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Sample records for human glycolipid transfer

  1. Membranes and mammalian glycolipid transferring proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuf, Jessica; Mattjus, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Glycolipids are synthesized in and on various organelles throughout the cell. Their trafficking inside the cell is complex and involves both vesicular and protein-mediated machineries. Most important for the bulk lipid transport is the vesicular system, however, lipids moved by transfer proteins are also becoming more characterized. Here we review the latest advances in the glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) and the phosphoinositol 4-phosphate adaptor protein-2 (FAPP2) field, from a membrane point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring glycolipid transfer protein activity and membrane interaction with the surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohvo-Rekilä, Henna; Mattjus, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) is a protein capable of binding and transferring glycolipids. GLTP is cytosolic and it can interact through its FFAT-like (two phenylalanines in an acidic tract) motif with proteins localized on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum. Previous in vitro work with GLTP has focused mainly on the complete transfer reaction of the protein, that is, binding and subsequent removal of the glycolipid from the donor membrane, transfer through the aqueous environment, and the final release of the glycolipid to an acceptor membrane. Using bilayer vesicles and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, we have now, for the first time, analyzed the binding and lipid removal capacity of GLTP with a completely label-free technique. This technique is focused on the initial steps in GLTP-mediated transfer and the parameters affecting these steps can be more precisely determined. We used the new approach for detailed structure-function studies of GLTP by examining the glycolipid transfer capacity of specific GLTP tryptophan mutants. Tryptophan 96 is crucial for the transfer activity of the protein and tryptophan 142 is an important part of the proteins membrane interacting domain. Further, we varied the composition of the used lipid vesicles and gained information on the effect of membrane properties on GLTP activity. GLTP prefers to interact with more tightly packed membranes, although GLTP-mediated transfer is faster from more fluid membranes. This technique is very useful for the study of membrane-protein interactions and lipid-transfer rates and it can easily be adapted to other membrane-interacting proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biosynthesis of fucose containing lacto-series glycolipids in human colonic adenocarcinoma Colo 205 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, E H; Levery, S B

    1989-11-01

    Biosynthesis of fucose containing lacto-series glycolipids has been studied in human colonic adenocarcinoma Colo 205 cells. Transfer of fucose in both alpha 1----3 linkage to type 2 chain acceptors and alpha 1----4 linkage to type 1 chain acceptors was demonstrated with a Triton X-100 solubilized membrane fraction. The enzyme was found to be highly active over a broad pH range between 6.0 and 7.5. Kinetics of the transfer reactions were studied and indicated that the enzyme had an apparent Km for GDPfucose of 53 and 49 microM with acceptors nLc4 and Lc4, respectively. The apparent Km values for acceptors Lc4, nLc4, and IV3NeuAcnLc4 were determined to be 42, 18, and 26 microM, respectively. Transfer of fucose to the type 1 chain acceptor Lc4 alone and in the presence of increasing concentrations of the type 2 chain acceptor IV3NeuAcnLc4 or Gb3 suggested that both type 1 and 2 acceptors were alternate acceptors for a single enzyme. This was further established by the finding that IV3NeuAcnLc4 behaved as a competitive inhibitor of fucose transfer with respect to Lc4. Conditions were defined for preparative scale in vitro synthesis of fucosylated products of nLc6 catalyzed by the Colo 205 cell enzyme. Yields of the monofucosyl derivative of 2.5 mg (46%) and 1 mg (17%) of the difucosyl derivative were obtained from 5 mg of original nLc6. The structures of these biosynthetic products were carefully studied by 1H NMR, +FAB-MS, and methylation analysis. These studies revealed extremely high purity products composed of III3FucnLc6 and III3V3Fuc2nLc6. The significance of the nature of these products and enzymatic properties is discussed.

  4. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  5. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini...... to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human...

  6. Glycolipid-Dependent, Protease Sensitive Internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Into Cultured Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Aufaugh; Carter, William G; Lingwood, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Internalization of PAK strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human respiratory epithelial cell lines and HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro was readily demonstrable via a gentamycin protection assay. Depletion of target cell glycosphingolipids (GSLs) using a glucosyl ceramide synthase inhibitor, P4, completely prevented P. aeruginosa internalization. In contrast, P4 treatment had no effect on the internalization of Salmonella typhimurium into HeLa cells. Internalized P. aeruginosa were within membrane vacuoles, often containing microvesicles, between the bacterium and the limiting membrane. P. aeruginosa internalization was markedly enhanced by target cell pretreatment with the exogenous GSL, deacetyl gangliotetraosyl ceramide (Gg4). Gg4 binds the lipid raft marker, GM1 ganglioside. Target cell pretreatment with TLCK, but not other (serine) protease inhibitors, prevented both P. aeruginosa host cell binding and internalization. NFkB inhibition also prevented internalization. A GSL-containing lipid-raft model of P. aeruginosa host cell binding/internalization is proposed PMID:21270937

  7. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

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    Brian L. Anderson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type.

  9. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. I. GLYCOLIPIDS

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    Pirog T. Р.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to surface-active glycolipids. The general characteristics, the physiological role of the rhamnolipids, trehalose lipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and their traditional producers — the representatives of the genera Pseudozyma, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Candida are given. The detailed analysis of the chemical structure, the stages of the biosynthesis and the regulation of some low molecular glycolipids are done. The own experimental data concerning the synthesis intensification, the physiological role and the practical use of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants, which are a complex of the glyco-, phospho-, amino- and neutral lipids (glycolipids of all strains are presented by trehalose mycolates are summarized. It was found that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants have protective, antimicrobial and antiadhesive properties. It was shown that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants preparation of cultural liquid intensified the degradation of oil in water due to the activation of the natural petroleum-oxidizing microflora.

  10. Glycolipid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The biosynthesis of monogalactosyldiacyl-glycerol (MGDG) was studied in five different cyanobacteria. Previous work has shown Anabaena variabilis to synthesize both MGDG and monoglucosyl-diacylglycerol (MG1cDG) with MG1cDG being the precursor of MGDG. They have examined four other cyanobacteria to determine if a similar relationship exists. The cyanobacteria studied were Anabaena variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis nidulans, and Anacystis marina. Each were grown in liquid culture and lipids were labeled with 14 C]CO 2 for 20 min., 1.0 hr, 1.0 hr + 10 hr chase. Glycolipids were analyzed by initial separation of MGDG and MG1cDG by TLC followed by further analysis by HPLC. Complete separation of molecular species was obtained isocratically on an ODS column. All of the cyanobacteria labeled 16-C and 18-C fatty acids except for A. marina which labeled only 14-C and 16-C fatty acids. Desaturation of the fatty acids could be observed in the 1.0 hr and chase experiments. All were capable of labeling both MG1cDG and MGDG with the precursor-product relationship being observed. There does not appear to be a direct relationship between the epimerization of the sugar moiety and fatty acid desaturation

  11. Glycolipids from spinach suppress LPS-induced vascular inflammation through eNOS and NK-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masakazu; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Araho, Daisuke; Murakami, Juri; Nishimura, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    Glycolipids are the major constituent of the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and have a variety of biological and pharmacological activities. However, anti-inflammatory effects of glycolipids on vascular endothelial cells have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of glycolipids extracted from spinach on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced endothelial inflammation and evaluated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Treatment with glycolipids from spinach had no cytotoxic effects on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and significantly blocked the expression of LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in them. Glycolipids treatment also effectively suppressed monocyte adhesion to HUVECs. Treatment with glycolipids inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In addition, glycolipids treatment significantly promoted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVECs. Furthermore, glycolipids treatment blocked LPS-induced inducible NOS (iNOS) expression in HUVECs. Pretreatment with a NOS inhibitor attenuated glycolipids-induced suppression of NF-κB activation and adhesion molecule expression, and abolished the glycolipids-mediated suppression of monocyte adhesion to HUVECs. These results indicate that glycolipids suppress LPS-induced vascular inflammation through attenuation of the NF-κB pathway by increasing NO production in endothelial cells. These findings suggest that glycolipids from spinach may have a potential therapeutic use for inflammatory vascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Transfer of mRNA Encoding Invariant NKT Cell Receptors Imparts Glycolipid Specific Responses to T Cells and γδT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawamura, Masami; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Sato, Yusuke; Iyoda, Tomonori; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using genetically engineered lymphocytes expressing antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) hold promise for the treatment of several types of cancers. Almost all studies using this modality have focused on transfer of TCR from CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The transfer of TCR from innate lymphocytes to other lymphocytes has not been studied. In the current study, innate and adaptive lymphocytes were transfected with the human NKT cell-derived TCRα and β chain mRNA (the Vα24 and Vβ11 TCR chains). When primary T cells transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR were subsequently stimulated with the NKT ligand, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), they secreted IFN-γ in a ligand-specific manner. Furthermore when γδT cells were transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR mRNA, they demonstrated enhanced proliferation, IFN-γ production and antitumor effects after α-GalCer stimulation as compared to parental γδT cells. Importantly, NKT cell TCR-transfected γδT cells responded to both NKT cell and γδT cell ligands, rendering them bi-potential innate lymphocytes. Because NKT cell receptors are unique and universal invariant receptors in humans, the TCR chains do not yield mispaired receptors with endogenous TCR α and β chains after the transfection. The transfection of NKT cell TCR has the potential to be a new approach to tumor immunotherapy in patients with various types of cancer.

  13. Martini Force Field Parameters for Glycolipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Cesar A.; Sovova, Zofie; van Eerden, Floris J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    We present an extension of the Martini coarse-grained force field to glycolipids. The glycolipids considered here are the glycoglycerolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) and its

  14. A Phosphorylcholine-Containing Glycolipid-like Antigen Present on the Surface of Infective Stage Larvae of Ascaris spp. Is a Major Antibody Target in Infected Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Vlaminck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pig parasite Ascaris suum plays and important role in veterinary medicine and represents a suitable model for A. lumbricoides, which infects over 800 million people. In pigs, continued exposure to Ascaris induces immunity at the level of the gut, protecting the host against migrating larvae. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize parasite antigens targeted by this local immune response that may be crucial for parasite invasion and establishment and to evaluate their protective and diagnostic potential.Pigs were immunized by trickle infection for 30 weeks, challenged with 2,000 eggs at week 32 and euthanized two weeks after challenge. At necropsy, there was a 100% reduction in worms recovered from the intestine and a 97.2% reduction in liver white spots in comparison with challenged non-immune control animals. Antibodies purified from the intestinal mucus or from the supernatant of cultured antibody secreting cells from mesenteric lymph nodes of immune pigs were used to probe L3 extracts to identify antibody targets. This resulted in the recognition of a 12kDa antigen (As12 that is actively shed from infective Ascaris L3. As12 was characterized as a phosphorylcholine-containing glycolipid-like antigen that is highly resistant to different enzymatic and chemical treatments. Vaccinating pigs with an As12 fraction did not induce protective immunity to challenge infection. However, serological analysis using sera or plasma from experimentally infected pigs or naturally infected humans demonstrated that the As12 ELISA was able to detect long-term exposure to Ascaris with a high diagnostic sensitivity (98.4% and 92%, respectively and specificity (95.5% and 90.0% in pigs and humans, respectively.These findings show the presence of a highly stage specific, glycolipid-like component (As12 that is actively secreted by infectious Ascaris larvae and which acts as a major antibody target in infected humans and pigs.

  15. Human pavlovian-instrumental transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Seymour, Ben; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2008-01-09

    The vigor with which a participant performs actions that produce valuable outcomes is subject to a complex set of motivational influences. Many of these are believed to involve the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens, which act as an interface between limbic and motor systems. One prominent class of influences is called pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT), in which the motivational characteristics of a predictor influence the vigor of an action with respect to which it is formally completely independent. We provide a demonstration of behavioral PIT in humans, with an audiovisual predictor of the noncontingent delivery of money inducing participants to perform more avidly an action involving squeezing a handgrip to earn money. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that this enhanced motivation was associated with a trial-by-trial correlation with the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the nucleus accumbens and a subject-by-subject correlation with the BOLD signal in the amygdala. Our data dovetails well with the animal literature and sheds light on the neural control of vigor.

  16. Human Pavlovian–Instrumental Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Seymour, Ben; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    The vigor with which a participant performs actions that produce valuable outcomes is subject to a complex set of motivational influences. Many of these are believed to involve the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens, which act as an interface between limbic and motor systems. One prominent class of influences is called pavlovian–instrumental transfer (PIT), in which the motivational characteristics of a predictor influence the vigor of an action with respect to which it is formally completely independent. We provide a demonstration of behavioral PIT in humans, with an audiovisual predictor of the noncontingent delivery of money inducing participants to perform more avidly an action involving squeezing a handgrip to earn money. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that this enhanced motivation was associated with a trial-by-trial correlation with the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the nucleus accumbens and a subject-by-subject correlation with the BOLD signal in the amygdala. Our data dovetails well with the animal literature and sheds light on the neural control of vigor. PMID:18184778

  17. Production and antimicrobial property of glycolipid biosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial glycolipids such as rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) are an important class of biosurfactants with excellent surface tension-lowering activity. Besides their surfactant- and environment-friendly properties, however, additional value-added property such as bacteriocidal activity is n...

  18. A glycolipid adjuvant, 7DW8-5, enhances CD8+ T cell responses induced by an adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padte, Neal N; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Andrews, Chasity D; McManus, Jenny; Grasperge, Brooke F; Gettie, Agegnehu; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G; Li, Xiangming; Wu, Douglass; Bruder, Joseph T; Sedegah, Martha; Patterson, Noelle; Richie, Thomas L; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D; Vasan, Sandhya; Tsuji, Moriya

    2013-01-01

    A key strategy to a successful vaccine against malaria is to identify and develop new adjuvants that can enhance T-cell responses and improve protective immunity. Upon co-administration with a rodent malaria vaccine in mice, 7DW8-5, a recently identified novel analog of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), enhances the level of malaria-specific protective immune responses more strongly than the parent compound. In this study, we sought to determine whether 7DW8-5 could provide a similar potent adjuvant effect on a candidate human malaria vaccine in the more relevant non-human primate (NHP) model, prior to committing to clinical development. The candidate human malaria vaccine, AdPfCA (NMRC-M3V-Ad-PfCA), consists of two non-replicating recombinant adenoviral (Ad) vectors, one expressing the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and another expressing the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) of Plasmodium falciparum. In several phase 1 clinical trials, AdPfCA was well tolerated and demonstrated immunogenicity for both humoral and cell-mediated responses. In the study described herein, 25 rhesus macaques received prime and boost intramuscular (IM) immunizations of AdPfCA alone or with an ascending dose of 7DW8-5. Our results indicate that 7DW8-5 is safe and well-tolerated and provides a significant enhancement (up to 9-fold) in malaria-specific CD8+ T-cell responses after both priming and boosting phases, supporting further clinical development.

  19. A glycolipid adjuvant, 7DW8-5, enhances CD8+ T cell responses induced by an adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal N Padte

    Full Text Available A key strategy to a successful vaccine against malaria is to identify and develop new adjuvants that can enhance T-cell responses and improve protective immunity. Upon co-administration with a rodent malaria vaccine in mice, 7DW8-5, a recently identified novel analog of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, enhances the level of malaria-specific protective immune responses more strongly than the parent compound. In this study, we sought to determine whether 7DW8-5 could provide a similar potent adjuvant effect on a candidate human malaria vaccine in the more relevant non-human primate (NHP model, prior to committing to clinical development. The candidate human malaria vaccine, AdPfCA (NMRC-M3V-Ad-PfCA, consists of two non-replicating recombinant adenoviral (Ad vectors, one expressing the circumsporozoite protein (CSP and another expressing the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 of Plasmodium falciparum. In several phase 1 clinical trials, AdPfCA was well tolerated and demonstrated immunogenicity for both humoral and cell-mediated responses. In the study described herein, 25 rhesus macaques received prime and boost intramuscular (IM immunizations of AdPfCA alone or with an ascending dose of 7DW8-5. Our results indicate that 7DW8-5 is safe and well-tolerated and provides a significant enhancement (up to 9-fold in malaria-specific CD8+ T-cell responses after both priming and boosting phases, supporting further clinical development.

  20. Heat transfer from humans wearing clothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotens, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this monograph the effects of clothing on human heat transfer are described. The description is based on the physics of heat and mass transfer, depending on the design of the clothing, the climate, and the activity of the wearer. The resulting model has been stepwise implemented in computer

  1. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  2. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  3. Transfer of radionuclides into human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Wirth, E.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now the potential radiation exposure to breast-fed babies due to contaminated human milk has not been taken into account, when deriving international limit values and reference levels for radionuclides in foodstuffs, in air at monitored work places or for exposures in the medical field. It was the aim of the research project 'Transfer of radionuclides into human milk' to quantify the transfer of incorporated radionuclides into mother's milk, and develop simple models to estimate the radiation exposure of babies through the ingestion of human milk. The study focused on considerations of the radiation exposure due to the ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs by the mother, the inhalation of radionuclides at monitored work places, and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals to breast-feeding mothers. The blocking of infant thyroid glands by stable iodine in the case of accidental releases of radioiodine was considered as well. (orig.) [de

  4. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Murine cell glycolipids customization by modular expression of glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Buschbeck, Marcus; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Functional analysis of glycolipids has been hampered by their complex nature and combinatorial expression in cells and tissues. We report an efficient and easy method to generate cells with specific glycolipids. In our proof of principle experiments we have demonstrated the customized expression of two relevant glycosphingolipids on murine fibroblasts, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3), a marker for stem cells, and Forssman glycolipid, a xenoantigen. Sets of genes encoding glycosyltansferases were transduced by viral infection followed by multi-color cell sorting based on coupled expression of fluorescent proteins.

  6. Ultrastructural study of chromoplast components rich in glycolipids

    OpenAIRE

    Wrischer, Mercedes; Prebeg, Tatjana; Magnus, Volker; Ljubešić, Nikola

    2001-01-01

    A cytochemical method for the ultrastructural localization of glycolipids, performed on thin sections, was used in the study of tubular chromoplasts. The method gave clear pictures of structures that contained glycolipids, while other chemical constituents were not stained. The method was tested on two flowers (Impatients noli-tangere L. and Thunbergia alata Boj. ex Sims) containing different types of tubular chromoplasts. The ultrastructure and mode of development of the two types of tubu...

  7. Transfer of estradiol to human milk. [Radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, S.; Nygren, K.G.; Johansson, E.D.B.

    1978-11-15

    A radioimmunoassay for the measurement of estradiol in human milk is evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 25 pg of estradiol per milliliter of milk. In milk samples collected from four lactating women during three to four months and from one pregnant and lactating woman, the concentration of estradiol was found to be below the detection limit of the assay. When six lactating women were given vaginal suppositories containing 50 or 100 mg of estradiol, it was possible to estimate the estradiol concentration in milk. A ratio of transfer of estradiol from plasma to milk during physiologic conditions is calculated to be less than 100 : 10.

  8. Transfer of estradiol to human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Nygren, K.G.; Johansson, E.D.B.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for the measurement of estradiol in human milk is evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 25 pg of estradiol per milliliter of milk. In milk samples collected from four lactating women during three to four months and from one pregnant and lactating woman, the concentration of estradiol was found to be below the detection limit of the assay. When six lactating women were given vaginal suppositories containing 50 or 100 mg of estradiol, it was possible to estimate the estradiol concentration in milk. A ratio of transfer of estradiol from plasma to milk during physiologic conditions is calculated to be less than 100 : 10

  9. Biosynthesis and structure-activity relationships of the lipid a family of glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xirui; Sankaranarayanan, Karthik; Khosla, Chaitan

    2017-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is a potent elicitor of innate immune responses in mammals. A typical LPS molecule is composed of three different structural domains: a polysaccharide called the O-antigen, a core oligosaccharide, and Lipid A. Lipid A is the amphipathic glycolipid moiety of LPS. It stimulates the immune system by tightly binding to Toll-like receptor 4. More recently, Lipid A has also been shown to activate intracellular caspase-4 and caspase-5. An impressive diversity is observed in Lipid A structures from different Gram-negative bacteria, and it is well established that subtle changes in chemical structure can result in dramatically different immune activities. For example, Lipid A from Escherichia coli is highly toxic to humans, whereas a biosynthetic precursor called Lipid IV A blocks this toxic activity, and monophosphoryl Lipid A from Salmonella minnesota is a vaccine adjuvant. Thus, an understanding of structure-activity relationships in this glycolipid family could be used to design useful immunomodulatory agents. Here we review the biosynthesis, modification, and structure-activity relationships of Lipid A. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oligosaccharides and glycolipids addition in charged lamellar phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, F.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the addition of oligosaccharides and glycolipids in lamellar phases of the cationic surfactant DDAB (di-dodecyl-dimethyl-ammonium bromide). Two steps have been followed: the determination of phases prisms and the thermodynamic interpretation in terms of molecular interactions. In order to characterize these systems, two new experimental small angle scattering methods have been perfected: 1) a neutron scattering contrast variation method which allows to study the adsorption of aqueous solution in bilayers and 2) a capillary concentration gradient method to establish directly and quantitatively the phases diagrams of ternary systems by X rays scattering. It has been pointed out that the oligosaccharides induce a depletion attractive force on the lamellar-lamellar equilibrium of the DDAB when they are excluded of the most concentrated phase. For the two studied glycolipids: 2-O lauroyl-saccharose and N-lauroyl N-nonyl lactitol, the ternary phase diagrams water-DDAB-glycolipid have been established in terms of temperature. Critical points at ambient temperature have been given. The osmotic pressure in concentrated lamellar phases has been measured. It has been shown that glycolipids increase the hydration repulsion at short distance and that the electrostatic repulsion is outstanding and unchanged at high distance if there is at less 1 mole percent of ionic surfactant. In a dilute solution, glycolipids decrease the maximum swelling of lamellar phases, with a competition between the lamellar phase and the micellae dilute phase for water. (O.M.)

  11. Oligosaccharides and glycolipids addition in charged lamellar phases; Addition d`oligosaccharides et de glycolipides dans des phases lamellaires chargees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricoul, F

    1997-09-26

    The aim of this work is to study the addition of oligosaccharides and glycolipids in lamellar phases of the cationic surfactant DDAB (di-dodecyl-dimethyl-ammonium bromide). Two steps have been followed: the determination of phases prisms and the thermodynamic interpretation in terms of molecular interactions. In order to characterize these systems, two new experimental small angle scattering methods have been perfected: 1) a neutron scattering contrast variation method which allows to study the adsorption of aqueous solution in bilayers and 2) a capillary concentration gradient method to establish directly and quantitatively the phases diagrams of ternary systems by X rays scattering. It has been pointed out that the oligosaccharides induce a depletion attractive force on the lamellar-lamellar equilibrium of the DDAB when they are excluded of the most concentrated phase. For the two studied glycolipids: 2-O lauroyl-saccharose and N-lauroyl N-nonyl lactitol, the ternary phase diagrams water-DDAB-glycolipid have been established in terms of temperature. Critical points at ambient temperature have been given. The osmotic pressure in concentrated lamellar phases has been measured. It has been shown that glycolipids increase the hydration repulsion at short distance and that the electrostatic repulsion is outstanding and unchanged at high distance if there is at less 1 mole percent of ionic surfactant. In a dilute solution, glycolipids decrease the maximum swelling of lamellar phases, with a competition between the lamellar phase and the micellae dilute phase for water. (O.M.). 165 refs.

  12. Current status in biotechnological production and applications of glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Bruno Nicolau; Pessôa, Marina Gabriel; Mano, Mario Cezar Rodrigues; Molina, Gustavo; Neri-Numa, Iramaia Angélica; Pastore, Glaucia Maria

    2016-12-01

    Biosurfactants are natural compounds with surface activity and emulsifying properties produced by several types of microorganisms and have been considered an interesting alternative to synthetic surfactants. Glycolipids are promising biosurfactants, due to low toxicity, biodegradability, and chemical stability in different conditions and also because they have many biological activities, allowing wide applications in different fields. In this review, we addressed general information about families of glycolipids, rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and trehalose lipids, describing their chemical and surface characteristics, recent studies using alternative substrates, and new strategies to improve of production, beyond their specificities. We focus in providing recent developments and trends in biotechnological process and medical and industrial applications.

  13. Glycolipid transfer protein: clear structure and activity, but enigmatic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.; Opacic, M.; Wechselberger, R.W.; Sprong, H.; Egmond, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids comprize a small (typically 5–10% by weight) but vital fraction of membrane lipids in eukaryotes (Holthuis et al., 2001). They provide the plasma membrane with chemical and mechanical stabilities and take part in fundamental biological processes including differentiation,

  14. Improved Method for the Isolation of Biosurfactant Glycolipids from Rhodococcus sp. Strain H13A

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Frank O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method for the isolation of the biosurfactant glycolipids from Rhodococcus sp. strain H13A by using XM 50 diafiltration and isopropanol precipitation was devised. This procedure was advantageous since it removes protein coisolated when the glycolipids are obtained by organic extraction and silicic acid chromatography. The protein apparently does not contribute any biosurfactant characteristics to the glycolipids. The deacylated glycolipid backbone included only a disaccharide.

  15. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows potential moisturizing activity toward cultured human skin cells: the recovery effect of MEL-A on the SDS-damaged human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Suzuki, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced in large amounts from renewable vegetable oils by Pseudozyma antarctica, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, the skin care property of MEL-A, the major component of MELs, was investigated using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution of 1 wt%, and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were then evaluated on the basis of the cell viability. The viability of the damaged cells was markedly recovered by the addition of MEL-A in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control, MEL-A solutions of 5 wt% and 10 wt% gave the recovery rate of 73% and 91%, respectively, while ceramide solution of 1 wt% gave the rate of over 100%. This revealed that MEL-A shows a ceramide-like moisturizing activity toward the skin cells. Considering the drawbacks of natural ceramides, namely limited amount and high production cost, the yeast biosurfactants should have a great potential as a novel moisturizer for treating the damaged skin.

  16. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-01-01

    Background A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. Results From the pa...

  17. Transfer of radionuclides from the environment to human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaman, M.

    1986-06-01

    The author reviews literature from an on-line bibliographic search and describes what is known about radionuclide and elemental transfer from the environment to human milk. Included in the review are factors affecting elemental transfer, element concentrations observed in human milk, as well as sampling and analytical methods used. Recommendations are given for the development of a field survey. 59 refs

  18. Production of microbial glycolipid biosurfactants and their antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial glycolipids produced by bacteria or yeast as secondary metabolites, such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs) and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are “green” biosurfactants desirable in a bioeconomy. High cost of production is a major hurdle toward widespread commercial use of bios...

  19. Isolation and screening of glycolipid biosurfactant producers from sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Hirose, Naoto; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-01-01

    Forty-three fungal producers for glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), were isolated from leaves and smuts of sugarcane plants. These isolates produced MELs with sugarcane juice as nutrient source. The strains were taxonomically categorized into the genera Pseudozyma and Ustilago on the basis of partial sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene.

  20. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 degrees C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of

  1. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-04-04

    A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. From the pair-wise alignments between human genome and 53 vertebrate genomes, 1,467 human genome regions (2.6 M bases) from all chromosomes were found to be more conserved with non-mammals than with most mammals. These human genome regions involve 642 known genes, which are enriched with ion binding. Compared to known horizontal gene transfer regions in the human genome, there were few overlapping regions, which indicated horizontal gene transfer is more common than we expected in the human genome. Horizontal gene transfer impacts hundreds of human genes and this study provided insight into potential mechanisms of HGT in the human genome.

  2. Estrogen influences dolichyl phosphate distribution among glycolipid pools in mouse uteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, D.D.; Tang, J.; Hu, G.

    1987-03-24

    To determine the role that dolichyl phosphate availability plays in this induction, the authors studied the effects of estrogen priming on the content of dolichyl phosphate and the distribution of dolichyl phosphate among various glycolipids in uteri. Dolichol-linked saccharides were metabolically labeled to equilibrium with either (/sup 3/H)glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)mannose and extracted from primary explants of uterine tissue. The amount of dolichol-linked saccharide was calculated from the specific radioactivity determined for the corresponding sugar nucleotides extracted from the tissues. The major dolichol-linked saccharides identified were mannosylphosphoryldolichol (MPD), oligosaccharylpyrophosphorydolichol (OSL), and N,N'-diacetylchitobiosylpyrophosphoryldolichol (CBL). Estrogen increased the levels of MPD and OSL 4-fold; however, CBL levels did not change. After 3 days of treatment, the levels of these glycolipids were very similar to those in uteri from pregnant mice. The specific activity of GPD synthase was similar under all conditions studied. These studies provide the first determination of the levels of dolichol-linked saccharides in tissues and how these levels change during hormonal induction of glycoprotein assembly. Coupled with earlier studies, the present work demonstrates that among a number of key points of N-linked oligosaccharide assembly and transfer only synthesis of MPD increases coordinately with the increase observed in lipid- and protein-linked oligosaccharide assembly that occurs in vivo in response to estrogen. They suggest that control of MPD levels is an important regulatory aspect of N-linked glycoprotein assembly in this system.

  3. Analysis of glycolipids in vegetable lecithin with HPLC-ELSD

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Tuyet, Mai; De Vrieze, Mike; Van de Walle, Davy; Van Hoed, Vera; Lynen, Frederic; Dewettinck, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable lecithins play an important role in the microstructural and macroscopic properties of food and cosmetic products. They are widely used as a natural emulsifier. As lecithin is a by-product of the vegetable oil refining industry, its composition is quite variable and rather complex. Therefore, a more complete view on the chemical composition of lecithin would assist in elucidating its functionality. This study focused on the separation and quantification of several glycolipid...

