prospective cohort study on 12 premenopausal and 13 postmenopausal women performing daily self-sampling for HR-HPV testing. They were all HR-HPV-positive 1-3 months ago. Postmenopausal women were sampled for 28 days and premenopausal women sampled during bleeding-free days in one menstrual cycle. A possible difference in viral load between the estrogen-dominated proliferative phase and the progesterone-dominated secretory phase was analyzed. Consistent results throughout the sampling period were observed for 19 women, with either a daily presence of HPV (14 women) or no HPV at all during the sampling period (5 women). Of 607 samples from 25 women, 596 were consistently positive or negative for HPV during the sampling period and 11 were inconsistent (2%). There was no difference in HPV copy number between the estrogen dominated proliferative or progesterone dominated secretory menstrual cycle phases. The major finding was a high degree of consistency concerning HR-HPV positivity and negativity of HR-HPV in vaginal fluid during a sustained period of daily self-sampling. It does not appear to matter whether the sample is collected in the proliferative or secretory phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intention to Seek Care for Symptoms Associated With Gynecologic Cancers, HealthStyles Survey, 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Trivers, Katrina F.; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Polonec, Lindsey; Gelb, Cynthia A.; Purvis Cooper, Crystale

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Women with ovarian cancer typically experience symptoms before diagnosis; such symptoms for other gynecologic cancers have not been systematically studied. We investigated which symptoms of gynecologic cancers prompt intention to seek care among women and whether demographic differences in intention exist. This study was undertaken, in part, to inform development of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's campaign, Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer...

  3. Study on the application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Gynecology tumors seriously threatened the health of female. With the development of imageology, PET, a functionality examination method, has been widely used in the early diagnosis and monitoring of curative effect in gynecology tumors. PET-CT has the good future in its development because it combined with the advantage of functional and structural imaging. The characters and application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors were reviewed in this paper. (author)

  4. Sexual Self-Schema and Sexual Morbidity Among Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Woods, Xichel A.; Copeland, Larry J.

    1997-01-01

    Longitudinal research indicates that approximately 50% of women treated for gynecologic cancer have sexual dysfunctions as they recover and become cancer survivors. This outcome occurs in the context of satisfactory quality of life in other domains. This study, comparing gynecologic cancer survivors (n = 61) and gynecologically healthy women (n = 74), documents the reliability of the latter observations with measures of quality of life (general, depressive symptoms, social contacts, and stres...

  5. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing among Non-Attenders Increases Attendance to the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen Enerly

    Full Text Available Increasing attendance to screening offers the best potential for improving the effectiveness of well-established cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling at home for human papillomavirus (HPV testing as an alternative to a clinical sampling can be a useful policy to increase attendance. To determine whether self-sampling improves screening attendance for women who do not regularly attend the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP, 800 women aged 25-69 years in the Oslo area who were due to receive a 2nd reminder to attend regular screening were randomly selected and invited to be part of the intervention group. Women in this group received one of two self-sampling devices, Evalyn Brush or Delphi Screener. To attend screening, women in the intervention group had the option of using the self-sampling device (self-sampling subgroup or visiting their physician for a cervical smear. Self-sampled specimens were split and analyzed for the presence of high-risk (hr HPV by the CLART® HPV2 test and the digene® Hybrid Capture (HC2 test. The control group consisted of 2593 women who received a 2nd reminder letter according to the current guidelines of the NCCSP. The attendance rates were 33.4% in the intervention group and 23.2% in the control group, with similar attendance rates for both self-sampling devices. Women in the self-sampling subgroup responded favorably to both self-sampling devices and cited not remembering receiving a call for screening as the most dominant reason for previous non-attendance. Thirty-two of 34 (94.1% hrHPV-positive women in the self-sampling subgroup attended follow-up. In conclusion, self-sampling increased attendance rates and was feasible and well received. This study lends further support to the proposal that self-sampling may be a valuable alternative for increasing cervical cancer screening coverage in Norway.

  6. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing among Non-Attenders Increases Attendance to the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enerly, Espen; Bonde, Jesper; Schee, Kristina; Pedersen, Helle; Lönnberg, Stefan; Nygård, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attendance to screening offers the best potential for improving the effectiveness of well-established cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling at home for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as an alternative to a clinical sampling can be a useful policy to increase attendance. To determine whether self-sampling improves screening attendance for women who do not regularly attend the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP), 800 women aged 25-69 years in the Oslo area who were due to receive a 2nd reminder to attend regular screening were randomly selected and invited to be part of the intervention group. Women in this group received one of two self-sampling devices, Evalyn Brush or Delphi Screener. To attend screening, women in the intervention group had the option of using the self-sampling device (self-sampling subgroup) or visiting their physician for a cervical smear. Self-sampled specimens were split and analyzed for the presence of high-risk (hr) HPV by the CLART® HPV2 test and the digene® Hybrid Capture (HC)2 test. The control group consisted of 2593 women who received a 2nd reminder letter according to the current guidelines of the NCCSP. The attendance rates were 33.4% in the intervention group and 23.2% in the control group, with similar attendance rates for both self-sampling devices. Women in the self-sampling subgroup responded favorably to both self-sampling devices and cited not remembering receiving a call for screening as the most dominant reason for previous non-attendance. Thirty-two of 34 (94.1%) hrHPV-positive women in the self-sampling subgroup attended follow-up. In conclusion, self-sampling increased attendance rates and was feasible and well received. This study lends further support to the proposal that self-sampling may be a valuable alternative for increasing cervical cancer screening coverage in Norway.

  7. Women’s experience with home-based self-sampling for human papillomavirus testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultana, Farhana; Mullins, Robyn; English, Dallas R.; Simpson, Julie A.; Drennan, Kelly T.; Heley, Stella; Wrede, C. David; Brotherton, Julia M. L.; Saville, Marion; Gertig, Dorota M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cervical screening coverage by reaching inadequately screened groups is essential for improving the effectiveness of cervical screening programs. Offering HPV self-sampling to women who are never or under-screened can improve screening participation, however participation varies widely between settings. Information on women’s experience with self-sampling and preferences for future self-sampling screening is essential for programs to optimize participation. The survey was conducted as part of a larger trial (“iPap”) investigating the effect of HPV self-sampling on participation of never and under-screened women in Victoria, Australia. Questionnaires were mailed to a) most women who participated in the self-sampling to document their experience with and preference for self-sampling in future, and b) a sample of the women who did not participate asking reasons for non-participation and suggestions for enabling participation. Reasons for not having a previous Pap test were also explored. About half the women who collected a self sample for the iPap trial returned the subsequent questionnaire (746/1521). Common reasons for not having cervical screening were that having Pap test performed by a doctor was embarrassing (18 %), not having the time (14 %), or that a Pap test was painful and uncomfortable (11 %). Most (94 %) found the home-based self-sampling less embarrassing, less uncomfortable (90 %) and more convenient (98 %) compared with their last Pap test experience (if they had one); however, many were unsure about the test accuracy (57 %). Women who self-sampled thought the instructions were clear (98 %), it was easy to use the swab (95 %), and were generally confident that they did the test correctly (81 %). Most preferred to take the self-sample at home in the future (88 %) because it was simple and did not require a doctor’s appointment. Few women (126/1946, 7 %) who did not return a self-sample in the iPap trial returned the questionnaire

  8. Quality assurance in the pre-analytical phase of human urine samples by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Kathrin; Gök, Ömer-Necmi; Pietzner, Maik; Meisinger, Christine; Leitzmann, Michael; Nauck, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches investigate changes in metabolite profiles, which may reflect changes in metabolic pathways and provide information correlated with a specific biological process or pathophysiology. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy is used to identify metabolites in biofluids and tissue samples qualitatively and quantitatively. This pre-analytical study evaluated the effects of storage time and temperature on (1)H NMR spectra from human urine in two settings. Firstly, to evaluate short time effects probably due to acute delay in sample handling and secondly, the effect of prolonged storage up to one month to find markers of sample miss-handling. A number of statistical procedures were used to assess the differences between samples stored under different conditions, including Projection to Latent Structure Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), non-parametric testing as well as mixed effect linear regression analysis. The results indicate that human urine samples can be stored at 10 °C for 24 h or at -80 °C for 1 month, as no relevant changes in (1)H NMR fingerprints were observed during these time periods and temperature conditions. However, some metabolites most likely of microbial origin showed alterations during prolonged storage but without facilitating classification. In conclusion, the presented protocol for urine sample handling and semi-automatic metabolite quantification is suitable for large-scale epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low vs Standard Pressures in Gynecologic Laparoscopy: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Esther B; Maheux-Lacroix, Sarah; Boutin, Amélie; Laberge, Philippe Y; Lemyre, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    The optimal intraperitoneal pressure during laparoscopy is not known. Recent literature found benefits of using lower pressures, but the safety of doing abdominal surgery with low peritoneal pressures needs to be assessed. This systematic review compares low with standard pneumoperitoneum during gynecologic laparoscopy. We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing intraperitoneal pressures during gynecologic laparoscopy. Two authors reviewed references and extracted data from included trials. Risk ratios, mean differences, and standard mean differences were calculated and pooled using RevMan5. Of 2251 studies identified, three were included in the systematic review, for a total of 238 patients. We found a statistically significant but modest diminution in postoperative pain of 0.38 standardized unit based on an original 10-point scale (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.67 to -0.08) during the immediate postoperative period when using low intraperitoneal pressure of 8 mm Hg compared with ≥ 12 mm Hg and of 0.50 (95% CI, -0.80 to -0.21) 24 hours after the surgery. Lower pressures were associated with worse visualization of the surgical field (risk ratio, 10.31; 95% CI, 1.29-82.38). We found no difference between groups over blood loss, duration of surgery, hospital length of stay, or the need for increased pressure. Low intraperitoneal pressures during gynecologic laparoscopy cannot be recommended on the behalf of this review because improvement in pain scores is minimal and visualization of the surgical field is affected. The safety of this intervention as well as cost-effectiveness considerations need to be further studied.

  10. Venous thromboembolism prevention in gynecologic cancer surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, M Heather; Pritts, Elizabeth A; Hartenbach, Ellen M

    2007-06-01

    Advanced age, pelvic surgery, and the presence of malignancy place gynecologic oncology patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study was designed to systematically analyze the world's literature on VTE in these patients and determine the optimal prophylaxis regimen. Computerized searches of Pubmed, Ovid, DARE, ACP Journal Club, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry 1966-2005 were performed, as well as EMBASE 1980-2005. Major conferences and target references were hand-searched. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating VTE prophylaxis with heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and sequential compression devices (SCD). The search yielded 278 articles; 11 met inclusion criteria. Data were abstracted by one author and analyzed with the Mantel-Haenszel method. The analysis of heparin-versus-control revealed a significant decrease in DVT in patients receiving heparin (RR=0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). There were no significant differences in EBL or transfusions between the two groups. In the 320 patients in the heparin vs. LMWH studies, there was no significant difference in DVT (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.38-2.17), although power analysis demonstrated insufficient numbers to show a difference. No patient in either group required re-exploration for bleeding. All gynecologic cancer patients should receive VTE prophylaxis. Although heparin, LMWH, and SCD have been shown to be safe and effective, due to the paucity of data in the gynecologic oncology literature, no one prevention modality can be considered superior at this time. Adequately powered RCTs are urgently needed to determine the optimal regimen in these high-risk patients.

  11. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; D R, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  12. Towards increase of diagnostic efficacy in gynecologic OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Panteleeva, Olga; Eliseeva, Darya; Kachalina, Olga; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Dubasova, Lyubov; Agrba, Pavel; Mikailova, Gyular; Prudnikov, Maxim; Shakhova, Natalia

    2013-06-01

    Gynecologic applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) are usually performed in combination with routine diagnostic procedures: laparoscopy and colposcopy. In combination with laparoscopy OCT is employed for inspection of fallopian tubes in cases of unrecognized infertility while in colposcopy it is used to identify cervix pathologies including cancer. In this paper we discuss methods for increasing diagnostic efficacy of OCT application in these procedures. For OCT-laparoscopy we demonstrate independent criteria for pathology recognition which allow to increase accuracy of diagnostics. For OCT-colposcopy we report on application of device for controlled compression allowing to sense the elasticity of the inspected cervix area and distinguish between neoplasia and inflammatory processes.

  13. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  14. German words: still used by Japanese obstetrics and gynecology doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Shigeki

    2018-03-01

    German used to be frequently employed in Japanese obstetric and gynecologic (OBGYN) practice; however, it is now less frequently used. Description and analysis of this situation may shed some light on the change of OBGYN practice and education in Japan, which may at least partly hold true to counties other than Japan. Three eras were classified according to the relationship between German and Japanese OBGYN, with each era characterized. Frequently used German words in Japanese OBGYN practice were described as examples. German words have become less frequently used with each successive generation. Even though English may suffice in practical OBGYN practice, German usage will still be passed on to these new generations.

  15. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  16. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  17. Radiation doses to personnel in clinics for gynecologic oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, B.; Spanne, P.

    1985-01-01

    Radium or Cesium is used for radiotherapy of gynecologic cancer at six clinics in Sweden. This report gives a survey of the radiation doses the personnel is exposed to. The measurement were performed using TL-dosimeters. The dose equivalents for different parts of the body at specific working moments was deduced as well as the effective dose equivalent and the collective dose equivalent. 1983 the total collective dose equivalent for the six clinics was 1.3 manSv, which corresponds to 3.9 manmSv/g equivalent mass of Radium used at the treatments. (With 11 tables and 10 figures) (L.E.)

  18. Designing a Standardized Laparoscopy Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, Eliane M; Lefebvre, Guylaine G; Husslein, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    surgery, and asked 39 experts in gynecologic education to rate the items on a Likert scale (1-5) for inclusion in the curriculum. Consensus was predefined as Cronbach α of ≥0.80. We then conducted another Delphi survey with 9 experienced users of laparoscopic virtual reality simulators to delineate...... of the curriculum Delphi, and after 2 rounds (Cronbach α=0.80) in the virtual reality curriculum Delphi. Consensus was reached for cognitive, technical, and nontechnical skills as well as for 6 virtual reality tasks. Median time and economy of movement scores defined benchmarks for all tasks. CONCLUSIONS...

  19. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin eApte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value-based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty which blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multi-disciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform which can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the

  20. Factors Affecting Journal Quality Indicator in Scopus (SCImago Journal Rank) in Obstetrics and Gynecology Journals: a Longitudinal Study (1999-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Jamshid; Salehi-Marzijarani, Mohammad; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi

    2014-12-01

    Awareness of the latest scientific research and publishing articles in top journals is one of the major concerns of health researchers. In this study, we first introduced top journals of obstetrics and gynecology field based on their Impact Factor (IF), Eigenfactor Score (ES) and SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) indicator indexed in Scopus databases and then the scientometric features of longitudinal changes of SJR in this field were presented. In our analytical and bibiliometric study, we included all the journals of obstetrics and gynecology field which were indexed by Scopus from 1999 to 2013. The scientometric features in Scopus were derived from SCImago Institute and IF and ES were obtained from Journal Citation Report through the Institute for Scientific Information. Generalized Estimating Equation was used to assess the scientometric features affecting SJR. From 256 journals reviewed, 54.2% and 41.8% were indexed in the Pubmed and the Web of Sciences, respectively. Human Reproduction Update based on the IF (5.924±2.542) and SJR (2.682±1.185), and American Journal of obstetrics and gynecology based on the ES (0.05685±0.00633) obtained the first rank among the other journals. Time, Index in Pubmed, H_index, Citable per Document, Cites per Document, and IF affected changes of SJR in the period of study. Our study showed a significant association between SJR and scientometric features in obstetrics and gynecology journals. According to this relationship, SJR may be an appropriate index for assessing journal quality.

  1. Proteoglycan and proteome profiling of central human pulmonary fibrotic tissue utilizing miniaturized sample preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Johan; Larsen, Kristoffer; Hansson, Lennart

    2002-01-01

    -dimensional electrophoresis was interfaced to miniaturized sample preparation techniques using microcapillary extraction. Four protein groups were identified; cytoskeletal, adhesion, scavenger and metabolic proteins. These patient's proteomes showed a high degree of heterogeneity between patients but larger homogeneity...

  2. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing: Increased Cervical Cancer Screening Participation and Incorporation in International Screening Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sarah; Palmer, Christina; Bik, Elisabeth M.; Cardenas, Juan P.; Nuñez, Harold; Kraal, Laurens; Bird, Sara W.; Bowers, Jennie; Smith, Alison; Walton, Nathaniel A.; Goddard, Audrey D.; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Zneimer, Susan; Richman, Jessica; Apte, Zachary S.

    2018-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, screening programs for cervical cancer have shifted from cytology (Pap smear or ThinPrep) alone on clinician-obtained samples to the addition of screening for human papillomavirus (HPV), its main causative agent. For HPV testing, self-sampling instead of clinician-sampling has proven to be equally accurate, in particular for assays that use nucleic acid amplification techniques. In addition, HPV testing of self-collected samples in combination with a follow-up Pap smear in case of a positive result is more effective in detecting precancerous lesions than a Pap smear alone. Self-sampling for HPV testing has already been adopted by some countries, while others have started trials to evaluate its incorporation into national cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling may result in more individuals willing to participate in cervical cancer screening, because it removes many of the barriers that prevent women, especially those in low socioeconomic and minority populations, from participating in regular screening programs. Several studies have shown that the majority of women who have been underscreened but who tested HPV-positive in a self-obtained sample will visit a clinic for follow-up diagnosis and management. In addition, a self-collected sample can also be used for vaginal microbiome analysis, which can provide additional information about HPV infection persistence as well as vaginal health in general. PMID:29686981

  3. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rist, Manuela; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Görling, Benjamin; Bub, Achim; Heissler, Stefan; Watzl, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine sample...

  4. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  5. A novel method of selective removal of human DNA improves PCR sensitivity for detection of Salmonella Typhi in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqing; Pollard, Andrew J

    2012-07-27

    Enteric fever is a major public health problem, causing an estimated 21million new cases and 216,000 or more deaths every year. Current diagnosis of the disease is inadequate. Blood culture only identifies 45 to 70% of the cases and is time-consuming. Serological tests have very low sensitivity and specificity. Clinical samples obtained for diagnosis of enteric fever in the field generally have blood, so that even PCR-based methods, widely used for detection of other infectious diseases, are not a straightforward option in typhoid diagnosis. We developed a novel method to enrich target bacterial DNA by selective removal of human DNA from blood samples, enhancing the sensitivity of PCR tests. This method offers the possibility of improving PCR assays directly using clinical specimens for diagnosis of this globally important infectious disease. Blood samples were mixed with ox bile for selective lysis of human blood cells and the released human DNA was then digested with addition of bile resistant micrococcal nuclease. The intact Salmonella Typhi bacteria were collected from the specimen by centrifugation and the DNA extracted with QIAamp DNA mini kit. The presence of Salmonella Typhi bacteria in blood samples was detected by PCR with the fliC-d gene of Salmonella Typhi as the target. Micrococcal nuclease retained activity against human blood DNA in the presence of up to 9% ox bile. Background human DNA was dramatically removed from blood samples through the use of ox bile lysis and micrococcal nuclease for removal of mammalian DNA. Consequently target Salmonella Typhi DNA was enriched in DNA preparations and the PCR sensitivity for detection of Salmonella Typhi in spiked blood samples was enhanced by 1,000 fold. Use of a combination of selective ox-bile blood cell lysis and removal of human DNA with micrococcal nuclease significantly improves PCR sensitivity and offers a better option for improved typhoid PCR assays directly using clinical specimens in diagnosis of

  6. High-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in human papillomavirus self-sampling of screening non-attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, J U H; Elfström, K M; Ejegod, D. M.

    2018-01-01

    precancer lesions. Here, we compare the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (⩾CIN2) detection rate between non-attenders who participated in self-sampling and women attending routine screening. METHODS: A total of 23 632 women who were qualified as non-attenders in the Copenhagen Region were......BACKGROUND: Self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) offered to women who do not participate in cervical cancer screening is an increasingly popular method to increase screening coverage. The rationale behind self-sampling is that unscreened women harbour a high proportion of undetected...... higher detection rates for ⩾CIN2 than routine cytology-based screening, and similar detection rates as HPV and cytology co-testing. This reinforces the importance of self-sampling for screening non-attenders in organised cervical cancer screening.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 14...

  7. Dioxin-like activity in environmental and human samples from Greenland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...

  8. Dioxin-like activity of environmental compounds in human blood and environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...

