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Sample records for human growth hormones

  1. Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Growth Hormone Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: GH; Human Growth Hormone; HGH; Somatotropin; Growth Hormone Stimulation Test; Growth ...

  2. Hormones and Human and Nonhuman Primate Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Robin Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review information pertaining to the hormonal regulation of nonhuman primate growth, with specific focus on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and adrenal androgens. Hormones of the GH-IGF axis are consistently associated with measures of growth - linear, weight, or both - during the growth period; in adulthood, concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein are not associated with any measures of size. Comparing patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) may be especially relevant for understanding whether the childhood stage of growth and development is unique to humans and perhaps other apes. Genetic, hormonal, and morphological data on adrenarche in other nonhuman primate species suggest that this endocrine transition is delayed in humans, chimpanzees, and possibly gorillas, while present very early in postnatal life in macaques. This suggests that although perhaps permitted by an extension of the pre-adolescent growth period, childhood builds upon existing developmental substrates rather than having been inserted de novo into an ancestral growth trajectory. Hormones can provide insight regarding the evolution of the human growth trajectory. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHPP): Information for People Treated with Pituitary Human Growth Hormone (Summary) How did Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) occur in people treated with pituitary human growth hormone (hGH)? From 1963 to 1985, the National Hormone ...

  4. Human Growth Hormone: The Latest Ergogenic Aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, Virginia S.

    1988-01-01

    Believing that synthetic human growth hormone (hGH) will lead to athletic prowess and fortune, some parents and young athletes wish to use the drug to enhance sports performance. Should hGH become widely available, its abuse could present many problems, from potential health risks to the ethics of drug-enhanced athletic performance. (JL)

  5. Single dose and pulsatile treatment with human growth hormone in growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    P. J. Smith; Pringle, P J; Brook, C. G.

    1987-01-01

    The growth and growth hormone profiles in four children receiving three different regimens of treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) were compared. There was no significant difference in the rate of growth between the regimens; the rate of growth fell dramatically after treatment. Pulsatile administration of hGH was no better than conventional treatment.

  6. Dimerization of Human Growth Hormone by Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian C.; Mulkerrin, Michael G.; Wells, James A.

    1991-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium studies demonstrated that zinc ion (Zn2+) induced the dimerization of human growth hormone (hGH). Scatchard analysis of 65Zn2+ binding to hGH showed that two Zn2+ ions associate per dimer of hGH in a cooperative fashion. Cobalt (II) can substitute for Zn2+ in the hormone dimer and gives a visible spectrum characteristic of cobalt coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by oxygen- and nitrogen-containing ligands. Replacement of potential Zn2+ ligands (His18, His21, and Glu174) in hGH with alanine weakened both Zn2+ binding and hGH dimer formation. The Zn2+-hGH dimer was more stable than monomeric hGH to denaturation in guanidine-HCl. Formation of a Zn2+-hGH dimeric complex may be important for storage of hGH in secretory granules.

  7. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  8. [Human growth hormone and Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marco, Silvia Beatriz; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José Ignacio; Garagorri Otero, Jesús María

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of clinical and analytical parameters as predictors of the final growth response in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone. A retrospective study was performed on 25 girls with Turner syndrome (17 treated with growth hormone), followed-up until adult height. Auxological, analytical, genetic and pharmacological parameters were collected. A descriptive and analytical study was conducted to evaluate short (12 months) and long term response to treatment with growth hormone. A favourable treatment response was shown during the first year of treatment in terms of height velocity gain in 66.6% of cases (height-gain velocity >3cm/year). A favourable long-term treatment response was also observed in terms of adult height, which increased by 42.82±21.23cm (1.25±0.76 SDS), with an adult height gain of 9.59±5.39cm (1.68±1.51 SDS). Predictors of good response to growth hormone treatment are: A) initial growth hormone dose, B) time on growth hormone treatment until starting oestrogen therapy, C) increased IGF1 and IGFBP-3 levels in the first year of treatment, and D) height gain velocity in the first year of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Autodecomposition of radiolabeled human growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, G.; Amburn, K.

    1986-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) was radiolabeled with /sup 125/I, using a gentle lactoperoxidase technique. The stability and decomposition products of this tracer were studied by frequent periodic analysis by Sephadex G-100 chromatography on a long column. Monomeric /sup 125/I-hGH showed an exponential decline, with a half-life of 61 days. The main radioactive degradation product was iodide, which appeared with a fractional appearance rate of 0.01136 per day. Secondary degradation products were a series of radioactive oligomers of hGH, which appeared with an overall fractional rate of 0.00525 per day. The kinetic data obtained should provide guidelines for the shelf-life and repurification schedule of radioiodinated polypeptides.

  10. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans.

  11. EFFECTS OF CHINA-MADE RECOMBINANT HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE ON THE TREATMENT OF GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jiang; Wei Wang; Wen-xin Sun; Xiu-min Wang; Ji-hong Ni; Feng-sheng Chen; De-fen Wang

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of China-made recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and to investigate the utilities of various biochemical parameters in GHD diagnosis and treatment.Methods Our study comprises of 30 normal children and 71 GHD children treated with China-made r-hGH substitution 3 (IGFBP-3), bone turnover markers (Ost, ICTP), and anti-growth hormone antibody (GHAb) were detected before and after r-hGH treatment.Results After the first 3 and 6 months of treatment, growth velocities of GHD children were significantly increased (13.1 + 3.7 and 12.6 ± 3.6 cm/year) compared with pretreatment values (2.9 ± 0.8 cm/year, P < 0.01). GHD Children had obviously reduced serum levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and bone turnover markers (Ost, ICTP) compared with normal controls(P < 0.01), and these biochemical parameters improved significantly after treatment (P < 0.01). Growth hormone antibodies were positive in 17 of 45 cases after treatment by binding capacity detection. The binding percentage of growth hormone antibody which was increased more than 30% after the treatment showed a negative correlation with growth velocity (P < 0.01).Conclusions (1) The growth stimulating effect and safety were confirmed in using China-made r-hGH in the treatment of GHD children for 6 months. (2) The measurements of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 may serve as useful parameters in the diagnosis of GHD. (3) Serum Ost and ICTP are useful laboratory criteria for evaluating the effect of r-hGH therapy in the early stage. (4) It is necessary to monitor serum levels of GHAb during r-hGH therapy.

  12. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  13. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  15. Human growth hormone and the development of osteochondritis dissecans lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Waqas M; Hussain, Haroon M; Hussain, Mohammed S; Ho, Sherwin S W

    2011-12-01

    No single etiology regarding the cause of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions is unanimously accepted. This report documents a novel case of multiple OCD lesions affecting the left knee and a solitary defect of the right elbow in a patient with acquired human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency and supplementation. hGH deficiency and hormone replacement may be related to the development of OCD lesions.

  16. Electrochemical Methods for Human Growth Hormone Doping Detection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Human Growth Hormone (GH) is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and promotes growth of tissue through direct uptake at target tissue sites, or alternatively, by regulating production of insulin-like growth factor-1. The World Anti-Doping Agency considers GH a performance enhancing substance, so the use of GH by athletes is prohibited in most sports. The current immunoassay for GH detection is suboptimal for routine screening of blood samples because of the large resources required for c...

  17. Human Growth Hormone (HGH): Does It Slow Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Healthy aging Human growth hormone is described by some as the key to slowing the aging process. Before you sign up, get the facts. ... stave off some of the changes linked to aging, such as decreased muscle and bone mass. If ...

  18. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the ... of granivorous species, such as the chicken ... dominant in carnivorous avian species.[1] The ... Studies in humans and animal models show ..... rabbits over expressing growth hormone develop acromegaly and.

  19. [How safe is the recombinant human growth hormone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-León, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, several aspects related to the safety of the use of biosynthetic human growth hormone are reviewed. For example, its classification as a biosynthetic drug, the phases that need to be performed in Mexico to verify its safety (obtaining, purification, preclinical studies, clinical trials, and finally observational clinical studies), as well as the evidence that exists in relation to the association of intracranial hypertension, muscular events, scoliosis, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, obstructive sleep apnea, pancreatitis, alterations in cortisol, thyroid hormones alterations, cardiovascular disease, metabolic risk, mortality and cancer, adverse events not related to its use, and finally dosing and safety.

  20. Recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessie E Spiliotis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bessie E SpiliotisDivision of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, University of Patras, School of Medicine, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Turner syndrome (TS is a common chromosomal disorder in women that is associated with the absence of one of the X chromosomes. Severe short stature and a lack of pubertal development characterize TS girls, causing psychosocial problems and reduced bone mass. The growth impairment in TS seems to be due to multiple factors including an abnormal growth hormone (GH – insulin-like growth factor (IGF – IGF binding protein axis and haploinsufficiency of the short stature homeobox-containing gene. Growth hormone and sex steroid replacement therapy has enhanced growth, pubertal development, bone mass, and the quality of life of TS girls. Recombinant human GH (hGH has improved the height potential of TS girls with varied results though, depending upon the dose of hGH and the age of induction of puberty. The best final adult height and peak bone mass achievement results seem to be achieved when hGH therapy is started early and puberty is induced at the normal age of puberty in a regimen mimicking physiologic puberty. The initiation of estradiol therapy at an age-appropriate time may also help the TS patients avoid osteoporosis during adulthood. Recombinant hGH therapy in TS seems to be safe. Studies so far show no adverse effects on cardiac function, glucose metabolism or any association with neoplasms but research is still in progress to provide conclusive data on long-term safety.Keywords: Turner syndrome, recombinant growth hormone, growth hormone deficiency, SHOX gene, hormonal replacement therapy

  1. Effectiveness of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Pharyngocutaneous Fistula Closure

    OpenAIRE

    Kucuk, Nurten; Sari, Murat; Midi, Ahmet; Yumusakhuylu, Ali Cemal; Findik, Ozan; Binnetoglu, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In laryngeal cancer, which comprises 25% of head and neck cancer, chemotherapy has come into prominence with the increase in organ-protective treatments. With such treatment, salvage surgery has increased following recurrence; the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula has also increased in both respiratory and digestive system surgery. We investigated the effects of recombinant human growth hormone on pharyngocutaneous fistula closure in Sprague-Dawley rats, based on an increase i...

  2. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed...

  3. Body segments and growth hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Bundak, R; Hindmarsh, P C; Brook, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of human growth hormone treatment for five years on sitting height and subischial leg length of 35 prepubertal children with isolated growth hormone deficiency were investigated. Body segments reacted equally to treatment with human growth hormone; this is important when comparing the effect of growth hormone on the growth of children with skeletal dysplasias or after spinal irradiation.

  4. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, K; Wagner, M; Brabant, G

    1997-01-01

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation.

  5. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  6. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G. [Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ling Hou,1,* Zhi-hang Chen,2,* Dong Liu,3 Yuan-guo Cheng,2 Xiao-ping Luo1 1Department of Pediatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Objective: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods: Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results: In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2, and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞7th/AUC(0–∞1st of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞6th/AUC(0–∞1st of Jintrolong® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion: The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was

  8. Growth hormone and the kidney: the use of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in growth-retarded children with chronic renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, R N

    1991-04-01

    Hypothalamic production of growth hormone releasing hormone stimulates the anterior pituitary gland to release growth hormone (GH). The clinical manifestations of GH on tissues are either direct or are mediated by insulin-like growth factors (IGF). Both the somatic effects of GH and the renal manifestations of an increase in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow are mediated by IGF. The increase in glomerular filtration rate/renal plasma flow that occurs with either exogenous or endogenous GH is not apparent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF); therefore, it is unlikely that recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment of patients with CRF will result in glomerular hyperfiltration. Longitudinal studies are required to determine if the glomerulosclerosis and renal functional impairment occurring in GH and growth hormone releasing hormone transgenic mice occurs after rhGH treatment of growth-retarded uremic rats with GH resulted in an improvement in growth velocity. This led to preliminary studies in growth-retarded children with CRF by using rhGH. The acceleration of growth velocity was dramatic despite the fact that GH levels are elevated in uremia. The elevated IGF carrier proteins in uremic children may contribute to the growth retardation. Treatment with rhGH may be efficacious by stimulating a net increase in the free (unbound) IGF levels. Hyposecretion of GH may contribute to the failure to achieve optimal growth after successful renal transplantation. Treatment with rhGH may be efficacious in improving the growth velocity of renal allograft recipients.

  9. Development of a long acting human growth hormone analog suitable for once a week dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanki, Moorthy S S; Bhat, Abhijit; Bolanos, Ben; Brunel, Florence; Del Rosario, Joselyn; Dettling, Danielle; Horn, Mark; Lappe, Rodney; Preston, Ryan; Sievers, Annette; Stankovic, Nebojsa; Woodnut, Gary; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-15

    Human growth hormone was conjugated to a carrier aldolase antibody, using a novel linker by connecting a disulphide bond in growth hormone to a lysine-94 amine located on the Fab arm of the antibody. The resulting CovX body showed reduced affinity towards human growth hormone receptor, reduced cell-based activity, but improved pharmacodynamic properties. We have demonstrated that this CovX-body, given once a week, showed comparable activity as growth hormone given daily in an in vivo hypophysectomized rat model.

  10. Buccal adhesive nanofibers containing human growth hormone for oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Suk; Han, Suk-Hee; Hyun, Changbaig; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2016-10-01

    Due to a lack of proper drug carriers to deliver treatments for mucositis, many cancer patients suffer from oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We prepared a double-layered electrospun nanofibrous sheets composed of Eudragit and chitosan to accelerate the healing rate of oral mucous ulcer. Human growth hormone (hGH) and Eudragit in a mixture of dimethylacetamide and ethanol were co-electrospun to nanofibrous sheets. The electrospun fibrous mat was subsequently layered with chitosan by a dip-coating method. Chitosan-layered sheets showed attenuated mass erosion while uncoated sheets were instantly melted at the physiological condition. The released hGH was trapped on the chitosan layer by the ionic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged hGH, and a large number of entrapped proteins remained on the SIS membrane due to the muco-adhesive properties of chitosan. hGH-incorporated sheets significantly increased proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts. In vivo study employing oral ulcers in dogs, the ulcers dressed with chitosan-layered sheets showed enhanced wound recovery and the chitosan layers on the sheet greatly assisted prolonged recovery. Therefore, chitosan-layered Eudragit nanofibrous sheets can be potentially applied to developing muco-adhesive wound dressing materials with pH-dependent drug release by adjusting the thickness of chitosan sheath on the sheets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1396-1406, 2016.

  11. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  12. Triiodothyronine inhibits transcription from the human growth hormone promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, A; Louette, J; Voz, M L; Tixier-Vidal, A; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-07-09

    Three DNA constructs, the natural human growth hormone gene (hGH-hGH) its 500 bp promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (hGH-CAT), and its structural part linked to the herpes virus thymidine kinase promoter (TK-hGH) were introduced into rat pituitary GC cells by DEAE-dextran transfection. Transient expression was followed as a function of triiodothyronine (T3) concentration. The hGH-CAT expression was specifically inhibited by T3 following a typical dose-response curve while hGH-GH gene expression was not significantly modified. The transient expression of TK-hGH increased as a function of T3 concentration. These results indicate that T3 exerts two opposite effects on hGH gene expression. First, it down-regulates expression by acting on the promoter; second, it up-regulates expression by acting on the structural part of the gene. These action could be due to regulation of transcription and mRNA stabilization, respectively.

  13. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  14. Short-term effect of recombinant human growth hormone in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Becker, U; Grønbaek, M;

    1994-01-01

    As growth hormone possesses anabolic properties that are active on protein metabolism, and thus of potential benefit to patients with chronic liver disease, we determined the metabolic effects of recombinant human growth hormone on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) its specific binding proteins......, and liver function. Twenty consecutive patients with cirrhosis were randomized to recombinant human growth hormone (Norditropin, 4 I.U. twice daily) subcutaneously for 6 weeks (n = 10) or conventional medical treatment (n = 10). The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I in the recombinant...... human growth hormone group increased after 3 (p growth factor-I during the treatment period was expressed as area under the curve (AUC). The AUCIGF-I was significantly larger...

  15. Short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone and feeding on gluconeogenesis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a short-term fast, lactating women have increased rates of glucose production but not gluconeogenesis (GNG) despite relative hypoinsulinemia. We explored the effects of non-insulin-dependent increase in glucose utilization and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on glucose production, glyc...

  16. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  17. Expression of an Exogenous Growth Hormone Gene by Transplantable Human Epidermal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Barrandon, Yann; Green, Howard; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1987-09-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was used to introduce a recombinant human growth hormone gene into cultured human keratinocytes. The transduced keratinocytes secreted biologically active growth hormone into the culture medium. When grafted as an epithelial sheet onto athymic mice, these cultured keratinocytes reconstituted an epidermis that was similar in appearance to that resulting from normal cells, but from which human growth hormone could be extracted. Transduced epidermal cells may prove to be a general vehicle for the delivery of gene products by means of grafting.

  18. Short-term effect of recombinant human growth hormone in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Becker, U; Grønbaek, M;

    1994-01-01

    As growth hormone possesses anabolic properties that are active on protein metabolism, and thus of potential benefit to patients with chronic liver disease, we determined the metabolic effects of recombinant human growth hormone on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) its specific binding proteins...... an increase in very low levels of insulin-like growth factor-I, even in patients with cirrhosis with advanced disease, but the clinical benefits remain to be demonstrated....

  19. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production ...

  20. Growth hormone test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone ...

  1. Optimization of production of recombinant human growth hormone in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Rezaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human growth hormone (hGH is a single-chain polypeptide that participates in a wide range of biological functions such as metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids as well as in growth, development and immunity. Growth hormone deficiency in human occurs both in children and adults. The routine treatment for this condition is administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH made by prokaryotes. Since nonglycosylated human growth hormone is a biologically active protein, prokaryotic expression systems are preferred for its production. Materials and Methods: Different strains of E.coli were transformed by plasmid containing human growth hormone gene and cultured in different conditions. After induction by IPTG, recombinant human growth hormone production was assessed using ELISA, dot blotting and western blotting techniques. Results: High levels of rhGH were produced using E.coli prokaryotic protein production system. Conclusion: This simple and cost effective production process could be recruited for large scale production of rhGH.

  2. Polyacrylamide gels with selective recognition of the tetrameric molecular form of human growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kublickas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Networks of polyacrylamide were studied for the possibility of imprinting of the oligomeric form of human growth hormone. The tetrameric molecular form of human growth hormone was molecularly imprinted for the first time. The results show that approximately 50–70% (w/w of the templates (depending on polymerization conditions could be extracted from the molecularly imprinted acrylamide polymers. The resulting ‘gel antibodies’ against this form of human growth hormone in the form of granules of polyacrylamide were compared with granules of non-imprinted polymer. The selectivity of the artificial gel antibodies was studied. Investigation of the binding to imprinted polymer of the template hormone, other molecular forms of the hormone and other proteins shows the selectivity of the developed artificial gel antibodies.

  3. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... Key words: Breast cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, immunohistochemistry, ... therapy.[6‑8] Of all these prognostic and predictive factors, ... one of the biggest private medical laboratories in Nigeria.

  4. Both pituitary and placental growth hormone transcripts are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melen, L; Hennen, G; Dullaart, RPF; Igout, A

    1997-01-01

    The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at t

  5. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  6. Influence of glucocorticoids and growth hormone on insulin sensitivity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, K C J; Chong, L E; Riddle, M C

    2013-06-01

    The seminal concept proposed by Sir Harold Himsworth more than 75 years ago that a large number of patients with diabetes were 'insulin insensitive', now termed insulin resistance, has now expanded to include several endocrine syndromes, namely those of glucocorticoid excess, and growth hormone excess and deficiency. Synthetic glucocorticoids are increasingly used to treat a wide variety of chronic diseases, whereas the beneficial effects of recombinant growth hormone replacement therapy in children and adults with growth hormone deficiency have now been well-recognized for over 25 years. However, clinical and experimental studies have established that increased circulating levels of glucocorticoids and growth hormone can also lead to worsening of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, overt diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Improved understanding of the physiological 24-h rhythmicity of glucocorticoid and growth hormone secretion and its influence on the dawn phenomenon and the Staub-Trauggot effect has therefore led to renewed interest in studies on the mechanisms of insulin resistance induced by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and growth hormone in humans. In this review, we describe the physiological events that result from the presence of resistance to insulin action at the level of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver, describe the known mechanisms of glucocorticoid- and growth hormone-mediated insulin resistance, and provide an update of the contributions of glucocorticoids and growth hormone to understanding the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and its effects on several endocrine syndromes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  7. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P growth.

  8. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than ...

  9. Inhibitory effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth and invasiveness of PC3 human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Arenas, M Isabel; Schally, Andrew V; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Zarka, Elías; González-Santander, Marta; Carmena, María J; Vacas, Eva; Prieto, Juan C; Bajo, Ana M

    2013-02-15

    New approaches are needed to the therapy of advanced prostate cancer. This study determined the effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists, JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on growth of PC3 tumors as well as on angiogenesis and metastasis through the evaluation of various factors that contribute largely to the progression of prostate cancer. Human PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) or JV-1-38 (20 μg/day) lasted 41 days. We also evaluated the effects of JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on proliferation, cell adhesion and migration in PC-3 cells in vitro. Several techniques (Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and zymography) were used to evaluate the expression levels of GHRH receptors and its splice variants, GHRH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, β-catenin and E-cadherin. GHRH antagonists suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro and significantly inhibited growth of PC3 tumors. After treatment with these analogues, we found an increase in expression of GHRH receptor accompanied by a decrease of GHRH levels, a reduction in both VEGF and HIF-1α expression and in active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9, a significant increase in levels of membrane-associated β-catenin and a significant decline in E-cadherin. These results support that the blockade of GHRH receptors can modulate elements involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Consequently, GHRH antagonists could be considered as suitable candidates for therapeutic trials in the management of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  10. Maternal serum placental growth hormone, but not human placental lactogen or insulin growth factor-1, is positively associated with fetal growth in the first half of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N G; Juul, A; Christiansen, M

    2010-01-01

    To investigate if maternal levels of human placental lactogen (hPL), placental growth hormone (PGH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are associated with growth rate of the biparietal diameter (BPD) in the first half of pregnancy.......To investigate if maternal levels of human placental lactogen (hPL), placental growth hormone (PGH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are associated with growth rate of the biparietal diameter (BPD) in the first half of pregnancy....

  11. A statistical model of diurnal variation in human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Jin, Moonsoo; Maliszewski, Anne M.; Brown, Emery N.

    2003-01-01

    The diurnal pattern of growth hormone (GH) serum levels depends on the frequency and amplitude of GH secretory events, the kinetics of GH infusion into and clearance from the circulation, and the feedback of GH on its secretion. We present a two-dimensional linear differential equation model based on these physiological principles to describe GH diurnal patterns. The model characterizes the onset times of the secretory events, the secretory event amplitudes, as well as the infusion, clearance, and feedback half-lives of GH. We illustrate the model by using maximum likelihood methods to fit it to GH measurements collected in 12 normal, healthy women during 8 h of scheduled sleep and a 16-h circadian constant-routine protocol. We assess the importance of the model components by using parameter standard error estimates and Akaike's Information Criterion. During sleep, both the median infusion and clearance half-life estimates were 13.8 min, and the median number of secretory events was 2. During the constant routine, the median infusion half-life estimate was 12.6 min, the median clearance half-life estimate was 11.7 min, and the median number of secretory events was 5. The infusion and clearance half-life estimates and the number of secretory events are consistent with current published reports. Our model gave an excellent fit to each GH data series. Our analysis paradigm suggests an approach to decomposing GH diurnal patterns that can be used to characterize the physiological properties of this hormone under normal and pathological conditions.

  12. Growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  13. Translational mixed-effects PKPD modelling of recombinant human growth hormone - from hypophysectomized rat to patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, A; Thygesen, P; Agersø, H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We aimed to develop a mechanistic mixed-effects pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) (PKPD) model for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in hypophysectomized rats and to predict the human PKPD relationship. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: A non-linear mixed-effects model...

  14. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  15. Translational mixed-effects PKPD modelling of recombinant human growth hormone - from hypophysectomized rat to patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Anders; Thygesen, Peter; Agersø, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We aimed to develop a mechanistic mixed-effects pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) (PKPD) model for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in hypophysectomized rats and to predict the human PKPD relationship. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: A non-linear mixed-effects model...... was developed from experimental PKPD studies of rhGH and effects of long-term treatment as measured by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and bodyweight gain in rats. Modelled parameter values were scaled to human values using the allometric approach with fixed exponents for PKs and unscaled for PDs...... a clinically relevant biomarker, IGF-1, to a primary clinical end-point, growth/bodyweight gain. Scaling of the model parameters provided robust predictions of the human PKPD in growth hormone-deficient patients including variability....

  16. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  17. Clastogenic effects of biosynthetic human growth hormone in Snell dwarf mice and CHO cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Buul-Offers, S. van

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of Snell dwarf mice with high concentrations of human growth hormone from pituitaries as well as of bacterial origin, significantly increased the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in bone-marrow cells, as measured by the micronucleus test. In vitro treatment of Chinese hamster ovary

  18. Clastogenic effects of biosynthetic human growth hormone in Snell dwarf mice and CHO cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Buul-Offers, S. van

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of Snell dwarf mice with high concentrations of human growth hormone from pituitaries as well as of bacterial origin, significantly increased the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in bone-marrow cells, as measured by the micronucleus test. In vitro treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease 38 years after diagnostic use of human growth hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Croes (Esther); G. Roks (Gerwin); G.H. Jansen; P.C. Nijssen; C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractA 47 year old man is described who developed pathology proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) 38 years after receiving a low dose of human derived growth hormone (hGH) as part of a diagnostic procedure. The patient presented with a cerebellar syndrome, which is compatible with iatrogenic

  20. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF 2 YEARS OF HUMAN GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT IN TURNER SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLIJPER, FME; SINNEMA, G; AKKERHUIS, GW; BRUGMANBOEZEMAN, A; FEENSTRA, J; DENHARTOG, L; HEUVEL, F

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-eight girls with Turner syndrome were treated for 2 years with human growth hormone. Both parents and patients carried out assessments of the effects of treatment on various aspects of psychosocial functioning. The children used the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Social Anxiety Scale

  1. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF 2 YEARS OF HUMAN GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT IN TURNER SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLIJPER, FME; SINNEMA, G; AKKERHUIS, GW; BRUGMANBOEZEMAN, A; FEENSTRA, J; DENHARTOG, L; HEUVEL, F

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-eight girls with Turner syndrome were treated for 2 years with human growth hormone. Both parents and patients carried out assessments of the effects of treatment on various aspects of psychosocial functioning. The children used the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Social Anxiety Scale

  2. Effects of growth hormone on glucose and fat metabolism in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Louise; Krag, Morten Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo data from tests performed in normal subjects and in patients who had abnormal growth hormone (GH) status. Experimental data in human subjects demonstrate that GH acutely inhibits glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. At the same time GH stimulates the turnover...

  3. Response of the growth plate of uremic rats to human growth hormone and corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.F. Barbosa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with chronic renal failure in general present growth retardation that is aggravated by corticosteroids. We describe here the effects of methylprednisolone (MP and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on the growth plate (GP of uremic rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal nephrectomy in 30-day-old rats, followed by 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH (N = 7 or 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH + 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 treatment for 10 days. Control rats with intact renal function were sham-operated and treated with 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or vehicle (N = 7. Uremic rats (N = 7 were used as untreated control animals. Structural alterations in the GP and the expression of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and anti-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I by epiphyseal chondrocytes were evaluated. Uremic MP rats displayed a reduction in the proliferative zone height (59.08 ± 4.54 vs 68.07 ± 7.5 µm, P < 0.05 and modifications in the microarchitecture of the GP. MP and uremia had an additive inhibitory effect on the proliferative activity of GP chondrocytes, lowering the expression of PCNA (19.48 ± 11.13 vs 68.64 ± 7.9% in control, P < 0.0005 and IGF-I (58.53 ± 0.96 vs 84.78 ± 2.93% in control, P < 0.0001, that was counteracted by rhGH. These findings suggest that in uremic rats rhGH therapy improves longitudinal growth by increasing IGF-I synthesis in the GP and by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

  4. Does growth hormone cause cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, P.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Shalet, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Acromegaly;Adult;Animals;cancer epidemiology;complications;Child;Child Development;Colorectal Neoplasms;deficiency;epidemiology;etiology;Evaluation;Growth Hormone;Human Growth Hormone;Humans;Insulin-Like Growth Factor I;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Neoplasm Recurrence,Local;Neoplasms;Neoplasms,Multiple Primary;physiology;physiopathology;Risk Factors;secretion;therapy. The ability of GH, via its mediator peptide IGF-1, to influence regulation of ce...

  5. Ovine prolactin and human growth hormone derivatives. Specific modification of their alpha-amino groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridad, J J; Nowicki, C; Santomé, J A; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1988-06-01

    The alpha-amino group of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and human growth hormone (hGH) was selectively modified by transamination with glyoxylic acid. No difference was found in the binding capacity of transaminated oPRL to rat liver lactogenic receptors with respect to its control, although both samples showed a decrease in its binding capacity with reference to the native hormone. This decrease was due to conformational changes caused by the reaction conditions and not by the transamination itself, as shown by the circular dichroism spectra. Transaminated hGH retained the full binding capacity of the hormone. These results suggest that the alpha-amino group is not relevant for the binding to lactogenic liver receptors in both lactogenic hormones.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance and electrochemical imunosensors for human growth hormone and antibodies against human growth hormone detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rukšnaitė, Justina

    2014-01-01

    Šioje daktaro disertacijoje buvo nagrinėjami paviršiaus plazmonų rezonanso (PPR) ir elektrocheminiai imuniniai jutikliai žmogaus augimo hormonui (ŽAH) ir antikūnams prieš žmogaus augimo hormoną (anti-ŽAH) nustatyti bei pritaikyti juos realių mėginių analizei. Šiame darbe buvo nagrinėjami nekryptingas ir kryptingas antikūnų imobilizavimo būdai PPR jutiklio lusto paviršiuje ir tirtas antikūno-antigeno komplekso formavimasis. Buvo nustatyta, kad tinkamiausias iš tirtų anti-ŽAH imobilizavimo P...

  7. Discrimination of Recombinant from Natural Human Growth Hormone Using DNA Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Detection of athletes who use synthetic human growth hormone (hGH; or somatotropin) to enhance physical strength and obtain an advantage in competitive sports is a formidable problem, as rhGH is virtually identical to the natural pituitary hormone. However, some post-translational and other modifications have been documented by chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry (MS) in a small percentage of rhGH. In the present work, development of DNA aptamers against research-grade rhGH and n...

  8. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than......' treatment of lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients with hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), increased total and free IGF-I twofold and appeared safe and tolerable. The potential of low-dose hGH in the treatment of HIV-lipodystrophy awaits examination by placebo-controlled, randomized trials....

  9. Free Access to Running Wheels Abolishes Hyperphagia in Human Growth Hormone Transgenic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    KOMATSUDA, Mugiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity is a major health problem, and increased food intake and decreased physical activity are considered as two major factors causing obesity. Previous studies show that voluntary exercise in a running wheel decreases not only body weight but also food intake of rats. We previously produced human growth hormone transgenic (TG) rats, which are characterized by severe hyperphagia and obesity. To gain more insight into the effects on physical activity to food consumption and obesity,...

  10. An insulin-induced DNA-binding protein for the human growth hormone gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Prager, D; Gebremedhin, S; Melmed, S

    1990-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is usually mediated by transacting transcriptional factors that bind to upstream regulatory elements. As insulin regulates transcription of the growth hormone (GH) gene, we tested nuclear extracts from unstimulated and insulin-stimulated Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells for binding to four human GH (hGH) gene promoter oligonucleotide fragments identified as target-binding sequences by DNAse I footprinting. Using a mobility shift assay, an insulin-induced D...

  11. Subcutaneous absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of recombinant human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Susgaard, Søren;

    1993-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: The relative bioavailability of two highly concentrated (12 IU/ml) formulations of biosynthetic human growth hormone (GH) administered subcutaneously was compared. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study. Conventional GH therapy was withdrawn 72 hours before each study period. T....... CONCLUSIONS: There is no significant difference between the absorption kinetics and short-term metabolic effects of these two highly concentrated formulations of biosynthetic GH. The two formulations are bioequivalent....

  12. Specific carbon-13 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, T.; Jensen, E.B.; Junker, F.; Dalboege, H. (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark)); Abildgaard, F.; Led, J.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, The H.C. Oersted Institute (Denmark))

    1992-01-01

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone specifically {sup 13}C-labelled in the carbonyl positions of all 26 leucine residues has been obtained by recombiant DNA techniques using {sup 13}C-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, on the whole, the labelling is specific with no significant mislabelling as would have been the case had the {sup 13}C-labelled leucine been metabolized. (au).

  13. Optimizing conditions for production of high levels of soluble recombinant human growth hormone using Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Marzieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Edalati, Masoud; Biria, Davoud

    2015-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is synthesized and stored by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and can effect on body metabolism. This protein can be used to treat hGH deficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome and Turner syndrome. The limitations in current technology for soluble recombinant protein production, such as inclusion body formation, decrease its usage for therapeutic purposes. To achieve high levels of soluble form of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) we used suitable host strain, appropriate induction temperature, induction time and culture media composition. For this purpose, 32 experiments were designed using Taguchi method and the levels of produced proteins in all 32 experiments were evaluated primarily by ELISA and dot blotting and finally the purified rhGH protein products assessed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. Our results indicate that media, bacterial strains, temperature and induction time have significant effects on the production of rhGH. The low cultivation temperature of 25°C, TB media (with 3% ethanol and 0.6M glycerol), Origami strain and a 10-h induction time increased the solubility of human growth hormone.

  14. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on growth of human gastric carcinoma xenograft model in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Ming Liang; Jia-Yong Chen; Yi Zhang; Ping Gan; Jie Lin; An-Bao Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth of a human gastric carcinoma cell in vivo.METHODS: Experimental mice were divided into control group, rhGH group, oxaliplatin (L-OHP) group and rhGH+L-OHP group. Cultured human gastric carcinoma cells BGC823 were inoculated into right axilla of nude mice and carcinoma xenograft model wasestablished successfully. Inhibitory rate of xenograft tumor growth was estimated by measuring tumor volume; expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax and Bcl-2 proteins of xenograft tumor was detected using immunohistochemical S-P method.RESULTS: Tumor growth inhibitory rate, the positive expression rate of PCNA, Bax and Bcl-2 were 49.3%,58.2%, 65.2% and 59.2% in rhGH+L-OHP group respectively; 46.6%, 62.5%, 59.7% and 64.7% in L-OHP group; 5.0%, 82.7%, 23.2% and 82.2% in rhGH group and 0, 77.8%, 23.5% and 80.3% in control group. There was significant difference between rhGH+L-OHP group (or L-OHP group ) and control group or rhGH group (P <0.05), whereas there were no significant differences (P >0.05) between L-OHP group and rhGH+L-OHP group and between rhGH group and control group.CONCLUSION: rhGH does not accelerate the proliferation of human gastric cancer cell in vivo.

  15. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  16. Recombinant growth hormone enhances muscle myosin heavy-chain mRNA accumulation and amino acid accrual in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Y; M. Rosenbaum; Tracey, K J; Raman, G.; Hesse, D G; Matthews, D. E.; Leibel, R. L.; Gertner, J M; Fischman, D. A.; Lowry, S F

    1989-01-01

    A potentially lethal complication of trauma, malignancy, and infection is a progressive erosion of muscle protein mass that is not readily reversed by nutritional support. Growth hormone is capable of improving total body nitrogen balance, but its role in myofibrillar protein synthesis in humans is unknown. The acute, in situ muscle protein response to an infusion of methionyl human growth hormone was investigated in the limbs of nutritionally depleted subjects during a period of intravenous ...

  17. Long-term effects of human growth hormone-releasing hormone and photoperiod on hormone release and puberty in dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringuet, H; Pelletier, G; Brazeau, P; Gaudreau, P; Guilbault, L A; Morisset, J; Couture, Y; Petitclerc, D

    1994-10-01

    Forty-eight Holstein dairy heifers (98.9 kg BW; 3 mo old) were subjected for 246 d to twice-daily s.c. injections of saline (CTL) or human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH; 5 micrograms/kg BW) and to photoperiods of 8 h of light (L): 16 h of dark (D) or 16L:8D according to a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Jugular blood samples were collected from 16 heifers at 3, 4, 8, and 11 mo of age to monitor prolactin, growth hormone, and estradiol-17 beta. Plasma progesterone concentrations were monitored weekly in all heifers as an index of puberty (> 1 ng/mL). Growth hormone release was induced by GRH (P GRH heifers. However, GRH-induced GH response was less (P GRH, photoperiod, and days of treatment on GRH-induced GH response; AUC was greater in GRH-16L:8D than in GRH-8L:16D heifers at 3 mo but less at 8 mo of age. The PRL concentrations were similar for both photoperiods at 3 mo (36.4 vs 41.7 ng/mL) and 8 mo (16.2 vs 12.8 ng/mL) of age but were greater in 16L:8D vs 8L:16D heifers at 4 mo (18.4 vs 39.3 ng/mL) and 11 mo (26.3 vs 44.1 ng/mL) of age (photoperiod x day interaction, P GRH-treated heifers (271 vs 284 kg BW; GRH x photoperiod interaction, P = .10). In conclusion, GH response is maintained throughout 8 mo of GRH treatment, and a 16L:8D photoperiod will reduce age and weight at puberty in heifers. Furthermore, refractoriness to photoperiod-induced PRL changes was detected.

  18. Exogenous recombinant human growth hormone effects during suboptimal energy and zinc intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duro Debora

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Energy and Zinc (Zn deficiencies have been associated with nutritional related growth retardation as well as growth hormone (GH resistance. In this study, the relationship between suboptimal energy and/or Zn intake and growth in rats and their response to immunoreactive exogenous recombinant human GH (GHi, was determined. Results Rats treated with GHi and fed ad-libitum energy and Zn (100/100 had increased IGFBP-3 (p Conclusion These results suggest that GHi enhances weight gain in rats with suboptimal energy and Zn intake but does not modify energy expenditure or physical activity index. Suboptimal Zn intake did not exacerbate the reduced growth or decrease in energy expenditure observed with energy restriction.

  19. Construction of the plasmid-free strain for human growth hormone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulga, A A; Mechev, P V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Skryabin, K G; Deyev, S M

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli strain, overproducing human growth hormone (hGH) was made by integration of the hGH gene under the control of T7 promoter into the chromosomal LacZ gene of BL21(DE3) via lambda Red recombineering. The strain gave higher productivity (50 mg·L(-1)·OD550(-1)) and better growth characteristics than the corresponding strain in which the same hGH expression cassette was placed in a plasmid. The protein produced by the plasmid-free strain was purified and characterized to be hGH. The results demonstrates that a plasmid-free recombinant strain having a single-copy gene expression cassette in the chromosome could provide better gene activity regulation, higher productivity, superior growth characteristics, as well as more stringent control of the gene sequence invariance than a plasmid-based strain.

  20. Bone age is the best predictor of growth response to recombinant human growth hormone in Turner′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Nagwa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH is approved for use in children with Turner′s syndrome (TS in most industrialized countries and is recommended in the recently issued guidelines. We determined the growth responses of girls who are treated with rhGH for TS, with an aim to identify the predictors of growth response. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six prepubertal girls with TS, documented by peripheral blood karyotype, were enrolled. All the patients received biosynthetic growth hormone therapy with a standard dose of 30 IU/m 2 /week. The calculated dose per week was divided for 6 days and given subcutaneously at night. Results: This study showed that rhGH therapy provides satisfactory auxological results. Bone age delay is to be considered as a predictive factor which may negatively influence the effect of rhGH therapy on final height. The growth velocity in the preceding year is the most important predictor of rhGH therapy response. Conclusion: These observations help us to guide rhGH prescription, to reduce the risks and costs.

  1. Height Outcome of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment in Achondroplasia Children: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Mario; Bertelloni, Silvano; Massart, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is not approved to treat short stature of achondroplasia (ACH), some studies suggested growth improvement during short-term rhGH treatment. A meta-analysis of rhGH therapy efficacy in ACH children was performed. From 12 English-language studies, 558 (54.0% males) rhGH-treated ACH children were enrolled. Administration of rhGH (median dosage 0.21 mg/kg/ week; range 0.16-0.42 mg/kg/week) improved height (Ht) from baseline [-5.069 standard deviation score (SDS; 95% CI -5.109 to -5.029); p treatment increased Ht from -5.0 to -4.0 SDS during 5 years, but insufficient data are available on both the adult Ht and the changes of body proportions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A; von Ehren, M; Skottheim, B; Grönbladh, A; Ortiz-Nieto, F; Raininko, R; Gordh, T; Nyberg, F

    2014-07-01

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported.

  3. Dipeptidylpeptidase IV and trypsin-like enzymatic degradation of human growth hormone-releasing hormone in plasma.

    OpenAIRE

    Frohman, L A; Downs, T. R.; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    The plasma enzyme responsible for primary proteolytic cleavage of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) at the 2-3 amino acid bond was characterized. Native GRH[GRH(1-44)-NH2 and GRH(1-40)-OH], and COOH-terminally shortened fragments [GRH(1-32)-NH2 and GRH(1-29)-NH2] were rapidly cleaved, while GRH(2-32)-NH2 was not degraded at this site. Moreover, degradation to GRH(3-44)-NH2 was unaffected by an aminopeptidase inhibitor, indicating that this metabolite was generated from a single step clea...

  4. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  5. Ten years' clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of efficacy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Pfäffle, Roland; Chanson, Philippe; Szalecki, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved Omnitrope(®) as a biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®), Pfizer). Data continue to be collected on the long-term efficacy of biosimilar rhGH from several on-going postapproval studies. Particular topics of interest include efficacy in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation, and whether efficacy of growth hormone treatment is affected when patients are changed to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH products. Data from clinical development studies and 10 years of postapproval experience affirm the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of biosimilar rhGH across all approved indications. In addition, the decade of experience with biosimilar rhGH since it was approved in Europe confirms the scientific validity of the biosimilar pathway and the approval process. Concerns about clinical effect in extrapolated indications, and also about the impact of changing from other rhGH preparations, have been alleviated. Biosimilar rhGH is an effective treatment option for children who require therapy with rhGH.

  6. On the possible role of mammary-derived growth hormone in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Jos H H

    2009-12-01

    The incidence of breast cancer has risen worldwide, especially in countries where it used to be low, very probably as a result of economic prosperity and changes in life-style. In women, the available data have resulted in the concept of progression from normal breast development to cancer through precursor lesions sensitive to hormones and growth factors that can be produced locally in the mammary gland, acting as paracrine or autocrine stimulating agents. The local endocrine environment in the breast can be different from the situation in the circulation. In the dog, growth hormone (GH) can be produced locally in the mammary glands and its production can be stimulated by progestins. This GH probably plays a paracrine role in the progesterone-induced proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelium. There is increasing evidence that the local mammary progestin/GH-axis is operational not only in dogs but also in human breast cancer. No data are yet available on the production of mammary-derived GH in women.

  7. Effect of two human growth hormone receptor antagonists on glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Shui-xian SHEN; Li-hua ZHU; En-bi WANG; Zeng-can YE; Jun LIN; Li-he GUO; Fei-hong LUO; Xi-hong LIU; Xin FANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of human growth hormone (hGH) receptor antagonist in the treatment of end-stage diabetic renal complications. METHODS: Two hGH mutants, hGHA1 (Cys-hGH-dell-4, G120R, K168A, E174A,C182S, de1186-191) and hGHA2 (hGH-H21A, G120R, E174A) were expressed in E coli. The IC50 (Mean±SD)values for the mutants for inhibiting 125I-hGH binding to rabbit growth hormone receptor were (65±10) ng for hGHA1, (27±5.6) ng for hGHA2, and (10±0.6) ng for wild type hGH, respectively. RESULTS: After treatment for 12 weeks, the renal histology analysis showed that treatment with hGHA2 at 4 mg/kg body weight daily markedly suppressed glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; hGHA1 at the same dosage slightly increased the renal damage compared with saline; while wild type hGH at 1 U/kg body weight daily severely worsened the glomerulo-sclerosis in diabetic SD rats. CONCLUSION: The data indicated that hGHA2 inhibited the end-stage glomerulosclerosis in diabetic rats, but hGHA1 mildly increased the glomerulosclerosis.

  8. Mechanism of growth hormone-induced postprandial carbohydrate intolerance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P; Kryshak, E; Rizza, R

    1991-04-01

    Growth hormone excess can cause postprandial carbohydrate intolerance. To determine the contribution of splanchnic and extrasplanchnic tissues to this process, subjects were fed an isotopically labeled mixed meal after either a 12-h infusion of saline or growth hormone (4 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 [corrected]). Growth hormone infusion resulted in higher glucose and insulin concentrations both before and after meal ingestion. Despite growth hormone-induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, postprandial hepatic glucose release and carbon dioxide incorporation into glucose (a qualitative estimate of gluconeogenesis) were similar to those present during saline, suggesting altered hepatic regulation. This was confirmed when glucose was infused in the absence of growth hormone to achieve glucose (and insulin) concentrations comparable to those present during growth hormone infusion. Although growth hormone excess did not alter splanchnic uptake of ingested glucose, it resulted in a fivefold increase in postprandial hepatic glucose release (578 +/- 31 vs. 117 +/- 10 mg.kg-16 h-1, P less than 0.01), less suppression of carbon dioxide incorporation into glucose (-13 +/- 9 vs. -53 +/- 12 mg.kg-1. 6-h-1, P less than 0.01), and lower glucose uptake (1,130 +/- 59 vs. 1,850 +/- 150 mg.kg-1.6 h-1, P less than 0.01). The decrease in postprandial glucose uptake did not appear to be mediated by a change in substrate uptake since postprandial plasma concentrations and forearm balance of lactate, free fatty acids, and ketone bodies did not differ in the presence and absence of growth hormone excess.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Characterization of growth hormone and prolactin produced by human pituitary in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, J S; Rogol, A D; Lovenberg, W; Knazek, R A

    1977-02-01

    Fragments of a pituitary tumor from a patient with acromegaly were grown in tissue culture. The tumor secreted both growth hormone and prolactin,which were recovered in high concentrations. The nonpurified hormones were characterized and compared to their respective counterparts obtained by extraction from normal pituitaries obtained at autopsy. The tissue culture and pituitary extracted hormones were eluted from Sephadex G-100 with the same partition coefficients. Growth hormone from both sources showed parallel dose-response displacement curves, by logit-log transformation, in both specific immunoassay and in a specific lymphocyte binding assay. Prolactin from both sources was compared in specific immunoassay using three different antisera. Parallel logit-log displacement curves were seen with one antiserum, while the other two antisera yielded non-parallel curves, indicating structural differences between prolactin from the two sources. Quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed using multiphasic buffer systems previously developed for characterization of each hormone. By the criteria of joint 95% confidence envelopes of retardation co-efficient and relative free mobility, tissue culture growth hormone and prolactin were indistinguishable from their pituitary-extracted counterparts. This study demonstrates that, prior to purification, tissue culture derived hormone can be characterized by multiple criteria and compared to a standard preparation. Structural differences can be detected, as in the case of prolactin. When the hormones are indistinguishable, as in the case of growth hormone, it becomes worthwhile to increase the scale of tissue cultured production, with the prospect that tissue culture may serve as a source of hormone for both experimental and therapeutic use.

  10. Intermittent versus continuous administration of growth hormone treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Hakeem, V; Hindmarsh, P C; Brook, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    Growth hormone treatment given by daily injection was compared with growth hormone given for three weeks of every four. All children had received recombinant human growth hormone for two years before randomisation. Growth velocity decreased in both groups in years one and two of the study but the effect was significantly greater in the group receiving intermittent growth hormone.