  4. Detecting Protein-Glycolipid Interactions Using CaR-ESI-MS and Model Membranes: Comparison of Pre-loaded and Passively Loaded Picodiscs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Han, Ling; Li, Jianing; Kitova, Elena N.; Xiong, Zi Jian; Privé, Gilbert G.; Klassen, John S.

    2018-04-01

    Catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS), implemented using model membranes (MMs), is a promising approach for the discovery of glycolipid ligands of glycan-binding proteins (GBPs). Picodiscs (PDs), which are lipid-transporting complexes composed of the human sphingolipid activator protein saposin A and phospholipids, have proven to be useful MMs for such studies. The present work compares the use of conventional (pre-loaded) PDs with passively loaded PDs (PLPDs) for CaR-ESI-MS screening of glycolipids against cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer (CTB5). The pre-loaded PDs were prepared from a mixture of purified glycolipid and phospholipid or a mixture of lipids extracted from tissue, while the PLPDs were prepared by incubating PDs containing only phospholipid with glycolipid-containing lipid mixtures in aqueous solution. Time-dependent changes in the composition of the PLPDs produced by incubation with glycomicelles of the ganglioside GM1 were monitored using collision-induced dissociation of the gaseous PD ions and from the extent of ganglioside binding to CTB5 measured by ESI-MS. GM1 incorporation into PDs was evident within a few hours of incubation. At incubation times ≥ 10 days, GM1 binding to CTB5 was indistinguishable from that observed with pre-loaded PDs produced directly from GM1 at the same concentration. Comparison of ganglioside binding to CTB5 measured for pre-loaded PDs and PLPDs prepared from glycolipids extracted from pig and mouse brain revealed that the PLPDs allow for the detection of a greater number of ganglioside ligands. Together, the results of this study suggest PLPDs may have advantages over conventionally prepared PDs for screening glycolipids against GBPs using CaR-ESI-MS. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Sensing power transfer between the human body and the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; Kortier, H.G.; Schepers, H. Martin

    The power transferred between the human body and the environment at any time and the work performed are important quantities to be estimated when evaluating and optimizing the physical interaction between the human body and the environment in sports, physical labor, and rehabilitation. It is the

  6. Biofilm disruption potential of a glycolipid biosurfactant from marine Brevibacterium casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, George Seghal; Sabarathnam, Balu; Selvin, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The antibiofilm activity of a glycolipid biosurfactant isolated from the marine actinobacterium Brevibacterium casei MSA19 was evaluated against pathogenic biofilms in vitro. The isolate B. casei MSA19 was a potential biosurfactant producer among the 57 stable strains isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra. The biosurfactant production was optimized under submerged fermentation. The purified glycolipid showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum bactericidal concentration ratio, the glycolipid was determined as bacteriostatic. The glycolipid biosurfactant disrupted the biofilm formation under dynamic conditions. The disruption of the biofilm by the MSA19 glycolipid was consistent against mixed pathogenic biofilm bacteria. Therefore, the glycolipid biosurfactant can be used as a lead compound for the development of novel antibiofilm agents.

  7. Glycolipid precursors for the membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins. II. Lipid structures of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C sensitive and resistant glycolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, S.; Menon, A.K.; Cross, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A common diagnostic feature of glycosylinositol phospholipid (GPI)-anchored proteins is their release from the membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). However, some GPI-anchored proteins are resistant to this enzyme. The best characterized example of this subclass is the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase, where the structural basis of PI-PLC resistance has been shown to be the acylation of an inositol hydroxyl group(s). Both PI-PLC-sensitive and resistant GPI-anchor precursors (P2 and P3, respectively) have been found in Trypanosoma brucei, where the major surface glycoprotein is anchored by a PI-PLC-sensitive glycolipid anchor. The accompanying paper shows that P2 and P3 have identical glycans, indistinguishable from the common core glycan found on all the characterized GPI protein anchors. This paper shows that the single difference between P2 and P3, and the basis for the PI-PLC insusceptibility of P3, is a fatty acid, ester-linked to the inositol residue in P3. The inositol-linked fatty acid can be removed by treatment with mild base to restore PI-PLC sensitivity. Biosynthetic labeling experiments with [3H]palmitic acid and [3H]myristic acid show that [3H]palmitic acid specifically labels the inositol residue in P3 while [3H]myristic acid labels the diacylglycerol portion. Possible models to account for the simultaneous presence of PI-PLC-resistant and sensitive glycolipids are discussed in the context of available information on the biosynthesis of GPI-anchors

  8. Transplacental transfer of nitrosodimethylamine in perfused human placenta.

    OpenAIRE

    Annola, K.; Heikkinen, A.T.; Partanen, H.; Woodhouse, H.; Segerback, D.; Vahakangas, K.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a carcinogenic compound present in tobacco smoke and food such as cured meat, smoked fish and beer. The O(6)-methylguanine formed in human cord blood in mothers highly exposed to such products implicates NDMA exposure of the fetus. Dual recirculating human placental perfusion was used to get direct evidence of the transplacental transfer of NDMA and DNA adduct formation in perfused human placenta. Eleven placentas from normal full-term pregnancies were collected...

  9. Adjuvant effect in aquaculture fish of cell-wall glycolipids isolated from acid-fast bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Araki, Kyosuke; Nishimura, Sayaka; Kuriyama, Hideki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2018-08-01

    Mycobacteriosis and nocardiosis in cultured fish caused by infections with acid-fast bacteria, are responsible for large economic losses globally. In this study, we suggest a novel adjuvant using glycolipids that activates host immune systems. The immune response to glycolipids stimulation was investigated using ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna vaccinated with FKC (formalin-killed cells) + glycolipids isolated from Mycobacterium sp., upregulated inflammatory- and Th1-related cytokines, and a DTH (delayed-type hypersensitivity) response was confirmed only in ginbuna vaccinated with FKC + glycolipids. These observations suggest that glycolipids activated host innate and cell-mediated immunity. Subsequently, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of glycolipids against amberjack nocardiosis. In a challenge test, a higher survival rate was observed in amberjack vaccinated with FKC + glycolipids emulsified with conventional oil adjuvant than in fish vaccinated with FKC + oil adjuvant without glycolipids. Therefore, glycolipids potentially could be used as a practical, economical and safe adjuvant for aquaculture fish. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. [Characterization of an extracellular glycolipid from Lentinus edodes (Berk.) Sing [Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivileva, O M; Nikitina, V E; Makarov, O E

    2008-01-01

    Submerged mycelium of a xylotrophic basidiomycete Lentinus edodes produces an extracellular glycolipid, S3, associated with a lectin. Galactose glycan residue, as well as the lipid pool composition, which includes nonhydroxylated short-chain fatty acids, is uncommon for basidiomycetes. The glycolipid consists of D-galactopyranose (15% of S3 contains galactose sulfate) acylated by octadecanoic and nonadecanoic fatty acid residues (28 and 72%, respectively). The glycolipid structure and composition are confirmed by physicochemical analysis. The glycolipid is assumed to be a regulator of lectin activity.

  11. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  12. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Igarashi, Tatsuhiko [Laboratory of Primate Model, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Sugita, Masahiko [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  13. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya; Nakamura, Takashi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection

  14. NKT-cell glycolipid agonist as adjuvant in synthetic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Guo, Jun

    2017-11-27

    NKT cells are CD1d-restricted, glycolipid antigen-reactive, immunoregulatory T lymphocytes that can serve as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunities. NKT cells have a wide range of therapeutic application in autoimmunity, transplant biology, infectious disease, cancer, and vaccinology. Rather than triggering "danger signal" and eliciting an innate immune response, αGalCer-based NKT-cell agonist act via a unique mechanism, recruiting NKT cells which play a T helper-like role even without peptide as Th epitope. Importantly, the non-polymorphism of CD1d render glycolipid a universal helper epitope, offering the potential to simplify the vaccine construct capable of eliciting consistent immune response in different individuals. This review details recent advances in the design of synthetic vaccines using NKT-cell agonist as adjuvant, highlighting the role of organic synthesis and conjugation technique to enhance the immunological actives and to simplify the vaccine constructs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Decay accelerating factor of complement is anchored to cells by a C-terminal glycolipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medof, M.E.; Walter, E.I.; Roberts, W.L.; Haas, R.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF) of human erythrocytes (E/sup hu/) was analyzed for a C-terminal glycolipid anchoring structure. Automated amino acid analysis of DAF following reductive radiomethylation revealed ethanolamine and glucosamine residues in proportions identical with those present in the E/sup hu/ acetylcholinesterase (AChE) anchor. Cleavage of radiomethylated 70-kilodalton (kDa) DAF with papain released the labeled ethanolamine and glucosamine and generated 61- and 55-kDa DAF products that retained all labeled Lys and labeled N-terminal Asp. Incubation of intact E/sup hu/ with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), which cleaves the anchors in trypanosome membrane form variant surface glycoproteins (mfVSGs) and murine thymocyte Thy-1 antigen, released 15% of the cell-associated DAF antigen. The released 67-kDa PI-PLC DAF derivative retained its ability to decay the classical C3 convertase C4b2a but was unable to membrane-incorporate and displayed physicochemical properties similar to urine DAF, a hydrophilic DAF form that can be isolated for urine. Nitrous acid deamination cleavage of E/sup hu/ DAF at glucosamine following labeling with the lipophilic photoreagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([ 125 I]TID) released the [ 125 I]TID label in a parallel fashion as from [ 125 I]TID-labeled AChE. Biosynthetic labeling of HeLa cells with [ 3 H] ethanolamine resulted in rapid 3 H incorporation into both 48-kDa pro-DAF and 72-kDa mature epithelial cell DAF. The findings indicate that DAF and AChE are anchored in E/sup hu/ by the same or a similar glycolipid structure and that, like VSGs, this structure is incorporated into DAF early in DAF biosynthesis prior to processing of pro-DAF in the Golgi

  16. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  17. Transferring aviation human factors technology to the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemerlo, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the availability of aviation safety technology and research on problems which are sufficiently similar to those faced by the nuclear power industry that an agressive effort to adapt and transfer that technology and research is warranted. Because of time and space constraints, the scope of this paper is reduced from a discussion of all of aviation safety technology to the human factors of air carrier safety. This area was selected not only because of similarities in the human factors challenges shared by both industries (e.g. selection, training, evaluation, certification, etc.) but because experience in aviation has clearly demonstrated that human error contributes to a substantially greater proportion of accidents and incidents than does equipment failure. The Congress of the United States has placed a great deal of emphasis on investigating and solving human factors problems in aviation. A number of recent examples of this interest and of the resulting actions are described. The opinions of prominent aviation organizations as to the human factors problems most in need of research are presented, along with indications of where technology transfer to the nuclear power industry may be viable. The areas covered include: fatigue, crew size, information transfer, resource management, safety data-bases, the role of automation, voice and data recording systems, crew distractions, the management of safety regulatory agencies, equipment recertification, team training, crew work-load, behavioural factors, human factors of equipment design, medical problems, toxicological factors, the use of simulators for training and certification, determining the causes of human errors, the politics of systems improvement, and importance of both safety and public perception of safety if the industry is to be viable. (author)

  18. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Ng, Tony W; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Carreño, Leandro J; Johnson, Alison J; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J; Cox, Liam R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F; Panas, Michael W; Gillard, Geoffrey O; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  19. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha M Venkataswamy

    Full Text Available Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag. We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  20. Simple glycolipids of microbes: Chemistry, biological activity and metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammad Abdel-Mawgoud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylated lipids (GLs are added-value lipid derivatives of great potential. Besides their interesting surface activities that qualify many of them to act as excellent ecological detergents, they have diverse biological activities with promising biomedical and cosmeceutical applications. Glycolipids, especially those of microbial origin, have interesting antimicrobial, anticancer, antiparasitic as well as immunomodulatory activities. Nonetheless, GLs are hardly accessing the market because of their high cost of production. We believe that experience of metabolic engineering (ME of microbial lipids for biofuel production can now be harnessed towards a successful synthesis of microbial GLs for biomedical and other applications. This review presents chemical groups of bacterial and fungal GLs, their biological activities, their general biosynthetic pathways and an insight on ME strategies for their production.

  1. Glycolipid biosurfactants: main properties and potential applications in agriculture and food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Inès; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2016-10-01

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by high structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. They have received much practical attention as biopesticides for controlling plant diseases and protecting stored products. As a result of their antifungal activity towards phytopathogenic fungi and larvicidal and mosquitocidal potencies, glycolipid biosurfactants permit the preservation of plants and plant crops from pest invasion. Also, as a result of their emulsifying and antibacterial activities, glycolipids have great potential as food additives and food preservatives. Furthermore, the valorization of food byproducts via the production of glycolipid biosurfactant has received much attention because it permits the bioconversion of byproducts on valuable compounds and decreases the cost of production. Generally, the use of glycolipids in many fields requires their retention from fermentation media. Accordingly, different strategies have been developed to extract and purify glycolipids. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Transfer of fallout tritium from environment to human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shun-ichi; Takizawa, Yukio

    1989-01-01

    A large quntity of tritium will be used as a fuel of nuclear fusion in the future. It is, therefore, considered important to elucidate tritium behavior present in the environment and the process of tritium transfer from the environment to the human body. Fallout tritium is an applicable material in searching for the long term behavior of tritium in the environment. This paper focuses on the American, Italian, Japanese literature concerning fallout tritium in food and in the human body. The specific activity ratio of bound to free tritium poses an important problem. The mechanism of biological concentration must await further studies. (N.K.) 63 refs

  3. Characterization of glycolipid galactosyltransferases from embryonic chicken brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Glycolipid galactosyltransferases (GalT-3 and GalT-4) were solubilized from a membrane fraction isolated from embryonic chicken brain. The profiles of specific activity and total units per brain of GalT-3 and GalT-4 varied with embryonic age. GalT-4 had the highest specific activity at 9 days of embryonic development and showed a steady decrease until hatching. GalT-3 showed a gradual increase in specific activity. Both GalT3 and GalT-4 showed a steady increase in total units per brain throughout embryonic development. The solubilized enzymes could be separated using gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography or affinity chromatography on α-lactalbumin-agarose. Data obtained in the study imply that GalT-4 is involved in both glycoprotein and glycolipid biosynthesis. Glycosphingolipid products from GalT-3 and GalT-4 catalyzed reactions labeled with [ 14 C]galactose comigrated with authentic GMI and nLcOse 4 Cer, when examined by thin layer chromatography and autoradiography. Studies with galactosidases revealed that all of the enzyme products formed by GalT-3 and GalT-4 contained a [ 14 C]-galactose in a β anomeric linkage. Periodate oxidation studies of Gal-[ 14 C]GlcNAc, formed by purified GalT-4 using [ 14 C]GlcNAc as the acceptor, demonstrated that approximately 70% of the linkage formed was Galβ1-4GlcNAc and 30% was Galβ1-3GlcNAc. Studies on the susceptibility of [ 14 C]Gal-GlcNAc to base catalyzed β-elimination also suggested the presence of approximately 30% Galβ1-3GlcNAc

  4. Analysis of NMR spectra of sugar chains of glycolipids by multiple relayed COSY and 2D homonuclear Hartman-Hahn spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, F.; Kohda, D.; Kodama, C.; Suzuki, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors applied multiple relayed COSY and 2D homonuclear Hartman-Hahn spectroscopy to globoside, a glycolipid purified from human red blood cells. The subspectra corresponding to individual sugar components were extracted even from overlapping proton resonances by taking the cross sections of 2D spectra parallel to the F 2 axis at anomeric proton resonances, so that unambiguous assignments of sugar proton resonances were accomplished. (Auth.)

  5. Phospholipid transfer from vesicles to high density lipoproteins, catalyzed by human plasma phospholipid transfer protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeny, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) catalyzes the mass transfer of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Partial purification of PLTP yielded proteins with apparent M/sub r/ = 59,000 and 40,000 by SDS-PAGE. PLTP activity was measured by transfer of [ 14 C]L-α-dipalmitoyl PC from egg-PC vesicles to HDL. Activity was enhanced at low pH (4.5) upon addition of β-mercaptoethanol while Ca +2 and Na + had no effect. E/sub act/ for facilitated PC transfer was 18.2 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The donor specificity of PLTP was examined using vesicles containing egg-PC plus cholesterol or sphingomyelin. The fluidity of the donor membrane (measured by fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene) correlated strongly with a decrease in PLTP activity. Phosphatidic acid did not affect activity. Increase in vesicle size reduced activity. The acceptor specificity of PLTP was examined using chemically modified HDL. PLTP activity increased up to 1.7-fold with an initial increase in negative charge and then decreased upon extensive modification. A mechanism is proposed where PLTP binds to vesicls and enhances the diffusion of PC into the medium where it is adsorbed by HDL

  6. Caesium contamination in human milk and transfer factor from diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risica, S.; Campos Venuti, G.; Rogani, A.; Baronciani, D.; Petrone, M.

    1992-01-01

    A study on caesium contamination in human milk, as a consequence of the Chernobyl fallout, was conducted in 1989 on a group of women from one of the areas of northern Italy most heavily affected by the radioactive fallout. Their diet was studied, and the caesium intake was calculated by using the mean food activity concentration in that area. The caesium transfer factor was evaluated both as the ratio of caesium concentration in mother's milk to the daily intake, and by using a simplified milk compartment model. (author)

  7. Structural insights into lipid-dependent reversible dimerization of human GLTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samygina, Valeria R.; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Popov, Alexander N.; Cabo-Bilbao, Aintzane; Goni-de-Cerio, Felipe; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Malinina, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that dimerization is promoted by glycolipid binding to human GLTP. The importance of dimer flexibility in wild-type protein is manifested by point mutation that ‘locks’ the dimer while diversifying ligand/protein adaptations. Human glycolipid transfer protein (hsGLTP) forms the prototypical GLTP fold and is characterized by a broad transfer selectivity for glycosphingolipids (GSLs). The GLTP mutation D48V near the ‘portal entrance’ of the glycolipid binding site has recently been shown to enhance selectivity for sulfatides (SFs) containing a long acyl chain. Here, nine novel crystal structures of hsGLTP and the SF-selective mutant complexed with short-acyl-chain monoSF and diSF in different crystal forms are reported in order to elucidate the potential functional roles of lipid-mediated homodimerization. In all crystal forms, the hsGLTP–SF complexes displayed homodimeric structures supported by similarly organized intermolecular interactions. The dimerization interface always involved the lipid sphingosine chain, the protein C-terminus (C-end) and α-helices 6 and 2, but the D48V mutant displayed a ‘locked’ dimer conformation compared with the hinge-like flexibility of wild-type dimers. Differences in contact angles, areas and residues at the dimer interfaces in the ‘flexible’ and ‘locked’ dimers revealed a potentially important role of the dimeric structure in the C-end conformation of hsGLTP and in the precise positioning of the key residue of the glycolipid recognition centre, His140. ΔY207 and ΔC-end deletion mutants, in which the C-end is shifted or truncated, showed an almost complete loss of transfer activity. The new structural insights suggest that ligand-dependent reversible dimerization plays a role in the function of human GLTP

  8. Multimodal transfer of MDR by exosomes in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Elena; Roncuzzi, Laura; Perut, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released by both normal and tumour cells which are involved in a new intercellular communication pathway by delivering cargo (e.g., proteins, microRNAs, mRNAs) to recipient cells. Tumour-derived exosomes have been shown to play critical roles in different stages of tumour growth and progression. In this study, we investigated the potential role of exosomes to transfer the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in human osteosarcoma cells. Exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugation of culture media from multidrug resistant human osteosarcoma MG-63DXR30 (Exo/DXR) and MG-63 parental cells (Exo/S). Exosome purity was examined by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed by immunoblot analysis for the expression of specific exosomal markers. Our data showed that exosomes derived from doxorubicin-resistant osteosarcoma cells could be taken up into secondary cells and induce a doxorubicin-resistant phenotype. The incubation of osteosarcoma cells with Exo/DXR decreased the sensitivity of parental cells to doxorubicin, while exposure with Exo/S was ineffective. In addition, we demonstrated that Exo/DXR expressed higher levels of MDR-1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein compared to Exo/S (p=0.03). Interestingly, both MDR-1 mRNA and P-gp increased in MG-63 cells after incubation with Exo/DXR, suggesting this as the main mechanism of exosome-mediated transfer of drug resistance. Our findings suggest that multidrug resistant osteosarcoma cells are able to spread their ability to resist the effects of doxorubicin treatment on sensitive cells by transferring exosomes carrying MDR-1 mRNA and its product P-glycoprotein.

  9. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of glycolipids bearing oligosaccharide headgroups; Origoto wo shinsuiki tosuru toshishitsu no gose to butsusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamikawa, H [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-12-22

    Glycolipids, amphiphiles that bear oligosaccharides their hydrophilic, are of importance both scientifically and technically. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular correlations in phase behavior of aqueous glycolipids. In the first part, we discuss how headgroup stereochemistry affects the phase behavior of glycolipids both two- and three- dimensional systems. In the second part, we discuss effects of alkyl chain structure behavior of phytanyl-chained glycolipid/water systems Physical properties of glycolipid/water systems strongly depend on the inter-headgroup interactions that is related to factors such as stereochemistry (conformation) and size of headgroups, type of sugar residues involved, alkyl chain structure, etc. Thus. apart from the conventional concept like [hydrophilic/lipophilic balance], explicit accounts of headgroup interactions are crucial to control a particular glycolipid/water system concerned. This makes contrast to the conventional amphiphile/water systems where the inter-headgroup interaction are in most cases simply repulsive. (author)

  10. Comparison of micelle structure of glycolipids with different head groups by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton; Hartmann, Thorsten; Niemeyer, Bernd; Garamus, V.M.; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Glycolipids such as n-alkyl- beta-D-glucopyranoside and n-alkyl- beta-D-maltopyranoside can self-assemble into different structures depending on solution conditions. Their amphiphilic properties enable them to serve as biosurfactants in biology and biotechnology, especially for solubilizing membrane proteins. The physicochemical properties of glycolipids have attracted attentions from several research groups, aiming to better understand their application in biological and environmental processes. For example, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering have been used to study micelle structures formed by glycolipids. Our previous work has shown that n-octyl-beta- D-glucopyranoside and n-octyl- beta-D-maltopyranoside form micelles with different structure, suggesting an important role of the sugar head group in micelle formation. In the present work, we further compare micelle structures of n-octyl- beta-Dglucopyranoside and n-octyl- beta-D-galactopyranoside. These two glycolipids have the same hydrophobic tail and their head sugar groups differ only in the conformation with one hydroxyl group pointing to different direction. Our SANS data together with phase behaviours reported by other group have suggested that a slight alteration of head group conformation can significantly affect self-assembly of glycolipids. (authors)

  11. Disassembly of Bacterial Biofilms by the Self-Assembled Glycolipids Derived from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Yadavali Siva; Miryala, Sandeep; Lalitha, Krishnamoorthy; Ranjitha, K; Barbhaiwala, Shehnaz; Sridharan, Vellaisamy; Maheswari, C Uma; Srinandan, C S; Nagarajan, Subbiah

    2017-11-22

    More than 80% of chronic infections of bacteria are caused by biofilms. It is also a long-term survival strategy of the pathogens in a nonhost environment. Several amphiphilic molecules have been used in the past to potentially disrupt biofilms; however, the involvement of multistep synthesis, complicated purification and poor yield still remains a major problem. Herein, we report a facile synthesis of glycolipid based surfactant from renewable feedstocks in good yield. The nature of carbohydrate unit present in glycolipid influence the ring chain tautomerism, which resulted in the existence of either cyclic structure or both cyclic and acyclic structures. Interestingly, these glycolipids self-assemble into gel in highly hydrophobic solvents and vegetable oils, and displayed foam formation in water. The potential application of these self-assembled glycolipids to disrupt preformed biofilm was examined against various pathogens. It was observed that glycolipid 6a disrupts Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes biofilm, while the compound 6c was effective in disassembling uropathogenic E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium biofilms. Altogether, the supramolecular self-assembled materials, either as gel or as surfactant solution could be potentially used for surface cleansing in hospital environments or the food processing industries to effectively reduce pathogenic biofilms.

  12. The challenges of understanding glycolipid functions: An open outlook based on molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, M.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    and molecular simulations can be used to shed light on the role of glycolipids in membrane structure and dynamics, receptor function, and other phenomena related to emergence of diseases such as Parkinson's. The cases we discuss highlight the challenge to understand how glycolipids function in cell membranes......, and the significant added value that one would gain by bridging molecular simulations with experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Glycolipids are the most complex lipid type in cell membranes, characterized by a great diversity of different structures and functions. The underlying atomistic/molecular interactions and mechanisms associated with these functions are not well understood. Here we discuss how atomistic...

  13. Phase sensitive molecular dynamics of self-assembly glycolipid thin films: A dielectric spectroscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham, T. S.; Ng, B. K.; Gan, W. C.; Majid, W. H. Abd.; Hashim, R.; Zahid, N. I.; Chaiprapa, Jitrin

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid, found commonly in membranes, is also a liquid crystal material which can self-assemble without the presence of a solvent. Here, the dielectric and conductivity properties of three synthetic glycolipid thin films in different thermotropic liquid crystal phases were investigated over a frequency and temperature range of (10-2-106 Hz) and (303-463 K), respectively. The observed relaxation processes distinguish between the different phases (smectic A, columnar/hexagonal, and bicontinuous cubic Q) and the glycolipid molecular structures. Large dielectric responses were observed in the columnar and bicontinuous cubic phases of the longer branched alkyl chain glycolipids. Glycolipids with the shortest branched alkyl chain experience the most restricted self-assembly dynamic process over the broad temperature range studied compared to the longer ones. A high frequency dielectric absorption (Process I) was observed in all samples. This is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network from the sugar group. An additional low-frequency mechanism (Process II) with a large dielectric strength was observed due to the internal dynamics of the self-assembly organization. Phase sensitive domain heterogeneity in the bicontinuous cubic phase was related to the diffusion of charge carriers. The microscopic features of charge hopping were modelled using the random walk scheme, and two charge carrier hopping lengths were estimated for two glycolipid systems. For Process I, the hopping length is comparable to the hydrogen bond and is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network. Additionally, that for Process II is comparable to the bilayer spacing, hence confirming that this low-frequency mechanism is associated with the internal dynamics within the phase.

  14. Avoidance-based human Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrea H.; Niznikiewicz, Michael A.; Delamater, Andrew R.; Delgado, Mauricio R.

    2013-01-01

    The Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) paradigm probes the influence of Pavlovian cues over instrumentally learned behavior. The paradigm has been used extensively to probe basic cognitive and motivational processes in studies of animal learning but, more recently, PIT and its underlying neural basis have been extended to investigations in humans. These initial neuroimaging studies of PIT have focused on the influence of appetitively conditioned stimuli on instrumental responses maintained by positive reinforcement, and highlight the involvement of the striatum. In the current study, we sought to understand the neural correlates of PIT in an aversive Pavlovian learning situation when instrumental responding was maintained through negative reinforcement. Participants exhibited specific PIT, wherein selective increases in instrumental responding to conditioned stimuli occurred when the stimulus signaled a specific aversive outcome whose omission negatively reinforced the instrumental response. Additionally, a general PIT effect was observed such that when a stimulus was associated with a different aversive outcome than was used to negatively reinforce instrumental behavior, the presence of that stimulus caused a non-selective increase in overall instrumental responding. Both specific and general PIT behavioral effects correlated with increased activation in corticostriatal circuitry, particularly in the striatum, a region involved in cognitive and motivational processes. These results suggest that avoidance-based PIT utilizes a similar neural mechanism to that seen with PIT in an appetitive context, which has implications for understanding mechanisms of drug-seeking behavior during addiction and relapse. PMID:24118624

  15. Biosynthesis and derivatization of microbial glycolipids and their potential application in tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial-produced glycolipids are biobased products with immense potential for commercial applications. Advances in the production process have led to the lowering of production cost and the appearance of commercial products in niche markets. The ability to manipulate the molecular structure by f...

  16. Endosymbiotic heterocystous cyanobacteria synthesize different heterocyst glycolipids than free-living heterocystous cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, S.; Villareal, T.A.; Hopmans, E.C.; Mets, A.; Swanson, K.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The heterocysts of limnetic nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacteria contain unique glycolipids in their cell wall that create the distinctive gas impermeability of the heterocyst cell wall as well as serve as biomarker lipids for these microbes. It has been assumed that marine free-living and

  17. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 °C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of heterocyst

  18. Self-glycolipids modulate dendritic cells changing the cytokine profiles of committed autoreactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Buschard

    Full Text Available The impact of glycolipids of non-mammalian origin on autoimmune inflammation has become widely recognized. Here we report that the naturally occurring mammalian glycolipids, sulfatide and β-GalCer, affect the differentiation and the quality of antigen presentation by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs. In response to sulfatide and β-GalCer, monocytes develop into immature DCs with higher expression of HLA-DR and CD86 but lower expression of CD80, CD40 and CD1a and lower production of IL-12 compared to non-modulated DCs. Self-glycolipid-modulated DCs responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS by changing phenotype but preserved low IL-12 production. Sulfatide, in particular, reduced the capacity of DCs to stimulate autoreactive Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD65 - specific T cell response and promoted IL-10 production by the GAD65-specific clone. Since sulfatide and β-GalCer induced toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated signaling, we hypothesize that self-glycolipids deliver a (tolerogenic polarizing signal to differentiating DCs, facilitating the maintenance of self-tolerance under proinflammatory conditions.