  9. Assessing Acceptability of Self-Sampling Kits, Prevalence, and Risk Factors for Human Papillomavirus Infection in American Indian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rachel L; Gonzales, Angela A; Noonan, Carolyn J; Cherne, Stephen L; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and calculated the prevalence of and risk factors for high-risk (hr) HPV infections in a community-based sample of American Indian women. To this end, we recruited 329 Hopi women aged 21-65 years to self-collect vaginal samples for hrHPV testing. Samples were tested by polymerase chain reaction for 14 hrHPV genotypes. We used Chi square tests to identify correlates of preference for clinician Pap testing versus HPV self-sampling, and age-adjusted Poisson regression to evaluate correlates of hrHPV prevalence. We found that satisfaction with HPV self-sampling was high, with 96 % of women reporting that the sample was easy to collect and 87 % reporting no discomfort. The majority (62 %) indicated that they preferred HPV self-sampling to receiving a Pap test from a clinician. Preference for Pap testing over HPV self-sampling was positively associated with adherence to Pap screening and employment outside the home. All samples evaluated were satisfactory for HPV testing, and 22 % were positive for hrHPV. HrHPV prevalence peaked in the late 20 s and declined with increasing age. HrHPV positivity was inversely associated with having children living the household. In conclusion, HPV self-sampling is feasible and acceptable to Hopi women, and could be effective in increasing rates of cervical cancer screening in Hopi communities. HrHPV prevalence was similar to estimates in the general United States population.

  10. Human blood RNA stabilization in samples collected and transported for a large biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is a nation-wide population-based pregnancy cohort initiated in 1999, comprising more than 108.000 pregnancies recruited between 1999 and 2008. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of integrating RNA analyses into existing MoBa protocols. We compared two different blood RNA collection tube systems – the PAXgene™ Blood RNA system and the Tempus™ Blood RNA system - and assessed the effects of suboptimal blood volumes in collection tubes and of transportation of blood samples by standard mail. Endpoints to characterize the samples were RNA quality and yield, and the RNA transcript stability of selected genes. Findings High-quality RNA could be extracted from blood samples stabilized with both PAXgene and Tempus tubes. The RNA yields obtained from the blood samples collected in Tempus tubes were consistently higher than from PAXgene tubes. Higher RNA yields were obtained from cord blood (3 – 4 times) compared to adult blood with both types of tubes. Transportation of samples by standard mail had moderate effects on RNA quality and RNA transcript stability; the overall RNA quality of the transported samples was high. Some unexplained changes in gene expression were noted, which seemed to correlate with suboptimal blood volumes collected in the tubes. Temperature variations during transportation may also be of some importance. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that special collection tubes are necessary for RNA stabilization and they should be used for establishing new biobanks. We also show that the 50,000 samples collected in the MoBa biobank provide RNA of high quality and in sufficient amounts to allow gene expression analyses for studying the association of disease with altered patterns of gene expression. PMID:22988904

  11. Determination of trace elements in human liver biopsy samples by ICP-MS and TXRF: hepatic steatosis and nickel accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Imre; Szoboszlai, Norbert [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, Budapest (Hungary); Szebeni, Agnes [MI Central Hospital, Ultrasound Laboratory, Budapest (Hungary); Kovacs, Bela [Debrecen University - Centre of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Food Science and Quality Assurance, P.O. Box 36, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2005-10-01

    Human liver biopsy samples, collected from 52 individuals, were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in a retrospective study (i.e. patient selection and liver biopsy were not for the purpose of element analysis). The freeze-dried samples (typically 0.5-2 mg dry weight) were digested in a laboratory microwave digestion system and solutions with a final volume of 1 mL were prepared. The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Pb were determined by use of a Thermo Elemental X7 ICP-MS spectrometer. TXRF measurements were performed with an Atomika Extra IIA spectrometer. Yttrium was employed as an internal standard, prepared by dissolution of 5N-purity yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in our laboratory. The accuracy was tested by analysis of NIST 1577a Bovine Liver certified reference material. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb determined in human liver biopsy samples were in good agreement with data published by other authors. The distribution of nickel in the samples was surprisingly uneven - nickel concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 12 {mu}g g{sup -1} (dry weight) in 38 samples and in several samples were extremely high, 36-693 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Analysis of replicate procedural blanks and control measurements were performed to prevent misinterpretation of the data. For patients with steatosis (n=14) Ni concentrations were consistently high except for two who had levels close to those measured for the normal group. As far as we are aware no previous literature data are available on the association of steatosis with high concentration of nickel in human liver biopsies taken from living patients. (orig.)

  12. Rapid detection of human parechoviruses in clinical samples by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benschop, Kimberley; Molenkamp, Richard; van der Ham, Alwin; Wolthers, Katja; Beld, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) have been associated with severe conditions such as neonatal sepsis and meningitis in young children. Rapid identification of an infectious agent in such serious conditions in these patients is essential for adequate decision making regarding treatment and

  13. A novel minimally-invasive method to sample human endothelial cells for molecular profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W Waldo

    Full Text Available The endothelium is a key mediator of vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular health. Molecular research on the human endothelium may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. Prior methodology used to isolate human endothelial cells has suffered from poor yields and contamination with other cell types. We thus sought to develop a minimally invasive technique to obtain endothelial cells derived from human subjects with higher yields and purity.Nine healthy volunteers underwent endothelial cell harvesting from antecubital veins using guidewires. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS was subsequently used to purify endothelial cells from contaminating cells using endothelial surface markers (CD34/CD105/CD146 with the concomitant absence of leukocyte and platelet specific markers (CD11b/CD45. Endothelial lineage in the purified cell population was confirmed by expression of endothelial specific genes and microRNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR.A median of 4,212 (IQR: 2161-6583 endothelial cells were isolated from each subject. Quantitative PCR demonstrated higher expression of von Willebrand Factor (vWF, P<0.001, nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3, P<0.001 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, P<0.003 in the endothelial population compared to similarly isolated leukocytes. Similarly, the level of endothelial specific microRNA-126 was higher in the purified endothelial cells (P<0.001.This state-of-the-art technique isolates human endothelial cells for molecular analysis in higher purity and greater numbers than previously possible. This approach will expedite research on the molecular mechanisms of human cardiovascular disease, elucidating its pathophysiology and potential therapeutic targets.

  14. Application of dried spot cards as a rapid sample treatment method for determining hydroxytyrosol metabolites in human urine samples. Comparison with microelution solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Aida; Rubió, Laura; Macià, Alba; Valls, Rosa-M; Catalán, Úrsula; de la Torre, Rafael; Motilva, Maria-José

    2013-11-01

    Two different rapid sample pretreatment strategies, dried spot cards, and microelution solid-phase extraction plates (μSPE), with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) have been developed and validated for the determination of hydroxytyrosol and its metabolites in spiked human urine samples. Hydroxytyrosol, hydroxytyrosol-3'-O-glucuronide, hydroxytyrosol-4'-O-glucuronide, hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate, and homovanillic alcohol-4'-O-glucuronide were used as the target compounds. Using the FTA DMPK-A dried urine spot card under optimum conditions, with 5 μL of preconcentrated urine volume and 100 μL of methanol/water (50/50, v/v) as the elution solvent, the extraction recovery (%R) of the compounds studied was higher than 80%, and the matrix effect (%ME) was less than 8%. The stability of these cards and punching at the centre or side of the card were also studied, obtaining an excellent stability after 7 days of storage and complete homogeneity across the surface of the dried drop. The different μSPE parameters that affect the efficiency were also studied, and under optimum conditions, the %R and the %ME were higher than 70% and lower than 17%, respectively. The linearity range in dried urine spot cards was 2.5-20 μM for all the metabolites, with the exception of hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate and hydroxytyrosol, which were 0.3-70 μM and 2.5-50 μM respectively. With regards to μSPE, the linearity range was 0.5-5 μM for all the studied compounds, except for hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate, which was 0.08-5 μM. The quantification limits (LOQs) were 0.3-2.5 μM and 0.08-0.5 μM in dried spot cards and in μSPE, respectively. The two developed methods were then applied and compared for determining hydroxytyrosol and its metabolites in human 24 h-urine samples after a sustained consumption (21 days) of a phenol-enriched virgin olive oil. The metabolites identified were hydroxytyrosol in its glucuronide and sulphate

  15. Development of sampling method and chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds emitted from human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska-Polanowska, Beata; Miarka, Przemysław; Skowron, Monika; Sułowicz, Joanna; Wojtyna, Katarzyna; Moskal, Karolina; Śliwka, Ireneusz

    2017-10-01

    The studies on volatile organic compounds emitted from skin are an interest for chemists, biologists and physicians due to their role in development of different scientific areas, including medical diagnostics, forensic medicine and the perfume design. This paper presents a proposal of two sampling methods applied to skin odor collection: the first one uses a bag of cellulose film, the second one, using cellulose sachets filled with active carbon. Volatile organic compounds were adsorbed on carbon sorbent, removed via thermal desorption and analyzed using gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer. The first sampling method allowed identification of more compounds (52) comparing to the second one (30). Quantitative analyses for acetone, butanal, pentanal and hexanal were done. The skin odor sampling method using a bag of cellulose film, allowed the identification of many more compounds when compared with the method using a sachet filled with active carbon.

  16. Effect of sampling and short isolation methodologies on the recovery of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from pig tonsils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Inge; Berkvens, Dirk; De Zutter, Lieven

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sampling (swab samples compared to destructive samples) on isolation rates of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from pig tonsils. Moreover, the relative efficiency of different rapid, routinely applicable isolation methods was evaluated. Therefore, swab and destructive samples from tonsils of 120 pigs at slaughter were analyzed in parallel using direct plating and different enrichment methods. Salmonella-Shigella-desoxycholate-calcium chloride (SSDC) agar, cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar, and Yersinia enterocolitica chromogenic medium (YeCM) were used as selective agar media. For enrichment, irgasan-ticarcillin-potassium chlorate (ITC) broth and peptone-sorbitol-bile (PSB) broth were incubated at 25°C for 48 h. Overall, 55 tonsils (45.8%) were positive for Y. enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Recovery was significantly higher using the destructive method compared to the swabbing method. Direct plating resulted in 47 and 28 Y. enterocolitica-positive destructive and swab samples, respectively. Alkali treatment of PSB and ITC enrichment broths significantly increased recovery of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from destructive tonsil samples. The performance of YeCM for qualitative and quantitative isolation of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from pig tonsils was equal to SSDC and CIN. In conclusion, direct plating and ISO 10273: 2003 with minor modifications are suitable and rapid methods for isolation of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from destructive tonsil samples.

  17. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  18. Human enterovirus D68 in clinical and sewage samples in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Merav; Mandelboim, Michal; Mendelson, Ella; Manor, Yossi; Shulman, Lester; Ram, Daniela; Barkai, Galia; Shemer, Yonat; Wolf, Dana; Kra-Oz, Zipi; Weiss, Leah; Pando, Rakefet; Hindiyeh, Musa; Sofer, Danit

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-August 2014, North America experienced a wide outbreak of Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) associated with severe respiratory illness in children. Several other countries also reported cases of EV-D68 in 2014. The aim of this study was to determine whether EV-D68 circulated in Israel in 2014, caused severe respiratory illness in children and was the causative agent of Acute Flaccid Paralysis. Archived clinical respiratory samples from a cohort of 710 hospitalized pediatric patient's (<10years old) with respiratory illness were screened for clade B specific EV-D68 by real-time PCR. The patients were seen at four medical centers covering the entire country between August and November 2014. We also evaluated 49 patient stool samples from 26 AFP cases during 2014 for presence of EV-D68. In addition, RNA from sewage samples collected throughout Israel during the same study period was also tested for EV-D68. Partial VP1 sequencing was performed on all positive samples. Of the 710 clinical samples evaluated, 7 (1%) were positive for EV-D68. Two patients were from the central part of Israel, while the rest was from the southern part. The majority of the patients did not have any underlying disease. Not only that, but, none of the 26 suspected AFP cases had EV-D68 nucleic acid in their stool samples. EV-D68 RNA was detected in 9 out of 93 sewage samples, mainly from Southern Israel. Sequence analysis of EV-D68 VP1 gene from both sewage and clinical samples indicated that the Israeli EV-D68 RNA belonged to Clade B which was genetically similar to 2014 circulating European and North American EV-D68 virus. EV-D68 circulated in Israel during the 2014 summer-fall season and caused hospitalization of a small percent of the patients with respiratory illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of γ-hydroxybutyrate in human urine samples by ion exclusion and ion exchange two-dimensional chromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Deng, Zhifen; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Yong; Wang, Guoqing; Sun, Yu-An; Zhu, Yan

    2017-12-15

    A two-dimensional ion chromatography system was developed for the determination of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in human urine samples. Ion exclusion chromatography was used in the first dimensional separation for elimination of urine matrices and detection of GHB above 10mgL -1 , ion exchange chromatography was used in the second dimensional separation via column-switching technique for detection of GHB above 0.08mgL -1 . Under the optimized chromatographic conditions, the ion exclusion and ion exchange chromatography separation system exhibited satisfactory repeatability (RSDchromatography system was convenient and practical for the determination of GHB in human urine samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prescription Writing Errors of Midwifery Students in Common Gynecological problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serveh Parang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Giving improper prescriptions is common among medical practitioners, mostly graduates, in most communities even developed countries. So far, to our knowledge, no study has been conducted on prescription writing of graduate midwifery students. Therefore, this study aimed to detect prescription writing errors of midwifery students in common gynecological problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 56 bachelor midwifery students, who had passed the theoretical and clinical courses of gynecology, were evaluated by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. A demographic questionnaire and a standard checklist for writing the prescriptions and medications were used for data collection. SPSS Version 16 was used to carry out descriptive statistics. Findings: Most of the students were single, with the mean age of 23.0±1.7 years. Most errors were related to not recording the patients’ age and sex, diagnosis, chief complaint, and the prescriber’s name (observed in less than 10% of the prescriptions. The complete dosage schedule and drug name were stated only in 1.8±4.8 and 14±18.6 of prescriptions, respectively. In more than 93% of the cases, route of use and treatment duration were not recorded. Conclusion: According to the results, the number of prescription errors of midwifery students was high. Therefore, it is recommended to run educational courses on prescription writing skills (e.g. writing prescriptions based on World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for the midwifery students.

  1. Uterine Clostridium perfringens infection related to gynecologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kevin M; McDonald, Megan E; Goodheart, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Uterine gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens is a serious, often life-threatening infection that is rarely encountered in the practice of gynecologic oncology. However, the hypoxic nature of gynecologic cancers due to necrosis and/or prior radiation therapy creates a microenvironment optimal for proliferation of anaerobic bacteria such as the Clostridium species. Early recognition and aggressive treatment with IV antibiotics and surgical debridement remain the cornerstones of management in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Here we present the case of a 52 year-old woman with a remote history of cervical cancer who was previously treated at our institution with primary chemotherapy and radiation and was then admitted decades later with Clostridium perfringens bacteremia and CT evidence of intrauterine abscess. The patient received a prolonged course of IV antibiotic therapy and subsequently underwent definitive surgical management with a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, small bowel resection with anastomosis for a utero-ileal fistula identified intraoperatively. Pathology from the uterine specimen demonstrated a primary poorly differentiated uterine adenocarcinoma. The patient recovered fully from her Clostridium perfringens infection and was discharged from the hospital shortly after surgical intervention.

  2. Insufficiency fractures following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Matsuki, Hirokazu; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Takashi; Shiba, Atsushi; Kishida, Yoshiomi; Iwamoto, Seiji; Nishitani, Hiromu [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, clinical and radiological findings of insufficiency fractures (IF) of the female pelvis following radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the radiation oncology records of 108 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent external beam radiation therapy of the whole pelvis. All patients underwent conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan every 6 months in follow-up after radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide bone scan were added when the patients complained of pelvic pain. Thirteen of 108 patients (12%) developed IF in the irradiated field with a median interval of 6 months (range 3-51) from the completion of external beam radiation therapy. All patients who developed IF were postmenopausal women. Age of the patients who developed IF was significantly higher than that of the other patients. The parts of IF were sacroiliac joints, pubis, sacral body and 5th lumbar vertebra and six of 14 patients had multiple lesions. Treatment with rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs lead to symptomatic relief in all patients, although symptoms lasted from 3 to 20 months. Radiation-induced pelvic IF following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies were frequently observed in the post-menopausal patients within 1 year after external beam radiation therapy. Symmetrical fractures of the bilateral sacroiliac joint and pubis were the characteristic pattern of pelvic IF. All patients healed with conservative treatment, and nobody became non-ambulant. (author)

  3. Gynecological applications of helical CT using SmartPrep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Akira; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    SmartPrep is software program for scanning a given region of interest (ROI) at optimal contrast density. An operator can arbitrarily define ROI and preset the CT value at which scanning should be started. After the injection of a contrast medium, system conducts continuous monitoring of the ROI and the operator starts helical scanning of the planned region when the present CT value has been reached. In comparison with conventional helical CT that requires a period of time from the beginning of contrast medium injection to the beginning of scanning, SmartPrep minimizes personal error and better depicts the artery-predominant phase under optimal conditions. In this study we examine the usefulness of contrast-enhanced helical CT using SmartPrep in the evaluation of gynecological disease. When the contrast medium was injected into the dorsal vein of the hand at a rate of 3 ml/sec, strong staining of pelvic arteries was observed in the CT images started at 17 to 23 sec after injection. The early-phase helical CT obtained under these conditions provided good depiction of lesions in cases of placenta accreta and invasive mole, as well as clear demonstration of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of laterality in cases of cervical cancer. Comparison of the early and delayed phase also facilitated easier evaluation of lymph nodes than conventional comparison of simple and contrast-enhanced CT. The results thus suggest the usefulness of contrast-enhanced helical CT using SmartPrep in gynecology. (author)

  4. Fall risk and function in older women after gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen L; Richter, Holly E; Graybill, Charles S; Neumayer, Leigh A

    2017-11-01

    To examine change in balance-related fall risk and daily functional abilities in the first 2 post-operative weeks and up to 6 weeks after gynecologic surgery. Prospective cohort study in gynecologic surgery patients age 65 and older. Balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale) and functional status (basic and instrumental activities of daily living) were recorded pre- and post-operatively daily for 1 week and twice the second week. Physical performance balance and functional mobility were measured pre- and 1 week post-operatively using the Tinetti Fall Risk Scale, Timed Up and Go, and 6-Minute Walk test. Measures were repeated 6 weeks after surgery. Non-parametric tests for paired data were used comparing scores baseline to post-operative (POD) 7 and to POD 42. Median age was 72 years (range 65-88). Fall risk was elevated during the first 2 post-operative weeks, greatest on the median discharge day, POD 2 (pBalance performance and functional mobility at 1 week were significantly lower than baseline (pfall risk is highest on POD 2 and remains elevated from baseline for 2 weeks. Functional limitations in the early home recovery period include the anticipated (bathing, cooking, etc.) and some unanticipated (medication management) ones. This information may help with post-operative discharge planning. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Obstetric and gynecological diseases and complications resulting from vaginal dysbacteriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the composition and ecology of vaginal microbial environment of a healthy woman is necessary for the understanding of normal flora and how to reduce the risk for diseases. Vagina and its microflora form a balanced ecosystem in which dominated bacteria are vaginal lactobacilli. There are dynamic changes in this ecosystem having structure and composition depending on many factors. The term dysbacteriosis defines any movement outside the normal range for the given biotope of obligate and/or facultative microflora. Such a change in the quantity and quality of the respective microbial balance is fraught with danger and requires correction and recovery. The purpose of this overview is to examine obstetric and gynecological diseases that can cause vaginal impaired microbial balance. Vaginal dysbacteriosis is a cause, predecessor, and often also consequence of vaginal infections. In essence, any vaginal infection can be seen as dysbacteriosis, developed to the most severe extent. Here, there is a dominant microorganism other than lactic acid bacteria in the vagina (clinically manifested or not, respectively), depletion of defense mechanisms of the vagina associated with the shift of lactobacilli from their dominant role in the vaginal balance, decrease in their number and species diversity, and a resulting change in the healthy status of the vagina. Vaginal dysbacteriosis can be found in pathogenetic mechanism, whereby many obstetric and gynecological diseases develop. Most of these diseases lead directly to increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, so it is important to understand the reasons for them and the arrangements for their prevention.

  6. Patient Perceptions of Open, Laparoscopic, and Robotic Gynecological Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Irani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate patient knowledge and attitudes toward surgical approaches in gynecology. Design. An anonymous Institutional Review Board (IRB approved questionnaire survey. Patients/Setting. A total of 219 women seeking obstetrical and gynecological care in two offices affiliated with an academic medical center. Results. Thirty-four percent of the participants did not understand the difference between open and laparoscopic surgeries. 56% of the participants knew that laparoscopy is a better surgical approach for patients than open abdominal surgeries, while 37% thought that laparoscopy requires the surgeon to have a higher technical skill. 46% of the participants do not understand the difference between laparoscopic and robotic procedures. 67.5% of the participants did not know that the surgeon moves the robot’s arms to perform the surgery. Higher educational level and/or history of previous abdominal surgeries were associated with the highest rates of answering all the questions correctly (p<0.05, after controlling for age and race. Conclusions. A substantial percentage of patients do not understand the difference between various surgical approaches. Health care providers should not assume that their patients have an adequate understanding of their surgical options and accordingly should educate them about those options so they can make truly informed decisions.