  11. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Growth Defici H e o n r c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary ...

  12. Optimization of a recombinant human growth hormone purification process using quality by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Enriquez, Carolina; Romero-Díaz, Alexis de Jesús; Hernández-Moreno, Ana V; Cueto-Rojas, Hugo F; Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P; López-Morales, Carlos A; Pérez, Néstor O; Salazar-Ceballos, Rodolfo; Cruz-García, Norberto; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2016-11-16

    This work describes a strategy to optimize a downstream processing of a recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) by incorporating a quality by design approach toward meeting higher quality specifications. The optimized process minimized the presence of impurities and degradation by-products during manufacturing by the establishment of in-process controls. Capillary zone electrophoresis, reverse phase, and size-exclusion chromatographies were used as analytical techniques to establish new critical process parameters for the solubilization, capture, and intermediate purification steps aiming to maintain rhGH quality by complying with pharmacopeial specifications. The results indicated that the implemented improvements in the process allowed the optimization of the specific recovery and purification of rhGH without compromising its quality. In addition, this optimization facilitated the stringent removal of the remaining impurities in further polishing stages, as demonstrated by the analysis of the obtained active pharmaceutical ingredient.

  13. Subcutaneous absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of recombinant human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Susgaard, Søren

    1993-01-01

    of signs of endogenous GH secretion. INTERVENTIONS: At the start of each study period, GH 3 IU/m2 was injected subcutaneously. The two formulations, PenFill and PenSet, differ in the buffers used and in the relative content of mannitol and glycine. Serum profiles of GH were monitored frequently for 24......Abstract OBJECTIVE: The relative bioavailability of two highly concentrated (12 IU/ml) formulations of biosynthetic human growth hormone (GH) administered subcutaneously was compared. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study. Conventional GH therapy was withdrawn 72 hours before each study period...... not significantly differ from 1 (p = 0.13). Neither Cmax (p = 0.74) nor Tmax (p = 0.58) of the two formulations was significantly different. Injection of the two formulations induced similar increments in serum IFG-I (p = 0.48). Serum insulin and blood glucose concentrations were not significantly different...

  14. Integration and Expression of Human Growth Hormone Gene in Caladium bicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝健; 王金发; 徐增富; 许友卿; 余慕贞; 何新; 沈玉

    1994-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) gene has been inserted into the plasmid pLGV1103 to give the recombinant plasmid pLB-9. It has been introduced into the agrobacterium containing plasmid pGV3850. The recombinant Ti plasmid pGL198(hGH) has been obtained by homologous recombination. The monocotyledon Caladium bicolor has been transferred with pGL198 (hGH) with the leaf-disk co-cultivation method, and transgenic plants have been regenerated. The results of nopaline analysis, NPT II detection Southern blot and Western blot show that the hGH gene was integrated into the genome of Caladium bicolor, and a 22-kD protein was synthesized in the transgenic plants.

  15. Product wastage from modern human growth hormone administration devices: a laboratory and computer simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollock RF

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard F Pollock,1 Yujun Qian,2 Tami Wisniewski,3 Lisa Seitz,4 Anne-Marie Kappelgaard2 1Ossian Health Economics and Communications GmbH, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novo Nordisk AS, Bagsværd, Denmark; 3Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 4Novo Nordisk Pharma GmbH, Mainz, Germany Background: Treatment of growth hormone disorders typically involves daily injections of human growth hormone (GH over many years, incurring substantial costs. We assessed the extent of undesired GH loss due to leakage in the course of pen preparation prior to injection, and differences between the prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and the actual delivered dose based on pen dosing increments in five GH administration devices. Methods: Norditropin® prefilled FlexPro®, NordiFlex®, NordiLet®, and durable NordiPen®/SimpleXx® 5 mg pens (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark and durable Omnitrope® Pen-5 devices (Sandoz, Holzkirchen, Germany were tested (n = 40 for each device type. Product wastage was measured in accordance with validated protocols in an ISO (International Organization for Standardization 11608-1 and Good Manufacturing Practice compliant laboratory. The average mass of wasted GH from each device type was measured in simulations of dripping with the needle attached prior to injection and while setting a dose. Statistical significance (P < 0.05 was confirmed by Student's t-test, and a model was constructed to estimate mean annual GH wastage per patient in cohorts of pediatric patients with GH disorders. Results: Mean GH mass wasted with the needle on prior to injection was 0.0 µg with Norditropin pens, relative to 98 µg with Omnitrope Pen-5. During dose dialing, 0.0–2.3 µg of GH was lost with Norditropin pens versus 0.8 µg with Omnitrope Pen-5. All Norditropin and Omnitrope device comparisons were statistically significant. Modeling GH wastage in a US cohort showed 5.5 mg of annual GH wastage per patient with FlexPro versus 43.6 mg with

  16. [Recombinant human growth hormone treatment in short children with renal disease--our first experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojević-Dimitrijeva, Brankica; Kostić, Mirjana; Peco-Antić, Amira; Kruscić, Divna; Cvetković, Mirjana; Milosevski-Lomić, Gordana; Paripović, Dusan

    2010-01-01

    Growth retardation is a hallmark of chronic illnesses such as chronic kidney disease in children, and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The growth hormone (GH) resistance observed in uraemia can be overcome by supraphysiological doses of exogenous GH. We would like to present our first results of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment, mainly in children on haemodialysis. Sixteen children, aged 4.5-17.1 years (mean age 11.25 +/- 3.57) with height below -2.0 standard deviation score (SDS) for age or height velocity below -2.0 SDS for age, were selected to receive rhGH therapy at our Nephrology and Haemodialysis Department. Most of them were on haemodialysis (14 children) with mean spent time 2.88 +/- 2.68 years (0-9 years) before the initiation of rhGH therapy. One half of patients were prepubertal (8 children) and the second half were in early puberty (testicular volume between 4 and 8 ml for boys and breast development B2 or B3 in girls). All patients received 28-30 IU/m2 rhGH per week by daily subcutaneous injection. The year before rhGH therapy served as a control period. During the first year of treatment, mean height velocity in haemodialysis patients increased from 2.25 cm/year to 6.59 cm/year (p first year of rhGH treatment (from -3.01 SDS to -2.77 SDS, p = 0.063). Neither weight nor the body mass index varied compared with the pretreatment period. Two patients developed worsened secondary hyperparathyroidism and were excluded from the study, but the relationship with rhGH remains uncertain. Mean height velocity significantly improved during rhGH therapy in haemodialysis patients. No significant side-effects were observed in children during three-year treatment with GH.

  17. Biosimilar growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Paul

    2012-01-01

    As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is expiring, biosimilars or follow-on -protein products (FOPP's) have emerged. Biosimilar drugs are cheaper than the originator/comparator drug. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Biosimilar soamtropin has been approved in both the US and Europe. The scientific viability of biosimilar drugs and especially growth hormone has been proven by several rigorously conducted clinical trials. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation) for up to 7 y for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones which served as reference comparators. The Obama Administration appears to be committed to establish innovative pathways for the approval of biologics and biosimilars in the US. The cost savings in health care expenditures will be substantial as the global sales of biologics have reached $ 93 billion in 2009.

  18. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mass and strength Mild bone loss Thinning skin Sleep problems Decreased exercise performance Decreased energy Decreased well-being, mild depression, or moodiness What are the benefits of growth hormone therapy? Growth hormone treatment involves injections (shots) ...

  19. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Brittain, Alison L; Kopchick, John J

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein that is known to stimulate postnatal growth, counter regulate insulin's action and induce expression of insulin-like growth factor-1. GH exerts anabolic or catabolic effects depending upon on the targeted tissue. For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues. This review first discusses proteomic techniques that are commonly used for these types of studies. We then examine the proteomic differences found in mice with excess circulating GH (bGH mice) or mice with disruption of the GH receptor gene (GHR(-/-)). We also describe the effects of increased and decreased GH action on the proteome of adult patients with either acromegaly, GH deficiency or patients after short-term GH treatment. Finally, we explain how these proteomic studies resulted in the discovery of potential biomarkers for GH action, particularly those related with the effects of GH on aging, glucose metabolism and body composition.

  20. Psychological functioning after growth hormone therapy in adult growth hormone deficient patients: endocrine and body composition correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Lašaitė, Lina; Bunevičius, Robertas; Lašienė, Danutė Teresė; Lašas, Liudvikas

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement in adult growth hormone deficient patients improves psychological well-being and the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between changes in mood, cognitive functioning, quality of life, changes in body composition and hormone concentration at baseline and six months after treatment with human recombinant growth hormone. Eighteen adult patients with growth hormone deficiency syndrome were recruited to the study. Growth hormone was a...

  1. Extrapituitary growth hormone and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    While growth hormone (GH) is obligatory for postnatal growth, it is not required for a number of growth-without-GH syndromes, such as early embryonic or fetal growth. Instead, these syndromes are thought to be dependent upon local growth factors, rather than pituitary GH. The GH gene is, however, also expressed in many extrapituitary tissues, particularly during early development and extrapituitary GH may be one of the local growth factors responsible for embryonic or fetal growth. Moreover, as the expression of the GH receptor (GHR) gene mirrors that of GH in extrapituitary tissues the actions of GH in early development are likely to be mediated by local autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, especially as extrapituitary GH expression occurs prior to the ontogeny of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of GH in embryos has also been shown to be of functional relevance in a number of species, since the immunoneutralization of endogenous GH or the blockade of GH production is accompanied by growth impairment or cellular apoptosis. The extrapituitary expression of the GH gene also persists in some central and peripheral tissues postnatally, which may reflect its continued functional importance and physiological or pathophysiological significance. The expression and functional relevance of extrapituitary GH, particularly during embryonic growth, is the focus of this brief review.

  2. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  3. Muscle force and endurance in untreated and human growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I-treated patients with growth hormone deficiency or Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, O; Ziv, I; Klinger, B; Avraham, M; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Muscle force and endurance of four muscle groups (biceps, triceps, hamstrings and quadriceps) were measured by a computerized device in three groups: (A) 4 boys with isolated growth hormone deficiencies (IGHD) examined before at 10 and 24 months of hGH treatment; (B) 5 children (2 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome were examined 3.5-4 years after initiation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment, and (C) comprised 8 untreated adults (5 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome. For each patient, 2 matched controls, by age, sex, physical activity and height below the 50th percentile, were examined. GH- or IGF-I-deficient patients before treatment revealed reduced muscle force and endurance. GH treatment (0.6 U/kg/week) restored muscle force and endurance, progressively, mainly in the boys with puberty. Three to 4 years of IGF-I treatment (150 micrograms/kg/day) in patients with Laron syndrome proved to have a weaker effect than GH in restoring muscle force. The difference in effectiveness between hGH and IGF-I in restoring muscle force may be due to either the more marked muscle underdevelopment in Laron syndrome patients than in patients with IGHD or a difference in action potential between the two hormones.

  4. Preparation of soluble isotopically labeled human growth hormone produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hee; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Song, Jimyeong; Lee, Ji Youn; Baek, Soyun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2016-11-01

    Isotopically labeled proteins have been used as internal standards for mass spectrometry (MS)-based absolute protein quantification. Although this approach can provide highly accurate analyses of proteins of interest within a complex mixture, one of the major limitations of this method is the difficulty in preparing uniformly labeled standards. Human growth hormone (hGH) is one of the most important hormones that circulate throughout the body, and its measurement is primarily of interest in the diagnosis and treatment of growth disorders. In order to provide a useful internal standard for MS-based hGH measurement, we describe an efficient strategy to produce a potentially valuable, stable isotope-labeled hGH with high purity and yield. The strategy involves the following steps: solubilization of hGH under labeling conditions, detection of stable isotope incorporation, large-scale purification, analysis of the labeled protein, and assessment of the labeling efficiency. We show that the yield of soluble hGH under selective isotopic labeling conditions can be greatly increased by optimizing protein expression and extraction. Our efficient method for generating isotopically labeled hGH does not influence the structural integrity of hGH. Finally, we assessed the efficiency of stable isotope labeling at the intact protein level, and the result was further verified by amino acid analysis. These results clearly indicate that our labeling approach allows an almost complete incorporation of (13)C6(15)N4-arginine into the hGH expressed in E.coli without detectable isotope scrambling.

  5. Application of human growth hormone to patients with polycystic ovary syndrome during in vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Jin-xia; Liu Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of applying human growth hormone during in vitro fertilization to patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)Methods:One hundred and twenty-one cycles of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer in PCOS patients with anovulation from Dec.2008 to Nov.2010 were studied retrospectively.Of these 121 cycles,48 were with treatment of growth hormone (GH group),73 without GH treatment (control group).The dose of gonadotropin (Gn),the number of retrieved oocytes,good-quality embryo rate,implantation rate,frozen embryo rate,and pregnancy rate were compared.Results:The dosage of Gn was slightly higher in GH group than that in control group (29.18±8.33 vs.23.43±8.68 ampoullas,4U/ampoulla) and the number of retrieved oocytes in GH group were slightly less than that in control group (10.73±6.0vs.14.0±8.57),but there were no significant differences (P>0.05).The good-quality embryo rate (59.1% vs.33.3%),frozen embryo rate (87.5% vs.58.9%),pregnancy rate (56.5% vs.35.3 % ) and implantation rate (35.3 % vs.20.4 % ) in GH group were all significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05).Conclusion:Early usage of GH in the ovarian hyperstimulation in PCOS patients could significantly improve good-quality embryo rate,implantation rate and pregnancy rate.

  6. Anabolic processes in human skeletal muscle: restoring the identities of growth hormone and testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel W D; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-10-01

    Testosterone supplementation acts via numerous mechanisms as a highly potent anabolic agent to skeletal muscle. Although growth hormone (GH) strongly affects collagen synthesis and lipolysis, as well as increasing lean body mass, it is not anabolic toward the contractile (ie, myofibrillar) muscle tissue in healthy individuals. However, there is a persistent belief (both in scientific literature and among recreational weightlifters) that exercise-induced release of GH and testosterone underpins muscular hypertrophy with resistance training. This is a premature assumption because although pharmacological GH supplementation can increase muscle strength or size in individuals with clinical GH deficiency, there is no evidence that transient exercise-induced changes in GH have the same effects in individuals with normal GH levels. Exercise paradigms are designed based on the assumption (not necessarily evidenced-based mechanisms) that GH and testosterone facilitate anabolic processes that lead to skeletal muscle protein accretion and hypertrophy. Our recent work disputes this assumption. Instead, our data indicate that exercise-induced hormonal elevations do not enhance intracellular markers of anabolic signaling or the acute postexercise elevation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. Furthermore, data from our training study demonstrate that exercise-induced increases in GH and testosterone availability are not necessary for and do not enhance strength and hypertrophy adaptations. Instead, our data lead us to conclude that local mechanisms that are intrinsic to the skeletal muscle tissue performing the resistive contractions (ie, weightlifting) are predominant in stimulating anabolism. The purpose of this article is 1) to provide a brief overview of the mechanisms of action of testosterone and GH; 2) to discuss the inability of physiological exercise-induced elevations in these hormones to have a measurable impact on skeletal muscle anabolism; and 3) to describe factors

  7. Discrimination of recombinant from natural human growth hormone using DNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, John G; Carrillo, Maria P; Phillips, Taylor; Edge, Allison

    2011-04-01

    Detection of athletes who use synthetic human growth hormone (hGH; or somatotropin) to enhance physical strength and obtain an advantage in competitive sports is a formidable problem, as rhGH is virtually identical to the natural pituitary hormone. However, some post-translational and other modifications have been documented by chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry (MS) in a small percentage of rhGH. In the present work, development of DNA aptamers against research-grade rhGH and natural hGH with adsorption of the rhGH aptamers against natural hGH was shown to produce a small family of aptamer sequences that bound consistently with greater affinity to rhGH over a low nanogram-to-microgram range in ELISA-like microplate assays. This collection of rhGH discriminatory aptamer sequences shared some short sequence segments and secondary structural features. The top rhGH discriminatory aptamers also appeared to cross-react with human myoglobin and BSA but not with bone collagen peptides and an unrelated viral envelope peptide. The cross-reactivity results suggested several strings of up to five consecutive amino acids that might serve as common epitopes for aptamer binding. SDS-PAGE revealed that the rhGH existed largely as a 45-kDa dimer, and the natural hGH was almost exclusively monomeric. The existence of the rhGH dimer suggests that a discontinuous "bridge" epitope may exist on the rhGH, which spans the subunits, thereby accounting somewhat for the difference in detection. Overall, these results suggest that aptamers might be useful for routine, presumptive laboratory screening to identify athletes who are potentially cheating by administration of rhGH.

  8. Growth Hormone and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    thru ADP010582 UNCLASSIFIED 23-1 GROWTH HORMONE AND AGING J.A.F. Tresguerres , Perez Romero, N. de las Heras, S. Vazquez, C. Ariznavarreta Complutense... Tresguerres 1996). GHRH is were treated as children with GH, a significant secreted in peaks as well as somatostatin, both number of problems were detected...of GH ( Tresguerres 1996) reduction in muscular and bone mass together IGFI is a peptide of 70 aminoacids that shows with an increase in body fat

  9. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    OpenAIRE

    PERONI, CIBELE N.; Cesar Y. Hayashida; Nancy Nascimento; LONGUINI, VIVIANE C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Paolo Bartolini; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo,Sergio P. A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/litmice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising frommutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those ...

  10. Complete solubilization and purification of recombinant human growth hormone produced in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ji Kim

    Full Text Available High-level expression of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH in Escherichia coli (E. coli leads to the formation of insoluble aggregates as inclusion bodies devoid of biological activity. Until recently, significant efforts have been made to improve the recovery of active hGH from inclusion bodies. Here, we developed an efficient procedure for the production of completely soluble hGH by minimizing the formation of inclusion bodies and optimizing protein purification conditions. Under the newly established conditions we were able to obtain most of the total hGH in the soluble fraction. We show that the soluble protein can be efficiently purified in high yield by a series of chromatographic procedures. We analyzed the resulting hGH using various analytical techniques such as reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism (CD. These multiple analyses support the conclusion that we obtained highly pure hGH with the expected molecular mass and intact secondary structure. The biological activity of purified hGH was also confirmed by evaluating its growth-promoting effect using a cell proliferation assay. Taken together, we describe a straightforward strategy for the production of completely soluble and biologically active hGH in E. coli.

  11. Development of a sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, H H; Shim, W S; Choi, M K; Son, M K; Kim, Y J; Yang, H C; Kim, T H; Lee, G I; Kim, B M; Kang, S H; Shim, C K

    2009-07-20

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy for short stature must be administered as a daily injection because of its poor bioavailability and short half-life. In the present study, a sustained-release formulation of rhGH (SR-rhGH), DA-3003, was prepared using double emulsion solvent evaporation with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), zinc oxide and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) as the release modulator, stabilizer, and aggregation-prevention agent, respectively. After a single administration of DA-3003, the elevated concentration of rhGH in plasma was sustained for 14 days in rats and 28 days in monkeys. The plasma concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which are pharmacodynamic markers of rhGH administration, increased and remained elevated for approximately 28 days in monkeys. Monkeys administered DA-3003 did not develop antibodies to hGH, indicating safety of the SR-rhGH formulation comparable to that observed with daily rhGH injections (Growtropin II). There were no significant differences in efficacy between Growtropin II (daily dose of 5 microg/animal for 14 days) and DA-3003 (weekly dose of 35 microg/animal for 14 days with a dosing interval of a week) in hypophysectomized rats, as assessed by changes in body weight and the width of the tibial growth plate. These results show that a sustained-release rhGH formulation, DA-3003, has the potential to be used safely and efficaciously in a weekly dosing regimen.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human Growth Hormone in Serum Using SPRi, Nano-SPRi and ELISA Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Stephen; Zeidan, Effat; Henrich, Vincent C; Sandros, Marinella G

    2016-01-07

    Sensitive and selective methods for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) over a wide range of concentrations (high levels of 50-100 ng ml(-) (1) and minimum levels of 0.03 ng ml(-) (1)) in circulating blood are essential as variable levels may indicate altered physiology. For example, growth disorders occurring in childhood can be diagnosed by measuring levels of hGH in blood. Also, the misuse of recombinant hGH in sports not only poses an ethical issue it also presents serious health threats to the abuser. One popular strategy for measuring hGH misuse, relies on the detection of the ratio of 22 kDa hGH to total hGH, as non-22 kDa endogenous levels drop after exogenous recombinant hGH (rhGH) administration. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an analytical tool that allows direct (label-free) monitoring and visualization of biomolecular interactions by recording changes of the refractive index adjacent to the sensor surface in real time. In contrast, the most frequently used colorimetric method, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) uses enzyme labeled detection antibodies to indirectly measure analyte concentration after the addition of a substrate that induces a color change. To increase detection sensitivity, amplified SPRi uses a sandwich assay format and near infrared quantum dots (QDs) to increase signal strength. After direct SPRi detection of recombinant rhGH in spiked human serum, the SPRi signal is amplified by the sequential injection of detection antibody coated with near-infrared QDs (Nano-SPRi). In this study, the diagnostic potential of direct and amplified SPRi was assessed for measuring rhGH spiked in human serum and compared directly with the capabilities of a commercially available ELISA kit.

  13. ELISA for Determination of Human Growth Hormone: Recognition of Helix 4 Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura Juliana F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH signal transduction initiates with a receptor dimerization in which one molecule binds to the receptor through sites 1 and 2. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for quantifying hGH molecules that present helix 4 from binding site 1. For this, horse anti-rhGH antibodies were eluted by an immunoaffinity column constituted by sepharose-rhGH. These antibodies were purified through a second column with synthetic peptide correspondent to hGH helix 4, immobilized to sepharose, and used as capture antibodies. Those that did not recognize synthetic peptide were used as a marker antibody. The working range was of 1.95 to 31.25 ng/mL of hGH. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV was between 4.53% and 6.33%, while the interassay CV was between 6.00% and 8.27%. The recovery range was between 96.0% to 103.8%. There was no cross-reactivity with human prolactin. These features show that our assay is an efficient method for the determination of hGH.

  14. Growth hormone, inflammation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal M. Masternak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant animals characterized by extended longevity provide valuable tools to study the mechanisms of aging. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 constitute one of the well-established pathways involved in the regulation of aging and lifespan. Ames and Snell dwarf mice characterized by GH deficiency as well as growth hormone receptor/growth hormone binding protein knockout (GHRKO mice characterized by GH resistance live significantly longer than genetically normal animals. During normal aging of rodents and humans there is increased insulin resistance, disruption of metabolic activities and decline of the function of the immune system. All of these age related processes promote inflammatory activity, causing long term tissue damage and systemic chronic inflammation. However, studies of long living mutants and calorie restricted animals show decreased pro-inflammatory activity with increased levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines such as adiponectin. At the same time, these animals have improved insulin signaling and carbohydrate homeostasis that relate to alterations in the secretory profile of adipose tissue including increased production and release of anti-inflammatory adipokines. This suggests that reduced inflammation promoting healthy metabolism may represent one of the major mechanisms of extended longevity in long-lived mutant mice and likely also in the human.

  15. The raman spectrum of biosynthetic human growth hormone. Its deconvolution, bandfitting, and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tensmeyer, Lowell G.

    1988-05-01

    The Raman spectrum of amorphous biosynthetic human growth hormone, somatotropin, has been measured at high signal-to-noise ratios, using a CW argon ion laser and single channel detection. The rms signal-to-noise ratio varies from 1800:1 in the Amide I region near 1650 cm -1 region, to 500:1 in the disulfide stretch region near 500 cm -1. Component Raman bands have been extracted from the entire spectral envelope from 1800-400 cm -1, by an interactive process involving both partial deconvolution and band-fitting. Interconsistency of all bands has been achieved by multiple overlapping of adjacent regions that had been isolated for the band-fitting programs. The resulting areas of the Raman component bands have been interpreted to show the ratios of peptide conformations in the hormone: 64% α-helix, 24% β-sheet, 8% β-turns and 4% γ-turns. Analysis of the tyrosine region, usually described as a Fermi resonance doublet near ˜830-850 cm -1, shows four bands, at 825, 833, 853, and 859 cm -1 in this macromolecule. Integrated intensities of these bands (2:2:2:2) are interpreted to show that only half of the eight tyrosine residues function as hydrogen-bond bridges via the acceptance of protons. Both disulfide bridges fall within the frequency ranges for normal, unstressed SS bonds: The 511 and 529 cm -1 bands are indicative of the gauche-gauche-gauche and trans-gauche-gauche conformations, respectively.

  16. Purification of recombinant human growth hormone by isoelectric focusing in a multicompartment electrolyzer with Immobiline membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, C; Righetti, P G; Chiesa, C; Frigerio, F; Galli, G; Grandi, G

    1992-09-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) expressed in Escherichia coli, was 70-80% purified by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography and metal ion affinity chromatography. For the last purification step, a multicompartment electrolyzer was used, containing three compartments delimited by isoelectric membranes and two additional anodic and cathodic chambers. The central compartment was situated between two membranes having isoelectric points (pI) of 5.08 (anodic) and of 5.16 (cathodic), i.e. equidistant from the pI value of hGH (pI 5.12). r-hGH was isoelectric between these two membranes and could not leave the central chamber, while more acidic and more cathodic impurities collected in the two lateral chambers under the influence of the electric field. The r-hGH, thus purified, exhibited a single band by isoelectric focusing (IEF) in immobilized pH gradients (IPG) and gave recoveries greater than 90%. The problem of isoelectric precipitation in a practically ion-free environment was alleviated by focusing in 30% glycerol added with 1% neutral detergent (Nonidet-P40). The latter was eliminated by passage through a Q-Sepharose column after collecting the pI 5.12 band from the electrolyzer. Also the pre-hormone (pre-hGH) can be purified in a similar manner (30% glycerol, 1% Nonidet P-40) between two membranes having pIs 4.77 (anodic) and 4.87 (cathodic) (pre-hGH pI 4.82). This paper demonstrates the possibility of purifying by a focusing process also poorly soluble proteins at the pI.

  17. Recombinant human growth hormone treatment in short children with renal disease: Our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Dimitrijeva Brankica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Growth retardation is a hallmark of chronic illnesses such as chronic kidney disease in children, and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The growth hormone (GH resistance observed in uraemia can be overcome by supraphysiological doses of exogenous GH. Objective. We would like to present our first results of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH treatment, mainly in children on haemodialysis. Methods. Sixteen children, aged 4.5-17.1 years (mean age 11.25±3.57 with height below -2.0 standard deviation score (SDS for age or height velocity below -2.0 SDS for age, were selected to receive rhGH therapy at our Nephrology and Haemodialysis Department. Most of them were on haemodialysis (14 children with mean spent time 2.88±2.68 years (0-9 years before the initiation of rhGH therapy. One half of patients were prepubertal (8 children and the second half were in early puberty (testicular volume between 4 and 8 ml for boys and breast development B2 or B3 in girls. All patients received 28-30IU/m² rhGH per week by daily subcutaneous injection. The year before rhGH therapy served as a control period. Results. During the first year of treatment, mean height velocity in haemodialysis patients increased from 2.25 cm/year to 6.59 cm/year (p<0.0001 and in the second year it was 5.25 cm/ year (p=0.004. The mean height SDS in haemodialysis children did not improve significantly during the first year of rhGH treatment (from -3.01 SDS to -2.77 SDS, p=0.063. Neither weight nor the body mass index varied compared with the pretreatment period. Two patients developed worsened secondary hyperparathyroidism and were excluded from the study, but the relationship with rhGH remains uncertain. Conclusion. Mean height velocity significantly improved during rhGH therapy in haemodialysis patients. No significant side-effects were observed in children during three-year treatment with GH.

  18. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Birgitte; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Nielsen, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  19. Expression of thyroid hormone transporters in the human placenta and changes associated with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubière, L S; Vasilopoulou, E; Bulmer, J N; Taylor, P M; Stieger, B; Verrey, F; McCabe, C J; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M D; Chan, S-Y

    2010-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are important for the development of the human fetus and placenta from very early gestation. The transplacental passage of TH from mother to fetus and the supply of TH into trophoblasts require the expression of placental TH plasma membrane transporters. We describe the ontogeny of the TH transporters MCT8, MCT10, LAT1, LAT2, OATP1A2 and OATP4A1 in a large series (n = 110) of normal human placentae across gestation and describe their expression changes with intrauterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR n = 22). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that all the mRNAs encoding TH transporters are expressed in human placenta from 6 weeks gestation and throughout pregnancy. MCT8, MCT10, OATP1A2 and LAT1 mRNA expression increased with gestation. OATP4A1 and CD98 (LATs obligatory associated protein) mRNA expression reached a nadir in mid-gestation before increasing towards term. LAT2 mRNA expression did not alter throughout gestation. Immunohistochemistry localised MCT10 and OATP1A2 to villous cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts, and extravillous trophoblasts while OATP4A1 was preferentially expressed in the villous syncytiotrophoblasts. Whilst MCT8 protein expression was increased, MCT10 mRNA expression was decreased in placentae from IUGR pregnancies delivered in the early 3rd trimester compared to age matched appropriately grown for gestational age controls. No significant change was found in the mRNA expression of the other transporters with IUGR. In conclusion, several TH transporters are present in the human placenta from early 1st trimester with varying patterns of expression throughout gestation. Their coordinated effects may regulate both transplacental TH passage and TH supply to trophoblasts, which are critical for the normal development of the fetus and placenta. Increased MCT8 and decreased MCT10 expression within placentae of pregnancies complicated by IUGR may contribute to aberrant development of the fetoplacental unit.

  20. The effect of L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion on human growth hormone secretion after strength training

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion on serum growth hormone secretion response after strength training in young men who did not regularly engage in high intensity exercise. Ten healthy young males without workout habits (age: 22.2 +/- 1.0 yr). Subjects performed biceps curl strength training after L-ornithine hydrochloride and placebo ingestions. They participated in both of the above conditions randomly with a week interval in between. Serum growth h...

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of innovator, counterfeit, and follow-on recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitao; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L; Hancock, William S

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed characterization of recombinant human growth hormone that included the identification of the entire sequence with disulfide linkages as well as subtle modifications by a sensitive liquid chromatography coupled online with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach using the accurate peptide mass (FTICR MS) and sequence assignment (MS/MS measurement). The extent of oxidation, deamidation, and chain cleavages were measured by the ratio of peak areas of the nonmodified peptide vs. the sum of peak area of the nonmodified and modified peptides in the same LC-MS analysis. The subtle but distinct differences were found in the recombinant human growth from the three manufacturers (the follow-on, counterfeit, and the original innovator products). In relative comparison, the follow-on product had the highest degree of oxidation at methionine residues, followed by the counterfeit product, and the original innovator product had the least amount of oxidation at all three sites with the similar oxidation order. In cases, the oxidation order was Met14 > Met125 > Met170. In contrast, the follow-on had the least amount of deamidation at aspargine (Asn149), and the counterfeit had the highest degree of deamidation at this site. For the chain cleavage, the follow-on product had the highest cleavage occurring at T 10 peptide (between Asn99 and Ser100), the counterfeit had the highest cleavage on T4 peptide, (between Glu30 and Phe31), and the original innovator product with the least amount of cleavages on both sites. These subtle but distinct differences are likely because of nonidentical manufacturing, formulation procedures, and storage conditions.

  2. Bone regeneration in experimental animals using calcium phosphate cement combined with platelet growth factors and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilov-Velev, K; Clemente-de-Arriba, C; Alobera-García, M Á; Moreno-Sansalvador, E M; Campo-Loarte, J

    2015-01-01

    Many substances (growth factors and hormones) have osteoinduction properties and when added to some osteoconduction biomaterial they accelerate bone neoformation properties. The materials included 15 New Zealand rabbits, calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon(®)), human growth hormone (GH), and plasma rich in platelets (PRP). Each animal was operated on in both proximal tibias and a critical size bone defect of 6mm of diameter was made. The animals were separated into the following study groups: Control (regeneration only by Calcibon®), PRP (regeneration by Calcibon® and PRP), GH (regeneration by Calcibon® and GH). All the animals were sacrificed at 28 days. An evaluation was made of the appearance of the proximal extreme of rabbit tibiae in all the animals, and to check the filling of the critical size defect. A histological assessment was made of the tissue response, the presence of new bone formation, and the appearance of the biomaterial. Morphometry was performed using the MIP 45 image analyser. ANOVA statistical analysis was performed using the Statgraphics software application. The macroscopic appearance of the critical defect was better in the PRP and the GH group than in the control group. Histologically greater new bone formation was found in the PRP and GH groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in the morphometric study between bone formation observed in the PRP group and the control group. Significant differences in increased bone formation were found in the GH group (p=0.03) compared to the other two groups. GH facilitates bone regeneration in critical defects filled with calcium phosphate cement in the time period studied in New Zealand rabbits. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth hormone and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bartke, Andrzej; Brown-Borg, Holly; Kinney, Beth; Mattison, Julie; Wright, Chris; Hauck, Steven; Coschigano, Karen; Kopchick, John

    2000-01-01

    The potential usefulness of growth hormone (GH) as an anti-aging therapy is of considerable current interest. Secretion of GH normally declines during aging and administration of GH can reverse age-related changes in body composition. However, mutant dwarf mice with congenital GH deficiency and GH resistant GH-R-KO mice live much longer than their normal siblings, while a pathological elevation of GH levels reduces life expectancy in both mice and men. We propose that the actions of GH on gro...

  4. In Vivo Bioassay of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Synthesized in B. mori Pupae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanglian Lan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human growth hormone (hGH has been expressed in prokaryotic expression system with low bioactivity previously. Then the effective B. mori baculovirus system was employed to express hGH identical to mature hGH successfully in larvae, but the expression level was still limited. In this work, the hGH was expressed in B. mori pupae by baculovirus system. Quantification of recombinant hGH protein (BmrhGH showed that the expression of BmrhGH reached the level of approximately 890 μg/mL pupae supernatant solution, which was five times more than the level using larvae. Furthermore, Animals were gavaged with BmrhGH at the dose of 4.5 mg/rat.day, and the body weight gain (BWG of treated group had a significant difference (P<.01 compared with the control group. The other two parameters of liver weight and epiphyseal width were also found to be different between the two groups (P<.05. The results suggested that BmrhGH might be used as a protein drug by oral administration.

  5. Stimulation tests of human growth hormone secretion by insulin, lysine vasopressin, pyrogen and glucagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa,Norio

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, comparisons have been made of the secretion of human growth hormone (HGH that was induced by insulin, lysine vasopressin and pyrogen injections in order to study whether these substances can be utilized as a rapid test of HGH secretion. In insulin test, a fall of the fasting blood glucose level by 28.6% or more seemed to be sufficient to provoke adequate HGH elevation, and 9.4 ng/ml or higher HGH increment was recognized as being normal, because lysine vasopressin and pyrogen produce varying degrees of side-effects and are less specific and unpredictable in the release of HGH. Secondly, the pharmacologic effects and mechanism of action of exogenous glucagon upon the HGH secretion were studied. In normal subjects after one mg sc glucagon, there was a mean peak blood glucose level of 142. 4±3.l mg/lOO ml at 30 min, HGH levels reached a mean peak level of 22. 6±4. 8 ng/ml at 150 min, and no false negative response was noted. In patients with hypopituitarism, there was no positive response in plasma HGH levels after the sc glucagon. The present study revealed that the rise and subsequent fall of blood glucose are not the sole mechanism responsible for the effct of glucagon on HGH secretion, and that the HGH secretion in response to the sc glucagon was not triggered by cathecholamine via the stimulation of the adrenal medulla.

  6. Twin arginine translocation system in secretory expression of recombinant human growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Bagherinejad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant protein production in E. coli has several advantages over other expression systems. Misfolding, inclusion body formation, and lack of eukaryotic post translational modification are the most disadvantages of this system. Exporting of correctly folded proteins to the outside of reductive cytoplasmic environment through twin-arginine system could help to pass these limiting steps. Two signal sequences, TorA and SufI are used at N-terminal of human growth hormone (hGH bearing DsbA gene sequence at C-terminal to enhance folding. The synthetic cassettes including the signal sequence, hGH and DsbA were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3 to study the effect of signal sequence and DsbA chaperone on translocation and folding of the protein. The results confirmed using signal sequence at N-terminal of targeted protein and coexpression with DsbA could transport proteins to the periplasmic space and culture media compared to control groups. Although there is no protein band of somatropin in SDS-Page of culture media samples when using SufI as signaling sequence, the study demonstrated TorA signal sequence could transport the target protein to the culture media. However, there was a considerable amount of hGH in periplasmic space when using SufI compared to control.

  7. In vivo bioassay of recombinant human growth hormone synthesized in B. mori pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hanglian; Nie, Zuoming; Liu, Yue; Lv, Zhengbing; Liu, Yingshuo; Quan, Yanping; Chen, Jianqing; Zhen, Qingliang; Chen, Qin; Wang, Dan; Sheng, Qing; Yu, Wei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Xiangfu; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2010-01-01

    The human growth hormone (hGH) has been expressed in prokaryotic expression system with low bioactivity previously. Then the effective B. mori baculovirus system was employed to express hGH identical to mature hGH successfully in larvae, but the expression level was still limited. In this work, the hGH was expressed in B. mori pupae by baculovirus system. Quantification of recombinant hGH protein (BmrhGH) showed that the expression of BmrhGH reached the level of approximately 890 microg/mL pupae supernatant solution, which was five times more than the level using larvae. Furthermore, Animals were gavaged with BmrhGH at the dose of 4.5 mg/rat.day, and the body weight gain (BWG) of treated group had a significant difference (P < .01) compared with the control group. The other two parameters of liver weight and epiphyseal width were also found to be different between the two groups (P < .05). The results suggested that BmrhGH might be used as a protein drug by oral administration.

  8. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  9. Modeling of protein-anion exchange resin interaction for the human growth hormone charge variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Patapoff, Thomas W; Zarraga, Isidro E

    2015-12-01

    Modeling ion exchange chromatography (IEC) behavior has generated significant interest because of the wide use of IEC as an analytical technique as well as a preparative protein purification process; indeed there is a need for better understanding of what drives the unique behavior of protein charge variants. We hypothesize that a complex protein molecule, which contains both hydrophobic and charged moieties, would interact strongly with an in silico designed resin through charged electrostatic patches on the surface of the protein. In the present work, variants of recombinant human growth hormone that mimic naturally-occurring deamidation products were produced and characterized in silico. The study included these four variants: rhGH, N149D, N152D, and N149D/N152D. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations were used to determine surface electrostatic potential. Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the resulting variants to simulate IEC systems, examining the free energy of the interaction of the protein with an in silico anion exchange column represented by polylysine polypeptide. The results show that the charge variants have different average binding energies and the free energy of interaction can be used to predict the retention time for the different variants.

  10. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  11. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on remnant liver after hepatectomy in hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Min Luo; Li-Jian Liang; Jia-Ming Lai

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on the remnant liver after hepatectomy in hepatocellular carcinoma with liver cirrhosis.METHODS: Twenty-four patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent hepatectomy were randomly divided into 2groups: parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=12) and rhGH+PN group (n=12). Liver function, blood glucose, AFP, serum prealbumin and transferrin were detected before operation,at post-operative d 1 and d 6. Albumin (ALB) mRNA in liver biopsy specimens was detected by RT-PCR at post-operative d 6. Liver Ki67 immunohistochemical staining was studied.RESULTS: On post-operative d 6, compared with PN group,the levels of blood glucose, serum prealbumin, transferrin,the expression of hepatic ALB mRNA and liver Ki67 labeling index were higher in rhGH+PN group.CONCLUSION: rhGH can improve protein synthesis and liver regeneration after hepatectomy in hepatocellular carcinoma with liver cirrhosis.

  12. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange.

  13. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium metabolism in patients with human growth hormone deficiency or acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, K; Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Kihara, M; Ohta, M; Sakoda, K; Uozumi, T; Usui, T

    1985-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate trace metal metabolism in patients with known abnormalities of human growth hormone (hGH). The mean concentration of zinc in plasma and urine decreased in patients with hGH deficiency after hGH injection, whereas, after adenomectomy, in patients with acromegaly, zinc increased in plasma, remained the same in erythrocytes, and decreased in urine. There was a negative correlation between plasma zinc and serum hGH levels and a positive correlation between urinary zinc excretion and serum hGH levels in acromegaly. In hGH deficiency, the copper content remained unchanged in plasma and erythrocytes and rose in urine after treatment; however, in acromegaly, the copper content increased in plasma and remained unchanged in erythrocytes and urine after surgery. The mean concentration of erythrocyte manganese did not change significantly after treatment in patients with hGH deficiency or acromegaly, but the pre-hGH treatment level of erythrocyte manganese in hGH deficiency was lower than in the controls. Plasma selenium concentrations were decreased in hGH deficiency and increased in acromegaly patients after therapy. These results suggest that hGH affects the metabolism of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

  14. Circulating microRNA as a biomarker of human growth hormone administration to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian N; Haverstick, Doris M; Lee, Jae K; Thorner, Michael O; Vance, Mary Lee; Xin, Wenjun; Bruns, David E

    2014-03-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in plasma are being studied for use as biomarkers of specific diseases and as markers of administration of pharmaceutical agents. Administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is prohibited by sporting authorities, but it continues to be used by athletes attempting to gain an unfair advantage in athletic competition. Current methods for detection of rhGH use rely on immunoassay technology and are limited by a short time-frame in which detection of rhGH is possible. We hypothesized that administration of rhGH would alter expression of circulating miRNAs and that any changes could be detected. To identify potential miRNA targets, we utilized miRNA microarrays for screening. Confirmatory testing used real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT) quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays of selected miRNAs in 35 plasma samples obtained from (1) individuals with no known pituitary disorders, (2) patients with excess GH production, and (3) patients receiving therapeutic replacement doses of rhGH. We identified and confirmed four miRNAs that were differentially expressed in all individuals using therapeutic replacement doses of rhGH when compared to individuals with naturally high levels of GH and normal controls. This study further develops the hypothesis that circulating miRNAs may be used as biomarkers for detection of doping in sports.

  15. The effect of local injection of the human growth hormone on the mandibular condyle growth in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Feizbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of local injection of human growth hormone (GH in stimulating cartilage and bone formation in a rabbit model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Materials and Methods: In an experimental animal study, 16 male Albino New Zealand white rabbits aged 12 weeks were divided into two groups: In the first group (7 rabbits 2 mg/kg/1 ml human GH and in the control group (9 rabbits 1 ml normal saline was administered locally in both mandibular condyles. Injections were employed under sedation and by single experienced person. Injections were made for 6 times with 3 injections a week in the all test and control samples. Rabbits were sacrified at the 20th day from the beginning of study and TMJs were histologically examined. ANOVA (two-sided with Dunnett post hoc test was used to compare data of bone and cartridge thickness while chi-square test was used to analyze hyperplasia and disk deformity data. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Cartilage layer thickness was greater in the GH-treated (0.413 ± 0.132 than the control group (0.287 ± 0.098 (P value = 0.02. Although bone thickness and condylar cartilage hyperplasia were greater in the GH-treated group, these differences were not statistically significant (P value = 0.189 and 0.083, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the disc deformity (P value = 0.46. Conclusion: Local injection of human GH in the TMJ is able to accelerate growth activity of condylar cartilage in rabbit.

  16. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Novel Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone: Fc Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Hyun-Hee; Cho, Sung Yoon; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Sung Won; Huh, Rimm; Kim, Jinsup; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-10-05

    The current recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which results in poor patient compliance, especially in young children. To reduce the dosing frequency, we generated a chimeric protein of rhGH and the Fc-domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (rhGH-Fc). The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sc-injected rhGH-Fc were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and hypophysectomized rats, respectively. A single sc injection of rhGH-Fc at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg slowly reached a Cmax of 16.80 ng/mL and remained for 7 days with a half-life of 51.1 h. Conversely, a single sc injection of rhGH 0.2 mg/kg rapidly reached a Cmax of 46.88 ng/mL and declined with a half-life of 0.55 h to baseline values in 4 h. In the efficacy study, the sc-injected rhGH-Fc induced rapid weight gain and tibial width growth at a dose of 240 μg/animal. The effect of two injections of rhGH-Fc separated by 1 week was comparable to that of the same dose of 14 daily injections of rhGH. The rhGH-Fc is a novel candidate for long-acting rhGH therapy with more convenient weekly administration, as it reduces glomerular filtration and receptor-mediated clearance while allowing for the rapid reversal of potential adverse events.

  17. Model-based process development for the purification of a modified human growth hormone using multimodal chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejergaard, Lars; Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Krarup, Janus Kristian; Hagel, Anne Birgitte Bagge; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the multimodal Capto adhere resin can be used in concert with calcium chloride or arginine hydrochloride as mobile phase modifiers to create a highly selective purification process for a modified human growth hormone. Importantly, these processes are shown to result in significant clearance of product related aggregates and host cell proteins. Furthermore, the steric mass action model is shown to be capable of accurately describing the chromatographic process and the aggregate removal. Finally, justification of the selected operating ranges is evaluated using the model together with Latin hypercube sampling. The results in this article establish the utility of multimodal chromatography when used with appropriate mobile phase modifiers for the downstream bioprocessing of a modified human growth hormone and offer new approaches for bioprocess verification.

  18. A nonpeptidyl growth hormone secretagogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R G; Cheng, K; Schoen, W R; Pong, S S; Hickey, G; Jacks, T; Butler, B; Chan, W W; Chaung, L Y; Judith, F

    1993-06-11

    A nonpeptidyl secretagogue for growth hormone of the structure 3-amino-3-methyl-N-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-1-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5 -yl) (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methyl)-1H-1-benzazepin-3(R)-yl)-butanamid e (L-692,429) has been identified. L-692,429 synergizes with the natural growth hormone secretagogue growth hormone-releasing hormone and acts through an alternative signal transduction pathway. The mechanism of action of L-692,429 and studies with peptidyl and nonpeptidyl antagonists suggest that this molecule is a mimic of the growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2 (GHRP-6). L-692,429 is an example of a nonpeptidyl specific secretagogue for growth hormone.

  19. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  20. Preventing Growth Hormone Abuse: An Emerging Health Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, George L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Facts about growth hormone abuse should be incorporated into substance abuse components of health education curriculums. Sources, uses, and dangers associated with human growth hormones are discussed. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  1. Renal tubule-specific expression and urinary secretion of human growth hormone: a kidney-based transgenic bioreactor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinhua; Cheng, Jin; Huang, Liwei; Gao, Jin; Zhang, Zhong-Ting; Pak, Joanne; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2003-04-01

    Tissue-specific expression of human genes and secretion of human proteins into the body fluids in transgenic animals provides an important means of manufacturing large-quantity and high-quality pharmaceuticals. The present study demonstrates using transgenic mice that a 3.0 kb promoter of the mouse Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP, or uromodulin) gene directs the specific expression of human growth hormone (hGH) gene in the kidney followed by the secretion of hGH protein into the urine. hGH expression was detected in renal tubules that actively produce the THP, that is, the ascending limb of Henle's loop and distal convoluted tubules. Up to 500 ng/ml of hGH was detected in the urine, and this level remained constant throughout the 10-month observation period. hGH was also detectable in the stomach epithelium and serum in two of the transgenic lines, suggesting position-dependent effects of the transgene and leakage of hGH from the site of synthesis into the bloodstream, respectively. These results indicate that the 3.0 kb mouse THP promoter is primarily kidney-specific and can be used to convert kidney into a bioreactor in transgenic animals to produce recombinant proteins. Given the capacity of urine production independent of age, sex and lactation, the ease of urinary protein purification, and the potentially distinct machinery for post-translational modifications in the kidney epithelial cells, the kidney-based transgenic bioreactor may offer unique opportunities for producing certain complex pharmaceuticals.