  19. Novel Polyoxyethylene-Containing Glycolipids Are Synthesized in Corynebacterium matruchotii and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cultured in the Presence of Tween 80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80 to a culture of mycobacteria greatly influences cell permeability and sensitivity to antibiotics but very little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Here we show that Corynebacterium matruchotii (surrogate of mycobacteria converts Tween 80 to a structural series of polyoxyethylenic acids which are then used to form novel series-2A and series-2B glycolipids. Minor series-3 glycolipids were also synthesized. The polyoxyethylenic acids replaced corynomycolic acids in the cell wall. Correspondingly the trehalose dicorynomycolate content was reduced. MALDI mass spectrometry, MS-MS, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR were used to characterize the series-2 glycolipids. Series-2A glycolipid is trehalose 6-C36:2-corynomycolate-6′-polyoxyethylenate and series-2B glycolipid is trehalose 6-C36:2-corynomycolate-6′-furan ring-containing polyoxyethylenate. Mycobacterium smegmatis grown in the presence of Tween 80 also synthesizes series-2 type glycolipids. The synthesis of these novel glycolipids in corynebacteria and mycobacteria should result in gross changes in the cell wall permeability and drug sensitivity.

  20. Current relevance of fungal and trypanosomatid glycolipids and sphingolipids: studies defining structures conspicuously absent in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio K. Takahashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, glycosphingolipids have been attracting attention due to their role on biological systems as second messengers or modulators of signal transduction, affecting several events, which range from apoptosis to regulation of the cell cycle. In pathogenic fungi, glycolipids are expressed in two classes: neutral monohexosylceramides (glucosyl-or galactosylceramide and acidic glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (the latter class carries longer glycan chains. It is worth to mention that monohexosylceramides exhibit significant structural differences in their lipid moieties compared to their mammalian counterparts, whereas the glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides exhibit remarkable structural differences in their carbohydrate moieties in comparison to mammal glycosphingolipids counterpart. We observed that glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides are capable of promoting immune response in infected humans. In addition, inhibiting fungal glycosphingolipid biosynthetic pathways leads to an inhibition of colony formation, spore germination, cell cycle, dimorphism and hyphal growth. Other pathogens, such as trypanosomatids, also present unique glycolipids, which may have an important role for the parasite development and/or disease establishment. Regarding host-pathogen interaction, cell membrane rafts, which are enriched in sphingolipids and sterols, participate in parasite/fungal infection. In this review, it is discussed the different biological roles of (glyco (sphingolipids of pathogenic/opportunistic fungi and trypanosomatids.Recentemente, glicoesfingolipídeos têm atraído atenção devido ao seu papel na biologia celular como segundo-mensageiro ou moduladores da transdução de sinal, afetando vários eventos, desde apoptose até a regulação do ciclo celular. Em fungos patogênicos, existem duas classes de glicolipídeos: monohexosil ceramidas neutras (glucosil-ou galactosilceramida e glicosilinositol fosforilceramidas (os quais apresentam

  1. Monovalent cations transfer through isolated human amnion: a new pharmacological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.; Durlach, J.

    1985-04-01

    Transfer of monovalent cations through the isolated human amnion consists of different factors: paracellular, coupling, ATPase dependent cellular transfer, leak cellular transfer. Understanding this transfer permits testing of the action of various substances. Physiological substances (Mg, taurine) increase ionic transfer and there is a vicarious effect between Mg and taurine. The tocolytic agents MgSO/sub 4/ and ethanol do not exhibit a good effect on the transfer: decrease with ethanol; equality between entry and exit fluxes with MgSO/sub 4/. On the other hand, amphotericin B increases mother-to-fetus transfer. Polluting metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As) dramatically reduce exchanges and almost completely inhibit amnion permeability. Ingestion of ethanol also exhibits a dramatic effect on the exchange between mother and fetus through the amnion. Study of ionic transfer in vitro can be considered a pharmacological model to investigate the modifications of mother-fetus exchanges by various substances.

  2. Torpor Inducing Transfer Habitat For Human Stasis To Mars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SpaceWorks proposes the design of a torpor-inducing Mars transfer habitat and an architectural-level assessment to fully characterize the impact to Mars...

  3. Transfer of environmental plutonium and americium across the human gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Leonard, D.R.P.; Lovett, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    Following the ingestion of winkles obtained from a coastal area near Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant, a group of volunteers provided urine for the next 7 days to be analysed for plutonium and americium. From this, estimates of the intake and gut transfer factors for these isotopes were determined. Preliminary estimates of gut transfer factors from a previous study by the same authors were then re-interpreted and combined with the results from the present study. (UK)

  4. Forster resonance energy transfer in the system of human serum albumin-xanthene dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochubey, V. I.; Pravdin, A. B.; Melnikov, A. G.; Konstantinova, I.; Alonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    The processes of interaction of fluorescent probes: eosin and erythrosine with human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by the methods of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Extinction coefficients of probes were determined. Critical transfer radius and the energy transfer efficiency were defined by fluorescence quenching of HSA. Analysis of the excitation spectra of HSA revealed that the energy transfer process is carried out mainly between tryptophanyl and probes.

  5. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Human Brain at 3 T via Selective Inversion Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Dortch, Richard D.; Li, Ke; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Welch, E. Brian; Dula, Adrienne N.; Tamhane, Ashish A.; Gore, John C.; Smith, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging yields indices describing the interactions between free water protons and immobile, macromolecular protons—including the macromolecular to free pool size ratio (PSR) and the rate of magnetization transfer between pools kmf. This study describes the first implementation of the selective inversion recovery quantitative magnetization transfer method on a clinical 3.0-T scanner in human brain in vivo. Selective inversion recovery data were acquired at 1...

  6. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  7. Topical Application of Glycolipids from Isochrysis galbana Prevents Epidermal Hyperplasia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azahara Rodríguez-Luna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis have a significant impact on society. Currently, the major topical treatments have many side effects, making their continued use in patients difficult. Microalgae have emerged as a source of bio-active molecules such as glycolipids with potent anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to investigate the effects of a glycolipid (MGMG-A and a glycolipid fraction (MGDG obtained from the microalga Isochrysis galbana on a TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia murine model. In a first set of experiments, we examined the preventive effects of MGMG-A and MGDG dissolved in acetone on TPA-induced hyperplasia model in mice. In a second step, we performed an in vivo permeability study by using rhodamine-containing cream, ointment, or gel to determinate the formulation that preserves the skin architecture and reaches deeper. The selected formulation was assayed to ensure the stability and enhanced permeation properties of the samples in an ex vivo experiment. Finally, MGDG-containing cream was assessed in the hyperplasia murine model. The results showed that pre-treatment with acetone-dissolved glycolipids reduced skin edema, epidermal thickness, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 in epidermal tissue. The in vivo and ex vivo permeation studies showed that the cream formulation had the best permeability profile. In the same way, MGDG-cream formulation showed better permeation than acetone-dissolved preparation. MGDG-cream application attenuated TPA-induced skin edema, improved histopathological features, and showed a reduction of the inflammatory cell infiltrate. In addition, this formulation inhibited epidermal expression of COX-2 in a similar way to dexamethasone. Our results suggest that an MGDG-containing cream could be an emerging therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammatory skin pathologies such as psoriasis.

  8. Decay accelerating factor (DAF) is anchored to membranes by a C-terminal glycolipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medof, M.E.; Haas, R.; Walter, E.I.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified 70 kDa membrane (m) DAF incorporates into cells when added in vitro. A 2 kDa smaller DAF form which functions extrinsically like C4bp but is unable to incorporate can be isolated from urine (u). Because of common deficits of mDAF and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in erythrocytes (E) of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), mDAF was analyzed for a O-terminal glycolipid membrane anchor similar to that in E AChE. Incubation of E with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme which cleaves a similar glycolipid anchor in trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins (mfVSGs), released 20% of the DAF antigen. The released DAF species resembled uDAF in size, extrinsic model of C4b2a decay, and lack of hydrophobicity. Reductive radiomethylation of mDAF with [ 14 C]HCHO and NaCNBH 3 revealed ethanolamine and glucosamine in proportions similar to those in the E AChE glycolipid anchor. Papain cleavage of radiomethylated mDAF released the labeled ethanolamine and glucosamine in small O-terminal fragments from the residual DAF that retained N-terminal Asp. Following labeling of the anchors of mDAF and E AChE with the lipophilic photoreagent 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine, cleavage at the glucosamine residue by deamination quantitatively released the label from both proteins. Biosynthetic labeling of Hela cells with [ 3 H]ethanolamine resulted in rapid 3 H incorporation into both 48 kDa proDAF and 70 kDa mDAF. These data indicate that mDAF is anchored by a glycolipid similar to that in E AChE, mfVSGs and Thy-1 antigen and raise the possibility that a defect in the assembly or attachment of this structure could account for the deficits of mDAF and E AChE in PNH

  9. Fossilized glycolipids reveal past oceanic N2 fixation by heterocystous cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, Thorsten; Speelman, Eveline N.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe

    2010-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria play an essential role in sustaining primary productivity in contemporary oceans and freshwater systems. However, the significance of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in past nitrogen cycling is difficult to establish as their preservation potential is relatively poor and specific biological markers are presently lacking. Heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacteria synthesize unique long-chain glycolipids in the cell envelope covering the heterocyst cell to protect the oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. We found that these heterocyst glycolipids are remarkably well preserved in (ancient) lacustrine and marine sediments, unambiguously indicating the (past) presence of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria. Analysis of Pleistocene sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea showed that heterocystous cyanobacteria, likely as epiphytes in symbiosis with planktonic diatoms, were particularly abundant during deposition of sapropels. Eocene Arctic Ocean sediments deposited at a time of large Azolla blooms contained glycolipids typical for heterocystous cyanobacteria presently living in symbiosis with the freshwater fern Azolla, indicating that this symbiosis already existed in that time. Our study thus suggests that heterocystous cyanobacteria played a major role in adding “new” fixed nitrogen to surface waters in past stratified oceans. PMID:20966349

  10. Transfer of radionuclides from the environment to human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, N.; Dean, J.; Veska, E.

    1988-03-01

    This report gives detailed procedures for: collecting, storing and shipping human milk samples; complete decomposition of human milk samples by nitric acid-perchloric acid oxidation; and sequential separation and determinations of lead 210, radium 226, thorium 230, natural thorium and natural uranium from decomposed human milk solutions. This sequential separation method is capable of detecting 0.025 Bq of radium 226, thorium 230 and thorium 232 and 0.05 Bq of lead 210. Recoveries are approximately 70% for radium 226 and 90% for thorium 230, thorium 232 and lead 210. This report also outlines a proposed field study program

  11. Microbiota and Human Health: characterization techniques and transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo-Moreno, Rosa; Alarcón-Cavero, Teresa; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Delgado-Palacio, Susana; Ferrer-Martínez, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    The human microbiota comprises all the microorganisms of our body, which can also be categorised as commensals, mutualists and pathogens according to their behaviour. Our knowledge of the human microbiota has considerably increased since the introduction of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing (16S rDNA gene). This technological breakthrough has seen a revolution in the knowledge of the microbiota composition and its implications in human health. This article details the different human bacterial ecosystems and the scientific evidence of their involvement in different diseases. The faecal microbiota transplant procedure, particularly used to treat recurrent diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile, and the methodological bases of the new molecular techniques used to characterise microbiota are also described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurements of actinide gut-transfer factors in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.S.; Ham, G.J.; Harrison, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the gastrointestinal absorption in humans of 239 Np and 242 Cm administered together in citrate media. Using five volunteers, consistent results of (2.0 ± 0.2) x 10 -4 and (1.7 ± 0.3) x 10 -4 were obtained for Np and Cm respectively; the quoted uncertainties are the standard errors of the means. A progress report is given of work to measure the f 1 value for Pu in humans. Early work suggests an f 1 value of 2 x 10 -4 . (author)

  13. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  14. The Bacterial Mobile Resistome Transfer Network Connecting the Animal and Human Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongfei; Yang, Xi; Li, Jing; Lv, Na; Liu, Fei; Wu, Jun; Lin, Ivan Y C; Wu, Na; Weimer, Bart C; Gao, George F; Liu, Yulan; Zhu, Baoli

    2016-11-15

    Horizontally acquired antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteria are highly mobile and have been ranked as principal risk resistance determinants. However, the transfer network of the mobile resistome and the forces driving mobile ARG transfer are largely unknown. Here, we present the whole profile of the mobile resistome in 23,425 bacterial genomes and explore the effects of phylogeny and ecology on the recent transfer (≥99% nucleotide identity) of mobile ARGs. We found that mobile ARGs are mainly present in four bacterial phyla and are significantly enriched in Proteobacteria The recent mobile ARG transfer network, which comprises 703 bacterial species and 16,859 species pairs, is shaped by the bacterial phylogeny, while an ecological barrier also exists, especially when interrogating bacteria colonizing different human body sites. Phylogeny is still a driving force for the transfer of mobile ARGs between farm animals and the human gut, and, interestingly, the mobile ARGs that are shared between the human and animal gut microbiomes are also harbored by diverse human pathogens. Taking these results together, we suggest that phylogeny and ecology are complementary in shaping the bacterial mobile resistome and exert synergistic effects on the development of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. The development of antibiotic resistance threatens our modern medical achievements. The dissemination of antibiotic resistance can be largely attributed to the transfer of bacterial mobile antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Revealing the transfer network of these genes in bacteria and the forces driving the gene flow is of great importance for controlling and predicting the emergence of antibiotic resistance in the clinic. Here, by analyzing tens of thousands of bacterial genomes and millions of human and animal gut bacterial genes, we reveal that the transfer of mobile ARGs is mainly controlled by bacterial phylogeny but under ecological constraints. We also found

  15. Blood-brain transfer of Pittsburgh compound B in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Aanerud, Joel; Braendgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    -brain barrier is held to be high but the permeability-surface area product and extraction fractions in patients or healthy volunteers are not known. We used PET to determine the clearance associated with the unidrectional blood-brain transfer of [(11)C]PiB and the corresponding cerebral blood flow rates...... with the observation that numerically, but insignificantly, unidirectional blood-brain clearances are lower and extraction fractions higher in the patients. The evidence of unchanged permeability-surface area products in the patients implies that blood flow changes can be deduced from the unidirectional blood......In the labeled form, the Pittsburgh compound B (2-(4'-{N-methyl-[(11)C]}methyl-aminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole, [(11)C]PiB), is used as a biomarker for positron emission tomography (PET) of brain β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The permeability of [(11)C]PiB in the blood...

  16. Prediction and Uncertainty in Human Pavlovian to Instrumental Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Leanne; Hogarth, Lee; Duka, Theodora

    2011-01-01

    Attentional capture and behavioral control by conditioned stimuli have been dissociated in animals. The current study assessed this dissociation in humans. Participants were trained on a Pavlovian schedule in which 3 visual stimuli, A, B, and C, predicted the occurrence of an aversive noise with 90%, 50%, or 10% probability, respectively.…

  17. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2009-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  18. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Sun, Xiaofang, E-mail: xiaofangsun@hotmail.com [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2009-04-24

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  19. Bioactivity of a Novel Glycolipid Produced by a Halophilic Buttiauxella sp. and Improving Submerged Fermentation Using a Response Surface Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrazagh Marzban

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An antimicrobial glycolipid biosurfactant (GBS, extracted and identified from a marine bacterium, was studied to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms. Production of the GBS was optimized using a statistical method, a response surface method (RSM with a central composite design (CCD for obtaining maximum yields on a cost-effective substrate, molasses. The GBS-producing bacterium was identified as Buttiauxella Species in terms of biochemical and molecular characteristics. This compound showed a desirable antimicrobial activity against some pathogens such as E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Candida albicans, Aspergilus niger, Salmonella enterica. The rheological studies described the stability of the GBS at high values in a range of pH (7–8, temperature (20–60 and salinity (0%–3%. The statistical optimization of GBS fermentation was found to be pH 7, temperature 33 °C, Peptone 1%, NaCl 1% and molasses 1%. The potency of the GBS as an effective antimicrobial agent provides evidence for its use against food and human pathogens. Moreover, favorable production of the GBS in the presence of molasses as a cheap substrate and the feasibility of pilot scale fermentation using an RSM method could expand its uses in food, pharmaceutical products and oil industries.

  20. Transfer of radionuclides by terrestrial food products from semi-natural ecosystems to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The potential radiological significance of radionuclide transfer to humans via foodstuffs derived from semi-natural ecosystems has become apparent since the Chernobyl accident. Foodchain models developed before this time usually did not take such transfers into account. The processes leading to contamination of food in these environments are complex and current understanding of the transfer mechanisms is incomplete. For these reasons the approach adopted in Chapter 3 is to represent, by means of aggregated parameters, the empirical relationships between ground deposits and concentration in the food product. 107 refs, 2 figs, 9 tabs

  1. Elemental transfer from Chinese soil via diet to whole human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongda; Fan Tiqiang; Wu Quan; Liu Qingfen; Zhang Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To calculate elemental transfer coefficients from soil via diet to whole human body and DFs of alkaline earth and alkaline metal elements in these transfers. Methods: Based on the results in this research series, including updated values of elemental dietary intakes and whole body burdens for Chinese adult man as well quoted national elemental background values in Chinese soil, their transfer coefficients and DFs of alkaline earth and alkaline metal elements in these transfers were calculated by using UNSCEAR model and Observed Ratio Method. Results: Both the transfer coefficients of 50 elements and the DF values of alkaline earth elements with Pb and alkaline metal elements in these transfers have been obtained. Conclusion: The obtained P 23 or P 234 were all much less than P 34 for these elements. For the observed elements, the highest P 23 , P 34 and P 234 were for Hg, Ca and Se respectively, while the lowest for Ce, In and Y. The P 23 and P 234 of rare earth elements were all less than those of alkaline metal or alkaline earth elements. All of these DFs for alkaline earth elements were all smaller than 1, with increasing or decreasing atomic order, the DF values of alkaline earth elements for these transfers were successfully decreasing. The DFs of Pb seem to be between Sr and Ba. For alkaline metal element, DF of Rb or Cs from soil to diet was smaller than 1, but that from diet to whole human body more than 1. (authors)

  2. Efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into Chinese hamster cell mutants: interspecific transfer of the human genes encoding leucyl- and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirullo, R.E.; Dana, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell recipients has been developed that does not rely on using calcium phosphate-precipitated high-molecular-weight DNA. Interspecific cell hybrids between human leukocytes and temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants with either a thermolabile leucyl-tRNA synthetase or a thermolabile asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase were used as the starting material in these experiments. These hybrids contain only one or a few human chromosomes and require expression of the appropriate human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene to grow at 39 degrees C. Hybrids were exposed to very high doses of gamma-irradiation to extensively fragment the chromosomes and re-fused immediately to the original temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant, and secondary hybrids were isolated at 39 degrees C. Secondary hybrids, which had retained small fragments of the human genome containing the selected gene, were subjected to another round of irradiation, refusion, and selection at 39 degrees C to reduce the amount of human DNA even further. Using this procedure, Chinese hamster cell lines have been constructed that express the human genes encoding either asparaginyl- or leucyl-tRNA synthetase, yet less than 0.1% of their DNA is derived from the human genome, as quantitated by a sensitive dot-blot nucleic acid hybridization procedure

  3. The effect of the head group on branched-alkyl chain surfactants in glycolipid/n-octane/water ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainggolan, Irwana; Radiman, Shahidan; Hamzah, Ahmad Sazali; Hashim, Rauzah

    2009-10-01

    Two novel glycolipids have been synthesized and their phase behaviour studied. They have been characterized using FT-IR, FAB and 13C NMR and 1H NMR to ensure the purity of novel glycolipids. The two glycolipids are distinguished based on the head group of glycolipids (monosaccharide/glucose and disaccharide/maltose). These two novel glycolipids have been used as surfactant to perform two phase diagrams. Phase behaviours that have been investigated are 2-hexyldecyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2-HDG)/n-octane/water ternary system and 2-hexyldecyl-beta-D-maltoside (2-HDM)/n-octane/water ternary system. SAXS and polarizing optical microscope have been used to study the phase behaviours of these two surfactants in ternary phase diagram. Study of effect of the head group on branched-alkyl chain surfactants in ternary system is a strategy to derive the structure-property relationship. For comparison, 2-HDM and 2-HDG have been used as surfactant in the same ternary system. The phase diagram of 2-hexyldecyl-beta-D-maltoside/n-octane/water ternary system exhibited a Lalpha phase at a higher concentration regime, followed with two phases and a micellar solution region in a lower concentration regime. The phase diagram of 2-HDG/water/n-octane ternary system shows hexagonal phase, cubic phase, rectangular ribbon phase, lamellar phase, cubic phase as the surfactant concentration increase.

  4. Optothermal transfer simulation in laser-irradiated human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Eduardo H; Zangaro, Renato A; Lobo, Paulo D C; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Pacheco, Marcos T; Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Vitkin, Alex

    2003-04-01

    Laser technology has been studied as a potential replacement to the conventional dental drill. However, to prevent pulpal cell damage, information related to the safety parameters using high-power lasers in oral mineralized tissues is needed. In this study, the heat distribution profiles at the surface and subsurface regions of human dentine samples irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser were simulated using Crank-Nicolson's finite difference method for different laser energies and pulse durations. Heat distribution throughout the dentin layer, from the external dentin surface to the pulp chamber wall, were calculated in each case, to investigate the details of pulsed laser-hard dental tissue interactions. The results showed that the final temperature at the pulp chamber wall and at the dentin surface are strongly dependent on the pulse duration, exposure time, and the energy contained in each pulse.

  5. Private Transfer Choices under Uncertainty in Human Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo J. Raad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical model for parental behavior regarding land inheritance, accounting for consumption and savings strategies. We identify two types of modeling: one with, and another without, strategic behavior. In the first model, we assume that children do not act strategically towards their parent. We find that the child with the highest return to human capital is more likely to receive a larger share of the land if the difference in offspring’s returns is large. In the second model, we allow for each child to influence parent’s optimal choice of bequest by providing services to the latter. We illustrate that the child’s strategy for service provision is sufficient to assure that the one providing more assistance will receive a larger share of the bequest in a Nash equilibrium. We conclude by illustrating our theoretical model with some empirical analysis using longitudinal data for the rural Brazilian Amazon.

  6. Ancient rice cultivar extensively replaces phospholipids with non-phosphorus glycolipid under phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawaraya, Keitaro; Honda, Soichiro; Cheng, Weiguo; Chuba, Masaru; Okazaki, Yozo; Saito, Kazuki; Oikawa, Akira; Maruyama, Hayato; Wasaki, Jun; Wagatsuma, Tadao

    2018-02-07

    Recycling of phosphorus (P) from P-containing metabolites is an adaptive strategy of plants to overcome soil P deficiency. This study was aimed at demonstrating differences in lipid remodelling between low-P-tolerant and -sensitive rice cultivars using lipidome profiling. The rice cultivars Akamai (low-P-tolerant) and Koshihikari (low-P-sensitive) were grown in a culture solution with [2 mg l -1 (+P)] or without (-P) phosphate for 21 and 28 days after transplantation. Upper and lower leaves were collected. Lipids were extracted from the leaves and their composition was analysed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Phospholipids, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), diacylglycerol (DAG), triacylglycerol (TAG) and glycolipids, namely sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and 1,2-diacyl-3-O-alpha-glucuronosyl glycerol (GlcADG), were detected. GlcADG level was higher in both cultivars grown in -P than in +P and the increase was larger in Akamai than in Koshihikari. DGDG, MGDG and SQDG levels were higher in Akamai grown in -P than in +P and the increase was larger in the upper leaves than in the lower leaves. PC, PE, PG and PI levels were lower in both cultivars grown in -P than in +P and the decrease was larger in the lower leaves than in the upper leaves and in Akamai than in Koshihikari. Akamai catabolised more phospholipids in older leaves and synthesised glycolipids in younger leaves. These results suggested that extensive phospholipid replacement with non-phosphorus glycolipids is a mechanism underlying low-P-tolerance in rice cultivars. © 2018 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. The transfer of category knowledge by macaques (Macaca mulatta) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Church, Barbara A; Smith, J David

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive psychologists distinguish implicit, procedural category learning (stimulus-response associations learned outside declarative cognition) from explicit-declarative category learning (conscious category rules). These systems are dissociated by category learning tasks with either a multidimensional, information-integration (II) solution or a unidimensional, rule-based (RB) solution. In the present experiments, humans and two monkeys learned II and RB category tasks fostering implicit and explicit learning, respectively. Then they received occasional transfer trials-never directly reinforced-drawn from untrained regions of the stimulus space. We hypothesized that implicit-procedural category learning-allied to associative learning-would transfer weakly because it is yoked to the training stimuli. This result was confirmed for humans and monkeys. We hypothesized that explicit category learning-allied to abstract category rules-would transfer robustly. This result was confirmed only for humans. That is, humans displayed explicit category knowledge that transferred flawlessly. Monkeys did not. This result illuminates the distinctive abstractness, stimulus independence, and representational portability of humans' explicit category rules. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Modelling flow and heat transfer around a seated human body by computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Voigt, Lars Peter Kølgaard

    2003-01-01

    A database (http://www.ie.dtu.dk/manikin) containing a detailed representation of the surface geometry of a seated female human body was created from a surface scan of a thermal manikin (minus clothing and hair). The radiative heat transfer coefficient and the natural convection flow around...... of the computational manikin has all surface features of a human being; (2) the geometry is an exact copy of an experimental thermal manikin, enabling detailed comparisons between calculations and experiments....

  9. SAR in human head model due to resonant wireless power transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guoqiang; Li, Yanhong; Song, Xianjin

    2016-04-29

    Efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between transmitter and the receiver has been achieved based on the magnetic resonant coupling method. The influence of electromagnetic field on the human body due to resonant wireless power transfer system (RWPT) should be taken into account during the design process of the system. To analyze the transfer performance of the RWPT system and the change rules of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head model due to the RWPT system. The circuit-field coupling method for a RWPT system with consideration of the displacement current was presented. The relationship between the spiral coil parameters and transfer performance was studied. The SAR in the human head model was calculated under two different exposure conditions. A system with output power higher than 10 W at 0.2 m distance operating at a frequency of approximately 1 MHz was designed. The FEM simulation results show the peak SAR value is below the safety limit which appeared when the human head model is in front of the transmitter. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results, which verified the validity of the analysis and design.

  10. Force sensor for measuring power transfer between the human body and the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, Robert Anton; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    A force sensor with capacitive readout is designed and realized for the measurement of mechanical power transfer. The ultimate aim is to integrate this in a glove that determines the complete mechanical interaction between the human hand and the environment. The sensor measures the normal force and

  11. Complementation of a DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells by transfer of human chromosome 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Complementation of the repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group A was achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 9. A set of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each containing a single Ecogpt-marked human chromosome, was used as a source of donor chromosomes. Chromosome transfer to XPTG-1 cells, a hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mutant of simian virus 40-transformed complementation group A cells, was achieved by microcell fusion and selection for Ecogpt. Chromosome-transfer clones of XPTG-1 cells, each containing a different human donor chromosome, were analyzed for complementation of sensitivity to UV irradiation. Among all the clones, increased levels of resistance to UV was observed only in clones containing chromosome 9. Since our recipient cell line XPTG-1 is hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient, cultivation of Ecogpt+ clones in medium containing 6-thioguanine permits selection of cells for loss of the marker and, by inference, transferred chromosome 9. Clones isolated for growth in 6-thioguanine, which have lost the Ecogpt-marked chromosome, exhibited a UV-sensitive phenotype, confirming the presence of the repair gene(s) for complementation group A on chromosome 9

  12. Inhibition of glycolipid biosynthesis by N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxy-pentyl)-deoxynojirimycin protects against the inflammatory response in hapten-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Chong; Bullens, Dominique; Kasran, Ahmad; Maerten, Philippe; Boon, Louis; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van Assche, Gert; Geboes, Karel; Rutgeerts, Paul; Ceuppens, Jan L.

    2004-01-01

    Since glycolipid biosynthesis is potentially involved in immunological and inflammatory responses, we tested the effect of a novel inhibitor of intracellular glycolipid biosynthesis N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxy-pentyl)-deoxynojirimycin (AMP-DNM) in two hapten-induced colitis models: trinitrobenzene

  13. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... a system that can be considered a paradigm for interactions of soluble proteins with membrane receptors. In this work, we have investigated different technologies for capturing nanodiscs containing the glycolipid receptor G(M1) in lipid bilayers, enabling measurements of binding of its soluble interaction...

  14. Proteomic analysis of the metabolic adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudozyma flocculosa leading to glycolipid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélanger Richard R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast-like epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma flocculosa is known to antagonize powdery mildew fungi through proliferation on colonies presumably preceded by the release of an antifungal glycolipid (flocculosin. In culture conditions, P. flocculosa can be induced to produce or not flocculosin through manipulation of the culture medium nutrients. In order to characterize and understand the metabolic changes in P. flocculosa linked to glycolipid production, we conducted a 2-DE proteomic analysis and compared the proteomic profile of P. flocculosa growing under conditions favoring the development of the fungus (control or conducive to flocculosin synthesis (stress. A large number of protein spots (771 were detected in protein extracts of the control treatment compared to only 435 matched protein spots in extracts of the stress cultures, which clearly suggests an important metabolic reorganization in slow-growing cells producing flocculosin. From the latter treatment, we were able to identify 21 protein spots that were either specific to the treatment or up-regulated significantly (2-fold increase. All of them were identified based on similarity between predicted ORF of the newly sequenced genome of P. flocculosa with Ustilago maydis' available annotated sequences. These proteins were associated with the carbon and fatty acid metabolism, and also with the filamentous change of the fungus leading to flocculosin production. This first look into the proteome of P. flocculosa suggests that flocculosin synthesis is elicited in response to specific stress or limiting conditions.