  7. [Gynecologic and endocrinologic sequelae of bulimia--hormonal changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Mária; Szendei, György; Haász, Péter

    2002-10-06

    Gynecological problems are one of the most frequent somatic complications of eating disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of improper eating habits causing menstrual disturbances, anovulation and related hormonal changes. Latent bulimia nervosa is in the focus of attention since amenorrhea is considered as a diagnostic criterion of anorexia nervosa. Subjects of the BITE (Bulimia Investigation Test, Edinburgh) test were infertile patients (n = 34) of the gynecological outpatient departments after medical examination, blood-test (LH, FSH, androstenedione, DHEAS, progesterone, testosterone, SHBG, prolactin) and ultrasonic examination (uterus and ovaries). Symptoms and severity subscales of the BITE test and body mass index (BMI) were close correlation (p = 0.003, p = 0.033). In comparison with previous results, EDNOS (Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified) prevalence was 48%. Of hormonal changes, low LH and FSH levels (6/6) and hyperandrogenism (5/6) were significant in patients with subclinical eating disorders (n = 6) by infertile women as compared with the "normal" infertile group (n = 18; 7/18, 8/18). The recent results suggests that unsatisfactory nutrition (bulimic binges, "crash diet") is as relevant in hormonal dysfunction, menstrual disturbances and infertility as pathologically low weight in anorexia nervosa. Excessive application of contraceptives in therapy has to be taken into consideration.

  8. Maternity leave: existing policies in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J L; Baillie, S; Hodgson, C S; Vontver, L; Platt, L D

    2001-12-01

    To survey program directors in obstetrics and gynecology regarding maternity leave and to determine how programs are dealing with maternity leave coverage. Questionnaires regarding impact and policy on maternity leave were mailed to accredited obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A total of 188 of 274 (69%) questionnaires were returned completed. Respectively, 80% and 69% of respondents indicated that they have a formal maternity (maximum mean 8.7 weeks) and paternity (mean 5.27 days) leave policy. Approximately 75% of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 8 weeks during the first 3 years. Eighty-five percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 6 weeks during the fourth year. Ninety-three percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 20 weeks over the 4 years. Seventy-seven percent of respondents have other residents in their program cover for the absent resident. Thirty-seven percent of programs have schedules flexible enough to allow rearrangement so that some rotations go uncovered. Eighty-three percent of programs surveyed stated that maternity leave has a somewhat to very significant impact on the residents' schedules. Most residency programs have written maternity/paternity leave policies. A more flexible curriculum may help to accommodate the residents on leave without overburdening the residents who are left to cover.

  9. Identification of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 Metabolites in Authentic Human Urine Samples Using Human Liver Microsomes and Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Vikingsson, Svante; Josefsson, Martin; Green, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of structurally related synthetic cannabinoids makes the identification of unique markers of drug intake particularly challenging. The aim of this study was to identify unique and abundant metabolites of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 for toxicological screening in urine. Investigations of authentic urine samples from forensic cases in combination with human liver microsome (HLM) experiments were used for identification of metabolites. HLM incubations of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 along with 3...

  10. Restricted access carbon nanotubes for direct extraction of cadmium from human serum samples followed by atomic absorption spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Adriano F; Barbosa, Valéria M P; Bettini, Jefferson; Luccas, Pedro O; Figueiredo, Eduardo C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new sorbent that is able to extract metal ions directly from untreated biological fluids, simultaneously excluding all proteins from these samples. The sorbent was obtained through the modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an external bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer, resulting in restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs). The BSA layer was fixed through the interconnection between the amine groups of the BSA using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. When a protein sample is percolated through a cartridge containing RACNTs and the sample pH is higher than the isoelectric point of the proteins, both proteins from the sample and the BSA layer are negatively ionized. Thus, an electrostatic repulsion prevents the interaction between the proteins from the sample on the RACNTs surface. At the same time, metal ions are adsorbed in the CNTs (core) after their passage through the chains of proteins. The Cd(2+) ion was selected for a proof-of-principle case to test the suitability of the RACNTs due to its toxicological relevance. RACNTs were able to extract Cd(2+) and exclude almost 100% of the proteins from the human serum samples in an online solid-phase extraction system coupled with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.24 and 0.80 μg L(-1), respectively. The sampling frequency was 8.6h(-1), and the intra- and inter-day precisions at the 0.80, 15.0, and 30.0 μg L(-1) Cd(2+) levels were all lower than 10.1% (RSD). The recoveries obtained for human blood serum samples fortified with Cd(2+) ranged from 85.0% to 112.0%. The method was successfully applied to analyze Cd(2+) directly from six human blood serum samples without any pretreatment, and the observed concentrations ranged from

  11. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Luy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, centrifuged and divided into aliquots. Urine aliquots were frozen either at −20 °C, on dry ice, at −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen and then stored at −20 °C, −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for 1–5 weeks before NMR analysis. Results show spectral changes depending on the freezing procedure, with samples frozen on dry ice showing the largest deviations. The effect was found to be based on pH differences, which were caused by variations in CO2 concentrations introduced by the freezing procedure. Thus, we recommend that urine samples should be frozen at −20 °C and transferred to lower storage temperatures within one week and that freezing procedures should be part of the publication protocol.

  12. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Manuela J; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Görling, Benjamin; Bub, Achim; Heissler, Stefan; Watzl, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-04-09

    It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, centrifuged and divided into aliquots. Urine aliquots were frozen either at -20 °C, on dry ice, at -80 °C or in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -20 °C, -80 °C or in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for 1-5 weeks before NMR analysis. Results show spectral changes depending on the freezing procedure, with samples frozen on dry ice showing the largest deviations. The effect was found to be based on pH differences, which were caused by variations in CO2 concentrations introduced by the freezing procedure. Thus, we recommend that urine samples should be frozen at -20 °C and transferred to lower storage temperatures within one week and that freezing procedures should be part of the publication protocol.

  13. Determination of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH Isozymes in Human Cancer Samples - Comparison of Kinetic and Immunochemical Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Borecka

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluorimetric assay of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes, based on naphthaldehyde oxidation, is compared with Western Blotting analysis on several clinical samples obtained from surgery. The comparison reveals qualitatively good correlation of ALDH1A1 isozyme detection with two methods and somewhat worse on ALDH3A1 assay.

  14. What do women with gynecologic cancer know about HPV and their individual disease? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pils, Sophie; Joura, Elmar A; Winter, Max-Paul; Shrestha, Anup; Jaeger-Lansky, Agnes; Ott, Johannes

    2014-05-30

    The vaccinations against human papilloma virus (HPV) are highly effective in preventing persistent infection. The level of knowledge about HPV and the consequences of an infection with this virus are low in the general population and in patients who suffer from HPV-associated diseases. We aimed to compare the level of knowledge about HPV and about the women's individual malignant disease between women with and without HPV-associated gynecologic cancer as well as the knowledge about individual malignant diseases. In a pilot study, 51 women with HPV-related cancer (cervical cancer: n=30; vulvar or vaginal cancer: n=21) and 60 women with non-HPV associated gynecologic malignancies (ovarian cancer: n=30; endometrial cancer, n=30) were included. They answered a questionnaire including questions about personal medical history, risk factors for cancer development, and HPV. The general level of knowledge of the term "HPV" was low (29.7%, 33/111) and it was similar in patients with HPV-related and non-HPV-associated cancer (18/60, 30.0% vs. 15/51, 29.4%, respectively; p=1.000). When asked about their disease, 80% (24/30) of women with ovarian cancer correctly named their diagnosis, followed by women with cervical cancer (73.3%, 22/30), endometrial cancer (70%, 21/30) and vaginal or vulvar cancer (42.9%, 9/21; p=0.008). The level of knowledge about HPV and the malignant diseases the patient suffered from was low. This applied even to patients with HPV associated malignancies.

  15. Homo floresiensis contextualized: a geometric morphometric comparative analysis of fossil and pathological human samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Baab

    Full Text Available The origin of hominins found on the remote Indonesian island of Flores remains highly contentious. These specimens may represent a new hominin species, Homo floresiensis, descended from a local population of Homo erectus or from an earlier (pre-H. erectus migration of a small-bodied and small-brained hominin out of Africa. Alternatively, some workers suggest that some or all of the specimens recovered from Liang Bua are pathological members of a small-bodied modern human population. Pathological conditions proposed to explain their documented anatomical features include microcephaly, myxoedematous endemic hypothyroidism ("cretinism" and Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity. This study evaluates evolutionary and pathological hypotheses through comparative analysis of cranial morphology. Geometric morphometric analyses of landmark data show that the sole Flores cranium (LB1 is clearly distinct from healthy modern humans and from those exhibiting hypothyroidism and Laron syndrome. Modern human microcephalic specimens converge, to some extent, on crania of extinct species of Homo. However in the features that distinguish these two groups, LB1 consistently groups with fossil hominins and is most similar to H. erectus. Our study provides further support for recognizing the Flores hominins as a distinct species, H. floresiensis, whose affinities lie with archaic Homo.

  16. Homo floresiensis Contextualized: A Geometric Morphometric Comparative Analysis of Fossil and Pathological Human Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baab, Karen L.; McNulty, Kieran P.; Harvati, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    The origin of hominins found on the remote Indonesian island of Flores remains highly contentious. These specimens may represent a new hominin species, Homo floresiensis, descended from a local population of Homo erectus or from an earlier (pre-H. erectus) migration of a small-bodied and small-brained hominin out of Africa. Alternatively, some workers suggest that some or all of the specimens recovered from Liang Bua are pathological members of a small-bodied modern human population. Pathological conditions proposed to explain their documented anatomical features include microcephaly, myxoedematous endemic hypothyroidism (“cretinism”) and Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity). This study evaluates evolutionary and pathological hypotheses through comparative analysis of cranial morphology. Geometric morphometric analyses of landmark data show that the sole Flores cranium (LB1) is clearly distinct from healthy modern humans and from those exhibiting hypothyroidism and Laron syndrome. Modern human microcephalic specimens converge, to some extent, on crania of extinct species of Homo. However in the features that distinguish these two groups, LB1 consistently groups with fossil hominins and is most similar to H. erectus. Our study provides further support for recognizing the Flores hominins as a distinct species, H. floresiensis, whose affinities lie with archaic Homo. PMID:23874886

  17. Quantification of Human and Animal Viruses to Differentiate the Origin of the Fecal Contamination Present in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different viruses are excreted by humans and animals and are frequently detected in fecal contaminated waters causing public health concerns. Classical bacterial indicator such as E. coli and enterococci could fail to predict the risk for waterborne pathogens such as viruses. Moreover, the presence and levels of bacterial indicators do not always correlate with the presence and concentration of viruses, especially when these indicators are present in low concentrations. Our research group has proposed new viral indicators and methodologies for determining the presence of fecal pollution in environmental samples as well as for tracing the origin of this fecal contamination (microbial source tracking. In this paper, we examine to what extent have these indicators been applied by the scientific community. Recently, quantitative assays for quantification of poultry and ovine viruses have also been described. Overall, quantification by qPCR of human adenoviruses and human polyomavirus JC, porcine adenoviruses, bovine polyomaviruses, chicken/turkey parvoviruses, and ovine polyomaviruses is suggested as a toolbox for the identification of human, porcine, bovine, poultry, and ovine fecal pollution in environmental samples.

  18. Gene expression data from acetaminophen-induced toxicity in human hepatic in vitro systems and clinical liver samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robim M. Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data set is composed of transcriptomics analyses of (i liver samples from patients suffering from acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF and (ii hepatic cell systems exposed to acetaminophen and their respective controls. The in vitro systems include widely employed cell lines i.e. HepaRG and HepG2 cells as well as a novel stem cell-derived model i.e. human skin-precursors-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hSKP-HPC. Data from primary human hepatocytes was also added to the data set “Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database” (Igarashi et al., 2015 [1]. Changes in gene expression due to acetaminophen intoxication as well as comparative information between human in vivo and in vitro samples are provided. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GEO: GSE74000. The provided data is used to evaluate the predictive capacity of each hepatic in vitro system and can be directly compared with large-scale publically available toxicogenomics databases. Further interpretation and discussion of these data feature in the corresponding research article “Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems” (Rodrigues et al., 2016 [2].

  19. Possible additional exposure to dioxin and dioxin-like compounds from waste incineration. Biomonitoring using human milk and animal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, C.; M. Fatima Reis; J. Pereira Miguel [Inst. of Preventive Medicine, Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal); Murk, A. [Wageningen Univ., Dept. of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    In the ambit of an Environmental Health Survey Program relative to a MSW facility, which has been operating near to Lisbon since 1999 a biomonitoring study using human breast milk has been performed. Specific aims of this study were: (1) determine whether living in the vicinity of the incinerator increases dioxin maternal body burden and accordingly perinatal (intra-uterus and lactacional) exposure; (2) to investigate the possibility of increased human exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds via locally produced food items from animal origin. Therefore, levels of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds have been determined in human milk samples collected in the vicinity of the incinerator and in a control area, for comparison. From the same areas, cow and sheep milk and eggs from free-range chickens have also been collected to get an indication of possible local additional exposure to air-borne dioxins via the food chain. Analyses of TCDD-equivalents (TEQs) were mainly performed with a reporter gene assay for dioxin-like activity, the DR-CALUX bioassay (Dioxin Responsive Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression).To determine congeners profile, some human milk samples have also been analysed for PCDD/Fs and relevant dioxin-like PCBs, by using high-resolution gas chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Both the Ethics Committees of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, and of the Maternity Dr. Alfredo da Costa have approved the study protocol.

  20. The work place educational: climate in gynecological oncology fellowships across Europe: the impact of accreditation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, J.M.J.; Bossart, M.; Boor, K.; Halaska, M.J.; Haidopoulos, D.; Zapardiel, I.; Grabowski, J.P.; Kesic, V.; Cibula, D.; Colombo, N.; Verheijen, RHM; Manchanda, R.

    Background: A good educational climate/environment in the workplace is essential for developing high-quality medical (sub)specialists. These data are lacking for gynecological oncology training. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the educational climate in gynecological oncology training

  1. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Eibhlín F

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations.

  2. Robotic surgery in complicated gynecologic diseases: Experience of Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Jen Tan

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The present analyses include various complicated gynecologic conditions, which make the estimation of the effectiveness of robotic surgery in each situation individually not appropriate. However, our experiences do show that robotic surgery is feasible and safe for patients with complicated gynecologic diseases.

  3. Gynecologic oncology training systems in europe: a report from the European network of young gynaecological oncologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gultekin, Murat; Dursun, Polat; Vranes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to highlight some of the differences in training systems and opportunities for training in gynecologic oncology across Europe and to draw attention to steps that can be taken to improve training prospects and experiences of European trainees in gynecologic oncology....

  4. The methodological quality of economic evaluation studies in obstetrics and gynecology: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijgen, Sylvia M. C.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the methodological quality of economic evaluation studies in the field of obstetrics and gynecology published in the last decade. A MEDLINE search was performed to find economic evaluation studies in obstetrics and gynecology from the years 1997 through 2009. We included full economic

  5. Vessel Sampling and Blood Flow Velocity Distribution With Vessel Diameter for Characterizing the Human Bulbar Conjunctival Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Wentao; Cintrón-Colón, Hector R; Perez, Victor L; DeBuc, Delia C; Feuer, William J; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    This study determined (1) how many vessels (i.e., the vessel sampling) are needed to reliably characterize the bulbar conjunctival microvasculature and (2) if characteristic information can be obtained from the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter. Functional slitlamp biomicroscope was used to image hundreds of venules per subject. The bulbar conjunctiva in five healthy human subjects was imaged on six different locations in the temporal bulbar conjunctiva. The histograms of the diameter and velocity were plotted to examine whether the distribution was normal. Standard errors were calculated from the standard deviation and vessel sample size. The ratio of the standard error of the mean over the population mean was used to determine the sample size cutoff. The velocity was plotted as a function of the vessel diameter to display the distribution of the diameter and velocity. The results showed that the sampling size was approximately 15 vessels, which generated a standard error equivalent to 15% of the population mean from the total vessel population. The distributions of the diameter and velocity were not only unimodal, but also somewhat positively skewed and not normal. The blood flow velocity was related to the vessel diameter (r=0.23, Psampling size of the vessels and the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter, which may lead to a better understanding of the human microvascular system of the bulbar conjunctiva.

  6. Simultaneous Determination of 30 Trace Elements in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissue Samples with Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K; Brune, D; Wester, P O

    1963-10-15

    The following trace elements were quantitatively determined by gamma-ray spectrometry in T samples of non-cancerous and 5 samples of cancerous human tissue: P, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, La, Au, and Hg. In some of the samples the following elements were qualitatively determined: Ti+Sc, Ga, Sr, In, Ba, Ce, Hf, Os, Pt, and U. Most of the trace elements were found to be present in much higher concentrations in the non-cancerous than in the corresponding cancerous liver samples. In a typical run one sample each of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue was irradiated together with standards of the elements to be determined in a thermal flux of 2.10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/sec. for 24 hours. The radioactive trace elements were separated into 16, and in some cases 18, groups by means of a chemical group separation method. Subsequently, the gamma spectrometric measurements were performed. Two persons can manage the chemical separations and measure the different activities from a run in 1,5 days. A new method of comparing unknown samples with standards was developed.

  7. Pediatric and Gynecologic Rates of Documentation of Last Menstrual Period in Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Kristl; Mirea, Lucia; Williamson, Amy

    2018-03-08

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have identified the menstrual cycle as essential in assessing overall health of adolescent girls. Menses should be considered a "vital sign" and documentation of last menstrual period (LMP) is recommended at every patient encounter. The aim of this study was to estimate and compare LMP documentation among adolescent and pediatric health care providers. A retrospective cohort study identified a random sample of 50 female patients seen in the general pediatrics (PEDS), adolescent medicine (AM), and pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) ambulatory clinics at Phoenix Children's Hospital between January 1, 2016 and March 31, 2016. Rates of LMP documentation were compared between clinics using the Pearson χ 2 test. Multivariable logistic regression analyses quantified the association of clinic and LMP documentation, with adjustments for visit reason, provider gender, and age at presentation. Rates of LMP documentation were 100% for adolescent gynecologists, but significantly lower for general pediatricians (14%) and AM (60%) providers (P < .0001). These findings were confirmed in multivariable analyses (PAG vs PEDS: odds ratio [OR], 280; 95% confidence interval [CI], 32-2331; PAG vs AM: OR, 34; 95% CI, 4.4-270; AM vs PEDS: OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.3-11.0). Adolescent gynecologists document LMP routinely. In contrast, LMP documentation rates in AM, and especially in PEDS, were significantly lower. Quality improvement methods such as incorporation of an LMP section into the vitals portion of an electronic medical record could help improve rates of compliance. Copyright © 2018 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An analysis of lead (Pb) from human hair samples (20-40 years of age) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelsano, Flordeliza K; Timing, Laurie D

    2003-02-17

    This analysis of lead from human hair samples in five different groups namely scavengers from Payatas Quezon City, tricycle drivers, car shop workers, paint factory workers, and students from Polytechnic University of the Philippines. The people from Nagcarlan, Laguna represented as a ''base-line value'' or as a control group. The method applied was acid digestion using HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4} then the samples were subjected to atomic absorption spectrophotometer. In terms of lead found from hair, the scavengers from Payatas Q.C. obtained high exposure of lead among the samples that were tested. The result of the analysis of concentration of lead was expressed in mg/L. (Authors)

  9. An analysis of lead (Pb) from human hair samples (20-40 years of age) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelsano, Flordeliza K.; Timing, Laurie D.