  2. High level expression of bioactive recombinant human growth hormone in the milk of a cloned transgenic cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Daniel; Barañao, Lino; Santos, Claudio; Bussmann, Leonardo; Artuso, Jorge; Werning, Carlos; Prync, Aida; Carbonetto, Cesar; Dabsys, Susana; Munar, Carlos; Salaberry, Roberto; Berra, Guillermo; Berra, Ignacio; Fernández, Nahuel; Papouchado, Mariana; Foti, Marcelo; Judewicz, Norberto; Mujica, Ignacio; Muñoz, Luciana; Alvarez, Silvina Fenández; González, Eliseo; Zimmermann, Juan; Criscuolo, Marcelo; Melo, Carlos

    2006-07-13

    Transgenic farm animals have been proposed as an alternative to current bioreactors for large scale production of biopharmaceuticals. However, the efficiency of both methods in the production of the same protein has not yet been established. Here we report the production of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) in the milk of a cloned transgenic cow at levels of up to 5 g l(-1). The hormone is identical to that currently produced by expression in E. coli. In addition, the hematological and somatometric parameters of the cloned transgenic cow are within the normal range for the breed and it is fertile and capable of producing normal offspring. These results demonstrate that transgenic cattle can be used as a cost-effective alternative for the production of this hormone.

  3. Effects of human growth hormone on the catabolic state after surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Thorbeck, R; Ruiz-Requena, E; Guerrero-Fernández, J A

    1996-01-01

    The aims of our studies were: (1) to determine if the protein catabolic response after a major or moderate surgical trauma can be restrained by the administration of exogenous human growth hormone (hGH); (2) to determine if the administration of hGH can improve systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, and (3) given that the postoperative fatigue syndrome (POF) is mediated by the endocrino-metabolic response to surgery we attempt to determine if the administration of hGH can prevent or reduce POF. Therefore, we performed three placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trials on 216 patients. Major gastrointestinal surgery was treated only with total parenteral nutrition (TPN; n = 20) or TPN plus 4 IU hGH (n = 18). Patients with moderate surgical trauma received either hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN; n = 93) or HPN and 8 IU hGH (n = 87). In this study, we also determined the evolution of the systemic host defenses and thereby the risk of infection. In 48 patients who underwent cholecystectomy treated (n = 26) either with HPN or HPN plus 8 IU hGH, we measured the protein catabolic response, postoperative fatigue and anthropometric modifications. The treatment with hGH together with HPN or TPN (1) overcomes the protein catabolic effects of the trauma response induced by major or moderate surgery by increasing protein synthesis, (2) improves humoral and cellular systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, (3) preserves or increases lean body mass and reduces adipose tissue and (4) minimizes POF.

  4. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  5. Improved Cardiac Contractility of Human Recombinant Growth Hormone on the Congestive Heart Failure of Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ping; He Yu-quan; Zeng Hong; Ni Jin-song; Yun Qing-jun; Huang Xiao-ping; Li Shu-mei

    2005-01-01

    The enhanced cardiac contractility effect of human recombinant growth hormone (hr-GH) on the congestive heart failure (CHF) was studied on the pig. To build a pig model of congestive heart failure, a temporary artificial cardiac pacemaker was implanted in the pig's body and paced at 220 beats to 240 beats per minute for 1 week. After the model of congestive heart failure was successfully set up, the frequency of the pacemaker was changed to 150 beats to 180 beats per minute to maintain the CHF model stable. Pigs were divided into three groups: The hr-GH group in which 0.5 mg/kg per day of hr-GH was administrated intramuscularly for 15 days, the injection control group in which an equal amount of physiological saline was injected intramuscularly, and a normal control group. The left ventricular diastolic end pressure was (10.60±2.41 ) mmHg in the hr-GH group, but (19.00±3.81) mmHg in the saline control group (P<0.01); Cardiac output was (1.86±0.13) L/min in the hr-GH group, but (1.56 ±0.18) L/min in the saline control group (P<0.05); Peripheral min) -1 in the saline control group (P<0.05); ± dp/dtmax was (2900 ±316.23) and (2280 ±286.36) in the hr-HG group and the saline control group respectively (P<0.05). The results show that hr-GH enhances myocardial contractility of CHF, and the CHF model built by a temporary artificial cardiac pacemaker at a high rate of stimulation is reasonable and applicable.

  6. Ten years of clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás Pérez, Maria Victoria; Kriström, Berit; Romer, Tomasz; Walczak, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Safety concerns for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatments include impact on cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and the formation of antibodies to endogenous/exogenous GH. Omnitrope(®) (biosimilar rhGH) was approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, with approval granted on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®)). Additional concerns that may exist in relation to biosimilar rhGH include safety in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation and the impact of changing to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH treatments. A substantial data set is available to fully understand the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH, which includes data from its clinical development studies and 10 years of post-approval experience. As of June 2016, 106,941,419 patient days (292,790 patient-years) experience has been gathered for biosimilar rhGH. Based on the available data, there have been no unexpected or unique adverse events related to biosimilar rhGH treatment. There is no increased risk of cancer, adverse glucose homeostasis, or immunogenic response with biosimilar rhGH compared with the reference medicine and other rhGH products. The immunogenicity of biosimilar rhGH is also similar to that of the reference and other rhGH products. Physicians should be reassured that rhGH products have a good safety record when used for approved indications and at recommended doses, and that the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH is in keeping with that of other rhGH products.

  7. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horber, F.F.; Marsh, H.M.; Haymond, M.W. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation {sup 14}C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.

  8. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  9. Conformational origin of a difficult coupling in a human growth hormone releasing factor analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deber, C M; Lutek, M K; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    During the solid-phase synthesis of the human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) analog [Ala15, Leu27, Asn28] -GRF(1-32)-OH, incorporation of Boc-Gln16 was determined to be incomplete. While aggregation of growing resin-bound peptide chains with concomitant beta-sheet formation and "precipitation" has been proposed to account in general for such "difficult coupling," no feature of sequence in the Gln16 region of this GRF analog provided an immediate rationale for this result. We now report 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra of a series of resin-bound GRF segments surrounding the Gln16 position (19-32 through 14-32), swelled in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 solutions [GRF(14-32) = Leu14-Ala-Gln-Leu-Ser(Bzl)-Ala-Arg(Tos)-Lys(CIZ)-Leu- Leu-Gln-Asp(OcHex)-Ile-Leu-Asn-Arg(Tos)-Gln-Gln-Gly32-PAM resin]. While relatively sharp spectra are observed for GRF(19-32), components with resonances broadened by an order-of-magnitude appear in spectra of the 18-32 and 17-32 peptide-resin, and the entire spectrum of 16-32 is ill-resolved and highly broadened. Subsequent spectra sharpen again (15-32, 14-32). These combined synthesis/spectroscopic experimental results, in conjunction with predictive analyses using standard Chou-Fasman 2 degrees structure parameters, suggest that the completeness of the Gln16 coupling is hindered by formation of a specific, folded beta-sheet/beta-turn structure in GRF(16-32) (with the turn located at 18-21, "upstream" of the difficult coupling site), and accompanying aggregation of peptide chains. This analysis suggests that awareness of such potential beta-sheet/beta-turn sequences can guide analog choices, and/or facilitate pre-programming of synthesis steps in anticipation of problem couplings.

  10. Expression of thyroid hormone transporters in the human placenta and changes associated with intrauterine growth restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Loubière, L S; Vasilopoulou, E.; Bulmer, J N; Taylor, P. M.; Stieger, B.; Verrey, F.; McCabe, C. J.; Franklyn, J.A.; Kilby, M. D.; Chan, S-Y

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are important for the development of the human fetus and placenta from very early gestation. The transplacental passage of TH from mother to fetus and the supply of TH into trophoblasts require the expression of placental TH plasma membrane transporters. We describe the ontogeny of the TH transporters MCT8, MCT10, LAT1, LAT2, OATP1A2 and OATP4A1 in a large series (n = 110) of normal human placentae across gestation and describe their expression changes with intrauterine ...

  11. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel;

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic β-cells, and to examine this in relation to β-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP......Fatty acid-induced damage in pancreatic β-cells is assumed to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lactogens (prolactin, placental lactogen and growth hormone) improve β-cell survival via STAT5 activation but the molecular targets are incompletely characterized. The aim...

  12. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel;

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic ß-cells, and to examine this in relation to ß-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP......Fatty acid-induced damage in pancreatic ß-cells is assumed to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lactogens (prolactin, placental lactogen and growth hormone) improve ß-cell survival via STAT5 activation but the molecular targets are incompletely characterized. The aim...

  13. Metabolic and Behavioural Phenotypes in Nestin-Cre Mice Are Caused by Hypothalamic Expression of Human Growth Hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Declercq

    Full Text Available The Nestin-Cre driver mouse line has mild hypopituitarism, reduced body weight, a metabolic phenotype and reduced anxiety. Although several causes have been suggested, a comprehensive explanation is still lacking. In this study we examined the molecular mechanisms leading to this compound phenotype. Upon generation of the Nestin-Cre mice, the human growth hormone (hGH minigene was inserted downstream of the Cre recombinase to ensure efficient transgene expression. As a result, hGH is expressed in the hypothalamus. This results in the auto/paracrine activation of the GH receptor as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 and reduced expression of growth hormone releasing hormone (Ghrh. Low Ghrh levels cause hypopituitarism consistent with the observed mouse growth hormone (mGH deficiency. mGH deficiency caused reduced activation of the GH receptor and hence reduced phosphorylation of STAT5 in the liver. This led to decreased levels of hepatic Igf-1 mRNA and consequently postnatal growth retardation. Furthermore, genes involved in lipid uptake and synthesis, such as CD36 and very low-density lipoprotein receptor were upregulated, resulting in liver steatosis. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the unexpected expression of hGH in the hypothalamus of Nestin-Cre mice which is able to activate both the GH receptor and the prolactin receptor. Increased hypothalamic GH receptor signaling explains the observed hypopituitarism, reduced growth and metabolic phenotype of Nestin-Cre mice. Activation of either receptor is consistent with reduced anxiety.

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life of Young Adults Treated with Recombinant Human Growth Hormone during Childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit Sommer

    Full Text Available Since recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH became available in 1985, the spectrum of indications has broadened and the number of treated patients increased. However, long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL after childhood rhGH treatment has rarely been documented. We assessed HRQoL and its determinants in young adults treated with rhGH during childhood.For this study, we retrospectively identified former rhGH patients in 11 centers of paediatric endocrinology, including university hospitals and private practices. We sent a questionnaire to all patients treated with rhGH for any diagnosis, who were older than 18 years, and who resided in Switzerland at time of the survey. Three hundred participants (58% of 514 eligible returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 23 years; 56% were women; 43% had isolated growth hormone deficiency, or idiopathic short stature; 43% had associated diseases or syndromes, and 14% had growth hormone deficiency after childhood cancer. Swiss siblings of childhood cancer survivors and the German norm population served as comparison groups. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form-36. We found that the Physical Component Summary of healthy patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency or idiopathic short stature resembled that of the control group (53.8 vs. 54.9. Patients with associated diseases or syndromes scored slightly lower (52.5, and former cancer patients scored lowest (42.6. The Mental Component Summary was similar for all groups. Lower Physical Component Summary was associated with lower educational level (coeff. -1.9. Final height was not associated with HRQoL.In conclusion, HRQoL after treatment with rhGH in childhood depended mainly on the underlying indication for rhGH treatment. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency/idiopathic short stature or patients with associated diseases or syndromes had HRQoL comparable to peers. Patients with growth hormone deficiency after childhood cancer were

  15. Potential benefits of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael R; Baker, Julien S; Evans, Peter; Hullin, David; Thomas, Non-Eleri; Davies, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Athletes have enjoyed almost a thirty year amnesty of rhGH abuse, which they consider has contributed to the winning of medals and the breaking of world records. Such a reprieve is almost at an end, since WADA have identified a method to detect rhGH abuse. Or have they? The anecdotal word "on the street" is that rhGH is still undetectable and athletes believe that the benefits, at the dosages they administer, far outweigh the risks! Scientists are aware that in a hormone deficiency condition, replacement can halt and in certain situations reverse some of the adverse effects. Growth hormone deficiency can lead to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and an increase in abdomino-visceral obesity, which is reversed on replacement with rhGH. Since the availability of GH, athletes have been trying to extrapolate these effects from the deficiency state to the healthy corpus and increase their sporting prowess. Past confessions from athletes, such as Ben Johnson, Kelly White, Tim Montgomery, Marion Jones and currently Dwain Chambers have demonstrated that they are prepared to tread the very fine lines that separate the "men from the boys". Rewards are so great, that anonymous surveys have identified that athletes will risk ill health, if they believe they can cheat, win and not get caught. The question that still needs to be answered is, "does growth hormone enhance performance"? Recent research suggests that it could. There is also a suspicion that in "cycled" low supraphysiological doses, it is no where near as harmful as WADA claim it to be.

  16. Studying the Anti-aging Effect of Human Growth Hormone on Human Fibroblast Cells via Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Chaparzadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In recent years, studies have focused on the telomerase for cancer treatmentby repressing telomerase in cancerous cells or prevent cell aging by activating it in theaged cells. Thus, in these studies natural and synthetic agents have been used to repressor activate telomerase. In this research, we investigated the effects of human growth hormone(hGH on aging via evaluation of telomerase activity.Materials and Methods: Primary human foreskin fibroblast cells were isolated, culturedand treated with different concentrations of hGH. BrdU and MTT cell proliferation assaysand cells number counting. Cell aging was assayed by the senescence sensitivegalactosidase staining method. Telomerase activity was measured with a telomerasePCR ELISA kit.Data were analyzed with SPSS software (one-way ANOVA and univariateANOVA.Results: Our results indicated that cells treated with a lower concentration (0.1, 1 ng/mlof hGH had more green color cells (aged cells. Furthermore, cell proliferation increasedwith increasing hGH concentrations (10 to 100 ng/ml which was significant in comparisonwith untreated control cells. TRAP assay results indicated that telomerase activityincreased with increasing hGH concentration, but there was no significant difference. Additionally,more rapid cell growth and telomerase activity was noted in the absence of H2O2when compared with the presence of H2O2, which was significantly different.Conclusion: Although increasing cell proliferation along with increasing hGH concentrationwas confirmed by all cell proliferation assays, only the cell counting test was statisticallysignificant. Thus, it is inconclusive that hGH (up to 100 ng/ml has an anti-agingeffect. Also, because there was no significant difference in the telomerase activity results(in spite of increasing progress along with increasing hGH concentration we can not certainlyconclude that hGH (up to 100 ng/ml impacts telomerase activity.

  17. Abnormal polyamine metabolism in hereditary muscular dystrophies: effect of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, D; Kutner, M H; Chawla, R K; Goldsmith, M A

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies showed hyperre-sponsiveness to human growth hormone (hGH) in men with myotonic or limb girdle dystrophies (MMD or LGD). Because polyamines may mediate some actions of hGH, we have now investigated polyamine metabolism in these and other dystrophies. Under metabolic balance study conditions, serum and urine levels of putrescine (Pu), spermidine (Sd), spermine (Sm), and cadaverine (Cd) were measured in six normal men (36-44 yr), four men with MMD (38-44 yr), and three men with LGD (30-36 yr), before and during treatment with 0.532 U/kg body wt ((3/4)/d) of hGH. Daily balances of N, P, and K were also monitored. In the normal subjects, hGH did not influence elemental balances or serum and urine polyamines. In MMD, hGH caused significant retention of N, P, and K (P muscular dystrophy, age 8-13, did not differ from those in five age-matched normal boys. Skeletal muscle polyamines were measured in five men (31-40 yr) without muscle disease and in three men with LGD (30-38 yr). Average concentrations of Pu, Sd, Sm, and Cd were 46, 306, 548, and 61 nmol/g wet wt in LGD and 1, 121, 245, and 14 in the normal subjects, respectively (P muscular dystrophy and in age- and sex-matched normal controls. Pu, Sd, Sm, and Cd levels were two to three times higher than normal in muscle, but did not differ in liver, kidney, and brain. Similar findings were made in male hamsters with hereditary dystrophy and in their controls. The abnormality in hamster muscle polyamines appeared between 1 and 6 wk of age and persisted or intensified until 30 wk. These data reveal abnormalities of polyamine metabolism in men with MMD, in men with LGD, and in mice or hamsters with hereditary muscular dystrophy. The polyamine disorder could be related to dystrophic patients' hyperresponsiveness to hGH.

  18. Metabolic effects of human growth hormone and of estrogens in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, D; Chyatte, S B; Patterson, J H; Gerron, G G; O'Beirne, I; Barlow, J; Jordan, A; Shavin, J S

    1972-05-01

    Metabolic balance studies were conducted in seven boys with Duchenne-type muscular dystrophy, and in six normal boys of similar age, during a 12 day control period and during a 12 day period of treatment with human growth hormone (HGH) at the following doses: 0.0168, 0.0532, and 0.168 U/kg body weight (BW)((3/4)) per day (doses A, B, and C, respectively). In five of the six normals, dose C caused positive balances in N, P, Na, and K; doses B and A had anabolic effects in two and one normal subjects, respectively. In six of the seven Duchenne cases, dose C caused negative balances of N and K, and sometimes of P. Negative balances were produced in three of the Duchenne subjects by dose B, and in one by dose A. None of the dystrophy cases exhibited an anabolic response to any dosage of HGH tested. The release of endogenous HGH in response to insulin, after 2 days' pretreatment with diethylstilbestrol, was similar in both groups of subjects. In the course of these tests, a marked anabolic effect of diethylstilbestrol in the Duchenne patients was apparent. Therefore metabolic balance studies were repeated, in both Duchenne and normal cases, during a 12 day control period and during 12 days of treatment with diethylstilbestrol (0.106 mg/kg BW((3/4)) per day). In three of the normal children, diethylstilbestrol had no effect on the elemental balances; in two cases, a retention of Na was observed. In all seven Duchenne cases, diethylstilbestrol caused positive balances in N, P, Na, and K. Ethinyl estradiol (0.0106 mg/kg BW((3/4)) per day) produced positive N, P, Na, and K balances in all three Duchenne cases tested with this agent. The data show that exogenous HGH causes a catabolic effect in boys with Duchenne dystrophy. These patients are hyperresponsive to the anabolic effect of diethylstilbestrol. The latter phenomenon may reflect the inhibitory effect of estrogen upon the peripheral actions of these boys' endogenous HGH.

  19. Glutamine and recombinant human growth hormone protect intestinal barrier function following portal hypertension surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Feng Tang; Yun-Biao Ling; Nan Lin; Zheng Hao; Rui-Yun Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment of glutamine (Gln) and recombinant human growth hormone(rhGH) on intestinal barrier function following portal hypertension surgery.METHODS: This study was designed as a prospective,randomized and controlled clinical trial. Forty two patients after portal hypertension surgery were randomly assigned into 2 groups: control group (n = 20) and supplemental group (adding Gin and rhGH, n = 22). Every patient received isocaloric and isonitrogenous standard total parenteral nutrition (TPN) starting 3 d after surgery for 7 d. Blood samples were obtained before surgery and at the 3rd and 10th day postoperatively. Host immunity was evaluated by measuring levels of CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, IgG, IgM and IgA, and the inflammatory responses were determined by assessing IL-2, TNF-α and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Intestinal permeability and integrity was evaluated by L/M test and histological examination, respectively.RESULTS: On postoperative d 10, CD4, CD4/CD8, IgG and IL-2 levels in supplemental group were significantly higher than those in control group (33.7 ± 5.5 vs 31.0± 5.4, P < 0.05, (1.17 ± 0.32 vs 1.05 ± 0.15, P < 0.05,13.94 ± 1.09 vs 12.33±1.33, P < 0.05, and 368.12± 59.25 vs 318.12 ± 45.65, P < 0.05, respectively),whereas the increase in serum TNF-α concentration was significantly reduced (41.02 ± 27.56 vs 160.09 ± 35.17,P < 0.05). The increase in L/M ratio was significantly lower in the supplemental group than in the control group (0.0166 ± 0.0017 vs 0.0339 ± 0.0028, P < 0.05).Moreover, mucosal integrity in the supplemental group was better than in the control group.CONCLUSION: Postoperative administration of TPN supplemented with Gin and rhGH in patients after portal hypertension surgery improves immune function,modulates inflammatory response, prevents the intestinal mucous membrane from atrophy and preserves intestinal integrity.

  20. Bioequivalence studies for three formulations of a recombinant human growth hormone: challenges and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Le; Jacobs, Joan; Kuebler, Peter; Bakker, Bert; Lippe, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Two bioequivalence (BE) studies in healthy volunteers comparing new formulations of the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) Nutropin AQ (somatropin [rDNA origin] injection; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) with the currently marketed formulation (5 mg/mL) were conducted to extend available dosing options. All formulations were administered by subcutaneous (SC) injection ranging in volume from 0.25 to 1.0 mL depending on the formulation concentration. Study A was a 2-period crossover design to assess the BE of 5 and 10 mg/mL. The estimate for relative bioavailability (AUC(0-24 h)) was within the prespecified BE interval (0.80-1.25). However, while the C(max) estimate (1.17) was contained within the range for BE, the 90% CI (0.986-1.38) extended beyond the prespecified BE interval. As a result, Study A failed to show BE between the 5 and 10mg/mL formulations. Review of the data showed unexpected increased variability in the observed C(max). Further review of individual data suggested that in 4 subjects, the GH concentration profile of 1 of the 2 injections closely resembled the absorption kinetics of an intramuscular injection rather than an SC injection. Because study conduct may have contributed to these results, we performed a second study, Study B. This study incorporated injection technique training, a defined injection site, and a larger sample size to accommodate variability. It also included a third formulation, creating a 3-period crossover design to assess the BE of 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL. Study B results demonstrated BE of the new 2.5- and 10-mg/mL formulations to the reference 5-mg/mL formulation, and BE to each other, with all 90% CIs within the BE range of 0.80 to 1.25. Thus the challenge of recognizing that design issues could affect outcomes gave us the tools to perform a second study, and the positive results taught us that demonstrating BE is an issue not only of pharmacology, but also of study methodology and execution.

  1. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on rat septic shock with intraabdominal infection by E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Huang; Shu-Ren Wang; Cheng Yi; Ming-Ying Ying; Ying Lin; Mao-Hui Zhi

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on rat septic shock with intraabdominal infection by E. coli and its possible mechanism. METHODS: 76 SD rats were divided into 3 groups randomly:control group (group C, n=16) without any special treatnent,of E. coli(1×1010 cfu@ L-1,15 ml@kg-1, ip), treated group (group by rhGH injection (2.25 U@kg-1@d-1, im). Group S and group T were further divided into 1d and 3d subgroups, respectively (n=15 each). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), levels of plasma TNFα and endotoxin and leukocyte count were determined on 1st day and 3rd day after E. coli injection. Another 39 SD rats were divided into groups C, S and T (n=13 each) just for observing survival rate within 1 week.RESULTS: (1) On 1st and 3rd day, MAP in group S decreased markedly, and MAP on 1st day lowered more than that of 3rd day (P<0.01), while MAP in group T just decreased slightly. The survival rate within 1 week was much higher in group T (84.6 %) than in group S (46.2 %) (P<0.01). (2)On 1st day, plasma TNFα and endotoxin elevated significantly in group S and group T (P<0.05), and endotoxin in group S had more increase (P<0.01). On 3rd day, TNFα in group S returned to the level of group C (P>0.05),while TNFα in group T went down below the level of group C(P<0.01). On 3rd day, endotoxin in group S declined, but was still higher than that of group C (P<0.01), endotoxin in group T returned to the level of group C (P>0.05). (3) On 1st day, neutrophil ratio in total leukocyte count in both group S and group T increased significantly (P<0.05 vs group C).CONCLUSION: rhGH showed beneficial effects on rat septic shock. The possible mechanisms may involve the attenuation of bacteria/endotoxin translocation and decreased systemic endotoxin level; inhibition of the production and release of TNFα; improved circulatory function; improved systemic host defenses and maintenance of intestinal mucosa barrier.

  2. Hormonal determinants of pubertal growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamarre-van Waal, H.A.; Coeverden, S.C. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Pubertal growth results from increased sex steroid and growth hormone (GH) secretion. Estrogens appear to play an important role in the regulation of pubertal growth in both girls and boys. In girls, however, estrogens cannot be the only sex steroids responsible for pubertal growth, as exogenous est

  3. Controlled release of human growth hormone fused with a human hybrid Fc fragment through a nanoporous polymer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Jang, Do Soo; Yang, Seung Yun; Lee, Mi Nam; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cha, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Kon; Sung, Young Chul; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and structural integrity of hGH. Thus, the nanoporous release device could be a potential delivery system for the long-term controlled release of therapeutic proteins fused with the hybrid Fc fragment.Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and

  4. Obtaining growth hormone from calf blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchev, L. A.; Ralchev, K. K.; Nikolov, I. T.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation of a growth hormone from human serum was used for the isolation of the hormone from calf serum. The preparation was biologically active - it increased the quantity of the free fatty acids released in rat plasma by 36.4 percent. Electrophoresis in Veronal buffer, ph 8.6, showed the presence of a single fraction having mobility intermediate between that of alpha and beta globulins. Gel filtration through Sephadex G 100 showed an elutriation curve identical to that obtained by the growth hormone prepared from pituitary glands.

  5. Growth Hormone and Endocrinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Choe, K. O.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, H.; Son, H. Y.; Huh, K. B.; Ryu, K. J. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    This is an analysis of 39 patients studied at the Yonsei Medical Center from January, 1976 to March 1979. Of these 35 patient were suspected of having hypothalamic insufficiency and subjected to the L-Dopa stimulation test to observe growth hormone secretary function while four acromegaly patient received the glucose loading test and L-Dopa stimulation test. The results are as follows: 1) The basal level of GH in the various disease was as follows: a) The basal level was lower than the control level but was not statistically significant b) In diabetes the mean value tended to higher than the control level but was not significant statistically c) In all four acromegaly patients the GH level was significantly higher than the control level 2) Of 13 patients with diabetes, nine had diabetic retinopathy, and of those nine, six showed increased L-Dopa response. However, of the four non retinopathic DM patients, only one showed increased response to L-Dopa. 3) Two patients out of ten with Sheehan's syndrome responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 4) One Patient of eight with pituitary chromophobe adenoma responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 5) Four acromegaly patients revealed 3 acidophilic adenoma and one chromophobe adenoma histologically. Of patients receiving the L-Dopa stimulation test. Two showed a paradoxical response. Two patients who received the glucose loading test showed suppressed response. 6) Of two craniopharyngioma patients, one showed increased GH response after L-Dopa stimulation. Increased response of GH after L-Dopa stimulation was seen in one two craniopharyngioma patients and also in one of two patients with short structure.

  6. Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following human growth hormone therapy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caboclo Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 41-year-old man with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD acquired after the use of growth hormone (GH obtained from a number of pituitary glands sourced from autopsy material. The incubation period of the disease (from the midpoint of treatment to the onset of clinical symptoms was rather long (28 years. Besides the remarkable cerebellar and mental signs, the patient exhibited sleep disturbance (excessive somnolence from the onset of the symptoms, with striking alteration of the sleep architecture documented by polysomnography. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the CSF, and MRI revealed increased signal intensity bilaterally in the striatum, being most evident in diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI sequences. This is the second case of iatrogenic CJD associated with the use of GH reported in Brazil.

  7. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension.

  8. Direct and label-free detection of the human growth hormone in urine by an ultrasensitive bimodal waveguide biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Ana Belén; Maldonado, Jesús; Dante, Stefania; Grajales, Daniel; Lechuga, Laura M

    2017-01-01

    A label-free interferometric transducer showing a theoretical detection limit for homogeneous sensing of 5 × 10(-8) RIU, being equivalent to a protein mass coverage resolution of 2.8 fg mm(-2) , is used to develop a high sensitive biosensor for protein detection. The extreme sensitivity of this transducer combined with a selective bioreceptor layer enables the direct evaluation of the human growth hormone (hGH) in undiluted urine matrix in the 10 pg mL(-1) range.

  9. [Ten years experience with the first approved biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone drug in normal clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Palla García, Margarida; Martínez Busto, Elena; Rebollo, Francisco José; Pombo, Manuel

    2017-06-28

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is the first biosimilar drug approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, using the biosimilar registration process. It was authorised for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency, and growth disorders associated with Turner's syndrome, chronic renal failure, Prader-Willi syndrome, and growth disorders in children/adolescents born small for gestational age, and replacement therapy in adults with pronounced growth hormone deficiency. This review is focused on the scientific evidence published about this drug in the last ten years, including the clinical trials on which the approval of the regulatory authority is based, and the most relevant studies evaluating the clinical impact of the drug in clinical practice. The equivalence between biosimilar and original product has been confirmed in the clinical trials published by Romer et al. and López-Siguero et al. Furthermore, studies carried out in real-life conditions confirm its long-term efficacy and safety, as well as the absence of clinical impact by switching treatment from the original to the biosimilar product. The number of patients receiving this medication has continuously increased since its approval. Its equivalence with the original product has been verified. Preliminary data from the post-authorisation PATRO study confirm the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar product in comparison with data from clinical trials. However, final results must be evaluated at the end of the study, which will provide additional information about the long-term efficacy and safety of the biosimilar drug. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. MOD-4023, a long-acting carboxy-terminal peptide-modified human growth hormone: results of a Phase 2 study in growth hormone-deficient adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Christian J; Vanuga, Peter; Payer, Juraj; Pfeifer, Marija; Popovic, Vera; Bajnok, László; Góth, Miklós; Olšovská, Veˇra; Trejbalová, L‘udmila; Vadasz, Janos; Fima, Eyal; Koren, Ronit; Amitzi, Leanne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Hershkovitz, Oren; Biller, Beverly M K

    2016-01-01

    Objective Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy currently requires daily injections, which may cause distress and low compliance. C-terminal peptide (CTP)-modified growth hormone (MOD-4023) is being developed as a once-weekly dosing regimen in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study’s objective is to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and efficacy of MOD-4023 administered once-weekly in GHD adults. Design 54 adults with GHD currently treated with daily GH were normalized and randomized into 4 weekly dosing cohorts of MOD-4023 at 18.5%, 37%, 55.5% or 123.4% of individual cumulative weekly molar hGH dose. The study included 2 stages: Stage A assessed the effectiveness and PK/PD profiles of the 4 dosing regimens of MOD-4023. Stage B was an extension period of once-weekly MOD-4023 administration (61.7% molar hGH content) to collect further safety data and confirm the results from Stage A. Results Dose-dependent response was observed for both PK and PD data of weekly MOD-4023 treatment. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) SDS levels were maintained within normal range. The 18.5% cohort was discontinued due to low efficacy. MOD-4023 was well tolerated and exhibited favorable safety profile in all dose cohorts. The reported adverse events were consistent with known GH-related side effects. Conclusions Once-weekly MOD-4023 administration in GHD adults was found to be clinically effective while maintaining a favorable safety profile and may obviate the need for daily injections. Weekly GH injections may improve compliance and overall outcome. The promising results achieved in this Phase 2 study led to a pivotal Phase 3 trial, which is currently ongoing. PMID:27932411

  11. Pituitary and mammary growth hormone in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatti, Sofie Fatima Mareyam

    2006-01-01

    Several pathological (e.g. obesity and chronic hypercortisolism) and non-pathological (e.g. ageing) states in humans are characterized by a reduction in pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion. Chronic hypercortisolism in humans is also associated with an impaired GH response to various stimuli. Pit

  12. Mass spectrometrical analysis of recombinant human growth hormone (Genotropin®) reveals amino acid substitutions in 2% of the expressed protein

    OpenAIRE

    Roitinger Elisabeth; Cszasar Edina; Hepner Felix; Lubec Gert

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The structural integrity of recombinant proteins is of critical importance to their application as clinical treatments. Recombinant growth hormone preparations have been examined by several methodologies. In this study recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; Genotropin®), expressed in E. coli K12, was structurally analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-TOF, LC-MS and LC-MS/ MS sequencing of the resolved peptides. Results Electrospray LC-MS analysis r...

  13. Additive effects of cortisol and growth hormone on regional and systemic lipolysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, C B; Gravholt, C H; Nielsen, S; Pedersen, S B; Møller, N; Schmitz, O

    2004-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and cortisol are important to ensure energy supplies during fasting and stress. In vitro experiments have raised the question whether GH and cortisol mutually potentiate lipolysis. In the present study, combined in vivo effects of GH and cortisol on adipose and muscle tissue were explored. Seven lean males were examined four times over 510 min. Microdialysis catheters were inserted in the vastus lateralis muscle and in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the thigh and abdomen. A pancreatic-pituitary clamp was maintained with somatostatin infusion and replacement of GH, insulin, and glucagon at baseline levels. At t = 150 min, administration was performed of NaCl (I), a 2 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) hydrocortisone infusion (II), a 200-microg bolus of GH (III), or a combination of II and III (IV). Systemic free fatty acid (FFA) turnover was estimated by [9,10-3H]palmitate appearance. Circulating levels of glucose, insulin, and glucagon were comparable in I-IV. GH levels were similar in I and II (0.50 +/- 0.08 microg/l, mean +/- SE). Peak levels during III and IV were approximately 9 microg/l. Cortisol levels rose to approximately 900 nmol/l in II and IV. Systemic (i.e., palmitate fluxes, s-FFA, s-glycerol) and regional (interstitial adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) markers of lipolysis increased in response to both II and III. In IV, they were higher and equal to the isolated additive effects of the two hormones. In conclusion, we find that GH and cortisol stimulate systemic and regional lipolysis independently and in an additive manner when coadministered. On the basis of previous studies, we speculate that the mode of action is mediated though different pathways.

  14. Testicular function in boys previously treated with recombinant-human growth hormone for non-growth hormone-deficient short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicioni, A F; Paris, E; De Marco, E; Anzuini, A; Gandini, L; Lenzi, A

    2007-12-01

    Data on the effects of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy during male puberty on future testis function are still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of recombinant hGH treatment on reproductive function in non-GH-deficient short stature boys. Eight boys with non-GH-deficient short stature, affected by constitutional delay of puberty or idiopathic short stature, were retrospectively studied after recombinant-hGH treatment to verify gonadal development, hormone production and semen quality. Auxological data, endocrinological/ andrological parameters and laboratory evaluation (GH, IGF-I, FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B) were assessed before treatment; after completion of pubertal development, the same parameters plus SHBG levels were evaluated and a seminal fluid examination was conducted (ejaculate volume, pH, sperm concentration, total sperm count, forward and total motility, morphology). All patients showed normal testicular volume at the final pubertal stage, with regular androgenization. Hormonal levels were within the normal adult range in all boys. Considering the immature reproductive system of these patients in comparison with adults, semen parameters (sperm count, motility, and morphology) were within almost normal limits, except in one patient. Although patients showed the wide fluctuation of semen values frequently observed at the end of puberty, the hypophysis-gonadal axis hormones were in the normal range in all adolescents. Pathological measurements of some seminal parameters were found in one patient only. This study suggests that recombinant hGH treatment has no detrimental effects on the development and maturation of male gonadal function in non- GH deficient short stature young patients.

  15. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on visceral fat, metabolic, and cardiovascular indices in human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Takara L; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2015-04-01

    Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with reductions in endogenous GH secretion, possibly as a result of hyperinsulinemia, increased circulating free fatty acid, increased somatostatin tone, and reduced ghrelin. Reduced GH may, in turn, further exacerbate visceral fat accumulation because of decreased hormone-sensitive lipolysis in this depot. Data from multiple populations demonstrate that both reduced GH and increased VAT appear to contribute independently to dyslipidemia, increased systemic inflammation, and increased cardiovascular risk. The reductions in GH in states of visceral adiposity are characterized by reduced basal and pulsatile GH secretion with intact pulse frequency. Treatment with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) provides a means to reverse these abnormalities, increasing endogenous basal and pulsatile GH secretion without altering pulse frequency. This review describes data from HIV-infected individuals and individuals with general obesity showing that treatment with GHRH significantly reduces visceral fat, ameliorates dyslipidemia, and reduces markers of cardiovascular risk. Further research is needed regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of this treatment modality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Possible participation of calcium in growth hormone release and in thyrotropin-releasing hormone and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor synergy in a primary culture of chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1989-09-01

    We previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) exert synergistic (greater than additive) effects on growth hormone (GH) release from chicken pituitary cells in primary culture. In the present studies the possible participation of calcium in GH release and in TRH and hpGRF synergy was investigated. Following dispersion with collagenase, cells were cultured for 48 hr prior to exposure (2 hr) to test agents. Cultured cells were exposed to a range of calcium concentrations (0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2.0 mM) in the presence and absence of secretagogues. These results demonstrated that basal GH release was not altered by the concentration of calcium in the medium: however, secretagogue-induced GH release required calcium. Thus, TRH, hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin stimulated GH release in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin was observed only at the highest calcium concentration (2.0 mM). In other studies, ionomycin (10(-5) M), a calcium ionophore, stimulated GH release to a value about 125% over the basal (absence of test agent) value. Ionomycin-induced GH release was not affected by TRH (5.0 ng/ml); the combined effects of ionomycin (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml) on GH release were less than additive. However, ionomycin (10(-5) M) further increased GH release over that resulting from the synergistic action of TRH and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). Verapamil (a calcium channel blocker) did not affect GH release induced by either TRH or hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). However, this agent did inhibit synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, forskolin, or isobutylmethylxanthine. These results suggest that calcium participates in secretagogue-induced GH release from chicken somatotrophs in vitro.

  17. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  18. Comparison of pulsatile vs. continuous administration of human placental growth hormone in female C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shutan; Vickers, Mark H; Evans, Angharad; Stanley, Joanna L; Baker, Philip N; Perry, Jo K

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous growth hormone has different actions depending on the method of administration. However, the effects of different modes of administration of the placental variant of growth hormone on growth, body composition and glucose metabolism have not been investigated. In this study, we examined the effect of pulsatile vs. continuous administration of recombinant variant of growth hormone in a normal mouse model. Female C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive vehicle or variant of growth hormone (2 or 5 mg/kg per day) by daily subcutaneous injection (pulsatile) or osmotic pump for 6 days. Pulsatile treatment with 2 and 5 mg/kg per day significantly increased body weight. There was also an increase in liver, kidney and spleen weight via pulsatile treatment, whereas continuous treatment did not affect body weight or organ size. Pulsatile treatment with 5 mg/kg per day significantly increased fasting plasma insulin concentration, whereas with continuous treatment, fasting insulin concentration was not significantly different from the vehicle-treated control. However, a dose-dependent increase in fasting insulin concentration and decrease in insulin sensitivity, as assessed by HOMA, was observed with both modes of treatment. At 5 mg/kg per day, hepatic growth hormone receptor expression was increased compared to vehicle-treated animals, by both modes of administration. Pulsatile variant of growth hormone did not alter the plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 concentration, whereas a slight decrease was observed with continuous variant of growth hormone treatment. Neither pulsatile nor continuous treatment affected hepatic insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that pulsatile variant of growth hormone treatment was more effective in stimulating growth but caused marked hyperinsulinemia in mice.

  19. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GH helps children grow taller (also called linear growth), increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat. In both children ... syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short ...

  20. Purification and functional characterization of a protein: Bombyx mori human growth hormone like protein in silkworm pupa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqing; Shu, Tejun; Lv, Zhengbing; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Chen, Hao; Yu, Wei; Gai, Qijing; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people's interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs.

  1. Purification and functional characterization of a protein: Bombyx mori human growth hormone like protein in silkworm pupa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Chen

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people's interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs.

  2. Development of a bioassay system for human growth hormone determination with close correlation to immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaiti, M; Tanahashi, Y; Mohri, Z; Fujieda, K

    2012-09-01

    Serum growth hormone (GH) level is measured largely through immunoassays in clinical practice. However, a few cases with bioinactive and immunoreactive GH have also been reported. We describe here a new bioassay system for GH determination using the BaF/GM cell line, which proliferates in a dose-dependent manner on hGH addition; cell proliferation was blocked by anti-hGH antibody. This bioassay had the lowest detection limit (∼0.02 ng/ml) reported thus far and the highest specificity for GH. The bioassay results were compared with those of an immunoradiometric assay across 163 patient samples in various endocrine states. A close correlation (the ratio of bioactivity/immunoreactivity was 1.04 ± 0.33, mean ± SD) was observed between bioactivity and immunoreactivity in these samples. The newly developed system is a specific, sensitive, easy, and fast bioassay system for GH determination; we consider it useful for evaluating GH bioactivity in various endocrine states.

  3. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G; Shaw, M A; Amburn, K

    1988-12-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subjects and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins.

  4. Qualitative identification of growth hormone-releasing hormones in human plasma by means of immunoaffinity purification and LC-HRMS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Andre; Thomas, Andreas; Fichant, Eric; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-05-01

    The use of growth hormone-releasing hormones (GHRHs) is prohibited in sports according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The aim of the present study was to develop a method for the simultaneous detection of four different GHRHs and respective metabolites from human plasma by means of immunoaffinity purification and subsequent nano-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. The target analytes included Geref (Sermorelin), CJC-1293, CJC-1295, and Egrifta (Tesamorelin) as well as two metabolites of Geref and CJC-1293, which were captured from plasma samples using a polyclonal GHRH antibody in concert with protein A/G monolithic MSIA™ D.A.R.T.'S® (Disposable Automation Research Tips) prior to separation and detection. The method was fully validated and found to be fit for purpose considering the parameters specificity, linearity, recovery (19-37%), lower limit of detection (sports drug testing samples. Further studies are however required and warranted to account for potential species-related differences in metabolism and elimination of the target analytes.

  5. Growth hormone secretagogues: out of competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyot, Armand; Nikolovski, Zoran; Bosch, Jaume; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Kageyama, Shinji; Segura, Jordi; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) constitute a new GH deficiency treatment increasing exponentially in number and improved potency and bioavailability over the last decade. The growth hormone releasing activity makes these compounds attractive for the artificial improvement of the human sports skills, now that recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration is effectively detected. The GHS family is extremely diverse both in number and chemical heterogeneity and keeps growing continuously. In this paper, a general screening test is proposed. To develop a universal method, the single common property of growth hormone secretagogues has been targeted: their capacity to bind to the GHS receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Pretreated urine samples have been tested in a competition assay where eventually the GHS presence detached a radiolabelled ligand from the receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Blank urine samples were processed to determine potential age, gender and exercise effects, and to define a threshold beyond which a specimen is considered positive. Samples from a growth hormone releasing peptide 2 (GHRP-2) excretion study corroborated the screening assay applicability with a detection window of approximately 4.5 h, and results were confirmed by comparison with a dedicated LC-MS quantification of the intact compound.

  6. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent desensitization of the human growth hormone secretagogue receptor by blocking its internalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.D. Delhanty (Patric); A. Kerkwijk (Anke); M. Huisman (Martijn); B. van de Zande (Bedette); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe composition of the plasma membrane affects the responsiveness of cells to metabolically important hormones such as insulin and vasoactive intestinal peptide. Ghrelin is a metabolically regulated hormone that activates the G protein-coupled receptor GH secretagogue receptor type 1a (G

  7. Interleukin-8 production from human somatotroph adenoma cells is stimulated by interleukin-1β and inhibited by growth hormone releasing hormone and somatostatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas cause morbidity and mortality due to their localization and influence on pituitary hormone secretion. Although the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is unclear, studies have indicated that cytokines are involved. We investigated the role of cytokines, in particular interleukin...... (IL)-8, in the pathogenesis of growth hormone (GH) producing tumours.......Pituitary adenomas cause morbidity and mortality due to their localization and influence on pituitary hormone secretion. Although the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is unclear, studies have indicated that cytokines are involved. We investigated the role of cytokines, in particular interleukin...

  8. Taguchi Experimental Design for Optimization of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Production in CHO Cell Lines and Comparing its Biological Activity with Prokaryotic Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghili, Zahra Sadat; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid

    2017-09-12

    Growth hormone deficiency results in growth retardation in children and the GH deficiency syndrome in adults and they need to receive recombinant-GH in order to rectify the GH deficiency symptoms. Mammalian cells have become the favorite system for production of recombinant proteins for clinical application compared to prokaryotic systems because of their capability for appropriate protein folding, assembly, post-translational modification and proper signal. However, production level in mammalian cells is generally low compared to prokaryotic hosts. Taguchi has established orthogonal arrays to describe a large number of experimental situations mainly to reduce experimental errors and to enhance the efficiency and reproducibility of laboratory experiments.In the present study, rhGH was produced in CHO cells and production of rhGH was assessed using Dot blotting, western blotting and Elisa assay. For optimization of rhGH production in CHO cells using Taguchi method An M16 orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate four different culture components. The biological activity of rhGH was assessed using LHRE-TK-Luciferase reporter gene system in HEK-293 and compared to the biological activity of prokaryotic rhGH.A maximal productivity of rhGH was reached in the conditions of 1%DMSO, 1%glycerol, 25 µM ZnSO4 and 0 mM NaBu. Our findings indicate that control of culture conditions such as the addition of chemical components helps to develop an efficient large-scale and industrial process for the production of rhGH in CHO cells. Results of bioassay indicated that rhGH produced by CHO cells is able to induce GH-mediated intracellular cell signaling and showed higher bioactivity when compared to prokaryotic GH at the same concentrations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  10. Evaluation of potential infectivity of Alzheimer and Parkinson disease proteins in recipients of cadaver-derived human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; Abrams, Joseph Y; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Leschek, Ellen Werber; Mills, James L; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2013-04-01

    Growing evidence of cell-to-cell transmission of neurodegenerative disease (ND)-associated proteins (NDAPs) (ie, tau, Aβ, and α-synuclein) suggests possible similarities to the infectious prion protein (PrPsc) in spongiform encephalopathies. There are limited data on the potential human-to-human transmission of NDAPs associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and other non-PrPsc ND. To examine evidence for human-to-human transmission of AD, Parkinson disease (PD), and related NDAPs in cadaveric human growth hormone (c-hGH) recipients. We conducted a detailed immunohistochemical analysis of pathological NDAPs other than PrPsc in human pituitary glands. We also searched for ND in recipients of pituitary-derived c-hGH by reviewing the National Hormone and Pituitary Program (NHPP) cohort database and medical literature. University-based academic center and agencies of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Thirty-four routine autopsy subjects (10 non-ND controls and 24 patients with ND) and a US cohort of c-hGH recipients in the NHPP. Detectable NDAPs in human pituitary sections and death certificate reports of non-PrPsc ND in the NHPP database. We found mild amounts of pathological tau, Aβ, and α-synuclein deposits in the adeno/neurohypophysis of patients with ND and control patients. No cases of AD or PD were identified, and 3 deaths attributed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were found among US NHPP c-hGH recipients, including 2 of the 796 decedents in the originally confirmed NHPP c-hGH cohort database. Despite the likely frequent exposure of c-hGH recipients to NDAPs, and their markedly elevated risk of PrPsc-related disease, this population of NHPP c-hGH recipients does not appear to be at increased risk of AD or PD. We discovered 3 ALS cases of unclear significance among US c-hGH recipients despite the absence of pathological deposits of ALS-associated proteins (TDP-43, FUS, and ubiquilin) in human pituitary glands. In this unique in vivo model

  11. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Werner, S; Eggertsen, G

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone therapy after myocardial infarction improves cardiac function and survival in animals. Beneficial effects in humans are reported from studies where patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were treated with growth hormone. We have studied the role of the endogenous growth...... hormone system in myocardial infarction....

  12. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  13. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  14. Growth hormone therapy in progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Ab; Demmer, Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Catabolic processes seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria resemble those of normal aging and, in the affected children, usually result in death at an early age. In addition to its growth promoting effects, growth hormone (GH) has potent anabolic properties. Administration of GH ameliorates some of the catabolic effects of normal aging. We report the results of GH treatment in a young child with progeria.