  15. A New Glucocerebrosidase Chaperone Reduces α-Synuclein and Glycolipid Levels in iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons from Patients with Gaucher Disease and Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Moaven, Nima; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Rogers, Steven A; Patnaik, Samarjit; Schoenen, Frank J; Westbroek, Wendy; Zheng, Wei; Sullivan, Patricia; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Khaliq, Zayd M; Lopez, Grisel J; Goldstein, David S; Ory, Daniel S; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-07-13

    Among the known genetic risk factors for Parkinson disease, mutations in GBA1, the gene responsible for the lysosomal disorder Gaucher disease, are the most common. This genetic link has directed attention to the role of the lysosome in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. To study how glucocerebrosidase impacts parkinsonism and to evaluate new therapeutics, we generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from four patients with Type 1 (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, two with and two without parkinsonism, and one patient with Type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, and differentiated them into macrophages and dopaminergic neurons. These cells exhibited decreased glucocerebrosidase activity and stored the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, demonstrating their similarity to patients with Gaucher disease. Dopaminergic neurons from patients with Type 2 and Type 1 Gaucher disease with parkinsonism had reduced dopamine storage and dopamine transporter reuptake. Levels of α-synuclein, a protein present as aggregates in Parkinson disease and related synucleinopathies, were selectively elevated in neurons from the patients with parkinsonism or Type 2 Gaucher disease. The cells were then treated with NCGC607, a small-molecule noninhibitory chaperone of glucocerebrosidase identified by high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry structure optimization. This compound successfully chaperoned the mutant enzyme, restored glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels, and reduced glycolipid storage in both iPSC-derived macrophages and dopaminergic neurons, indicating its potential for treating neuronopathic Gaucher disease. In addition, NCGC607 reduced α-synuclein levels in dopaminergic neurons from the patients with parkinsonism, suggesting that noninhibitory small-molecule chaperones of glucocerebrosidase may prove useful for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Because GBA1 mutations are the most common genetic risk factor for

  16. Pregnancy derived from human zygote pronuclear transfer in a patient who had arrested embryos after IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John; Zhuang, Guanglun; Zeng, Yong; Grifo, Jamie; Acosta, Carlo; Shu, Yimin; Liu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear transfer of an oocyte into the cytoplasm of another enucleated oocyte has shown that embryogenesis and implantation are influenced by cytoplasmic factors. We report a case of a 30-year-old nulligravida woman who had two failed IVF cycles characterized by all her embryos arresting at the two-cell stage and ultimately had pronuclear transfer using donor oocytes. After her third IVF cycle, eight out of 12 patient oocytes and 12 out of 15 donor oocytes were fertilized. The patient's pronuclei were transferred subzonally into an enucleated donor cytoplasm resulting in seven reconstructed zygotes. Five viable reconstructed embryos were transferred into the patient's uterus resulting in a triplet pregnancy with fetal heartbeats, normal karyotypes and nuclear genetic fingerprinting matching the mother's genetic fingerprinting. Fetal mitochondrial DNA profiles were identical to those from donor cytoplasm with no detection of patient's mitochondrial DNA. This report suggests that a potentially viable pregnancy with normal karyotype can be achieved through pronuclear transfer. Ongoing work to establish the efficacy and safety of pronuclear transfer will result in its use as an aid for human reproduction. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Managing Human Tissue Transfer Across National Boundaries - An Approach from an Institution in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Safia; Behrens, Kevin; Slabbert, Melodie; Sanne, Ian

    2016-04-01

    With biobank research on the increase and the history of exploitation in Africa, it has become necessary to manage the transfer of human tissues across national boundaries. There are many accepted templates of Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs) that currently exist internationally. However, these templates do not address the specific concerns of South Africa and even of Africa as a continent. This article will examine three significantly important ethico-legal concepts that were deliberated and carefully adapted by a South African Institution to suit the transfer of Human Biological Materials (HBMs) and associated data for biobank research, namely: informed consent; benefit sharing arrangements; and ownership together with intellectual property rights in human tissues. The discussion includes an analysis of current practice; the ethico-legal challenges in the South African/African context; the decisions made with regard to how the related ethico-legal challenges were addressed in the MTA; and justifications for implementing these decisions. The processes considered could be of benefit to other developing world countries who consider it necessary to manage the transfer of HBMs across national boundaries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The importance of specific human capital, planning and familiarity in Dutch small firm ownership transfers : a seller’s perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lex van Teeffelen; Martijn Driessen; Lorraine Uhlaner

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the transfer process and the importance of human capital and succession planning as firm resource from the seller’s perspective. It further differentiates amongst two types of human capital - specific and generic - to predict the transfer duration, obtained price and

  19. The magnetization transfer characteristics of human breast tissues: an in vitro NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicott, C.; Thomas, J. M.; Goode, A. W.

    1999-05-01

    A series of freshly excised human breast tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histopathology examination. Tissues comprised normal parenchymal, adipose, fibrocystic, fibroadenoma and malignant types. An inversion-recovery sequence performed both with and without magnetization transfer allowed T1, T1, and values to be obtained. From this information, the magnetization transfer rate constant, K, was calculated for each tissue sample. These data show that T1 provided greater discrimination between neoplasic and normal tissues than did T1. However, neither T1 nor K values provided a means of discriminating between benign and malignant disease.

  20. The magnetization transfer characteristics of human breast tissues: an in vitro NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callicott, C.; Thomas, J.M.; Goode, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    A series of freshly excised human breast tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histopathology examination. Tissues comprised normal parenchymal, adipose, fibrocystic, fibroadenoma and malignant types. An inversion-recovery sequence performed both with and without magnetization transfer allowed T1, T1 5 , M o and M 5 values to be obtained. From this information, the magnetization transfer rate constant, K, was calculated for each tissue sample. These data show that T1 5 provided greater discrimination between neoplasic and normal tissues than did T1. However, neither T1 5 nor K values provided a means of discriminating between benign and malignant disease. (author)

  1. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A role for research ethics committees in exchanges of human biospecimens through material transfer agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Donald; Nicol, Dianne; Nicolás, Pilar; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2014-09-01

    International transfers of human biological material (biospecimens) and data are increasing, and commentators are starting to raise concerns about how donor wishes are protected in such circumstances. These exchanges are generally made under contractual material transfer agreements (MTAs). This paper asks what role, if any, should research ethics committees (RECs) play in ensuring legal and ethical conduct in such exchanges. It is recommended that RECs should play a more active role in the future development of best practice MTAs involving exchange of biospecimens and data and in monitoring compliance.

  3. Food and human gut as reservoirs of transferable antibiotic resistance encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc eRolain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR over the past decade in human pathogens has become a worldwide health concern. Recent genomic and metagenomic studies in humans, animals, in food and in the environment have led to the discovery of a huge reservoir of AR genes called the resistome that could be mobilized and transferred from these sources to human pathogens. AR is a natural phenomenon developed by bacteria to protect antibiotic-producing bacteria from their own products and also to increase their survival in highly competitive microbial environments. Although antibiotics are used extensively in humans and animals, there is also considerable usage of antibiotics in agriculture, especially in animal feeds and aquaculture. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the sources of AR and the use of antibiotics in these reservoirs as selectors for emergence of AR bacteria in humans via the food chain.

  4. Comparative placental transfer, localization, and effects of radionuclides in experimental animal and human pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Meznarich, H.K.; Traub, R.J.

    1991-11-01

    Estimating radiation doses to the human embryo/fetus from radionuclides and predicting effects requires extrapolation of data from studies of laboratory species, with scaling for species-specific developmental stage and gestational time relationships and maturities at birth. Combinations of fetal-to-maternal ratios of concentrations, patterns of deposition, transfer kinetics, and compartmental and physiologic models are used to predict radioactivity levels and radiation doses to the conceptus. There is agreement between values expressing fractional transfer across the placenta (θ) with tabulated values for fractional absorption (f 1 ) from gastrointestinal (GI) tract or lung for most substances commonly involved in metabolic processes. A tendency toward disagreement for some other materials is thought to involve explanations based on their physicochemistry, toxicity, or the influence of target tissue development on placental transfer kinetics

  5. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of the Human Body under Forced Convection from Ceiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Rezgals, Lauris; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    The average convective heat transfer coefficient for a seated human body exposed to downward flow from above was determined. Thermal manikin with complex body shape and size of an average Scandinavian female was used. The surface temperature distribution of the manikin’s body was as the skin...... of the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body (hc [W/(m2•K)]) was proposed: hc=4.088+6.592V1.715 for a seated naked body at 20ºC and hc=2.874+7.427V1.345 for a seated naked body at 26ºC. Differences in the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body in low air velocity range, V

  6. Retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human β-globin genes in cultured murine and human erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber-Benarous, A.; Cone, R.D.; London, I.M.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned human β-globin DNA sequences from a genomic library prepared from DNA isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562 and have used the retroviral vector pZip-NeoSV(X)1 to introduce a 3.0-kilobase segment encompassing the globin gene into mouse erythroleukemia cells. Whereas the endogenous K562 β-globin gene is repressed in K562 cells, when introduced into mouse erythroleukemia cells by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, the β-globin gene from K562 cells was transcribed and induced 5-20-fold after treatment of the cells with dimethyl sulfoxide. The transcripts were correctly initiated, and expression and regulation of the K562 gene were identical to the expression of a normal human β-globin gene transferred into mouse erythroleukemia cells in the same way. They have also introduced the normal human β-globin gene into K562 cells using the same retrovirus vector. SP6 analysis of the RNA isolated from the transduced cells showed that the normal β-globin gene was transcribed at a moderately high level, before or after treatment with hemin. Based on these data, they suggest that the lack of expression of the endogenous β-globin gene in K562 cells does not result from an alteration in the gene itself and may not result from a lack of factor(s) necessary for β-lobin gene transcription. Retroviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene may, however, uniquely influence expression of the gene K562 cells

  7. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  8. Imaging of endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using frequency labeled exchange transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nirbhay N; Jones, Craig K; Hua, Jun; Xu, Jiadi; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-04-01

    To image endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using a recently reported method called frequency labeled exchange transfer (FLEX) MRI. As opposed to labeling exchangeable protons using saturation (i.e., chemical exchange saturation transfer, or CEST), FLEX labels exchangeable protons with their chemical shift evolution. The use of short high-power frequency pulses allows more efficient labeling of rapidly exchanging protons, while time domain acquisition allows removal of contamination from semi-solid magnetization transfer effects. FLEX-based exchangeable proton signals were detected in human brain over the 1-5 ppm frequency range from water. Conventional magnetization transfer contrast and the bulk water signal did not interfere in the FLEX spectrum. The information content of these signals differed from in vivo CEST data in that the average exchange rate of these signals was 350-400 s(-1) , much faster than the amide signal usually detected using direct saturation (∼30 s(-1) ). Similarly, fast exchanging protons could be detected in egg white in the same frequency range where amide and amine protons of mobile proteins and peptides are known to resonate. FLEX MRI in the human brain preferentially detects more rapidly exchanging amide/amine protons compared to traditional CEST experiments, thereby changing the information content of the exchangeable proton spectrum. This has the potential to open up different types of endogenous applications as well as more easy detection of rapidly exchanging protons in diaCEST agents or fast exchanging units such as water molecules in paracest agents without interference of conventional magnetization transfer contrast. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Spontaneous transfer of stearic acids between human serum albumin and PEG:2000-grafted DPPC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantusa, Manuela; Stirpe, Andrea; Sportelli, Luigi; Bartucci, Rosa

    2010-05-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to study the transfer of stearic acids between human serum albumin (HSA) and sterically stabilized liposomes (SSL) composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and of submicellar content of poly(ethylene glycol:2000)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (PEG:2000-DPPE). Protein/lipid dispersions are considered in which spin-labelled stearic acids at the 16th carbon atom along the acyl chain (16-SASL) are inserted either in the protein or in the SSL. Two component ESR spectra with different rotational mobility are obtained over a broad range of temperature and membrane composition. Indeed, superimposed to an anisotropic protein-signal, appears a more isotropic lipid-signal. Since in the samples only one matrix (protein or membranes) is spin-labelled, the other component accounts for the transfer of 16-SASL between albumin and membranes. The two components have been resolved and quantified by spectral subtractions, and the fraction, f (p) (16-SASL), of spin labels bound non-covalently to the protein has been used to monitor the transfer. It is found that it depends on the type of donor and acceptor matrix, on the physical state of the membranes and on the grafting density of the polymer-lipids. Indeed, it is favoured from SSL to HSA and the fraction of stearic acids transferred increases with temperature in both directions of transfer. Moreover, in the presence of polymer-lipids, the transfer from HSA to SSL is slightly attenuated, especially in the brush regime of the polymer-chains. Instead, the transfer from SSL to HSA is favoured by the polymer-lipids much more in the mushroom than in the brush regime.

  10. In vitro thermodynamic dissection of human copper transfer from chaperone to target protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Moritz S; Weise, Christoph F; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2012-01-01

    Transient protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are fundamental components of biological activity. To understand biological activity, not only the structures of the involved proteins are important but also the energetics of the individual steps of a reaction. Here we use in vitro biophysical methods to deduce thermodynamic parameters of copper (Cu) transfer from the human copper chaperone Atox1 to the fourth metal-binding domain of the Wilson disease protein (WD4). Atox1 and WD4 have the same fold (ferredoxin-like fold) and Cu-binding site (two surface exposed cysteine residues) and thus it is not clear what drives metal transfer from one protein to the other. Cu transfer is a two-step reaction involving a metal-dependent ternary complex in which the metal is coordinated by cysteines from both proteins (i.e., Atox1-Cu-WD4). We employ size exclusion chromatography to estimate individual equilibrium constants for the two steps. This information together with calorimetric titration data are used to reveal enthalpic and entropic contributions of each step in the transfer process. Upon combining the equilibrium constants for both steps, a metal exchange factor (from Atox1 to WD4) of 10 is calculated, governed by a negative net enthalpy change of ∼10 kJ/mol. Thus, small variations in interaction energies, not always obvious upon comparing protein structures alone, may fuel vectorial metal transfer.

  11. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ki [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sorrell, Alice M. [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jae-Seok [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bong-Hwan [Genomics and Bioinformatics Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won-Kyong [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  12. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. → hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. → hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  13. DNA-mediated gene transfer into human diploid fibroblasts derived from normal and ataxia-telangiectasia donors: parameters for DNA transfer and properties of DNA transformants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debenham, P.G.; Webb, M.B.T.; Masson, W.K.; Cox, R.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of DNA-mediated gene transfer into human diploid fibroblasts derived from patients with the radiation sensitive syndrome ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and from a normal donor. Although they are markedly different in their growth characteristics, both normal and A-T strains give similar frequencies for DNA transfer in a model system using the recombinant plasmid pSV2-gpt. pSV2-gpt DNA transformants arise with a frequency between 10 -5 and 10 -4 per viable cell. Analysis of such transformants, although possible, is severely handicapped by the limited clonal life span of diploid human cells. Despite these problems it may be concluded that diploid human fibroblasts are competent recipients for DNA-mediated gene transfer and the putative repair deficiency of A-T does not markedly effect the efficiency of this process. (author)

  14. Computational Characterization of Exogenous MicroRNAs that Can Be Transferred into Human Circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have been long considered synthesized endogenously until very recent discoveries showing that human can absorb dietary microRNAs from animal and plant origins while the mechanism remains unknown. Compelling evidences of microRNAs from rice, milk, and honeysuckle transported to human blood and tissues have created a high volume of interests in the fundamental questions that which and how exogenous microRNAs can be transferred into human circulation and possibly exert functions in humans. Here we present an integrated genomics and computational analysis to study the potential deciding features of transportable microRNAs. Specifically, we analyzed all publicly available microRNAs, a total of 34,612 from 194 species, with 1,102 features derived from the microRNA sequence and structure. Through in-depth bioinformatics analysis, 8 groups of discriminative features have been used to characterize human circulating microRNAs and infer the likelihood that a microRNA will get transferred into human circulation. For example, 345 dietary microRNAs have been predicted as highly transportable candidates where 117 of them have identical sequences with their homologs in human and 73 are known to be associated with exosomes. Through a milk feeding experiment, we have validated 9 cow-milk microRNAs in human plasma using microRNA-sequencing analysis, including the top ranked microRNAs such as bta-miR-487b, miR-181b, and miR-421. The implications in health-related processes have been illustrated in the functional analysis. This work demonstrates the data-driven computational analysis is highly promising to study novel molecular characteristics of transportable microRNAs while bypassing the complex mechanistic details.

  15. Computational Characterization of Exogenous MicroRNAs that Can Be Transferred into Human Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiang; Chiang, Kevin; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been long considered synthesized endogenously until very recent discoveries showing that human can absorb dietary microRNAs from animal and plant origins while the mechanism remains unknown. Compelling evidences of microRNAs from rice, milk, and honeysuckle transported to human blood and tissues have created a high volume of interests in the fundamental questions that which and how exogenous microRNAs can be transferred into human circulation and possibly exert functions in humans. Here we present an integrated genomics and computational analysis to study the potential deciding features of transportable microRNAs. Specifically, we analyzed all publicly available microRNAs, a total of 34,612 from 194 species, with 1,102 features derived from the microRNA sequence and structure. Through in-depth bioinformatics analysis, 8 groups of discriminative features have been used to characterize human circulating microRNAs and infer the likelihood that a microRNA will get transferred into human circulation. For example, 345 dietary microRNAs have been predicted as highly transportable candidates where 117 of them have identical sequences with their homologs in human and 73 are known to be associated with exosomes. Through a milk feeding experiment, we have validated 9 cow-milk microRNAs in human plasma using microRNA-sequencing analysis, including the top ranked microRNAs such as bta-miR-487b, miR-181b, and miR-421. The implications in health-related processes have been illustrated in the functional analysis. This work demonstrates the data-driven computational analysis is highly promising to study novel molecular characteristics of transportable microRNAs while bypassing the complex mechanistic details. PMID:26528912

  16. [3H]cholesteryl ester labeling and transfer among human and honhuman primate plasma lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.S.; Rudel, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    Aliquots of human and nonhuman primate plasma containing 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) were incubated at 37 0 C in tubes previously coated with trace amounts of tritium-labeled cholesteryl oleate ([ 3 H]CO). Initially, cholesteryl esters were transferred at a rapid rate into plasma after which the rate slowed. During 24 h of incubation, an average of 55% of the [ 3 H]CO transferred from the side of the tube into African green monkey plasma, 44% into human plasma and 21% into rat plasma. Greater than 98% of the radioactive ester transferred into plasma was found to be associated with plasma lipoproteins that were then rapidly separated using vertical rotor density gradient ultracentrifugation. In very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-poor plasma after 30 min incubations, high density lipoproteins (HDL) contained most of the [ 3 H]CO while 5- to 24-h incubations resulted in increased labeling of low density proteins (LDL). In VLDL-rich plasma, it was found that in addition to the labeling of HDL, VLDL contained about 25% of the labeled cholesteryl esters after 30-min incubations and, as above, the proportion in LDL subsequently increased. Compositional analyses showed that intermediate-sized LDL (ILDL) were accumulating cholesteryl ester mass while transfer occurred. LDL labeled using this method were injected intravenously into monkeys and their removal from plasma was found to be similar to that found for LDL labeled in vivo. It was concluded that this method of plasma lipoprotein cholesteryl ester labeling, presumably a result of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity, was efficient, resulted in lipoproteins labeled only in the cholesteryl ester moiety, and induced minimal modification of lipoprotein particles that did not alter their biological activity

  17. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  18. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  19. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  20. T-cell receptor transfer into human T cells with ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koste, L; Beissert, T; Hoff, H; Pretsch, L; Türeci, Ö; Sahin, U

    2014-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy requires genetic modification of T cells with recombinant T-cell receptors (TCRs). Amphotropic retroviral vectors (RVs) used for TCR transduction for this purpose are considered safe in principle. Despite this, TCR-coding and packaging vectors could theoretically recombine to produce replication competent vectors (RCVs), and transduced T-cell preparations must be proven free of RCV. To eliminate the need for RCV testing, we transduced human T cells with ecotropic RVs so potential RCV would be non-infectious for human cells. We show that transfection of synthetic messenger RNA encoding murine cationic amino-acid transporter 1 (mCAT-1), the receptor for murine retroviruses, enables efficient transient ecotropic transduction of human T cells. mCAT-1-dependent transduction was more efficient than amphotropic transduction performed in parallel, and preferentially targeted naive T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ecotropic TCR transduction results in antigen-specific restimulation of primary human T cells. Thus, ecotropic RVs represent a versatile, safe and potent tool to prepare T cells for the adoptive transfer.

  1. Combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing for the development of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Narumi; Abe, Satoshi; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome transfer technology, including chromosome modification, enables the introduction of Mb-sized or multiple genes to desired cells or animals. This technology has allowed innovative developments to be made for models of human disease and humanized animals, including Down syndrome model mice and humanized transchromosomic (Tc) immunoglobulin mice. Genome editing techniques are developing rapidly, and permit modifications such as gene knockout and knockin to be performed in various cell lines and animals. This review summarizes chromosome transfer-related technologies and the combined technologies of chromosome transfer and genome editing mainly for the production of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models. Specifically, these include: (1) chromosome modification with genome editing in Chinese hamster ovary cells and mouse A9 cells for efficient transfer to desired cell types; (2) single-nucleotide polymorphism modification in humanized Tc mice with genome editing; and (3) generation of a disease model of Down syndrome-associated hematopoiesis abnormalities by the transfer of human chromosome 21 to normal human embryonic stem cells and the induction of mutation(s) in the endogenous gene(s) with genome editing. These combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing open up new avenues for drug development and therapy as well as for basic research.

  2. Mechanism of transfer of LDL-derived free cholesterol to HDL subfractions in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miida, T.; Fielding, C.J.; Fielding, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of [ 3 H]cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to different high-density lipoprotein (HDL) species in native human plasma was determined by using nondenaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis. Transfer from LDL had a t 1/2 at 37 degree C of 51 ± 8 min and an activation energy of 18.0 kCal mol -1 . There was unexpected specificity among HDL species as acceptors of LDL-derived labeled cholesterol. The largest fraction of the major α-migrating class (HDL 2b ) was the major initial acceptor of LDL-derived cholesterol. Kinetic analysis indicated a rapid secondary transfer from HDL 2b to smaller αHDL (particularly HDL 3 ) driven enzymatically by the lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase reaction. Rates of transfer among αHDL were most rapid from the largest αHDL fraction (HDL 2b ), suggesting possible protein-mediated facilitation. Simultaneous measurements of the transport of LDL-derived and cell-derived isotopic cholesterol indicated that the former preferably utilized the αHDL pathyway, with little label in pre-βHDL. The same experiments confirmed earlier data that cell-derived cholesterol is preferentially channeled through pre-βHDL. The authors suggest that the functional heterogeneity of HDL demonstrated here includes the ability to independently process cell- and LDL-derived free cholesterol

  3. Transfer of PAMAM dendrimers across human placenta: prospects of its use as drug carrier during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjoge, Anupa R; Rinderknecht, Amber L; Navath, Raghavendra S; Faridnia, Masoud; Kim, Chong J; Romero, Roberto; Miller, Richard K; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2011-03-30

    Dendrimers offer significant potential as nanocarriers for targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transport, kinetics and biodistribution of PAMAM dendrimers ex-vivo across the human placenta in comparison with antipyrine, a freely diffusible molecule, using dually perfused re-circulating term human placental lobules. The purpose of this study is to determine if dendrimers as drug carriers can be used to design drug delivery systems directed at selectively treating either the mother or the fetus. The transplacental transfers of fluorescently (Alexa 488) tagged PAMAM dendrimer (16 kDa) and antipyrine (188 Da) from maternal to fetal circulation were measured using HPLC/dual UV and fluorescent detector (sensitivity of 10 ng/mL for dendrimer and 100 ng/mL for antipyrine respectively). C(max) for the dendrimer-Alexa (DA) in maternal perfusate (T(max)=15 min) was 18 times higher than in the fetal perfusate and never equilibrated with the maternal perfusate during 5.5 h of perfusion (n=4). DA exhibited a measurable but low transplacental transport of 2.26±0.12 μg/mL during 5.5h, where the mean transplacental transfer was 0.84±0.11% of the total maternal concentration and the feto-maternal ratio as percent was 0.073%±0.02. The biochemical and physiological analysis of the placentae perfused with DA demonstrated normal function throughout the perfusion. The immunofluorescence histochemistry confirmed that the biodistribution of DA in perfused placenta was sparsely dispersed, and when noted was principally seen in the inter-villous spaces and outer rim of the villous branches. In a few cases, DA was found internalized and localized in nuclei and cytoplasm of syncytiotrophoblast and inside the villous core; however, DA was mostly absent from the villous capillaries. In conclusion, the PAMAM dendrimers exhibited a low rate of transfer from maternal to the fetal side across the perfused human placenta

  4. Comparative placental transfer, localization, and effects of radionuclides in experimental animal and human pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Traub, R.J.; Meznarich, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Estimating radiation doses to the human embryo/fetus from radionuclides and predicting effects requires extrapolation of data from studies of laboratory species with scaling for species-specific developmental stage and gestational time relationships and maturities at birth. Combinations of fetal-to-maternal ratios of concentrations, patterns of deposition, transfer kinetics, and compartmental and physiologic models are used to predict radioactivity levels and radiation doses to the conceptus. There is agreement between values expressing fractional transfer across the placenta with values for fractional absorption from gastrointestinal tract or lung for most substances. Information about three elements - cesium, strontium, and iodine - serve to present comparative approaches to predicting radiation dose and effect. 25 refs., 11 figs., tab

  5. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  6. Transcytosis of immunoglobulin A in the mouse enterocyte occurs through glycolipid raft- and rab17-containing compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, L L; Immerdal, Lissi

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glycolipid "rafts" have been shown to play a role in apical membrane trafficking in the enterocyte. The present study characterized the membrane compartments of the enterocyte involved in transepithelial transport of small intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA). Methods: Immunogold...... electron microscopy and radioactive labeling of mouse small intestinal explants were performed. RESULTS: IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor/secretory component were present in a raft compartment. Raft association occurred posttranslationally within 30 minutes, preceding secretion...... and were also frequently seen associated with the same vesicular profiles of glycolipid rafts. Colocalization of IgA and rab17, a small guanosine triphosphatase involved in transcytosis, was seen mainly along the basolateral plasma membrane and over basolateral endosomes and vesicles, but also...

  7. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration...... variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends...

  8. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Umegaki-Arao, Noriko; Higgins, Claire A; Itoh, Munenari; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  9. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Gledhill

    Full Text Available The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  10. Effect of Adding Human Chorionic Gonadotropin to The Endometrial Preparation Protocol in Frozen Embryo Transfer Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, one of the initial embryonic signals, isprobably a major regulator of the embryo-endometrial relationship. This study aims to assess theadvantage of HCG supplementation during the secretory phase of hormonally prepared cycles forthe transfer of cryopreserved-thawed embryos.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. Infertile women who werecandidates for frozen-thawed embryo transfers entered the study and were divided into two groups,HCG and control. The endometrial preparation method was similar in both groups: all women receivedestradiol valerate (6 mg po per day from the second day of the menstrual cycle and progesteronein oil (100 mg intramuscular (I.M. when the endometrial thickness reached 8 mm. Estradiol andprogesterone were continued until the tenth week of gestation. In the HCG group, patients received anHCG 5000 IU injection on the first day of progesterone administration and the day of embryo transfer.Results: In this study, 130 couples participated: 65 in the HCG group and 65 in the control group.There was no statistically significant difference between groups regarding basic characteristics.Implantation rate, chemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, and abortion rateswere similar in both groups.Conclusion: Although HCG has some advantages in assisted reproductive technology (ARTcycles, our study did not show any benefit of HCG supplementation during the secretory phase offrozen cycles (Registration Number: IRCT201107266420N4.

  11. Correlation of bacterial viability with uptake of (14C) acetate into phenolic glycolipid-1 of Mycobacterium leprae within Schwannoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, Y.; Antia, N.H.; Mukherjee, R.