    2003-01-01

    This analysis of lead from human hair samples in five different groups namely scavengers from Payatas Quezon City, tricycle drivers, car shop workers, paint factory workers, and students from Polytechnic University of the Philippines. The people from Nagcarlan, Laguna represented as a ''base-line value'' or as a control group. The method applied was acid digestion using HNO 3 and HClO 4 then the samples were subjected to atomic absorption spectrophotometer. In terms of lead found from hair, the scavengers from Payatas Q.C. obtained high exposure of lead among the samples that were tested. The result of the analysis of concentration of lead was expressed in mg/L. (Authors)

  10. Combined micro-PIXE and NIR Raman spectroscopic plaque characterisation in a human atherosclerotic aorta sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brands, P.J.M.; Poll, S.W.E. van de; Quaedackers, J.A.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Puppels, G.J.; Laarse, A. van der; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    2001-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be applied to characterise the chemical composition of an atherosclerotic plaque in vivo. In the near future this technique may become available for use in (coronary) arteries of living patients. For this moment, Raman spectroscopy is applied on artery samples in vitro, to study progression and regression of atherosclerotic plaque. Raman spectroscopy provides chemical information on a molecular basis. In this study, micro-particle induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) is applied to provide additional information on the elemental composition of the artery. Furthermore, the combined techniques allow for validation of the structures studied with Raman spectroscopy. This study proves that it is possible to combine and compare both techniques using the same region on the same sample if proper sample preparation is applied. Comparison shows that regions appearing in the Raman spectroscopy results can also be distinguished in micro-PIXE and backscattering spectroscopy (BS) distributions and vice versa. Combining both techniques makes it possible to separate phospholipids from triglycerides. Combined Raman spectroscopy and micro-PIXE/BS is recommended for studying progression and regression of atherosclerosis

  11. Bioanalytical methods for the determination of cocaine and metabolites in human biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M; Gallardo, E; Queiroz, J A

    2009-08-01

    Determination of cocaine and its metabolites in biological specimens is of great importance, not only in clinical and forensic toxicology, but also in workplace drug testing. These compounds are normally screened for using sensitive immunological methods. However, screening methods are unspecific and, therefore, the posterior confirmation of presumably positive samples by a specific technique is mandatory. Although GC-MS-based techniques are still the most commonly used for confirmation purposes of cocaine and its metabolites in biological specimens, the advent of LC-MS and LC-MS/MS has enabled the detection of even lower amounts of these drugs, which assumes particular importance when sample volume available is small, as frequently occurs with oral fluid. This paper will review recently-published papers that describe procedures for detection of cocaine and metabolites, not only in the most commonly used specimens, such as blood and urine, but also in other 'alternative' matrices (e.g., oral fluid and hair) with a special focus on sample preparation and chromatographic analysis.

  12. Resident Education Curriculum in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: The Short Curriculum 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Hina J; Karjane, Nicole; Teelin, Karen; Abraham, Margaret; Holt, Stephanie; Chelvakumar, Gayaythri; Dumont, Tania; Huguelet, Patricia S; Conner, Lindsay; Wheeler, Carol; Fleming, Nathalie

    2018-04-01

    The degree of exposure to pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) varies across residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible for training residents and providing opportunities within their programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by creating and systematically updating the Short Curriculum. This curriculum outlines specific learning objectives that are central to PAG education and lists essential resources for learners' reference. This updated curriculum replaces the previous 2014 publication with added content, resources, and updated references. Additionally, attention to the needs of learners in pediatrics and adolescent medicine is given greater emphasis in this revised North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Short Curriculum 2.0. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Angolan human hair samples by the k0-NAA technique on the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, P.C.D; Ho Manh Dung; Cao Dong Vu; Nguyen Thi Sy; Nguyen Mong Sinh

    2006-01-01

    There is personal difference in concentrations of trace elements in the human hair according to human life or history such as occupation, sex, age, food, habit, social condition and so on. It is also found that the individual's deviation of elemental concentrations reflecting the degree of environmental pollutants exposure to the human body, intakes of food and metabolism. The k 0 -standardization method of neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) on research reactor has been recommended by WHO and IAEA as a main analytical technique with the advantages of sensitivity, precision, accuracy, multi-element and routine. This report presents the results of determination of about 20 elements in 23 human hair samples, which have been collected from different places in Angola by using k 0 -NAA technique on Dalat nuclear research reactor. Accuracy of the method was ascertained by analysis of two human hair certified reference materials (CRMs), i.e. NIES-5 and GBW-09101 and assessed by the deviation of experiment to certified values generally within 10% and U-score values mostly lower 2. (author)

  14. HPLC/Fluorometric Detection of Carvedilol in Real Human Plasma Samples Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Arslan, Sakir

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed to quantify carvedilol in human plasma using an isocratic system with fluorescence detection. The method included a single-step liquid-liquid extraction with diethylether and ethylacetate mixture (3 : 1, v/v). HPLC separation was carried out by reversed-phase chromatography with a mobile phase composed of 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7)-acetonitrile (65 : 35, v/v), pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Fluorescence detection was performed at 240 nm (excitation) and 330 nm (emission). The calibration curve for carvedilol was linear from 10 to 250 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision values for carvedilol in human plasma were plasma averaged out to 91.8%. The limits of detection and quantification of carvedilol were 3.0 and 10 ng/mL, respectively. Also, the method was successfully applied to three patients with hypertension who had been given an oral tablet of 25 mg carvedilol. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Microbial Degradation of Forensic Samples of Biological Origin: Potential Threat to Human DNA Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Hirak Ranjan; Das, Surajit

    2018-02-01

    Forensic biology is a sub-discipline of biological science with an amalgam of other branches of science used in the criminal justice system. Any nucleated cell/tissue harbouring DNA, either live or dead, can be used as forensic exhibits, a source of investigation through DNA typing. These biological materials of human origin are rich source of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, trace elements as well as water and, thus, provide a virtuous milieu for the growth of microbes. The obstinate microbial growth augments the degradation process and is amplified with the passage of time and improper storage of the biological materials. Degradation of these biological materials carriages a huge challenge in the downstream processes of forensic DNA typing technique, such as short tandem repeats (STR) DNA typing. Microbial degradation yields improper or no PCR amplification, heterozygous peak imbalance, DNA contamination from non-human sources, degradation of DNA by microbial by-products, etc. Consequently, the most precise STR DNA typing technique is nullified and definite opinion can be hardly given with degraded forensic exhibits. Thus, suitable precautionary measures should be taken for proper storage and processing of the biological exhibits to minimize their decaying process by micro-organisms.

  16. Sample preparation and UHPLC-FD analysis of pteridines in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšíková, H; Solich, P; Nováková, L

    2014-07-01

    Elevated levels of pteridines can indicate the activation of cellular immune system by certain diseases. No work dealing with the simultaneous determination of urinary neopterin, biopterin and their reduced forms has been published. Therefore, a new SPE-UHPLC-FD method for the analysis of these compounds has been developed. The main emphasis was put on the stability of dihydroforms during the sample processing and storage. As a stabilizing agent, dithiothreitol, at various concentrations, and various pH values (3.8-9.8) of working solutions were tested. Chromatographic separation was performed under HILIC isocratic conditions on BEH Amide column. The method was linear for the calibration standard solutions in the range of 10-10,000 ng/ml (dihydroforms) and 0.5-1000 ng/ml (oxidized forms), and for real samples in the range of 25-1000 ng/ml (dihydroforms) and 1-100 ng/ml (oxidized forms). The development of a new SPE sample preparation method was carried out on different types of sorbents (based on a mixed-mode cation exchange, porous graphitic carbon and a polymer comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic components). Final validation was performed on a MCAX SPE column. Method accuracy ranged from 76.9 to 121.9%. The intra- and inter-day precision did not exceed 10.7%. The method provided high sensitivity for the use in routine clinical measurements of urine (LLOQ 1 ng/ml for oxidized forms and 25 ng/ml for dihydroforms). Average concentrations of biopterin, neopterin, and dihydrobiopterin found in urine of healthy persons were related to the mol of creatinine (66.8, 142.3, and 257.3 μmol/mol of creatinine, respectively) which corresponded to the literature data. The concentration of dihydroneopterin obtained using our method was 98.8 μmol/mol of creatinine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of Wuchereria bancrofti from human blood samples in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Shafi, Iman R; Shoieb, Eman Y; Attia, Samar S; Rubio, José M; Ta-Tang, Thuy-Huong; El-Badry, Ayman A

    2017-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a serious vector-borne health problem, and Wuchereria bancrofti (W.b) is the major cause of LF worldwide and is focally endemic in Egypt. Identification of filarial infection using traditional morphologic and immunological criteria can be difficult and lead to misdiagnosis. The aim of the present study was molecular detection of W.b in residents in endemic areas in Egypt, sequence variance analysis, and phylogenetic analysis of W.b DNA. Collected blood samples from residents in filariasis endemic areas in five governorates were subjected to semi-nested PCR targeting repeated DNA sequence, for detection of W.b DNA. PCR products were sequenced; subsequently, a phylogenetic analysis of the obtained sequences was performed. Out of 300 blood samples, W.b DNA was identified in 48 (16%). Sequencing analysis confirmed PCR results identifying only W.b species. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated genetically distinct clusters of W.b among the study population. Study results demonstrated that the semi-nested PCR proved to be an effective diagnostic tool for accurate and rapid detection of W.b infections in nano-epidemics and is applicable for samples collected in the daytime as well as the night time. PCR products sequencing and phylogenitic analysis revealed three different nucleotide sequences variants. Further genetic studies of W.b in Egypt and other endemic areas are needed to distinguish related strains and the various ecological as well as drug effects exerted on them to support W.b elimination.

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy for locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, M.G.; Petersen, I.A.; Webb, M.J.; Wilson, T.O.; Podratz, K.C.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate disease control and survival in patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies who received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons (IOERT) as a component of treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1983 and June 1995, 63 patients (pts) with locally advanced primary (9 pts) or recurrent (54 pts) gynecological malignancies received IOERT as a component of attempted curative therapy. The site of origin was uterine cervix in 40 pts, uterine corpus in 16 pts, vagina in 5 pts, and ovary in 2 pts. Thirty-eight patients with recurrent disease had been previously irradiated (median prior RT dose 5040 cGy, range 900-8400). External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was given to 43 of 63 pts either before or after IOERT (900-6570 cGy, median 4960 cGy). Chemotherapy was given to 21 pts prior to IOERT and following IOERT in 2 pts. IOERT doses ranged from 800 cGy to 2500 cGy with a median of 1750 cGy. The median IOERT dose was 2000 cGy in 20 patients with gross residual disease and 1500 cGy in 43 patients with microscopic residual disease. Endpoints included central control within the IOERT cone, local control, distant failure, disease free survival and overall survival. Variables evaluated for impact on disease outcome included tumor grade, primary site, prior RT, IOERT dose, EBRT dose, residual disease at time of IOERT, and use of chemotherapy. Results: Survival and disease control data are presented in the table below. There was no impact of any disease or treatment related variable on local or central failure. Pts with microscopic residual disease at the time of IOERT had significantly fewer distant metastases than pts with gross residual (5 yr 31% vs. 77%, p = 0.001) and improved survival (5 yr 37% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Patients with recurrent disease after previous RT had survival and disease control rates which were similar to those seen in pts without priot RT. Toxicity ≥ grade 3 due to IOERT was observed in 11 pts (17%). Conclusion: A

  19. Self-sampling for human papillomavirus testing among rural young women of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbatha, J N; Galappaththi-Arachchige, H N; Mtshali, A; Taylor, M; Ndhlovu, P D; Kjetland, E F; Baay, M F D; Mkhize-Kwitshana, Z L

    2017-12-06

    Cervical cancer is a major problem in women and it is important to find a suitable and acceptable screening method, especially among young in low-resource areas for future human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine follow-up investigations. The study sought to test the acceptability of self-sampling as well as the suitability of the specimen collecting devices. Ninety-eight young women from rural KwaZulu-Natal were enrolled between March and July 2014. Collected genital specimens were transferred to colour indicator cards for HPV detection. Participants answered a questionnaire where they described their experiences with self-sampling. Samples were tested for high-risk HPV using GP5/6+ PCR. Of the enrolled participants, 91 answered questionnaires and indicated that self-sampling was preferred by 51/91 (56%) women while 40/91 (44%) indicated preference for sampling by a doctor (p = 0.023). The majority, 64% were comfortable using a swab, 22% preferred a brush while 11% were comfortable with both devices. Of the 98 self-sampled specimens 61 were negative for HPV in both specimens while 37 were HPV-positive in either brush or swab. Of the 37, 26 (70%) were HPV-positive in both brush and swab (kappa = 0.743) and 11 (30%) were discordant. Self-sampling was acceptable to the majority of participants in this rural area. The Dacron swab was the preferred device, and can be used in combination with colour indicator cards for comfortable self-sampling, easy storage and transport of specimens plus detection.

  20. Differential DNA methylation profiles in gynecological cancers and correlation with clinico-pathological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang Percy CK

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic gene silencing is one of the major causes of carcinogenesis. Its widespread occurrence in cancer genome could inactivate many cellular pathways including DNA repair, cell cycle control, apoptosis, cell adherence, and detoxification. The abnormal promoter methylation might be a potential molecular marker for cancer management. Methods For rapid identification of potential targets for aberrant methylation in gynecological cancers, methylation status of the CpG islands of 34 genes was determined using pooled DNA approach and methylation-specific PCR. Pooled DNA mixture from each cancer type (50 cervical cancers, 50 endometrial cancers and 50 ovarian cancers was made to form three test samples. The corresponding normal DNA from the patients of each cancer type was also pooled to form the other three control samples. Methylated alleles detected in tumors, but not in normal controls, were indicative of aberrant methylation in tumors. Having identified potential markers, frequencies of methylation were further analyzed in individual samples. Markers identified are used to correlate with clinico-pathological data of tumors using χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Results APC and p16 were hypermethylated across the three cancers. MINT31 and PTEN were hypermethylated in cervical and ovarian cancers. Specific methylation was found in cervical cancer (including CDH1, DAPK, MGMT and MINT2, endometrial cancer (CASP8, CDH13, hMLH1 and p73, and ovarian cancer (BRCA1, p14, p15, RIZ1 and TMS1. The frequencies of occurrence of hypermethylation in 4 candidate genes in individual samples of each cancer type (DAPK, MGMT, p16 and PTEN in 127 cervical cancers; APC, CDH13, hMLH1 and p16 in 60 endometrial cancers; and BRCA1, p14, p16 and PTEN in 49 ovarian cancers were examined for further confirmation. Incidence varied among different genes and in different cancer types ranging from the lowest 8.2% (PTEN in ovarian cancer to the highest 56

  1. Differential DNA methylation profiles in gynecological cancers and correlation with clinico-pathological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hui-Juan; Liu, Vincent WS; Wang, Yue; Tsang, Percy CK; Ngan, Hextan YS

    2006-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is one of the major causes of carcinogenesis. Its widespread occurrence in cancer genome could inactivate many cellular pathways including DNA repair, cell cycle control, apoptosis, cell adherence, and detoxification. The abnormal promoter methylation might be a potential molecular marker for cancer management. For rapid identification of potential targets for aberrant methylation in gynecological cancers, methylation status of the CpG islands of 34 genes was determined using pooled DNA approach and methylation-specific PCR. Pooled DNA mixture from each cancer type (50 cervical cancers, 50 endometrial cancers and 50 ovarian cancers) was made to form three test samples. The corresponding normal DNA from the patients of each cancer type was also pooled to form the other three control samples. Methylated alleles detected in tumors, but not in normal controls, were indicative of aberrant methylation in tumors. Having identified potential markers, frequencies of methylation were further analyzed in individual samples. Markers identified are used to correlate with clinico-pathological data of tumors using χ 2 or Fisher's exact test. APC and p16 were hypermethylated across the three cancers. MINT31 and PTEN were hypermethylated in cervical and ovarian cancers. Specific methylation was found in cervical cancer (including CDH1, DAPK, MGMT and MINT2), endometrial cancer (CASP8, CDH13, hMLH1 and p73), and ovarian cancer (BRCA1, p14, p15, RIZ1 and TMS1). The frequencies of occurrence of hypermethylation in 4 candidate genes in individual samples of each cancer type (DAPK, MGMT, p16 and PTEN in 127 cervical cancers; APC, CDH13, hMLH1 and p16 in 60 endometrial cancers; and BRCA1, p14, p16 and PTEN in 49 ovarian cancers) were examined for further confirmation. Incidence varied among different genes and in different cancer types ranging from the lowest 8.2% (PTEN in ovarian cancer) to the highest 56.7% (DAPK in cervical cancer). Aberrant methylation

  2. How medical education can contribute towards the reduction of maternal mortality in Angola: the teaching/learning process of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Barbosa, J; Loureiro, E; Ferreira, M A

    2014-03-01

    In Angola the maternal mortality ratio is among the highest in the world. Medical students are an important target for intervention. To evaluate how students perceive the curricular unit of Gynecology and Obstetrics (G&O) in a public institution of reference in Angola. The study involved a sample of 147 students of the faculty of Medicine of the University Agostinho Neto, Luanda, Angola, attending the curricular unit of G&O in the 5th and 6th years of the medical course. Data were obtained through surveys of opinion. The information of the scales was summarized through the construction of scores from the original items using the Principal Components Analysis. Students evaluated positively the curricular unit although emphasizing the lack of human and physical resources. The 5th year scored with higher values Teacher Performance and 6th year Students' Performance. Both years considered to have insufficient skills to meet the learning objectives. Constraints were identified in the outcomes of the teaching/learning program. Several points emerged as crucial from this study: widespread the areas of teaching/learning, increase the number and quality of teaching staff, improve the monitoring of students and provide adequate infrastructures and medical equipment to support the teaching/learning program.

  3. Epo receptors are not detectable in primary human tumor tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Elliott

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo is a cytokine that binds and activates an Epo receptor (EpoR expressed on the surface of erythroid progenitor cells to promote erythropoiesis. While early studies suggested EpoR transcripts were expressed exclusively in the erythroid compartment, low-level EpoR transcripts were detected in nonhematopoietic tissues and tumor cell lines using sensitive RT-PCR methods. However due to the widespread use of nonspecific anti-EpoR antibodies there are conflicting data on EpoR protein expression. In tumor cell lines and normal human tissues examined with a specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody to human EpoR (A82, little/no EpoR protein was detected and it was not functional. In contrast, EpoR protein was reportedly detectable in a breast tumor cell line (MCF-7 and breast cancer tissues with an anti-EpoR polyclonal antibody (M-20, and functional responses to rHuEpo were reported with MCF-7 cells. In another study, a functional response was reported with the lung tumor cell line (NCI-H838 at physiological levels of rHuEpo. However, the specificity of M-20 is in question and the absence of appropriate negative controls raise questions about possible false-positive effects. Here we show that with A82, no EpoR protein was detectable in normal human and matching cancer tissues from breast, lung, colon, ovary and skin with little/no EpoR in MCF-7 and most other breast and lung tumor cell lines. We show further that M-20 provides false positive staining with tissues and it binds to a non-EpoR protein that migrates at the same size as EpoR with MCF-7 lysates. EpoR protein was detectable with NCI-H838 cells, but no rHuEpo-induced phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3, pS6RP or STAT5 was observed suggesting the EpoR was not functional. Taken together these results raise questions about the hypothesis that most tumors express high levels of functional EpoR protein.

  4. Precise isotope analysis. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to human sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Isotope 14 C is a radioisotope with a half-life of 5,730 years, and the measurement of its concentration makes it possible to calculate 'carbon 14 age.' This paper introduces up-to-date accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), which is used in 14 C concentration measurement, and outlines its applied researches in pharmaceutical and medical fields. AMS technique has been applied in Europe and the United States to microdose clinical tests. In Japan, implementation foundation has been ready through the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, five years behind Europe and the United States. Although conventional AMS measurement of 14 C required an acceleration voltage of 3 million volts or more, technological development has enabled a high accuracy of 14 C concentration measurement with the low acceleration voltage of about 400,000 volts. A sample for AMS method is graphitized, transformed to carbon ions ( 12 C-, 13 C-, and 14 C-) through negative ionization with cesium irradiation, accelerated under 450 kV, bombarded with argon gas, charge-converted to 12 C+, 13 C+, and 14 C+, and measured. Biological samples for microdose study are plasma, urine, feces, and biological tissue. Model tests showed a very good linearity between the concentrations of 14 C-containing compounds and 14 C concentrations. Applied research on microdose clinical tests is expected to increase its usability in the future, as an effective means of drug development. (A.O.)

  5. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN......: Prospective clinical laboratory study. SETTING: University assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory. PATIENT(S): A total of 594 patients undergoing semen analysis and cryopreservation. INTERVENTION(S): Semen analysis, cryopreservation with different intermediate steps and in different volumes (50......-1,000 μL), and long-term storage in LN2 or VN2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Optimal TV volume, prediction of cryosurvival (CS) in ART procedure vials (ARTVs) with pre-freeze semen parameters and TV CS, post-thaw motility after two- or three-step semen cryopreservation and cryostorage in VN2 and LN2. RESULT...