  15. Genetic factors associated with small for gestational age birth and the use of human growth hormone in treating the disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saenger Paul

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term small for gestational age (SGA refers to infants whose birth weights and/or lengths are at least two standard deviation (SD units less than the mean for gestational age. This condition affects approximately 3%–10% of newborns. Causes for SGA birth include environmental factors, placental factors such as abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and inherited genetic mutations. In the past two decades, an enhanced understanding of genetics has identified several potential causes for SGA. These include mutations that affect the growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 axis, including mutations in the IGF-1 gene and acid-labile subunit (ALS deficiency. In addition, select polymorphisms observed in patients with SGA include those involved in genes associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and deletion of exon 3 growth hormone receptor (d3-GHR polymorphism. Uniparental disomy (UPD and imprinting effects may also underlie some of the phenotypes observed in SGA individuals. The variety of genetic mutations associated with SGA births helps explain the diversity of phenotype characteristics, such as impaired motor or mental development, present in individuals with this disorder. Predicting the effectiveness of recombinant human GH (hGH therapy for each type of mutation remains challenging. Factors affecting response to hGH therapy include the dose and method of hGH administration as well as the age of initiation of hGH therapy. This article reviews the results of these studies and summarizes the success of hGH therapy in treating this difficult and genetically heterogenous disorder.

  16. Genetic factors associated with small for gestational age birth and the use of human growth hormone in treating the disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Paul; Reiter, Edward

    2012-05-15

    The term small for gestational age (SGA) refers to infants whose birth weights and/or lengths are at least two standard deviation (SD) units less than the mean for gestational age. This condition affects approximately 3%-10% of newborns. Causes for SGA birth include environmental factors, placental factors such as abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and inherited genetic mutations. In the past two decades, an enhanced understanding of genetics has identified several potential causes for SGA. These include mutations that affect the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis, including mutations in the IGF-1 gene and acid-labile subunit (ALS) deficiency. In addition, select polymorphisms observed in patients with SGA include those involved in genes associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and deletion of exon 3 growth hormone receptor (d3-GHR) polymorphism. Uniparental disomy (UPD) and imprinting effects may also underlie some of the phenotypes observed in SGA individuals. The variety of genetic mutations associated with SGA births helps explain the diversity of phenotype characteristics, such as impaired motor or mental development, present in individuals with this disorder. Predicting the effectiveness of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy for each type of mutation remains challenging. Factors affecting response to hGH therapy include the dose and method of hGH administration as well as the age of initiation of hGH therapy. This article reviews the results of these studies and summarizes the success of hGH therapy in treating this difficult and genetically heterogenous disorder.

  17. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  18. High-level expression and purification of recombinant human growth hormone produced in soluble form in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levarski, Zdenko; Šoltýsová, Andrea; Krahulec, Ján; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Turňa, Ján

    2014-08-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) was one of the first recombinant proteins approved for the treatment of human growth disorders. Its small size (191 amino acids), possession of only 2 disulphide bonds and absence of posttranslational modifications make Escherichia coli the host of choice for its production on any scale. In this work, we have utilized an efficient T7 based expression system to produce high levels of soluble thioredoxin-hGH (Trx-hGH) fusion protein. We outline a relatively simple three step purification process employing two immobilized metal-affinity chromatography and one anion-exchange steps and removal of fusion partner by enterokinase cleavage yielding native hGH. The ability of cell populations to produce quantities of up to 1 g/L of the soluble Trx-hGH fusion protein has been tested in flask cultivations as well as in batch and fed-batch bioreactor runs. The sequence and structure of derived hGH were confirmed by mass spectrometry and circular dichroism and its native function, to induce cell proliferation, was confirmed by employing a Nb2 cell line proliferation assay.

  19. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) on experimental osteoporotic fracture healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of recombinant human growthhormone (r-hGH) on osteoporotic fracture healing in rats, and to provide an effective therapy for osteoporotic fracture.Methods: Thirty-six female 8-month-old SD rats were randomized into two groups: therapy group and control group. After the experimental model of osteoporotic fracture was established, the therapy group was treated with r-hGH of 2.7 mg/kg body weigh/day (1 mg=3 IU) for 10 days continuously by daily subcutaneous injection; whereas the control group was treated with equivalent saline. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I concentration was detected and bone mineral density (BMD) as well as biomechanical strength of callus were measured at 2, 4, 8 weeks.Results: Plasma insulin-like growth factor I concentration in the therapy group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.005) at 2nd week and began to decline at 4th week. At 8th week, there was no significant difference between the two groups. At 4th week, callus area and BMD in therapy group were higher than those in the control group, but at 8th week, they were lower and BMD had a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.001). Biomechanical testing of callus showed that torsional strength of the therapy group was higher than that of the control group at 4th or 8th week, meanwhile maximum torsional angle had a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.005).Conclusions: The results show that exogenous r-hGH can stimulate osteoporotic fracture healing in rats.

  20. Cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic human growth hormone in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mozhdeh; Berenjian, Aydin; Hemmati, Shiva; Nezafat, Navid; Ghoshoon, Mohammad Bagher; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve high-level production of the human growth hormone (hGH) in the prokaryotic expression system. In this regard, we performed cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic hGH gene in BL21 (DE3) strain of E. coli. The hGH production was determined by SDS-PAGE and western blotting techniques, and then the protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. To gain insight into the effect of different nutrients on the growth of E. coli and hGH production, in a preliminary assessment nine different types of the basal medium were analyzed. The highest growth of E. coli and hGH production were observed in TB and SOB media. Accordingly, design of experiments was employed for screening the most significant nutrients, and central composite face design was applied for the optimization. The optimum medium consisted of yeast extract (10 g/L), tryptone (10 g/L), and K2HPO4 (2 g/L). The optimum hGH concentration was 391 mg/L, which was 3-fold higher than the hGH concentration in the LB basal medium (119 mg/L). This production rate is the highest hGH concentration reported in the IPTG-inducible expression systems.

  1. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. In children, GH has growth-promoting effects on the body. It stimulates the ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  3. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Chao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2. GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1 reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2 in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A.

  4. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  5. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy. The......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... study groups, including suppressed GH, and increased GHBP in LIPO, argue against GH resistance of GH-sensitive tissues in LIPO compared with NONLIPO; however, this notion awaits examination in dose-response studies. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGFBP-3 protease is a significant regulator...

  6. Complex signatures of locus-specific selective pressures and gene conversion on Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Laura; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Kelgo, Piret; Laan, Maris

    2008-10-01

    Reduced birth weight and slow neonatal growth are risks correlated with the development of common diseases in adulthood. The Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin (hGH/CSH) gene cluster (48 kb) at 17q22-24, consisting of one pituitary-expressed postnatal (GH1) and four placental genes (GH2, CSH1, CSH2, and CSHL1) may contribute to common variation in intrauterine and infant growth, and also to the regulation of feto-maternal and adult glucose metabolism. In contrast to GH1, there are limited genetic data on the hGH/CSH genes expressed in utero. We report the first survey of sequence variation encompassing all five hGH/CSH genes. Resequencing identified 113 SNPs/indels (ss86217675-ss86217787 in dbSNP) including 66 novel variants, and revealed remarkable differences in diversity patterns among the homologous duplicated genes as well as between the study populations of European (Estonians), Asian (Han Chinese), and African (Mandenkalu) ancestries. A dominant feature of the hGH/CSH region is hyperactive gene conversion, with the rate exceeding tens to hundreds of times the rate of reciprocal crossing-over and resulting in near absence of linkage disequilibrium. The initiation of gene conversion seems to be uniformly distributed because the data do not predict any recombination hotspots. Signatures of different selective constraints acting on each gene indicate functional specification of the hGH/CSH genes. Most strikingly, the GH2 coding for placental growth hormone shows strong intercontinental diversification (F(ST)=0.41-0.91; p<10(-6)) indicative of balancing selection, whereas the flanking CSH1 exhibits low population differentiation (F(ST)=0.03-0.09), low diversity (non-Africans, pi=8-9 x 10(-5); Africans, pi=8.2 x 10(-4)), and one dominant haplotype worldwide, consistent with purifying selection. The results imply that the success of an association study targeted to duplicated genes may be enhanced by prior resequencing of the study population in order

  7. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( muscle-wasting disorders.

  8. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( muscle-wasting disorders.

  9. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on age-related hepatocyte changes in old male and female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen; Salazar, Veronica; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2004-10-01

    Aging induces changes in several organs, such as the liver, and this process might be due to damage caused by free radicals and inflammatory mediators. The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis shows a reduction with age, and this fact could be associated with some age-related changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GH administration on age-induced alterations in hepatocytes. Two and twenty two month-old male and female Wistar rats were used. Old rats were treated with human recombinant GH for 10 wk. At the end of the treatment, hepatocytes were isolated from the liver and cultured, and different parameters were measured in cells and medium. Plasma IGF-1 was also measured. Aging significantly decreased plasma IGF-1 in males. In females, plasma IGF-1 was also reduced, but not significantly. GH treatment restored plasma IGF-1 levels to values similar to young males. Aging was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and cyclic guanosyl-monophosphate (cGMP), as well as a reduction in adenosyl triphosphate (ATP) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. GH administration partially prevented all these changes in males. In females, some of the parameters were significantly improved by GH (ATP, CO, cGMP), while others showed a tendency to improvement, although differences did not reach significance. In conclusion, GH administration could exert beneficial effects against age-related changes in hepatocytes, mainly in males.

  10. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  11. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  12. Pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas develop in old mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both growth hormone and prolactin, by 8 months of age. We now report for the first time that old GRH-transgenic m......-transgenic mice, 16 to 24 months of age, develop pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted stimulation of secretory activity can cause proliferation, hyperplasia and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  13. Novel mechanisms of growth hormone regulation: growth hormone-releasing peptides and ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-M.J. Lengyel

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone secretion is classically modulated by two hypothalamic hormones, growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin. A third pathway was proposed in the last decade, which involves the growth hormone secretagogues. Ghrelin is a novel acylated peptide which is produced mainly by the stomach. It is also synthesized in the hypothalamus and is present in several other tissues. This endogenous growth hormone secretagogue was discovered by reverse pharmacology when a group of synthetic growth hormone-releasing compounds was initially produced, leading to the isolation of an orphan receptor and, finally, to its endogenous ligand. Ghrelin binds to an active receptor to increase growth hormone release and food intake. It is still not known how hypothalamic and circulating ghrelin is involved in the control of growth hormone release. Endogenous ghrelin might act to amplify the basic pattern of growth hormone secretion, optimizing somatotroph responsiveness to growth hormone-releasing hormone. It may activate multiple interdependent intracellular pathways at the somatotroph, involving protein kinase C, protein kinase A and extracellular calcium systems. However, since ghrelin has a greater ability to release growth hormone in vivo, its main site of action is the hypothalamus. In the current review we summarize the available data on the: a discovery of this peptide, b mechanisms of action of growth hormone secretagogues and ghrelin and possible physiological role on growth hormone modulation, and c regulation of growth hormone release in man after intravenous administration of these peptides.

  14. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvana Duran-Ortiz; Alison L Brittain; John J Kopchick

    2017-01-01

    .... For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues...

  15. Patterns of resource utilization and cost for postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative advanced breast cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalem, Guy; Neven, Patrick; Marinsek, Nina; Zhang, Jie; Degun, Ravi; Benelli, Giancarlo; Saletan, Stephen; Ricci, Jean-François; Andre, Fabrice

    2015-10-24

    Healthcare resource utilization in breast cancer varies by disease characteristics and treatment choices. However, lack of clarity in guidelines can result in varied interpretation and heterogeneous treatment management and costs. In Europe, the extent of this variability is unclear. Therefore, evaluation of chemotherapy use and costs versus hormone therapy across Europe is needed. This retrospective chart review (N = 355) examined primarily direct costs for chemotherapy versus hormone therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer across 5 European countries (France, Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium, and Sweden). Total direct costs across the first 3 treatment lines were approximately €10,000 to €14,000 lower for an additional line of hormone therapy-based treatment versus switching to chemotherapy-based treatment. Direct cost difference between chemotherapy-based and hormone therapy-based regimens was approximately €1900 to €2500 per month. Chemotherapy-based regimens were associated with increased resource utilization (managing side effects; concomitant targeted therapy use; and increased frequencies of hospitalizations, provider visits, and monitoring tests). The proportion of patients taking sick leave doubled after switching from hormone therapy to chemotherapy. These results suggest chemotherapy is associated with increased direct costs and potentially with increased indirect costs (lower productivity of working patients) versus hormone therapy in HR+, HER2- advanced breast cancer.

  16. Human Growth Hormone Delivery with a Microneedle Transdermal System: Preclinical Formulation, Stability, Delivery and PK of Therapeutically Relevant Doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ameri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, Zosano Pharma (ZP-hGH, and assessed preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. rhGH liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. The stability of coated rhGH was determined by size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC. Preclinical delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in female hairless guinea pigs (HGP using rhGH coated microneedle patches at 0.5 and 1 mg doses and compared to Norditropin® a commercially approved rhGH subcutaneous injection. Studies demonstrated successful rhGH formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. The ZP-hGH patches remained stable at 40 °C for six months with no significant change in % aggregates. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the rhGH-coated microneedle patches, delivered with high efficiency and the doses delivered indicated linearity with average Tmax of 30 min. The absolute bioavailability of the microneedle rhGH patches was similar to subcutaneous Norditropin® injections. These results suggest that ZP-transdermal microneedle patch delivery of rhGH is feasible and may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed rhGH injectables.

  17. Production of recombinant human growth hormone conjugated with a transcytotic peptide in Pichia pastoris for effective oral protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Yeong; Kang, Sang-Kee; Li, Hui-Shan; Choi, Chang-Yun; Park, Tae-Eun; Bok, Jin-Duck; Lee, Seung-Ho; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-05-01

    Among the possible delivery routes, the oral administration of a protein is simple and achieves high patient compliance without pain. However, the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine due to the physical barriers of the intestinal epithelia is the most critical problem that needs to be solved. To overcome the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine, we aimed to construct a recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing a human growth hormone (hGH) fusion protein conjugated with a transcytotic peptide (TP) that was screened through peroral phage display to target goblet cells in the intestinal epithelia. The TP-conjugated hGH was successfully produced in P. pastoris in a secreted form at concentrations of up to 0.79 g/l. The function of the TP-conjugated hGH was validated by in vitro and in vivo assays. The transcytotic function of the TP through the intestinal epithelia was verified only in the C terminus conjugated hGH, which demonstrated the induction of IGF-1 in a HepG2 cell culture assay, a higher translocation of recombinant hGH into the ileal villi after oral administration in rats and both IGF-1 induction and higher body weight gain in rats after oral administration. The present study introduces the possibility for the development of an effective oral protein delivery system in the pharmaceutical and animal industries through the introduction of an effective TP into hGH.

  18. Phenyl amide linker improves the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of N-terminally mono-PEGylated human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Ji, Shaoyang; Shen, Lijuan; Hu, Tao

    2014-09-02

    Human growth hormone (hGH) suffers from a short plasma half-life of ∼15 min, necessitating frequent injections to maintain its physiological effect. PEGylation, conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), is an effective strategy to prolong the plasma half-life of hGH. However, PEGylation can significantly decrease the bioactivity of hGH. Thus, a new PEGylation approach is desired to improve the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of the PEGylated hGH. In the present study, two N-terminally mono-PEGylated hGHs were prepared using aldehyde chemistry. Phenyl amide and ethyl moieties were used as the linkers between PEG and hGH, respectively. The hydrodynamic volume, proteolytic sensitivity, and immunogenicity of the PEGylated hGH with phenyl amide linker (hGH-phenyl-PEG) were lower than those of the one with propyl linker (hGH-prop-PEG). In addition, hGH-phenyl-PEG showed a higher in vitro bioactivity and better PK and PD than hGH-prop-PEG. The better PK of hGH-phenyl-PEG was mainly due to its lower proteolytic sensitivity and low immunogenicity. The better PD of hGH-phenyl-PEG was mainly due to its higher in vitro bioactivity. Thus, the phenyl amide linker can improve the overall pharmacological profiles of the PEGylated hGH. Our study is expected to advance the development of long-acting protein biotherapeutics with high therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Human chorionic somatomammotropin and growth hormone gene expression in rat pituitary tumor cells is dependent on proximal promoter sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, M.W.; Nickel, B.E.; Klassen, M.E.; Cattini, P.A. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)); Zhang, Wengang; Eberhardt, N.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-06-12

    Human placental chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS-A or hCS-B) and pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) are related by structure and function. The hCS-A gene is expressed in rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells after gene transfer. Deletion of hCS-A 5{prime}-flanking DNA reveals repressor activity upstream of nucleotide {minus}132, and a region essential for expression in GC cells between nucleotides {minus}94 and {minus}61. The sequences in this region differ from the equivalent hGH-N gene DNA by one nucleotide, and include the binding site for a pituitary-specific factor (GHF-1), required for hGH-N expression in GC cells. Exchange of hGH-N with hCS-A gene DNA in this region maintains expression in GC cells. By contrast, modification of these sequences blocks expression. These data indicate that proximal promoter sequences, equivalent to those bound by GHF-1 on the hGH-N gene, are required for hCS-A expression in GC cells.

  20. A new method to increase selectivity of transglutaminase mediated PEGylation of salmon calcitonin and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, Anna; Schiavon, Mariano; Veronese, Francesco M; Pasut, Gianfranco

    2011-08-25

    Modification of therapeutic proteins and peptides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugation is a well-known approach to improve the pharmacological properties of drugs. Several chemical procedures of PEG coupling are already in use but an alternative method based on microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) was recently devised. The enzyme catalyzes the link of mPEG-NH(2) to glutamines (Gln) of a substrate protein. In this case the advantage resides in the fact that usually only few Gln(s) in a protein are substrate of mTGase. In order to further restrict the selectivity of the enzyme, we investigated a new approach leading to the formation of a single conjugate isomer as well as for those proteins containing two or more Gln(s) as mTGase substrates. It was found that the addition of co-solvents in the reaction mixture influenced both the secondary structure of the targeted protein and the mTGase activity. The enzymatic PEGylation under these conditions yielded only mono- and selectively modified conjugates. The method was investigated with salmon calcitonin (sCT) and human growth hormone (hGH). In the case of sCT we also demonstrated the importance of site-selective conjugation for the preservation of in vivo activity.

  1. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on protein turnover in the fasting and fed state in adolescents with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Tamara S; DiMeglio, Linda A; Pfefferkorn, Marian D; Carroll, Aaron E; Denne, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test whether recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) supplementation would enhance protein synthesis and accretion of lean body mass. Eight adolescents (six males and two females; 17.2 +/- 2.6 years; age range, 13.7-21.2 years) participated in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial of rhGH. We employed stable isotopes to measure proteolysis and protein synthesis during fasting and fed conditions during two 6-month treatment conditions. We also measured bone mineral density (BMD), markers of bone turnover, and body composition. Whole-body proteolysis, phenylalanine catabolism, and protein synthesis did not differ during treatment with rhGH vs. placebo. Enteral nutrition suppressed proteolysis and increased protein synthesis similarly during placebo and rhGH treatments. We conclude that rhGH is unlikely to provide sufficient metabolic benefit to warrant its use as an adjunct treatment in clinically stable adolescents with Crohn disease. A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and suboptimal BMD existed, which deserves further investigation and clinical attention.

  2. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  3. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuytens, Kim; Tuand, Krizia; Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W M

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  4. N-glycosylation increases the circulatory half-life of human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flintegaard, Thomas V; Thygesen, Peter; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic use of recombinant GH typically involves daily sc injections. We examined the possibilities for prolonging the in vivo circulation of GH by introducing N-glycans. Human GH variants with a single potential N-glycosylation site (N-X-S/T) introduced by site-directed mutagenesis were...

  5. Trefoil factors are expressed in human and rat endocrine pancreas: differential regulation by growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackerott, Malene; Lee, Ying C; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    Trefoil factors (TFFs) 1, 2, and 3 are expressed in mucosal epithelia. TFFs are particular abundant in the intestine in which they play a crucial role in maintenance and restitution of the epithelium. Because pancreas developmentally arises from the primitive foregut, we explored the expression o...... of TFF3 resulted in attachment and migration of the islet cells, but no effects on proliferation, insulin secretion or cytokine-induced apoptosis were seen. These data demonstrate expression of TFFs in the endocrine pancreas, but their possible functions remain unknown....... of TFFs in the pancreas in man and rat. Immunocytochemical staining of adult human pancreas showed abundant TFF3 immunoreactivity in pancreatic islets and some duct cells, whereas weak TFF1 and no TFF2 staining were detected. In the islets TFF3 localized to most insulin and some glucagon and pancreatic...... polypeptide-producing cells. TFF3 immunoreactivity was colocalized with insulin and glucagon in distinct cell clusters in human fetal pancreas at wk 14 and in the newborn rat pancreas. In isolated human and rat islets, TFF3 and TFF1 mRNA was identified by RT-PCR, and TFF3 protein was detected in human...

  6. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...

  7. Obesity, growth hormone and weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Growth hormone (GH) is the most important hormonal regulator of postnatal longitudinal growth in man. In adults GH is no longer needed for longitudinal growth. Adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) are characterised by perturbations in body composition, lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk profile and bone mineral density. It is well established that adult GHD usually is accompanied by an increase in fat accumulation and GH replacement in adult patients with GHD res...

  8. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( < 0.02). This atrophy was significantly attenuated 41 to 55% (p < 0.02) in animals that received C2-BAM implants, but not in animals receiving daily injections of purified rhGH (1 mg/kg/day). These data support the concept that delivery of rhGH from BAMs may be efficacious in treating muscle-wasting disorders.

  9. Growth hormone in sport: beyond Beijing 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Jordi; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Ventura, Rosa; Pascual, Josep A; Bosch, Jaume; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Nikolovski, Zoran; Pinyot, Armand; Pichini, Simona

    2009-02-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a protein endogenously produced predominantly by the anterior pituitary gland. Native hGH and, especially, its recombinant analogue (rhGH), used to treat patients with hormone deficiency, are supposed to be abused by athletes searching its anabolic and lipolytic effects. Hence, hGH use has been prohibited for a long time by the sport authorities, but until recently, hGH abuse could not be detected. Two approaches have been followed when trying to develop methods for GH abuse detection. The direct method identifies an abnormal ratio between GH isoforms--a result of hGH exogenous administration. The time window to find a cheating athlete by this approach is limited by the excretion time of the hormone. The indirect approach measures serum biomarkers directly affected by GH intake (eg, markers of released liver growth factors and of bone and collagen turnover). In this approach, the retrospective power extends further. Alternative possibilities for cheating related to hGH could be the administration of recombinant growth factors themselves, the administration of hGH metabolic precursors such as ghrelin-like GH secretagogues, or the genetic manipulation of muscle growth-related genes (gene doping). In parallel with the new types of abuse, which will surely emerge in the near future, the research and development for the improvement of the analytical detection of GH itself will continue.

  10. Effects of cortisol and growth hormone on lipolysis in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, M; Lönnroth, P; Björntorp, P; Edén, S

    2000-02-01

    The in vitro effects of cortisol and GH on basal and stimulated lipolysis in human adipose tissue were studied using a tissue incubation technique. After preincubation for 3 days in control medium containing insulin, adipose tissue pieces were exposed to cortisol for 3 days. GH was added to the cortisol-containing medium during the last 24 h (day 6). Adipocytes were then isolated, and lipolysis was studied in the absence and presence of isoprenaline, noradrenaline, forskolin, and N-6-monobutyryl-cAMP. Cortisol reduced the basal rate of lipolysis (P cortisol-containing medium increased the basal rate of lipolysis (P effects were obtained in the presence of noradrenaline. Maximum forskolin-induced lipolytic activity was reduced after exposure of the tissue to cortisol (P effect (P cortisol and GH have opposite effects on the basal lipolytic activity in human adipose tissue in vitro as well as on the sensitivity to catecholamines, GH being the lipolytic and cortisol the antilipolytic agent. The present findings are in agreement with in vivo observations.

  11. The adverse reactions of recombinant human growth hormone in treatment%重组人生长激素治疗的不良反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翯; 李志红

    2013-01-01

    生长激素(GH)是人体必需的激素之一.对于生长激素缺乏症(GHD)的儿童,重组人生长激素(rhGH)替代治疗疗效明确,但其仍可引起水钠潴留、良性颅高压、股骨头滑脱、脊柱侧弯、甲状腺功能减退症、糖脂代谢紊乱、继发肿瘤发生的危险性升高等不良反应.对上述不良反应的发生情况、发生机制及其相关的治疗措施等方面进行详细的阐述,有助于指导今后安全用药.%Growth hormone (GH) is one of the essential hormones needed by human body.For children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD),the effect of replacement therapy using recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is obvious,but still some adverse reactions can be caused,such as sodium and water retention,benign intracranial hypertension,slipped capital femoral epiphysis,scoliosis,hypothyroidism,glucose and lipid metabolism disorder,increasing risk of secondary neoplasm,etc.Clarifing the occurrences,mechanisms and related treatments of adverse reactions mentioned above is helpful to guide the safe application of medication in the future.

  12. Gamma irradiation effects on human growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma tissue. An analysis of morphology and hormone secretion in an in vitro model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anniko, M. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology); Arndt, J. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics, Radiumhemmet); Raehn, T. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Werner, S. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Endocrinology)

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation-induced effects on pituitary cell morphology and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) have been analysed using an in vitro system. Specimens for organ culture were were obtained from three patients with pituitary tumours causing acromegaly but with different clinical activity of disease. Specimens were followed in vitro 1 h - 6 days after single-dose gamma irradiation (/sup 60/Co) with 70 100 and 150 Gy, respectively. These doses are used in clinical work for the stereotactic radiosuregery of pituitary adenomas. Considerable fluctuations in hormone secretion/release occurred during the first 24h after irradiation. All three tumours showed individual differences concern ing irradiation-induced morphological damage. Only a minor variation occurred between specimens from the same tumour. An individual sensitivity to irradiation of pituitary tumours in vitro is documented. The great number of surviving pituitary tumour cells one week after irradiation-many with an intact ultrastructure and containing hormone granules-indicated an initial high degree of radioresistance.

  13. Maternal serum human placental growth hormone at 11 to 13 weeks in trisomy 21 and trisomy 18 pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifakis, Stavros; Akolekar, Ranjit; Syngelaki, Argyro; De Cruz, Jader; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the maternal serum concentration of human placental growth hormone (hPGH) in trisomy 21 and trisomy 18 pregnancies at 11 to 13 weeks of gestation and to examine the possible association between fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness and maternal serum free beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). The maternal serum concentration of hPGH at 11 to 13 weeks was measured in a case-control study from 28 pregnancies with fetal trisomy 21, 28 with trisomy 18 and 112 pregnancies with euploid fetuses. The median hPGH multiple of the median (MoM) in trisomy 21 and trisomy 18 pregnancies were compared with euploid pregnancies. Serum hPGH was significantly lower in trisomy 21 (0.93 MoM) and trisomy 18 (0.62 MoM) compared to euploid pregnancies (1.02 MoM). There was a significant association between serum hPGH and PAPP-A in both the euploid (r = 0.258, p = 0.006) and trisomy 21 pregnancies (r = 0.410, p = 0.030) but not in trisomy 18 pregnancies (p = 0.445). In the first trimester, serum hPGH in trisomy 21 and trisomy 18 pregnancies is reduced. This is the opposite of findings in previous studies reporting that in the second trimester, trisomy 21 and 18 pregnancies have increased hPGH. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Can the usage of human growth hormones affect facial appearance and the accuracy of face recognition systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jake; Martin, Michael; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2014-06-01

    In law enforcement and security applications, the acquisition of face images is critical in producing key trace evidence for the successful identification of potential threats. The goal of the study is to demonstrate that steroid usage significantly affects human facial appearance and hence, the performance of commercial and academic face recognition (FR) algorithms. In this work, we evaluate the performance of state-of-the-art FR algorithms on two unique face image datasets of subjects before (gallery set) and after (probe set) steroid (or human growth hormone) usage. For the purpose of this study, datasets of 73 subjects were created from multiple sources found on the Internet, containing images of men and women before and after steroid usage. Next, we geometrically pre-processed all images of both face datasets. Then, we applied image restoration techniques on the same face datasets, and finally, we applied FR algorithms in order to match the pre-processed face images of our probe datasets against the face images of the gallery set. Experimental results demonstrate that only a specific set of FR algorithms obtain the most accurate results (in terms of the rank-1 identification rate). This is because there are several factors that influence the efficiency of face matchers including (i) the time lapse between the before and after image pre-processing and restoration face photos, (ii) the usage of different drugs (e.g. Dianabol, Winstrol, and Decabolan), (iii) the usage of different cameras to capture face images, and finally, (iv) the variability of standoff distance, illumination and other noise factors (e.g. motion noise). All of the previously mentioned complicated scenarios make clear that cross-scenario matching is a very challenging problem and, thus, further investigation is required.

  15. [Proceedings: The clinical effects of human growth hormone. Report on an international symposium of the German Kabi Corp. on February 15, 1975 in Munich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butenandt, O

    1975-09-11

    Report of an International Symposion (Febr. 15, 1975, Munich). Human growth hormone (HGH) acts on proliferation of cartilage, the basal process of growth, by the way of somatomedine and changes in protein metabolism. Growth can be enhanced in hypopituitary dwardism and with higher dosage in other forms of failure to thrive. HGH also seems to have a beneficial effect in patients with muscular dystrophy as shown in a preliminary report but not in thrombocytopenia. First observations on patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and on patients with non healing fractures of the long bones (pseudarthroses) have shown significant improvement. Of importance are the reports on stopping severe gastric hemorrhage in patients with stress ulcera.

  16. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  17. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Hossam; Assaad, Jana Mir; Al-Shemali, Rasha; Abbady, Abdul Qader

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin(®)). Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones. A fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples. Two major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04) used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07) on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide "immune" cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml) and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants. In regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  18. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on intestinal absorption and body composition in children with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Olivier; Dabbas-Tyan, Myriam; Talbotec, Cécile; Kapel, Nathalie; Rosilio, Myriam; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Corriol, Odile; Ricour, Claude; Colomb, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to establish the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on intestinal function in children with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Eight children with neonatal SBS were included. All were dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for >3 years (range, 3.8-11.6 years), with PN providing >50% of recommended dietary allowance for age (range, 50%-65%). The subjects received rhGH (Humatrope) 0.13 mg/kg/d subcutaneously over a 12-week period. The follow-up was continued over a 12-month period after rhGH discontinuation. Clinical and biological assessments were performed at baseline, at the end of the treatment period, and 12 months after the end of treatment. No side effects related to rhGH were observed. PN requirements were decreased in all children during the course of rhGH treatment. Between baseline and the end of treatment, significant increases were observed in concentrations (mean ± standard deviation) of serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (103.1 ± 49.9 µg/L vs 153.5 ± 82.2 µg/L; P < .01), serum insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (1.7 ± 0.6 mg/L vs 2.5 ± 0.9 mg/L; P < .001), and plasma citrulline (16.5 ± 14.8 µmol/L vs 25.2 ± 18.3 µmol/L; P < .05). A median 54% increase in enteral intake (range, 10%-244%) was observed (P < .001) and net energy balance improved significantly (P < .002). It was necessary for 6 children to be maintained on PN or restarted after discontinuation of rhGH treatment, and they remained on PN until the end of the follow-up period. A 12-week high-dose rhGH treatment allowed patients to decrease PN, but only 2 patients could be definitively weaned from PN. Indications and cost-effectiveness of rhGH treatment for SBS pediatric patients need further evaluation.

  19. Expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenicek, Tanja; Kasumović, Dino; Stajduhar, Emil; Dzombeta, Tihana; Jukić, Zoran; Kruslin, Bozo

    2013-06-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most prevalent benign breast tumor. It consists of epithelial and stromal components. In general, breast tumors are highly hormonally dependent and growth hormone by its physiology may have a possible oncogenic potential. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas. Study group included 30 randomly chosen fibroadenomas from female patients aged between 18 and 69 years. The expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor was defined in both histologic components of fibroadenomas. Growth hormone was expressed in 96.7% of both epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas, with stronger expression in the stromal component. The same percentage of positive reaction (96.7%) was obtained in the epithelial component of fibroadenomas for growth hormone receptor expression. Only 6.7% of stromal components tested for growth hormone receptor were positive. The high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenoma tissue indicates their possible role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Follow up of patients with high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor may be suggested.

  20. Nanostructure controlled sustained delivery of human growth hormone using injectable, biodegradable, pH/temperature responsive nanobiohybrid hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra K.; Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Kim, Bong Sup; Lee, Doo Sung

    2015-02-01

    The clinical efficacy of a therapeutic protein, the human growth hormone (hGH), is limited by its short plasma half-life and premature degradation. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a new protein delivery system by the self-assembly and intercalation of a negatively charged hGH onto a positively charged 2D-layered double hydroxide nanoparticle (LDH). The LDH-hGH ionic complex, with an average particle size of approximately 100 nm, retards hGH diffusion. Nanobiohybrid hydrogels (PAEU/LDH-hGH) were prepared by dispersing the LDH-hGH complex into a cationic pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable PAEU copolymer hydrogel to enhance sustained hGH release by dual ionic interactions. Biodegradable copolymer hydrogels comprising poly(β-amino ester urethane) and triblock poly(ε-caprolactone-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly-(ε-caprolactone-lactide) (PCLA-PEG-PCLA) were synthesized and characterized. hGH was self-assembled and intercalated onto layered LDH nanoparticles through an anion exchange technique. X-ray diffraction and zeta potential results showed that the LDH-hGH complex was prepared successfully and that the PAEU/LDH-hGH nanobiohybrid hydrogel had a disordered intercalated nanostructure. The biocompatibility of the nanobiohybrid hydrogel was confirmed by an in vitro cytotoxicity test. The in vivo degradation of pure PAEU and its nanobiohybrid hydrogels was investigated and it showed a controlled degradation of the PAEU/LDH nanobiohybrids compared with the pristine PAEU copolymer hydrogel. The LDH-hGH loaded injectable hydrogels suppressed the initial burst release of hGH and extended the release period for 13 days in vitro and 5 days in vivo. The developed nanohybrid hydrogel has the potential for application as a protein carrier to improve patient compliance.The clinical efficacy of a therapeutic protein, the human growth hormone (hGH), is limited by its short plasma half-life and premature degradation. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a new

  1. Analysis of recombinant human growth hormone by capillary electrophoresis with bilayer-coated capillaries using UV and MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catai, Jonatan R; Sastre Toraño, Javier; Jongen, Peter M J M; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2007-06-01

    The characterization of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; somatropin) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV-absorbance and mass spectrometric (MS) detection using capillaries noncovalently coated with polybrene (PB) and poly(vinyl sulfonic acid) (PVS) is demonstrated. Compared with bare fused-silica capillaries, PB-PVS coated capillaries yielded more favorable migration-time reproducibilities and higher separation efficiencies. Optimal separation conditions for the bilayer-coated capillaries comprised a background electrolyte (BGE) of 400 mM Tris phosphate (pH 8.5) yielding migration-time R.S.D.s of less than 1.0% and plate numbers above 300,000 for intact rhGH. The protein was also analyzed using the CE method described in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monograph. The pharmacopoeial method gave much longer analysis times (22 min versus 8 min), lower resolution and plate numbers, and consecutive shifts in migration time for rhGH, indicating possible interactions between the protein and the inner capillary wall. Due to stable migration times obtained with the coated capillaries, reliable profiling and quantification of rhGH and its byproducts in time was possible. Analysis of thermally degraded rhGH revealed the formation of two main degradation products. CE-mass spectrometry (MS) of this sample, using a PB-PVS coated capillary and a BGE of 75 mM ammonium formate (pH 8.5), suggests that these products are desamido forms of rhGH. Analyses of expired rhGH preparations with CE-UV and CE-MS indicated the presence of both deamidation and oxidation products.

  2. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange in Peptides Derived from Human Growth Hormone during Lyophilization and Storage in the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is frequently used to stabilize protein therapeutics. However, covalent modifications such as thiol-disulfide exchange and disulfide scrambling can occur even in the solid state. The effects of lyophilization and storage of lyophilized powders on the mechanism and kinetics of thioldisulfide exchange have not been elucidated and are explored here. Reaction kinetics were monitored in peptides corresponding to tryptic fragments of human growth hormone (T20 + T20-T21 or T20 + cT20-T21) during different stages of lyophilization and during storage of the lyophilized powders at 22 °C and ambient RH. The concentrations of reactants and products were determined using RP-HPLC and product identity confirmed using LC-MS. Loss of native disulfide was observed for the reaction of T20 with both linear (T20-T21) and cyclic (cT20-T21) peptides during the primary drying step, however, the native disulfides were regenerated during secondary drying with no further change till the end of lyophilization. Deviations from Arrhenius parameters predicted from solution studies and the absence of buffer effects during lyophilization suggest that factors such as temperature, initial peptide concentration, buffer type and concentration do not influence thiol-disulfide exchange during lyophilization. Results from a ‘cold finger’ method used to study peptide adsorption to ice indicate that there is no preferential adsorption to the ice surface and that its presence may not influence disulfide reactivity during primary drying. Overall, reaction rates and product distribution differ for the reaction of T20 with T20-T21 or cT20-T21 in the solid state and aqueous solution, while the mechanism of thiol-disulfide remains unchanged. Increased reactivity of the cyclic peptide in the solid state suggests that peptide cyclization does not offer protection against lyophilization and that damage induced by a process stress further affects storage stability at 22 °C and

  3. New tools for chloroplast genetic engineering allow the synthesis of human growth hormone in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannathong, Thanyanan; Waterhouse, Janet C; Young, Rosanna E B; Economou, Chloe K; Purton, Saul

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the exploitation of microalgae in industrial biotechnology. Potentially, these phototrophic eukaryotes could be used for the low-cost synthesis of valuable recombinant products such as bioactive metabolites and therapeutic proteins. The algal chloroplast in particular represents an attractive target for such genetic engineering, both because it houses major metabolic pathways and because foreign genes can be targeted to specific loci within the chloroplast genome, resulting in high-level, stable expression. However, routine methods for chloroplast genetic engineering are currently available only for one species-Chlamydomonas reinhardtii-and even here, there are limitations to the existing technology, including the need for an expensive biolistic device for DNA delivery, the lack of robust expression vectors, and the undesirable use of antibiotic resistance markers. Here, we describe a new strain and vectors for targeted insertion of transgenes into a neutral chloroplast locus that (i) allow scar-less fusion of a transgenic coding sequence to the promoter/5'UTR element of the highly expressed endogenous genes psaA or atpA, (ii) employ the endogenous gene psbH as an effective but benign selectable marker, and (iii) ensure the successful integration of the transgene construct in all transformant lines. Transformation is achieved by a simple and cheap method of agitation of a DNA/cell suspension with glass beads, with selection based on the phototrophic rescue of a cell wall-deficient ΔpsbH strain. We demonstrate the utility of these tools in the creation of a transgenic line that produces high levels of functional human growth hormone.

  4. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on hepatic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in HIV-infected patients with fat accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Mulligan, Kathleen; Lee, Jeongae; Lo, Joan C; Wen, Michael; Noor, Mustafa A; Grunfeld, Carl; Schambelan, Morris

    2002-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with a pharmacologic dose of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) resulted in a significant loss of body fat and gain in lean tissue in HIV-infected patients with syndromes of fat accumulation. However, insulin-mediated glucose disposal decreased transiently after one month of GH therapy. The present paper focuses on the changes of hepatic carbohydrate and fat metabolism associated with GH treatment in the same subjects. We assessed hepatic insulin sensitivity under both fasting and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions prior to and after one and six months of GH treatment (3 mg/day) in five patients using stable isotope tracer techniques. Indirect calorimetry, and measurements of lipid concentrations. Fasting endogenous glucose production (EGP) increased significantly at one month (12.0 +/- 0.7 to 14.9 +/- 0.9 micromol/kg/min, P glucogenesis (GNG) (3.5 +/- 0.9 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 and 5.8 +/-1.2 micromol/kg/min, n = 4, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 at one and six months, respectively); small changes in hepatic glycogenolysis also contributed. Sustained increases in lipolysis and progressive decreases in hepatic fractional de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and triglyceride concentrations occurred with GH treatment. These changes were accompanied by an improved lipid profile with a significant increase in HDL cholesterol and significant decreases in total and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, the latter consistent with the decrease in hepatic DNL. During a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamp, EGP and GNG were markedly suppressed compared to the corresponding time points under fasting conditions, albeit less so when measured after one month of GH treatment. Thus, in HIV-infected patients with abnormal fat distribution, pharmacologic doses of GH improved the overall lipid profile, but worsened glucose homeostasis under both fasting and hyperinsulinemic conditions. The combined implications of these positive and negative metabolic

  5. Studies on the nature of plasma growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S.; Grindeland, R. E.; Reilly, T. J.; Yang, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents further evidence for the existence of two discrete forms of growth hormone in human plasma, one which is detectable by both radioimmunoassay and bioassay and is immunoreactive, and the other, termed 'bioactive', which is detected by tibial bioassay but shows little reactivity with currently available antisera to pituitary growth hormone. The same division of immunoactive and bioactive growth hormone occurs in rats, though with less disparity. Tests on rats indicated that the bioactive hormone is preferentially released into jugular vein plasma and that plasma concentrations of the bioactive hormone can be enhanced by insulin administration. The bioactive hormone was detectable by tibial assays in Cohn fractions IV, IV-1, and IV-4, and could be concentrated about 40-fold by fractionation with (NaPO3)6 and (NH4)2SO4.

  6. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    .3), 1.6 (1.3), 2.1 (0.5), and 4.4 (0.9) in the four dose groups, respectively]. Conclusion: After multiple dosing of NNC126-0083, a sustained pharmacodynamic response was observed. NNC126-0083 has the potential to serve as an efficacious, safe, and well-tolerated once-weekly treatment of adult patients......Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives......: Our objective was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of NNC126-0083 in adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three adult patients with GHD, age 20-65 yr, body mass index 18.5-35.0 kg/m(2), and glycated...

  7. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  8. Phosphorylation of chicken growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramburo, C.; Montiel, J.L. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)); Donoghue, D.; Scanes, C.G. (Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Berghman, L.R. (Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology and Immunological Biotechnology, Louvain (Belgium))

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that chicken growth hormone (cGH) can be phosphorylated has been examined. Both native and biosynthetic cGH were phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (and {gamma}-{sup 32}P-ATP). The extent of phosphorylation was however less than that observed with ovine prolactin. Under the conditions employed, glycosylated cGH was not phosphorylated. Chicken anterior pituitary cells in primary culture were incubated in the presence of {sup 32}P-phosphate. Radioactive phosphate was incorporated in vitro into the fraction immunoprecipitable with antisera against cGH. Incorporation was increased with cell number and time of incubation. The presence of GH releasing factor (GRF) increased the release of {sup 32}P-phosphate labeled immunoprecipitable GH into the incubation media but not content of immunoprecipitable GH in the cells. The molecular weight of the phosphorylated immunoreactive cGH in the cells corresponded to cGH dimer.

  9. Validation and ease of use of a new pen device for self-administration of recombinant human growth hormone: results from a two-center usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Robert; Saenger, Paul; Schmidt, Heinrich; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Colle, Michel; Loche, Sandro; Marcantonio, Sandra; Bonfig, Walter; Zabransky, Markus; Lifshitz, Fima

    2013-01-01

    Close adherence to the recommended treatment regimen is important for the success of recombinant human growth hormone therapy, although nonadherence can be common. Ease of use and safety during use/storage are among several important factors in the design of a growth hormone injection device intended for long-term use. This study was performed to validate the usability and assess the ease of use of a new pen device (SurePal™) that has been developed to support daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope® (somatropin). The primary objectives of the study were to assess if study participants, representing intended users of the pen in clinical practice, were able to perform an injection procedure into an injection pad effectively and safely and disassemble the pen without receiving a needlestick injury. A total of 106 participants (61 adults and 45 children/adolescents) were enrolled at two study centers (one in the US, one in Germany). Results for both primary usability tasks met the predefined acceptance criteria, with >85% of participants successfully performing each task. All of the other tasks/handling steps assessed were also successfully performed by most participants, with high success rates reflected in the high proportion of participants who classified each task as "very easy" or "easy". After a second use of the device, 87%-97% of participants rated it as "very easy" or "easy" to use. In summary, the new pen device is safe and easy to use for both adults and children, and will help to support effective, long-term daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope®.

  10. Current Status of Biosimilar Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saenger Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is set to expire, biosimilars or follow-on protein products (FOPPs have emerged. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Recent approval of biosimilar Somatropin (growth hormone in Europe and the US prompted this paper. The scientific viability of biosimilar growth hormone is reviewed. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation for up to 7 years for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones as reference comparators. While the approval in the US is currently only for treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD in children and adults, the commercial use of approved biosimilar growth hormones will allow in the future for in-depth estimation of their efficacy and safety in non-GH deficient states as well.

  11. Current Status of Biosimilar Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Saenger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is set to expire, biosimilars or follow-on protein products (FOPPs have emerged. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Recent approval of biosimilar Somatropin (growth hormone in Europe and the US prompted this paper. The scientific viability of biosimilar growth hormone is reviewed. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation for up to 7 years for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones as reference comparators. While the approval in the US is currently only for treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD in children and adults, the commercial use of approved biosimilar growth hormones will allow in the future for in-depth estimation of their efficacy and safety in non-GH deficient states as well.

  12. Recombinant human growth hormone treatment, using two dose regimens in children with chronic renal failure--a report on linear growth and adverse effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Niels Thomas; Holmberg, Christer; Rönnholm, Kai A R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the efficiency and the adverse effects of 2 or 4 IU/m2/day of growth hormone (GH) in the first year and 4 IU/m2/day in the second. Of 29 growth-retarded children with chronic renal failure (CRF) (aged 3.4-15.1 years), 23 completed the first year of therapy, and 16...

  13. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome: A sensitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Growth Hormone Insensitivity have characteristic phenotypic features and severe short stature. The underlying basis are mutations in the growth hormone receptor gene which gives rise to a characteristic hormonal profile. Although a scoring system has been devised for the diagnosis of this disorder, it has not been indisputably validated. The massive expense incurred in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition with suboptimal therapeutic response necessitates a judicious approach in this regard in our country.

  14. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  15. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  16. Hormone-dependent bacterial growth, persistence and biofilm formation--a pilot study investigating human follicular fluid collected during IVF cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Pelzer

    Full Text Available Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%. We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples.

  17. The Influence of Physical Training on Blood Levels of Human Growth Hormone, Testosterone and Procollagen in Young Rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloupsis Socratis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle strength and skeletal age in trained and untrained pubertal boys and its relationship to the levels of Testosterone (T, Growth Hormone (GH and Procollagen (PICP. Methods: Both the exercise and control groups consisted of 24 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.63 and 17 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.48 year old boys, respectively. The exercise group (EG, in addition to school activities, participated in a rowing training program for six months (rowing technique, strength & aerobic exercises, 60 min/day, three days/week. The control group (CG only participated in the school physical education program, two to three times/week. Hormonal concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay techniques. Venus blood samples were taken at rest from both groups. Results: Testosterone was increased in both groups (p<0.001. Significant differences were found within groups in T before training (p<0.01 There was an increase of PICP in EG after training (p<0.01. Differences on GH were observed before the training period in both groups (p<0.01. Both groups significantly differed in upper and lower limbs strengths. Significant correlation was found between PICP and skeletal age in both (p<0.05 and p<0.02, respectively Conclusions: The gains in muscle strength in both groups may partly be explained by the increase in the concentrations of hormone levels and the changes in body size. Key words: skeletal age, muscle strength, anabolic hormones, rowing

  18. Two thyroid hormone regulated genes, the beta-subunits of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSHB), are located less than 310 kb apart in both human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracopoli, N C; Rose, E; Whitfield, G K; Guidon, P T; Bale, S J; Chance, P A; Kourides, I A; Housman, D E

    1988-08-01

    Two thyroid hormone regulated genes, the beta-subunits of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSHB), have been assigned to mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1p22. We have used the techniques of linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis to determine the proximity of these two antithetically regulated genes in this conserved linkage group. Four novel restriction fragment length polymorphisms were identified at the human TSHB gene. Two-point linkage analysis between TSHB and NGFB in 46 families, including the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) reference panel, demonstrated no recombination (theta = 0.00, Z = 42.8). Analysis of this region by pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that the genes for TSHB and NGFB are located less than 310 kb apart in man and 220 kb in the mouse.