    1989-01-01

    The viability of Mycobacterium leprae, maintained within 33B Schwannoma cells, was estimated in terms of incorporation of ( 14 C) acetate into its specific phenolic glycolipid-1. This measure of viability was correlated with two other assays, viz., fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining and mouse footpad growth. Observation of a 2-fold increase in the number of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae over an experimental period of 12 days also corroborated this contention. Furthermore, on addition of anti-leprosy drugs to these intracellular Mycobacterium leprae there was significant decrease in phenolic glycolipid-1 synthesis indicative of loss of viability of the organisms. This study also established the importance of the host cell for active bacillary metabolism, as Mycobacterium leprae maintained in cell-free conditions showed no incorporation into phenolic glycolipid-1. Moreover, compromising the host's protein synthesis capacity with cycloheximide, also led to reduction in bacillary metabolism. As this system measures the metabolic synthesis of a unique Mycobacterium leprae component, it would be useful for development and screening of compounds acting against specific bacillary targets. (author). 19 refs., 5 tabs

  12. Transfer factors across the human gut for plutonium and americium in shellfish from near Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Leonard, D.R.P.; Lovett, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Data on gut transfer factors for environmental forms of radionuclides are essential for estimates of public radiation exposures following ingestion, and thus in decisions on controlling waste disposals. Dose estimates for transuranic nuclides are particularly sensitive to uncertainties stemming from gut transfer data being related to non-environmental forms and/or derived from animal experiments. The main parameter in question is f 1 , the fraction of intake reaching human body fluids following ingestion, as applied in the model of the gastro-intestinal tract used by the ICRP. The ICRP have recently reviewed the metabolism of plutonium and related elements (ICRP, 1986). Values of f 1 were derived from animal data; limited verification was provided by the only human data then available which was based on the low levels of fallout in foodstuffs. The ICRP proposed a cautious value of f 1 of 10 -3 for unknown or mixed compounds of Pu and for other actinides. However, it was recognised that this cautious value may not be appropriate in all situations where a best estimate of absorption is required; in such cases, if a different value more suitable to the specific situation can be justified, it should be employed

  13. Heat Transfer Behavior across the Dentino-Enamel Junction in the Human Tooth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Niu

    Full Text Available During eating, the teeth usually endure the sharply temperature changes because of different foods. It is of importance to investigate the heat transfer and heat dissipation behavior of the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ of human tooth since dentine and enamel have different thermophysical properties. The spatial and temporal temperature distributions on the enamel, dentine, and pulpal chamber of both the human tooth and its discontinuous boundaries, were measured using infrared thermography using a stepped temperature increase on the outer boundary of enamel crowns. The thermal diffusivities for enamel and dentine were deduced from the time dependent temperature change at the enamel and dentine layers. The thermal conductivities for enamel and dentine were calculated to be 0.81 Wm-1K-1 and 0.48 Wm-1K-1 respectively. The observed temperature discontinuities across the interfaces between enamel, dentine and pulp-chamber layers were due to the difference of thermal conductivities at interfaces rather than to the phase transformation. The temperature gradient distributes continuously across the enamel and dentine layers and their junction below a temperature of 42°C, whilst a negative thermal resistance is observed at interfaces above 42°C. These results suggest that the microstructure of the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ junction play an important role in tooth heat transfer and protects the pulp from heat damage.

  14. Evidence that a glycolipid tail anchors antigen 117 to the plasma membrane of Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, H.; Da Silva, A.M.; Klein, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the biochemical features of the putative cell cohesion molecule antigen 117, indicating that it is anchored to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid tail. Antigen 117 can be radiolabeled with [ 3 H]myristate, [ 3 H]palmitate, and [ 14 C]ethanolamine. The fatty acid label is removed by periodate oxidation and nitrous acid deamination, indicating that the fatty acid is attached to the protein by a structure containing carbohydrate and an unsubstituted glucosamine. As cells develop aggregation competence, the antigen is released from the cell surface in a soluble form that can still be radiolabeled with [ 14 C]ethanolamine but not with [ 3 H]myristate of [ 3 H]-palmitate. The molecular weight of the released antigen is similar to that found in the plasma membrane, but it preferentially partitions in Triton X-114 as a hydrophilic, as opposed to a hydrophobic, protein. Plasma membranes contain the enzyme activity responsible for the release of the antigen in a soluble form

  15. Accelerated in vivo wound healing evaluation of microbial glycolipid containing ointment as a transdermal substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonam; Raghuwanshi, Navdeep; Varshney, Ritu; Banat, I M; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    A potent biosurfactant (BS) producing Bacillus licheniformis SV1 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. KX130852) was isolated from oil contaminated soil sample. Physicochemical investigations (TLC, HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and NMR) revealed it to be glycolipid in nature. Fibroblast culture assay showed cytocompatibility and increased cell proliferation of 3T3/NIH fibroblast cells treated with this biosurfactant when checked using MTT assay and DAPI fluorescent staining. To evaluate the wound healing potential, BS ointment was formulated and checked for its spreadability and viscosity consistency. In vivo wound healing examination of full thickness skin excision wound rat model demonstrated the prompt re-epithelialization and fibroblast cell proliferation in the early phase while quicker collagen deposition in later phases of wound healing when BS ointment was used. These results validated the potential usage of BS ointment as a transdermal substitute for faster healing of impaired skin wound. Biochemical evaluation also substantiated the highest concentration of hydroxyproline (32.18±0.46, ptreated animal tissue samples compared to the control. Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) and Masson's Trichrome staining validated the presence of increased amount of collagen fibers and blood vessels in the test animals treated with BS ointment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Glycolipid Biosurfactants Activate, Dimerize, and Stabilize Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase in a pH-Dependent Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jens Kvist; Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Andersen, Camilla Bertel; Nedergaard Pedersen, Jannik; Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-08-15

    We present a study of the interactions between the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TlL) and the two microbially produced biosurfactants (BSs), rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL). Both RL and SL are glycolipids; however, RL is anionic, while SL is a mixture of anionic and non-ionic species. We investigate the interactions of RL and SL with TlL at pH 6 and 8 and observe different effects at the two pH values. At pH 8, neither RL nor SL had any major effect on TlL stability or activity. At pH 6, in contrast, both surfactants increase TlL's thermal stability and fluorescence and activity measurements indicate interfacial activation of TlL, resulting in 3- and 6-fold improved activity in SL and RL, respectively. Nevertheless, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals binding of only a few BS molecules per lipase. Size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering suggest formation of TlL dimers with binding of small amounts of either RL or SL at the dimeric interface, forming an elongated complex. We conclude that RL and SL are compatible with TlL and constitute promising green alternatives to traditional surfactants.

  17. Lipidomic Approaches towards Deciphering Glycolipids from Microalgae as a Reservoir of Bioactive Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete da Costa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, noteworthy research has been performed around lipids from microalgae. Among lipids, glycolipids (GLs are quite abundant in microalgae and are considered an important source of fatty acids (FAs. GLs are rich in 16- and 18-carbon saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and often contain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs like n-3 α-linolenic (ALA 18:3, eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5 and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6. GLs comprise three major classes: monogalactosyldiacyl glycerolipids (MGDGs, digalactosyl diacylglycerolipids (DGDGs and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerolipids (SQDGs, whose composition in FA directly depends on the growth conditions. Some of these lipids are high value-added compounds with antitumoral, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities and also with important nutritional significance. To fully explore GLs’ bioactive properties it is necessary to fully characterize their structure and to understand the relation between the structure and their biological properties, which can be addressed using modern mass spectrometry (MS-based lipidomic approaches. This review will focus on the up-to-date FA composition of GLs identified by MS-based lipidomics and their potential as phytochemicals.

  18. Mycoplasma fermentans glycolipid-antigen as a pathogen of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Yutaka; Ichinose, Sizuko; Sano, Hajime; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Kohno, Masataka; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Hojo, Tatsuya; Harasawa, Ryo; Nakano, Teruaki; Matsuda, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected as one of the causative pathogenic microorganisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) however, the pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. We, previously, reported that glycolipid-antigens (GGPL-I and III) are the major antigens of M. fermentans. Monoclonal antibody against the GGPL-III could detect the existence of the GGPL-III antigens in synovial tissues from RA patients. GGPL-III antigens were detected in 38.1% (32/84) of RA patient's tissues, but not in osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that a part of GGPL-III antigens are located at endoplasmic reticulum. GGPL-III significantly induced TNF-α and IL-6 production from peripheral blood mononulear cells, and also proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Further study is necessary to prove that M. fermentans is a causative microorganism of RA; however, the new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis provides hope for the development of effective and safe immunotherapeutic strategies based on the lipid-antigen, GGPL-III, in the near future

  19. Mycobacterial Phenolic Glycolipids Selectively Disable TRIF-Dependent TLR4 Signaling in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Oldenburg

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic glycolipids (PGLs are cell wall components of a subset of pathogenic mycobacteria, with immunomodulatory properties. Here, we show that in addition, PGLs exert antibactericidal activity by limiting the production of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. PGL-mediated downregulation of iNOS was complement receptor 3-dependent and comparably induced by bacterial and purified PGLs. Using Mycobacterium leprae PGL-1 as a model, we found that PGLs dampen the toll-like receptor (TLR4 signaling pathway, with macrophage exposure to PGLs leading to significant reduction in TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF protein level. PGL-driven decrease in TRIF operated posttranscriptionally and independently of Src-family tyrosine kinases, lysosomal and proteasomal degradation. It resulted in the defective production of TRIF-dependent IFN-β and CXCL10 in TLR4-stimulated macrophages, in addition to iNOS. Our results unravel a mechanism by which PGLs hijack both the bactericidal and inflammatory responses of host macrophages. Moreover, they identify TRIF as a critical node in the crosstalk between CR3 and TLR4.

  20. Cholesterol, sphingolipids, and glycolipids: What do we know about their role in raft-like membranes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids rafts are considered to be functional nanoscale membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, characteristic in particular of the external leaflet of cell membranes. Lipids, together with membrane-associated proteins, are therefore considered to form nanoscale units with pote......Lipids rafts are considered to be functional nanoscale membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, characteristic in particular of the external leaflet of cell membranes. Lipids, together with membrane-associated proteins, are therefore considered to form nanoscale units...... with potential specific functions. Although the understanding of the structure of rafts in living cells is quite limited, the possible functions of rafts are widely discussed in the literature, highlighting their importance in cellular functions. In this review, we discuss the understanding of rafts that has...... emerged based on recent atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation studies on the key lipid raft components, which include cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycolipids, and the proteins interacting with these classes of lipids. The simulation results are compared to experiments when possible...

  1. Differential Interaction of Synthetic Glycolipids with Biomimetic Plasma Membrane Lipids Correlates with the Plant Biological Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Lins, Laurence; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Ongena, Marc; Dorey, Stephan; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Clément, Christophe; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Sarazin, Catherine; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Nott, Katherine; Deleu, Magali

    2017-09-26

    Natural and synthetic amphiphilic molecules including lipopeptides, lipopolysaccharides, and glycolipids are able to induce defense mechanisms in plants. In the present work, the perception of two synthetic C14 rhamnolipids, namely, Alk-RL and Ac-RL, differing only at the level of the lipid tail terminal group have been investigated using biological and biophysical approaches. We showed that Alk-RL induces a stronger early signaling response in tobacco cell suspensions than does Ac-RL. The interactions of both synthetic RLs with simplified biomimetic membranes were further analyzed using experimental and in silico approaches. Our results indicate that the interactions of Alk-RL and Ac-RL with lipids were different in terms of insertion and molecular responses and were dependent on the lipid composition of model membranes. A more favorable insertion of Alk-RL than Ac-RL into lipid membranes is observed. Alk-RL forms more stable molecular assemblies than Ac-RL with phospholipids and sterols. At the molecular level, the presence of sterols tends to increase the RLs' interaction with lipid bilayers, with a fluidizing effect on the alkyl chains. Taken together, our findings suggest that the perception of these synthetic RLs at the membrane level could be related to a lipid-driven process depending on the organization of the membrane and the orientation of the RLs within the membrane and is correlated with the induction of early signaling responses in tobacco cells.

  2. A Macrophage Response to Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid Initiates Nerve Damage in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Cressida A; Cambier, C J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Zailaa, Joseph; Bloom, Barry R; Moody, D Branch; Smale, Stephen T; Sagasti, Alvaro; Modlin, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2017-08-24

    Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy and is unique among mycobacterial diseases in producing peripheral neuropathy. This debilitating morbidity is attributed to axon demyelination resulting from direct interaction of the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) with myelinating glia and their subsequent infection. Here, we use transparent zebrafish larvae to visualize the earliest events of M. leprae-induced nerve damage. We find that demyelination and axonal damage are not directly initiated by M. leprae but by infected macrophages that patrol axons; demyelination occurs in areas of intimate contact. PGL-1 confers this neurotoxic response on macrophages: macrophages infected with M. marinum-expressing PGL-1 also damage axons. PGL-1 induces nitric oxide synthase in infected macrophages, and the resultant increase in reactive nitrogen species damages axons by injuring their mitochondria and inducing demyelination. Our findings implicate the response of innate macrophages to M. leprae PGL-1 in initiating nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of cadmium transfers from soil to humans and its health effects and Jamaican environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalor, Gerald C.

    2008-01-01

    Concerns about the effects of cadmium on human health have led to numerous guidelines and regulations limiting its concentrations in soils and food and allowable human intakes. These have socio-economic consequences in terms of land use and the marketing of food. The bauxite soils in Jamaica, which are both aluminium ores and agricultural soils contain orders of magnitude higher than world normal concentrations of cadmium resulting in elevated Cd concentrations in several foodstuffs and significant transfers to humans, which would seem to represent a risk factor for increased mortality and/or morbidity in the local populations. But, as in Shipham and other examples, there is no evidence of cadmium-related human distress. Macro-indicators like life expectancy and median ages of death do not show cadmium related geographical distributions. The present review focuses on the soils and foods and illnesses of high incidence especially cancers and renal disease that have been traditionally associated with cadmium. In view of the remarkable concentrations of cadmium involved in Jamaica, and often contradictory reports in the literature, it appears that much remains to be learned about certain details of cadmium toxicity

  4. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Huang, Xueliang

    2017-02-08

    The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT) systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR) in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs). The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems working

  5. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Huang, Xueliang

    2017-01-01

    The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT) systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR) in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs). The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems working

  6. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs. The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP, specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems

  7. Spontaneous transfer of gangliotetraosylceramide between phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.E.; Sugar, I.P.; Thompson, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer kinetics of the neutral glycosphingolipid gangliotetraosylceramide (asialo-GM1) were investigated by monitoring tritiated asialo-GM1 movement from donor to acceptor vesicles. Two different methods were employed to separate donor and acceptor vesicles at desired time intervals. In one method, a negative charge was imparted to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine donor vesicles by including 10 mol% dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid. Donors were separated from neutral dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine acceptor vesicles by ion-exchange chromatography. In the other method, small, unilamellar donor vesicles and large, unilamellar acceptor vesicles were coincubated at 45 degrees C and then separated at desired time intervals by molecular sieve chromatography. The majority of asialo-GM1 transfer to acceptor vesicles occurred as a slow first-order process with a half-time of about 24 days assuming that the relative concentration of asialo-GM1 in the phospholipid matrix was identical in each half of the donor bilayer and that no glycolipid flip-flop occurred. Asialo-GM1 net transfer was calculated relative to that of [ 14 C]cholesteryl oleate, which served as a nontransferable marker in the donor vesicles. A nearly identical transfer half-time was obtained when the phospholipid matrix was changed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. Varying the acceptor vesicle concentration did not significantly alter the asialo-GM1 transfer half-time. This result is consistent with a transfer mechanism involving diffusion of glycolipid through the aqueous phase rather than movement of glycolipid following formation of collisional complexes between donor and acceptor vesicles. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Commercial Biocides Induce Transfer of Prophage Φ13 from Human Strains of Staphylococcus aureus to Livestock CC398

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyue Tang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration of ΦSa3 in LA-MRSA CC398 occurs at multiple positions and the integration site influences the stability of the prophage. We did not observe integration in hlb encoding β-hemolysin that contains the preferred ΦSa3 attachment site in human strains, and we demonstrate that this is due to allelic variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends on the integration site. Knowledge of ΦSa3 transfer and stability between human and livestock strains may lead to new intervention measures directed at reducing human infection by LA-MRSA strains.

  9. Commercial Biocides Induce Transfer of Prophage Φ13 from Human Strains of Staphylococcus aureus to Livestock CC398.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene N; Hvitved, Annemette; Haaber, Jakob K; Wirtz, Christiane; Andersen, Paal S; Larsen, Jesper; Wolz, Christiane; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration of ΦSa3 in LA-MRSA CC398 occurs at multiple positions and the integration site influences the stability of the prophage. We did not observe integration in hlb encoding β-hemolysin that contains the preferred ΦSa3 attachment site in human strains, and we demonstrate that this is due to allelic variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends on the integration site. Knowledge of ΦSa3 transfer and stability between human and livestock strains may lead to new intervention measures directed at reducing human infection by LA-MRSA strains.

  10. Radiation and environment. Study of uranium transfer to humans by the food chain: experiment design and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, G.; Guzman, F.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Manso, M.V.; Mesa, J.; Deppman, A.; Likhachev, V.P.; Pereira, J.W.; Helene, O.M.; Araujo, G.W.; Camargo, S.P.; Cestari, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    During years, scientific assessments had considered plants, animal and other living organism as part of the environment in which radionuclides become dispersed. They were further seen as resources which, when contaminated, may contribute to human radiation exposure since some plants and animals are elements of food chains and represent pathways for the transfer of radionuclides to humans. Today, the assessments are development reflected the generally accepted position that priority should be given to evaluating the potential consequences for humans, which are among the most radiosensitive mammalian species. The transfer of radioisotopes from food to humans is still a well debated issue, because experimental results are even scarce. As a contribution to this issue, the Linear Accelerator Laboratory of the Physics Institute at the Sao Paulo University jointed to other institute of Brazil and Cuba development a project for study of uranium in the food-chain: food-animal/vegetables-human. This project involves experimentation with mammalians (wistar rats and beagles dogs), fishes and vegetables, plus extrapolation to humans by means of the General Multiple-Compartments Model. The pilot experiments in animal and vegetables are well described in the paper. As first results were obtained the transfer coefficients of uranium to the organs of animals as a function of the uranium concentration present in the administered food and the transfer coefficients of uranium for each part of the plant, as function of both growing time and uranium concentration in the nutrients solution. With this data it would be possible to evaluate the uranium ingestion by humans from animal products and plants, given their dietary habits, to infer human absorption of uranium associated with prolonged intake of uranium contained in food and estimates the content of uranium transferred to humans organs, thus allowing the evaluation of internally localized doses and the radiobiological damage and

  11. Template Dimerization Promotes an Acceptor Invasion-Induced Transfer Mechanism during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Minus-Strand Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P.; Fay, Philip J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism of template switching by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase and the role of template dimerization were examined. Homologous donor-acceptor template pairs derived from the HIV-1 untranslated leader region and containing the wild-type and mutant dimerization initiation sequences (DIS) were used to examine the efficiency and distribution of transfers. Inhibiting donor-acceptor interaction was sufficient to reduce transfers in DIS-containin...

  12. Probability weighted ensemble transfer learning for predicting interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyu Mei

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of host-pathogen protein interaction networks is of great significance to reveal the underlying microbic pathogenesis. However, the current experimentally-derived networks are generally small and should be augmented by computational methods for less-biased biological inference. From the point of view of computational modelling, data scarcity, data unavailability and negative data sampling are the three major problems for host-pathogen protein interaction networks reconstruction. In this work, we are motivated to address the three concerns and propose a probability weighted ensemble transfer learning model for HIV-human protein interaction prediction (PWEN-TLM, where support vector machine (SVM is adopted as the individual classifier of the ensemble model. In the model, data scarcity and data unavailability are tackled by homolog knowledge transfer. The importance of homolog knowledge is measured by the ROC-AUC metric of the individual classifiers, whose outputs are probability weighted to yield the final decision. In addition, we further validate the assumption that only the homolog knowledge is sufficient to train a satisfactory model for host-pathogen protein interaction prediction. Thus the model is more robust against data unavailability with less demanding data constraint. As regards with negative data construction, experiments show that exclusiveness of subcellular co-localized proteins is unbiased and more reliable than random sampling. Last, we conduct analysis of overlapped predictions between our model and the existing models, and apply the model to novel host-pathogen PPIs recognition for further biological research.

  13. Transfer of Japanese Human Resource Management to US Subsidiaries: Resource Dependence Theory and Institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Matsuo, Ph.D.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Japanese corporations are characterized by distinctive management practices which have been nurtured in a culturally homogeneous environment. The transferability of these practices to foreign subsidiaries has been a subject of debate among management scholars. Drawing on resource dependence theory and institutionalism, this study examines the impact of homogeneity in management and parent company control on the degree of presence of Japanese human resource management (HRM in U.S. subsidiaries. The study uses Walton and Lawrence’s classification (reward, selection and promotion, employee influence mechanism, and job design to measure uniquely Japanese HRM and a sample survey of 138 U.S. subsidiaries of Japanese multinational corporations for data collection. A principal component analysis reveals that three dimensions of HRM (reward system, selection and promotion, and job design, rather than four, are salient among these establishments. An OLS regression analysis also reveals that the degree of homogeneity in management and parent company control has impact on the transfer of these dimensions of HRM. Some implications for future study are discussed.

  14. Predictive value of plasma human chorionic gonadotropin measured 14 days after Day-2 single embryo transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Oldenburg, Anna; Toftager, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Prediction of pregnancy outcome after in vitro fertilization is important for patients and clinicians. Early plasma human chorionic gonadotropin (p-hCG) levels are the best known predictor of pregnancy outcome, but no studies have been restricted to single embryo transfer (SET) of Day......-2 embryos. The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of p-hCG measured exactly 14 days after the most commonly used Day-2 SET on pregnancy, delivery, and perinatal outcome. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 466 women who had...... p-hCG measured exactly 14 days after Day-2 SET during a randomized trial including 1050 unselected women (aged 18–40 years) undergoing their first in vitro fertilization/ intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment. Results: The p-hCG predicted clinical pregnancy [area under the curve (AUC) 0.953; 95...

  15. Enzymatic-induced upconversion photoinduced electron transfer for sensing tyrosine in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongqiong; Fang, Aijin; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports a novel nanosensor for tyrosine based on photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) between NaYF4:Yb, Tm upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and melanin-like polymers. Melanin-like films were obtained from catalytic oxidation of tyrosine by tyrosinase, and deposited on the surface of UCNPs, and then quenched the fluorescence of UCNPs. Under the optimized conditions, the fluorescence quenching of UCNPs showed a good linear response to tyrosine concentration in the range of 0.8-100 μΜ with a detection limit of 1.1 μΜ. Meanwhile, it showed good sensitivity, stability and has been successfully applied to the detection of tyrosine in human serum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term transfer and expression of the human beta-globin gene in a mouse transplant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftopoulos, H; Ward, M; Leboulch, P; Bank, A

    1997-11-01

    Somatic gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies depends initially on the demonstration of safe, efficient gene transfer and long-term, high-level expression of the transferred human beta-globin gene in animal models. We have used a beta-globin gene/beta-locus control region retroviral vector containing several modifications to optimize gene transfer and expression in a mouse transplant model. In this report we show that transplantation of beta-globin-transduced hematopoietic cells into lethally irradiated mice leads to the continued presence of the gene up to 8 months posttransplantation. The transferred human beta-globin gene is detected in 3 of 5 mice surviving long term (>4 months) transplanted with bone marrow cells transduced with high-titer virus. Southern blotting confirms the presence of the unrearranged 5.1-kb human beta-globin gene-containing provirus in 2 of these mice. In addition, long-term expression of the transferred gene is seen in 2 mice at levels of 5% and 20% that of endogenous murine beta-globin at 6 and 8 months posttransplantation. We further document stem cell transduction by the successful transfer and high-level expression of the human beta-globin gene from mice transduced 9 months earlier into irradiated secondary recipient mice. These results demonstrate high-level, long-term somatic human beta-globin gene transfer into the hematopoietic stem cells of an animal for the first time, and suggest the potential feasibility of a retroviral gene therapy approach to sickle cell disease and the beta thalassemias.

  17. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  18. Animal ice-binding (antifreeze) proteins and glycolipids: an overview with emphasis on physiological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, John G

    2015-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) assist in subzero tolerance of multiple cold-tolerant organisms: animals, plants, fungi, bacteria etc. IBPs include: (1) antifreeze proteins (AFPs) with high thermal hysteresis antifreeze activity; (2) low thermal hysteresis IBPs; and (3) ice-nucleating proteins (INPs). Several structurally different IBPs have evolved, even within related taxa. Proteins that produce thermal hysteresis inhibit freezing by a non-colligative mechanism, whereby they adsorb onto ice crystals or ice-nucleating surfaces and prevent further growth. This lowers the so-called hysteretic freezing point below the normal equilibrium freezing/melting point, producing a difference between the two, termed thermal hysteresis. True AFPs with high thermal hysteresis are found in freeze-avoiding animals (those that must prevent freezing, as they die if frozen) especially marine fish, insects and other terrestrial arthropods where they function to prevent freezing at temperatures below those commonly experienced by the organism. Low thermal hysteresis IBPs are found in freeze-tolerant organisms (those able to survive extracellular freezing), and function to inhibit recrystallization - a potentially damaging process whereby larger ice crystals grow at the expense of smaller ones - and in some cases, prevent lethal propagation of extracellular ice into the cytoplasm. Ice-nucleator proteins inhibit supercooling and induce freezing in the extracellular fluid at high subzero temperatures in many freeze-tolerant species, thereby allowing them to control the location and temperature of ice nucleation, and the rate of ice growth. Numerous nuances to these functions have evolved. Antifreeze glycolipids with significant thermal hysteresis activity were recently identified in insects, frogs and plants. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Production of glycolipidic bio surfactants by environment bacteria: diversity and physiological part; Production de biosurfactants glycolipidiques par les bacteries de l`environnement: diversite et role physiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arino, S

    1996-10-09

    About a hundred bacterial strains, isolated from soils, polluted or not by hydrocarbons, were tested for their capacity to excrete glycosides. The biggest productions were obtained for a soluble carbon source (glycerol) in a culture medium limited in the nitrogen source. In these conditions, 18 g/l of rhamnose lipids were produced by train Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1 in a 200 h culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1, Cellulomonas celulans SA43 and Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43060 were studied in detail. The bio-surfactants produced were identified respectively as rhamnose lipids, oligosaccharide lipids and trehalose lipids, using various original analytical methods. Sugars and fatty acids composing these glycolipids had been shown to be usual components of the outer part of the cell wall in these microbial species. Moreover, cell hydrophobicity of the producing bacteria varied in time during culture. These results showed that both the cell wall and the extracellular glycolipids take part in the process of hydrocarbon uptake in the polluted environments. As other bacteria of the same species from different origins present the same characteristics, it may be concluded that glycolipid excretion does not constitute a specific response for hydrocarbon assimilation. In fact, a more general physiological role of glycolipids, concerning modifications of hydrophobic interfaces between the producing bacteria and their surrounding environment, could explain the production of glycolipids, and could also be utilized in hydrocarbon uptake. (author)

  20. Modulation in the activity of purified tonoplast H+-ATPase by tonoplast glycolipids prepared from cultured rice (Oryza sativa L. var. Boro) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, M; Kasamo, K

    2001-05-01

    Glycolipids, phospholipids, and neutral lipids were extracted from the tonoplast fraction of cultured rice cells (Oryza sativa L. var. Boro). Acyl steryl glucoside (ASG) and glucocerebroside (GlcCer) were also prepared from this fraction. We determined the effects of these tonoplast lipids on the activity of H+-ATPase which was delipidated and purified from the tonoplast fraction. Exogenously added tonoplast phospholipids stimulated the activity of purified tonoplast H+-ATPase, but tonoplast glycolipids did not. When tonoplast glycolipids or tonoplast ASG was added in the presence of tonoplast phospholipids, they decreased the phospholipid-induced activation of the tonoplast H+-ATPase; tonoplast GlcCer only caused a small decrease. Steryl glucoside (SG) did not cause any decrease in this activation. Phospholipids, ASG, and GlcCer made up 35 mol%, 20 mol% and 7 mol% of the total lipids of the tonoplast fraction of cultured rice cells, respectively, and these glycolipid levels were enough to depress the phospholipid-induced activation of the tonoplast H+-ATPASE: These results revealed that H+-ATPase activity in the tonoplast may be modulated toward activation and depression by tonoplast phospholipids and glycolipids, respectively. The acylation of SG would be responsible for the depression in the phospholipid-induced H+-ATPase activity.

  1. Colonization of olive trees (Olea europaea L.) with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus sp. modified the glycolipids biosynthesis and resulted in accumulation of unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, Beligh; Attia, Faouzi; Tekaya, Meriem; Cheheb, Hechmi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonization on photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, the amount of phospholipids and glycolipids in the leaves of olive (Olea europaea L.) trees was investigated. After six months of growth, the rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, transpiration and stomatal conductance in mycorrhizal (M) plants was significantly higher than that of non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. The inoculation treatment increased the foliar P and Mg but not N. The amount of glycolipids in the leaves of M plants was significantly higher than that of NM plants. However, the amount of phospholipids in the leaves of M plants was not significantly different to that in the leaves of NM plants. Also, we observed a significant increase in the level of α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) in glycolipids of M plants. This work supports the view that increased glycolipids level in the leaves of M plants could be involved, at least in part, in the beneficial effects of mycorrhizal colonization on photosynthesis performance of olive trees. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the effect of AM fungi on the amount of glycolipids in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Micro-Doppler Based Classification of Human Aquatic Activities via Transfer Learning of Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhee Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate classification of human aquatic activities using radar has a variety of potential applications such as rescue operations and border patrols. Nevertheless, the classification of activities on water using radar has not been extensively studied, unlike the case on dry ground, due to its unique challenge. Namely, not only is the radar cross section of a human on water small, but the micro-Doppler signatures are much noisier due to water drops and waves. In this paper, we first investigate whether discriminative signatures could be obtained for activities on water through a simulation study. Then, we show how we can effectively achieve high classification accuracy by applying deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN directly to the spectrogram of real measurement data. From the five-fold cross-validation on our dataset, which consists of five aquatic activities, we report that the conventional feature-based scheme only achieves an accuracy of 45.1%. In contrast, the DCNN trained using only the collected data attains 66.7%, and the transfer learned DCNN, which takes a DCNN pre-trained on a RGB image dataset and fine-tunes the parameters using the collected data, achieves a much higher 80.3%, which is a significant performance boost.