  6. Do single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer differ in types and intensities of illness- and treatment-related psychosocial concerns? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Janet M; Mah, Kenneth; Fyles, Anthony; Winton, Susan; Greenwood, Sarah; DePetrillo, Denny; Devins, Gerald M

    2007-09-01

    We compared the psychosocial and psychosexual concerns of single and partnered women with gynecologic cancer, since relationship status and psychosocial context are known to affect sexuality, a life domain commonly affected by this cancer. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 49 women (68% response), with ovarian (n=31), endometrial (n=12), and cervical (n=6) cancer, responded to a 72-item self-report Cancer Concerns Questionnaire and additional psychosocial questionnaires. Single (n=13) and partnered women (n=36) similarly reported prognosis as their highest concern, but single women (26% of the sample) reported that communication with the treatment team, treatment side effects, and prognosis were of greater salience to them than did partnered women. The latter group had greater sexuality and partner relationship concerns. These preliminary findings suggest that relationship status, whether partnered or single, influences current psychosocial concerns among women with gynecologic cancer, despite similar levels of illness- and treatment-related intrusions on important life domains.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of 18 Nocardia isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Herrera, K; Sandoval, H; Couble, A; Mouniee, D; Ramírez-Durán, N; Uzcategui de Morillo, M; Serrano, J A; Bergeron, E; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2012-03-01

    Mexico has the largest number of clinical cases of actinomycetoma in North and South America. Species originally identified by less specific methods have been recently reclassified as other known species or as new species. To assess, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic methods, the species distribution of 18 human clinical isolates originally identified as N. brasiliensis, some of them isolated between 1947 and 1959 in Mexico City. Clinical isolates came from the Hospital General, "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez", and Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica (INDRE) in Mexico, D.F. The strains used in this study included 15 clinical strains isolated between 1947 and 1959 that were originally identified as N. brasiliensis and three more strains obtained in 2007 identified as Nocardia spp. The isolates were identified genotypically by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, and their phenotypic profiles were obtained with the API Coryne(®) system. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were tested according to the protocol of the Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société française de microbiologie[4]. According to 16S rRNA gene, sequencing were identified among 18 human clinical isolates as Nocardia farcinica (n=11) and Nocardia brasiliensis (n=7). A high number of the strains were susceptible to the majority of the antibiotics tested. The phenotypic profiles of the strains were quite uniform for N. farcinica and some variability was observed for N. brasiliensis strains. N. farcinica was the most prevalent species identified. Modern methodologies should be applied in clinical laboratories to accurately identify etiological agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing employability capacities and career adaptability in a sample of human resource professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Employers have come to recognise graduates’ employability capacities and their ability to adapt to new work demands as important human capital resources for sustaining a competitive business advantage. Research purpose: The study sought (1 to ascertain whether a significant relationship exists between a set of graduate employability capacities and a set of career adaptability capacities and (2 to identify the variables that contributed the most to this relationship. Motivation for the study: Global competitive markets and technological advances are increasingly driving the demand for graduate knowledge and skills in a wide variety of jobs. Contemporary career theory further emphasises career adaptability across the lifespan as a critical skill for career management agency. Despite the apparent importance attached to employees’ employability and career adaptability, there seems to be a general lack of research investigating the association between these constructs. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional, quantitative research design approach was followed. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlations and canonical correlation analysis were performed to achieve the objective of the study. The participants (N = 196 were employed in professional positions in the human resource field and were predominantly early career black people and women. Main findings: The results indicated positive multivariate relationships between the variables and showed that lifelong learning capacities and problem solving, decision-making and interactive skills contributed the most to explaining the participants’ career confidence, career curiosity and career control. Practical/managerial implications: The study suggests that developing professional graduates’ employability capacities may strengthen their career adaptability. These capacities were shown to explain graduates’ active engagement in career management

  9. A comparison of lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in formula and human milk samples from Northern Ireland mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, V C; Mayes, C B D; Tubman, T R J; Northrop-Clewes, C A; Thurnham, D I

    2004-01-01

    Two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin are found in the retinal pigment epithelium of the eye where they are believed to protect it against oxidative and light damage. The amounts of these carotenoids consumed by premature infants are not known. The objective of the investigation was to measure these carotenoids in human and formulae milks. In all, 28 human milk samples were obtained at various times between days 1 and 41 of lactation from 13 mothers. Six formula milks commonly used in hospitals were also analysed. Mothers who provided the milk samples had infants in the neonatal ward at the Royal Maternity Hospital, Belfast. Median lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in human milk were 4.79 (range 0.42-9.98) nmol/g fat and 0.55 (0.00-1.70) nmol/g fat, respectively. Five of the six formula milks also contained lutein and zeaxanthin with concentrations that varied over a wide range (0.7-9.7 and 0.1-1.2 nmol/g fat, respectively). Carotenoid concentrations usually decreased with the duration of lactation. Some formula milks that were specially formulated for premature infants contained high concentrations of the lutein and zeaxanthin and the source may be egg yolk. These studies were supported by the University of Ulster and the Northern Ireland Mother and Baby Appeal.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel for knee meniscus applications, including comparison with human donor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer C; Curley, Colin; Tierney, Paul; Kennedy, James E

    2016-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was the biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel, in order to assess its potential for use as an artificial meniscal implant. Aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was treated with a sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) solution to precipitate out the polyvinyl alcohol resulting in a pliable hydrogel. The freeze-thaw process, a strictly physical method of crosslinking, was employed to crosslink the hydrogel. Development of a meniscal shaped mould and sample housing unit allowed the production of meniscal shaped hydrogels for direct comparison to human meniscal tissue. Results obtained show that compressive responses were slightly higher in PVA/Na2SO4 menisci, displaying maximum compressive loads of 2472N, 2482N and 2476N for samples having undergone 1, 3 and 5 freeze-thaw cycles respectively. When compared to the human meniscal tissue tested under the same conditions, an average maximum load of 2467.5N was observed. This suggests that the PVA/Na2SO4 menisci are mechanically comparable to the human meniscus. Biocompatibility analysis of PVA/Na2SO4 hydrogels revealed no acute cytotoxicity. The work described herein has innovative potential in load bearing applications, specifically as an alternative to meniscectomy as replacement of critically damaged meniscal tissue in the knee joint where repair is not viable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a polymerase chain reaction applicable to rapid and sensitive detection of Clonorchis sinensis eggs in human stool samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Pyo Yun; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Mi Choi, Kyung; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Lim, Sung-Bin; Cha, Seok Ho; Park, Yun-Kyu; Pak, Jhang Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Woo; Hong, Sung-Jong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic examination of eggs of parasitic helminths in stool samples has been the most widely used classical diagnostic method for infections, but tiny and low numbers of eggs in stool samples often hamper diagnosis of helminthic infections with classical microscopic examination. Moreover, it is also difficult to differentiate parasite eggs by the classical method, if they have similar morphological characteristics. In this study, we developed a rapid and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular diagnostic method for detection of Clonorchis sinensis eggs in stool samples. Nine primers were designed based on the long-terminal repeat (LTR) of C. sinensis retrotransposon1 (CsRn1) gene, and seven PCR primer sets were paired. Polymerase chain reaction with each primer pair produced specific amplicons for C. sinensis, but not for other trematodes including Metagonimus yokogawai and Paragonimus westermani. Particularly, three primer sets were able to detect 10 C. sinensis eggs and were applicable to amplify specific amplicons from DNA samples purified from stool of C. sinensis-infected patients. This PCR method could be useful for diagnosis of C. sinensis infections in human stool samples with a high level of specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23916334

  12. Human papilloma virus 18 detection in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant lesions using saliva samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goot-Heah, Khor; Kwai-Lin, Thong; Froemming, Gabriele Ruth Anisah; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Nik Mohd Rosdy, Nik Mohd Mazuan; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2012-01-01

    Oral cancer has become one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide and human Papillomavirus is one of the risk factors for developing oral cancer. For this study HPV18 was chosen as it is one of the high risk HPV types and may lead to carcinogenesis. However, prevalence of HPV18 infection in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Malaysia remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the viral load of HPV18 DNA in OSCC and potentially malignant lesions using saliva samples. Genomic DNAs of thirty saliva samples of normal subjects and thirty saliva samples compromised of 16 samples from potentially malignant lesions and 14 of OSCC patients were amplified for HPV18 DNA using a nested polymerase chain reaction analysis. All PCR products were then analyzed using the Bioanalyzer to confirm presence of HPV18 DNA. From thirty patients examined, only one of 30 (3.3%) cases was found to be positive for HPV18 in this study. The finding of this study revealed that there is a low viral detection of HPV18 in Malaysian OSCC by using saliva samples, suggesting that prevalence of HPV18 may not be important in this group of Malaysian OSCC.

  13. Prevalence of High risk Human Papillomavirus in cervical dysplasia and cancer samples from twin cities in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sana; Murad, Sheeba; Javed, Aneela

    2015-05-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is small DNA virus mostly infecting mucosa and cutaneous keratinocytes. So far, more than 200 Human papillomaviruses are known. HPV have been divided into high- and low-risk on the basis of their oncogenic potential. High risk HPV is considered to be the main etiological cause for cervical cancer. The current study was designed to screen the local cervical cancer patients from the twin cities of Pakistan for the occurance of high risk HPV. A total of 67 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded samples of cervical cancer biopsies were obtained from the government hospitals in Islamabad and Rawalpindi. Cervical cancer biopsies were examined for the presence of HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the amplification of a region in the HPV-L1 gene for the general detection of the Papilloma virus and for the genotype specific detection of high risk HPV 16 and 18 using the GP5/GP6 primers and genotype specific primers, respectively. HPV DNA was detected in 59 out of 67 samples analyzed. 30 samples showed the presence of HPV16 while 22 samples were positive for HPV18. HPV subtype could not be determined in 7 samples. Our results show a strong association between HPV infection and cervical cancer among women in twin cities of Pakistan. One way to minimize the disease burden in relation to HPV infection in Pakistani population is the use of prophylactic vaccines and routine screening. An early diagnosis of HPV infection will allow better health management to reduce the risk of developing cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of the Donation and Use of Human Biological Samples for Research: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Patterson

    Full Text Available Human biological samples (biosamples are increasingly important in diagnosing, treating and measuring the prevalence of illnesses. For the gay and bisexual population, biosample research is particularly important for measuring the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. By determining people's understandings of, and attitudes towards, the donation and use of biosamples, researchers can design studies to maximise acceptability and participation. In this study we examine gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 gay and bisexual men aged between 18 and 63 recruited in commercial gay scene venues in two Scottish cities. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Most men interviewed seemed to have given little prior consideration to the issues. Participants were largely supportive of donating tissue for medical research purposes, and often favourable towards samples being stored, reused and shared. Support was often conditional, with common concerns related to: informed consent; the protection of anonymity and confidentiality; the right to withdraw from research; and ownership of samples. Many participants were in favour of the storage and reuse of samples, but expressed concerns related to data security and potential misuse of samples, particularly by commercial organisations. The sensitivity of tissue collection varied between tissue types and collection contexts. Blood, urine, semen and bowel tissue were commonly identified as sensitive, and donating saliva and as unlikely to cause discomfort. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth study of gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. While most men in this study were supportive of donating tissue for research, some clear areas of concern were identified. We suggest that these minority concerns should be accounted

  15. Incorporating simulation into gynecologic surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlrab, Kyle; Jelovsek, J Eric; Myers, Deborah

    2017-11-01

    Today's educational environment has made it more difficult to rely on the Halstedian model of "see one, do one, teach one" in gynecologic surgical training. There is decreased surgical volume, but an increased number of surgical modalities. Fortunately, surgical simulation has evolved to fill the educational void. Whether it is through skill generalization or skill transfer, surgical simulation has shifted learning from the operating room back to the classroom. This article explores the principles of surgical education and ways to introduce simulation as an adjunct to residency training. We review high- and low-fidelity surgical simulators, discuss the progression of surgical skills, and provide options for skills competency assessment. Time and money are major hurdles when designing a simulation curriculum, but low-fidelity models, intradepartmental cost sharing, and utilizing local experts for simulation proctoring can aid in developing a simulation program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phytochemicals: A Multitargeted Approach to Gynecologic Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se-Woong; Song, Yong Sang; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers constitute the fourth most common cancer type in women. Treatment outcomes are dictated by a multitude of factors, including stage at diagnosis, tissue type, and overall health of the patient. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, although significant unmet medical needs remain in regard to side effects and long-term survival. The efficacy of chemotherapy is influenced by cellular events such as the overexpression of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors, which together determine apoptotic responses. Phytochemicals are a broad class of natural compounds derived from plants, a number of which exhibit useful bioactive effects toward these pathways. High-throughput screening methods, rational modification, and developments in regulatory policies will accelerate the development of novel therapeutics based on these compounds, which will likely improve overall survival and quality of life for patients. PMID:25093186

  17. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Biaggio, Maria F. de

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author)

  18. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF ANESTHESIA METHODS FOR GYNECOLOGIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Khusainova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: to improve the quality of anesthesia for gynecologic cancer surgery. materials and methods. The study included 421 patients who underwent a routine hysterectomy. The patients were divided into 3 groups with respect to analgesic method. The method of multimodal balanced analgesia was used in all cases. Group I patients additionally received epidural analgesia. Group II patients did not receive epidural analgesia (the control group. Group III patients received 600 mg of gabapentin as an adjuvant to opioid analgesia. Results. A significant difference in pain intensity within the first 72 hours after surgery between 3 groups of patients was found. Oral gabapentin as an adjunct to patient-controlled epidural analgesia provided efficient pain relief, reduction in the need for opioid analgesics in the perioperative period, as well as reduction in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting after surgery.

  19. Annual State of Connecticut Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Research Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Ballard, Jennifer; Kakar, Freshta; Panarelli, Erin; Samuelson, Robert; Shahabi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    To increase opportunities for Obstetrics and Gynecology(Ob/Gyn) residents to present their research, an Annual State of Connecticut Ob/Gyn Resident Research Day (RRD) was created. At the first annual RRD, 33 residents, representing five of six Connecticut Ob/Gyn residency programs, presented 39 poster and eight oral presentations. RRD evaluators rated the overall symposium and the quality of resident oral and poster presentations as either "excellent" or "above average." Residency program directors reported that the symposium was "very helpful" for evidencing resident scholarship as required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Surveyed residents reported that the symposium promoted their research and was a valuable investment of their time. An annual specialty-specific, statewide RRD was created, experienced good participation, and was well evaluated. The annual, statewide Ob/Gyn RRD may serve as a model for development of other specialty-specific, statewide RRD events.

  20. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    that follow-up affects the women's quality of life. CONCLUSIONS:: The main purpose of follow-up after treatment of cancer is improved survival. Our review of the literature showed no evidence of a positive effect on survival in women followed up after primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer......INTRODUCTION:: To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients. METHODS:: Systematic literature searches according......:: None of the identified studies supported a survival benefit from hospital-based follow-up after completion of primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer. The methods for follow-up were of low technology (gynecologic examination with or without ultrasound examination). Other technologies had...

  1. Comparative studies of energy sources in gynecologic laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kenneth S K; Lyons, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Energy sources incorporating "vessel sealing" capabilities are being increasingly used in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery although conventional monopolar and bipolar electrosurgery remain popular. The preference for one device over another is based on a combination of factors, including the surgeon's subjective experience, availability, and cost. Although comparative clinical studies and meta-analyses of laparoscopic energy sources have reported small but statistically significant differences in volumes of blood loss, the clinical significance of such small volumes is questionable. The overall usefulness of the various energy sources available will depend on a number of factors including vessel burst pressure and seal time, lateral thermal spread, and smoke production. Animal studies and laboratory-based trials are useful in providing a controlled environment to investigate such parameters. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of one energy source over another. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. All rights reserved.

  2. Pelvic radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy in geriatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.T.; Jeffrey, J.F.; Fraser, R.C.; Tompkins, M.G.; Filbee, J.F.; Wong, O.S.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one patients, aged 75 years or older, who received pelvic radiation therapy as part of primary treatment for a gynecologic malignancy, were reviewed. Ten patients (32%) failed to complete their treatment and 4 patients (13%) died of treatment-related complications. The treatment-related complications were independent of increasing age, but did correlate closely with the patients' pretreatment ECOG performance status. Ten patients with performance levels of 2 or higher had a mortality rate of 30%, while 70% failed to complete treatment. Treatment fractions of greater than 220 cGy per day also resulted in unacceptably high complication rates. Alternative treatment formats should be considered in geriatric patients with poor initial performance levels

  3. [150 cases of vedio-laparoscopic gynecologic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Hui, N

    1994-04-01

    From September 1992 to September 1993, 150 patients aged 15-68 years underwent laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. These patients included 63 patients with acute abdominal diseases (46 had ectopic pregnancy, 9 rupture of ovary, and 8 torsion of ovarian cyst), which consisted of 90% of total patients with acute abdomen in corresponding period, 63 patients with mass of adnexa, which made up 72% of total patients with ovarian tumors, and 24 patients with uterine diseases. We successfully performed laparoscopic salpingostomy, fallotomy, removal of ovarian cyst, oophorosalpingectomy, myomectomy and laparoscopy assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) with 2-4 puncture technic after general anesthesia. The largest ovarian tumor and the enlarged uterus were 14 and 16 cm in diameter respectively. Four patients had laparotomy because of severe pelvic adhesions and the laparotomy rate was about 2.6%. The procedure lasted 20-240 minutes and bleeding was less than 200ml. No major surgical complication was encountered.

  4. Forensic Analysis of Human DNA from Samples Contamined with Bioweapons Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    dénaturation des toxines. 3. Comparer la quantité et la qualité d’ADN extrait dans le sang et la salive , en l’absence ou en présence de matières...modifications. Samples on swabs were incubated overnight at 56oC in 300 uL of an RCMP lysis buffer (REB, 100mN NaCL, 10mM Tris HCL, pH 8.0, 10mM...formulation) or the RCMP buffer (100mN NaCL, 10mM Tris HCL ( pH 8.0), 10mM EDTA, 0.5% sarkosyl and 40mM DTT). In both cases, proteinase K was added to

  5. Electrooxidation of antihistamine drug methdilazine and its analysis in human urine and blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj P. Shetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of an antihistamine drug, methdilazine, was studied in 9.2 pH with 0.2 M phosphate buffer as supporting electrolyte at 25 ± 0.2°C. Glassy carbon electrode was used to perform the experiment at cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetric techniques. The dependence of the current on pH, concentration and scan rate were investigated. Differential pulse voltammetric technique was adopted to know the linear relation between peak current and methdilazine concentration. The linear response was obtained in the range of 3.0 μM–1.0 mM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM. The proposed method was also applied for the quantitative determination of methdilazine in pharmaceuticals and biological samples.

  6. Older women in Appalachia: experiences with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katherine R; Roberto, Karen A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how older women in rural Appalachia with gynecological cancer construct and interpret their experience with cancer. Grounded in social constructionist theory, semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 women, aged 51-82, who had been treated for gynecological cancer. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Although women narrated their experience along a common trajectory from symptoms to diagnosis to treatment, four distinct patterns of posttreatment perceptions were described: (a) positive: women believed they were cancer survivors, (b) cautious: women saw themselves as survivors but not risk free, (c) distanced: women viewed themselves as cured and equated survivor with victim, and (d) resigned: women refused more treatment. All of the women acknowledged an inner strength in how they experienced cancer, requiring a more nuanced framework for understanding how negative and positive feelings coexist with faith in a higher power and the capacity to endure a devastating threat to life and health. The findings expand the concept of survivor identity, suggesting that the women's perception that they had met life's challenges with fortitude and inner strength may have more resonance in later life than the concept of survivorship. Family members and medical and public health professionals need to support older women's individual response to cancer recovery and acknowledge their complicated reactions to a cancer diagnosis and prognosis. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Safety culture in the gynecology robotics operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Melissa D; McCarroll, Michele L; Mendise, Thomas M; Ferris, Edward F; Roulette, G D; Zolton, Jessica; Andrews, Stephen J; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    To measure the safety culture in the robotics surgery operating room before and after implementation of the Robotic Operating Room Computerized Checklist (RORCC). Prospective study. Gynecology surgical staff (n = 32). An urban community hospital. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains examined were teamwork, safety, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management, and working conditions. Questions and domains were described using percent agreement and the Cronbach alpha. Paired t-tests were used to describe differences before and after implementation of the checklist. Mean (SD) staff age was 46.7 (9.5) years, and most were women (78%) and worked full-time (97%). Twenty respondents (83% of nurses, 80% of surgeons, 66% of surgical technicians, and 33% of certified registered nurse anesthetists) completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; 6 were excluded because of non-matching identifiers. Before RORCC implementation, the highest quality of communication and collaboration was reported by surgeons and surgical technicians (100%). Certified registered nurse anesthetists reported only adequate levels of communication and collaboration with other positions. Most staff reported positive responses for teamwork (48%; α = 0.81), safety (47%; α = 0.75), working conditions (37%; α = 0.55), stress recognition (26%; α = 0.71), and perceptions of management (32%; α = 0.52). No differences were observed after RORCC implementation. Quality of communication and collaboration in the gynecology robotics operating room is high between most positions; however, safety attitude responses are low overall. No differences after RORCC implementation and low response rates may highlight lack of staff support. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Domestic violence against women attending gynecologic outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojomi, Marzieh; Agaee, Saideh; Eslami, Samira

    2007-07-01

    Violence against women and threat of violence are some of the main barriers to women's empowerment and equal participation in the society. However, they often go unnoticed and undocumented and therefore unresolved. For women, one of every five years of healthy life lost because of injury, disease, or premature death is attributable to violence. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of domestic violence in women attending three obstetric and gynecologic clinics in Tehran, and to determine the association between domestic violence and demographic factors. One thousand women, 15-64 years old, attending three obstetric and gynecologic clinics affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with self-administered questionnaire. The association between demographic factors (age, level of education, religious believes, annual income, job, husband's employment status, drug and alcohol abuse, previous custody of husbands) and domestic violence was assessed by questionnaire. Five hundred and ninety out of the 1000 women had experienced at least one form of violence (physical, mental, not sexual) from their husbands, 196 women had experienced some forms of controlling behavior and mental violence, and 361 women had been physically threatened. Low level of education in women, nongovernmental job, previous custody, psychiatric disorders of men, and coercive marriage for women were associated with an increased risk of domestic violence. With the high prevalence of domestic violence, health workers should not ignore the seriousness of domestic violence. Health and social personnel should be appropriately trained before "asking all cases" becomes a policy within health and social services.