  19. Sexual hormones in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, C C; Chen, W-C; Thornton, M J; Qin, K; Rosenfield, R

    2007-02-01

    The skin locally synthesizes significant amounts of sexual hormones with intracrine or paracrine actions. The local level of each sexual steroid depends upon the expression of each of the androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes in each cell type, with sebaceous glands and sweat glands being the major contributors. Sebocytes express very little of the key enzyme, cytochrome P450c17, necessary for synthesis of the androgenic prohormones dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione, however, these prohormones can be converted by sebocytes and sweat glands, and probably also by dermal papilla cells, into more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Five major enzymes are involved in the activation and deactivation of androgens in skin. Androgens affect several functions of human skin, such as sebaceous gland growth and differentiation, hair growth, epidermal barrier homeostasis and wound healing. Their effects are mediated by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor. Changes of isoenzyme and/or androgen receptor levels may have important implications in the development of hyperandrogenism and the associated skin diseases such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. On the other hand, estrogens have been implicated in skin aging, pigmentation, hair growth, sebum production and skin cancer. Estrogens exert their actions through intracellular receptors or via cell surface receptors, which activate specific second messenger signaling pathways. Recent studies suggest specific site-related distribution of ERalpha and ERbeta in human skin. In contrast, progestins play no role in the pathogenesis of skin disorders. However, they play a major role in the treatment of hirsutism and acne vulgaris, where they are prescribed as components of estrogen-progestin combination pills and as anti-androgens. These combinations enhance gonadotropin suppression of ovarian androgen production. Estrogen-progestin treatment can reduce the need for shaving

  20. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome: unusual oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Siqueira, Carlos Rodrigo Barros; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Palma, Vinícius Canavarros; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Children with significant growth retardation and normal levels of growth hormone are diagnosed with growth hormone insensitivity. The main oral findings observed in patients with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS) are underdeveloped jaws, crowded teeth and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. This manuscript describes a 9-year-old child diagnosed with GHIS, who had delayed eruption of permanent teeth and 14 unerupted supernumerary teeth. All supernumerary teeth were extracted except for two maxillary and one mandibular teeth which were difficult to identify and access. Multiple supernumerary teeth have never been reported before in patients with GHIS.

  1. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of children with Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Weibin; Li, Shuxian; Shen, Qiong; Guo, Xiuxia; Rong, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of Turner syndrome (TS). Metho d s: Total 45 patients with TS admitted between Jul. 2008 and Jun. 2011 were involved in this study. All patients received the clinical evaluation of body fat, plasma lipids, proteins and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after rhGH therapy. Results : Our results indicated a significant decrease of body fat (FAT%) from 23.56±4.21 to 18.71±2.23 but no obvious change on the level of fat mass (FM) (p>0.05) was observed after rhGH therapy. We also detected significant changes on plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) from (1.65±0.58 mmol/L) to (2.20±0.65 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDH-C) from (2.55±0.55 mmol/L) to (2.10±0.54 mmol/L) after rhGH exposure. However, no statistical significance was detected on the level of plasma triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO). Interestingly, the levels of plasma retinol binding protein (RbP) (32.55±4.28mg/L), transferrin (TRF) (2.95±0.40 mg/L), serum albumin (PRE) (250.00±45.50 mg/L) and albumin (propagated) (33.58±4.25 mg/L) were significantly increased. When it goes to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) test, there were 10 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) cases among all patients before and after rhGH therapy. No significant change was observed on homeostasis model assessment- insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) level during rhGH intervention. Conclusion : Abnormal lipid and protein metabolisms of the children with TS can be improved with rhGH therapy for 6 months. PMID:25097506

  2. Altered Nutrition State in the Severe Multiple Trauma Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Nutritional Support Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanqing; BAI Xiangjun; LIN Guanyu; TANG Zhaohui

    2007-01-01

    In order to observe the nutrition state in the severe multiple trauma patients undergoing adjuvant recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) nutritional support therapy, 45 patients with severe multiple traumas (ISS>25) were randomly divided into 3 groups. All the 3 groups had been supplied with nitrogen and caloricity according to the need of patients for 16 days. The rhGH therapy started 48 h after surgery and lasted for 14 days in two rhGH-treated groups in which rhGH was 0.2 and 0.4 U/(kg·d) respectively, and the resting group served as control one. The levels of nitrogen balance, prealbumin and safety variables (blood sugar, Na+, TT3 and TT4) were observed and compared among the three groups. The levels of nitrogen balance on the postoperative day (POD) 3 and 5 in the rhGH-treated groups were - 1.28±3.19, 5.45±2.00 and -0.18±2.55, 6.11±1.60, respectively,which were significantly higher than those in the control group (-5.17±1.68 and -1.08±3.31, P<0.01). The values of prealbumin on the POD 3 and 5 in the rhGH-treated groups were 180.19±27.15, 194.44±50.82 and 194.94±29.65, 194.11±16.17, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (117.42±19.10 and 135.63±28.31, P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the rhGH 0.2 U/(kg·d) group and rhGH 0.4 U/(kg·d) group in both of the levels of nitrogen balance and prealbumin. It is concluded that the nutritional support therapy with adjuvant rhGH which starts 48 h after surgery improves the nutrition state of the patients with severe multiple trauma. It is safe for severe multiple trauma patients who accept rhGH at the dose of 0.2 and 0.4 U/(kg·d).

  3. Growth hormone-releasing factor regulates growth hormone mRNA in primary cultures of rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gick, G G; Zeytin, F N; BRAZEAU, P.; Ling, N C; Esch, F S; Bancroft, C

    1984-01-01

    A peptide with high intrinsic activity for specifically stimulating the secretion of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH; somatotropin) has been characterized and reproduced by total synthesis. This peptide, human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, 44-amino-acid form (hpGRF1-44-NH2), was isolated from a tumor localized in the pancreas of a patient with acromegaly. We report here the effect of this growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on GH release and the GH mRNA levels in monolayer c...

  4. Validation and ease of use of a new pen device for self-administration of recombinant human growth hormone: results from a two-center usability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapaport R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert Rapaport,1 Paul Saenger,2 Heinrich Schmidt,3 Yukihiro Hasegawa,4 Michel Colle,5 Sandro Loche,6 Sandra Marcantonio,7 Walter Bonfig,8 Markus Zabransky,9 Fima Lifshitz10 1Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 2Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA; 3University Children's Hospital, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Munich, Germany; 4Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; 525 rue Boudet, Bordeaux, France; 6Servizio di Endocrinologia Pediatrica, Ospedale Microcitemico ASL Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy; 7Clinica de Endocrinologia Pediátrica, Londrina, Brazil; 8Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Technical University München, Munich, Germany; 9Sandoz International GmbH, Holzkirchen, Germany; 10Pediatric Sunshine Academics, Inc, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract: Close adherence to the recommended treatment regimen is important for the success of recombinant human growth hormone therapy, although nonadherence can be common. Ease of use and safety during use/storage are among several important factors in the design of a growth hormone injection device intended for long-term use. This study was performed to validate the usability and assess the ease of use of a new pen device (SurePal™ that has been developed to support daily administration of the recombinant human growth hormone product, Omnitrope® (somatropin. The primary objectives of the study were to assess if study participants, representing intended users of the pen in clinical practice, were able to perform an injection procedure into an injection pad effectively and safely and disassemble the pen without receiving a needlestick injury. A total of 106 participants (61 adults and 45 children/adolescents were enrolled at two study centers (one in the US, one in Germany. Results for both primary usability tasks met the predefined acceptance criteria, with >85% of

  5. A proteomic approach combining MS and bioinformatic analysis for the detection and identification of biomarkers of administration of exogenous human growth hormone in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Joshua; Kay, Richard; Lancashire, Lee; Brown, Pamela; Velloso, Cristiana; Bouloux, Pierre; Teale, Phil; Roberts, Jane; Rees, Robert; Ball, Graham; Harridge, Stephen; Goldspink, Geoffrey; Creaser, Colin

    2009-08-01

    An integrated MS-based proteomic approach is described that combines MALDI-MS and LC-MS with artificial neural networks for the identification of protein and peptide biomarkers associated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration. Serum from exercised males administered with rhGH or placebo was analysed using ELISA to determine insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations. Diluted serum from rhGH- and placebo-treated subjects was analysed for protein biomarkers by MALDI-MS, whereas LC-MS was used to analyse tryptically digested ACN-depleted serum extracts for peptide biomarkers. Ion intensities and m/z values were used as inputs to artificial neural networks to classify samples into rhGH- and placebo-treated groups. Six protein ions (MALDI-MS) correctly classified 96% of samples into their respective groups, with a sensitivity of 91% (20 of 22 rhGH treated) and specificity of 100% (24 of 24 controls). Six peptide ions (LC-MS) were also identified and correctly classified 93% of samples with a sensitivity of 90% (19 of 21 rhGH treated) and a specificity of 95% (20 of 21 controls). The peptide biomarker ion with the highest significance was sequenced using LC-MS/MS and database searching and found to be associated with leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein. Copyright © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Growth hormone doping: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erotokritou-Mulligan I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ioulietta Erotokritou-Mulligan, Richard IG Holt, Peter H SönksenDevelopmental Origins of Health and Disease Division, University of Southampton School of Medicine, The Institute of Developmental Science, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: The use of growth hormone (GH as a performance enhancing substance was first promoted in lay publications, long before scientists fully acknowledged its benefits. It is thought athletes currently use GH to enhance their athletic performance and to accelerate the healing of sporting injuries. Over recent years, a number of high profile athletes have admitted to using GH. To date, there is only limited and weak evidence for its beneficial effects on performance. Nevertheless the “hype” around its effectiveness and the lack of a foolproof detection methodology that will detect its abuse longer than 24 hours after the last injection has encouraged its widespread use. This article reviews the current evidence of the ergogenic effects of GH along with the risks associated with its use. The review also examines methodologies, both currently available and in development for detecting its abuse.Keywords: performance enhancing substance, GH, doping in sport, detection methods

  7. Effects of transplanted myoblasts transfected with human growth hormone gene on improvement of ventricular function of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell transplantation for myocardial repair is limited by early cell death.Gene therapy with human growth hormone(hGH)has been shown to promote angiogensis and attenuate apoptosis in the experimental animal.This study was conducted to explore the effects of myoblast-based hGH gene therapy on heart function restoration and angiogenesis after myocardial infarction,and to compare the differences between myoblast-based hGH gene therapy and myoblast therapy.Methods Myoblasts were isolated from several SD rats,cultured,purified,and transfected with plasmid pLghGHSN and pLgGFPSN.Radioimmunoassay(RIA)was used to detect the expression of hGH in these myoblasts.SD rats underwent the ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery so as to establish a heart ischemia model.Thirty surviving rats that underwent ligation were randomly divided into 3 equal groups 2 weeks after left coronary artery occlusion:pLghGHSN group received myoblast infected with hGH gene transplantation;pLgGFPSN group received myoblast infected with GFP gene transplantation;control group:received cultured medium only.Four weeks after the injection the surviving rat underwent evaluation of cardiac function by echocardiography.The rats were killed and ventricular samples were undergone immunohistochemistry with hematoxylin-eosin and factorⅧ.Cryosection was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy to examine the expression of green fluorescent protein.Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)was used to examine the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF),bax and Bcl-2.hGH expression in myocardium was examined by Western blot.Results Myoblast can be successfully isolated,cultured and transfected.The expression of hGH in transfected myoblast was demonstrated with RIA.Four weeks after therapy,the cardiac function was improved significantly in pLghGHSN group and pLgGFPSN group.Fractional shortening(FS)and ejection fraction(EF)in pLghGHSN group were elevated

  8. Different short-term effect of protein and carbohydrate intake on TSH, growth hormone (GH), insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Andersen, B B; Jensen, B G

    1990-01-01

    hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to protein and carbohydrate was identical, with a reduction in both GH and TSH, and nadir occurring after 45-60 min and 120 min, respectively. During the next 120 min TSH returned to starting level after carbohydrate intake but was still reduced after...... protein intake (p less than 0.04). After both diets GH increased after the initial decline, the increase was greatest after protein intake and maximum was reached at 180 min (p less than 0.02). It has been reported that the 5'-deiodination of T4 is stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon......The effect of isocaloric (500 kcal) protein and carbohydrate ingestion was studied in a crossover study in nine healthy humans. Subjects were studied twice after overnight fasting, with an interval of 3 to 7 days. Blood was collected for 240 min after food ingestion. The initial reaction of growth...

  9. In Vitro and in Vivo Characterization of MOD-4023, a Long-Acting Carboxy-Terminal Peptide (CTP)-Modified Human Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, Oren; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Guy, Rachel; Felikman, Yana; Moschcovich, Laura; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Fima, Eyal; Hart, Gili

    2016-02-01

    MOD-4023 is a novel long-acting version of human growth hormone (hGH), containing the carboxy-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MOD-4023 is being developed as a treatment for adults and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), which would require fewer injections than currently available GH formulations and thus reduce patient discomfort and increase compliance. This study characterizes MOD-4023's binding affinities for the growth hormone receptor, as well as the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics, toxicology, and safety profiles of repeated dosing of MOD-4023 in Sprague-Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys. Although MOD-4023 exhibited reduced in vitro potency and lower affinity to the GH receptor than recombinant hGH (rhGH), administration of MOD-4023 every 5 days in rats and monkeys resulted in exposure comparable to daily rhGH, and the serum half-life of MOD-4023 was significantly longer. Repeated administration of MOD-4023 led to elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and twice-weekly injections of MOD-4023 resulted in larger increase in weight gain with fewer injections and a lower accumulative hGH dose. Thus, the increased half-life of MOD-4023 in comparison to hGH may increase the frequency of protein-receptor interactions and compensate for its decreased in vitro potency. MOD-4023 was found to be well-tolerated in rats and monkeys, with minimal adverse events, suggesting an acceptable safety profile. These results provide a basis for the continued clinical development of MOD-4023 as a novel treatment of GHD in children and adults.

  10. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone administration on body composition and vascular function and structure in old male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen; Cruzado, Mar; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Gil-Loyzaga, Pablo; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2005-01-01

    The process of ageing affects negatively both cardiovascular system and body composition. On the other hand, the hormones of the somatotrophic axis, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), whose production is reduced by age, are involved in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GH on body composition, vascular function and structure in old male rats. Old (20 months) and adult (4 months) male Wistar rats were used. One group of old animals was treated with GH for 4 weeks. Periepididimary fat weight, Specific Gravity Index (SGI), dose responses to Acetylcholine (ACh), Isoproterenol (Iso), Phenylephrine (Phe) and ACh in the presence of NG-nitro-L: -arginine metylester (L-NAME; ACh + L-NAME), as well as vascular morphology in aortic rings, were studied. Old rats showed increased fat weight and decreased SGI as compared to adult animals. GH increased SGI and tended to reduce fat weight. Old rats showed an impairment in the vasodilator response to ACh and Iso; GH significantly improved the vasodilatation induced by Iso, whereas the response to ACh was not significantly enhanced by GH treatment. There were no significant differences between adult and old rats in the contractile response to Phe, and GH did not show any effect. Contraction induced by ACh + L-NAME was higher in old rats as compared to adults, and treatment with GH significantly reduced this response. Aortic media area was increased in old rats, and GH administration reduced this parameter. In conclusion, GH shows beneficial effects on body composition, as well as on vascular function and morphology in old male rats.

  11. Obesity, growth hormone and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Kraemer, William J; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is regulated, suppressed and stimulated by numerous physiological stimuli. However, it is believed that obesity disrupts the physiological and pathological factors that regulate, suppress or stimulate GH release. Pulsatile GH has been potently stimulated in healthy subjects by both aerobic and resistance exercise of the right intensity and duration. GH modulates fuel metabolism, reduces total fat mass and abdominal fat mass, and could be a potent stimulus of lipolysis when administered to obese individuals exogenously. Only pulsatile GH has been shown to augment adipose tissue lipolysis and, therefore, increasing pulsatile GH response may be a therapeutic target. This review discusses the factors that cause secretion of GH, how obesity may alter GH secretion and how both aerobic and resistance exercise stimulates GH, as well as how exercise of a specific intensity may be used as a stimulus for GH release in individuals who are obese. Only five prior studies have investigated exercise as a stimulus of endogenous GH in individuals who are obese. Based on prior literature, resistance exercise may provide a therapeutic target for releasing endogenous GH in individuals who are obese if specific exercise programme variables are utilized. Biological activity of GH indicates that this may be an important precursor to beneficial changes in body fat and lean tissue mass in obese individuals. However, additional research is needed including what molecular GH variants are acutely released and involved at target tissues as a result of different exercise stimuli and what specific exercise programme variables may serve to stimulate GH in individuals who are obese.

  12. Poly(amino carbonate urethane)-based biodegradable, temperature and pH-sensitive injectable hydrogels for sustained human growth hormone delivery

    OpenAIRE

    V. H. Giang Phan; Thavasyappan Thambi; Huu Thuy Trang Duong; Doo Sung Lee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new pH-/temperature-sensitive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable hydrogel based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(amino carbonate urethane) (PEG-PACU) copolymers has been developed for the sustained delivery of human growth hormone (hGH). In aqueous solutions, PEG-PACU-based copolymers existed as sols at low pH and temperature (pH 6.0, 23 °C), whereas they formed gels in the physiological condition (pH 7.4, 37 °C). The physicochemical characteristics, including gelatio...

  13. Oral manifestations in growth hormone disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone is of vital importance for normal growth and development. Individuals with growth hormone deficiency develop pituitary dwarfism with disproportionate delayed growth of skull and facial skeleton giving them a small facial appearance for their age. Both hyper and hypopituitarism have a marked effect on development of oro-facial structures including eruption and shedding patterns of teeth, thus giving an opportunity to treating dental professionals to first see the signs and symptoms of these growth disorders and correctly diagnose the serious underlying disease.

  14. Psychological responses to the needle-free Medi-Jectorρ or the multidose Disetronicρ injection pen in human growth hormone therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verrips, G.H.; Hirasing, R.A.; Fekkes, M.; Vogels, T.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Delemarre-Waal, H.A. van de

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that daily administration of growth hormone using the Medi-Jector® results in fewer adverse psychological responses than needle injection with a multidose injection pen. The Medi-Jector is a needle-free injection device that can deliver growth hormone

  15. Interpretation of growth hormone provocative tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Orskov, H; Ranke, M B

    1995-01-01

    To compare interpretations of growth hormone (GH) provocative tests in laboratories using six different GH immunoassays (one enzymeimmunometric assay (EIMA, assay 1), one immunoradiometric assay (IRMA, assay 5), one time-resolved fluorimmunometric assay (TRFIA, assay 3) and three radioimmunoassays...

  16. Growth hormone and selective attention : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quik, Elise H.; van Dam, P. Sytze; Kenemans, J. Leon

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The relation between growth hormone (GH) secretion and general cognitive function has been established. General cognitive functioning depends on core functions including selective attention, which have not been addressed specifically in relation to GH. The present review addresses curr

  17. Growth hormone replacement therapy in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christoforidis, Athanasios; Vargiami, Euthymia; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2014-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is considered an overgrowth disorder given the macrosomia that is present at birth .However, shortly after birth the weight drops dramatically and the patients are usually referred for failure to thrive. Subsequently, affected patients develop the distinctive coarse facial appearance and are at risk for cardiac anomalies and solid tumor malignancies. Various endocrine disorders, although not very often, have been reported in patients with CS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypoglycemia, ACTH deficiency, cryptorchidism and hypothyroidism. We report a case of Costello syndrome with hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and growth hormone deficiency and we evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of growth hormone replacement therapy. The index patient is a paradigm of successful and safe treatment with growth hormone for almost 7 years. Since patients with CS are at increased risk for cardiac myopathy and tumor development they deserve close monitoring during treatment.

  18. Update on long-acting recombinant human growth hormone(rhGH):from basic research to clinical trial%重组人生长激素长效剂型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓玲; 巩纯秀

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1985年重组人生长激素(recombinant human growth hormone,rhGH)的问世,彻底解决了尸源性人GH来源稀少和潜在脘病毒感染而致Creutzfeldt-Jakob病的问题,为生长激素缺乏症(growth hormone deficiency,GHD)患者提供了治疗途径.

  19. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem.

  20. Impact of Growth Hormone on Cystatin C

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Sze; René L. Bernays; Cornelia Zwimpfer; Peter Wiesli; Michael Brändle; Christoph Schmid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cystatin C (CysC) is an alternative marker to creatinine for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hormones such as thyroid hormones and glucocorticoids are known to have an impact on CysC. In this study, we examined the effect of growth hormone (GH) on CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery. Methods: Creatinine, CysC, GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were determined in 24 patients with acromegaly before and following transsphe...

  1. Impact of Growth Hormone on Cystatin C

    OpenAIRE

    Sze, Lisa; René L. Bernays; Zwimpfer, Cornelia; Wiesli, Peter; Brändle, Michael; Schmid, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystatin C (CysC) is an alternative marker to creatinine for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hormones such as thyroid hormones and glucocorticoids are known to have an impact on CysC. In this study, we examined the effect of growth hormone (GH) on CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery. METHODS: Creatinine, CysC, GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were determined in 24 patients with acromegaly before and following transs...

  2. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  3. Adrenergic receptor control mechanism for growth hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackard, W G; Heidingsfelder, S A

    1968-06-01

    The influence of catecholamines on growth hormone secretion has been difficult to establish previously, possibly because of the suppressive effect of the induced hyperglycemia on growth hormone concentrations. In this study, an adrenergic receptor control mechanism for human growth hormone (HGH) secretion was uncovered by studying the effects of alpha and beta receptor blockade on insulin-induced growth hormone elevations in volunteer subjects. Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine during insulin hypoglycemia, 0.1 U/kg, inhibited growth hormon elevations to 30-50% of values in the same subjects during insulin hypoglycemia without adrenergic blockade. More complete inhibition by phentolamine could not be demonstrated at a lower dose of insulin (0.05 U/kg). Beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol during insulin hypoglycemia significantly enhanced HGH concentrations in paired experiments. The inhibiting effect of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade on HGH concentrations could not be attributed to differences in blood glucose or free fatty acid values; however, more prolonged hypoglycemia and lower plasma free fatty acid values may have been a factor in the greater HGH concentrations observed during beta blockade. In the absence of insulin induced hypoglycemia, neither alpha nor beta adrenergic receptor blockade had a detectable effect on HGH concentrations. Theophylline, an inhibitor of cyclic 3'5'-AMP phosphodiesterase activity, also failed to alter plasma HGH concentrations. These studies demonstrate a stimulatory effect of alpha receptors and a possible inhibitory effect of beta receptors on growth hormone secretion.

  4. Influence of human growth hormone on granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, and the aminoterminal propeptide of collagen type III in wound chambers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Garbarsch, C; Schuppan, D; Moe, D; Hørslev-Pedersen, K; Gottrup, F; Steenfos, H

    1994-01-01

    The influence of growth hormone on granulation tissue formation was investigated in wire mesh cylinders implanted subcutaneously in rats. Two groups of 10 rats (study 1) and 1 group of 12 rats (study 2) were used for the investigation. Growth hormone, 0.02 and 0.2 IU (study 1), 0.05 and 0.2 IU (study 2), or vehicle only, was injected into the cylinders every third day for 16 days. In study 2, wound fluid was aspirated before injection of growth hormone and saved for later analysis of the aminoterminal propeptide of collagen type III. In both studies, growth hormone significantly increased the formation of granulation tissue and of total collagen content dose-dependently, whereas the relative amount of collagen was unaffected by growth hormone treatment. Wound fluid aminopropeptide increased significantly after implantation of the cylinders until day 7, before declining slightly, with no difference between the groups. We conclude that growth hormone stimulated granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition dose-dependently in the wound cylinders when injected every third day. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment does not cause excessive collagen deposition in newly formed granulation tissue.

  5. Familial growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J

    1991-01-01

    A mother with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism and her short son showed poor spontaneous growth hormone secretion, and provocation tests suggested a deficiency of growth hormone releasing factor. This is the first report of growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. The boy has responded well to growth hormone treatment over a period of three years.

  6. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  7. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradishar WJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available William J Gradishar Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. Keywords: community oncologists, hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine resistance

  8. Heterogeneity in the growth hormone pituitary gland system of rats and humans: Implications to microgravity based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Hayes, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    The cell separation techniques of velocity sedimentation, flow cytometry and continuous flow electrophoresis were used to obtain enriched populations of growth hormone (GH) cells. The goal was to isolate a GH cell subpopulation which releases GH molecules which are very high in biological activity, it was important to use a method which was effective in processing large numbers of cells over a short time span. The techniques based on sedimentation are limited by cell density overlaps and streaming. While flow cytometry is useful in the analytical mode for objectively establishing cell purity, the numbers of cells which can be processed in the sort mode are so small as to make this approach ineffective in terms of the long term goals. It was shown that continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) can separate GH cells from other cell types on the basis of differences in surface charge. The bioreactive producers appear to be more electrophoretically mobile than the low producers. Current ground based CFES efforts are hampered by cell clumping in low ionic strength buffers and poor cell recoveries from the CFES device.

  9. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society (GRS) convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting growth hormone preparations (LAGH). A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in GH, including pediatric and adult endocrino...

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) before and after short-term recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Jung, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jin; Jin, Hye Young; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lee, Beom Hee; Shin, Choong Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-04-01

    This study was undertaken to identify growth hormone (GH) responsive proteins and protein expression patterns by short-term recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in patients with idiopathic short stature (ISS) using proteomic analysis. Seventeen children (14 males and three females) with ISS were included. They were treated with rhGH at a dose of 0.31 ± 0.078 mg/kg/week for 3 months. Immunodepletion of six highly-abundant serum proteins followed by 2D DIGE analysis, and subsequent MALDI TOF MS, were employed to generate a panel of proteins differentially expressed after short-term rhGH therapy and verify the differences in serum levels of specific proteins by rhGH therapy. Fourteen spots were differentially expressed after rhGH treatment. Among them, apo E and apo L-1 expression were consistently enhanced, whereas serum amyloid A was reduced after rhGH therapy. The differential expressions of these proteins were subsequently verified by Western blot analysis using sera of the before and after rhGH treatment. This study suggests that rhGH therapy influences lipoprotein metabolism and enhances apo L-1 protein expression in ISS patients. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Administration of recombinant human growth hormone normalizes GH-IGF1 axis and improves malnutrition-related disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Satoru; Komatsu, Ai; Hiramatsu, Kunihide; Mori, Jun-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Masanori; Takeda, Teiji; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Takahide; Koizumi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    High serum level of GH in the presence of low plasma level of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is one of the endocrinological features of anorexia nervosa (AN). Whether the amount of endogenous GH is not enough to increase IGF-I is not certain. We studied the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on the GH-IGF-I axis and on malnutrition-related disorders in this syndrome. Twenty patients with AN were divided into two groups; one (N = 13) was given rhGH (0.33 mg/day), and the other (N = 7) was given placebo for 6 or 12 months, respectively. During each treatment, levels of serum GH, plasma IGF-I, serum thyroid hormones, serum cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose and cardiac function were monitored. Changes in body mass index (BMI) and calorie taken were also evaluated. Plasma IGF-I level increased from 74.4 +/- 41.9 to 269.0 +/- 31.2 microg/L (Ppatients treated with placebo. Administration of rhGH is recommended as one of the methods of managing the patients with AN.

  12. Synthesis of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor and two omission analogs by segment-coupling method in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, J.; Westphal, M.; Li, C.H. (Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, University of California, San Francisco, USA)

    1984-01-01

    The human growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) peptides (GlyS/sup 15/)-GRF-(1-15) (IV), trifluoroacetyl-GRF-(20-44) (VI), trifluoroacetyl-GRF-(18-44) (VIII), and trifluoroacetyl-GRF-(16-44) (X) were synthesized by the solidphase method. Each of the peptides was reacted with citraconic anhydride and the trifluoroacetyl group was removed by reaction with 10% hydrazine in water. The citraconylated GRF-(1-15) peptide was coupled to the (20-44), (18-44) or (16-44) peptides by reaction with silver nitrate/N-hydroxysuccinimide to give GRF-(1-15)-(20-44) (XII), GRF-(1-15)-(18-44) (XIII), or GRF-(1-44), respectively. GRF-(1-44) was shown to stimulate the release of rat growth hormone from rat pituitary cells with an ED/sub 50/=8.8 x 10/sup -11/M. Peptides XII and XIII were inactive, either as agonists or as antagonists of the action of GRF-(1-44).

  13. A crucial role of activin A-mediated growth hormone suppression in mouse and human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritoshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available Infusion of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNC has been reported to ameliorate cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction. In this study, we investigated whether infusion of BMMNC is also effective for non-ischemic heart failure model mice and the underlying mechanisms. Intravenous infusion of BMMNC showed transient cardioprotective effects on animal models with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM without their engraftment in heart, suggesting that BMMNC infusion improves cardiac function via humoral factors rather than their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Using conditioned media from sorted BMMNC, we found that the cardioprotective effects were mediated by growth hormone (GH secreted from myeloid (Gr-1(+ cells and the effects was partially mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, the GH expression in Gr-1(+ cells was significantly downregulated in DCM mice compared with that in healthy control, suggesting that the environmental cue in heart failure might suppress the Gr-1(+ cells function. Activin A was upregulated in the serum of DCM models and induced downregulation of GH levels in Gr-1(+ cells and serum. Furthermore, humoral factors upregulated in heart failure including angiotensin II upregulated activin A in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC via activation of NFκB. Similarly, serum activin A levels were also significantly higher in DCM patients with heart failure than in healthy subjects and the GH levels in conditioned medium from PBMNC of DCM patients were lower than that in healthy subjects. Inhibition of activin A increased serum GH levels and improved cardiac function of DCM model mice. These results suggest that activin A causes heart failure by suppressing GH activity and that inhibition of activin A might become a novel strategy for the treatment of heart failure.

  14. Prokaryotic soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive human growth hormone by fusion to thioredoxin, maltose binding protein, and protein disulfide isomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Tan Nguyen

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH is synthesized by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and induces cell proliferation and growth. This protein has been approved for the treatment of various conditions, including hGH deficiency, chronic renal failure, and Turner syndrome. Efficient production of hGH in Escherichia coli (E. coli has proven difficult because the E. coli-expressed hormone tends to aggregate and form inclusion bodies, resulting in poor solubility. In this study, seven N-terminal fusion partners, hexahistidine (His6, thioredoxin (Trx, glutathione S-transferase (GST, maltose-binding protein (MBP, N-utilization substance protein A (NusA, protein disulfide bond isomerase (PDI, and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a', were tested for soluble overexpression of codon-optimized hGH in E. coli. We found that MBP and hPDI tags significantly increased the solubility of the hormone. In addition, lowering the expression temperature to 18°C also dramatically increased the solubility of all the fusion proteins. We purified hGH from MBP-, PDIb'a'-, or Trx-tagged hGH expressed at 18°C in E. coli using simple chromatographic techniques and compared the final purity, yield, and activity of hGH to assess the impact of each partner protein. Purified hGH was highly pure on silver-stained gel and contained very low levels of endotoxin. On average, ∼37 mg, ∼12 mg, and ∼7 mg of hGH were obtained from 500 mL-cell cultures of Trx-hGH, MBP-hGH, and PDIb'a'-hGH, respectively. Subsequently, hGH was analyzed using mass spectroscopy to confirm the presence of two intra-molecular disulfide bonds. The bioactivity of purified hGHs was demonstrated using Nb2-11 cell.

  15. Estrogen and Growth Hormone and their Roles in Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Baki ÇİFTCİ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the effect of estrogen on growth hormone secretion and the roles of estrogen and growth hormone in reproductive function. Estrogen is the main hormone affecting growth, development, maturation and functioning of reproductive tract as well as the sexual differentiation and the behavior. Growth hormone is also important factor in sexual maturation and attainment of puberty. The impact of estrogen on growth hormone secretion has been reported in rodents and primates. However, the precise mechanism for the alterations in growth hormone secretion is not clearly known. Estrogen may possibility have a direct affect on growth hormone secretion via the binding to estrogen receptor-α due to its co-expression in growth hormone neurons in the medial preoptic area and arcuate nucleus. Estrogen may also have an indirect effect via the reducing insulin-like growth factor-1 feedback inhibition resulting with increased growth hormone secretion.

  16. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-07

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

  17. Growth hormone and the heart in Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical hallmarks of Noonan syndrome (NS) are facial dysmorphism, short stature and cardiac defects. As one of the common cardiac defects in NS is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, there have been concerns regarding cardiac safety since the start of human growth hormone (hGH) therapy for

  18. Growth hormone and the heart in Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical hallmarks of Noonan syndrome (NS) are facial dysmorphism, short stature and cardiac defects. As one of the common cardiac defects in NS is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, there have been concerns regarding cardiac safety since the start of human growth hormone (hGH) therapy for

  19. Long-Acting Growth Hormone: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Paul H; Mejia-Corletto, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    After the introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in 1985, a myriad of children and adults have benefited from its growth-promoting and metabolic effects. Nowadays, current therapeutic regimens rely on daily subcutaneous GH injections that could be burdensome and inconvenient to pediatric patients. As expected with any long-term parenteral pharmacological treatment, these daily regimens may promote nonadherence, poor compliance, treatment abandonment and/or suboptimal clinical outcomes. In order to improve patient and caregiver acceptance of proposed regimens, simplified dosing schedules could potentially aid in reducing poor compliance and maximize the therapeutic end results. Long-acting GH formulations have been designed and perfected over the last two decades, and currently there are several formulations in advanced stages of research as a reasonable attempt to improve patient's adherence to GH treatment. A long-acting GH preparation allowing for reduced injection frequency is likely to improve treatment adherence and to decrease the distress and inconvenience associated with daily injections. This review presents an update about the status of current and recent efforts that have enabled the formulation of sustained-release, long-acting rhGH as it has been longed for many years in the pediatric endocrinology field.

  20. Effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on GH and insulin-like growth factor I levels in transgenic mice overexpressing the human GHRH gene, an animal model of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, M; Kineman, R D; Schally, A V; Zarandi, M; Groot, K; Frohman, L A

    1997-11-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the human GH-releasing hormone (hGHRH) gene, an animal model of acromegaly, were used to investigate the effects of potent GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 on the excessive GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion caused by overproduction of hGHRH. Because metallothionein (MT)-GHRH mice express the hGHRH transgene in various tissues, including the pituitary and hypothalamus, initial experiments focused on the effectiveness of the GHRH antagonists in blocking basal and stimulated GH secretion from pituitary cells in vitro. Both MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 suppressed basal release of GH from superfused MT-GHRH pituitary cells, apparently by blocking the action of endogenously produced hGHRH. In addition, these antagonists effectively eliminated the response to stimulatory action of exogenous hGHRH(1-29)NH2 (30 and 100 nM). To ascertain whether MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 could antagonize the effect of hGHRH hyperstimulation in vivo, each antagonist was administered to MT-GHRH transgenic mice in a single iv dose of 10-200 microg. Both compounds decreased serum GH levels in transgenic mice by 39-72% at 1 h after injection. The inhibitory effect of 50 microg MZ-5-156 was maintained for 5 h. Twice daily ip administration of 100 microg MZ-5-156 for 3 days suppressed the highly elevated serum GH and IGF-I concentrations in transgenic mice by 56.8% and 39.0%, respectively. This treatment also reduced IGF-I messenger RNA levels in the liver by 21.8% but did not affect the level of GH messenger RNA in the pituitary. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 can inhibit elevated GH levels caused by overproduction of hGHRH. The suppression of circulating GH concentrations induced by the antagonists seems to be physiologically relevant, because both IGF-I secretion and synthesis also were reduced. Our findings, showing the suppression of GH and IGF-I secretion with GHRH antagonists, suggest that this class of analogs

  1. IGF-1 and insulin as growth hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    IGF-1 generated in the liver is the anabolic effector and linear growth promoting hormone of the pituitary growth hormone (GH). This is evidenced by dwarfism in states of congenital IGF-1 deficiency, Igf1 gene mutation/deletions or knockouts, and in Laron syndrome (LS), due to GH receptor gene mutations/deletions or IGF-1 receptor blocking. In a positive way, daily IGF-1 administration to stunted patients with LS or hGH gene deletion accelerates linear growth velocity. IGF-1 acts on the proliferative cells of the epiphyseal cartilage. IGF-1 also induces organ and tissue growth; its absence causing organomicria. Insulin shares a common ancestry with IGF-1 and with 45% amino acid homology, as well as very close relationships in the structure of its receptors and post-receptor cascade, also acts as a growth hormone. It has protein anabolic activity and stimulates IGF-1 synthesis. Pancreas agenesis causes short babies, and obese children with hyperinsulinism, with or without pituitary GH, have an accelerated growth rate and skeletal maturation; so do babies with macrosomia. Whether the insulin growth effect is direct, or mediated by IGF-1 or leptin is controversial.

  2. MRI findings of complete growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiba, Yozo [National Hospital of Okayama (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on the pituitary gland of 20 children (age range, 2-11 years) with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. Sixteen patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency showed disappearance of the pituitary stalk, disappearance of high signal area of the posterior pituitary, presence of ectopic pituitary, and decreased volume of the anterior pituitary. Many of them had a history of perinatal abnormalities such as asphyxia at delivery, breech delivery, and bradytocia. On the contrary, patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency presented no abnormal findings on MR images, and had no history of perinatal abnormalities. The findings of pituitary stalk separation syndrome suggested the presence of multiple hypopituitarism. (S.Y.).

  3. The role of SOCS2 in recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) regulating lipid metabolism in high-fat-diet-induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai Li; Feng, Min; Tan, Xiao; Yan, Guo Yong; Sun, Chao

    2013-03-01

    In addition to regulate body growth and development process, growth hormone (GH) also involved in lipid metabolism, decreasing fat mass and improving lipolysis. To normal mice, GH could reduce their fat content, but events turned uncertain coming to the pattern of feeding high-fat-diet. In order to investigate the role of GH in adipogenesis of mice with high-fat-diet, the high-fat-diet feeding mice were randomly assigned into three groups and treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and the somatostatin analogue octreotide respectively. Results demonstrated that both rhGH and octreotide could reduce the body weight but the trends diminished in the end. HDL-C level was increased in octreotide treated groups but the activity of lipase was increased significantly in both two groups. RhGH remarkable increased the expression of SOCS2, FAS (P < 0.01) and SREBP-1c (P < 0.05), decreased the expression of SOCS1, SOCS3 (P < 0.05) and HSL (P < 0.01) in subcutaneous fat mass. In visceral fat tissue, all genes were increased except SOCS2 (P < 0.01), at the same time the visceral fat mass was decreased. The protein phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5 which were treated with octreotide were increased in subcutaneous fat, visceral fat and liver (P < 0.01) and were increased significant in visceral fat by rhGH treated (P < 0.01). In liver, only JAK2 protein phosphorylation was raised (P < 0.01). In conclusion, rhGH and octreotide could decrease the whole body mass before 6 days; the trend was weaken in later period with high-fat-diet. RhGH could increase the subcutaneous fat mass and reduce the visceral fat mass, and SOCS2 might be involved in regulation of the mechanism through JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

  4. The role of epidermal growth factor-like module containing mucin-like hormone receptor 2 in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Safaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are among the most diverse and ubiquitous proteins in all of biology. The epidermal growth factorseven span transmembrane (EGF-TM7 subfamily of adhesion GPCRs is a small subset whose members are mainly expressed on the surface of leukocytes. The EGF domains on the N-terminus add significant size to these receptors and they are considered to be among the largest members of the TM7 family. Although not all of their ligands or downstream targets have been identified, there is evidence implicating the EGF-TM7 family diverse processes such as cell adhesion, migration, inflammation, and autoimmune disease. Recent studies have identified expression of EGF-TM7 family members on human neoplasms including those of the thyroid, stomach, colon, and brain. Their presence on these tissues is not surprising given the ubiquity of GPCRs, but because their functional significance and pathways are not completely understood, they are of tremendous clinical and scientific interest. Current evidence suggests that expression of certain EGF-TM7 receptors is correlated with tumor grade, confers a more invasive phenotype, and increases the likelihood of metastatic disease. In this review, we will discuss the structure, function, and regulation of these receptors. We also describe the expression of these receptors in human cancers and explore their potential mechanistic significance.

  5. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-04

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  6. Chemosensitization role of fulvestrant in combination with chemotherapy in postmenopausal hormone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor negative metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qing-Qing; Adhikari, Vishnu Prasad; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Wu, He; Dai, Wei; Li, Xin; Wu, Yu-Tuan; Wu, Kai-Nan; Kong, Ling-Quan

    2016-12-01

    In metastatic breast cancer (MBC), hormone receptor positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor negative (HER2-) subtype accounts for the majority. With various new modalities available to prolong life span in this group of patients, the effect is distant from optimum. Prevalent strategy of treating postmenopausal HR+ HER2- MBC is application of chemotherapy (CT) after progression of disease on endocrine therapy (ET) of several lines. Generally, ET targets HR+ ingredients and CT works better with HR- tumor cells. HR+ MBC, though hormone-sensitive, has HR- portion which reacts poorly to ET. Thus, sequential use of ET and CT neglects its insensitive part and gives rise to drug resistance, while alleviation of tumor burden is the top priority in metastatic setting. Chemohormonal therapy (i.e. concomitant use of ET and chemotherapy) complements for the shortcoming of current therapy strategy targeting both HR+ and HR- ingredients theoretically. Fulvestrant, a pure estrogen receptor antagonist and down-regulator, could be a promising agent using concurrently with CT based on chemosensitizing character shown in preclinical and pilot clinical studies. It is hypothesized in this article that chemohormonal therapy with concurrent fulvestrant and CT would be a promising strategy in postmenopausal HR+ HER2- MBC patients. Proof of this hypothesis would help control evolvement of tumor burden and acquirement of drug resistance over a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modification of arginine residues in human growth hormone by 1,2-cyclohexanedione: effects on the binding capacity to lactogenic and somatogenic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlasovich, F M; Caridad, J J; Nowicki, C; Santomé, J A; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1990-08-15

    Reactivity of arginine residues in human growth hormone was studied by reaction with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. Kinetic analysis of the data showed a good fit to a pseudo first order curve, with an apparent velocity constant k = 1.26 x 10(-2) min-1 and a maximum modification of 9.6 out of the 11 arginines of the molecule. Modification led to a decrease in binding capacity to both lactogenic and somatogenic rat liver receptors. In either case Tsou plots suggest that the modification of two arginine residues is responsible for this behavior, although it cannot be ascertained whether the two relevant residues are the same for both receptor types. Circular dichroism studies indicated no apparent changes in protein conformation in the modified hormone. Binding capacity was restored upon regeneration of arginines by incubation with Tris-HCl buffer. Only the carboxy-terminal peptide was isolated by HPLC from a tryptic digest of succinylated Arg-modified hGH, indicating that 183 is the nonreacting arginine residue.

  8. Urinary growth hormone excretion in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Lindholm, J; Vandeweghe, M

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical assessment of disease activity in acromegaly still presents a problem, especially in treated patients with mild clinical symptoms. We therefore examined the diagnostic value of the measurement of urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion in seventy unselected patients with acromegaly...

  9. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis, morbid o

  10. Growth hormone: health considerations beyond height gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The therapeutic benefit of growth hormone (GH) therapy in improving height in short children is widely recognized; however, GH therapy is associated with other metabolic actions that may be of benefit in these children. Beneficial effects of GH on body composition have been documented in several dif...

  11. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  12. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 protein expression in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients correlates with cancer specific survival and increases after exposure to hormonal therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Dai; Yun-Yi Kong; Ding-Wei Ye; Chun-Guang Ma; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Xu-Dong Yao

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein expression and gene amplification in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients and their potential value as prognostic factors. Methods: Immuno-histochemistry (IHC) was performed to investigate HER2 protein expression in prostate biopsy specimens from 104 Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients. After 3-11 months of hormonal therapy, 12 patients underwent transure- thral resection of the prostate (TURP). HER2 protein expression of TURP specimens was compared with that of the original biopsy specimens. Of these, 10 biopsy and 4 TURP specimens with HER2 IHC staining scores ≥ 2+ were investigated for HER2 gene amplification status by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Of the 104 prostate biopsy specimens, HER2 protein expression was 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+ in 49 (47.1%), 45 (43.3%), 8 (7.7%) and 2 (1.9%) cases, respectively. There was a significant association between HER2 expression and Gleason score (P = 0.026). HER2 protein expression of prostate cancer tissues increased in 33.3% of patients after hormonal therapy. None of the 14 specimens with HER2 IHC scores > 2+ showed HER2 gene amplification. Patients with HER2 scores ≥ 2+ had a significantly higher chance of dying from prostate cancer than those with HER2 scores of 0 (P = 0.004) and 1+ (P = 0.034). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HER2 protein expression intensity was an independent predictor of cancer-related death (P = 0.039). Conclusion: An HER2 IHC score ≥ 2+ should be defined as HER2 protein overexpression in prostate cancer. Overexpression of HER2 protein in cancer tissue might suggest an increased risk of dying from prostate cancer. HER2 protein expression increases in some individual patients after hormonal therapy.

  13. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  14. Effects of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone and Sex Hormone on Children with Turner Syndrome%基因重组人生长激素和雌/孕激素治疗Turner综合征患儿疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽娜; 向承发

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨基因重组人生长激素(recombinant human growth hormone,rhGH)及雌/孕激素(estrogen/progestogem,E/P)治疗对Turner综合征(Turner syndrome,TS)患儿身高及性征发育的影响.方法 2005年1月-2009年6月四川大学华西第二医院门诊就诊TS患儿22例,12例患儿接受rhGH治疗,年龄(13.58±2.23)岁,剂量0.15 U/(kg·d),睡前皮下注射,疗程4~24个月.16例年龄≥13岁、骨龄≥11岁的患儿接受E/P治疗,疗程3~30个月.结果 rhGH治疗后患儿身高、身高的标准差积分提高,生长速率达(9.33±2.39)cm/年;E/P治疗可促进患儿乳房发育及规律月经出现.结论 rhGH和E/P治疗对TS患儿身高增长及性征发育有明显疗效.%Objective To explore the therapeutic effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and sex hormone on the stature and sex feature of children with Turner syndrome (TS). Methods A total of 22 children with TS were selected in the outpatients department of West China Second Hospital between January 2005 and June 2009. Twelve children with TS the average age of (13. 58±2. 23) years] received rhGH [0. 15 U/(kg · d)] every night before sleep for 4-24 months. Sixteen children with TS (age≥14 years old, bone age≥ll years old) underwent estrogen and progestogen (E/P) treatment for 3-30 months. Results The height and height standard deviation score increased significantly in children with rhGH therapy (P<0. 01). The height velocity was (9. 33±2. 39)cm/year after the treatment. The treatment of estrogen and progestogen could promote the development of breast and establish menstrual cycle in children with TS. Conclusion rhGH and E/P can play a significant role in treatment of TS in children.