  3. Evaluation of carbon transfers in cattle and humans using 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Tako, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    In the safety assessment made around the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Aomori, among radioactive nuclides released from the plant, 14 C is expected to be the largest contributor to radiation dose received by the neighboring population through agricultural and dairy products. The objectives of this study are to clarify the transfer of 14 C from grass to beef and milk and its metabolism in the human body experimentally. (1) 13 C-labeled grass was fed for 28 days to beef cattle and cows. 13 C isotopic ratio was measured in serum and other samples including muscle of beef cattle and milk of dairy cow. The 13 C rations in milk, breath air, urine and feces decreased very rapidly within 3 day after cessation of the administration of 13 C-labeled feed. However, a slow decrease in 13 C ratio was observed in muscle and serum. (2) 13 C isotopic ratios were measured in breath air, urine, feces and serum over 16 weeks in humans who were orally administered of 13 C labeled leucine, palmitic acid, glucose, boiled rice and soymilk, respectively. Residual 13 C in their bodies experimentally observed were lower than the estimates by the ICRP metabolic model for organic carbon ingestion. (author)

  4. Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) for Environmental Development and Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita, Alejandro; Backhaus, Thomas; Borriello, Peter; Brandt, Kristian K.; Collignon, Peter; Coors, Anja; Finley, Rita; Gaze, William H.; Heberer, Thomas; Lawrence, John R.; Larsson, D.G. Joakim; McEwen, Scott A.; Ryan, James J.; Schönfeld, Jens; Silley, Peter; Snape, Jason R.; Van den Eede, Christel; Topp, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: Only recently has the environment been clearly implicated in the risk of antibiotic resistance to clinical outcome, but to date there have been few documented approaches to formally assess these risks. Objective: We examined possible approaches and sought to identify research needs to enable human health risk assessments (HHRA) that focus on the role of the environment in the failure of antibiotic treatment caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop held 4–8 March 2012 in Québec, Canada, to define the scope and objectives of an environmental assessment of antibiotic-resistance risks to human health. We focused on key elements of environmental-resistance-development “hot spots,” exposure assessment (unrelated to food), and dose response to characterize risks that may improve antibiotic-resistance management options. Discussion: Various novel aspects to traditional risk assessments were identified to enable an assessment of environmental antibiotic resistance. These include a) accounting for an added selective pressure on the environmental resistome that, over time, allows for development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB); b) identifying and describing rates of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the relevant environmental “hot spot” compartments; and c) modifying traditional dose–response approaches to address doses of ARB for various health outcomes and pathways. Conclusions: We propose that environmental aspects of antibiotic-resistance development be included in the processes of any HHRA addressing ARB. Because of limited available data, a multicriteria decision analysis approach would be a useful way to undertake an HHRA of environmental antibiotic resistance that informs risk managers. Citation: Ashbolt NJ, Amézquita A, Backhaus T, Borriello P, Brandt KK, Collignon P, Coors A, Finley R, Gaze WH, Heberer T, Lawrence JR, Larsson DG, McEwen SA, Ryan JJ, Schönfeld J, Silley P, Snape JR

  5. Production of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall in aerosol murine models of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, P J; Julián, E; Vallès, X; Gordillo, S; Muñoz, M; Luquin, M; Ausina, V

    2002-06-01

    Evolution of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall has been studied for the first time in experimental murine models of tuberculosis induced by aerosol, in which infection, reinfection, reactivation, prophylaxis and treatment with antibiotics have been assayed. Results show a significant humoral response against these antigens, where diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and sulpholipid I (SL-I) elicited higher antibody levels than protein antigens like antigen 85 protein complex (Ag85), culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and purified protein derivative (PPD). Only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies have been detected against DAT and SL-I. Their evolution has a positive correlation with bacillary concentration in tissues.

  6. Palmitoylated claudin7 captured in glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains promotes metastasis via associated transmembrane and cytosolic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Thuma, Florian; Heiler, Sarah; Schn?lzer, Martina; Z?ller, Margot

    2016-01-01

    In epithelial cells claudin7 (cld7) is a major component of tight junctions, but is also recovered from glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEM). In tumor cells, too, cld7 exists in two stages. Only GEM-located cld7, which is palmitoylated, promotes metastasis. Searching for the underlying mechanism(s) revealed the following. The metastatic capacity of the rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line ASML is lost by a knockdown (kd) of cld7 and is not regained by rescuing cld7 with a mutate...

  7. Dynamic Simulation of Human Thermoregulation and Heat Transfer for Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas R.; Nelson, David A.; Bue, Grant; Kuznetz, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Models of human thermoregulation and heat transfer date from the early 1970s and have been developed for applications ranging from evaluating thermal comfort in spacecraft and aircraft cabin environments to predicting heat stress during EVAs. Most lumped or compartment models represent the body as an assemblage cylindrical and spherical elements which may be subdivided into layers to describe tissue heterogeneity. Many existing models are of limited usefulness in asymmetric thermal environments, such as may be encountered during an EVA. Conventional whole-body clothing models also limit the ability to describe local surface thermal and evaporation effects in sufficient detail. A further limitation is that models based on a standard man model are not readily scalable to represent large or small subjects. This work describes development of a new human thermal model derived from the 41-node man model. Each segment is divided into four concentric, constant thickness cylinders made up of a central core surrounded by muscle, fat, and skin, respectively. These cylinders are connected by the flow of blood from a central blood pool to each part. The central blood pool is updated at each time step, based on a whole-body energy balance. Results show the model simulates core and surface temperature histories, sweat evaporation and metabolic rates which generally are consistent with controlled exposures of human subjects. Scaling rules are developed to enable simulation of small and large subjects (5th percentile and 95th percentile). Future refinements will include a clothing model that addresses local surface insulation and permeation effects and developing control equations to describe thermoregulatory effects such as may occur with prolonged weightlessness or with aging.

  8. An advanced computational bioheat transfer model for a human body with an embedded systemic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Boileau, Etienne; Parthimos, Dimitris; Nithiarasu, Perumal

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, an elaborate one-dimensional thermofluid model for a human body is presented. By contrast to the existing pure conduction-/perfusion-based models, the proposed methodology couples the arterial fluid dynamics of a human body with a multi-segmental bioheat model of surrounding solid tissues. In the present configuration, arterial flow is included through a network of elastic vessels. More than a dozen solid segments are employed to represent the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues, and each segment is constituted by a multilayered circular cylinder. Such multi-layers allow flexible delineation of the geometry and incorporation of properties of different tissue types. The coupling of solid tissue and fluid models requires subdivision of the arterial circulation into large and small arteries. The heat exchange between tissues and arterial wall occurs by convection in large vessels and by perfusion in small arteries. The core region, including the heart, provides the inlet conditions for the fluid equations. In the proposed model, shivering, sweating, and perfusion changes constitute the basis of the thermoregulatory system. The equations governing flow and heat transfer in the circulatory system are solved using a locally conservative Galerkin approach, and the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues is solved using a standard implicit backward Euler method. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed model, temperature field evolutions are monitored at different points of the arterial tree and in the surrounding tissue layers. To study the differences due to flow-induced convection effects on thermal balance, the results of the current model are compared against those of the widely used modelling methodologies. The results show that the convection significantly influences the temperature distribution of the solid tissues in the vicinity of the arteries. Thus, the inner convection has a more predominant role in the human body heat

  9. Inclusive fitness and differential productivity across the life course determine intergenerational transfers in a small-scale human society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Paul L; Gurven, Michael; Winking, Jeffrey; Kaplan, Hillard S

    2015-03-22

    Transfers of resources between generations are an essential element in current models of human life-history evolution accounting for prolonged development, extended lifespan and menopause. Integrating these models with Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness, we predict that the interaction of biological kinship with the age-schedule of resource production should be a key driver of intergenerational transfers. In the empirical case of Tsimane' forager-horticulturalists in Bolivian Amazonia, we provide a detailed characterization of net transfers of food according to age, sex, kinship and the net need of donors and recipients. We show that parents, grandparents and siblings provide significant net downward transfers of food across generations. We demonstrate that the extent of provisioning responds facultatively to variation in the productivity and demographic composition of families, as predicted by the theory. We hypothesize that the motivation to provide these critical transfers is a fundamental force that binds together human nuclear and extended families. The ubiquity of three-generational families in human societies may thus be a direct reflection of fundamental evolutionary constraints on an organism's life-history and social organization.

  10. Reaction Coordinate, Free Energy, and Rate of Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjib; Paul, Tanmoy Kumar; Taraphder, Srabani

    2018-03-22

    The role of structure and dynamics of an enzyme has been investigated at three different stages of its function including the chemical event it catalyzes. A one-pot computational method has been designed for each of these stages on the basis of classical and/or quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and transition path sampling simulations. For a pair of initial and final states A and B separated by a high free-energy barrier, using a two-stage selection process, several collective variables (CVs) are identified that can delineate A and B. However, these CVs are found to exhibit strong cross-coupling over the transition paths. A set of mutually orthogonal order parameters is then derived from these CVs and an optimal reaction coordinate, r, determined applying half-trajectory likelihood maximization along with a Bayesian information criterion. The transition paths are also used to project the multidimensional free energy surface and barrier crossing dynamics along r. The proposed scheme has been applied to the rate-determining intramolecular proton transfer reaction of the well-known enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. The potential of mean force, F( r), in the absence of the chemical step is found to reproduce earlier results on the equilibrium population of two side-chain orientations of key residue His-64. Estimation of rate constants, k, from mean first passage times for the three different stages of catalysis shows that the rate-determining step of intramolecular proton transfer occurs with k ≃ 1.0 × 10 6 s -1 , in close agreement with known experimental results.

  11. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein increases the antiatherogenic potential of high density lipoproteins in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); A. van Tol (Arie); P. Vermeulen; M. Jauhiainen; T. van Gent (Teus); P.M. van den Berg (Paul); S. Ehnholm (Sonja); A.W.M. van der Kamp (Arthur); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPlasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) transfers phospholipids between lipoprotein particles and alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction patterns in vitro, but its physiological function is poorly understood. Transgenic mice that overexpress

  12. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  13. The effects of Sophora angustifolia and other natural plant extracts on melanogenesis and melanin transfer in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman K; Baker, Richard; Wibawa, Judata I D; Bell, Mike; Tobin, Desmond J

    2013-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is a multistep process of melanin synthesis by melanocytes, its transfer to recipient keratinocytes and its degradation. As dyspigmentation is a prominent marker of skin ageing, novel effective agents that modulate pigmentation safely are being sought for both clinical and cosmetic use. Here, a number of plant extracts were examined for their effect on melanogenesis (by melanin assay and Western blotting) and melanin transfer (by confocal immunomicroscopy of gp100-positive melanin granules in cocultures and by SEM analysis of filopodia), in human melanocytes and in cocultures with phototype-matched normal adult epidermal keratinocytes. Mulberry, Kiwi and Sophora extracts were assessed against isobutylmethylxanthine, hydroquinone, vitamin C and niacinamide. Compared with unstimulated control, all extracts significantly reduced melanogenesis in human melanoma cells and normal adult epidermal melanocytes. These extracts also reduced melanin transfer and reduced filopodia expression on melanocytes, similar to hydroquinone and niacinamide, indicating their effectiveness as multimode pigmentation actives. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Effects of exogenous retinol and retinoic acid on the biosynthesis of 14C-mannose labelled glycolipids and glycoproteins in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Mayumi; DeLuca, L.M.; Muto, Yasutoshi

    1978-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro effects of retinol and retionic acid was investigated on the synthesis of mannolipids and mannopeptides in rat liver. Weanling male, Wister-strain rats (Japan Clea Inc., Tokyo), weighing 35 to 40g are housed in hanging wire bottom cages and maintained on a vitamin A-deficient diet. The incorporation of 14 C-mannose into glycolipids and glycoproteins showed a decrease in vitamin A-depleted rats as compared with vitamin A-fed rats. The mannose-containing lipids were separated into retinyl phosphate (MRP, R sub(f) 0.2) and dolichyl mannosyl phosphate (DMP, R sub(f) 0.4), respectively, by DEAE-cellulose, silicic acid and thin-layer chromatography. A rapid increase in the synthesis of labelled MPR was observed, exhibiting a peak between 25 and 60 minutes after intraperitoneal administration of retinol to vitamin A-depleted rats. Similarly, administration of retionic acid brought about elevation of 14 C-mannolipid (R sub(f) 0.2) synthesis with a peak at 60 minutes after injection. On the other hand, the incorporation of 14 C-mannose into DMP (R sub(f) 0.4) remained unchanged by such treatment. These results suggest that not only retinol but also retionic acid plays an important biological role in manosyl transfer reaction in rat liver. However, the molecular participation of a metabolite of retionic acid in the formation of manolipid and the structure of such a metabolite remain to be established. (Iwakiri, K.)

  15. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  16. Seasonal lake surface water temperature trends reflected by heterocyst glycolipid-based molecular thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, T.; Rochelmeier, J.; Schwark, L.

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that the relative distribution of heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) in cultures of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria is largely controlled by growth temperature, suggesting a potential use of these components in paleoenvironmental studies. Here, we investigated the effect of environmental parameters (e.g., surface water temperatures, oxygen concentrations and pH) on the distribution of HGs in a natural system using water column filtrates collected from Lake Schreventeich (Kiel, Germany) from late July to the end of October 2013. HPLC-ESI/MS (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) analysis revealed a dominance of 1-(O-hexose)-3,25-hexacosanediols (HG26 diols) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25-hexacosanol (HG26 keto-ol) in the solvent-extracted water column filtrates, which were accompanied by minor abundances of 1-(O-hexose)-3,27-octacosanediol (HG28 diol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-27-octacosanol (HG28 keto-ol) as well as 1-(O-hexose)-3,25,27-octacosanetriol (HG28 triol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25,27-octacosanediol (HG28 keto-diol). Fractional abundances of alcoholic and ketonic HGs generally showed strong linear correlations with surface water temperatures and no or only weak linear correlations with both oxygen concentrations and pH. Changes in the distribution of the most abundant diol and keto-ol (e.g., HG26 diol and HG26 keto-ol) were quantitatively expressed as the HDI26 (heterocyst diol index of 26 carbon atoms) with values of this index ranging from 0.89 in mid-August to 0.66 in mid-October. An average HDI26 value of 0.79, which translates into a calculated surface water temperature of 15.8 ± 0.3 °C, was obtained from surface sediments collected from Lake Schreventeich. This temperature - and temperatures obtained from other HG indices (e.g., HDI28 and HTI28) - is similar to the one measured during maximum cyanobacterial productivity in early to mid-September and suggests that HGs

  17. Detecting Protein-Glycolipid Interactions Using Glycomicelles and CaR-ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the use of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay, combined with glycomicelles, as a method for detecting specific interactions between water-soluble proteins and glycolipids (GLs) in aqueous solution. The B subunit homopentamers of cholera toxin (CTB 5 ) and Shiga toxin type 1 B (Stx1B 5 ) and the gangliosides GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2 served as model systems for this study. The CTB 5 exhibits broad specificity for gangliosides and binds to GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b; Stx1B 5 does not recognize gangliosides. The CaR-ESI-MS assay was used to analyze solutions of CTB 5 or Stx1B 5 and individual gangliosides (GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2) or mixtures thereof. The high affinity interaction of CTB 5 with GM1 was successfully detected. However, the apparent affinity, as determined from the mass spectra, is significantly lower than that of the corresponding pentasaccharide or when GM1 is presented in model membranes such as nanodiscs. Interactions between CTB 5 and the low affinity gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b, as well as GD2, which served as a negative control, were detected; no binding of CTB 5 to GM2 or GM3 was observed. The CaR-ESI-MS results obtained for Stx1B 5 reveal that nonspecific protein-ganglioside binding can occur during the ESI process, although the extent of binding varies between gangliosides. Consequently, interactions detected for CTB 5 with GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b are likely nonspecific in origin. Taken together, these results reveal that the CaR-ESI-MS/glycomicelle approach for detecting protein-GL interactions is prone to false positives and false negatives and must be used with caution. Graphical Abstract GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT TEXT HERE] -->.

  18. Clinical responses to adoptive T-cell transfer can be modeled in an autologous immune-humanized mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Henrik; Lindberg, Mattias F; Donia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous tumor-infiltrating T cells have shown durable responses in patients with melanoma. To study ACT and immunotherapies in a humanized model, we have developed PDXv2.0 - a melanoma PDX model where tumor cells and tumor...

  19. Template Dimerization Promotes an Acceptor Invasion-Induced Transfer Mechanism during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Minus-Strand Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P.; Fay, Philip J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism of template switching by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase and the role of template dimerization were examined. Homologous donor-acceptor template pairs derived from the HIV-1 untranslated leader region and containing the wild-type and mutant dimerization initiation sequences (DIS) were used to examine the efficiency and distribution of transfers. Inhibiting donor-acceptor interaction was sufficient to reduce transfers in DIS-containing template pairs, indicating that template dimerization, and not the mere presence of the DIS, promotes efficient transfers. Additionally, we show evidence that the overall transfer process spans an extended region of the template and proceeds through a two-step mechanism. Transfer is initiated through an RNase H-facilitated acceptor invasion step, while synthesis continues on the donor template. The invasion then propagates towards the primer terminus by branch migration. Transfer is completed with the translocation of the primer terminus at a site distant from the invasion point. In our system, most invasions initiated before synthesis reached the DIS. However, transfer of the primer terminus predominantly occurred after synthesis through the DIS. The two steps were separated by 60 to 80 nucleotides. Sequence markers revealed the position of primer terminus switch, whereas DNA oligomers designed to block acceptor-cDNA interactions defined sites of invasion. Within the region of homology, certain positions on the template were inherently more favorable for invasion than others. In templates with DIS, the proximity of the acceptor facilitates invasion, thereby enhancing transfer efficiency. Nucleocapsid protein enhanced the overall efficiency of transfers but did not alter the mechanism. PMID:12663778

  20. Antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid reverses reticuloendothelial system depression in an animal model of severe sepsis and surgical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, M.C.; Chadwick, S.J.; Cheslyn-Curtis, S.; Rapson, N.; Dudley, H.A.

    1987-10-01

    To study the effect of severe sepsis on the function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) we have measured the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of both low-dose technetium tin colloid (TTC) and /sup 75/selenomethionine-labelled E. coli in rabbits 24 hours after either sham laparotomy or appendix devascularization. Sepsis resulted in similar delayed blood clearance and reduced liver (Kupffer cell) uptake of both TTC and E. coli. To investigate the ability of polyclonal antibody to E. coli-J-5 (core glycolipid) to improve RES function in the same model of sepsis, further animals were pretreated with either core glycolipid antibody or control serum (10 ml IV) 2 hours before induction of sepsis. TTC clearance kinetics were determined 24 hours later. Antibody pretreated animals showed: a reduced incidence of bacteremia; normalization of the rate of blood clearance and liver uptake of TTC; and a 'rebound' increase in splenic uptake of TTC. We conclude that antibody to E. coli-J-5 enhances bacterial clearance by the RES.

  1. Multiplatform Mass Spectrometry-Based Approach Identifies Extracellular Glycolipids of the Yeast Rhodotorula babjevae UCDFST 04-877.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajka, Tomas; Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L; Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-10-28

    A multiplatform mass spectrometry-based approach was used for elucidating extracellular lipids with biosurfactant properties produced by the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula babjevae UCDFST 04-877. This strain secreted 8.6 ± 0.1 g/L extracellular lipids when grown in a benchtop bioreactor fed with 100 g/L glucose in medium without addition of hydrophobic substrate, such as oleic acid. Untargeted reversed-phase liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) detected native glycolipid molecules with masses of 574-716 Da. After hydrolysis into the fatty acid and sugar components and hydrophilic interaction chromatography-QTOFMS analysis, the extracellular lipids were found to consist of hydroxy fatty acids and sugar alcohols. Derivatization and chiral separation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified these components as d-arabitol, d-mannitol, (R)-3-hydroxymyristate, (R)-3-hydroxypalmitate, and (R)-3-hydroxystearate. In order to assemble these substructures back into intact glycolipids that were detected in the initial screen, potential structures were in-silico acetylated to match the observed molar masses and subsequently characterized by matching predicted and observed MS/MS fragmentation using the Mass Frontier software program. Eleven species of acetylated sugar alcohol esters of hydroxy fatty acids were characterized for this yeast strain.

  2. Antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid reverses reticuloendothelial system depression in an animal model of severe sepsis and surgical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, M.C.; Chadwick, S.J.; Cheslyn-Curtis, S.; Rapson, N.; Dudley, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    To study the effect of severe sepsis on the function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) we have measured the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of both low-dose technetium tin colloid (TTC) and 75 selenomethionine-labelled E. coli in rabbits 24 hours after either sham laparotomy or appendix devascularization. Sepsis resulted in similar delayed blood clearance and reduced liver (Kupffer cell) uptake of both TTC and E. coli. To investigate the ability of polyclonal antibody to E. coli-J-5 (core glycolipid) to improve RES function in the same model of sepsis, further animals were pretreated with either core glycolipid antibody or control serum (10 ml IV) 2 hours before induction of sepsis. TTC clearance kinetics were determined 24 hours later. Antibody pretreated animals showed: a reduced incidence of bacteremia; normalization of the rate of blood clearance and liver uptake of TTC; and a 'rebound' increase in splenic uptake of TTC. We conclude that antibody to E. coli-J-5 enhances bacterial clearance by the RES

  3. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Alison; Savage, David B; Williams, Guy B; Porter, David; Carpenter, T Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M; Kemp, Graham J

    2016-03-15

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Characterization of Tetraploid Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer-Derived Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Jeoung-Eun; Eum, Jin Hee; Chung, Young Gie; Lee, Hoon Taek; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2017-12-01

    Polyploidy is occurred by the process of endomitosis or cell fusion and usually represent terminally differentiated stage. Their effects on the developmental process were mainly investigated in the amphibian and fishes, and only observed in some rodents as mammalian model. Recently, we have established tetraploidy somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived human embryonic stem cells (SCNT-hESCs) and examined whether it could be available as a research model for the polyploidy cells existed in the human tissues. Two tetraploid hESC lines were artificially acquired by reintroduction of remained 1st polar body during the establishment of SCNT-hESC using MII oocytes obtained from female donors and dermal fibroblasts (DFB) from a 35-year-old adult male. These tetraploid SCNT-hESC lines (CHA-NT1 and CHA-NT3) were identified by the cytogenetic genotyping (91, XXXY,-6, t[2:6] / 92,XXXY,-12,+20) and have shown of indefinite proliferation, but slow speed when compared to euploid SCNT-hESCs. Using the eight Short Tendem Repeat (STR) markers, it was confirmed that both CHA-NT1 and CHA-NT3 lines contain both nuclear and oocyte donor genotypes. These hESCs expressed pluripotency markers and their embryoid bodies (EB) also expressed markers of the three embryonic germ layers and formed teratoma after transplantation into immune deficient mice. This study showed that tetraploidy does not affect the activities of proliferation and differentiation in SCNT-hESC. Therefore, tetraploid hESC lines established after SCNT procedure could be differentiated into various types of cells and could be an useful model for the study of the polyploidy cells in the tissues.

  5. Optimization of selective inversion recovery magnetization transfer imaging for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortch, Richard D; Bagnato, Francesca; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Smith, Seth A

    2018-03-24

    To optimize a selective inversion recovery (SIR) sequence for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain at 3.0T. SIR is a quantitative method for measuring magnetization transfer (qMT) that uses a low-power, on-resonance inversion pulse. This results in a biexponential recovery of free water signal that can be sampled at various inversion/predelay times (t I/ t D ) to estimate a subset of qMT parameters, including the macromolecular-to-free pool-size-ratio (PSR), the R 1 of free water (R 1f ), and the rate of MT exchange (k mf ). The adoption of SIR has been limited by long acquisition times (≈4 min/slice). Here, we use Cramér-Rao lower bound theory and data reduction strategies to select optimal t I /t D combinations to reduce imaging times. The schemes were experimentally validated in phantoms, and tested in healthy volunteers (N = 4) and a multiple sclerosis patient. Two optimal sampling schemes were determined: (i) a 5-point scheme (k mf estimated) and (ii) a 4-point scheme (k mf assumed). In phantoms, the 5/4-point schemes yielded parameter estimates with similar SNRs as our previous 16-point scheme, but with 4.1/6.1-fold shorter scan times. Pair-wise comparisons between schemes did not detect significant differences for any scheme/parameter. In humans, parameter values were consistent with published values, and similar levels of precision were obtained from all schemes. Furthermore, fixing k mf reduced the sensitivity of PSR to partial-volume averaging, yielding more consistent estimates throughout the brain. qMT parameters can be robustly estimated in ≤1 min/slice (without independent measures of ΔB 0 , B1+, and T 1 ) when optimized t I -t D combinations are selected. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Molecular interaction and energy transfer between human serum albumin and bioactive component Aloe dihydrocoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Feng; Xie, Ling; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Li, Lin; Tang, Ya-Lin

    2008-10-01

    Aloe dihydrocoumarin is an antioxidant and a candidate of immunomodulatory drug on the immune system and can balance physiological reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels which may be useful to maintain homeostasis. In order to explore the mechanism of drug action at a molecular level, the binding of Aloe dihydrocoumarin with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet (UV), circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence dynamics, and molecular dynamic docking for the first time. We observed a quenching of fluorescence of HSA in the presence of Aloe dihydrocoumarin and also analyzed the quenching results using the Stern-Volmer equation and obtained high affinity binding to HSA. A Förster type fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism is involved in this quenching of Trp fluorescence by Aloe dihydrocoumarin. From the CD and FT-IR results, it is apparent that the interaction of Aloe dihydrocoumarin with HSA causes a conformational change of the protein, with the loss of α-helix stability and the gain of β-sheet and β-turn content. Data obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence dynamics, CD, and FT-IR experiments along with the docking studies suggest that Aloe dihydrocoumarin binds to residues located in subdomain IIA of HSA.

  7. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  8. Warfarin traps human vitamin K epoxide reductase in an intermediate state during electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guomin; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Fengbo; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qian; Yang, Yihu; Li, Shuang; Bowman, Gregory R.; Sadler, J. Evan; Gross, Michael L.; Li, Weikai

    2017-01-01

    Although warfarin is the most widely used anticoagulant worldwide, the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits its target, human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR), remains unclear. Here we show that warfarin blocks a dynamic electron-transfer process in hVKOR. A major fraction of cellular hVKOR is at an intermediate redox state of this process containing a Cys51-Cys132 disulfide, a characteristic accommodated by a four-transmembrane-helix structure of hVKOR. Warfarin selectively inhibits this major cellular form of hVKOR, whereas disruption of the Cys51-Cys132 disulfide impairs warfarin binding and causes warfarin resistance. Relying on binding interactions identified by cysteine alkylation footprinting and mass spectrometry coupled with mutagenesis analysis, we are able to conduct structure simulations to reveal a closed warfarin-binding pocket stabilized by the Cys51-Cys132 linkage. Understanding the selective warfarin inhibition of a specific redox state of hVKOR should enable the rational design of drugs that exploit the redox chemistry and associated conformational changes in hVKOR. PMID:27918545

  9. [Testing of the effect of classic conditioning stimuli in human experiment by means of the transfer of control paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, J

    1999-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning in animals is often evaluated by means of transfer of control experiments. With human subjects, however, only very few studies have been conducted and the outcomes were often not in accordance with theoretical explanations based on studies with animals. A theoretical framework is presented that tries to integrate the results of the human conditioning paradigm and the animal conditioning paradigm as well, with reference to the well-known Yerkes-Dodson law. The experimental study with human subjects (N = 24) confirmed the predictions out of this framework, when a procedure similar to animal research is applied.

  10. Cadmium transfer from contaminated soils to the human body through rice consumption in southern Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyuan; Chang, Qing; Yuan, Xuyin; Li, Jizhou; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Chen, Hongyan; Zhang, Xinjian; Song, Yinxian; Song, Wenzhi

    2017-06-21

    Consumption of crops grown in cadmium-contaminated soils is an important Cd exposure route to humans. The present study utilizes statistical analysis and in vitro digestion experiments to uncover the transfer processes of Cd from soils to the human body through rice consumption. Here, a model was created to predict the levels of bioaccessible Cd in rice grains using phytoavailable Cd quantities in the soil. During the in vitro digestion, a relatively constant ratio between the total and bioaccessible Cd in rice was observed. About 14.89% of Cd in soils was found to be transferred into rice grains and up to 3.19% could be transferred from rice grains to the human body. This model was able to sufficiently predict rice grain cadmium concentrations based on CaCl 2 extracted zinc and cadmium concentrations in soils (R 2 = 0.862). The bioaccessible Cd concentration in rice grains was also able to be predicted using CaCl 2 extracted cadmium from soil (R 2 = 0.892). The models established in this study demonstrated that CaCl 2 is a suitable indicator of total rice Cd concentrations and bioaccessible rice grain Cd concentrations. The chain model approach proposed in this study can be used for the fast and accurate evaluation of human Cd exposure through rice consumption based on the soil conditions in contaminated regions.