  9. Postoperative adhesion prevention in gynecologic surgery with hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, G; Cerrone, L; Iovenitti, P

    2004-01-01

    Despite improvements in surgical instrumentation and techniques, adhesions continue to form after most procedures. Peritoneal adhesions develop in 60-90% of women who undergo major gynecological operations. This adhesion formation causes significant postoperative morbidity such as bowel obstruction (65%), infertility (15-20%), and chronic pelvic pain (40%). To demonstrate the efficacy of a hyaluronic acid product (Hyalobarrier Gel) for the prevention of adhesions in gynecological surgery. From October 2000 to July 2002, 18 women from 26 to 41 years old (mean age 33.66) underwent myomectomy via laparotomy as their first abdominal operation. Between August 2001 and May 2003, the patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy (7 women, 38.9%, 15 sites, 42.8%) or a second-look laparotomy (11 women, 61.1%, 20 sites, 57.1%) during which all the 35 sites corresponding to the previous myomectomies were analyzed. During the second-look procedure the presence, localization and severity of adhesions were evaluated using the Operative Laparoscopy Study Group Classification (OLSG) and American Fertility Society Classification (AFSC). All patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy/laparotomy and only five of 18 (27.7%) showed pelvic adhesions in seven sites (20%) of previous myomectomies. No adhesion was found on the previous sites of myomectomies of pedunculated leiomyomas so, excluding those, adhesions were found in seven of 29 sites of myomectomies (24.1%). The present study emphasizes the need for improved treatments to prevent adhesions, as there is no doubt that adhesions represent one of the major causes of female morbidity.

  10. Menopause education: needs assessment of American obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Ducie, Jennifer A; Altman, Kristiina; Khafagy, Ayatallah M; Shen, Wen

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to understand the current teaching of menopause medicine in American obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A Web-based survey was e-mailed to all American obstetrics and gynecology residency directors, with a request that they forward it to their residents. Of 258 residency program directors contacted, 79 (30.6%) confirmed forwarding the survey. In all, 1,799 people received the survey, with 510 completions, for a response rate of 28.3%. Most residents reported that they had limited knowledge and needed to learn more about these aspects of menopause medicine: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (67.1%), hormone therapy (68.1%), nonhormone therapy (79.0%), bone health (66.1%), cardiovascular disease (71.7%), and metabolic syndrome (69.5%). Among fourth-year residents who will be entering clinical practice soon, a large proportion also reported a need to learn more in these areas: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (45.9%), hormone therapy (54.2%), nonhormone therapy (69.4%), bone health (54.2%), cardiovascular disease (64.3%), and metabolic syndrome (63.8%). When asked to rate the most preferred modalities for learning about menopause, the top choice was supervised clinics (53.2%), followed by case presentations (22.2%), formal lectures (21.3%), small groups (14.7%), Web-based learning (7.8%), and independent reading (5.2%). Only 20.8% of residents reported that their program had a formal menopause medicine learning curriculum, and 16.3% had a defined menopause clinic as part of their residency. It seems that some American residency programs do not fulfill the educational goals of their residents in menopause medicine. A curriculum would be beneficial for increasing knowledge and clinical experience on menopause issues.

  11. Emotional state and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Toshiko; Murata, Hinako; Matsushima, Eisuke; Sakata, Yu; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Aso, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in emotional state and the relationship between emotional state and demographic/clinical factors and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery. Using the Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), 90 patients (benign disease: 32, malignancy: 58) were examined on three occasions: before surgery, before discharge, and 3 months after discharge. They were also examined using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) on one occasion before discharge. The scores for the subscales depression, anger, and confusion were the highest after discharge while those for anxiety were the highest before surgery. The average scores of the POMS subscales for all subjects were within the normal range. With regard to the relationship between these emotional states and other factors, multiple regressions showed that the principal determinants of anxiety before surgery were religious belief, psychological symptoms during hospitalization and emotion-oriented (E) coping style; further, it was found that depression after discharge could be explained by chemotherapy, duration of hospitalization, and E coping style. The principal determinants of anger after discharge and vigor before surgery were length of education and E coping style, and severity of disease, chemotherapy, E coping style and task-oriented coping style, respectively. Those of post-discharge fatigue and confusion were length of education, psychological symptoms, and E coping style. In summary it is suggested that the following should be taken into account in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery: anxiety before surgery, depression, anger, and confusion after surgery, including coping styles.

  12. Opioid use following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Lekha S; Warda, Hussein A; Haviland, Miriam J; Searle, Frances M; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-09-09

    Opioid use, addiction, and overdose are a growing epidemic in the USA. Our objective was to determine whether the amount of opioid medication prescribed following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery is insufficient, adequate, or in excess. We hypothesized that we were overprescribing postoperative opioids. Participants who were at least 18 years old and underwent gynecologic and/or pelvic reconstructive surgery from April through August 2016 were eligible to participate. Routine practice for pain management is to prescribe 30 tablets of opioids for major procedures and ten to 15 tablets for minor procedures. At the 2-week postoperative visit, participants completed a questionnaire regarding the number of tablets prescribed and used, postoperative pain control, and relevant medical history. Fisher's exact test was used to compare data. Sixty-five participants completed questionnaires. Half (49.1%) reported being prescribed more opioids than needed, while two (3.5%) felt the amount was less than needed. Though not significant, participants who underwent major surgeries were more likely to report being prescribed more than needed (53.5%) compared with participants who underwent minor surgeries (35.7%; p = 0.47). Though not significant, participants with anxiety were less likely to report being prescribed more tablets than needed compared with participants without anxiety (44.4% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.38). This was also true of participants with depression compared with those without (37.5% vs. 58.3%; p = 0.17), and those with chronic pain compared with those without (33.3% vs. 60.0%; p = 0.10). Our current opioid prescription practice for postoperative pain management may exceed what patients need.

  13. Direct determination of lead in human urine and serum samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and permanent modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrada, Daniel; Pinto, Frederico G.; Magalhaes, Cristina Goncalves; Nunes, Berta R.; Silva, Jose Bento Borba da; Franco, Milton B.

    2006-01-01

    The object of the present study was the development of alternative methods for the direct determination of lead in undigested samples of human urine and serum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Thus, some substances have been investigated to act as chemical modifiers. Volumes of 20 μL of diluted samples, 1 + 1, v/v for urine and 1 + 4, v/v for serum, with HNO 3 1% v/v and 0.02% v/v of cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) were prepared directly in the autosampler cups and placed into the graphite furnace. For modifiers in solutions 10 μL were used. Pyrolysis and atomization temperature curves were used in all optimizations in the matrixes diluted as exposed. For urine with permanent iridium (500 μg), the best pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 and 1600 deg C, respectively, with a characteristic mass of 12 pg (recommended of 10 pg), with symmetrical absorption pulses and corrected background. Spiked urine samples presented recoveries between 86 and 112% for Ir permanent. The analysis results of certified urine samples are in agreement with certified values (95% of confidence) for two levels of the metal. For serum, good results were obtained with the mixture of Zr+Rh or Ir+Rh as permanent modifiers, with characteristic masses of 9.8 and 8.1 pg, respectively. Recoveries from spiked serum samples varied between 98.6 and 100.1% (Ir+Rh) and between 93.9 and 105.2% (Zr+Rh). In both recovery studies, the relative standard deviation (n=3) was lower than 7%. Calibration for both samples were made with aqueous calibration curves and presented r 2 higher than 0.99. The limits of detection were 0.7 μg L -1 for serum samples, with Zr+Rh permanent, and 1.0 μg L -1 for urine with iridium permanent. (author)

  14. The use of human samples obtained during medicolegal autopsies in research: An introduction to current conditions and initiatives in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura-Ito, Takako; Inoue, Yusuke; Muto, Kaori; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-01

    Background Leftover samples obtained during autopsies are extremely important basic materials for forensic research. However, there are no established practices for research-related use of obtained samples. Objective This study discusses good practice for the secondary use of samples collected during medicolegal autopsies. Methods A questionnaire was posted to all 76 departments of forensic medicine performing medicolegal autopsies in Japan, and 48 responses were received (response rate: 63.2%). As a secondary analysis, we surveyed information provided on department websites. Results Ethical reviews conducted when samples were to be used for research varied greatly among departments, with 21 (43.8%) departments reporting 'fundamentally, all cases are subject to review', eight (16.7%) reporting 'only some are subject to review' and 17 (39.6%) reporting 'none are subject to review'. Information made available on websites indicated that 11 departments had a statement of some type to bereaved families about the potential research use of human samples obtained during autopsies. Nine of these included a notice stating that bereaved families may revoke their consent for use. Several departments used an opt-out system. Conclusion There is no common practice in the field of legal medicine on the ethical use for medical research of leftover samples from medicolegal autopsies. The trust of not only bereaved families but also society in general is required for the scientific validity and social benefits of medical studies using leftover samples from medicolegal autopsies through the use of opt-out consenting and offline and online dissemination and public-relations activities.

  15. Direct determination of lead in human urine and serum samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and permanent modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrada Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the present study was the development of alternative methods for the direct determination of lead in undigested samples of human urine and serum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS. Thus, some substances have been investigated to act as chemical modifiers. Volumes of 20 µL of diluted samples, 1 + 1, v/v for urine and 1 + 4, v/v for serum, with HNO3 1% v/v and 0.02% v/v of cetil trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC were prepared directly in the autosampler cups and placed into the graphite furnace. For modifiers in solutions 10 µL were used. Pyrolysis and atomization temperature curves were used in all optimizations in the matrixes diluted as exposed. For urine with permanent iridium (500 µg, the best pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 and 1600 ºC, respectively, with a characteristic mass of 12 pg (recommended of 10 pg, with symmetrical absorption pulses and corrected background. Spiked urine samples presented recoveries between 86 and 112% for Ir permanent. The analysis results of certified urine samples are in agreement with certified values (95% of confidence for two levels of the metal. For serum, good results were obtained with the mixture of Zr+Rh or Ir+Rh as permanent modifiers, with characteristic masses of 9.8 and 8.1 pg, respectively. Recoveries from spiked serum samples varied between 98.6 and 100.1% (Ir+Rh and between 93.9 and 105.2% (Zr+Rh. In both recovery studies, the relative standard deviation (n=3 was lower than 7%. Calibration for both samples were made with aqueous calibration curves and presented r² higher than 0.99. The limits of detection were 0.7 µg L-1 for serum samples, with Zr+Rh permanent, and 1.0 µg L-1 for urine with iridium permanent.

  16. Using hair, nail and urine samples for human exposure assessment of legacy and emerging per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Zhou, Zhen; Liang, Yong; Cai, Yaqi

    2018-09-15

    Non-invasive samples present ethical and practical benefits for investigating human exposure to hazardous contaminants, but analytical challenges and difficulties to interpret the results limit their application in biomonitoring. Here we investigated the potential for using hair, nail and urine samples as a measure of internal exposure to an array of legacy and emerging per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in two populations with different exposure conditions. Paired urine-serum measurements of PFASs from a group of highly exposed fishery employees displayed strong correlations for PFASs with three to eight perfluorinated carbons (ρ > 0.653; p < 0.01). Consistent statistical correlations and transfer ratios in nails and hair from both populations demonstrated that these non-invasive samples can be used as a measure of internal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and C8 chlorinated polyfluoralkyl ether sulfonic acid (C8 Cl-PFESA). Contrastingly, the infrequent detections and/or lack of consistent transfer ratios for perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorononanoic acid and short-chain PFASs in hair and nail samples indicate passive uptake from the external environment rather than uptake and internal distribution. Collectively, the study supports the use of urine samples as a valid measure of internal exposure for a range of short- and medium-chain PFASs, while the validity of nail and hair samples as a measure of internal exposure may vary for different PFASs and populations. The ubiquitous detection of C8 Cl-PFESA in all sample matrices from both populations indicates widespread exposure to this contaminant of emerging concern in China. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, Chu Chieh; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Yang, Amy X.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Hewlett, Indira; Duncan, Robert; Puri, Raj K.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) are transfusion-transmitted human pathogens that have a major impact on blood safety and public health worldwide. We developed a microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of these three viruses. The microarray consists of 16 oligonucleotide probes, immobilized on a silylated glass slide. Amplicons from multiplex PCR were labeled with Cy-5 and hybridized to the microarray. The assay detected 1 International Unit (IU), 10 IU, 20 IU of HBV, HCV, and HIV-1, respectively, in a single multiplex reaction. The assay also detected and discriminated the presence of two or three of these viruses in a single sample. Our data represent a proof-of-concept for the possible use of highly sensitive multiplex microarray assay to screen and confirm the presence of these viruses in blood donors and patients

  18. Using CF11 cellulose columns to inexpensively and effectively remove human DNA from Plasmodium falciparum-infected whole blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Meera

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome and transcriptome studies of Plasmodium nucleic acids obtained from parasitized whole blood are greatly improved by depletion of human DNA or enrichment of parasite DNA prior to next-generation sequencing and microarray hybridization. The most effective method currently used is a two-step procedure to deplete leukocytes: centrifugation using density gradient media followed by filtration through expensive, commercially available columns. This method is not easily implemented in field studies that collect hundreds of samples and simultaneously process samples for multiple laboratory analyses. Inexpensive syringes, hand-packed with CF11 cellulose powder, were recently shown to improve ex vivo cultivation of Plasmodium vivax obtained from parasitized whole blood. This study was undertaken to determine whether CF11 columns could be adapted to isolate Plasmodium falciparum DNA from parasitized whole blood and achieve current quantity and purity requirements for Illumina sequencing. Methods The CF11 procedure was compared with the current two-step standard of leukocyte depletion using parasitized red blood cells cultured in vitro and parasitized blood obtained ex vivo from Cambodian patients with malaria. Procedural variations in centrifugation and column size were tested, along with a range of blood volumes and parasite densities. Results CF11 filtration reliably produces 500 nanograms of DNA with less than 50% human DNA contamination, which is comparable to that obtained by the two-step method and falls within the current quality control requirements for Illumina sequencing. In addition, a centrifuge-free version of the CF11 filtration method to isolate P. falciparum DNA at remote and minimally equipped field sites in malaria-endemic areas was validated. Conclusions CF11 filtration is a cost-effective, scalable, one-step approach to remove human DNA from P. falciparum-infected whole blood samples.

  19. Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov., isolated from a human faecal sample from a traditional Peruvian coastal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha B; Tito, Raul Y; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; O'Neal, Lindsey; Trujillo-Villaroel, Omar; Marin-Reyes, Luis; Troncoso-Corzo, Luzmila; Guija-Poma, Emilio; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, coccus-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a faecal sample obtained from an individual in a traditional community located off the southern coast of Peru. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed the novel bacterium belonged to the genus Peptoniphilus but showed no particular relationship with any species, demonstrating less than 91 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with all members of the genus. The major cellular fatty acids of the novel isolate were determined to be C10 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 2ω6,9c/anteiso-C18 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 34.4 mol%. End-products of metabolism from peptone-yeast-glucose broth (PYG) were determined to be acetate and butyrate. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results, the organism represents a novel species of the genus Peptoniphilus, for which the name Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M6.X2DT ( = DSM 29874T = CCUG 66798T).

  20. Metric Sex Determination of the Human Coxal Bone on a Virtual Sample using Decision Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frédéric; Faruch-Bilfeld, Marie; Dedouit, Fabrice; Sans, Nicolas; Rousseau, Hervé; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    Decision trees provide an alternative to multivariate discriminant analysis, which is still the most commonly used in anthropometric studies. Our study analyzed the metric characterization of a recent virtual sample of 113 coxal bones using decision trees for sex determination. From 17 osteometric type I landmarks, a dataset was built with five classic distances traditionally reported in the literature and six new distances selected using the two-step ratio method. A ten-fold cross-validation was performed, and a decision tree was established on two subsamples (training and test sets). The decision tree established on the training set included three nodes and its application to the test set correctly classified 92% of individuals. This percentage was similar to the data of the literature. The usefulness of decision trees has been demonstrated in numerous fields. They have been already used in sex determination, body mass prediction, and ancestry estimation. This study shows another use of decision trees enabling simple and accurate sex determination. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in viking-age settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    Ancient parasite eggs were recovered from environmental samples collected at a Viking-age settlement in Viborg, Denmark, dated 1018-1030 A.D. Morphological examination identified Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp., and Fasciola sp. eggs, but size and shape did not allow species identification. By carefully...... selecting genetic markers, PCR amplification and sequencing of ancient DNA (aDNA) isolates resulted in identification of: the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura, using SSUrRNA sequence homology; Ascaris sp. with 100% homology to cox1 haplotype 07; and Fasciola hepatica using ITS1 sequence homology...

  2. Brief Communication: Intertooth and Intrafacet Dental Microwear Variation in an Archaeological Sample of Modern Humans From the Jordan Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Dental microwear was recorded in a Bronze-Iron Age (3570–3000 BP) sample of modern humans recovered from Tell es-Sa'idiyeh in the Jordan Valley. Microwear patterns were compared between mandibular molars, and between the upper and lower part of facet 9. The comparison revealed a greater frequency of pits and shorter scratches on the second and third molars, compared to the first. Pit frequency also increased on the lower part of the facet on the first molar, compared to the upper part. These ...

  3. Chiral analyses of dextromethorphan/levomethorphan and their metabolites in rat and human samples using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Kawamura, Maiko; Miyajima, Atsuko; Sunouchi, Momoko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    In order to develop an analytical method for the discrimination of dextromethorphan (an antitussive medicine) from its enantiomer, levomethorphan (a narcotic) in biological samples, chiral analyses of these drugs and their O-demethyl and/or N-demethyl metabolites in rat plasma, urine, and hair were carried out using LC-MS/MS. After the i.p. administration of dextromethorphan or levomethorphan to pigmented hairy male DA rats (5 mg/kg/day, 10 days), the parent compounds and their three metabolites in plasma, urine and hair were determined using LC-MS/MS. Complete chiral separation was achieved in 12 min on a Chiral CD-Ph column in 0.1% formic acid-acetonitrile by a linear gradient program. Most of the metabolites were detected as being the corresponding O-demethyl and N, O-didemethyl metabolites in the rat plasma and urine after the hydrolysis of O-glucuronides, although obvious differences in the amounts of these metabolites were found between the dextro and levo forms. No racemation was observed through O- and/or N-demethylation. In the rat hair samples collected 4 weeks after the first administration, those differences were more clearly detected and the concentrations of the parent compounds, their O-demethyl, N-demethyl, and N, O-didemethyl metabolites were 63.4, 2.7, 25.1, and 0.7 ng/mg for the dextro forms and 24.5, 24.6, 2.6, and 0.5 ng/mg for the levo forms, respectively. In order to fully investigate the differences of their metabolic properties between dextromethorphan and levomethorphan, DA rat and human liver microsomes were studied. The results suggested that there might be an enantioselective metabolism of levomethorphan, especially with regard to the O-demethylation, not only in DA rat but human liver microsomes as well. The proposed chiral analyses might be applied to human samples and could be useful for discriminating dextromethorphan use from levomethorphan use in the field of forensic toxicology, although further studies should be carried out

  4. The Evaluation of Hydroxyethyl Starch (6% HES 130/0.4 Solution’s Potential Preventive Effects on Coagulation Status in Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Using Rotation Thromboelastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Olga Akay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of in vitro hemodilution with 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4 solution on the coagulation status of women with gynecologic malignancies by using rotation thromboelastogram (ROTEM®. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with gynecological tumors scheduled for anesthesia were enrolled. Blood samples were diluted by 20% with 6% HES (130/0.4 solution. RESULTS: In the INTEM assay, clotting time (CT (p<0.01 and clot formation time (CFT (p<0.001 were significantly increased and maximum maximum clot formation (MCF (p< 0.001 was significantly decreased in HES hemodilution compared with the undiluted control samples. In the EXTEM assay, there was a similar significant increase in increase in CFT (p<0.01 and a decrease in maximum a decrease in MCF (p<0.01 in HES hemodilution when compared with control samples. CONCLUSION: HES 130/0.4 solution causes significant hypocoagulable changes in the thromboelastographic profile of gynecologic cancer patients in vitro.