  15. Accelerating Growth Rates in Shellfish with Bovine Growth Hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Marine biologist Dr.Ernest Chang of the Bodega Marine Laboratory and colleagues at the University of Hawaii investigated the possibility of using bovine growth hormone to increase growth rates of American lobster (Homarus americanus) and two species of shrimp—a cold-water California rock shrimp (Sicyonia ingentis) and the warm-water Penaeus vannamei.

  16. GENETIC DEFECTS IN THE GROWTH HORMONE-IGF-I AXIS CAUSING GROWTH HORMONE INSENSITIVITY AND IMPAIRED LINEAR GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Savage

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human genetic defects in the growth hormone (GH –IGF-I axis affecting the IGF system present with growth failure as their principal clinical feature. This is usually associated with GH insensitivity (GHI presenting in childhood as severe or mild short stature. Dysmorphic features and metabolic abnormalities may also be present. The field of GHI due to mutations affecting GH action has evolved radidly since the first description of the extreme phenotype related to homozygous GH receptor (GHR mutations in 1966. A continuum of genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical abnormalities can be defined associated with clinically relevant defects in linear growth. The mechanisms of the GH–IGF-I axis in the regulation of normal human growth is discussed followed by descriptions of mutations in GHR, STAT5B, IGF-I, IGFALS, IGF1R and GH1 defects causing bioinactive GH or anti-GH antibodies. These GH-IGF-I axis defects are associated with a range of clinical, and hormonal characteristics. An up-dated approach to the clinical assessment of the patient with GHI focussing on investigation of the GH–IGF-I axis and relevant molecular studies contributing to the identification of causative genetic defects is also discussed.

  17. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on changes in height, bone mineral density, and body composition over 1-2 years in children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgreen, Lynda E; Thomas, William; Orchard, Paul J; Whitley, Chester B; Miller, Bradley S

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Hurler or Hunter syndrome typically have moderate to severe growth deficiencies despite therapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and/or enzyme replacement therapy. It is unknown whether treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) can improve growth in these children. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of hGH on growth, bone mineral density (BMD), and body composition in children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome enrolled in a longitudinal observational study. The difference in annual change in outcomes between hGH treated and untreated subjects was estimated by longitudinal regression models that adjusted for age, Tanner stage, and sex where appropriate. We report on 23 participants who completed at least 2 annual study visits (10 [43%] treated with hGH): Hurler syndrome (n=13) average age of 9.8 ± 3.1 years (range 5.3-13.6 years; 54% female) and Hunter syndrome (n=10) average age of 12.0 ± 2.7 years (range 7.0-17.0 years; 0% female). As a group, children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome treated with hGH had no difference in annual change in height (growth velocity) compared to those untreated with hGH. Growth velocity in hGH treated individuals ranged from -0.4 to 8.1cm/year and from 0.3 to 6.6 cm/year in the untreated individuals. Among children with Hunter syndrome, 100% (N=4) of those treated but only 50% of those untreated with hGH had an annual increase in height standard deviation score (SDS). Of the individuals treated with hGH, those with GHD had a trend towards higher annualized growth velocity compared to those without GHD (6.5 ± 1.9 cm/year vs. 3.5 ± 2.1cm/year; p=.050). Children treated with hGH had greater annual gains in BMD and lean body mass. In conclusion, although as a group we found no significant difference in growth between individuals treated versus not treated with hGH, individual response was highly variable and we are unable to predict who will respond to treatment. Thus

  18. Anti-Müllerian hormone inhibits growth of AMH type II receptor-positive human ovarian granulosa cell tumor cells by activating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttonen, Mikko; Färkkilä, Anniina; Tauriala, Hanna; Kauppinen, Marjut; Maclaughlin, David T; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Bützow, Ralf; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2011-11-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are sex cord stromal tumors that constitute 3-5% of all ovarian cancers. GCTs usually present with an indolent course but there is a high risk of recurrence, which associates with increased mortality, and targeted treatments would be desirable. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a key factor regulating sexual differentiation of the reproductive organs, has been implicated as a growth inhibitor in ovarian cancer. GCTs and normal granulosa cells produce AMH, but its expression in large GCTs is usually downregulated. Further, as the lack of specific AMH-signaling pathway components leads to GCT development in mice, we hypothesized that AMH inhibits growth of GCTs. Utilizing a large panel of human GCT tissue samples, we found that AMH type I receptors (ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6) and type II receptor (AMHRII), as well as their downstream effectors Smad1/5, are expressed and active in GCTs. AMHRII expression was detected in the vast majority (96%) of GCTs and correlated with AMH mRNA and protein expression. AMH mRNA level was low in large GCTs, confirming previous findings on low-AMH protein expression in large human as well as mouse GCTs. To study the functional role of AMH in this peculiar ovarian cancer, we utilized a human GCT cell line (KGN) and 10 primary GCT cell cultures. We found that the AMH-Smad1/5-signaling pathway was active in these cells, and that exogenous AMH further activated Smad1/5 in KGN cells. Furthermore, AMH treatment reduced the number of KGN cells and primary GCT cells, with increasing amounts of AMH leading to augmented activation of caspase-3 and subsequent apoptosis. All in all, these data support the premise that AMH is a growth inhibitor of GCTs.

  19. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  20. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth.

  1. Prolactin and growth hormone in fish osmoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Prolactin is an important regulator of multiple biological functions in vertebrates, and has been viewed as essential to ion uptake as well as reduction in ion and water permeability of osmoregulatory surfaces in freshwater and euryhaline fish. Prolactin-releasing peptide seems to stimulate prolactin expression in the pituitary and peripheral organs during freshwater adaptation. Growth hormone, a member of the same family of hormones as prolactin, promotes acclimation to seawater in several teleost fish, at least in part through the action of insulin-like growth factor I. In branchial epithelia, development and differentiation of the seawater-type chloride cell (and their underlying biochemistry) is regulated by GH, IGF-I, and cortisol, whereas the freshwater-type chloride cell is regulated by prolactin and cortisol. In the epithelia of gastrointestinal tract, prolactin induces cell proliferation during freshwater adaptation, whereas cortisol stimulates both cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose that control of salinity acclimation in teleosts by prolactin and growth hormone primarily involves regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation (the latter including upregulation of specific ion transporters), and that there is an important interaction of these hormones with corticosteroids. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, FK; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Mul, D; Hop, WCJ; ten Cate, R; Oostdijk, W; Van Luijk, W; Jansen-van Wijngaarden, CJA; Keizer-Schrama, SMPFD

    2006-01-01

    Background: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims: To study the

  3. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Backeljauw, Philippe F; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting GH preparations (LAGH). PARTICIPANTS: A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in growth hormone, including pediatric...... and adult endocrinologists, basic scientists, regulatory scientists, and participants from the pharmaceutical industry. EVIDENCE: Current literature was reviewed for gaps in knowledge. Expert opinion was utilized to suggest studies required to address potential safety and efficacy issues. CONSENSUS PROCESS...

  4. New detection methods of growth hormone and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Human growth hormone (GH), but also GH related growth factors like the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are known to be abused in sports. Although the scientific evidence supporting a distinct effect of GH on performance in healthy trained subjects is limited, it has been repeatedly found with athletes or trainers, and the recent introduction of a first test to detect GH doping has led to a number of positive cases. Currently, there is no test for the detection of IGF-1 introduced worldwide, but confiscation of the drug from sports teams can be taken as indirect evidence for its abuse. The major biochemical difficulty for the detection of GH is that the recombinant form is identical in physicochemical properties to the endogenous GH secreted by the pituitary gland. Furthermore, the very short half-life of GH in circulation inherently shortens the window of opportunity where the drug can be detected. Two strategies have been followed for more than a decade to develop a test to detect the application of recombinant GH: the marker approach, which is based on the elevation of GH-dependent markers above the level seen under physiological conditions evoked by administration of recombinant GH, and the isoform approach, which is based on a change in the pattern of GH isoforms in circulation following the injection of recombinant GH.

  5. Obesity, growth hormone and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby

    2010-03-25

    Growth hormone (GH) is the most important hormonal regulator of postnatal longitudinal growth in man. In adults GH is no longer needed for longitudinal growth. Adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) are characterised by perturbations in body composition, lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk profile and bone mineral density. It is well established that adult GHD usually is accompanied by an increase in fat accumulation and GH replacement in adult patients with GHD results in reduction of fat mass and abdominal fat mass in particular. It is also recognized that obesity and abdominal obesity in particular results in a secondary reduction in GH secretion and subnormal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels. The recovery of the GH IGF-I axis after weight loss suggest an acquired defect, however, the pathophysiologic role of GH in obesity is yet to be fully understood. In clinical studies examining the efficacy of GH in obese subjects very little or no effect are observed with respect to weight loss, whereas GH seems to reduce total and abdominal fat mass in obese subjects. The observed reductions in abdominal fat mass are modest and similar to what can be achieved by diet or exercise interventions.

  6. Growth hormone treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertner, J M

    1997-04-01

    GH therapy increases final height in GH-deficient children. Short-term growth acceleration is also seen in children with many other causes of shortness. This review covers the diagnosis of GH-deficiency (GHD) and the details of GH treatment and its long-term results in GH-deficient patients and in those with other conditions, including "idiopathic short stature" and Turner syndrome. The efficacy of GH in enhancing adult stature in children with diagnoses other than GHD and Turner syndrome has not been established, and the only other indication for which it is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is chronic renal insufficiency. Broadening of the indications for GH use in childhood can only occur if supported by the results of carefully performed clinical trials. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:92-97). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. The physiology of growth hormone and sport.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    The growth hormone (GH)\\/ insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis exerts short-and long-term metabolic effects that are potentially important during exercise. Exercise is a potent stimulus to GH release and there is some evidence that the acute increase in GH is important in regulating substrate metabolism post-exercise. Regular exercise also increases 24-hour GH secretion rates, which potentially contributes to the physiologic changes induced by training. The effects of GH replacement in GH-deficient adults provide a useful model with which to study the effects of the more long-term effects of the GH\\/ IGF-I axis. There is convincing evidence that GH replacement increases exercise capacity. Measures of exercise performance including maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and ventilatory threshold (VeT) are impaired in GH deficiency and improved by GH replacement, probably through some combination of increased oxygen delivery to exercising muscle, increased fatty acid availability with glycogen sparing, increased muscle strength, improved body composition and improved thermoregulation. Administration of supraphysiologic doses of GH to athletes increases fatty acid availability and reduces oxidative protein loss particularly during exercise, and increases lean body mass. It is not known whether these effects translate to improved athletic performance, although recombinant human GH is known to be widely abused in sport. The model of acromegaly provides evidence that long-term GH excess does not result in improved performance but it is possible that a "window" exists in which the protein anabolic effects of supraphysiologic GH might be advantageous.

  8. The physiology of growth hormone and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdowson, W Matthew; Healy, Marie-Louise; Sönksen, Peter H; Gibney, James

    2009-08-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/ insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis exerts short-and long-term metabolic effects that are potentially important during exercise. Exercise is a potent stimulus to GH release and there is some evidence that the acute increase in GH is important in regulating substrate metabolism post-exercise. Regular exercise also increases 24-hour GH secretion rates, which potentially contributes to the physiologic changes induced by training. The effects of GH replacement in GH-deficient adults provide a useful model with which to study the effects of the more long-term effects of the GH/ IGF-I axis. There is convincing evidence that GH replacement increases exercise capacity. Measures of exercise performance including maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and ventilatory threshold (VeT) are impaired in GH deficiency and improved by GH replacement, probably through some combination of increased oxygen delivery to exercising muscle, increased fatty acid availability with glycogen sparing, increased muscle strength, improved body composition and improved thermoregulation. Administration of supraphysiologic doses of GH to athletes increases fatty acid availability and reduces oxidative protein loss particularly during exercise, and increases lean body mass. It is not known whether these effects translate to improved athletic performance, although recombinant human GH is known to be widely abused in sport. The model of acromegaly provides evidence that long-term GH excess does not result in improved performance but it is possible that a "window" exists in which the protein anabolic effects of supraphysiologic GH might be advantageous.

  9. Crosstalk between growth hormone and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Messina, Joseph L

    2009-01-01

    Growth Hormone (GH) is a major growth-promoting and metabolic regulatory hormone. Interaction of GH with its cell surface GH receptor (GHR) causes activation of the GHR-associated cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, JAK2, and activation of several signaling pathways, including the STATs, ERK1/2, and PI3K pathways. Insulin is also a key hormone regulating metabolism and growth. Insulin binding to the insulin receptor (IR) results in phosphorylation/activation of the IR, and activates the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. Due to their important roles in growth and metabolism, GH and insulin can functionally interact with each other, regulating cellular metabolism. In addition, recent data suggests that GH and insulin can directly interact by signaling crosstalk. Insulin regulation of GH signaling depends on the duration of exposure to insulin. Transient insulin exposure enhances GH-induced activation of MEK/ERK pathway through post-GHR mechanisms, whereas prolonged insulin exposure inhibits GH-induced signaling at both receptor and postreceptor levels. Chronic excessive GH interferes with insulin's activation of the IR/IRS/PI3K pathway and several proteins are involved in the mechanisms underlying GH-induced insulin resistance.

  10. Impact of Growth Hormone on Cystatin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sze

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystatin C (CysC is an alternative marker to creatinine for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Hormones such as thyroid hormones and glucocorticoids are known to have an impact on CysC. In this study, we examined the effect of growth hormone (GH on CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery. Methods: Creatinine, CysC, GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 were determined in 24 patients with acromegaly before and following transsphenoidal surgery. Estimated GFR was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula. Results: In all patients, surgical debulking resulted in decreased clinical disease activity and declining GH/IGF-1 levels. Postoperatively, biochemical cure was documented in 20 out of 24 patients. Creatinine levels (mean ± SEM increased from 72 ± 3 to 80 ± 3 µmol/l (p = 0.0004 and concurrently, estimated GFR decreased from 99 ± 3 to 91 ± 3 ml/min (p = 0.0008. In contrast to creatinine, CysC levels decreased from 0.72 ± 0.02 to 0.68 ± 0.02 mg/l (p = 0.0008. Conclusions: Our study provides strong evidence for discordant effects of GH on creatinine and CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery, thus identifying another hormone that influences CysC independent of renal function.

  11. Dual ionic interaction system based on polyelectrolyte complex and ionic, injectable, and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained release of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ran; Seo, Bo-Bae; Song, Soo-Chang

    2013-01-01

    A dual ionic interaction system composed of a positively charged polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) containing human growth hormone (hGH) and anionic thermosensitive hydrogel has been suggested for sustained delivery of bioactive hGH. The PEC was prepared by ionic interaction between negatively charged hGH and positively charged protamine sulfate (PS) to suppress diffusion of hGH. Moreover, we loaded the positively charged PEC into an anionic, injectable, and thermosensitive poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel to enhance sustained release of hGH by dual ionic interactions. PS formed a spherical complex with hGH, and their ionic interaction grew stronger with increasing amounts of PS. From a weight ratio of 0.5, the PS/hGH complex had a size and zeta-potential that were constantly maintained around 500 nm and +8 mV, respectively, in 0.9% NaCl. The PEC-loaded hydrogels suppressed the initial burst release of hGH and extended the release period in vitro and in vivo. In a pharmacokinetic study in rats, the PEC-loaded anionic hydrogel extended half-life 13-fold with similar area under the curve (AUC) compared to hGH solution. Furthermore, single injection of PEC-loaded anionic hydrogel showed a more increased growth rate than daily injection of hGH solution for 7 days in hypophysectomized rats, demonstrating its potential as an injectable, sustained delivery system that can release bioactive hGH.

  12. Determination of free growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frystyk, Jan; Andreasen, Caroline Marie; Fisker, Sanne

    2008-08-01

    Approximately 50% of circulating GH is bound to the high-affinity GH-binding protein (GHBP), which is known to affect the pharmacokinetics, bioactivity, and quantitative determination of GH. Nevertheless, the presence of GHBP is rarely taken into account in the clinical use of GH measurements. Our objective was to develop an assay for free GH in serum. We used ultrafiltration by centrifugation. Due to the small molecular difference between GH and GHBP, the size of GHBP and GHBP-GH complexes was increased by preincubation of serum with a monoclonal GHBP antibody (MAb 263). The ultrafiltration membrane almost completely retained all GHBP (>98.5%) and allowed free passage of unbound GH (>98.4%). Addition of increasing concentrations of GHBP reduced free GH dose dependently, and measured and calculated levels of free GH changed in parallel. During an insulin-tolerance test, free and total GH changed in parallel in all individuals (n = 11) and their peak values as well as area under the curve values were positively correlated (r = 0.89; P < 0.001 and r = 0.92; P < 0.001, respectively). Of note, the relative levels of free GH (calculated as the area under the curve of free to total GH) was inversely correlated with GHBP (r = -0.94; P < 0.001). It is possible to measure free GH in human serum. Free GH correlated positively with total GH and inversely with GHBP. Measurement of free GH may be a helpful future tool in the management of GH disorders and in studies of GH-GHBP interrelationships.

  13. Nuclear translocation and retention of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertani, Hichem C; Raccurt, Mireille; Abbate, Aude

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that GH is subject to rapid receptor-dependent nuclear translocation. Here, we examine the importance of ligand activation of the GH-receptor (GHR)-associated Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and receptor dimerization for hormone internalization and nuclear translocation by use...... of cells stably transfected with cDNA for the GHR. Staurosporine and herbimycin A treatment of cells did not affect the ability of GH to internalize but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of hormone. Similarly, receptor mutations, which prevent the association and activation of JAK2, did not affect...... the ability of the hormone to internalize or translocate to the nucleus but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of GH. These results were observed both by nuclear isolation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Staurosporine treatment of cells in which human GH (hGH) was targeted to the cytoplasm...

  14. Mortality and reduced growth hormone secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Christiansen, Jens; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data regarding the mortality rates of patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), whether or not treated with growth hormone (GH), are limited, but an increased mortality rate among hypopituitary patients compared with the general population has been documented. Cardiovascular...... disease has been suggested as a primary cause of death, whereas cancer statistics might be influenced by the number of malignancies causing the pituitary disease. Furthermore, differences in mortality rates in females and males have been reported. METHODS: Epidemiological studies of mortality......-onset GHD might also exist. Two studies showed a normal mortality rate in GHD patients treated with GH compared with the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Although an increased mortality rate in hypopituitary patients is well documented, further research is needed to provide more reliable estimates...

  15. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  16. Growth hormone evaluation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, L; Granata, C; Ballestrazzi, A; Cornelio, F; Tassoni, P; Tugnoli, S; Cacciari, E

    1988-10-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release with pharmacological tests and sleep test, somatomedin C and auxological features were studied in 10 patients affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. GH release in these patients seems to be lower than normal; moreover some of them are of short stature without an evident relationship with GH deficit. The possible significance of the data obtained is discussed, particularly in relation to the clinical course of the disease, and to current therapeutic trials with a GH release inhibitor (mazindol).

  17. Metabolic effects of discontinuing growth hormone treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, F; Evans, W.; Gregory, J

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the effects of discontinuing growth hormone (GH) treatment on energy expenditure and body composition, which might help predict those most likely to benefit from early reintroduction of GH treatment in young adult life.
METHODS—Body composition was calculated from skinfold thicknesses and dual energy x ray absorptometry (DXA). Resting metabolic rate (RMR) and whole body bone mineral content (BMC) were also measured. Measurements were made before stoppi...

  18. Growth hormone therapy for people with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngim, Chin Fang; Lai, Nai Ming; Hong, Janet Yh; Tan, Shir Ley; Ramadas, Amutha; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-09-18

    Thalassaemia is a recessively-inherited blood disorder that leads to anaemia of varying severity. In those affected by the more severe forms, regular blood transfusions are required which may lead to iron overload. Accumulated iron from blood transfusions may be deposited in vital organs including the heart, liver and endocrine organs such as the pituitary glands which can affect growth hormone production. Growth hormone deficiency is one of the factors that can lead to short stature, a common complication in people with thalassaemia. Growth hormone replacement therapy has been used in children with thalassaemia who have short stature and growth hormone deficiency. To assess the benefits and safety of growth hormone therapy in people with thalassaemia. We searched the Cochrane Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, reviews and clinical trial registries. Our database and trial registry searches are current to 10 August 2017 and 08 August 2017, respectively. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of growth hormone therapy to placebo or standard care in people with thalassaemia of any type or severity. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were also conducted independently by two authors. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. One parallel trial conducted in Turkey was included. The trial recruited 20 children with homozygous beta thalassaemia who had short stature; 10 children received growth hormone therapy administered subcutaneously on a daily basis at a dose of 0.7 IU/kg per week and 10 children received standard care. The overall risk of bias in this trial was low except for the selection criteria and attrition bias which were unclear. The quality of the evidence for all major outcomes

  19. Increase in maternal placental growth hormone during pregnancy and disappearance during parturition in normal and growth hormone-deficient pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønberg, Ulla; Damm, Peter; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental growth hormone levels in maternal circulation throughout pregnancy in normal and growth hormone-deficient women with the use of a specific assay and to determine the clearance of placental growth hormone from maternal circulation after birth....

  20. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Anders, Bojesen; Skydsgaard, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Growth hormone (GH) treatment is a successful medical therapy for children and adults with GH deficiency as well as for growth retardation due to chronic renal disease, Turner syndrome and in children born small for gestational age. For all of these conditions, treatment is long term...... and patients receive daily subcutaneous injections of GH for many years. Patient compliance is therefore of critical importance to ensure treatment benefit. One of the major factors influencing compliance is injection pain. Besides the injection device used, pain perception and local tissue reaction following...

  1. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  2. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  3. Catch-up growth in early treated patients with growth hormone deficiency. Dutch Growth Hormone Working Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma, B.; Rikken, B.; Wit, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Catch-up growth of 26 children with growth hormone deficiency during four years of growth hormone treatment, which was started young (< 3 years), was compared with that of 16 children with coeliac disease on a gluten free diet. In children with growth hormone deficiency mean (SD) height SD score increased from -4.3 (1.8) to -1.9 (1.4) and in patients with coeliac disease from -1.8 (0.9) to -0.1 (0.8). Height SD score after four years correlated positively with injection frequency and height S...

  4. DOES GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH TURNERS SYNDROME CAUSE AN ABNORMAL BODY SHAPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERVER, WJM; DRAYER, NM; VANES, A

    1992-01-01

    The effect of human growth hormone on the body shape of 51 patients with Turner's syndrome (aged 6-19 years) was evaluated. Biosynthetic growth hormone was given in a dose of 24 IU/m2 body surface/week for two years. Karyotype analysis on peripheral blood was performed. Patients older than 12 years

  5. Evidence for association of the cloned liver growth hormone receptor with a tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Uhler, M D; Billestrup, N;

    1992-01-01

    The ability of the cloned liver growth hormone (GH) receptor, when expressed in mammalian cell lines, to copurify with tyrosine kinase activity and be tyrosyl phosphorylated was examined. 125I-human growth hormone-GH receptor complexes isolated from COS-7 cells transiently expressing high levels ...

  6. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues w...

  7. Safety of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Treating Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency and Idiopathic Short Stature%重组人生长激素治疗儿童生长激素缺乏症和特发性矮小症的安全性问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒畅; 潘慧

    2011-01-01

    重组人生长激素的安全性总体较好,但也有少量不良反应出现,如水钠潴留、良性颅内高压、胰岛素敏感性下降、继发肿瘤发生的危险性升高、脊柱侧凸、股骨头滑脱等,但总体发生率较低.%Recombinant human growth hormone is generally safe in treating children with growth hormone deficiency and idiopathic short stature. However, side effects such as sodium and water retention, benign intracranial hypertension, insulin insensitivity, increasing risk of secondary neoplasm, scoliosis, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis may occur occasionally, although the overall incidence remains low.

  8. Growth Hormone Receptor Knockdown Sensitizes Human Melanoma Cells to Chemotherapy by Attenuating Expression of ABC Drug Efflux Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Reetobrata; Baumgaertel, Nicholas; Wu, Shiyong; Kopchick, John J

    2017-03-14

    Melanoma remains one of the most therapy-resistant forms of human cancer despite recent introductions of highly efficacious targeted therapies. The intrinsic therapy resistance of human melanoma is largely due to abundant expression of a repertoire of xenobiotic efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Here, we report that GH action is a key mediator of chemotherapeutic resistance in human melanoma cells. We investigated multiple ABC efflux pumps (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCB8, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1, and ABCG2) reportedly associated with melanoma drug resistance in different human melanoma cells and tested the efficacy of five different anti-cancer compounds (cisplatin, doxorubicin, oridonin, paclitaxel, vemurafenib) with decreased GH action. We found that GH treatment of human melanoma cells upregulates expression of multiple ABC transporters and increases the EC50 of melanoma drug vemurafenib. Also, vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells had upregulated levels of GH receptor (GHR) expression as well as ABC efflux pumps. GHR knockdown (KD) using siRNA in human melanoma cells treated with sub-EC50 doses of anti-tumor compounds resulted in significantly increased drug retention, decreased cell proliferation and increased drug efficacy, compared to mock-transfected controls. Our set of findings identify an unknown mechanism of GH regulation in mediating melanoma drug resistance and validates GHR as a unique therapeutic target for sensitizing highly therapy-resistant human melanoma cells to lower doses of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  10. Duchenne muscular dystrophy with associated growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Tariq; Mahmood, Arshad; Shams, Shahnaz

    2003-12-01

    A patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and growth hormone (GH) deficiency is described who had no clinical evidence of muscular weakness before initiation of GH replacement therapy. Treatment with human GH resulted in appearance of symptoms of easy fatigability and proximal muscle weakness. Thorough investigations including serum creatinine phosphokinase (CK) levels is recommended in every patient with GH deficiency before starting GH replacement therapy.

  11. Immunofunctional assay of human growth hormone (hGH) in serum: A possible consensus for quantitative hGH measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Strasburger, Christian J.; Wu, Zida; Pflaum, Claus-Dieter; Dressendörfer, Regina A.

    1996-01-01

    Confirmation of the diagnosis of GH deficiency in adults and children involves provocative testing for human (h) GH. Different commercially available immunoassays yield largely discrepant results in the measurement of GH levels in human serum. These discrepancies result in doubtful relevance of cut-off levels proposed for GH provocative testing. We have developed an immunofunctional assay method that allows quantitation of only those GH forms in circulation that possess both binding sites of ...

  12. Growth Hormone and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1: New Endocrine Therapies in Cardiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R

    1997-10-01

    The hormones growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) play a dominant role in whole body growth and metabolism. This is reflected in the use of human GH (hGH) in GH-deficient children to stimulate growth and in GH-deficient adults to reduce visceral fat mass. Recent data suggest that hGH may improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure, so there is current interest in methods to raise GH-IGF levels, including the testing of agents that release GH from the pituitary, administering IGF-1, and most recently, long-acting formulations of hGH. It is hoped that this ongoing integration of cardiology and endocrinology will uncover the pathophysiology of some cardiovascular diseases and yield new treatments based on the hormones of the GH axis. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:264-268). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  13. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  14. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...... protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...... became pregnant after donor insemination. The GH treatment was continued until variant GH production from the placenta was evident. Serum levels of GH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured monthly during pregnancy after 3 days off GH therapy. Abdominal ultrasound was performed five times. Hormonal levels were...

  15. Long-term effect on body composition and metabolic parameters after treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in HIV-1 infected patients with lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Markus; Zangos, Stephan; Lutz, Thomas; Eisen, Johannes; Knecht, Gabi; Goebel, Frank D; Crespi, Catherine M; Jacobi, Volkmar; Staszewski, Schlomo; Klauke, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown reduction of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in HIV-1+ patients, but whether these effects are maintained after the end of treatment is unknown. In a prospective, randomized study we previously studied the effects of r-hGH 4 mg daily vs 3 times/week over 12 weeks, followed by a 2 mg daily maintenance dose for an additional 12 weeks. T1 weighted MRI flash sequences were performed of the face, abdomen and at mid-thigh level (MTF) at baseline, week 12, week 24 and at follow-up. Of 20 subjects who completed the 24-week study, follow-up is available for 16 patients (15 male, mean age 44.8 y, mean duration of HIV infection 13.5 y). After a median time of follow-up of 9 months, VAT remained overall 18% below baseline level (p =0.005). MTF was significantly reduced by 12% compared to its baseline level (p =0.03). Fasting glucose levels significantly improved by 21% compared to baseline (p =0.006). These results suggest that the achieved reduction of VAT using r-hGH in lipodystrophic HIV+ patients is in part maintained after a median follow-up of 9 months.

  16. Poly(amino carbonate urethane)-based biodegradable, temperature and pH-sensitive injectable hydrogels for sustained human growth hormone delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, V. H. Giang; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a new pH-/temperature-sensitive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable hydrogel based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(amino carbonate urethane) (PEG-PACU) copolymers has been developed for the sustained delivery of human growth hormone (hGH). In aqueous solutions, PEG-PACU-based copolymers existed as sols at low pH and temperature (pH 6.0, 23 °C), whereas they formed gels in the physiological condition (pH 7.4, 37 °C). The physicochemical characteristics, including gelation rate, mechanical strength and viscosity, of the PEG-PACU hydrogels could be finely tuned by varying the polymer weight, pH and temperature of the copolymer. An in vivo injectable study in the back of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats indicated that the copolymer could form an in situ gel, which exhibited a homogenous porous structure. In addition, an in vivo biodegradation study of the PEG-PACU hydrogels showed controlled degradation of the gel matrix without inflammation at the injection site and the surrounding tissue. The hGH-loaded PEG-PACU copolymer solution readily formed a hydrogel in SD rats, which subsequently inhibited the initial hGH burst and led to the sustained release of hGH. Overall, the PEG-PACU-based copolymers prepared in this study are expected to be useful biomaterials for the sustained delivery of hGH.

  17. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence.

  18. A randomized controlled trial to compare the effects of liquid versus powdered recombinant human growth hormone in treating patients with severe burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, GUOXIAN; SHAO, HUAWEI; PAN, XUANLIANG

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) promotes protein utilization and synthesis, and is widely used as a therapy to treat severe burns. The present randomized controlled trial evaluated the effects of different forms of rhGH on patients with severe burns. A total of 29 adult severe burns patients were enrolled between February 2009 and November 2011, and randomly assigned to either treatment group (T, liquid rhGH) or control group (C, powder rhGH). From days 5 to 7 following the infliction of burns, both patient groups received rhGH at 0.067 mg/kg/d, once for 10 days. Median serum pre-albumin levels increased in both groups following treatment, the elevation from baseline was significantly higher in the T group on day 10 compared to the C group (88 mg/l vs. 65 mg/l, P=0.046). C-reactive protein, fasting plasma glucose and body weight decreased in both groups. Body weight was significantly lower in the T compared to the C group at baseline, Day 5 and Day 10 (P=0.046, P=0.018 and P=0.006, respectively), however the decrease from baseline levels were not significantly different. Wound healing time was similar between groups (P=0.270). In conclusion the early use of liquid rather than powder rhGH may be more beneficial for treating adult patients with severe burns. PMID:27123246

  19. Psychomotor retardation in a girl with complete growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Devi; Malhi, Prabhjot; Kumar Bhalla, Anil; Sachdeva, Naresh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Infants with complete growth hormone deficiency may suffer from psychomotor retardation in addition to severe growth failure. Without replacement therapy, they may have a compromised intellectual potential manifesting as learning disabilities and attention-deficit disorders in later life. In this communication, we discuss an infant who showed improvement in physical growth after growth hormone therapy but her psychomotor skills did not improve probably due to late start of treatment. There is a need to start growth hormone therapy as early as possible in infants with complete growth hormone deficiency to avoid adverse effects on psychomotor and brain development.

  20. Urinary growth hormone excretion as a screening test for growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, J.M.; Wood, P. J.; Williamson, S.; Betts, P. R.; Evans, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Overnight urinary growth hormone secretion was measured by an immunoradiometric assay incorporating commercially available reagents, in 41 normal prepubertal school-children from three age groups: 3-5 years, 6-7 years, and 9-10 years. There was no significant difference between the groups expressing the results as total microU/specimen and so they have been combined to provide a prepubertal reference range of 2.25-10.50 microU/night. Prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency who had...

  1. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real...... cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found...... that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma....

  2. Impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH treatment on psychiatric, neuropsychological and clinical profiles of GH deficient adults: a placebo - controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOARES CLÁUDIO DE NOVAES

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Untreated GH-deficient adults have a diversity of dysfunctions (e.g. reduced muscle strength, emotional instability during stress, depressive symptoms that may cause deleterious effects on quality of life, and may be positively influenced by recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH therapy. AIM: To evaluate the impact of a clinical intervention with rh-GH therapy on GH - deficient adults. METHOD: The physical, psychiatric and neuropsychological status of 9 GH-deficient adults was determined before and after the administration of rh-GH (0.250 IU/Kg/week in a double blind placebo-controlled trial for six months. Patients then received rh-GH for a further period of 6 months and their status was re-evaluated. RESULTS: Rh-GH was significant better than placebo at 6th month (p<0.05, producing increased serum Insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-1 levels, reduced body mass index (BMI and body fat, increased lean body mass and water, reduced waist/hip ratio and increased energy expenditure. The rh-GH therapy was also significantly better than placebo on depressive features as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale (17-items (p= 0.0431 and the Beck Depression Inventory (p= 0.0431. Neuropsychological evaluations showed significant improvements in measures of Attention: Digit Backward (p= 0.035,Verbal Fluency (FAS (p= 0.02 and Cognitive Efficiency (WAIS-R tests: Vocabulary (p= 0.027 , Picture Arrangements (p= 0.017, and Comprehension (p= 0.01 following rh-GH therapy. CONCLUSION: The clinical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological impairments of untreated GH-deficient adults can be decreased by rh-GH therapy.

  3. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor 23 - et fosfatregulerende hormon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Signe; Pedersen, Susanne Møller; Kassem, Moustapha

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) er et nyligt identificeret fosfatonin. FGF23's fysiologiske hovedfunktion er at opretholde normalt serumfosfat og at virke som et D-vitaminmodregulatorisk hormon. Sygdomme, der er koblet til forhøjet serum FGF23, er hypofosfatæmisk rakitis, fibrøs dysplasi og...... tumorinduceret osteomalaci. Hyperfosfatæmisk familiær tumoral calcinosis er derimod associeret med forhøjet nedbrydning af FGF23. Måling af FGF23 er et differentialdiagnostisk redskab ved udredning af tilstande med længerevarende hypofosfatæmi. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-May 17...

  5. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, Robert S.; Schulze, Aga

    Numerous studies, particularly those of H. Dolk in the 1930's, established by means of bio-assay, that more growth hormone diffused from the lower, than from the upper side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot. Now, using an isotope dilution assay, with 4,5,6,7 tetradeutero indole-3-acetic acid as internal standard, and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as the method of determination, we have confirmed Dolk's finding and established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is, in fact, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physico-chemical demonstration that there is more free IAA on the lower sides of a geo-stimulated plant shoot. We have also shown that free IAA occurs primarily in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, whereas IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. Now, using an especially sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay we have found that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the non-vascular tissue. Currently, efforts are directed to developing isotope dilution assays, with picogram sensitivity, to determine how this asymmetry of IAA distribution is attained so as to better understand how the plant perceives the geo-stimulus.

  6. Negative regulation of human growth hormone gene expression by insulin is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor binding in primary non-tumor pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2012-09-28

    Insulin controls growth hormone (GH) production at multiple levels, including via a direct effect on pituitary somatotrophs. There are no data, however, on the regulation of the intact human (h) GH gene (hGH1) by insulin in non-tumor pituitary cells, but the proximal promoter region (nucleotides -496/+1) responds negatively to insulin in transfected pituitary tumor cells. A DNA-protein interaction was also induced by insulin at nucleotides -308/-235. Here, we confirmed the presence of a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) binding site within these sequences (-264/-259) and investigated whether HIF-1 is associated with insulin regulation of "endogenous" hGH1. In the absence of primary human pituitary cells, transgenic mice expressing the intact hGH locus in a somatotroph-specific manner were generated. A significant and dose-dependent decrease in hGH and mouse GH RNA levels was detected in primary pituitary cell cultures from these mice with insulin treatment. Increasing HIF-1α availability with a hypoxia mimetic significantly decreased hGH RNA levels and was accompanied by recruitment of HIF-1α to the hGH1 promoter in situ as seen with insulin. Both inhibition of HIF-1 DNA binding by echinomycin and RNA interference of HIF-1α synthesis blunted the negative effect of insulin on hGH1 but not mGH. The insulin response is also sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibition/trichostatin A and associated with a decrease in H3/H4 hyperacetylation in the proximal hGH1 promoter region. These data are consistent with HIF-1-dependent down-regulation of hGH1 by insulin via chromatin remodeling specifically in the proximal promoter region.

  7. AAS, growth hormone, and insulin abuse: psychological and neuroendocrine effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Graham

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: The nontherapeutic use of prescription medicines by individuals involved in sport is increasing. Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS are the most widely abused drug. Much of our knowledge of the psychological and physiological effects of human growth hormone (hGH and insulin has been learned from deficiency states. As a consequence of the Internet revolution, previously unobtainable and expensive designer drugs, particularly recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH and insulin, have become freely available at ridiculously discounted prices from countries such as China and are being abused. These drugs have various physiological and psychological effects and medical personnel must become aware that such prescription medicine abuse appears to be used not only for performance and cosmetic reasons, but as a consequence of psychological pre-morbidity.Keywords: AAS, cosmesis, growth hormone, insulin, performance, strength

  8. Isolated growth hormone deficiency type 2: from gene to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Lochmatter, Didier; Pektovic, Vibor; Mullis, Primus-E

    2012-01-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type-2 (IGHD-2), the autosomal-dominant form of GH deficiency, is mainly caused by specific splicing mutations in the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (GH-1). These mutations, occurring in and around exon 3, cause complete exon 3 skipping and produce a dominant-negative 17.5 kD GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild type-GH (wt-GH). At present, patients suffering from IGHD-2 are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kD mutant on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Considering a well-known correlation between the clinical severity observed in IGHD-2 patients and the increased expression of the 17.5-kD isoform, therapies that specifically target this isoform may be useful in patients with GH-1 splicing defects. This chapter focuses on molecular strategies that could represent future directions for IGHD-2 treatment.

  9. Growth hormone stimulates the collagen synthesis in human tendon and skeletal muscle without affecting myofibrillar protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Simon; Heinemeier, Katja; Holm, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    young individuals. rhGH administration caused an increase in serum GH, serum IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA expression in tendon and muscle. Tendon collagen I mRNA expression and tendon collagen protein synthesis increased by 3.9-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively (P ...RNA expression and muscle collagen protein synthesis increased by 2.3-fold and 5.8-fold, respectively (P protein synthesis was unaffected by elevation of GH and IGF-I. Moderate exercise did not enhance the effects of GH manipulation. Thus, increased GH availability stimulates...... matrix collagen synthesis in skeletal muscle and tendon, but without any effect upon myofibrillar protein synthesis. The results suggest that GH is more important in strengthening the matrix tissue than for muscle cell hypertrophy in adult human musculotendinous tissue....

  10. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  11. Growth hormone-mediated breakdown of body fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T.; Malmlöf, K.; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2003-01-01

    regimen. Twelve-month-old rats fed first a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for 14 weeks were injected with saline or growth hormone (4 mg/kg/d) for four days or three weeks in different combinations with either high- or low-fat diets. In adipose tissue, growth hormone generally inhibited lipoprotein...... lipase and also attenuated the inhibiting effect of insulin on hormone-sensitive lipase activity. Growth hormone treatment combined with restricted high-fat feeding reduced the activity of both lipases in adipose tissue and stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase in muscle. Generally, plasma levels of free...... fatty acids, glycerol and cholesterol were reduced by growth hormone, and in combination with restricted high-fat feeding, triglyceride levels improved too. We conclude that growth hormone inhibits lipid storage in adipose tissue by reducing both lipoprotein lipase activity and insulin's inhibitory...

  12. Role of Stroma-Derived Extracellular Matrix in Regulation of Growth and Hormonal Responsiveness of Normal and Cancerous Human Breast Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    by residual estrogen or more likely by growth factor pathways ( Ignar -Trowbridge et al., 1996), have masked estrogen-induced proliferation in serum...an ERE- CAT construct independent of estrogen, but this was blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 164,384 ( Ignar -Trowbridge et al., 1996). Again, these...modulates hormonal responsiveness of mammary epithelium in vivo in the mouse. Endocrinology, 129:2017-2023. Ignar -Trowbridge, D.M., M. Pimentel, M.G

  13. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone for embryo transfer%重组人生长激素对胚胎移植的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马新兰; 韩伟; 陈辉; 李文杰

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察重组人生长激素对胚胎移植后生化妊娠率、临床妊娠率的影响。方法回顾性分析2013年9月至2014年5月在我中心行IVF助孕治疗的患者360例,按自愿原则分为两组,移植日内膜均≥8mm,其中移植日及以后加用生长激素的180例为研究组,未用生长激素的138例为对照组,分析两组生化妊娠率、临床妊娠率的差异。结果两组生化妊娠率有明显差异(74.44%50.72%),临床妊娠率无差异(56.11%50.00%)。结论生长激素可提高胚胎移植后生化妊娠率。%Objective to evaluate the effect of the growth hormone on biochemical pregnancy rate and clinical pregnancy rate behind embryo transfer.Methods a retrospective analysis in September 2013– May 2014 , divided into two groups according to the voluntary principle, transplantation, lining are 8 mm or higher, which combined with growth hormone after the transplantation, and 180 cases for the team, not using growth hormone 138 cases as control group, analysis the differences ofbiochemical pregnancy rate, clinical pregnancy rate of two groups .The results the biochemical pregnancy rate of two groups have obvious difference(74.44% 50.72%), clinical pregnancy rate is no difference(56.11% 50.00%).Conclusion growth hormone can improve the biochemical pregnancy rate after embryo transfer.

  14. Effects of growth hormone deficiency and recombinant growth hormone therapy on postprandial gallbladder motility and cholecystokinin release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; Twickler, M.; Rehfeld, J.F.; Ooteghem, N.A. van; Castro Cabezas, M.; Portincasa, P.; Berge-Henegouwen, G.P. van; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cholecystokinin, other hormones have been suggested to be involved in regulation of postprandial gallbladder contraction. We aimed to evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) on gallbladder contractility and cholecystokinin release. Gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound) and

  15. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  16. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation...

  17. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-01-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1β (HIF-1β) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0–10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  18. [Localized lipohypertrophy during growth hormone therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersebach, Henriette; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-04-01

    Accumulation of subcutaneous fat is described in a 51-year-old woman with panhypopituitarism treated on all insufficient pituitary axes, including growth hormone (GH). Malnutrition and alcoholic liver disease caused reduced synthesis of hepatic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and the function of IGF-I as biochemical marker of the GH effect was compromised. Peripheral levels of GH and IGF-I in tissues may have reached supra physiological levels and induced localised lipohypertrophy. Adjustment of GH treatment should not rest in all cases on IGF-I alone, but also depend on the clinical effect. Adjustment should follow suspected adverse events, such as lipohypertrophy, which is, however, an unusual complication of GH therapy.

  19. Growth rates and the prevalence and progression of scoliosis in short-statured children on Australian growth hormone treatment programmes

    OpenAIRE

    McPhee Ian; Day Gregory A; Batch Jenny; Tomlinson Francis H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Study design and aim This was a longitudinal chart review of a diverse group (cohort) of patients undergoing HGH (Human Growth Hormone) treatment. Clinical and radiological examinations were performed with the aim to identify the presence and progression of scoliosis. Methods and cohort 185 patients were recruited and a database incorporating the age at commencement, dose and frequency of growth hormone treatment and growth charts was compiled from their Medical Records. The presence...

  20. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  1. Growth hormone signaling in muscle and adipose tissue of obese human subjects: associations with measures of body composition and interaction with resveratrol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Berthil F; Poulsen, Morten M; Escande, Carlos; Pedersen, Steen B; Møller, Niels; Chini, Eduardo N; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is reduced in obesity, despite normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels, but the association between obesity and the GH signaling is unknown. Furthermore, SIRT1, an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, reduces hepatic IGF-1 production in mice via blunting of GH-induced STAT5 signaling. To study GH signaling in muscle and fat in obese subjects and the interaction with concomitant administration of the putative SIRT1 activator resveratrol, and to assess the effects of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on GH regulated genes in vitro. Twenty-four obese males were examined in a randomized, double blinded, parallel-group study with resveratrol or placebo treatment for 5 weeks followed by a GH bolus. Muscle and fat biopsies were collected before and after GH. Body composition was assessed by DEXA and MRI. (1) Effect of body composition and age on GH-stimulated STAT5b phosphorylation and IGF-1, SOCS2, and CISH mRNA in muscle and fat. (2) The impact of resveratrol treatment on GH activity. (3) Impact of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on effects of GH in vitro. Significant GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle and fat in obese subjects was recorded together with increased CISH and SOCS2 mRNA. GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle correlated positively with age [r = 0.53, p < 0.01], but not with body composition. Resveratrol administration had no impact on body composition, serum IGF-1, or GH signaling in vivo, and SIRT1 knock down or inhibition did not affect GH signaling in vitro. (1) GH induced STAT5b phosphorylation is detectable in muscle and fat in adult males with simple obesity, but is not determined by body composition. (2) Resveratrol supplementation does not impact circulating IGF-1 levels or GH signaling in human muscle and fat. (3) Our data speak against a major impact of SIRT1on GH action in human subjects.

  2. Growth hormone rescues hippocampal synaptic function after sleep deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, EunYoung; Grover, Lawrence M; Bertolotti, Don; Green, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is required for, and sleep loss impairs, normal hippocampal synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor function and expression, hippocampal NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity, and hippocampal-dependent memory function. Although sleep is essential, the signals linking sleep to hippocampal function are not known. One potential signal is growth hormone. Growth hormone is released during sleep, and its release is suppressed during sleep deprivation. If growth hormone l...

  3. Parathyroid hormone-mitogen-activated protein kinase axis exerts fibrogenic effect of connective tissue growth factor on human renal proximal tubular cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yun-shan; YUAN Wei-jie; ZHANG Ai-ping; DING Yao-hai; WANG Yan-xia

    2010-01-01

    Background Enhanced and prolonged expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is associated with kidney fibrosis. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is involved in the genesis of disturbed calcium/phosphate metabolism and ostitis fibrosa in renal failure. PTH activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is present in renal tubular cells. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism how the signal is transduced to result in extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation, leading to upregulation of CTGF.Methods The levels of CTGF mRNA and protein in human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK-2) treated with PTH in the presence or absence of the MAPK inhibitor PD98059 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting assay. The activation of the CTGF promoter in HK-2 cells was determined by the dual-luciferase assay. The effects of the protein kinase A (PKA) activator 8-Br-cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on MAPK phosphorylation, and the effects of the PKA inhibitor H89 and PKC inhibitor calphostin C on MAPK phosphorylation and CTGF expression were detected by immunoblotting assay.Results PD98059 inhibited the PTH stimulated expression of CTGF, which strongly suggested that the MAPK signaling pathway plays an important role in the PTH-induced CTGF upregulation in renal tubular cells. A PKA activator as well as PKC activators induced MAPK phosphorylation, and both PKA and PKC inhibitors antagonized PTH-induced MAPK phosphorylation and CTGF expression.Conclusion CTGF expression is upregulated by PTH through a PKC/PKA-ERK-dependent pathway.