  11. Chemical Rescue of Enzymes: Proton Transfer in Mutants of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C. Mark; Castillo, Norberto; Taraphder, Srabani; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    In human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) the mutation of position 64 from histidine to alanine (H64A) disrupts the rate limiting proton transfer (PT) event, resulting in a reduction of the catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to the wild-type. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations utilizing the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology for H64A HCA II give a PT free energy barrier significantly higher than that found in the wild-type enzyme. This high barrier, determined in the absence of exogenous buffer and assuming no additional ionizable residues in the PT pathway, indicates the likelihood of alternate enzyme pathways that utilize either ionizable enzyme residues (self-rescue) and/or exogenous buffers (chemical rescue). It has been shown experimentally that the catalytic activity of H64A HCA II can be chemically rescued to near wild type levels by the addition of the exogenous buffer 4-methylimidazole (4MI). Crystallographic studies have identified two 4MI binding sites, yet site specific mutations intended to disrupt 4MI binding have demonstrated these sites to be non-productive. In the present work MS-EVB simulations show that binding of 4MI near Thr199 in the H64A HCA II mutant, a binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy, results in a viable chemical rescue pathway. Additional viable rescue pathways are also identified where 4MI acts as a proton transport intermediary from the active site to ionizable residues on the rim of the active site, revealing a probable mode of action for the chemical rescue pathway PMID:21452838

  12. Human-robot skills transfer interfaces for a flexible surgical robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calinon, Sylvain; Bruno, Danilo; Malekzadeh, Milad S; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-09-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, tools go through narrow openings and manipulate soft organs to perform surgical tasks. There are limitations in current robot-assisted surgical systems due to the rigidity of robot tools. The aim of the STIFF-FLOP European project is to develop a soft robotic arm to perform surgical tasks. The flexibility of the robot allows the surgeon to move within organs to reach remote areas inside the body and perform challenging procedures in laparoscopy. This article addresses the problem of designing learning interfaces enabling the transfer of skills from human demonstration. Robot programming by demonstration encompasses a wide range of learning strategies, from simple mimicking of the demonstrator's actions to the higher level imitation of the underlying intent extracted from the demonstrations. By focusing on this last form, we study the problem of extracting an objective function explaining the demonstrations from an over-specified set of candidate reward functions, and using this information for self-refinement of the skill. In contrast to inverse reinforcement learning strategies that attempt to explain the observations with reward functions defined for the entire task (or a set of pre-defined reward profiles active for different parts of the task), the proposed approach is based on context-dependent reward-weighted learning, where the robot can learn the relevance of candidate objective functions with respect to the current phase of the task or encountered situation. The robot then exploits this information for skills refinement in the policy parameters space. The proposed approach is tested in simulation with a cutting task performed by the STIFF-FLOP flexible robot, using kinesthetic demonstrations from a Barrett WAM manipulator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The human alimentary tract transfer and body retention of environmental polonium-210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G J; Rumney, H S

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4 year study to investigate the human alimentary tract transfer factor (f A value) and body retention of 210 Po in shellfish. In the first 3 years, mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.) and brown meat from crab (Cancer pagurus L.) were successively studied. In each year five volunteers (from a pool of seven) ate a suitable portion of the shellfish and provided 24 h samples of excreta usually for 3 days before and for at least 7 days during and after eating. Subsamples of shellfish were analysed to determine the intakes of 210 Po. Faeces were analysed and the data used to assess apparent f A values. Urine samples were analysed in the mussel and crab studies to provide urinary excretion parameters. Pb-210 was also analysed during the mussel study; the levels were low, leading to large uncertainties, but confirming the negligible effect of radioactive decay to its granddaughter 210 Po in the main study. In the fourth year, larger samples of brown crab meat were eaten by five volunteers and faecal samples were taken at suitable times over periods of up to 43 days to study body retention of 210 Po. The first ∼7 days provided additional data on f A values. Pooled results for the apparent f A for the whole study lay in the range 0.15-0.65 with a mean of 0.46; corrections for endogenous excretion suggest a true f A value of ∼0.51, supporting the value of 0.5 currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The retention data suggest a biological half-time of about 40 days, in broad consistency with the 50 days currently used by the ICRP. Thus there is no strong evidence from this study suggesting a change in dose coefficient for 210 Po. Full experimental data are provided to allow independent further interpretation

  14. Hyperreactive malarial splenomegaly is associated with low levels of antibodies against red blood cell and Plasmodium falciparum derived glycolipids in Yanomami Amerindians from Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Livia; O'Dea, Kieran P; Noya, Oscar; Pabon, Rosalba; Magris, Magda; Botto, Carlos; Holder, Anthony A; Brown, K Neil

    2008-03-01

    The immunological basis of the aberrant immune response in hyperreactive malarial splenomegaly (HMS) is poorly understood, but believed to be associated with polyclonal B cell activation by an unidentified malaria mitogen, leading to unregulated immunoglobulin and autoantibody production. HMS has been previously reported in Yanomami communities in the Upper Orinoco region of the Venezuelan Amazon. To investigate a possible association between antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum and uninfected red blood cell (URBC) glycolipids and splenomegaly, a direct comparison of the parasite versus host anti-glycolipid antibody responses was made in an isolated community of this area. The anti-P. falciparum glycolipid (Pfglp) response was IgG3 dominated, whereas the uninfected red blood cell glycolipid (URBCglp) response showed a predominance of IgG1. The levels of IgG1 against Pfglp, and of IgG4 and IgM against URBCglp were significantly higher in women, while the anti-Pfglp or URBCglp IgM levels were inversely correlated with the degree of splenomegaly. Overall, these results suggest differential regulation of anti-parasite and autoreactive responses and that these responses may be linked to the development and evolution of HMS in this population exposed to endemic malaria. The high mortality rates associated with HMS point out that its early diagnosis together with the implementation of malaria control measures in these isolated Amerindian communities are a priority.

  15. A bipartite signal mediates the transfer of type IV secretion substrates of Bartonella henselae into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulein, Ralf; Guye, Patrick; Rhomberg, Thomas A; Schmid, Michael C; Schröder, Gunnar; Vergunst, Annette C; Carena, Ilaria; Dehio, Christoph

    2005-01-18

    Bacterial type IV secretion (T4S) systems mediate the transfer of macromolecular substrates into various target cells, e.g., the conjugative transfer of DNA into bacteria or the transfer of virulence proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The T4S apparatus VirB of the vascular tumor-inducing pathogen Bartonella henselae causes subversion of human endothelial cell (HEC) function. Here we report the identification of multiple protein substrates of VirB, which, upon translocation into HEC, mediate all known VirB-dependent cellular changes. These Bartonella-translocated effector proteins (Beps) A-G are encoded together with the VirB system and the T4S coupling protein VirD4 on a Bartonella-specific pathogenicity island. The Beps display a modular architecture, suggesting an evolution by extensive domain duplication and reshuffling. The C terminus of each Bep harbors at least one copy of the Bep-intracellular delivery domain and a short positively charged tail sequence. This biparte C terminus constitutes a transfer signal that is sufficient to mediate VirB/VirD4-dependent intracellular delivery of reporter protein fusions. The Bep-intracellular delivery domain is also present in conjugative relaxases of bacterial conjugation systems. We exemplarily show that the C terminus of such a conjugative relaxase mediates protein transfer through the Bartonella henselae VirB/VirD4 system into HEC. Conjugative relaxases may thus represent the evolutionary origin of the here defined T4S signal for protein transfer into human cells.

  16. Frequent Detection of Anti-Tubercular-Glycolipid-IgG and -IgA Antibodies in Healthcare Workers with Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Ruman Siddiqi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tubercular-glycolipid-IgG (TBGL-IgG and -IgA (TBGL-IgA antibodies, and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT were compared in healthcare workers (HCWs, n=31 and asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-carriers (HIV-AC, n=56 in Manila. In HCWs, 48%, 51%, and 19% were positive in QFT, TBGL-IgG, and -IgA, respectively. The TBGL-IgG positivity was significantly higher (P=0.02 in QFT-positive than QFT-negative HCWs. Both TBGL-IgG- and -IgA-positive cases were only found in QFT-positive HCWs (27%. The plasma IFN-γ levels positively correlated with TBGL-IgA titers (r=0.74, P=0.005, but not TBGL-IgG titers in this group, indicating that mucosal immunity is involved in LTBI in immunocompetent individuals. The QFT positivity in HIV-AC was 31% in those with CD4+ cell counts >350/μL and 12.5% in low CD4 group (<350/μL. 59 % and 29% were positive for TBGL-IgG and -IgA, respectively, in HIV-AC, but no association was found between QFT and TBGL assays. TBGL-IgG-positive rates in QFT-positive and QFT-negative HIV-AC were 61% and 58%, and those of TBGL-IgA were 23% and 30%, respectively. The titers of TBGL-IgA were associated with serum IgA (P=0.02 in HIV-AC. Elevations of TBGL-IgG and -IgA were related to latent tuberculosis infection in HCWs, but careful interpretation is necessary in HIV-AC.

  17. Oxidation of the FAD cofactor to the 8-formyl-derivative in human electron-transferring flavoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Peter; Toplak, Marina; Fuchs, Katharina; Gerstmann, Eva Christine; Prassl, Ruth; Winkler, Andreas; Macheroux, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The heterodimeric human (h) electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) transfers electrons from at least 13 different flavin dehydrogenases to the mitochondrial respiratory chain through a non-covalently bound FAD cofactor. Here, we describe the discovery of an irreversible and pH-dependent oxidation of the 8α-methyl group to 8-formyl-FAD (8f-FAD), which represents a unique chemical modification of a flavin cofactor in the human flavoproteome. Furthermore, a set of hETF variants revealed that several conserved amino acid residues in the FAD-binding pocket of electron-transferring flavoproteins are required for the conversion to the formyl group. Two of the variants generated in our study, namely αR249C and αT266M, cause glutaric aciduria type II, a severe inherited disease. Both of the variants showed impaired formation of 8f-FAD shedding new light on the potential molecular cause of disease development. Interestingly, the conversion of FAD to 8f-FAD yields a very stable flavin semiquinone that exhibited slightly lower rates of electron transfer in an artificial assay system than hETF containing FAD. In contrast, the formation of 8f-FAD enhanced the affinity to human dimethylglycine dehydrogenase 5-fold, indicating that formation of 8f-FAD modulates the interaction of hETF with client enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. Thus, we hypothesize that the FAD cofactor bound to hETF is subject to oxidation in the alkaline (pH 8) environment of the mitochondrial matrix, which may modulate electron transport between client dehydrogenases and the respiratory chain. This discovery challenges the current concepts of electron transfer processes in mitochondria. PMID:29301933

  18. In Vitro Drug Transfer Due to Drug Retention in Human Epidermis Pretreated with Application of Marketed Estradiol Transdermal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Pavurala, Naresh; Yang, Yang; Manda, Prashanth; Katragadda, Usha; Yang, Yongsheng; Shah, Rakhi; Fang, Guodong; Khan, Mansoor A

    2017-08-01

    Study objective was to assess skin-to-skin drug transfer potential that may occur due to drug retention in human epidermis (DRE) pretreated with application of estradiol transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) and other estradiol transdermal dosage forms (gels and sprays). TDDS (products-A, B, and C) with varying formulation design and composition, and other estradiol transdermal products (gel and spray) were applied to heat separated human epidermis (HSE) and subjected to in vitro drug permeation study. Amounts of DRE were quantified after 24 h. The DRE with product-B was significantly (P  0.05) amounts of DRE. A separate in vitro permeation study was carried out to determine amounts of drug transferred from drug-retaining epidermis to untreated HSE. The amounts of drug transferred, due to DRE after 8 h, with product-C were significantly (P drug transfer due to the DRE after labeled period of using estradiol TDDS, though the clinical relevance of these findings is yet to be determined.

  19. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I determination using blood collection on filter paper in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMIMORI-YAMASHITA Jane

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 70 leprosy patients and 20 normal individuals, comparing the traditional sera collection method and the finger prick blood with the conservation on filter paper for specific antibodies against the native phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I from Mycobacterium leprae. The finger prick blood dried on filter paper was eluated in phosphate buffer saline (PBS containing 0.5% gelatin. The classical method for native PGL-I was performed for these eluates, and compared with the antibody determination for sera. It was observed that there is a straight correlation comparing these two methods; although the titles found for the eluates were lower than those obtained for serology. This blood collection method could be useful for investigation of new leprosy cases in field, specially in contacts individuals.

  20. Production of a new glycolipid biosurfactant from marine Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 in solid-state cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, G Seghal; Thomas, T Anto; Selvin, Joseph

    2010-06-15

    Considering the need of potential biosurfactant producers and economic production processes using industrial waste, the present study aims to develop solid-state culture (SSC) of a marine actinobacterium for biosurfactant production. A potential biosurfactant producer Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 was isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra. Among the substrates screened, wheat bran increased the production significantly (E(24) 25%) followed by oil seed cake and industrial waste such as tannery pretreated sludge, treated molasses (distillery waste) and pretreated molasses. Enhanced biosurfactant production was achieved under SSC conditions using kerosene as carbon source, beef extract as nitrogen source and wheat bran as substrate. The maximum production of biosurfactant by MSA04 occurred at a C/N ratio of 0.5 envisaging that a higher amount of nitrogen source is required by the strain compared to that of the carbon source. The kerosene and beef extract interactively increase the production and a stable production was attained with the influence of both factors independently. A significant interactive influence of secondary control factors such as copper sulfate and inoculum size was validated in response surface methods-based experiments. The surface active compound produced by MSA04 was characterized as glycolipid with a hydrophobic non-polar hydrocarbon chain (nonanoic acid methyl ester) and hydrophilic sugar, 3-acetyl 2,5 dimethyl furan. In conclusion, the strain N. lucentensis MSA04 was a potential source of glycolipid biosurfactant, could be used for the development of bioremediation processes in the marine environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Distributions of Heterocyst Glycolipids in Settling Particulate Matter Record Ecological and Environmental Parameters in a Tropical Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan Kumar, D.; Hopmans, E.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Schouten, S.; Bauersachs, T.; Werne, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature is a critical component of paleoenvironmental reconstructions, yet it is notoriously difficult to measure in terrestrial archives. Presented here is an investigation of unique glycolipids produced by heterocystous cyanobacteria, so-called heterocyst glycolipids (HGs), in the water column of Lake Malawi (East Africa). The goal of the study is to evaluate the potential of HGs to function as a paleotemperature proxy in tropical lacustrine environments. HGs in Lake Malawi were extracted from settling particulate matter (SPM) collected at bi-monthly intervals from 2011 - 2013. Sediment traps were moored in the metalimnion of both the north and south basins of the lake in order to evaluate the spatial and the temporal trends in lipid production and export. This study is the first to analyze HGs in SPM and contains the longest time-series of HG production in a natural environment to date. HGs are consistently present throughout the three-year study period, but maximum fluxes occur annually in December, coincident with the timing of cyanobacterial blooms in the lake. HGs in SPM appear to be sourced from living cyanobacteria populations, indicating rapid export of the lipids through the water column. Temperatures reconstructed with published HG-based indices, which are derived from the relative abundances of HG diols and triols to HG keto-(di)ols, do not accurately reflect the seasonal variability in measured surface water temperatures. Rather, the production of C28 HG keto-ols appears to be related to the timing of heterocyst differentiation. Heterocystous cyanobacteria in Lake Malawi may instead respond to growth temperatures by elongating the alkyl side chain of HG diols, as indicated by increases in the abundance of the C28 HG diol relative to the C26 HG diol with warmer surface water temperatures. Distributions of HGs thus may indeed provide a novel tool for paleotemperature reconstructions in tropical lakes.

  2. C5 glycolipids of heterocystous cyanobacteria track symbiont abundance in the diatom Hemiaulus hauckii across the tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Nicole J.; Villareal, Tracy A.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Besseling, Marc; Dorhout, Denise; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Diatom-diazotroph associations (DDAs) include marine heterocystous cyanobacteria found as exosymbionts and endosymbionts in multiple diatom species. Heterocysts are the site of N2 fixation and have thickened cell walls containing unique heterocyst glycolipids which maintain a low oxygen environment within the heterocyst. The endosymbiotic cyanobacterium Richelia intracellularis found in species of the diatom genus Hemiaulus and Rhizosolenia makes heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) which are composed of C30 and C32 diols and triols with pentose (C5) moieties that are distinct from limnetic cyanobacterial HGs with predominantly hexose (C6) moieties. Here we applied a method for analysis of intact polar lipids to the study of HGs in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediment from across the tropical North Atlantic. The study focused on the Amazon plume region, where DDAs are documented to form extensive surface blooms, in order to examine the utility of C5 HGs as markers for DDAs as well as their transportation to underlying sediments. C30 and C32 triols with C5 pentose moieties were detected in both marine SPM and surface sediments. We found a significant correlation between the water column concentration of these long-chain C5 HGs and DDA symbiont counts. In particular, the concentrations of both the C5 HGs (1-(O-ribose)-3,27,29-triacontanetriol (C5 HG30 triol) and 1-(O-ribose)-3,29,31-dotriacontanetriol (C5 HG32 triol)) in SPM exhibited a significant correlation with the number of Hemiaulus hauckii symbionts. This result strengthens the idea that long-chain C5 HGs can be applied as biomarkers for marine endosymbiotic heterocystous cyanobacteria. The presence of the same C5 HGs in surface sediment provides evidence that they are effectively transported to the sediment and hence have potential as biomarkers for studies of the contribution of DDAs to the paleo-marine N cycle.

  3. Transfer of human frozen-thawed embryos with further cleavage during culture increases pregnancy rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat V Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the pregnancy rate following transfer of frozen-thawed embryos with or without overnight culture after thawing. Settings and Design: This is a retrospective analysis of frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET cycles performed between January 2006 and December 2008. Materials and Methods: Out of 518 thaw cycles, 504 resulted in embryo transfers (ETs. Of the total FET cycles, 415 were performed after an overnight culture of embryos (group A; and in 89 cycles, ET was performed within 2 hours of embryo thawing (group B. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically analyzed using chi-square test. Results: We observed that with FET, women ≤30 years of age had a significantly higher (P=0.003 pregnancy rate (PR=28.9% as compared to women >30 years of age (17.5%. A significantly higher (P<0.001FNx08 pregnancy rate was also observed in women receiving 3 frozen-thawed embryos (29% as compared to those who received less than 3 embryos (10.7%. The difference in PR between group A (PR=24.3% and group B (PR=20.3% was not statistically significant. However, within group A, ET with cleaved embryos showed significantly ( P≤0.01 higher pregnancy rate compared to the uncleaved embryos, depending on the number of cleaved embryos transferred. Conclusion: No significant difference was noticed between FETs made with transfer of embryos with overnight culture and those without culture. However, within the cultured group, transfer of embryos cleaved during overnight culture gave significantly higher PR than transfers without any cleavage.

  4. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting.As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells.These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  5. Low cytotoxicity effect of dendrosome as an efficient carrier for rotavirus VP2 gene transferring into a human lung cell line : dendrosome, as a novel intranasally gene porter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Massumi, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of dendrosome (a gene porter) was assessed in transferring recombinant human rotavirus VP2 cDNA into A549, a human lung cell line. After gene transferring, transmission electron microscopy showed core-like particles (CLPs) formation in the transfected cells both with dendrosome and lipofectamine porters. In addition, western blotting analysis showed that the expression of VP2 gene was almost equal in the dendrosome and lipofectamine-transfected cells. Also, the cytotoxicity studies revealed that dendrosome had a lower cytotoxicity than lipofectamine. Therefore, our study may introduce dendrosome as a possible carrier for gene transferring into the human lung cell line, especially, for intranasally administration of DNA vaccines.

  6. Trophic transfer of microplastics and mixed contaminants in the marine food web and implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbery, Maddison; O'Connor, Wayne; Palanisami, Thavamani

    2018-06-01

    Plastic litter has become one of the most serious threats to the marine environment. Over 690 marine species have been impacted by plastic debris with small plastic particles being observed in the digestive tract of organisms from different trophic levels. The physical and chemical properties of microplastics facilitate the sorption of contaminants to the particle surface, serving as a vector of contaminants to organisms following ingestion. Bioaccumulation factors for higher trophic organisms and impacts on wider marine food webs remain unknown. The main objectives of this review were to discuss the factors influencing microplastic ingestion; describe the biological impacts of associated chemical contaminants; highlight evidence for the trophic transfer of microplastics and contaminants within marine food webs and outline the future research priorities to address potential human health concerns. Controlled laboratory studies looking at the effects of microplastics and contaminants on model organisms employ nominal concentrations and consequently have little relevance to the real environment. Few studies have attempted to track the fate of microplastics and mixed contaminants through a complex marine food web using environmentally relevant concentrations to identify the real level of risk. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to understand the transfer of microplastics and associated contaminants from seafood to humans and the implications for human health. Research is needed to determine bioaccumulation factors for popular seafood items in order to identify the potential impacts on human health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  8. Adenovirus-assisted lipofection: efficient in vitro gene transfer of luciferase and cytosine deaminase to human smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, J; Denger, S; Reifers, F; Beisel, C; Haack, K; Gebert, J; Kübler, W

    1996-07-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are a central cell type involved in multiple processes of coronary artery diseases including restenosis and therefore are major target cells for different aspects of gene transfer. Previous attempts to transfect primary arterial cells using different techniques like liposomes, CaPO4 and electroporation resulted in only low transfection efficiency. The development of recombinant adenoviruses dramatically improved the delivery of foreign genes into different cell types including SMC. However, cloning and identification of recombinants remain difficult and time-consuming techniques. The present study demonstrates that a complex consisting of reporter plasmid encoding firefly luciferase (pLUC), polycationic liposomes and replication-deficient adenovirus was able to yield very high in vitro transfection of primary human smooth muscle cells under optimized conditions. The technique of adenovirus-assisted lipofection (AAL) increases transfer and expression of plasmid DNA in human smooth muscle cells in vitro up to 1000-fold compared to lipofection. To verify the applicability of AAL for gene transfer into human smooth muscle cells we studied a gene therapy approach to suppress proliferation of SMC in vitro, using the prokaryotic cytosine deaminase gene (CD) which enables transfected mammalian cells to deaminate 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the highly toxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The effect of a transient CD expression on RNA synthesis was investigated by means of a cotransfection with a RSV-CD expression plasmid and the luciferase reporter plasmid. Western blot analysis demonstrated high expression of CD protein in transfected SMC. Cotransfected SMC demonstrated two-fold less luciferase activity in the presence of 5-FC (5 mmol/l) after 48 h compared to cells transfected with a non-CD coding plasmid. The data demonstrate that a transient expression of CD could be sufficient to reduce the capacity of protein synthesis in human SMC. This simple and

  9. Transplacental transfer of monomethyl phthalate and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in a human placenta perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Hedegaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The transplacental passage of monomethylphtalate (mMP) and mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (mEHP) was studied using an ex vivo placental perfusion model with simultaneous perfusion of fetal and maternal circulation in a single cotyledon. Umbilical cord blood and placental tissue collected both before...... plasma samples. mMP and possibly other short-chained phthalate monoesters in maternal blood can cross the placenta by slow transfer, whereas the results indicate no placental transfer of mEHP. Further studies are recommended....

  10. Normative foundations of technology transfer and transnational benefit principles in the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas Alured; Nasu, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    The United Nations Scientific, Education, and Cultural Organization Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) expresses in its title and substance a controversial linkage of two normative systems: international human rights law and bioethics. The UDBHR has the status of what is known as a "nonbinding" declaration under public international law. The UDBHR's foundation within bioethics (and association, e.g., with virtue-based or principlist bioethical theories) is more problematic. Nonetheless, the UDBHR contains socially important principles of technology transfer and transnational benefit (articles 14, 15, and 21). This paper is one of the first to explore how the disciplines of bioethics and international human rights law may interact in the UDBHR to advance the policy relevance and health impact of such principles. It investigates their normative ancestry in the UDBHR, as well as relevant conceptual differences between bioethics and public international law in this respect, and how these may be relevant to their conceptual evolution and application.

  11. Environmental and resources geochemistry of earth system mass transfer mechanism, geochemical cycle and the influence of human activity

    CERN Document Server

    Shikazono, Naotatsu

    2015-01-01

    The Earth system consists of subsystems that include the atmosphere, hydrosphere (water), geosphere (rocks, minerals), biosphere, and humans. In order to understand these subsystems and their interactions, it is essential to clarify the mass transfer mechanism, geochemical cycle, and influence of human activity on the natural environment. This book presents fundamental theories (thermodynamics, kinetics, mass balance model, coupling models such as the kinetics-fluid flow model, the box model, and others) concerning mechanisms in weathering, formation of hydrothermal ore deposits, hydrothermal alteration, formation of groundwater quality, and the seawater system. The interaction between fluids (atmosphere, water) and solid phases (rocks, minerals) occurs both in low-temperature and also in high-temperature systems. This book considers the complex low-temperature cycle with the high-temperature cycle, a combination that has not been dealt with in previous books concerning Earth systems. Humanity is a small part...

  12. High-level transfer and long-term expression of the human beta-globin gene in a mouse transplant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftopoulos, H; Ward, M; Bank, A

    1998-06-30

    Insertion of a normally functioning human beta-globin gene into the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of patients with beta-thalassemia may be an effective approach to the therapy of this disorder. Safe, efficient gene transfer and long-term, high-level expression of the transferred human beta-globin gene in animal models are prerequisites for HSC somatic gene therapy. We have recently shown for the first time that, using a modified beta-globin retroviral vector in a mouse transplant model, long-term, high-level expression of a transferred human beta-globin gene is possible. The human beta-globin gene continues to be detected up to eight months post-transplantation of beta-globin-transduced hematopoietic cells into lethally irradiated mice. The transferred human beta-globin gene is detected in three of five mice surviving long-term (> 4 months) transplanted with bone marrow cells transduced with high-titer virus. The unrearranged 5.1 kb human beta-globin gene-containing provirus is seen by Southern blotting in two of these mice. More importantly, long-term expression of the transferred gene is seen in two mice at levels of 5% and 20% that of endogenous murine beta-globin. We document stem cell transduction by showing continued high-level expression of the human beta-globin gene in secondarily transplanted recipient mice. These results provide evidence of HSC transduction with a human beta-globin gene in animals and demonstrate that retroviral-mediated unrearranged human beta-globin gene transfer leads to a high level of human beta-globin gene expression in the long term for the first time. A gene therapy strategy may be a feasible therapeutic approach to the beta-thalassemias if consistent human beta-globin gene transfer and expression into HSC can be achieved.

  13. Aliens in Antarctica: Assessing transfer of plant propagules by human visitors to reduce invasion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskes, A.H.L.; Gremmen, N.J.M.; Bergstrom, D.M.; Frenot, Y.; Hughes, K.A.; Imura, S.; Kiefer, K.; Lebouvier, M.; Lee, J.E.; Tsujimoto, M.; Ware, C.; Van de Vijver, B.; Chown, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable research on biological invasions, key areas remain poorly explored, especially ways to reduce unintentional propagule transfer. The Antarctic represents a microcosm of the situation, with the numbers of established non-native species growing. Information to help reduce potential

  14. A Model for the Transfer of Perceptual-Motor Skill Learning in Human Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalie, Simon M.; Muller, Sean

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary model that outlines the mechanisms underlying the transfer of perceptual-motor skill learning in sport and everyday tasks. Perceptual-motor behavior is motivated by performance demands and evolves over time to increase the probability of success through adaptation. Performance demands at the time of an event…

  15. Culture and Human Capital Investments: Evidence of an Unconditional Cash Transfer Program in Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez-Pagans, Monica

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a policy quasi-experiment created by the introduction of an old-age unconditional cash transfer program in Bolivia to study the intra-household income allocation process towards children's educational expenditure by ethnicity and gender of the recipient. Taking advantage of a sharp discontinuity created by the program assignment mechanism, I investigate the heterogeneity in the patterns of allocation within indigenous, multiethnic, and non-indigenous families, conditional on h...

  16. Radioiodinated, photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine: transfer properties and differential photoreactive interaction with human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroit, A.J.; Madsen, J.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    An isotopically labeled cross-linking reagent, succinimido 3-(3-[ 125 I]iodo-4-azidophenyl)propionate, has been synthesized and coupled to 1-acyl-2-(aminocaproyl)phosphatidylcholine according to previously described procedures. 125 I- and N 3 -labeled phosphatidylserine ( 125 I-N 3 -PS) was produced from the phosphatidylcholine (PC) analog by phospholipase D catalyzed base exchange in the presence of L-serine. These phospholipid analogues are photoactivatable, are labeled with 125 I at high specific activity, completely incorporate into synthetic vesicles, and spontaneously transfer between membranes. When an excess of acceptor vesicles or red blood cells (RBC) was mixed with a population of donor vesicles containing the 125 I-N 3 -phospholipids, approximately 40% of the analogues transferred to the acceptor population. After transfer in the dark to RBC, all of the 125 I-N 3 -PC incorporated into the cells could be removed by washing with serum, whereas the 125 I-N 3 -PS could not. After photolabeling of intact RBC, ∼50% of the PC and 20% of the PS cross-linked to membrane proteins as determined by their insolubility in CHCl 3 /MeOH. Analysis of probe distribution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that 125 I-N 3 -PS preferentially labeled a M/sub r/ 30,000 peptide which contained ∼30% of the protein-bound label

  17. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Cyborg: Establishing a Functional Information Transfer Pathway from Human Brain to Cockroach Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangye; Zhang, Dingguo

    2016-01-01

    An all-chain-wireless brain-to-brain system (BTBS), which enabled motion control of a cyborg cockroach via human brain, was developed in this work. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer interface (BCI) was used in this system for recognizing human motion intention and an optimization algorithm was proposed in SSVEP to improve online performance of the BCI. The cyborg cockroach was developed by surgically integrating a portable microstimulator that could generate invasive electrical nerve stimulation. Through Bluetooth communication, specific electrical pulse trains could be triggered from the microstimulator by BCI commands and were sent through the antenna nerve to stimulate the brain of cockroach. Serial experiments were designed and conducted to test overall performance of the BTBS with six human subjects and three cockroaches. The experimental results showed that the online classification accuracy of three-mode BCI increased from 72.86% to 78.56% by 5.70% using the optimization algorithm and the mean response accuracy of the cyborgs using this system reached 89.5%. Moreover, the results also showed that the cyborg could be navigated by the human brain to complete walking along an S-shape track with the success rate of about 20%, suggesting the proposed BTBS established a feasible functional information transfer pathway from the human brain to the cockroach brain.