  5. Comparative and Absolute Measurements of 11 Inorganic Constituents of 38 Human Tooth Samples with Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.; Soeremark, R.

    1961-12-01

    The mean concentrations of the following elements have been simultaneously determined in normal human dentine, enamel and dental calculus with gamma-ray spectrometry; Na, P, Cl, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, W and Au. In a typical run one sample each of dentine, enamel and dental calculus were irradiated together with standards of the elements to be determined in a thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10 12 n/cm/sec for 20 hours. The chemical elements were separated into nine groups with ion exchange technique before the subsequent gamma spectrometric measurements. One man can manage the chemical separations and take the necessary gamma spectra from a run in one day. In a few samples of dentine, enamel and dental calculus which had been irradiated in a thermal neutron flux of 7 x 10 13 n/cm/sec for one week the additional long lived trace elements were qualitatively determined Cr, Fe, Co, Rb, Ag, Sb, Cs and Ba

  6. Hybrid Capture 2 and cobas human papillomavirus assays perform similarly on SurePath samples from women with abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornari, D; Rebolj, M; Bjerregaard, B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In two laboratories (Departments of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospitals of Herlev and Hvidovre), we compared cobas and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) assays using SurePath® samples from women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS......) at ≥30 years and women after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). METHODS: Samples from 566 women with ASCUS and 411 women after treatment were routinely tested with HC2 and, thereafter, with cobas. Histological outcomes were retrieved from the Danish Pathology Data Base. We calculated...... the overall agreement between the assays, and compared their sensitivity and specificity for ≥CIN2. RESULTS: In women with ASCUS, HC2 and cobas testing results were similar in the two laboratories. The overall agreement was 91% (95% CI, 88-93). After CIN treatment, the overall agreement was 87% (95% CI, 82...

  7. Human urine as test material in 1H NMR-based metabonomics: recommendations for sample preparation and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Michael; Hansen, Steen H; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Cornett, Claus

    2007-02-01

    Metabonomic approaches are believed to have the capability of revolutionizing diagnosis of diseases and assessment of patient conditions after medical interventions. In order to ensure comparability of metabonomic 1H NMR data from different studies, we suggest validated sample preparation guidelines for human urine based on a stability study that evaluates effects of storage time and temperature, freeze-drying, and the presence of preservatives. The results indicated that human urine samples should be stored at or below -25 degrees C, as no changes in the 1H NMR fingerprints have been observed during storage at this temperature for 26 weeks. Formation of acetate, presumably due to microbial contamination, was occasionally observed in samples stored at 4 degrees C without addition of a preservative. Addition of a preserving agent is not mandatory provided that the samples are stored at -25 degrees C. Thus, no differences were observed between 1H NMR spectra of nonpreserved urines and urines with added sodium azide and stored at -25 degrees C, whereas the presence of sodium fluoride caused a shift of especially citrate resonances. Freeze-drying of urine and reconstitution in D2O at pH 7.4 resulted in the disappearance of the creatinine CH2 signal at delta 4.06 due to deuteration. A study evaluating the effects of phosphate buffer concentration on signal variability and assessment of the probability of citrate or creatinine resonances crossing bucket border (a boundary between adjacent integrated regions) led to the conclusion that a minimum buffer concentration of 0.3 M is adequate for normal urines used in this study. However, final buffer concentration of 1 M will be required for very concentrated urines.

  8. Cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and ACOG recommendations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    To conduct a methodological review of the existing scientific literature within the field of cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and to establish their relevance to the ACOG Committee Opinion No. 378. The appropriate medical subject heading terms were selected and applied in the search of the Internet multiple databases since 1900 until January 2010. Articles focusing on cosmetic gynecology were reviewed. Also, anecdotal and advertising literatures were analyzed. A methodological review of the literatures was conducted. In peer review journals, 72 relevant articles related to cosmetic gynecology were identified. Anecdotal information was identified in 3 sources and over 1,100 published marketing literatures were identified on the Internet and no scientific journals. Among reviewed articles on cosmetic gynecology, only two articles met the level II-2 in evidence-based medicine. The absence of documentations on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic vaginal procedures in the scientific literatures was ACOG's main concern. Practicing cosmetic gynecology within ACOG recommendations is desirable and possible. Currently, the standard of practice of cosmetic gynecology cannot be determined due to the absence of the documentation on safety and effectiveness. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be called cosmetic procedures, since it is a deceptive form of practice and marketing. Creating medical terminology trademarks and establishing a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical.

  9. Identification of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 Metabolites in Authentic Human Urine Samples Using Human Liver Microsomes and Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Svante; Josefsson, Martin; Gréen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of structurally related synthetic cannabinoids makes the identification of unique markers of drug intake particularly challenging. The aim of this study was to identify unique and abundant metabolites of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 for toxicological screening in urine. Investigations of authentic urine samples from forensic cases in combination with human liver microsome (HLM) experiments were used for identification of metabolites. HLM incubations of AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48 along with 35 urine samples from authentic cases were analyzed with liquid chromatography quadrupole tandem time of flight mass spectrometry. Using HLMs 41 metabolites of AKB-48 and 37 metabolites of 5F-AKB-48 were identified, principally represented by hydroxylation but also ketone formation and dealkylation. Monohydroxylated metabolites were replaced by di- and trihydroxylated metabolites within 30 min. The metabolites from the HLM incubations accounted for on average 84% (range, 67-100) and 91% (range, 71-100) of the combined area in the case samples for AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48, respectively. While defluorinated metabolites accounted for on average 74% of the combined area after a 5F-AKB-48 intake only a few identified metabolites were shared between AKB-48 and 5F-AKB-48, illustrating the need for a systematic approach to identify unique metabolites. HLMs in combination with case samples seem suitable for this purpose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Establishing and evaluating bar-code technology in blood sampling system: a model based on human centered human-centered design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shin-Shang; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Kuo, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study intended to use a human-centered design study method to develop a bar-code technology in blood sampling process. By using the multilevel analysis to gather the information, the bar-code technology has been constructed to identify the patient's identification, simplify the work process, and prevent medical error rates. A Technology Acceptance Model questionnaire was developed to assess the effectiveness of system and the data of patient's identification and sample errors were collected daily. The average scores of 8 items users' perceived ease of use was 25.21(3.72), 9 items users' perceived usefulness was 28.53(5.00), and 14 items task-technology fit was 52.24(7.09), the rate of patient identification error and samples with order cancelled were down to zero, however, new errors were generated after the new system deployed; which were the position of barcode stickers on the sample tubes. Overall, more than half of nurses (62.5%) were willing to use the new system.

  11. Analysis of chlorpheniramine in human urine samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Maham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple and environmentally friendly microextraction technique was used for determination of chlorpheniramine (CPM, an antihistamine drug, in human urine samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD. In this extraction technique, an appropriate mixture of acetonitrile (disperser solvent and carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent was rapidly injected into the urine sample containing the target analyte. Tiny droplets of extractant were formed and dispersed into the sample solution and then sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube by centrifugation. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.055-5.5 µg mL-1, with a detection limit of 16.5 ng mL-1. This proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of real urine samples. Low consumption of toxic organic solvents, simplicity of operation, low cost and acceptable figures of merit are the main advantages of the proposed technique.

  12. A comparative study of some physico-chemical properties of human serum albumin samples from different sources--I : Some physico-chemical properties of isoionic human serum albumin solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dröge, J.H.M.; Janssen, L.H.M.; Wilting, J.

    1982-01-01

    Human serum albumin samples from different sources were investigated. The fatty acid content of the albumin before and after deionization on a mixed bed ion-exchange column varied from sample to sample. When an albumin sample from one source was deionized under standard conditions the amount of

  13. Health and Human Rights in Chin State, Western Burma: A Population-Based Assessment Using Multistaged Household Cluster Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollom, Richard; Richards, Adam K.; Parmar, Parveen; Mullany, Luke C.; Lian, Salai Bawi; Iacopino, Vincent; Beyrer, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chin State of Burma (also known as Myanmar) is an isolated ethnic minority area with poor health outcomes and reports of food insecurity and human rights violations. We report on a population-based assessment of health and human rights in Chin State. We sought to quantify reported human rights violations in Chin State and associations between these reported violations and health status at the household level. Methods and Findings Multistaged household cluster sampling was done. Heads of household were interviewed on demographics, access to health care, health status, food insecurity, forced displacement, forced labor, and other human rights violations during the preceding 12 months. Ratios of the prevalence of household hunger comparing exposed and unexposed to each reported violation were estimated using binomial regression, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were constructed. Multivariate models were done to adjust for possible confounders. Overall, 91.9% of households (95% CI 89.7%–94.1%) reported forced labor in the past 12 months. Forty-three percent of households met FANTA-2 (Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance II project) definitions for moderate to severe household hunger. Common violations reported were food theft, livestock theft or killing, forced displacement, beatings and torture, detentions, disappearances, and religious and ethnic persecution. Self reporting of multiple rights abuses was independently associated with household hunger. Conclusions Our findings indicate widespread self-reports of human rights violations. The nature and extent of these violations may warrant investigation by the United Nations or International Criminal Court. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21346799

  14. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples by using the FTA cartridge: new possibilities for cervical cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenselink, C.H.; Bie, R.P. de; Hamont, D. van; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF(10)-Line Blot 25. Set 1

  15. Development and validation of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for analysis of cephradine in human plasma samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Usman, M.; Madni, A.; Akhtar, N.; Khalid, N.; Asghar, W.

    2010-01-01

    An HPLC method with high precision, accuracy and selectivity was developed and validated for the assessment of cephradine in human plasma samples. The extraction procedure was simple and accurate with single step followed by direct injection of sample into HPLC system. The extracted cephradine in spiked human plasma was separated and quantitated using reversed phase C/sub 18/ column and UV detection wavelength of 254 nm. The optimized mobile phase of new composition of 0.05 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 3.4)-acetonitrile (88: 12) was pumped at an optimum flow rate of 1 mL.min/sup 1/. The method resulted linearity in the concentration range 0.15- 20 micro g mL/sup -1/. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.150 Microg.mL/sup -1/, respectively. The accuracy of method was 98.68 %. This method can 1>e applied for bioequivalence studies and therapeutic drug monitoring as well as for the routine analysis of cephradine. (author)

  16. Concurrent Detection of Human Norovirus and Bacterial Pathogens in Water Samples from an Agricultural Region in Central California Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and human norovirus (HuNoV are major cause for acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated food and water. Public waterways can become contaminated from a variety of sources and flood after heavy rain events, leading to pathogen contamination of produce fields. We initiated a survey of several public watersheds in a major leafy green produce production region of the Central California Coast to determine the prevalence of HuNoV as well as bacterial pathogens. Moore swabs were used to collect environmental samples bi-monthly at over 30 sampling sites in the region. High prevalence of HuNoV and bacterial pathogens were detected in environmental water samples in the region. The overall detection rates of HuNoV, O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC, non-O157 STEC, Salmonella, and Listeria were 25.58, 7.91, 9.42, 59.65, and 44.30%, respectively. The detection rates of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were significantly higher in the spring. Fall and spring had elevated detection rates of O157 STEC. The overall detection rates of non-O157 STEC in the fall were lower than the other seasons but not significant. The overall detection rates of HuNoV were highest in fall, followed by spring and winter, with summer being lowest and significantly lower than other seasons. This study presented the first study of evaluating the correlation between the detection rate of HuNoV and the detection rates of four bacterial pathogens from environmental water. Overall, there was no significant difference in HuNoV detection rates between samples testing positive or negative for the four bacterial pathogens tested. Pathogens in animal-impacted and human-impacted areas were investigated. There were significant higher detection rates in animal-impacted areas than that of human-impacted areas for bacterial pathogens. However, there was no difference in HuNoV detection rates between these two areas. The overall detection levels of generic E

  17. Detection of Human Epididymis Protein 4 (HE4) in Human Serum Samples Using a Specific Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijun; Lv, Zhiqiang; Shao, Jing; Xu, Ying; Luo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wenji; Luo, Shuhong; Fang, Jianmin; Wang, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Huang, Ruopan

    2016-09-01

    The human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) may have high specificity in the detection of malignant diseases, making the development of an immunoassay for HE4 essential. In our study, a fusion gene was constructed encoded with the HE4 protein. This protein was then produced in the bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) and used to immunize mice in order to eventually generate hybridomas specific to HE4. The hybridoma supernatants were then screened, and four positive anti-HE4 cell lines were selected. These cell lines produce monoclonal antibodies against HE4 epitopes, as demonstrated in the Western blot as well as by direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using the developed antibodies, we successfully identified several good antibody pairs from the hybridomas, which allowed for the development of a sandwich ELISA to measure HE4 levels. By using the HE4 ELISA, we measured HE4 levels of 60 clinical human serum samples. Compared with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved kit (Roche), our results showed a strong positive correlation to those of the FDA-approved kit. In summary, highly sensitive antibody pairs were screened against HE4, and a sandwich ELISA was developed as an accurate analytical tool for the detection of HE4 in human serum, which could be especially valuable for diagnosing ovarian carcinomas. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neuronal correlates of the five factor model (FFM) of human personality: Multimodal imaging in a large healthy sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnebekk, Astrid; Fjell, Anders M; Walhovd, Kristine B; Grydeland, Håkon; Torgersen, Svenn; Westlye, Lars T

    2013-01-15

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques have recently provided glimpse into the neurobiology of complex traits of human personality. Whereas some intriguing findings have connected aspects of personality to variations in brain morphology, the relations are complex and our current understanding is incomplete. Therefore, we aimed to provide a comprehensive investigation of brain-personality relations using a multimodal neuroimaging approach in a large sample comprising 265 healthy individuals. The NEO Personality Inventory was used to provide measures of core aspects of human personality, and imaging phenotypes included measures of total and regional brain volumes, regional cortical thickness and arealization, and diffusion tensor imaging indices of white matter (WM) microstructure. Neuroticism was the trait most clearly linked to brain structure. Higher neuroticism including facets reflecting anxiety, depression and vulnerability to stress was associated with smaller total brain volume, widespread decrease in WM microstructure, and smaller frontotemporal surface area. Higher scores on extraversion were associated with thinner inferior frontal gyrus, and conscientiousness was negatively associated with arealization of the temporoparietal junction. No reliable associations between brain structure and agreeableness and openness, respectively, were found. The results provide novel evidence of the associations between brain structure and variations in human personality, and corroborate previous findings of a consistent neuroanatomical basis of negative emotionality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Three Sample Preparation Procedures for the Quantification of L-Arginine, Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, and Symmetric Dimethylarginine in Human Plasma Using HPLC-FLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in human plasma has been associated with reduced generation of nitric oxide, leading to atherosclerotic diseases. ADMA may therefore be an important biomarker for cardiovascular disease. In the present study, three sample preparation techniques were co...... sample preparation of human plasma samples before HPLC-FLD in providing important information regarding elevated ADMA concentrations.......Increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in human plasma has been associated with reduced generation of nitric oxide, leading to atherosclerotic diseases. ADMA may therefore be an important biomarker for cardiovascular disease. In the present study, three sample preparation techniques were...... compared regarding the quantification of L-arginine and ADMA in human plasma: (A) protein precipitation (PP) based on aqueous trichloroacetic acid (TCA), (B) PP using a mixture of ammonia and acetonitrile, and (C) solid-phase extraction (SPE). The samples were analysed by using high-performance liquid...

  20. CLINICAL EXAMINATION IN GYNECOLOGY CONSULT X LABORATORY FINDINGS: EVIDENCE OF THE MAIN INFECTIONS OF THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Sodré

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs are among the most common public health problems worldwide. The study aimed to identify gynecological infectious etiology, based on the clinical complaint of the patient and later compare with the results released by the clinical laboratory, clinically analyzing external gynecological changes and clinical complaints of patients seen in primary care. This is a documentary, descriptive, and quantitative research, conducted in a primary care unit of the Sinop municipality in 2015. Women assisted by the Extension Project Team “Nursing care: A health promotion tool sexual and reproductive” participated in this work. The clinical examination data were collected in gynecological care and preventive examinations and recorded in a structured form. The number of preventive examinations in 2015 was 100 samples. The age of the women participating in the survey that stood out was 20 to 29 years old. Analyzing aspects of the cervix of patients who performed the Pap smear: 82 (82% were complete, 5 (5% showed some change, 6 (6% were friable, 5 (5% were not displayed having been surgically removed and 2 (2% were not displayed. According to this survey, of the 20 amendments in the laboratory results, 14 (70% examinations portrayed resemblance to the clinical description of the gynecological examination. The infectious agent of higher prevalence compared with the clinical description of abundant leucorrhea was Gardinerella vaginalis represented in 09 reports of cervical cytology. There was 68 (68% negative Schiller test and 8 (8% positive Schiller test and 24 (24% women, unfortunately, did not perform the test for lack of material during collection at the unit. It is concluded that investment in health education is necessary, with groups that address women's health, emphasizing the importance of prevention as well as the return of the woman to take the laboratory results and/or post-therapeutic assessment; promoting the

  1. The quantitative LOD score: test statistic and sample size for exclusion and linkage of quantitative traits in human sibships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, G P; Amos, C I; Boerwinkle, E

    1998-04-01

    We present a test statistic, the quantitative LOD (QLOD) score, for the testing of both linkage and exclusion of quantitative-trait loci in randomly selected human sibships. As with the traditional LOD score, the boundary values of 3, for linkage, and -2, for exclusion, can be used for the QLOD score. We investigated the sample sizes required for inferring exclusion and linkage, for various combinations of linked genetic variance, total heritability, recombination distance, and sibship size, using fixed-size sampling. The sample sizes required for both linkage and exclusion were not qualitatively different and depended on the percentage of variance being linked or excluded and on the total genetic variance. Information regarding linkage and exclusion in sibships larger than size 2 increased as approximately all possible pairs n(n-1)/2 up to sibships of size 6. Increasing the recombination (theta) distance between the marker and the trait loci reduced empirically the power for both linkage and exclusion, as a function of approximately (1-2theta)4.

  2. Health utilities in gynecological oncology and mastology in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Thiel, Falk C; Fasching, Peter A; Graf, Christiane; Bani, Mayada R; Loehberg, Christian R; Schrauder, Michael G; Jud, Sebastian M; Hack, Carolin C; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lux, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Cost increases in the healthcare system are leading to a need to distribute financial resources in accordance with the value of each service performed. Health-economic decision-making models can support these decisions. Due to the previous unavailability of health utilities in Germany (scored states of health as a basis for calculating quality-adjusted life-years, QALYs) for women undergoing treatment, international data are often used for such models. However, these may widely deviate from the values for a woman actually living in Germany. It is, therefore, necessary to collect and analyze health utilities in Germany. In a questionnaire survey, health utilities were collected, along with data for a healthy control group, for 580 female patients receiving treatment in the fields of mastology and gynecological oncology using a German version of the EuroQol questionnaire (EQ-5D) and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Data were also collected for the patients' medical history, tumor disease, and treatment. Significant differences with regard to quality of life were measured in relation to the individual tumor entities and in comparison to the controls. Apart from the healthy control group, patients with breast or cervical carcinoma had the best quality of life. In patients with recurrent and metastatic disease, those with breast carcinoma experienced the greatest impairment of their quality of life. According to current treatment, the most important impairment of life quality occurred in patients under radiotherapy and after surgical treatment. There are significant differences from the health utilities recorded for other countries - for example, the state of health declines much more markedly in patients with metastatic disease among American women with breast carcinoma than among German women, in whom recurrent disease and a first diagnosis of metastasis were comparable. Overall, the VAS was able to distinguish more adequately than the EQ-5D questionnaire between the

  3. Comparison of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tropism Profiles in Clinical Samples by the Trofile and MT-2 Assays▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  4. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism profiles in clinical samples by the Trofile and MT-2 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B

    2009-11-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  5. Differences in C-type lectin receptors and their adaptor molecules in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis and gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Geun; Won, Yong Sung; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Choon

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis, although not malignant, has clinically demonstrated properties of invasiveness and metastasis. The pathogenesis of endometriosis, however, has not yet been elucidated. The immunological differences between endometriosis and malignant gynecologic tumors were analyzed by assessing C-type lectin receptors, which are associated with innate immunity, and immunoglobulin secretion, which is associated with B cell adaptive immunity, in the peritoneal fluid of these patients. Peritoneal fluid samples were obtained from 42 patients with benign masses (control group), 38 with endometriosis, and 43 with gynecologic (ovarian, uterine, and cervical) cancers. The levels of expression in these samples of mRNAs encoding the C-type lectin receptors Dectin-1, MR1, MR2, DC-SIGN, Syk, Card 9, Bcl 10, Malt 1, src, Dec 205, Galectin, Tim 3, Trem 1, and DAP 12, were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the concentrations of IgG, IgA and IgM were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Findings in the three groups were compared. The level of galectin mRNA was significantly lower, and the levels of MR2 and DAP 12 mRNAs significantly higher, in the endometriosis than in the control group (pgynecologic cancer group, the level of Bcl 10 mRNA was significantly lower, and the levels of MR1, MR2, Syk, Card 9, Malt 1, Dec 205, Tim 3, and DAP 12 mRNAs significantly higher, in the endometriosis group (pcontrol group (pgynecologic cancer groups. IgA and IgG concentrations in peritoneal fluid were significantly lower in the gynecologic cancer than in the control group (p0.05). C-type lectin receptors and immunoglobulins act cooperatively and are closely associated in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The decreased expression of galectin mRNA in the peritoneal fluid of the endometriosis group suggests that endometriosis and gynecologic cancers have similar immunologic characteristics.