  4. Development and Characterization of Sodium Hyaluronate Microparticle-Based Sustained Release Formulation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Prepared by Spray-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun J; Kim, Chan W

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a sodium hyaluronate microparticle-based sustained release formulation of recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH) prepared by spray-drying. Compared to freeze-drying, spray-dried SR-rhGH showed not only prolonged release profiles but also better particle property and injectability. The results of size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography showed that no aggregate was detected, and dimer was just about 2% and also did not increase with increase of inlet temperature up to 150 °C. Meanwhile, the results of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that related proteins increased slightly from 4.6% at 100 °C to 6.3% at 150 °C. Thermal mapping test proved that product temperature did not become high to cause protein degradation during spray-drying because thermal energy was used for the evaporation of surface moisture of droplets. The structural characterization by peptide mapping, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism revealed that the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of rhGH in SR-rhGH were highly comparable to those of reference somatropin materials. The biological characterization by rat weight gain and cell proliferation assays provided that bioactivity of SR-rhGH was equivalent to that of native hGH. These data establish that spray-dried SR-rhGH is highly stable by preserving intact rhGH and hyaluronate microparticle-based formulation by spray-drying can be an alternative delivery system for proteins.

  5. Development of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) sustained-release microspheres by a low temperature aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Wu, Fei; Cai, Yunpeng; Xu, Mingxin; He, Mu; Yuan, Weien

    2014-10-01

    A novel method has been developed to protect Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres using an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion and S/O/W multi-emulsion method. This method develops a novel rhGH sustained-release system, which is based on the combination of rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles and PLGA microspheres. The process to fabricate rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles involves an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion system formed at the reduced temperature. RhGH was first dissolved in water together with dextran and polyethylene glycol, followed by stirring at the speed of 2000 rpm for 20-30s at 0°C, and then a freezing process could enable the dextran phase to separate from the continuous PEG phase and rhGH could preferentially be loaded with dextran. The sample after freezing and phase separation was then lyophilized to powder and washed with dichloromethane to remove the PEG. Once loaded in the dextran microparticles (1-4 μm in diameter), rhGH gained resistance to interface tensions and was encapsulated into PLGA microspheres without aggregation thereafter. RhGH released from PLGA microspheres was in a sustained manner with minimal burst and maximally reduced incomplete release in vitro. Single subcutaneous injection of rhGH-loaded PLGA microspheres to rats resulted in a stable plasma concentration for 30 days avoiding the drug concentration fluctuations after multiple injections of protein solutions. In a hypophysectomized rat model, the IGF-1 and bodyweight results showed that there were higher than the levels obtained for the sustained release formulation by W/O/W for 40 days. These results suggest that the microsphere delivery system had the potential to be an injectable depot for sustained-release of the biocompatible protein of rhGH.

  6. Thiomers in noninvasive polypeptide delivery: in vitro and in vivo characterization of a polycarbophil-cysteine/glutathione gel formulation for human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Verena M; Guggi, Davide; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2004-07-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the potential of a new polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys)/glutathione (GSH) gel formulation to enhance the permeation of the model drug human growth hormone (hGH) across nasal mucosa in vitro and in vivo. The aqueous nasal gel contained PCP-Cys, GSH, and hGH in a final concentration of 0.3%, 0.5%, and 0.6% (m/v), respectively. In vitro permeation studies were performed in Ussing chambers on freshly excised bovine nasal mucosa using fluorescence-labeled dextran (molecular mass: 4.3 kDa; FD-4) and hGH (FITC-hGH). The release profile of FITC-hGH from the gel formulation and an unmodified PCP control formulation was determined. Furthermore, in vivo studies in rats were performed comparing the PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel with PCP/hGH control gel and physiological saline. The permeation of FD-4 and FITC-hGH across the nasal mucosa was improved two-fold and three-fold, respectively, in the presence of PCP-Cys/GSH. The PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel and the PCP/hGH control gel showed the same biphasic and matrix-controlled drug release. The nasal administration of the PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel formulation to rats resulted in a significantly increased and prolonged hGH plasma concentration-time profile versus unmodified PCP gel and physiological saline. According to these results, PCP-Cys gels might represent a promising new strategy for systemic nasal polypeptide delivery.

  7. Fast evolution of growth hormone receptor in primates and ruminants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhenfang; LI Ying; ZHANG Yaping

    2005-01-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) evolves very slowly in most of mammals, but the evolutionary rates appear to have increased markedly on two occasions during the evolution of primates and ruminants. To investigate the evolutionary pattern of growth hormone receptor (GHR), we sequenced the extracellular domain of GHR genes from four primate species. Our results suggested that GHR in mammal also shows an episodic evolutionary pattern, which is consistent with that observed in pituitary growth hormone. Further analysis suggested that this pattern of rapid evolution observed in primates and ruminants is likely the result of coevolution between pituitary growth hormone and its receptor.

  8. contribution of growth hormone-releasing hormone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hormone (GHRH) and increased somatostatin secretion to this phenomenon. ... negative feedback effects of IGF-1 or combinations of these factors. Studies to ..... increase in lean body mass and reduction in adipose tissue.6. Reduced GH ...

  9. Preliminary investigation of plasma levels of sex hormones and human growth factor(s, and P300 latency as correlates to cognitive decline as a function of gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerner Mallory M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is marked by declines in levels of many sex hormones and growth factors, as well as in cognitive function. The P300 event-related potential has been established as a predictor of cognitive decline. We decided to determine if this measure, as well as 2 standard tests of memory and attention, may be correlated with serum levels of sex hormones and growth factors, and if there are any generalizations that could be made based on these parameters and the aging process. Findings In this large clinically based preliminary study several sex-stratified associations between hormone levels and cognition were observed, including (1 for males aged 30 to 49, both IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 significantly associated negatively with prolonged P300 latency; (2 for males aged 30 to 49, the spearman correlation between prolonged P300 latency and low free testosterone was significant; (3 for males aged 60 to 69, there was a significant negative correlation between P300 latency and DHEA levels; (4 for females aged 50 to 59 IGFBP-3 significantly associated negatively with prolonged P300 latency; (5 for females at all age periods, estrogen and progesterone were uncorrelated with P300 latency; and (6 for females aged 40 to 69, there was significant negative correlation between DHEA levels and P300 latency. Moreover there were no statistically significant correlations between any hormone and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-111. However, in females, there was a significant positive correlation between estrogen levels and the number of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD complaints. Conclusion Given certain caveats including confounding factors involving psychiatric and other chronic diseases as well as medications, the results may still have important value. If these results could be confirmed in a more rigorously controlled investigation, it may have important value in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cognitive impairments and decline.

  10. The influence of growth hormone on bone and adipose programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbauer, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    In utero growth hormone exposure is associated with distinct immediate growth responses and long term impacts on adult physiological parameters that include obesity, insulin resistance, and bone function. Growth hormone accelerates cellular proliferation in many tissues but is exemplified by increases in the number of cells within the cartilaginous growth plate of bone. In some cases growth hormone also potentiates differentiation as seen in the differentiation of adipocytes that rapidly fill upon withdrawal of growth hormone. Growth hormone provokes these changes either by direct action or through intermediaries such as insulin-like growth factor-I and other downstream effector molecules. The specific mechanism used by growth hormone in programming tissues is not yet fully characterized and likely represents a multipronged approach involving DNA modification, altered adult hormonal milieu, and the development of an augmented stem cell pool capable of future engagement as is seen in adipose accrual. This review summarizes findings of growth hormone's influence on in utero and neonatal cellular and metabolic profiles related to bone and adipose tissue.

  11. Autocrine/Paracrine Human Growth Hormone-stimulated MicroRNA 96-182-183 Cluster Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Invasion in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Qian, Pengxu; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong; Wu, Mingming; Kong, Xiangjun; Tan, Sheng; Ding, Keshuo; Perry, Jo K; Wu, Zhengsheng; Cao, Yuan; Lobie, Peter E; Zhu, Tao

    2015-05-29

    Human growth hormone (hGH) plays critical roles in pubertal mammary gland growth, development, and sexual maturation. Accumulated studies have reported that autocrine/paracrine hGH is an orthotopically expressed oncoprotein that promotes normal mammary epithelial cell oncogenic transformation. Autocrine/paracrine hGH has also been reported to promote mammary epithelial cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely obscure. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are reported to be involved in regulation of multiple cellular functions of cancer. To determine whether autocrine/paracrine hGH promotes EMT and invasion through modulation of miRNA expression, we performed microarray profiling using MCF-7 cells stably expressing wild type or a translation-deficient hGH gene and identified miR-96-182-183 as an autocrine/paracrine hGH-regulated miRNA cluster. Forced expression of miR-96-182-183 conferred on epithelioid MCF-7 cells a mesenchymal phenotype and promoted invasive behavior in vitro and dissemination in vivo. Moreover, we observed that miR-96-182-183 promoted EMT and invasion by directly and simultaneously suppressing BRMS1L (breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1-like) gene expression. miR-96 and miR-182 also targeted GHR, providing a potential negative feedback loop in the hGH-GHR signaling pathway. We further demonstrated that autocrine/paracrine hGH stimulated miR-96-182-183 expression and facilitated EMT and invasion via STAT3 and STAT5 signaling. Consistent with elevated expression of autocrine/paracrine hGH in metastatic breast cancer tissue, miR-96-182-183 expression was also remarkably enhanced. Hence, we delineate the roles of the miRNA-96-182-183 cluster and elucidate a novel hGH-GHR-STAT3/STAT5-miR-96-182-183-BRMS1L-ZEB1/E47-EMT/invasion axis, which provides further understanding of the mechanism of autocrine/paracrine hGH-stimulated EMT and invasion in breast cancer.

  12. Zip1, Zip2, and Zip8 mRNA expressions were associated with growth hormone level during the growth hormone provocation test in children with short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Shifu; Jiang, Yali; Tao, Yanting; Tian, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Kai; Wan, Haiyan; Zhang, Lehai; Zhang, Lianying

    2013-10-01

    Short stature of children is affected by multiple factors. One of them is growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Growth hormone therapy can increase the final height of children with growth hormone deficiency. Zinc is found to induce dimerization and to enhance the bioactivity of human GH. Two gene families have been identified involved in zinc homeostasis. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, and ZnT1 mRNA were associated with zinc level in established human breast cancer in nude mice model; Zip8 was significantly lower in zinc-deficient Wistar rats in kidney. In this study, five zinc transporters: Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, Zip8, and ZnT1 were chosen. We aimed to investigate the mRNA expression of zinc transporters and to explore the relationship between zinc transporters and growth hormone in short stature children. Growth hormone provocation test is used to confirm the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. Six short children for the test were enrolled. At the same time, 15 sex- and age-matched normal children were enrolled as control. The expression levels of zinc transporters in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Zip1 and Zip2 mRNA expression positively correlated with growth hormone level (r = 0.5133, P = 0.0371; r = 0.6719, P = 0.0032); Zip8 mRNA expression negatively correlated with growth hormone level (r = -0.5264, P = 0.0285) during the test in short stature children. The average expression level of Zip2 was significantly higher and Zip6, Zip8 mRNA levels were significantly lower in short stature children than in health controls at 0 min (P < 0.05, P < 0.05).

  13. Comparing the Behavioural Effects of Exogenous Growth Hormone and Melatonin in Young and Old Wistar Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pere Barceló; Cristina Nicolau; Antoni Gamundí; Fiol, Maria A.; Tresguerres, Jesús A.F.; Mourad Akaârir; Rial, Rubén V.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin are two hormones with quite different physiological effects. Curiously, their secretion shows parallel and severe age-related reductions. This has promoted many reports for studying the therapeutic supplementation of both hormones in an attempt to avoid or delay the physical, physiological, and psychological decay observed in aged humans and in experimental animals. Interestingly, the effects of the external administration of low doses of GH and of melatonin ...

  14. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Marzullo, Paolo; Doga, Mauro; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of the adult is characterized by reduced quality of life (QoL) and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, and increased weight and cardiovascular risk. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, but an exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain owing to limited awareness and the scarce and conflicting data available on this topic. Because acromegaly and GHD may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of acromegaly may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. However, it is still largely unknown whether patients with post-acromegaly GHD may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adult patients treated for acromegaly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth hormone modulation of arginine-induced glucagon release: studies of isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Y; Taminato, T; Goto, Y; Inoue, Y; Kadowaki, S; Hattori, M; Mori, K; Kato, Y; Matsukura, S; Imura, H

    1978-12-01

    Plasma glucagon and insulin responses to L-arginine were compared in normal controls and patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency were characterized by high plasma glucagon response and low plasma insulin response, whereas acromegalic patients showed exaggerated plasma glucagon response and almost normal insulin response. These results suggest that growth hormone is probably required for optimum function of the islets, and since hyperglucagonaemia was observed in both growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly, metabolic disturbances stemming from the respective primary diseases may affect glucagon secretion.

  16. The in vitro and in vivo effects of human growth hormone administration on tumor growth of rats bearing a transplantable rat pituitary tumor (7315b)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Binnerts (Arjen); P. Uitterlinden (Piet); L.J. Hofland (Leo); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The direct effects of human GH and IGF-I on PRL secretion and cell proliferation were studied on PRL secreting rat pituitary tumor 7315b cells in vitro, as well as the effects in vivo of human GH administration on body weight, IGF-I levels and tumor size in rats bearing th

  17. Growth hormone and somatostatin in glomerular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, L; Fouqueray, B; Bellocq, A; Doublier, S; Dumoulin, A

    1999-01-01

    Among other neuropeptides and neurohormones, growth hormone (GH) and somatostatin (SRIF) have been shown to modulate the development of glomerular injury in various renal diseases. In particular, GH is implicated in the induction of glomerular hypertrophy and sclerosis in partial nephrectomy and diabetic nephropathy. While GH effects on glomerular hypertrophy are likely mediated by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), GH effects on glomerular sclerosis are independent of IGF-I. Those effects rather require multiple signaling pathways functioning in series, e.g. angiotensin II binding preceding transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) release, or pro-inflammatory factor release preceding repair/scarring processes. In contrast with GH, SRIF administration prevents the development of glomerular lesions in experimental diabetes, partial nephrectomy and immune glomerulonephritis. Inhibitory effects of SRIF on glomerular hypotrophy may be through a decrease in GH secretion and/or IGF-I expression or through a direct blockade of glomerular cell proliferation. The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of SRIF are most likely a deactivation of inflammatory cells related in part to an upregulated response of these cells to glucocorticoids. Additional studies will be required to further define the role of GH and SRIF in the development of glomerular injury and, hence, to identify new targets for a therapeutic approach in glomerular diseases.

  18. The effect of exercise performed before and 24 hours after blood withdrawal on serum erythropoietin and growth hormone concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, K; Zoladz, J A; Majerczak, J; Kolodziejski, L; Konturek, S J

    2003-07-01

    In the present experiment we have studied the effect of exercise performed before and 24 h after withdrawal of 450 ml of blood on the serum erythropoietin and growth hormone (GH) levels, in humans. Twelve male subjects (x +/- SD) aged 23.2 +/- 2.6 y, with a body mass of 74.8 +/- 7.2 kg, height 178.0 +/- 7.6 cm, BMI 23.6 +/- 2.1 kg x m(-2), VO2 max 2937 +/- 324 ml x min(-1), participated in this study. The subjects performed twice an incremental exercise test until exhaustion, separated by a period of about 7 - 10 days. The second test was performed 24 h after withdrawal of 450 ml of blood (honorary blood donation). In the control study we found no effect of the incremental exercise on the serum erythropoietin concentration, which amounted to 14.24 +/- 7.66 mU x ml(-1) at rest and 14.97 +/- 6.07 mU x ml(-1) at the end of the incremental test. Serum GH level in the control study rose considerably from 0.158 +/- 0.024 nmol x l(-1) at rest to 1.523 +/- 0.336 nmol x l(-1) at the end of exercise and returned to initial value 2 h after the exercise. During the experiment performed 24 h after withdrawal of 450 ml of blood the serum erythropoietin concentration at rest was significantly elevated (p blood withdrawal was similar to that in control test and exercise caused a rise in the GH level to 1.056 +/- 0.52 nmol x l(-1), significantly less than in control test, but this increment fell to control value 2 h after exercise. The elevated level of erythropoietin 24 h after blood withdrawal was accompanied by a significant increase (p blood hydrogen ion concentration [H +] b at rest from 48.2 +/- 2.8 nmol x l(-1) in the control study to 52.9 +/- 4.5 nmol x l(-1) after blood donation. No effect of blood withdrawal on pre-exercise level of plasma lactate concentration, end-tidal O2 and end-tidal CO2 was found. We concluded that withdrawal of 450 ml of blood, within 24 hours significantly increased serum erythropoietin concentration and caused non-lactic acidosis. A single bout

  19. Acceleration of wound healing by growth hormone-releasing hormone and its agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Dioufa, Nikolina; Schally, Andrew V.; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Moustou, Evi; Block, Norman L.; Owens, Gary K.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2010-01-01

    Despite the well-documented action of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on the stimulation of production and release of growth hormone (GH), the effects of GHRH in peripheral tissues are incompletely explored. In this study, we show that GHRH plays a role in wound healing and tissue repair by acting primarily on wound-associated fibroblasts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in culture and wound-associated fibroblasts in mice expressed a splice variant of the receptors for GHRH (SV1). ...

  20. Regulation of endometrial cancer cell growth by luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, S.; Bax, C M R; Chatzaki, E; Chard, Tim; Iles, Ray K.

    2000-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used to treat recurrent endometrial cancer. However, the mode of action is uncertain. Our previous studies showed no direct effect of GnRHa on endometrial cancer cell growth in vitro. We have now examined the effect of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) on endometrial cancer cell growth. The aim was to determine whether suppression of pituitary LH and FSH by GnRHa could explain the tumour regression seen ...

  1. Growth Hormone Therapy in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Vogt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is characterized by hyperphagia, obesity if food intake is not strictly controlled, abnormal body composition with decreased lean body mass and increased fat mass, decreased basal metabolic rate, short stature, low muscle tone, cognitive disability, and hypogonadism. In addition to improvements in linear growth, the benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition and motor function in children with PWS are well established. Evidence is now emerging on the benefits of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. This review summarizes the current literature on growth hormone status and the use of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. The benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition, muscle strength, exercise capacity, certain measures of sleep-disordered breathing, metabolic parameters, quality of life, and cognition are covered in detail along with potential adverse effects and guidelines for initiating and monitoring therapy.

  2. Diverse roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in mammalian aging: progress and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; deCabo, Raphael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Because the initial reports demonstrating that circulating growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 decrease with age in laboratory animals and humans, there have been numerous studies related to the importance of these hormones for healthy aging. Nevertheless, the role of these potent anabolic hormones in the genesis of the aging phenotype remains controversial. In this chapter, we review the studies demonstrating the beneficial and deleterious effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency and explore their effects on specific tissues and pathology as well as their potentially unique effects early during development. Based on this review, we conclude that the perceived contradictory roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in the genesis of the aging phenotype should not be interpreted as a controversy on whether growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-1 increases or decreases life span but rather as an opportunity to explore the complex roles of these hormones during specific stages of the life span.

  3. Timing of growth hormone treatment affects trabecular bone microarchitecture and mineralization in growth hormone deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W; Boyd, Steven K

    2010-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is essential in the development of bone mass, and a growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood is frequently treated with daily injections of GH. It is not clear what effect GHD and its treatment has on bone. It was hypothesized that GHD would result in impaired microarchitecture, and an early onset of treatment would result in a better recovery than late onset. Growth hormone deficient homozygous (lit/lit) mice of both sexes were divided into two treatment groups receiving daily injections of GH, starting at an early (21 days of age) or a late time point (35 days of age, corresponding to the end of puberty). A group of heterozygous mice with normal levels of growth hormone served as controls. In vivo micro-computed tomography scans of the fourth lumbar vertebra were obtained at five time points between 21 and 60 days of age, and trabecular morphology and volumetric BMD were analyzed to determine the effects of GH on bone microarchitecture. Early GH treatment led to significant improvements in bone volume ratio (p=0.006), tissue mineral density (p=0.005), and structure model index (p=0.004) by the study endpoint (day 60), with no detected change in trabecular thickness. Trabecular number increased and trabecular separation decreased in GHD mice regardless of treatment compared to heterozygous mice. This suggests fundamental differences in the structure of trabecular bone in GHD and GH treated mice, reflected by an increased number of thinner trabeculae in these mice compared to heterozygous controls. There were no significant differences between the late treatment group and GHD mice except for connectivity density. Taken together, these results indicate that bone responds to GH treatment initiated before puberty but not to treatment commencing post-puberty, and that GH treatment does not rescue the structure of trabecular bone to that of heterozygous controls. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  5. Efficacy of growth hormone therapy in adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Yoo, Han-Wook; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Growth hormone (GH) plays a key role in the regulation of body composition, lipid metabolism, and quality of life in adults with GH deficiency (GHD). This study investigated changes in laboratory findings and body composition after GH recommencement for adult GHD and analyzed correlation between GH interruption period and endocrine or anthropometric parameters. Methods A total of 45 patients (17 females and 28 males) diagnosed with childhood-onset GHD (CO-GHD) were investigated and al...

  6. Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2014-01-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant huma...

  7. Recombinant human growth hormone and rosiglitazone for abdominal fat accumulation in HIV-infected patients with insulin resistance: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, factorial trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall J Glesby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH reduces visceral adipose tissue (VAT volume in HIV-infected patients but can worsen glucose homeostasis and lipoatrophy. We aimed to determine if adding rosiglitazone to rhGH would abrogate the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity (SI and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT volume. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial using a 2×2 factorial design in which HIV-infected subjects with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance were randomized to rhGH 3 mg daily, rosiglitazone 4 mg twice daily, combination rhGH + rosiglitazone, or double placebo (control for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in SI by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test from entry to week 12. Body composition was assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and dual Xray absorptiometry (DEXA. Seventy-seven subjects were randomized of whom 72 initiated study drugs. Change in SI from entry to week 12 differed across the 4 arms by 1-way ANCOVA (P = 0.02; by pair-wise comparisons, only rhGH (decreasing SI; P = 0.03 differed significantly from control. Changes from entry to week 12 in fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve on 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test differed across arms (1-way ANCOVA P = 0.004, increasing in the rhGH arm relative to control. VAT decreased significantly in the rhGH arms (-17.5% in rhGH/rosiglitazone and -22.7% in rhGH but not in the rosiglitazone alone (-2.5% or control arms (-1.9%. SAT did not change significantly in any arm. DEXA results were consistent with the MRI data. There was no significant rhGH x rosiglitazone interaction for any body composition parameter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The addition of rosiglitazone abrogated the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance while not significantly modifying the lowering effect of rhGH on VAT. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  8. Combined human growth hormone and lactulose for prevention and treatment of multiple organ dysfunction in patients with severe chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Guo Ding; Jing Shan; Bin Zhang; Hong-Bo Ma; Li Zhou; Rui Jin; Yu-Fen Tan; Li-Xiang He

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficiency and safety of combined recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and lactulose for treatment and/or prevention of multiple organ dysfunction in patients with chronic severe hepatitis B. METHODS: Forty-eight inpatients with chronic severe hepatitis B were randomly divided into rhGH group (n = 28)and control group (n = 20). In rhGH group, 4-4.5 IU of rhGH was injected intramuscularly once daily for 2-4 wk,and 100 mL of enema containing 30 mL of lactulose, 2 g of metronidazole and 0.9% saline was administered every 2 d for 2-4 wk. Their symptoms and complications were noted. Liver and kidney functions were analyzed by an Olympus analyzer. Serum GH, IGF-1, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 were measured by ELISA.RESULTS: Clinical symptoms of 90% of these patients in rhGH group were obviously improved. The total effectiveness in rhGH group was better than that in control group (75% vs40%, P<0.05). After 2- and 4-wk treatment of rhGH respectively, serum albumin (26.1±4.1 vs 30.2±5.3,31.9±5.1 g/L), prealbumin (79.6±28.0 vs 106.6±54.4,108.4±55.0 g/L), cholesterol (76.3±16.7 vs 85.6±32.3,96.1±38.7 mg/dL), and IGFBP1 (56.8±47.2 vs 89.7±50.3ng/mL after 2 wk) were significantly increased compared to control group (P<0.05). However, serum GH was decreased. The increase of serum IGF1 and IGFBP3 after rhGH treatment was also observed.CONCLUSION: rhGH in combination with lactulose may be beneficial to the prevention and treatment of multiple organ dysfunction in patients with chronic severe hepatitis.

  9. Recombinant human growth hormone secreted from tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle improves left ventricular function in rat with acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Shu-ling; WANG Yong-jin; WANG Xiao-lin; LU Yong-xin; CHANG Chao; WANG Feng-zhi; LIU Qi-yun; LIU Xiang-yang; GAO Yan-zhang; MI Shao-hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Experimental studies and preliminary clinical studies have suggested that growth hormone (GH) treatment may improve cardiovascular parameters in chronic heart failure (CHF). Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been delivered by a recombinant protein, by plasmid DNA, and by genetically engineered cells with different pharmacokinetic and physiological properties. The present study aimed to examine a new method for delivery of rhGH using genetically modified bioartificial muscles (BAMs), and investigate whether the rhGH delivered by this technique improves left ventricular (LV) function in rats with CHF.Methods Primary skeletal myoblasts were isolated from several Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, cultured, purified, and retrovirally transduced to synthesize and secrete human rhGH, and tissue-engineered into implantable BAMs. Ligation of the left coronary artery or sham operation was performed. The rats that underwent ligation were randomly assigned to 2 groups: CHF control group (n=6) and CHF treatment group (n=6). The CHF control group received non-rhGH-secreting BAM (GFP-BAMs) transplantation, and the CHF treatment group received rhGH-secreting BAM (GH-BAMs) transplantation. Another group of rats served as the sham operation group, which was also randomly assigned to 2 subgroups: sham control group (n=6) and sham treatment group (n=6). The sham control group underwent GFP-BAM transplantation, and the sham treatment group underwent GH-BAM transplantation. GH-BAMs and GFP-BAMs were implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic rats with ligaUon of the left coronary artery or sham operation was performed. Eight weeks after the treatment,echocardiography was performed, hGH, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and TNF-a levels in rat serum were measured by radioimmunoassay and ELISA, and then the rats were killed and ventricular samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry. Results Primary rat myoblasts were retrovirally transduced to secrete rhGH and tissue-engineered into

  10. No Improvement of Adult Height in Non-growth Hormone (GH) Deficient Short Children with GH Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Yokoya, Susumu; Shimatsu, Akira; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Tanizawa, Takakuni; Teramoto, Akira; Nagai, Toshiro; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hanew, Kunihiko; Fujita, Keinosuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Takada, Goro

    2006-01-01

    It is still in doubt whether the standard-dose growth hormone (GH) used in Japan (0.5 IU/kg/week, 0.167 mg/kg/week) for growth hormone deficiency is effective for achieving significant adult height improvement in non-growth hormone deficient (non-GHD) short children. We compared the growth of GH-treated non-GHD short children with that of untreated short children to examine the effect of standard-dose GH treatment on non-GHD short children. GH treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (...

  11. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  12. Adult growth hormone deficiency: academic extravagance or real clinical entity for the internist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Scanelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Growth Hormone (GH continues to act lifelong: it has been described, in fact, an Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency (AGHD syndrome, involving several organs and functions, whose clinical aspects greatly improve with the administration of human recombinant GH. The authors describe, evaluating the most recent data from the literature, the clinical picture, the pathophysiologic mechanisms, the diagnostic tools and the therapy of AGHD.

  13. Regulation of a metallothionein-growth hormone hybrid gene in bovine papilloma virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlakis, G N; Hamer, D H

    1983-01-01

    We have constructed bovine papilloma virus recombinants carrying a hybrid gene in which human growth hormone structural sequences are fused to the promoter and presumptive control region of the mouse metallothionein-I gene. Mouse cells transformed with the recombinants synthesize metallothionein-growth hormone hybrid mRNA with the same 5' end as metallothionein mRNA. Hybrid mRNA is inducible by cadmium but not by dexamethasone, whereas the chromosomal metallothionein genes in the same cells a...

  14. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 Enhances the Growth Hormone Receptor Expression in Tendon Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon.

  15. Acute effects of growth hormone on metabolism of pancreatic hormones, glucose and ketone bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Y; Peña, J; Chou, J; Field, J B

    2001-07-01

    Controversy exists as to whether acute administration of growth hormone has insulin-like effects. In conscious dogs, acute effects on plasma flows, plasma glucose, hepatic glucose output, free fatty acids, ketone bodies, insulin, and glucagon were determined following intravenous injection of 1 mg of growth hormone extracted from the canine pituitary gland. The following results were obtained: (1) Plasma flows in the portal vein, hepatic artery and hepatic vein were significantly increased 20 min after growth hormone administration. (2) By 40 min after growth hormone, the glucose concentration in these three vessels was significantly increased. (3) Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased 60 min after growth hormone administration. (4) Free fatty acids levels were significantly but transiently increased at 20 min, while ketone body concentrations were elevated at 120-180 min. (5) The insulin levels in the three vessels demonstrated a biphasic response. In the portal vein, they were significantly higher 20 min after growth hormone and again at 150-180 min. Glucagon concentrations were increased in all three vessels by 20 min and remained elevated for the remainder of the experiment. These results do not support an acute insulin-like action of growth hormone in normal dogs.

  16. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Höybye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope. Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  17. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Gilfoyle, David; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Mortensen, Eva; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  18. Effects of octreotide on insulin-like growth factor I and metabolic indices in growth hormone-treated growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Ørskov, Hans;

    1993-01-01

    Abstract Animals studies have demonstrated that in addition to inhibiting growth hormone (GH) secretion octreotide inhibits in a direct manner hepatic or peripheral insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation. To test this hypothesis in humans we studied ten GH-deficient patients with frequent.......5 +/- 1.47 (octreotide) and 12.8 +/- 1.42 (placebo) (p = 0.83), and Tmax (h) was 6.1 +/- 0.97 (octreotide) and 5.2 +/- 0.65 (placebo) (p = 0.49). Growth hormone administration was associated with an increase in serum IGF-I (microgram/l), which was identical during the two studies, from 85.3 +/- 19...

  19. Growth hormone reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-de-Segura, I.A.; Miguel, E. de [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Experimental Surgery; Prieto, I. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of General and Digestive Surgery; Grande, A.G. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Oncology Radiotherapy; Garcia, P.; Mendez, J. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry; Guerra, A. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-09-01

    Growth hormone stimulates the growth of intestinal mucosa and may reduce the severity of injury caused by radiation. Male Wistar rats underwent abdominal irradiation (12 Gy) and were treated with either human growth hormone (hGH) or saline, and sacrificed at day 4 or 7 post-irradiation. Bacterial translocation, and the ileal mucosal thickness, proliferation, and disaccharidase activity were assessed. Mortality was 65% in irradiated animals, whereas hGH caused a decrement (29%, p<0.05). Bacterial translocation was also reduced by hGH (p<0.05). Treating irradiated rats with hGH prevented body weight loss (p<0.05). Mucosal thickness increased faster in irradiated hGH-treated animals. The proliferative index showed an increment in hGH-treated animals (p<0.05). Giving hGH to irradiated rats prevented decrease in sucrose activity, and increment in lactase activity. In conclusion, giving hGH to irradiated rats promotes the adaptative process of the intestine and acute radiation-related negative effects, including mortality, bacterial translocation, and weight loss. (orig.)

  20. Effects of growth hormone in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloia, J F; Zanzi, I; Ellis, K; Jowsey, J; Roginsky, M; Wallach, S; Cohn, S H

    1976-11-01

    The effect of chronic administration of growth hormone (GH) to osteoporotic patients was studied using the techniques of total body neutron activation analysis, whole body counting, calcium tracer kinetics, photon absorptiometry, quantitative microradiography, and urinary hydroxyproline. Two dosage schedules were utilized for six months each: 2 units daily and 0.2 w3/4 units of GH daily (where W represents body weight expressed in kg). The lower dosage (2 units) did not produce any appreciable change in the indices studied. Following the higher dose, no evidence of any anabolic effect was apparent in most patients (i.e., no increase in total body levels of Ca, Na, K, P, or Cl). Increases were noted in the urinary calcium excretion rate and in the urinary hydroxyproline excretion. Bone mineral content decreased. The bone biopsies displayed an increase in bone formation and resorption surfaces in response to treatment, but these changes were not statistically significant. It may be concluded that under the conditions of this study, GH administration did not result in an increment in skeletal mass. Several side effects that are characteristic of acromegaly were observed, including hyperglycemia, hypertension, arthralgia, and the carpal tunnel syndrome. Because of the lack of demonstrated benefit and the associated complications of therapy, GH administration does not appear to be of value in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  1. Effects of growth hormone in osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloia, J.F. (Nassau County Medical Center, East Meadow, NY); Zanzi, I.; Ellis, K.; Jowsey, J.; Roginsky, M.; Wallach, S.; Cohn, S.H.

    1976-11-01

    The effect of chronic administration of growth hormone (GH) to osteoporotic patients was studied using the techniques of total body neutron activation analysis, whole body counting, calcium tracer kinetics, photon absorptiometry, quantitative microradiography, and urinary hydroxyproline. Two dosage schedules were utilized for six months each: 2 units daily and 0.2 W/sup 3///sup 4/ units of GH daily (where W represents body weight expressed in kg). The lower dosage (2 units) did not produce any appreciable change in the indices studied. Following the higher dose, no evidence of any anabolic effect was apparent in most patients (i.e., no increase in total body levels of Ca, Na, K, P, or Cl). Increases were noted in the urinary calcium excretion rate and in the urinary hydroxyproline excretion. Bone mineral content decreased. The bone biopsies displayed an increase in bone formation and resorption surfaces in response to treatment, but these changes were not statistically significant. It may be concluded that under the conditions of this study, GH administration did not result in an increment in skeletal mass. Several side effects that are characteristic of acromegaly were observed, including hyperglycemia, hypertension, arthralgia, and the carpal tunnel syndrome. Because of the lack of demonstrated benefit and the associated complications of therapy, GH administration does not appear to be of value in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. Genetic disorders in the growth hormone - IGF-I Axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Maria Josephina Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Growth is a complex process, regulated by multiple external and internal factors. Deviation from the normal growth pattern can be one of the first manifestations of an underlying disorder, disrupting the normal growth process. The growth hormone – IGF-I axis plays a key role in regulating this growt

  3. Growth hormone does not stimulate early healing in rat tendons

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Growth Hormone stimulates bone growth and fracture repair. It acts mainly by increasing the systemic levels of IGF-1. Local treatment with IGF-1 appears to stimulate tendon healing. We therefore hypothesized that systemic treatment with Growth Hormone would also stimulate tendon healing. Rat Achilles tendons were transected and left to heal. 4 groups were studied. Intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (Botox) were used to reduce loading in 2 groups. The animals were randomized to twic...

  4. Ontogeny of pituitary growth hormone and growth hormone mRNA in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Levorse, L M; Radecki, S V; Donoghue, D J; Malamed, S; Foster, D N; Scanes, C G

    1993-01-01

    The changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels have been determined by Northern blot analysis and laser densitometry during embryonic development and posthatch growth of white Leghorn cockerels. Pituitary GH mRNA levels were observed to progressively increase between 18 days of embryonic development to a maximum at 4 weeks of age (posthatch). Subsequently, pituitary GH mRNA levels declined between 4 and 8 weeks of age, and between 12 weeks of age and adulthood. Pituitary GH contents showed increases during embryonic development and posthatch growth that paralleled the rise in GH mRNA. The decline in pituitary GH mRNA levels between 4 weeks of age and adulthood occurs when GH secretion has been observed previously to decline.

  5. Effect of acute and regular exercise on growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a expression in human lymphocytes, T cell subpopulation and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Hayashida, Harumi; Clark, Megan; Coombs, Charlotte; Miller, Sean; Stensel, David J

    2014-07-01

    The orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin exerts potent inhibitory effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release via the growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHS-R1a) on T cells and monocytes. As such, ghrelin is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, but these effects depend on the availability of GHS-R1a. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of acute exercise on GHS-R1a expression on circulating CD14+ monocytes, total lymphocytes and CD3+ T cells. Nine male club-standard cyclists cycled for 1h at 75% V̇O2peak (EX) or rested (REST) in a randomised cross-over design. Compared with the equivalent times in REST, the concentration of circulating GHS-R1a+ lymphocytes and monocytes was higher in EX at immediately and 1 and 2h post-exercise (all pexercise only (258 (203)cellsμl(-1) vs. 62 (42)cellsμl(-1), pexercise. Given that the anti-inflammatory effects of ghrelin depend on the availability of GHS-R1a, the preferential recruitment of subpopulations with high anti-inflammatory potential found here add a novel aspect to the potential mechanisms by which exercise acts to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine levels.

  6. Growth hormone, insulin and aging: the benefits of endocrine defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartke, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Longevity of mice can be increased by spontaneous or experimentally induced mutations that interfere with the biosynthesis or actions of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), or insulin in the adipose tissue. The effects of GH resistance and deficiency of GH (along with thyrotropin and prolactin) on aging and lifespan are the most pronounced and best established of these mutations. Potential mechanisms linking these endocrine deficits with delayed aging and extended longevity include increased stress resistance, alterations in insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and metabolic adjustments. Physiological relationships deduced from the extreme phenotypes of long-lived mouse mutants appear to apply broadly, encompassing genetically normal ("wild-type") mice and other mammalian species. The role of GH in the control of human aging continues to be hotly debated, but recent data indicate that reduced somatotropic signaling provides protection from cancer and other age-related diseases and may promote old age survival.

  7. Epiphyseal growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling is decreased in chronic kidney disease-related growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troib, Ariel; Landau, Daniel; Kachko, Leonid; Rabkin, Ralph; Segev, Yael

    2013-11-01

    Linear growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been ascribed to insensitivity to growth hormone. This resistance state has been attributed to impaired growth hormone signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in liver and skeletal muscle leading to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Here we determine whether systemic and growth plate alterations in growth hormone signaling contribute to CKD-induced linear growth retardation using partially nephrectomized and pair-fed control 20-day-old rats. Serum growth hormone did not change in rats with CKD, yet serum IGF-I levels were decreased and growth retarded. The tibial growth plate hypertrophic zone was wider and vascularization at the primary ossification center was reduced in CKD. This was associated with a decrease in growth plate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and immunostainable VEGF and IGF-I levels. Growth plate growth hormone receptor and STAT5 protein levels were unchanged, while JAK2 was reduced. Despite comparable growth hormone and growth hormone receptor levels in CKD and control rats, relative STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly depressed in CKD. Of note, the mRNA of SOCS2, an inhibitor of growth hormone signaling, was increased. Thus, linear growth impairment in CKD can in part be explained by impaired long bone growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, an abnormality that may be caused by an increase in SOCS2 expression.

  8. A comparison of different definitions of growth response in short prepubertal children treated with growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, P; Bjerknes, R; Dahlgren, J

    2011-01-01

    How to define poor growth response in the management of short growth hormone (GH)-treated children is controversial. Aim: Assess various criteria of poor response.......How to define poor growth response in the management of short growth hormone (GH)-treated children is controversial. Aim: Assess various criteria of poor response....

  9. An enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone - Applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Marianne A.; Hymer, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone (GH) is described and its use in the detection of GH variants is demonstrated. In the present assay, soluble GH and GH adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-GH antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-GH complex is detected and quantified using goat antimonkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. It is noted that the assay can be performed in 27 hours and that sensitivities in the range of 0.19 to 25 ng can be obtained in the region of 10 to 90 percent binding.

  10. Clinical study on effect of gene recombination human growth hormone with differentthe form of a drug on growth hormone deficiency dwarfish children%两种不同剂型基因重组人生长激素治疗生长激素缺乏性矮小的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志鸿; 沈伊娜; 胡茂庆

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察基因重组人生长激素(rhGH)水剂与粉剂治疗生长激素缺乏性矮小的效果.方法 将36例生长激素缺乏性矮小儿童随机分为A、B两组,分别采用rhGH水剂与粉剂治疗6个月,比较其治疗前后的年生长速率和青春期发育情况,及不良反应的发生率.结果 经rhGH治疗,A、B两组生长激素缺乏性矮小儿童的年生长速率均明显的提高,身高年龄的增长明显快于生活年龄和骨龄的增长,A、B两组组间比较无统计学差异(P>0.05),没有明显青春期加速的现象.A、B两组胰岛素样生长因子-1 (IGF-1)及其结合蛋白-3(IGFBP-3)含量,与治疗前相比差异有显著性(P<0.01);但两组组间比较无统计学差异(P>0.05).结论 两种剂型rhGH均可显著改善生长激素缺乏性矮小儿童的身高,且青春期、骨龄均不提前.但粉刺治疗费用低于水剂,更易临床推广.%Objective: To understand the effect of gene recombination human growth hormone ( rhGH) of liquid and powder on growth hormone deficiency dwarfish children. Methods; 36 growth hormone deficiency dwarfish children were assigned into group (18) A or group (18) B. Two group were treated by rhGH for 6 months, the growth velocity per year and puberty development before and after treatment were compared, Observation of adverse reaction rate. Results: After treatment, the growth velocity and predicting final height of growth hormone deficiency dwarfish children increased significantly, the height age increased faster than life age and bone age, no puberty acceleration occurred; There were no differences between the two groups, the serum insulin - like growth factor 1 (IGF - 1), and serum insulin - like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP - 3) levels of GHD before and after treatment were compared with a significant difference (P <0. 01); but there were no differences between the two groups. Conclusion; Two form of rhGH can improve the height of dwarfish children

  11. Ghrelin and the growth hormone secretagogue receptor in growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanoine, J-P; De Waele, K; Walia, P

    2009-04-01

    The pancreas is a major source of ghrelin in the perinatal period, whereas gastric production progressively increases after birth. Loss of function of the genes for ghrelin or for the constitutively activated growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) does not affect birth weight and early postnatal growth. However, ghrl(-/-) or ghsr(-/-) mice fed a high fat diet starting soon after weaning are resistant to diet-induced obesity, suggesting that ghrelin affects the maturation of the metabolic axes involved in energy balance. In addition, animal and human studies suggest that GHSR plays a physiological role in linear growth. In mice, absence of the GHSR gene is associated with lower insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations and lower body mass in adult animals, independently of food intake. In humans, a mutation of the GHSR gene that impairs the constitutive activity of the receptor was found in two families with short stature. Administration of acylated ghrelin to rat pups directly does not affect weight gain. In contrast, administration of ghrelin to pregnant or lactating rats results in greater fetal weight and postnatal weight gain, respectively, suggesting that maternal ghrelin may stimulate perinatal growth. These data point toward a physiological role for ghrelin and GHSR in growth and/or in the maturation of hormonal systems involved in the regulation of energy balance.

  12. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  13. Concomitant occurrence of Turner syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jung; Shin, Ha Young; Lee, Chong Guk; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder in phenotypic females that has characteristic physical features and presents as partial or complete absence of the second sex chromosome. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a condition caused by insufficient release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. The concomitant occurrence of TS and GHD is rare and has not yet been reported in Korea. Here we report 2 cases of TS and GHD. In case 1, GHD was initially diagnosed. Karyotyping was performed because of the presence of the typical phenotype and poor response to growth hormone therapy, which revealed 45,X/45,X+mar. The patient showed increased growth velocity after the growth hormone dose was increased. In case 2, a growth hormone provocation test and chromosomal analysis were performed simultaneously because of decreased growth velocity and the typical TS phenotype, which showed GHD and a mosaic karyotype of 45,X/46,XX. The patient showed spontaneous pubertal development. In female patients with short stature, it is important to perform a throughout physical examination and test for hormonal and chromosomal abnormalities because diagnostic accuracy is important for treatment and prognosis.

  14. The history of doping and growth hormone abuse in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Richard I G; Erotokritou-Mulligan, Ioulietta; Sönksen, Peter H

    2009-08-01

    The earliest records of doping in sport come from the Ancient Olympics games when athletes are reported to have taken figs to improve their performance. With the advent of modern pharmacology in the 19th century, many athletes began to experiment with cocktails of drugs to improve strength and overcome fatigue. As this practice was not illegal, there are good records of the lengths athletes would go to in order to win. Alongside the benefits, came the dangers and following several fatalities, a code to ban performance enhancing drugs was gradually developed. Growth hormone was first isolated from the human pituitary gland in the 1950s. Its anabolic effects were soon recognised and athletes had begun to abuse it by the early 1980s, at least a decade before it was used therapeutically by adult endocrinologists. A number of high profile athletes have admitted using growth hormone. Detection of its abuse has been challenging and the lack of an effective test has undoubtedly encouraged its abuse. Only now are methodologies being developed that should stem this tide.

  15. Growth hormone response to feeding in term and preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, T E; Lucas, A; Bloom, S R; Aynsley-Green, A

    1983-03-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations were measured in 248 healthy term and preterm infants. At birth growth hormone concentrations in cord blood from both term and preterm babies were approximately 100-fold higher than those in blood drawn from healthy adults. By the sixth postnatal day basal pre-feed levels had fallen in term neonates by 65% and a marked postprandial rise was apparent; preterm infants did not show this initial fall in preprandial hormone levels nor was any response to feeding seen. However a fall in preprandial concentrations accompanied by the development of postprandial surges in growth hormone occurred during the next 2 weeks so that by 24 days the postprandial rise was similar to that of term neonates on the sixth day. We conclude that although the initial postnatal changes in plasma growth hormone concentrations are different in preterm and term infants, feeding is a major stimulus to growth hormone secretion in both groups of neonates. Further work is needed to define the precise role of this hormone in neonatal metabolic adaptation.

  16. Real-time growth kinetics measuring hormone mimicry for ToxCast chemicals in T-47D human ductal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Dix, David J; Houck, Keith A; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Richard, Ann M; Sipes, Nisha S; Abassi, Yama A; Jin, Can; Stampfl, Melinda; Judson, Richard S

    2013-07-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays capable of profiling thousands of environmentally relevant chemicals for in vitro biological activity provide useful information on the potential for disrupting endocrine pathways. Disruption of the estrogen signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including impaired development, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. The estrogen-responsive human mammary ductal carcinoma cell line T-47D was exposed to 1815 ToxCast chemicals comprising pesticides, industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, cosmetics, food ingredients, and other chemicals with known or suspected human exposure potential. Cell growth kinetics were evaluated using real-time cell electronic sensing. T-47D cells were exposed to eight concentrations (0.006-100 μM), and measurements of cellular impedance were repeatedly recorded for 105 h. Chemical effects were evaluated based on potency (concentration at which response occurs) and efficacy (extent of response). A linear growth response was observed in response to prototypical estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genistein, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol A and genistein, induced cell growth comparable in efficacy to that of 17β-estradiol, but with decreased potency. Progestins, androgens, and corticosteroids invoked a biphasic growth response indicative of changes in cell number or cell morphology. Results from this cell growth assay were compared with results from additional estrogen receptor (ER) binding and transactivation assays. Chemicals detected as active in both the cell growth and ER receptor binding assays demonstrated potencies highly correlated with two ER transactivation assays (r = 0.72; r = 0.70). While ER binding assays detected chemicals that were highly potent or efficacious in the T-47D cell growth and transactivation assays, the binding assays lacked sensitivity in detecting

  17. EFFECTS OF GROWTH MEDIA AND HORMONES ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    growth media and hormonal concentration on the sprouting and rooting of M. acuminata ... cuttings with the aid of artificial stimulation with ... obtained from M. acuminata plants raised in the ... the cuttings and allow the penetration of light into.

  18. Skin morphological changes in growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Merete Wolder; Thulesen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the histomorphology of skin and its appendages, especially eccrine sweat glands, in patients with GH disorders, because reduced sweating ability in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with increased risk of hyperthermia under stressed conditions....