  6. SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS DEL GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER IN THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE BRAZILIAN NURSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio Éder Dias da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One is a documentary investigation whose objective to characterize the social representations on the gynecological cancer gifts in theses and dissertations of the Brazilian infirmary in the period from 2001 to 2007. The investigation source was the Bank of Thesis and Dissertations of the Brazilian Association of Infirmary. 51 studies had been identified. The analysis of the dices originated the following thematic categories: Imaginary the Social one of Women in front of the Gynecological Cancer; The daily one of the mastectomizada woman; The gynecological cancer and its treatment; Prevention of the gynecological cancer in the vision of the infirmary. The studies caused to apprehend the aspects of the psycho-social context, so important and necessary in the sense more atenciosamente to watch the welfare practice of the infirmary.

  7. Adverse reactions analysis and prevention of antiseptic drug in the obstetrics and gynecology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Bo, Qing; Zhang, Ying; He, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Antimicrobial agents are widely used in gynecologic inflammation and surgical period, so as to cure some infectious diseases, reduce the chance of surgical incision infection, but at the same time, there are many adverse reactions. The use of nursing interventions in obstetrics and gynecology can significantly reduce the adverse drug reactions in the treatment. The results showed that the incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was 8.8%, while that in the control group was 15.6%. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). The results showed that the nursing intervention in obstetrics and gynecology could reduce the adverse drug reactions. In a word, the nursing intervention of obstetrics and gynecology can greatly reduce the adverse reaction of antibiotics and has certain application value. It is worth popularizing in clinical practice.

  8. Is thrombocytosis a valid indicator of advanced stage and high mortality of gynecological cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Eskelund, Christian W.; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Thrombocytosis has been associated with higher stage and mortality of cancer, however, the evidence is conflicting. We examined the stage distribution and prognosis of gynecologic cancer according to levels of prediagnostic platelet count. Methods: In a primary care resource with blood...... may have an important role in diagnosis and post-diagnostic control of gynecological cancer.......Objective: Thrombocytosis has been associated with higher stage and mortality of cancer, however, the evidence is conflicting. We examined the stage distribution and prognosis of gynecologic cancer according to levels of prediagnostic platelet count. Methods: In a primary care resource with blood...... cell counts from more than 500,000 individuals, we identified 581 women with a primary diagnosis of gynecological cancer. We divided the pre-diagnostic mean platelet count derived from the 3-year period prior to cancer diagnosis into three categories of thrombocytosis (no, 150–400 × 109 /L; mild, N400...

  9. U.S. Navy Women's Satisfaction With Obstetric and Gynecologic Medical Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burr, R

    1997-01-01

    There are more than 55,000 women on active duty in the U.S. Navy. Previous research has shown that women utilize health care services at higher rates than men, and that obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN...

  10. Doppler ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maulik, D. [Winthrop Univ. Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Zalud, I. (eds.) [Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The second edition of Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology has been expanded and comprehensively updated to present the current standards of practice in Doppler ultrasound and the most recent developments in the technology. Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology encompasses the full spectrum of clinical applications of Doppler ultrasound for the practicing obstetrician-gynecologist, including the latest advances in 3D and color Doppler and the newest techniques in 4D fetal echocardiography. Written by preeminent experts in the field, the book covers the basic and physical principles of Doppler ultrasound; the use of Doppler for fetal examination, including fetal cerebral circulation; Doppler echocardiography of the fetal heart; and the use of Doppler for postdated pregnancy and in cases of multiple gestation. Chapters on the use of Doppler for gynecologic investigation include ultrasound in ectopic pregnancy, for infertility, for benign disorders and for gynecologic malignancies. (orig.)

  11. Physician's gender, communication style, patient preferences and patient satisfaction in gynecology and obstetrics: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Review of studies published in the last 10 years about women seeking gynecological- or obstetrical care and physician's gender in relation to patient preferences, differences in communication style and patient satisfaction. METHODS: Studies were identified by searching the online

  12. Doppler ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulik, D.

    2005-01-01

    The second edition of Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology has been expanded and comprehensively updated to present the current standards of practice in Doppler ultrasound and the most recent developments in the technology. Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology encompasses the full spectrum of clinical applications of Doppler ultrasound for the practicing obstetrician-gynecologist, including the latest advances in 3D and color Doppler and the newest techniques in 4D fetal echocardiography. Written by preeminent experts in the field, the book covers the basic and physical principles of Doppler ultrasound; the use of Doppler for fetal examination, including fetal cerebral circulation; Doppler echocardiography of the fetal heart; and the use of Doppler for postdated pregnancy and in cases of multiple gestation. Chapters on the use of Doppler for gynecologic investigation include ultrasound in ectopic pregnancy, for infertility, for benign disorders and for gynecologic malignancies. (orig.)

  13. Hope pictured in drawings by women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Kristianna; Hall, Elisabeth; Mogensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: In mysterious ways, hope makes life meaningful even in chaotic and uncontrolled situations. When a woman is newly diagnosed with gynecologic cancer, hope is ineffable and needs exploring. Drawings help express ineffable phenomena. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of the study was to explore how...... women newly diagnosed with gynecologic cancer express the meaning of hope in drawings. METHOD:: Participants were 15 women who on the same day had received the diagnosis of gynecologic cancer. They were between 24 and 87 years (median, 52 years) with a variety of gynecologic cancer diagnoses. Data from...... 15 drawings and postdrawing interviews with the women were analyzed using visual and hermeneutic phenomenology. RESULTS:: Three themes emerged: hope as a spirit to move on, hope as energy through nature, and hope as a communion with families. CONCLUSION:: Hope as pictured in drawings often appears...

  14. The situation of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion of gynecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain the role and possibilities of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion in gynecological cancers as uterine cervix carcinoma, uterus carcinoma, ovary carcinoma and vulva carcinoma

  15. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos César Lima de Mendonça

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  16. "Center punch" and "whole spot" bioanalysis of apixaban in human dried blood spot samples by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Yuan, Long; Ji, Qin C; Mangus, Heidi; Song, Yan; Frost, Charles; Zeng, Jianing; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2015-04-15

    Apixaban (Eliquis™) was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) and Pfizer to use as an antithrombotic/anticoagulant agent and has been recently approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A clinical study of apixaban, sponsored by BMS and Pfizer, included a pilot exploratory portion to evaluate the potential for future drug concentration monitoring using dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection. For DBS sample collection, a fixed blood volume was dispensed onto a DBS card by either regular volumetric pipette (venous blood collection) or capillary dispenser (finger prick blood collection). A 96-well semi-automated liquid-liquid extraction sample preparation procedure was developed to provide clean extracts for UHPLC-MS/MS quantitation. Assays using both partial-spot center punch and whole spot punch were developed and validated. The linear dynamic ranges for all the analyses were from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL. The coefficient of determination (r(2)) values was >0.9944 for all the validation runs. For the center punch approach, the intra-assay precision (%CV) was within 4.4% and inter-assay precision was within 2.6%. The assay accuracy, expressed as %Dev., was within ± 5.4% of the nominal concentrations. One accuracy and precision run was performed using the whole spot approach, the intra-assay precision (%CV) was within 7.1% and the accuracy was within ± 8.0% of the nominal concentrations. In contrast to the center punch approach, the whole spot approach eliminated the effect of hematocrit and high lipids on the analysis of apixaban in human DBS when an accurate sample blood volume was collected on DBS cards. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of amino acids in human sweat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-01-01

    The determination of physiological levels of amino acids is important to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases and nutritional status of individuals. Amino acids are frequently determined in biofluids such as blood (serum or plasma) and urine; however, there are less common biofluids with different concentration profiles of amino acids that could be of interest. One of these biofluids is sweat that can be obtained in a non-invasive manner and is characterized by low complex composition. The analysis of amino acids in human sweat requires the development of sample preparation strategies according to the sample matrix and small collected volume. The influence of sample preparation on the quantitative analysis of amino acids in sweat by LC-MS/MS has been assessed through a comparison between two strategies: dilution of sweat and centrifugal microsolid-phase extraction (c-μSPE). In both cases, several dilution factors were assayed for in-depth knowledge of the matrix effects, and the use of c-μSPE provided the best results in terms of accuracy. The behavior of the target analytes was a function of the dilution factor, thus providing a pattern for sample preparation that depended on the amino acid to be determined. The concentration of amino acids in sweat ranges between 6.20 ng mL(-1) (for homocysteine) and 259.77 µg mL(-1) (for serine) with precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, within 1.1-21.4%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel approach to non-biased systematic random sampling: a stereologic estimate of Purkinje cells in the human cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashiwala, Rajiv M; Louis, Elan D; Hof, Patrick R; Perl, Daniel P

    2008-10-21

    Non-biased systematic sampling using the principles of stereology provides accurate quantitative estimates of objects within neuroanatomic structures. However, the basic principles of stereology are not optimally suited for counting objects that selectively exist within a limited but complex and convoluted portion of the sample, such as occurs when counting cerebellar Purkinje cells. In an effort to quantify Purkinje cells in association with certain neurodegenerative disorders, we developed a new method for stereologic sampling of the cerebellar cortex, involving calculating the volume of the cerebellar tissues, identifying and isolating the Purkinje cell layer and using this information to extrapolate non-biased systematic sampling data to estimate the total number of Purkinje cells in the tissues. Using this approach, we counted Purkinje cells in the right cerebella of four human male control specimens, aged 41, 67, 70 and 84 years, and estimated the total Purkinje cell number for the four entire cerebella to be 27.03, 19.74, 20.44 and 22.03 million cells, respectively. The precision of the method is seen when comparing the density of the cells within the tissue: 266,274, 173,166, 167,603 and 183,575 cells/cm3, respectively. Prior literature documents Purkinje cell counts ranging from 14.8 to 30.5 million cells. These data demonstrate the accuracy of our approach. Our novel approach, which offers an improvement over previous methodologies, is of value for quantitative work of this nature. This approach could be applied to morphometric studies of other similarly complex tissues as well.

  19. Chemometrics enhanced HPLC-DAD performance for rapid quantification of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in human serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosough, Maryam; Ghafghazi, Shiva; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of phenobarbital and carbamazepine in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) regarding a fast elution methodology in less than 5 min. Briefly, this method consisted of a simple deproteinization step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a Bonus-RP column using an isocratic mode of elution with acetonitrile/K2HPO4 (pH=7.5) buffer solution (45:55). Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as non-calibrated components in the sample, second-order calibration based on multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for carbamazepine and phenobarbital were 89.7% and 86.1% and relative standard deviation values were lower than 9%. Additionally, computed elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) confirmed the accuracy of the proposed method and indicated the absence of both constant and proportional errors in the predicted concentrations. The developed method enabled the determination of the analytes in different serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction steps at minimum. Finally, the serum concentration levels of carbamazepine in three time intervals were reported for morphine-dependents who had received carbamazepine for treating their neuropathic pain. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Teresa L; Rogers, Rebecca; Lee, Sang-Joon; Muller, Carolyn Y

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported high rates of urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple intervention for treatment of urinary incontinence in this population. We recruited 40 gynecologic cancer survivors who reported urinary incontinence on a validated questionnaire. Women were randomized to either pelvic floor muscle training/behavioral therapy (treatment group) or usual care (control group). The primary outcome measure, assessed at 12 weeks post intervention, was a 40% difference in the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Fisher's exact test was used to identify differences between groups for frequency data; two-sample t-test was conducted for continuous measurements. Mean age of this cohort was 57 (range: 37-79). The majority of the survivors had uterine cancer (60%), 18% had received radiation therapy, 95% had received surgical therapy, and 35% had received chemotherapy. At three months, 80% of the treatment and 40% of the control group reported that their urinary incontinence was "much better" or "very much better" as evaluated by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (p=0.02). Brink's scores were significantly improved in the treatment group as compared to those of the controls (pgynecologic cancer survivors, it is often under-assessed and undertreated. We found a simple intervention that included pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy, which significantly improved cancer survivor's urinary incontinence. © 2013.

  1. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody OC 125 after intravenous and intraperitoneal administration in gynecologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.; Moseley, K.R.; Battaile, A.; Griffiths, T.C.; Knapp, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may be useful for radioimmunotherapy of gynecologic tumors. Iodine 131-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody, OC 125, with specificity for ovarian carcinoma, were used to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of this antibody in patients with gynecologic tumors. The radiolabeled antibody was injected intravenously or intraperitoneally into 10 patients suspected of having ovarian cancer. Blood and urine samples were used for pharmacokinetic studies, and biopsy specimens were examined for the uptake of antibody. The serum half-life of the labeled antibody was 30 hours after intravenous administration, with 20% of the injected dose per liter detected at 24 hours. After intraperitoneal injection, the appearance of antibody in serum was slow, with a maximum level of 1.4% of the injected dose per liter at 24 hours. Urinary excretion of the radiolabeled antibody was similar for intravenous and intraperitoneal administration, with approximately 50% of the injected dose excreted after 48 hours. Intraperitoneal administration of the radiolabeled antibody resulted in a higher uptake of antibody in the tumor and a lower uptake of antibody in normal tissues. On the basis of this limited study, intraperitoneal administration of radiolabeled antibody is preferred over intravenous administration for radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer

  2. Small cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract: a multifaceted spectrum of lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza-Amores, Maria; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J; Weigelt, Britta

    2014-08-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the female genital tract constitutes a diagnostic and clinical challenge given its rarity and the lack of standardized therapeutic approaches. Here we review the morphological, clinical and molecular features of gynecologic SmCCs and discuss potential areas for future research. Data for this review article were identified by searches of PubMed, EMBASE and the Internet using the search terms "small cell carcinoma" or "neuroendocrine carcinoma" and "gynecologic", "uterine cervix", "cervix", "uterus", "endometrium", "ovary", "vagina", "fallopian tube" or "vulva", and research articles published in English between 1972 and February 2014 were included. SmCCs arising from different organs within the gynecologic tract share the same histopathologic characteristics, which closely resemble those of small cell lung carcinoma. The expression of at least one immunohistochemical neuroendocrine marker is a common finding. The uterine cervix is the most frequent site of SmCC in the female genital tract. HPV infection seems to play a role in the development of cervical SmCC but not in cancers of other gynecologic sites. FIGO stage is an established prognostic factor, in particular in SCCs of the cervix. Irrespective of the site, SmCCs of the gynecologic tract display an aggressive clinical behavior with few reported long-term survivors. The therapeutic management includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Despite the potential differences in etiology and risk factors, SmCCs from different sites of the gynecologic tract have similar morphologic appearances and clinical behavior. Recent genomic analyses of small cell carcinoma of the lung have revealed potential driver genomic alterations. We posit that the comprehensive genomic characterization of gynecologic SmCCs may lead to the identification of markers that result in an improvement of diagnostic reproducibility of SmCCs of the gynecologic tract, and of molecular aberrations that may be

  3. Gynecologic radiation therapy. Novel approaches to image-guidance and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard (eds.) [Vienna General Hospital Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Erickson, Beth E. [Medical College of Wisconsin Clinics Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies led to a new worldwide consensus to introduce image guidance to gynecologic radiation therapy, particularly to brachytherapy. The book summarizes the changed practice of management: treatment planning for cervical cancer, not modified for over 60 years, has been shifted to an image-based approach, endometrial cancer management with an increase in the use of chemotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy, and vaginal cancer therapy including image guidance and high-dose delivery with IMRT. (orig.)

  4. Methodological principles of radiation influence upon specific function of female organism and gynecological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvelev, Yu.V.; Kira, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    1025 women permanently residing at the territory subjected to radioactive contamination due to the Chernobyl NPP accident underwent dispensary examination in 1991-1992. Study of ionizing radiation influence on specific functions (menstrual, reproductive, secretory and gynecological) of female organism is carried out. It is found that the highest percentage in the structure of gynecological diseases is accounted for inflammatory diseases of uterine appendages and neck of the uterus. 1 tab

  5. The Magnitude of Hemoglobin–Drop in Obstetrics and Gynecologic Operations (Is Routine Hb Check Necessary?)

    OpenAIRE

    J. Nasohi; B. Falakaflaki

    2004-01-01

    Routine hemoglobin check after obstetrics and gynecologic operations is common and recommended by textbooks, but there are just few literatures regarding to the value of routine Hb check. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of hemoglobin and it’s effects on clinical management after obstetrics and gynecologic operations . This study was undertaken on low risk patients who underwent hysterectomy, removal of dnexal mass , C-Section , A.P repair , tub...

  6. Laparoscopic virtual reality simulator and box trainer in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Ali; Sendağ, Fatih; Oztekin, Mehmet K

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether a virtual reality simulator (LapSim) and traditional box trainer are effective tools for the acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills, and whether the LapSim is superior to the box trainer in surgical education. In a study at Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey, between September 2008 and March 2013, 40 first- and second-year residents were randomized to train via the LapSim or box trainer for 4 weeks, and 20 senior residents were allocated to a control group. All 3 groups performed laparoscopic bilateral tubal ligation. Video records of each operation were assessed via the general rating scale of the Objective Structured Assessment of Laparoscopic Salpingectomy and by operation time in seconds. Compared with the control group, the LapSim and box trainer groups performed significantly better in total score (Peducation. Training with a virtual reality simulator or box trainer should be considered before actual laparoscopic procedures are carried out. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis of gynecologic pelvic masses by CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hisao; Kubo, Atsushi; Takagi, Yaeko; Kinoshita, Fumio; Maekawa, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred eighty four patients with gynecologic pelvic masses were evaluated with CT scans. Of the patients, 196 had subsequent surgical determination of abnormalities and pathological proof of diagnosis was obtained. Only these 196 patients were included in this study. The CT scans could provide correct diagnosis in 113 of 114 (99%) patients with benign uterine tumor and in all (100%) patients with either serous cystadenoma or dermoid cyst. However, evaluation of mucinous cystadenoma (44%) and endometriosis cyst (37%) by CT scan has some limitations. It was difficult to differentiate mucinous cystadenoma from ovarian carcinoma, because both lesions had partial multiloculation and solid-like areas in the cyst. The CT findings of endometriosis cyst had similarity with serous cystadenoma, and 5 of 8 patients with this disease were diagnosed as serous cystadenoma. Ovarian fibroma and endometrial cancer were also not determined by CT scans. CT identified 87% of patients with ovarian cancer, while false positive rate of this disease was 38% (8/21). In 6 of 13 patients with both of leiomyoma and ovarian cyst, CT was able to demonstrate ovarian lesions that were overlooked by bimanual examinations. The role of CT scanning in our clinical practice is discussed. (author)

  8. Women's preference of cosmetic results after gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Kathryn; Goldberg, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    To determine the cosmetic appeal of different incision types used in gynecologic surgery. One hundred women between the ages of 20 and 40 years were shown 4 color photographs of a female abdomen with incision sites marked for Pfannenstiel, minilaparotomy, traditional laparoscopy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopy. The women were asked to rank the photographs on cosmetic appeal alone. An additional photograph depicting single-port laparoscopy was then added, and patients were asked to again rank the photographs. Participants were also asked basic demographic information and prior surgical history. Office practice. One hundred women between the ages of 20 and 40. Participants. Minilaparotomy was ranked as the most appealing incision among the first set of photographs by 74% of the participants, and the remaining 26% preferred traditional laparoscopy. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy was ranked as the least appealing scar type by 42%, and no patient selected it as their first choice. Sixty-four percent preferred the appearance of a single-port laparoscopic scar when that option was added. The only demographic variable that reached statistical significance was the presence of prior abdominal surgery. Patients without prior surgery ranked minilaparotomy as more cosmetically appealing. When several minimally invasive surgical approaches are possible, the patient should be counseled regarding the cosmetic results of each. Patients in this study strongly preferred the appearance of minilaparotomy and single-port incisions over full Pfannenstiel or robotic incisions. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabirmanesh B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR. Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5′untranslated region (5′ UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid detection of HPeV1 by RT-PCR can decrease both the unnecessary use of antibiotics and the costs in clinical practice

  10. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ghazi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR.

     

    Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5untranslated region (5 UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.

     

    Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and aut