  19. A model of human sleep-related growth hormone secretion in dogs: effects of 3, 6, and 12 hours of forced wakefulness on plasma growth hormone, cortisol, and sleep stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Ebihara, S; Nakamura, Y; Takahashi, K

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-four canine GH (cGH) and cortisol secretion patterns associated with sleep stages were studied in 10 male adult dogs. Plasma samples were obtained at 30- or 15-min intervals via an indwelling catheter. Under baseline conditions, all dogs showed irregular polyphasic sleep, and the episodic cGH secretion had no apparent relationship with sleep or the light-dark cycle. Five dogs were subjected to regular sleep-wake cycles; 3, 6, and 12 h of forced wakefulness (FW) were repeated at 3-, 6-, and 12-h intervals (recovery sleep periods), respectively. Peak cGH secretion (mean +/- SD, 6.4 ng/ml +/- 2.4) occurred soon after recovery sleep onset in 25 of 40 total recovery periods. The incidence of sleep-onset cGH peaks and cGH secretion during the first hour of recovery sleep significantly increased with the length of the preceding FW, but were not affected by the time of day. Delta wave sleep increased during this hour, suggesting a possible correlation with the sleep-onset cGH peak. During the first 3 h of recovery after 6 and 12 h of FW, cGH secretion was significantly enhanced, but cortisol was not. Considering the characteristics of human sleep-related GH secretion, we suggest that this peak cGH secretion represents a model of human GH secretion. Possibly, a close association of cGH secretion with sleep is concealed under the baseline condition and uncovered by inducing longer sleep-wake cycles in dogs. No circadian cortisol variation was detected under the baseline or the experimental conditions.

  20. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates cAMP release in superfused rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, J E; Groot, K. de; Schally, A V

    1995-01-01

    The release of growth hormone (GH) and cAMP was studied in superfused rat pituitary cells by infusing growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) at different doses or a combination of GHRH and somatostatin 14 (SS-14). Three-minute pulses of GHRH caused a dose-dependent GH and cAMP release (effective concentration of 50% of the maximal biological effect is 0.21 nM and 52.5 nM, respectively). The lowest effective doses of GHRH in the superfusion system were 0.03 nM for GH release and 0.3 nM for cA...

  1. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic effects of growth hormone injected subcutaneously in growth hormone deficient patients: thich versus abdomen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    1994-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: The absorption of insulin following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is faster in the abdomen than the thigh. We therefore studied the effect of changing the site of injection on the absorption and metabolic effects of human growth hormone. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: In a cross......-over study human GH (Norditropin) was injected s.c. in the thigh or abdomen in random order. Ultrasonography of the thigh and abdomen was performed in order to evaluate the thickness of the s.c. tissue. After each treatment period (4 weeks), serum profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1.......c. tissue (mm) was higher on the abdominal site (9.35 +/- 1.38 (thigh), and 22.61 +/- 2.19 (abdomen), P abdomen) (P = 0.91). AUC (m...

  2. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic effects of growth hormone injected subcutaneously in growth hormone deficient patients: thich versus abdomen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    1994-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: The absorption of insulin following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is faster in the abdomen than the thigh. We therefore studied the effect of changing the site of injection on the absorption and metabolic effects of human growth hormone. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: In a cross......-over study human GH (Norditropin) was injected s.c. in the thigh or abdomen in random order. Ultrasonography of the thigh and abdomen was performed in order to evaluate the thickness of the s.c. tissue. After each treatment period (4 weeks), serum profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1.......c. tissue (mm) was higher on the abdominal site (9.35 +/- 1.38 (thigh), and 22.61 +/- 2.19 (abdomen), P abdomen) (P = 0.91). AUC (m...

  3. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, M.A.; Argente, J.; Chernausek, S; Gracia, R.; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Hopp, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Rosenbloom, A; Toledo,S.P.; Francke, U.

    1993-01-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), we analyzed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. We amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We identified a single GHR g...

  4. Neuroprotective Actions of Ghrelin and Growth Hormone Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frago, Laura M.; Baquedano, Eva; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, growth hormone secretagogues–GH secretagogue-receptor, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety, and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved. PMID:21994488

  5. Growth hormone treatment in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and glucocorticoid-induced growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Meilan M; Collins, James; Rose, Susan R; Woo, Jessica G; Sucharew, Heidi; Sawnani, Hemant; Hor, Kan N; Cripe, Linda H; Wong, Brenda L

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated efficacy and safety of growth hormone treatment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy boys with glucocorticoid-induced growth failure. We reviewed 39 consecutive boys (average age 11.5 years; 32 ambulatory) treated with growth hormone for 1 year during a four-year period. Boys were on long-term daily deflazacort or prednisone (mean duration 5 ± 2.2 years; dosing regimen prednisone 0.75 mg/kg/day equivalent). Primary outcomes were growth velocity and height-for-age z-scores (height SD) at 1 year. Height velocity increased from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 5.2 ± 0.4 cm/year on growth hormone (pgrowth hormone decline in height SD (-0.5 ± 0.2SD/year) stabilized at height SD -2.9 ± 0.2 on growth hormone (pgrowth hormone and 2.6 ± 0.7 kg/year at 1 year. Motor function decline was similar pre-growth hormone and at 1 year. Cardiopulmonary function was unchanged. Three experienced side effects. In this first comprehensive report of growth hormone in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, growth hormone improved growth at 1 year, without detrimental effects observed on neuromuscular and cardiopulmonary function.

  6. Health-related quality of life of young adults with Turner syndrome following a long-term randomized controlled trial of recombinant human growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Vliet Guy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited long-term randomized controlled trials of growth hormone (GH supplementation to adult height and few published reports of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL following treatment. The present follow-up study of young adults from a long-term controlled trial of GH treatment in patients with Turner syndrome (TS yielded data to examine whether GH supplementation resulted in a higher HRQOL (either due to taller stature or from the knowledge that active treatment and not placebo had been received or alternatively a lower HRQOL (due to medicalization from years of injections. Methods The original trial randomized 154 Canadian girls with TS aged 7-13 years from 13 centres to receive either long-term GH injections at the pharmacologic dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week or to receive no injections; estrogen prescription for induction of puberty was standardized. Patients were eligible for the follow-up study if they were at least 16 years old at the time of follow-up. The instrument used to study HRQOL was the SF-36, summarized into physical and mental component scales (PCS and MCS; higher scores indicate better HRQOL. Results Thirty-four of the 48 eligible participants (71% consented to participate; data were missing for one patient. Both groups (GH and no treatment had normal HRQOL at this post-treatment assessment. The GH group had a (mean ± SD PCS score of 56 ± 5; the untreated group 58 ± 4; mean score for 16-24 year old females in the general population 53.5 ± 6.9. The GH group had a mean MCS score of 52 ± 6; the untreated group 49 ± 13; mean score for 16-24 year old females in the general population 49.6 ± 9.8. Secondary analyses showed no relationship between HRQOL and height. Conclusions We found no benefit or adverse effect on HRQOL either from receiving or not receiving growth hormone injections in a long-term randomized controlled trial, confirming larger observational studies. We suggest that it remains

  7. A controlled study on serum insulin-like growth factor-I and urinary excretion of growth hormone in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Main, K; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1995-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that secretory deficiencies of growth hormone may play a pathophysiological role in fibromyalgia (FM). Our objective was thus to evaluate the secretion of growth hormone in FM.......It has been hypothesized that secretory deficiencies of growth hormone may play a pathophysiological role in fibromyalgia (FM). Our objective was thus to evaluate the secretion of growth hormone in FM....

  8. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  9. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age...

  10. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M

    2013-01-01

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore......, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life......, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels....

  11. Predictors of Insulin Like Growth Factor-I responses to Growth Hormone replacement in young adults with Growth Hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Thankamony, Ajay; Capalbo, Donatella; Jonsson, Peter J.; Simpson, Helen L.; Dunger, David B.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by Karger Publishers. Background/Aims: Physiological growth hormone (GH) secretion and IGF-I levels are greater in young compared to older adults. We evaluated IGF-I levels and predictors of IGF-I responses in young adults on GH replacement. Design: From KIMS database, 310 young adults (age, 15 26 years) with the severe GH deficiency related to childhood-onset disease, and commenced ...

  12. Primary growth hormone insensitivity (Laron syndrome) and acquired hypothyroidism: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Corneli Ginevra; Aimaretti Gianluca; Curtò Lorenzo; Santarpia Libero; Cotta Oana R; Trimarchi Francesco; Cannavò Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Primary growth hormone resistance or growth hormone insensitivity syndrome, also known as Laron syndrome, is a hereditary disease caused by deletions or different types of mutations in the growth hormone receptor gene or by post-receptor defects. This disorder is characterized by a clinical appearance of severe growth hormone deficiency with high levels of circulating growth hormone in contrast to low serum insulin-like growth factor 1 values. Case presentation We report...

  13. Growth hormone secretion in Turner's syndrome and influence of oxandrolone and ethinyl oestradiol.

    OpenAIRE

    Massarano, A A; Brook, C G; Hindmarsh, P C; Pringle, P J; Teale, J D; Stanhope, R; Preece, M A

    1989-01-01

    We investigated 24 hour growth hormone secretion by intermittent 20 minute blood sampling in 34 prepubertal patients with Turner's syndrome, aged 4.3-12.4 years. Growth hormone profiles were analysed by the PULSAR programme and results expressed as the sum of growth hormone pulse amplitudes. Six patients had abnormal growth hormone pulse frequencies. In the remaining 28, growth hormone pulse amplitudes declined significantly with increasing age, but there was no correlation between growth hor...

  14. Response to three years of growth hormone therapy in girls with Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Kyu; Lee, Hae Sang; Ko, Jung Hee; Hwang, Il Tae

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Short stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Improving the final adult height in these patients is a challenge both for the patients and physicians. We investigated the clinical response of patients to growth hormone treatment for height improvement over the period of three years. Methods Review of medical records from 27 patients with Turner syndrome treated with recombinant human growth hormone for more than 3 years was done. Differences in the changes of height standard deviation scores according to karyotype were measured and factors influencing the height changes were analyzed. Results The response to recombinant human growth hormone was an increase in the height of the subjects to a mean value of 1.1 standard deviation for subjects with Turner syndrome at the end of the 3-year treatment. The height increment in the first year was highest. The height standard deviation score in the third year was negatively correlated with the age at the beginning of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment. Different karyotypes in subjects did not seem to affect the height changes. Conclusion Early growth hormone administration in subjects with Turner syndrome is helpful to improve height response to the treatment. PMID:24904845

  15. Investigations on hormone dependency of human mammary carcinomas transplanted into nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1981-01-01

    Since human mammary cancer can be transplanted into nude mice, this makes possible the in vivo study of relations between hormone dependency and the steroid hormone receptor content of the tumors. The macroscopic growth curve of the transplanted tumors during endocrine therapy will reflect the ho...

  16. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Leão Ignacio

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1 activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60% in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  17. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of solid recombinant bovine growth hormone and related growth hormone analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamann, Thomas J.; Chao, Robert S.

    1999-09-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra have been obtained for lyophilized recombinant bovine growth hormone (r-bGH), partially reduced, and completely reduced r-bGH, plus a tryptic digest fragment of r-bGH. Amide I and II data indicate r-bGH to have substantial helical character. Partially reduced r-bGH, in which the carboxyl terminal disulfide bridge (residues 181, 189) has been cleaved, has slightly less helical content than r-bGH. The spectral data indicate that breaking the carboxyl terminal cystine link produces only localized structural alterations. The additional cleavage of the second disulfide bridge (residues 53 164) leads to a further decrease in helix content, accompanied by increases in β-sheet and disordered structures. A tryptic digest r-bGH fragment (residues 96-133), which contains a small amount of biological activity (≈10%), has predominantly helical structure.

  19. Adult growth hormone deficiency – benefits, side effects, and risks of growth hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lim Reed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of growth hormone (GH in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD; beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality.

  20. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  1. Resistance to growth hormone releasing hormone and gonadotropins in Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteo-dystrophy (AHO). Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action (pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia [PHP-Ia), recent studies have provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad and pituitary. Accordingly, patients with PHP-Ia display variable degrees of resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone (GHRH). Although the incidence and the clinical and biochemical characteristics of PTH and TSH resistance have been widely investigated and described, the cause and significance of the reproductive dysfunction in AHO is still poorly understood. The clinical finding of alterations of GH secretion in these patients was described for the first time only 2 years ago. The present report briefly reviews the literature focusing on the actual knowledge about these last two subjects.

  2. Impact of Growth Hormone on Regulation of Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troike, Katie M; Henry, Brooke E; Jensen, Elizabeth A; Young, Jonathan A; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2017-06-18

    Increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related conditions worldwide has necessitated a more thorough understanding of adipose tissue (AT) and expanded the scope of research in this field. AT is now understood to be far more complex and dynamic than previously thought, which has also fueled research to reevaluate how hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), alter the tissue. In this review, we will introduce properties of AT important for understanding how GH alters the tissue, such as anatomical location of depots and adipokine output. We will provide an overview of GH structure and function and define several human conditions and cognate mouse lines with extremes in GH action that have helped shape our understanding of GH and AT. A detailed discussion of the GH/AT relationship will be included that addresses adipokine production, immune cell populations, lipid metabolism, senescence, differentiation, and fibrosis, as well as brown AT and beiging of white AT. A brief overview of how GH levels are altered in an obese state, and the efficacy of GH as a therapeutic option to manage obesity will be given. As we will reveal, the effects of GH on AT are numerous, dynamic and depot-dependent. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:819-840, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Effects of low-dose recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I on insulin sensitivity, growth hormone and glucagon levels in young adults with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerini, C L; Harris, D A; Matyka, K A; Watts, A P; Umpleby, A M; Russell-Jones, D L; Dunger, D B

    1998-12-01

    Despite recent interest in the therapeutic potential of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I) in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, its mechanism of action is still not defined. We have studied the effects of low-dose bolus subcutaneous rhIGF-I (40 microg/kg and 20 microg/kg) on insulin sensitivity, growth hormone (GH) and glucagon levels in seven young adults with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) using a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study design. Each was subjected to a euglycemic clamp (5 mmol/L) protocol consisting of a variable-rate insulin infusion clamp (6:00 PM to 8:00 AM) followed by a two-dose hyperinsulinemic clamp (insulin infusion of 0.75 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1) from 8 to 10 AM and 1.5 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1) from 10 AM to 12 noon) incorporating [6,6 2H2]glucose tracer for determination of glucose production/utilization rates. Following rhIGF-I administration, the serum IGF-I level (mean +/- SEM) increased (40 microg/kg, 655 +/- 90 ng/mL, P overnight GH level (40 microg/kg, 9.1 +/- 1.4 mU/L, P = .04; 20 microg/kg, 9.6 +/- 2.0 mU/L, P = .12; placebo, 11.3 +/- 1.7 mU/L) and GH pulse amplitude (40 microg/kg, 18.8 +/- 2.9 mU/L, P = .04; 20 microg/kg, 17.0 +/- 3.4 mU/L, P > .05; placebo, 23.0 +/- 3.7 mU/L) were also reduced. No differences in glucagon, IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), acetoacetate, or beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were found. During the hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions, no differences in glucose utilization were noted, whereas hepatic glucose production was reduced by rhIGF-I 40 microg/kg (P = .05). Our data demonstrate that in subjects with IDDM, low-dose subcutaneous rhIGF-I leads to a dose-dependent reduction in the insulin level for euglycemia overnight that parallels the decrease in overnight GH levels, but glucagon and IGFBP-1 levels remain unchanged. The decreases in hepatic glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp study observed the following day are likely related to GH

  4. Craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Julsoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In addition to well-established physical characteristics, Turner syndrome patients have distinct craniofacial morphology. Since short stature is the most typical characteristic, Turner syndrome patients are commonly treated with growth hormone in order to increase final height. At the same time, growth hormone treatment was found to influence craniofacial growth and morphology in various groups of treated patients. Whereas craniofacial characteristics of Turner syndrome patients are well documented, comparatively little is known of craniofacial morphology of those who are treated with growth hormone. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone in comparison to healthy females. Materials and methods: The cephalometric evaluation was conducted on twenty lateral cephalograms of Turner syndrome patients (13.53 ± 4.04 years treated with growth hormone for at least one year (4.94 ± 1.92 years in average. As a control group, forty lateral cephalograms of healthy female controls, who matched Turner syndrome patients by chronological (11.80 ± 2.37 years and skeletal age, were used. Eleven angular, seven linear measurements and six dimensional ratios were measured to describe craniofacial morphology. Results: The results obtained for angular measurements, in cephalometric analyses for Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone, revealed bimaxillary retrognathism. The linear measurements indicated longer mandibular ramus, anterior cranial base and both anterior and posterior facial heights. However, posterior cranial base and maxilla were in proportion to the anterior cranial base, when comparing dimensional ratios. Anterior cranial base, maxilla and mandibular ramus were larger in proportion to mandibular body; as well as posterior facial height was when compared to anterior facial height. Turner syndrome patients treated with growth

  5. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting,such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partⅠ, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors,epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part Ⅱ will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids.

  6. Decreased hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone content and pituitary responsiveness in hypothyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Katakami, H; Downs, T. R.; Frohman, L A

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and thyroxine replacement (T4Rx) on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion and hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) concentration were compared to define the mechanism of hypothyroid-associated GH deficiency. Thyroidectomized rats exhibited a complete loss of pulsatile GH secretion with extensive reduction in GRH responsiveness and pituitary GH content. Cultured pituitary cells from Tx rats exhibited reduced GRH sensitivity, maximal GH responsiveness, and...

  7. Growth hormone deficiency in a Nigerian child with Turner's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IRORO YARHERE

    Keywords: Turner's syndrome, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, ... CD is a 15-year-old female who presented to the consultant paediatric .... system thus promoting growth.4,7,8 Randomised controlled trials have ... improve non-verbal processing speed, motor performance and verbal and non-verbal memory.

  8. Growth Hormone Treatment in SGA : More than meets the eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Steen (Manouk)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractGrowth hormone (GH) treatment effectively induces catch-up growth and improves adult height in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Besides this visual effect, GH treatment also has several other effects which occur inside the body. This doctoral thesis presents th

  9. Successful Growth Hormone Therapy in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Michael; Kant, Sarina G; Wit, Jan Maarten; Willem Redeker, Egbert Johan; Eduard Santen, Gijs Willem; Henriëtta Verkerk, Annemieke Johanna Maria; Uitterlinden, André Gerardus; Losekoot, Monique; Oostdijk, Wilma

    2017-06-07

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a heterogeneous syndrome, both clinically and genetically, in its classical form characterised by distinctive facial features, intra-uterine growth retardation, short stature, developmental delay and anomalies in multiple organ systems. NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 and HDAC8, all involved in the Cohesin pathway, have been identified to cause CdLS. Growth hormone (GH) secretion has been reported as normal, and to our knowledge there are no reports on the effect of recombinant human GH (r-hGH) treatment in CdLS patients. We present a patient born small for gestational age (SGA) with persistent severe growth retardation (height -3.4 SDS) and mild dysmorphic features, who was treated with GH from 4.3 years of age onward, and diagnosed 6 years later with CdLS using whole exome sequencing. Treatment led to a height gain of 1.6 standard deviation score (SDS) over 8 years. Treatment was interrupted shortly due to high serum IGF-1 serum values. We conclude that GH therapy appears effective and safe for short children with CdLS.

  10. Parathyroid hormone levels in pubertal uremic adolescents treated with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picca, Stefano; Cappa, Marco; Martinez, Chiara; Moges, Seyoum Ido; Osborn, John; Perfumo, Francesco; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Bonaudo, Roberto; Montini, Giovanni; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2004-01-01

    We have previously described severe hyperparathyroidism during the pubertal growth spurt in three uremic adolescents treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Here we investigate the possible role of puberty in the genesis of hyperparathyroidism during rhGH treatment of a large cohort of patients. Data from 67 uremic patients treated with rhGH from five Italian pediatric nephrology centers were retrospectively recorded every 3 months starting 1 year before rhGH administration. The mean (+/-SD) rhGH treatment observation period was 19.9+/-5.9 months. The mean age at the start of rhGH treatment was 8.3+/-3.6 years. Of the 67 patients, 15 reached pubertal stage 2 during the 1st year of rhGH treatment and 12 of these 15 progressed to pubertal stage 3. The relative increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels after rhGH initiation was greater in pubertal [1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-2.66] than in prepubertal patients (1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.40). Increases in PTH levels were significantly different between the two groups (Delta=1.64, 95% CI 1.16-3.19, P=0.007). Multiple regression analysis showed an inverse correlation between PTH and calcium levels and a positive correlation between PTH and pubertal stage 3. There was no correlation with phosphate levels and calcitriol dosage. In conclusion, these results suggest that in uremic adolescents treated with rhGH puberty may influence PTH levels.

  11. cDNA cloning and sequencing of ostrich Growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosti Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, industrial breeding of ostrich (Struthio camelus has been widely developed in Iran. Growth hormone (GH is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth and cell reproduction in different animals. The aim of this study was to clone and sequence the ostrich growth hormone gene in E. coli, done for the first time in Iran. The cDNA that encodes ostrich growth hormone was isolated from total mRNA of the pituitary gland and amplified by RT-PCR using GH specific PCR primers. Then GH cDNA was cloned by T/A cloning technique and the construct was transformed into E. coli. Finally, GH cDNA sequence was submitted to the GenBank (Accession number: JN559394. The results of present study showed that GH cDNA was successfully cloned in E. coli. Sequencing confirmed that GH cDNA was cloned and that the length of ostrich GH cDNA was 672 bp; BLAST search showed that the sequence of growth hormone cDNA of the ostrich from Iran has 100% homology with other records existing in GenBank.

  12. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-03-01

    Foregut neuroendocrine tumors [NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal (GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid,BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor,Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr(1068) EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs.

  13. Effect of growth hormone on the immune function of dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiu-liang; WANG Yi-sheng; WANG Jia-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the most important antigen presenting cells in the human body, and DCs at various stages of maturation possess different or even opposite functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of growth hormones on the functional status of cord blood-derived DCs encompassing immunophenotype, ability to excrete interleukin (IL)-12 and provoke autologous leukomonocyte.Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from fresh cord blood, with IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) used to induce and stimulate the mononuclear cells. Growth hormone at different concentrations was used to modify DCs, and then DCs morphology, number and growth status were observed. The immunophenotype of DCs was detected with a flow cytometer. The concentration of IL-12 in the DCs supernatant was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and DCs functional status was evaluated by autologous mixed lymphocyte reactions. Results Mononuclear cells from cord blood can be differentiated into DCs by cytokine induction and growth hormone modification. With the increase in growth hormone concentrations (5-100 μ g/L), the expression of DCs HLA-DR, CD1α, CD80 and CD83 were significantly increased (P<0.05). The ability of DCs to secrete IL-12 was significantly improved (P <0.05), and the ability of DCs to activate autologous lymphocytes was significantly enhanced (P <0.05). Pegvisomant was able to ablate the effects of growth hormone on DCs.Conclusions Growth hormone may facilitate DCs induction and maturation, and improve the reproductive activity of autologous lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Growth hormone may serve as a factor of modifying DCs to achieving maturity.

  14. Effect of growth hormone on protein phosphorylation in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Lipson, K.E.; Marino, M.W.; Donner, D.B.

    1987-02-10

    Hepatocytes from male rats were incubated with (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/ for 40 min at 37/sup 0/C, thereby equilibrating the cellular ATP pool with /sup 32/P. Subsequent exposure to bovine growth hormone for 10 additional min did not change the specific activity of cellular (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or chromatofocusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to fractionate phosphoproteins solubilized from control or hormone-stimulated cells. Stimulation of hepatocytes with 5 nM growth hormone for 10 min at 37/sup 0/C affected the phosphorylation of a number of proteins including an M/sub r/ 46,000 species of pI 4.7 whose phosphorylation was augmented (2.65 +/- 0.50)-fold. A significant fraction of the maximal effect of growth hormone on phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 46,000 species was elicited by 1-5% receptor occupancy. Bovine growth hormone, which binds to somatogenic receptors with great specificity, or recombinant human growth hormone, which is not contaminated with other hormones, affected phosphorylation of hepatic proteins similarly. The M/sub r/ 46,000 phosphoprotein was isolated in a fraction enriched in cytosol after centrifugation of cellular homogenates. Phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 46,000 phosphoprotein was also increased (1.75 +/- 0.35)-fold and (2.15 +/- 0.50)-fold by insulin and glucagon, respectively. These observations are consistent with the possibility that selective changes in the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins may mediate growth hormone actions in cells.

  15. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I as anabolic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, S

    1998-05-01

    The reduced growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations in growth hormone deficiency and normal ageing are associated with reduced muscle mass and strength, and slower muscle protein synthesis. Recent research has addressed the hypothesis that growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I have an anabolic effect in adults, including the elderly. These hormones stimulate whole-body and muscle protein synthesis, at least under some conditions. There is increasing evidence to justify long-term administration of growth hormone to promote muscle growth in growth hormone deficient adults. However, the long-term effects on muscle mass and function in the elderly do not seem beneficial enough to justify widespread hormone replacement therapy. These hormones may be useful anabolic agents to counteract muscle wasting under other conditions, including surgical stress, renal failure, muscular dystrophy, glucocorticoid administration and HIV infection, but more clinical trials are needed to determine the functional significance of the protein anabolic effects under these conditions.

  16. EFFECT OF GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT ON CRANIOFACIAL GROWTH IN TURNERS SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RONGENWESTERLAKEN, C; VANDERBORN, E; PRAHLANDERSEN, B; VONTEUNENBROEK, A; MANESSE, P; OTTEN, BJ; VANDERTWEEL, [No Value; KUIJPERSJAGTMAN, AM; VANDERWAAL, HAD; DRAYER, NM; WIT, JM; VANDERBRANDE, JL

    1993-01-01

    A cephalometric study was performed in 19 patients with Turner's syndrome, aged 8.7-16.5 years. A lateral roentgencephalogram was taken before and after two years of treatment with biosynthetic growth hormone in a dose of 24 IU/m2/week. During two years of growth hormone treatment, the mandibular le

  17. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  18. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  19. The Placental Variant of Human Growth Hormone Reduces Maternal Insulin Sensitivity in a Dose-Dependent Manner in C57BL/6J Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shutan; Vickers, Mark H; Stanley, Joanna L; Ponnampalam, Anna P; Baker, Philip N; Perry, Jo K

    2016-03-01

    The human placental GH variant (GH-V) is secreted continuously from the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta during pregnancy and is thought to play a key role in the maternal adaptation to pregnancy. Maternal GH-V concentrations are closely related to fetal growth in humans. GH-V has also been proposed as a potential candidate to mediate insulin resistance observed later in pregnancy. To determine the effect of maternal GH-V administration on maternal and fetal growth and metabolic outcomes during pregnancy, we examined the dose-response relationship for GH-V administration in a mouse model of normal pregnancy. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive vehicle or GH-V (0.25, 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg · d) by osmotic pump from gestational days 12.5 to 18.5. Fetal linear growth was slightly reduced in the 5 mg/kg dose compared with vehicle and the 0.25 mg/kg groups, respectively, whereas placental weight was not affected. GH-V treatment did not affect maternal body weights or food intake. However, treatment with 5 mg/kg · d significantly increased maternal fasting plasma insulin concentrations with impaired insulin sensitivity observed at day 18.5 as assessed by homeostasis model assessment. At 5 mg/kg · d, there was also an increase in maternal hepatic GH receptor/binding protein (Ghr/Ghbp) and IGF binding protein 3 (Igfbp3) mRNA levels, but GH-V did not alter maternal plasma IGF-1 concentrations or hepatic Igf-1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that at higher doses, GH-V treatment can cause hyperinsulinemia and is a likely mediator of the insulin resistance associated with late pregnancy.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: an autocrine hormone that promotes lipogenesis in human sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Seltmann, Holger; Hiroi, Naoki; Chen, WenChieh; Young, Maggie; Oeff, Marina; Scherbaum, Werner A; Orfanos, Constantin E; McCann, Samuel M; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2002-05-14

    Sebaceous glands may be involved in a pathway conceptually similar to that of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Such a pathway has been described and may occur in human skin and lately in the sebaceous glands because they express neuropeptide receptors. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is the most proximal element of the HPA axis, and it acts as central coordinator for neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to stress. To further examine the probability of an HPA equivalent pathway, we investigated the expression of CRH, CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP), and CRH receptors (CRH-R) in SZ95 sebocytes in vitro and their regulation by CRH and several other hormones. CRH, CRH-BP, CRH-R1, and CRH-R2 were detectable in SZ95 sebocytes at the mRNA and protein levels: CRH-R1 was the predominant type (CRH-R1/CRH-R2 = 2). CRH was biologically active on human sebocytes: it induced biphasic increase in synthesis of sebaceous lipids with a maximum stimulation at 10(-7) M and up-regulated mRNA levels of 3 beta- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta(5-4) isomerase, although it did not affect cell viability, cell proliferation, or IL-1 beta-induced IL-8 release. CRH, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 17 beta-estradiol did not modulate CRH-R expression, whereas testosterone at 10(-7) M down-regulated CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNA expression at 6 to 24 h, and growth hormone (GH) switched CRH-R1 mRNA expression to CRH-R2 at 24 h. Based on these findings, CRH may be an autocrine hormone for human sebocytes that exerts homeostatic lipogenic activity, whereas testosterone and growth hormone induce CRH negative feedback. The findings implicate CRH in the clinical development of acne, seborrhea, androgenetic alopecia, skin aging, xerosis, and other skin disorders associated with alterations in lipid formation of sebaceous origin.

  1. Adherence in children with growth hormone deficiency treated with r-hGH and the easypod™ device

    OpenAIRE

    S. Loche; Salerno, M.; Garofalo, P; Cardinale, G. M.; Licenziati, MR; Citro, G.; Caruso Nicoletti, M.; Cappa, M.; Longobardi, S.; Maghnie, M; Perrone, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) therapy is associated with reduced growth velocity in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This twelve-month observational study was to assess adherence in r-hGH patients treated with the easypod™, an electronic, fully automated injection device designed to track the time, date and dose administered. Methods Ninety-seven prepubertal patients receiving r-hGH therapy were included in the study from ten Italian clinical...

  2. Application of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Idiopathic Growth Hormone Deficient Children of Anyang,Henan Province%河南安阳地区重组人生长激素治疗少年儿童特发性矮小症疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段艳峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone ( rhGH ) in idiopathic growth hormone deficient ( IGHD ) children of Anyang, Henan province. Methods A prospective study including 30 children [ 18 boys and 12 girls, with mean age of ( 12. 0 ± 1. 5 ) years and BA of ( 8. 5 ±2. 1 ) years ] was carried out. The enrolled children were treated with subcutaneous injection of rhGH ( 0. 15 ~0. 20 U ? kg~ ? d ) daily before sleep for six months. Results The mean height growth rate of the enrolled children increased from ( 3. 56 ± 0. 78 ) cm/year to ( 9. 87 ± 2. 11 ) cm/year ( P < 0. 01 ) . The mean HtSDSCA increased from ( -2. 01 ±0. 63 ) cm to ( - 1. 72 ±0. 58 ) cm. HtSDSBA increased from ( 0. 11 ± 0. 65 ) cm to ( 0. 28 ± 1. 21 ) cm. Conclusion rhGH appears to be effective and sate in treating growth hormone deficient ( IGHD ) children in Anyang, Henan province, without affecting adolescence.%目的 观察河南安阳地区重组人生长激素(rhGH)治疗少年儿童特发性矮小症的疗效.方法 30例特发性矮小症患儿,女12例,男18例,平均年龄为(12.0±1.5)岁;骨龄为(8.5±2.1)岁,给予0.15~0.20 U·kg-1·d-1,睡前1 h皮下注射,连续治疗6个月.结果 特发性矮小症患儿治疗前后生长速率由(3.56±0.78)cm/年增长为(9.87±2.11)cm/年,治疗前后比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);年龄身高标准差分值由(-2.01±0.63)cm增长为(-1.72±0.58)cm,骨龄的身高标准差分值由(0.11±0.65)cm增长为(0.28±1.21)cm,治疗前后差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 对于河南安阳人群,国产重组人生长激素能对特发性矮小症起到治疗作用,且不会引起青春期提前.

  3. 利用Bac-to-Bac杆状病毒表达系统在家蚕中表达人生长素%Expression of Human Growth Hormone in Bombyx mori Using Bacto-Bac Baculovirus Expression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付凡; 陈蔚; 唐顺明; 汪生鹏; 黄金山; 赵巧玲; 沈兴家

    2011-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) secreted by adenohypophysis plays an important role in human growth, development and metabolism, showing extensive physiological functions. Using Bac-to-Bac expression system of Bombyx mori nuclepolyhedrovirus ( BmNPV), a hgh gene was cloned into a baculovirus transfer vector pFastBacHTb which was used to transform BmDH10Bac to prepare recombinant shuttle vector Bacmid-hgh through bacterial transposition. The recombinant plasmid Bacmid-hgh was used to transfect BmN cells to obtain the recombinant baculovirus containing human growth gene hgh. The recombinant baculovirus was used to infect BmN cells and the recombinant virus was collected and used to inoculate newly exuviated Bombyx mori larvae of the 5th instar. After 3 d, the larvae showed symptom of infection by baculovirus. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting detected target protein with molecular weight of approximately 20 kD in hemolymph of the larvae, indicating that human growth hormone had been successfully expressed in Bombyx mori larvae through Bac-to-Bac system.%人生长素是由腺垂体分泌的一种在人体生长、发育及代谢中发挥重要作用的激素,具有广泛的生理作用.利用家蚕核型多角体病毒(BmNPV)Bac-to-Bac表达系统,将人生长素基因(hgh)克隆到杆状病毒转移载体pFastBacHTb,通过细菌转座子原理,转化BmDH10Bac细胞,获得重组穿梭载体质粒Baemid-hgh,并将其转染家蚕BmN细胞,获得含有hgh的重组杆状病毒.将此重组病毒感染家蚕BmN细胞,收集重组病毒液并穿刺接种家蚕5龄起蚕,3d后观察到家蚕感染了杆状病毒的症状,并通过SDS-PAGE和Western blotting方法在家蚕血液中检测到分子质量约20kD的目的蛋白,袁明人生长素通过Bac-to-Bac 系统在家蚕体内获得了表达.

  4. Growth related hormones in idiopathic scoliosis. An endocrine basis for accelerated growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogland, L B; Miller, J A

    1980-10-01

    In a total of 95 children with idiopathic scoliosis and 60 controls between the ages of 7 and 17 years, a prospective study of hormones related to growth and maturation was carried out. The pituitary release mechanism for growth hormone was evaluated using the propanolol/L-dopa stimulation test. In addition the blood levels of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, oestradiol, thyroxin, prolactin, cortisol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were determined. The girls were divided into age groups and all results were evaluated according to chronological and skeletal age. The number of boys was too small (25) to allow subdivision into age groups. The girls with idiopathic scoliosis had a significantly higher response to the growth hormone stimulation test than had the controls between the ages of 7 and 12 years whereas no significant difference could be found for the older girls. In girls with a skeletal age between 9 and 12 years a significantly higher mean serum level of testosterone was found (P less than 0.05). No significant differences could be demonstrated for the remaining hormones. Growth hormone and testosterone are the most important growth factors in prepubertal and pubertal children. Thus, the present findings suggest a hormonal basis for the increased stature in children with idiopathic scoliosis which has previously been reported.

  5. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  6. Time dependent effects of two absorption enhancers on the nasal absorption of growth hormone in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermehren, C.; Hansen, Harald S.; Thomsen, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Enhancer-based drug preparations allow absorption of peptide drugs. We investigated the reversibility with time of nasal absorption of human growth hormone (hGH) induced by the absorption enhancers didecanoylphosphatidylcholine (DDPC) and a-cyclodextrin (a-CD). Rabbits were dosed intranasally wit...

  7. Acute and chronic effects of growth hormone on renal regulation of electrolyte and water homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimke, H.; Flyvbjerg, A.; Frische, S.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, growth hormone (GH) has been known to influence electrolyte and water handling in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the GH-induced anti-natriuretic and anti-diuretic effects have remained elusive. This review will examine the existing literature on renal e

  8. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A role for central nervous growth hormone-releasing hormone signaling in the consolidation of declarative memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Hallschmid

    Full Text Available Contributions of somatotropic hormonal activity to memory functions in humans, which are suggested by clinical observations, have not been systematically examined. With previous experiments precluding a direct effect of systemic growth hormone (GH on acute memory formation, we assessed the role of central nervous somatotropic signaling in declarative memory consolidation. We examined the effect of intranasally administered growth hormone releasing-hormone (GHRH; 600 µg that has direct access to the brain and suppresses endogenous GHRH via an ultra-short negative feedback loop. Twelve healthy young men learned word-pair associates at 2030 h and were administered GHRH and placebo, respectively, at 2100 h. Retrieval was tested after 11 hours of wakefulness. Compared to placebo, intranasal GHRH blunted GH release within 3 hours after substance administration and reduced the number of correctly recalled word-pairs by ∼12% (both P<0.05. The impairment of declarative memory consolidation was directly correlated to diminished GH concentrations (P<0.05. Procedural memory consolidation as examined by the parallel assessment of finger sequence tapping performance was not affected by GHRH administration. Our findings indicate that intranasal GHRH, by counteracting endogenous GHRH release, impairs hippocampal memory processing. They provide first evidence for a critical contribution of central nervous somatotropic activity to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation.

  10. Neuroprotective actions of ghrelin and growth hormone secretagogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Frago

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, GHS-R1a, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved.

  11. Different short-term effect of protein and carbohydrate intake on TSH, growth hormone (GH), insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Andersen, B B; Jensen, B G

    1990-01-01

    hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to protein and carbohydrate was identical, with a reduction in both GH and TSH, and nadir occurring after 45-60 min and 120 min, respectively. During the next 120 min TSH returned to starting level after carbohydrate intake but was still reduced after...... protein intake (p less than 0.04). After both diets GH increased after the initial decline, the increase was greatest after protein intake and maximum was reached at 180 min (p less than 0.02). It has been reported that the 5'-deiodination of T4 is stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon...

  12. Kidney function and size in normal subjects before and during growth hormone administration for one week

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens; Orskov, H; Andersen, A R

    1981-01-01

    Kidney function and size were studied in seven normal male subjects before and after administration of highly purified human growth hormone for 1 week. Glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow (steady-state infusion technique with urinary collections using 125I-iothalamate and 131I......-hippuran) kidney size (ultrasonic scanning) and urinary excretion rates of albumin and beta 2-microglobulin (radioimmunoassays) were measured. Highly purified growth hormone was injected subcutaneously, 2 IU in the morning and 4 IU in the evening. Glomerular filtration rate increased from (mean +/- SEM) 114 +/- 5...... to 125 +/- 4 ml/min x 1.73 m2 (P less than 0.01) and renal plasma flow increased from 554 +/- 30 to 601 +/- 36 ml/min x 1.73 m2 (P less than 0.01). Kidney size and urinary excretion rates of albumin and beta 2-microglobulin did not change significantly. Our results show that raising plasma growth hormone...

  13. Beneficial effects of anti-growth hormone antiserum in avian muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenbach, E; Moraes, S S; Trocado, M T; Lôbo, G F; Nascimento, P S; Verjovski-Almeida, S

    1989-08-01

    Human subjects and mice have been found to have a milder progression of muscular dystrophy when the disease is associated with genotypically determined dwarfism. In this paper we describe an experimental test for reducing growth hormone in dystrophic chickens that uses rabbit anti-chicken growth hormone anti-serum (anti-cGH). Antiserum was injected daily into dystrophic (line 413) male chickens from day 1 to day 8 after hatching. Dystrophic chickens injected with anti-cGH maintained a significantly higher score in the standardized test for righting ability (P less than 0.001-0.051) from 3 to 9 1/2 wk after hatching when compared with dystrophic controls. The observed prolongation of the functional ability of injected dystrophic animals suggests that growth hormone plays a role in potentiating the symptoms of dystrophy in chickens.

  14. Genetic and structural characterization of the growth hormone gene and protein from tench, Tinca tinca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicz, R; Sadowski, J; Drozd, R

    2012-12-01

    The analysis of the tench growth hormone gene structure revealed a comparable organization of coding and non-coding regions than other from cyprinid species. Based on the performed mRNA and amino acid sequence alignments, gh tench is related to Asian than to European representatives of Cyprinidae family. Second aim of the work was to characterize and predict protein structure of the tench growth hormone. Tinca tinca GH share many common features with human GH molecule. The Tench GH protein binds to the growth hormone receptor (GHR) using two regions I and II that are situated at opposite sites of molecule. Binding site I is placed in the central part of T. tinca GH and H 189 amino acid in the middle region of the IV helix is crucial for GH-GHR interactions.

  15. Usability and Tolerability of the Norditropin NordiFlex® Injection Device in Children Never Previously Treated With Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-23

    Growth Hormone Disorder; Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children; Genetic Disorder; Turner Syndrome; Foetal Growth Problem; Small for Gestational Age; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Insufficiency; Delivery Systems

  16. Effects of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide to Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor on the Expression of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Primary Culture Cells Derived from Human Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcino

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (antisense ODN) to follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were studied in primary culture cells derived from human ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (OMC). The prlmary OMC cells were cultured with the enzyme digestion method, and the expression of pan Keratin protein and FSHR mRNA was detected for identification of the cells. OMC cells were co-cultured with antisense ODN, nonsense ODN and FSH with different concentrations for 48 h and 72 h. The expression of PCNA and VEGF was detected by using SP immunohistochemistry. Compared with that in the control group, the PCNA and VEGF expression was increased obviously in FSH groups (P<0.05 or P< 0.01), while decreased significantly in antisense ODN groups (P<0. 05 or P<0.01) and unchanged in nonsense ODN groups, respectively. Meanwhile, antisense ODN could antagonize the increased expression of PCNA and VEGF caused by FSH significantly (P<0.01). It was suggested that FSH might promotethe development of OMC to some extent. Antisense ODN could inhibit the proliferative activity of OMC cells and the promoting proliferative activity enhanced by FSH.

  17. Growth hormone, the insulin-like growth factor axis, insulin and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Peter E; Banerjee, Indraneel; Murray, Philip G; Renehan, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and insulin have potent growth-promoting and anabolic actions. Their potential involvement in tumor promotion and progression has been of concern for several decades. The evidence that GH, IGF-I and insulin can promote and contribute to cancer progression comes from various sources, including transgenic and knockout mouse models and animal and human cell lines derived from cancers. Assessments of the GH-IGF axis in healthy individuals followed up to assess cancer incidence provide direct evidence of this risk; raised IGF-I levels in blood are associated with a slightly increased risk of some cancers. Studies of human diseases characterized by excess growth factor secretion or treated with growth factors have produced reassuring data, with no notable increases in de novo cancers in children treated with GH. Although follow-up for the vast majority of these children does not yet extend beyond young adulthood, a slight increase in cancers in those with long-standing excess GH secretion (as seen in patients with acromegaly) and no overall increase in cancer with insulin treatment, have been observed. Nevertheless, long-term surveillance for cancer incidence in all populations exposed to increased levels of GH is vitally important.

  18. Clinical effect of recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of burn patients%重组人生长激素用于烧伤治疗的临床效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗斌杰; 田甜

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical effect of recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of burn. Methods 88 cases of burn patients were randomly divided into observation group and control group,44 cases in each group. 2 groups of patients were treated with conventional anti infection treatment and nutrition support.On this basis,the observation group was treated with subcutaneous injection of recombinant human growth hormone at the end of third days.The improvement of clinical parameters,PA,Tb content and wound healing time were observed and compared between the 2 groups.Results Compared with before treatment,growth hormone,blood sugar and insulin and other clinical indicators were improved,and the observation group was better than the control group (P<0.05);The contents of PA and Tb in the 2 groups were all increased, and the observation group was higher than that of the control group (P<0.01);The observation group graft donor site healing time,healing time and healing time of deep crust is shorter than the control group(P<0.01).Conclusion Recombinant hu-man growth hormone therapy can significantly improve the clinical indicators of burn patients,improve the content of PA,Tb, shorten the wound healing time,the effect is good,it is worth promoting the application.%目的:观察重组人生长激素用于烧伤治疗的临床效果。方法选取烧伤患者88例,随机分为观察组与对照组各44例。植皮术后予2组患者常规抗感染治疗与相应的营养支持。观察组在此基础上于手术结束第3天予重组人生长激素皮下注射治疗,观察、比较2组临床指标改善情况、体内PA、Tb含量变化及创面愈合时间。结果与治疗前比较,2组生长激素、血糖以及胰岛素等3项临床指标均有改善,观察组改善情况优于对照组(P<0.05);2组PA、Tb含量均升高,观察组升高幅度大于对照组( P<0.01);观察组植皮区愈合时间、供皮区愈合时间及

  19. Stimulation of chicken growth hormone release by phorbol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1990-11-01

    Synergism between thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) has been shown in a primary (48 hr) culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells established in this laboratory. The purpose of the present study was to determine if phorbol esters acting alone or in concert with TRH or hpGRF affect chicken GH release. Collagenase-dissociated chicken adenohypophyseal cells were treated (2 hr) with combinations of TRH, hpGRF, phorbol esters (activators of protein kinase C; PKC), and pharmacologic agents that increase cAMP. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) alone stimulated GH release in a dose-dependent manner; either phorbol ester (10(-6) M) increased GH release from 100 to 390% over the value obtained in the absence of test agents (control). Similarly, hpGRF (10(-9) M), 8 Br-cAMP (10(-3) M), forskolin (10(-6) M), or isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX, 10(-3) M) alone elevated GH release by at least 60% over the control value. The combined effects of phorbol esters (either PMA or PDBu) and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin on GH release were additive. Only one combination, phorbol esters with IBMX, exerted synergistic effects on GH release. No synergy was shown between TRH (1.3 x 10(-9) M) and either phorbol ester. These findings are the first to implicate PKC in chicken GH release in vitro. In addition, these studies, together with previous results, suggest that TRH and hpGRF synergy occurs via a pathway that arises prior to activation of PKC.

  20. Etiology of growth hormone deficiency in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD can be isolated or associated with deficiency of other pituitary gland hormones. According to age at diagnosis, causes of GHD are divided into congenital or acquired, and according to etiology into recognized and unknown. Objective. We analyzed etiology and prevalence of GHD, demographic data at birth, age, body height (BH and bone age at diagnosis as well as the frequency of other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Methods. The study involved 164 patients (109 male. The main criterion for the diagnosis of GHD was inadequate response of GH after two stimulation tests. The patients were classified into three groups: idiopathic, congenital and acquired GHD. Results. Idiopathic GHD was confirmed in 57.9% of patients, congenital in 11.6% and acquired in 30.5%. The mean age at diagnosis of GHD was 10.1±4.5 years. The patients with congenital GHD had most severe growth retardation (-3.4±1.4 SDS, while the patients with idiopathic GHD showed most prominent bone delay (-3.6±2.3 SDS. The prevalence of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency was 56.1%, in the group with congenital GHD 73.7%, acquired GHD 54.0% and idiopathic GHD 53.7%. The frequency of thyrotropin deficiency ranged from 88.2-100%, of adrenocorticotrophin 57.1-68.8% and of gonadotrophins deficiency 57.1- 63.0%, while deficiency of antidiuretic hormone was 2.0-25.0%. Conclusion. Although regular BH measurements enable early recognition of growth retardation, patients’ mean age and degree of growth retardation indicate that GHD is still diagnosed relatively late. A high incidence of other pituitary hormone deficiencies requires a detailed investigation of the etiology of disorders and evaluation of all pituitary functions in each child with confirmed GHD.