  18. Transferability of a tetracycline resistance gene from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri to bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervärn, Maria; Lindmark, Hans; Olsson, Johan; Roos, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus reuteri as a donor of antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut was investigated by studying the transferability of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(W) to faecal enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In a double-blind clinical study, seven subjects consumed L. reuteri ATCC 55730 harbouring a plasmid-encoded tet(W) gene (tet(W)-reuteri) and an equal number of subjects consumed L. reuteri DSM 17938 derived from the ATCC 55730 strain by the removal of two plasmids, one of which contained the tet(W) gene. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after ingestion of 5 x 10(8) CFU of L. reuteri per day for 14 days. Both L. reuteri strains were detectable at similar levels in faeces after 14 days of intake but neither was detected after a two-week wash-out period. After enrichment and isolation of tetracycline resistant enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli from each faecal sample, DNA was extracted and analysed for presence of tet(W)-reuteri using a real-time PCR allelic discrimination method developed in this study. No tet(W)-reuteri signal was produced from any of the DNA samples and thus gene transfer to enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during intestinal passage of the probiotic strain was non-detectable under the conditions tested, although transfer at low frequencies or to the remaining faecal bacterial population cannot be excluded.

  19. Activation of human T lymphocytes by Leishmania lipophosphoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Theander, T G; Handman, E

    1991-01-01

    This study describes Leishmania antigen-induced activation of lymphocytes isolated from Kenyan donors, previously treated for visceral leishmaniasis, and from Danish and Kenyan controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cured Kala-Azar patients proliferated and produced Interferon......, the results suggest that human T lymphocytes can respond to glycolipid antigens....

  20. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  1. Review on modeling heat transfer and thermoregulatory responses in human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming; Weng, Wenguo; Chen, Weiwang; Luo, Na

    2016-12-01

    Several mathematical models of human thermoregulation have been developed, contributing to a deep understanding of thermal responses in different thermal conditions and applications. In these models, the human body is represented by two interacting systems of thermoregulation: the controlling active system and the controlled passive system. This paper reviews the recent research of human thermoregulation models. The accuracy and scope of the thermal models are improved, for the consideration of individual differences, integration to clothing models, exposure to cold and hot conditions, and the changes of physiological responses for the elders. The experimental validated methods for human subjects and manikin are compared. The coupled method is provided for the manikin, controlled by the thermal model as an active system. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is also used along with the manikin or/and the thermal model, to evaluate the thermal responses of human body in various applications, such as evaluation of thermal comfort to increase the energy efficiency, prediction of tolerance limits and thermal acceptability exposed to hostile environments, indoor air quality assessment in the car and aerospace industry, and design protective equipment to improve function of the human activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolation of basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis and production of glycolipid biosurfactant, a diastereomer type of mannosylerythritol lipid-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Takashima, Masako; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-10-01

    The producers of glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid-B (MEL-B), were isolated from leaves of Perilla frutescens on Ibaraki in Japan. Four isolates, 1D9, 1D10, 1D11, and 1E5, were identified as basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis by rDNA sequence and biochemical properties. The structure of MEL-B produced by these strains was analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, and was determined to be the same as the diastereomer MEL-B produced by P. tsukubaensis NBRC 1940. Of these isolates, P. tsukubaensis 1E5 (JCM 16987) is capable of producing the largest amount of the diastereomer MEL-B from vegetable oils. In order to progress the diastereomer MEL-B production by strain 1E5, factors affecting the production, such as carbon and organic nutrient sources, were further examined. Olive oil and yeast extract were the best carbon and nutrient sources, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, a maximum yield, productivity, and yield coefficient of 73.1 g/L, 10.4 g L(-1) day(-1), and 43.5 g/g were achieved by feeding of olive oil in a 5-L jar-fermenter culture using strain 1E5.

  3. Playing hide-and-seek with host macrophages through the use of mycobacterial cell envelope phthiocerol dimycocerosates and phenolic glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eARBUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, have evolved a remarkable ability to evade the immune system in order to survive and to colonize the host. Among the most important evasion strategies is the capacity of these bacilli to parasitize host macrophages, since these are major effector cells against intracellular pathogens that can be used as long-term cellular reservoirs. Mycobacterial pathogens employ an array of virulence factors that manipulate macrophage function to survive and establish infection. Until recently, however, the role of mycobacterial cell envelope lipids as virulence factors in macrophage subversion has remained elusive. Here, we will address exclusively the proposed role for phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM in the modulation of the resident macrophage response and that of phenolic glycolipids (PGL in the regulation of the recruitment and phenotype of incoming macrophage precursors to the site of infection. We will provide a unique perspective of potential additional functions for these lipids, and highlight obstacles and opportunities to further understand their role in the pathogenesis of TB and other mycobacterial diseases.

  4. Effects of Chimonanthus nitens Oliv. Leaf Extract on Glycolipid Metabolism and Antioxidant Capacity in Diabetic Model Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigated the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic efficacy and antioxidant capacity of Chimonanthus nitens Oliv. leaf extract (COE in combination of high-glucose-fat diet-fed and streptozotocin-induced diabetic model mice. Various physiological indexes in diabetic model mice were well improved especially by oral administration of high dose of COE; the results were listed as follows. Fast blood glucose (FBG level and serum triglyceride (TC, total cholesterol (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC, and malondialdehyde (MDA as well as MDA in liver were significantly reduced; fasting serum insulin (FINS and insulin sensitivity index (ISI were both increased; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC in serum was significantly increased; total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and catalase (CAT in serum and liver were apparently enhanced; liver coefficient (LC, liver transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were decreased. Furthermore, pancreas islets and liver in diabetic model mice showed some extend of improvement in morphology and function after 4 weeks of COE treatment. In consequence, COE was advantageous to regulate glycolipid metabolism and elevate antioxidant capacity in diabetic model mice. Thus, the present study will provide a scientific evidence for the use of COE in the management of diabetes and its related complications.

  5. Production and characterisation of glycolipid biosurfactant by Halomonas sp. MB-30 for potential application in enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhasayan, Asha; Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant-producing Halomonas sp. MB-30 was isolated from a marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa, and its potency in crude oil recovery from sand pack column was investigated. The biosurfactant produced by the strain MB-30 reduced the surface tension to 30 mN m(-1) in both glucose and hydrocarbon-supplemented minimal media. The critical micelle concentration of biosurfactant obtained from glucose-based medium was at 0.25 mg ml(-1) at critical micelle dilution 1:10. The chemical structure of glycolipid biosurfactant was characterised by infrared spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The emulsification activity of MB-30 biosurfactant was tested with different hydrocarbons, and 93.1 % emulsification activity was exhibited with crude oil followed by kerosene (86.6 %). The formed emulsion was stable for up to 1 month. To identify the effectiveness of biosurfactant for enhanced oil recovery in extreme environments, the interactive effect of pH, temperature and salinity on emulsion stability with crude oil and kerosene was evaluated. The stable emulsion was formed at and above pH 7, temperature >80 °C and NaCl concentration up to 10 % in response surface central composite orthogonal design model. The partially purified biosurfactant recovered 62 % of residual crude oil from sand pack column. Thus, the stable emulsifying biosurfactant produced by Halomonas sp. MB-30 could be used for in situ biosurfactant-mediated enhanced oil recovery process and hydrocarbon bioremediation in extreme environments.

  6. In vitro investigation of heat transfer phenomenon in human immature teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Maryam; Moghimi, Sahar; Shafagh, Mina; Kalani, Hadi; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element models were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the model validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth) and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth). When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling illustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are required to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  7. Co-localization of a CD1d-binding glycolipid with a radiation-attenuated sporozoite vaccine in LN-resident DCs for a robust adjuvant effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Kawamura, Akira; Andrews, Chasity D.; Miller, Jessica L.; Wu, Douglass; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Oren, Deena; Padte, Neal N.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Ho, David D.; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-01-01

    A CD1d-binding glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), activates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and acts as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying nearly 100-fold stronger CD1d binding affinity. In the present study, 7DW8-5 was found to exert a more potent adjuvant effect than αGalCer for a vaccine based on radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) of a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, also referred to as irradiated P. yoelii sporozoites (IrPySpz). 7DW8-5 had a superb adjuvant effect only when the glycolipid and IrPySpz were conjointly administered intramuscularly (i.m.). Therefore, we evaluated the impact of distinctly different biodistribution patterns of αGalCer and 7DW8-5 on their respective adjuvant activities. While both glycolipids induce a similar cytokine response in sera of mice injected intravenously, after i.m. injection, αGalCer induces a systemic cytokine response, whereas 7DW8-5 is locally trapped by CD1d expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Moreover, the i.m. co-administration of 7DW8-5 with IrPySpz results in the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and the activation and maturation of DCs. These events cause the potent adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, resulting in the enhancement of the CD8+ T-cell response induced by IrPySpz, and, ultimately, improved protection against malaria. Our study is the first to show that the co-localization of a CD1d-binding iNKT-cell stimulatory glycolipid and a vaccine, like RAS, in dLN-resident DCs upon i.m. conjoin administration governs the potency of the adjuvant effect of the glycolipid. PMID:26254338

  8. Colocalization of a CD1d-Binding Glycolipid with a Radiation-Attenuated Sporozoite Vaccine in Lymph Node-Resident Dendritic Cells for a Robust Adjuvant Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Kawamura, Akira; Andrews, Chasity D; Miller, Jessica L; Wu, Douglass; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Oren, Deena; Padte, Neal N; Porcelli, Steven A; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kappe, Stefan H I; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-09-15

    A CD1d-binding glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), activates invariant NK T cells and acts as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying nearly 100-fold stronger CD1d binding affinity. In the current study, 7DW8-5 was found to exert a more potent adjuvant effect than αGalCer for a vaccine based on radiation-attenuated sporozoites of a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, also referred to as irradiated P. yoelii sporozoites (IrPySpz). 7DW8-5 had a superb adjuvant effect only when the glycolipid and IrPySpz were conjointly administered i.m. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of distinctly different biodistribution patterns of αGalCer and 7DW8-5 on their respective adjuvant activities. Although both glycolipids induce a similar cytokine response in sera of mice injected i.v., after i.m. injection, αGalCer induces a systemic cytokine response, whereas 7DW8-5 is locally trapped by CD1d expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Moreover, the i.m. coadministration of 7DW8-5 with IrPySpz results in the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and the activation and maturation of DCs. These events cause the potent adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, resulting in the enhancement of the CD8(+) T cell response induced by IrPySpz and, ultimately, improved protection against malaria. Our study is the first to show that the colocalization of a CD1d-binding invariant NK T cell-stimulatory glycolipid and a vaccine, like radiation-attenuated sporozoites, in dLN-resident DCs upon i.m. conjoint administration governs the potency of the adjuvant effect of the glycolipid. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Gene Transfer Properties and Structural Modeling of Human Stem Cell-derived AAV

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34+ human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34+ cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34+ cells...

  10. Numerical modeling of heat and mass transfer in the human eye under millimeter wave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2013-05-01

    Human exposure to millimeter wave (MMW) radiation is expected to increase in the next several years. In this work, we present a thermal model of the human eye under MMW illumination. The model takes into account the fluid dynamics of the aqueous humor and predicts a frequency-dependent reversal of its flow that also depends on the incident power density. The calculated maximum fluid velocity in the anterior chamber and the temperature rise at the corneal apex are reported for frequencies from 40 to 100 GHz and different values of incident power density. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Talebi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp. Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU. Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element mod-els were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the mod-el validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth. When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling il-lustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are re-quired to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  12. Evaluating psychological markers for human nicotine dependence: tobacco choice, extinction, and Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Lee; Chase, Henry W

    2012-06-01

    Individual differences in drug dependence may be mediated by several abnormalities in associative learning, including perseveration of drug-seeking following contingency change, greater control over drug-seeking by Pavlovian stimuli, or greater sensitivity to drug reinforcement establishing higher rates of drug-seeking. To evaluate these three candidate markers for nicotine dependence, Experiment 1 contrasted daily (N = 22) and nondaily smoker groups (N = 22) on a novel instrumental learning task, where one S+ was first trained as a predictor of tobacco reward before being extinguished. Experiment 2 compared daily (N = 18) and nondaily smoker groups (N = 18) on a concurrent-choice task for tobacco and chocolate reward before an extinction test in which the tobacco response was extinguished, followed by a Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer test, wherein the impact of tobacco and chocolate cues on concurrent choice was measured (gender was balanced within each smoker group). The results showed no group difference in sensitivity to extinction of either the stimulus-drug or response-drug contingency in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively, nor did groups show a difference in Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer of control over tobacco choice. By contrast, nicotine-dependence status was marked by a higher frequency of tobacco choice in the concurrent-choice procedure, and this choice preference was associated with subjective craving (gender did not affect any behavioral measure). These results favor the view that nicotine dependence in this sample is not determined by individual predilection for perseveration or stimulus-control over drug-seeking, but by greater sensitivity to reinforcement of instrumental drug choice. Value-based decision theories of dependence are discussed.

  13. Kinematics design and human motion transfer for a humanoid service robot arm

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dube, C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available . Philadelphia: Saunders Col- lege Publishing, 1982. [2] Hamill, J. and Knutzen, K. M., Biomechanical Basis of Human Motion, Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1995. [3] Lenarcˇicˇ, J. and Klopcˇar, N.,“Positional kinematics of hu- manoid arms,” Robotica, vol...

  14. Improved numerical modelling of heat transfer in human tissue exposed to RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prishvin, Mikheil; Zaridze, Revaz; Bit-Babik, Georgi; Faraone, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A novel numerical model to simulate thermal response of human body tissues exposed to RF energy is presented in this article. It is based on a new algorithm for the construction of a realistic blood vessel network, a new model of blood flow velocity distribution and an approach to solve the bio-heat equation in human tissue with variable and initially unknown blood temperature distribution. The algorithm generates a discrete 3D representation of both arterial and venous vascular networks and a continuous blood velocity vector field for arbitrary enclosed geome tries required to represent the complex anatomy of human body and blood flow. The results obtained in this article by applying the developed method to realistic exposure con ditions demonstrates relative difference in thermal response of the exposed tissue compared to results obtained by conventional bio-heat equation with constant blood perfusion and temperature. The developed technique may provide more accurate and realistic modelling in thermal dosimetry studies of human body RF exposure.

  15. Agonistic Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Death Receptor 4 (DR4) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in licensing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 ("DR4"). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its functional receptors, DR4 and DR5, have been recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment.

  16. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  17. Knowledge Transfer in Higher Education: Collaboration in the Arts and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lisa Mooney

    2012-01-01

    This book presents four years of close observation of research and KT practices in one UK University. It attempts to contextualise KT within the arts and humanities, as well as situate learning about the reception and adoption of KT by the individual scholar and the organisation in which they operate. (Contains 3 figures)

  18. Human health risk assessment (HHRA) for environmental development and transfer of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Here we present possible approaches and identify research needs to enable human health risk assessments that focus on the role the environment plays in antibiotic treatment failure of patients. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop sub-committee to define t...

  19. Human anti-CCR4 minibody gene transfer for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Han

    Full Text Available Although several therapeutic options have become available for patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma (CTCL, no therapy has been curative. Recent studies have demonstrated that CTCL cells overexpress the CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4.In this study, a xenograft model of CTCL was established and a recombinant adeno-associated viral serotype 8 (AAV8 vector expressing a humanized single-chain variable fragment (scFv-Fc fusion (scFvFc or "minibody" of anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody (mAb h1567 was evaluated for curative treatment. Human CCR4+ tumor-bearing mice treated once with intravenous infusion of AAV8 virions encoding the h1567 (AAV8-h1567 minibody showed anti-tumor activity in vivo and increased survival. The AAV8-h1567 minibody notably increased the number of tumor-infiltrating Ly-6G+ FcγRIIIa(CD16A+ murine neutrophils in the tumor xenografts over that of AAV8-control minibody treated mice. Furthermore, in CCR4+ tumor-bearing mice co-treated with AAV8-h1567 minibody and infused with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, marked tumor infiltration of human CD16A+ CD56+ NK cells was observed. The h1567 minibody also induced in vitro ADCC activity through both mouse neutrophils and human NK cells.Overall, our data demonstrate that the in vivo anti-tumor activity of h1567 minibody is mediated, at least in part, through CD16A+ immune effector cell ADCC mechanisms. These data further demonstrate the utility of the AAV-minibody gene transfer system in the rapid evaluation of candidate anti-tumor mAbs and the potency of h1567 as a potential novel therapy for CTCL.

  20. Human health risk assessment (HHRA) for environmental development and transfer of antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Amézquita, Alejandro; Backhaus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    to enable human health risk assessments (HHRA) that focus on the role of the environment in the failure of antibiotic treatment caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop held 4-8 March 2012 in Québec, Canada, to define the scope and objectives...... of an environmental assessment of antibiotic-resistance risks to human health. We focused on key elements of environmental-resistance-development "hot spots," exposure assessment (unrelated to food), and dose response to characterize risks that may improve antibiotic-resistance management options. Discussion: Various...... novel aspects to traditional risk assessments were identified to enable an assessment of environmental antibiotic resistance. These include a) accounting for an added selective pressure on the environmental resistome that, over time, allows for development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB); b...

  1. Pre-steady-state fluorescence analysis of damaged DNA transfer from human DNA glycosylases to AP endonuclease APE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Saparbaev, Murat K; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-10-01

    DNA glycosylases remove the modified, damaged or mismatched bases from the DNA by hydrolyzing the N-glycosidic bonds. Some enzymes can further catalyze the incision of a resulting abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic, AP) site through β- or β,δ-elimination mechanisms. In most cases, the incision reaction of the AP-site is catalyzed by special enzymes called AP-endonucleases. Here, we report the kinetic analysis of the mechanisms of modified DNA transfer from some DNA glycosylases to the AP endonuclease, APE1. The modified DNA contained the tetrahydrofurane residue (F), the analogue of the AP-site. DNA glycosylases AAG, OGG1, NEIL1, MBD4(cat) and UNG from different structural superfamilies were used. We found that all DNA glycosylases may utilise direct protein-protein interactions in the transient ternary complex for the transfer of the AP-containing DNA strand to APE1. We hypothesize a fast "flip-flop" exchange mechanism of damaged and undamaged DNA strands within this complex for monofunctional DNA glycosylases like MBD4(cat), AAG and UNG. Bifunctional DNA glycosylase NEIL1 creates tightly specific complex with DNA containing F-site thereby efficiently competing with APE1. Whereas APE1 fast displaces other bifunctional DNA glycosylase OGG1 on F-site thereby induces its shifts to undamaged DNA regions. Kinetic analysis of the transfer of DNA between human DNA glycosylases and APE1 allows us to elucidate the critical step in the base excision repair pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A review of heat transfer in human tooth--experimental characterization and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian; Bai, Bo Feng

    2010-06-01

    With rapid advances in modern dentistry, high-energy output instruments (e.g., dental lasers and light polymerizing units) are increasingly employed in dental surgery for applications such as laser assisted tooth ablation, bleaching, hypersensitivity treatment and polymerization of dental restorative materials. Extreme high temperature occurs within the tooth during these treatments, which may induce tooth thermal pain (TTP) sensation. Despite the wide application of these dental treatments, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Therefore, there is an urgent need to better understand heat transfer (HT) process in tooth, thermally induced damage of tooth, and the corresponding TTP. This will enhance the design and optimization of clinical treatment strategies. This paper presents the state-of-the-art of the current understanding on HT in tooth, with both experimental study and mathematical modeling reviewed. Limitations of the current experimental and mathematical methodologies are discussed and potential solutions are suggested. Interpretation of TTP in terms of thermally stimulated dentinal fluid flow is also discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  3. β-Cell Replacement in Mice Using Human Type 1 Diabetes Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lina; Danzl, Nichole; Campbell, Sean R; Viola, Ryan; Williams, Damian; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Neil; Poffenberger, Greg; Johannesson, Bjarki; Oberholzer, Jose; Powers, Alvin C; Leibel, Rudolph L; Chen, Xiaojuan; Sykes, Megan; Egli, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    β-Cells derived from stem cells hold great promise for cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here we examine the ability of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (NT-ESs) derived from a patient with type 1 diabetes to differentiate into β-cells and provide a source of autologous islets for cell replacement. NT-ESs differentiate in vitro with an average efficiency of 55% into C-peptide-positive cells, expressing markers of mature β-cells, including MAFA and NKX6.1. Upon transplantation in immunodeficient mice, grafted cells form vascularized islet-like structures containing MAFA/C-peptide-positive cells. These β-cells adapt insulin secretion to ambient metabolite status and show normal insulin processing. Importantly, NT-ES-β-cells maintain normal blood glucose levels after ablation of the mouse endogenous β-cells. Cystic structures, but no teratomas, were observed in NT-ES-β-cell grafts. Isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed greater variability in β-cell differentiation. Even though different methods of somatic cell reprogramming result in stem cell lines that are molecularly indistinguishable, full differentiation competence is more common in ES cell lines than in induced pluripotent stem cell lines. These results demonstrate the suitability of NT-ES-β-cells for cell replacement for type 1 diabetes and provide proof of principle for therapeutic cloning combined with cell therapy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros, E-mail: theosama@auth.g [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-10-07

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 x 10{sup -4} m s{sup -1}. The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  5. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2010-10-07

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 × 10(-4) m s(-1). The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  6. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 x 10 -4 m s -1 . The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of quetiapine fumarate in pharmaceuticals and human urine by two charge-transfer complexation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric procedures are proposed for the determination of quetiapine fumarate (QTF in pharmaceuticals and in spiked human urine. The methods are based on charge transfer complexation reactions of free base form of the drug (quetiapine, QTP, as n-electron donor (D, with either p-chloranilic acid (p-CAA (method A or 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanoquinone (DDQ (method B as π-acceptors (A. The coloured charge transfer complexes produced exhibit absorption maxima at 520 and 540 nm, in method A and method B, respectively. The experimental conditions such as reagent concentration, reaction solvent and time have been carefully optimized to achieve the maximum sensitivity. Beer’s law is obeyed over the concentration ranges of 8.0 - 160 and 4.0 - 80.0 μg ml-1, for method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 1.77 × 103 and 4.59 × 103 l mol-1cm-1, respectively, for method A and method B. The Sandell sensitivity values, limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ have also been reported. The stoichiometry of the reaction in both cases was accomplished adopting the limiting logarithmic method and was found to be 1: 2 (D: A. The accuracy and precision of the methods were evaluated on intra-day and inter-day basis. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of QTF in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked human urine.

  8. High-energy phosphate transfer in human muscle: diffusion of phosphocreatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Refaat E; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G; Bottomley, Paul A

    2011-07-01

    The creatine kinase (CK) reaction is central to muscle energetics, buffering ATP levels during periods of intense activity via consumption of phosphocreatine (PCr). PCr is believed to serve as a spatial shuttle of high-energy phosphate between sites of energy production in the mitochondria and sites of energy utilization in the myofibrils via diffusion. Knowledge of the diffusion coefficient of PCr (D(PCr)) is thus critical for modeling and understanding energy transport in the myocyte, but D(PCr) has not been measured in humans. Using localized phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we measured D(PCr) in the calf muscle of 11 adults as a function of direction and diffusion time. The results show that the diffusion of PCr is anisotropic, with significantly higher diffusion along the muscle fibers, and that the diffusion of PCr is restricted to a ∼28-μm pathlength assuming a cylindrical model, with an unbounded diffusion coefficient of ∼0.69 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. This distance is comparable in size to the myofiber radius. On the basis of prior measures of CK reaction kinetics in human muscle, the expected diffusion distance of PCr during its half-life in the CK reaction is ∼66 μm. This distance is much greater than the average distances between mitochondria and myofibrils. Thus these first measurements of PCr diffusion in human muscle in vivo support the view that PCr diffusion is not a factor limiting high-energy phosphate transport between the mitochondria and the myofibrils in healthy resting myocytes.

  9. Indian hedgehog gene transfer is a chondrogenic inducer of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To date, no single most-appropriate factor or delivery method has been identified for the purpose of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatment of cartilage injury. Therefore, in this study we tested whether gene delivery of the growth factor Indian hedgehog (IHH) was able to induce chondrogenesis in human primary MSCs, and whether it was possible by such an approach to modulate the appearance of chondrogenic hypertrophy in pellet cultures in vitro. Methods First-generation adenoviral vectors encoding the cDNA of the human IHH gene were created by cre-lox recombination and used alone or in combination with adenoviral vectors, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Ad.BMP-2), or transforming growth factor beta-1 (Ad.TGF-β1) to transduce human bone-marrow derived MSCs at 5 × 102 infectious particles/cell. Thereafter, 3 × 105 cells were seeded into aggregates and cultured for 3 weeks in serum-free medium, with untransduced or marker gene transduced cultures as controls. Transgene expressions were determined by ELISA, and aggregates were analysed histologically, immunohistochemically, biochemically and by RT-PCR for chondrogenesis and hypertrophy. Results IHH, TGF-β1 and BMP-2 genes were equipotent inducers of chondrogenesis in primary MSCs, as evidenced by strong staining for proteoglycans, collagen type II, increased levels of glycosaminoglycan synthesis, and expression of mRNAs associated with chondrogenesis. IHH-modified aggregates, alone or in combination, also showed a tendency to progress towards hypertrophy, as judged by the expression of alkaline phosphatase and stainings for collagen type X and Annexin 5. Conclusion As this study provides evidence for chondrogenic induction of MSC aggregates in vitro via IHH gene delivery, this technology may be efficiently employed for generating cartilaginous repair tissues in vivo. PMID:22817660

  10. Novel glycolipid TLR2 ligands of the type Pam2Cys-α-Gal: synthesis and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Monneaux, Fanny; Creusat, Gaëlle; Spanedda, Maria Vittoria; Heurtault, Béatrice; Habermacher, Chloé; Schuber, Francis; Bourel-Bonnet, Line; Frisch, Benoît

    2012-05-01

    A more complete understanding of the mechanism of action of TLR agonists has fueled the investigation of new synthetic immunoadjuvants. In this context, we designed and synthesized glycolipids of the type Pam(2)Cys-α-Galactose as novel immunoadjuvants. Their synthesis required modifying a hydrophobic tBoc-[2,3-bispalmitoyloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl moiety, i.e. the minimal structure required for TLR2 agonist activity, by addition of a hydrophilic head, either an α-Galactosylpyranose or an α-Galactosylfuranose to gain respectively Pam(2)CGalp and Pam(2)CGalf. While preparing a carbohydrate building block, an unexpected stereoselectivity was observed during a halide ion-catalytic process on a protected galactofuranose: the alpha anomer was obtained with surprisingly high selectivity (α/β ratio>9) and with good isolated yield (51%). The TLR2 binding properties of Pam(2)CGalp and Pam(2)CGalf were then fully evaluated. Their efficiency in triggering the proliferation of BALB/c mouse splenocytes was also compared to that of Pam(2)CAG and Pam(3)CAG, two well-established ligands of TLRs. Moreover, the maturation state of murine dendritic cells previously incubated with either Pam(2)CGalp or Pam(2)CGalf was monitored by flow cytometry and compared to that induced by lipopolysaccharide. Pam(2)CGalp and Pam(2)CGalf were found to be equivalent TLR2 agonists, and induced splenocyte proliferation and DC maturation. With very similar activity, Pam(2)CGalp and Pam(2)CGalf were also 10-fold to 100-fold better than Pam(2)CAG and Pam(3)CAG at inducing B cell proliferation. This represents the first time a glucidic head has been added to the tBoc-[2,3-bispalmitoyloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl moiety whilst maintaining the immunomodulating activity. This should greatly enrich the data available on Pam(2)C structure/activity relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer lowers blood pressure and promotes growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaawy, H E; Zhang, F; Nguyen, X; ElHosseiny, A; Nasjletti, A; Schwartzman, M; Dennery, P; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    2001-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, with release of free iron and carbon monoxide. Both heme and carbon monoxide have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone. A retroviral vector containing human HO-1 cDNA (LSN-HHO-1) was constructed and subjected to purification and concentration of the viral particles to achieve 5x10(9) to 1x10(10) colony-forming units per milliliter. The ability of concentrated infectious viral particles to express human HO-1 (HHO-1) in vivo was tested. A single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles (expressing HHO-1) to 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in functional expression of the HHO-1 gene and attenuation of the development of hypertension. Rats expressing HHO-1 showed a significant decrease in urinary excretion of a vasoconstrictor arachidonic acid metabolite and a reduction in myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure in isolated arterioles. Unexpectedly, HHO-1 chimeric rats showed a simultaneous significant proportionate increase in somatic growth. Thus, delivery of HHO-1 gene by retroviral vector attenuates the development of hypertension and promotes body growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  13. Remodelling of human osteoarthritic cartilage by FGF-2, alone or combined with Sox9 via rAAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, Magali; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Kohn, Dieter; Madry, Henning

    2009-08-01

    Compensating for the loss of extracellular cartilage matrix, as well as counteracting the alterations of the chondrocyte phenotype in osteoarthritis are of key importance to develop effective therapeutic strategies against this disorder. In the present study, we analysed the benefits of applying a potent gene combination to remodel human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We employed the promising recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to deliver the mitogenic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) factor, alone or simultaneously with the transcription factor Sox9 as a key activator of matrix synthesis, to human normal and OA articular chondrocytes. We evaluated the effects of single (FGF-2) or combined (FGF-2/SOX9) transgene expression upon the regenerative activities of chondrocytes in three dimensional cultures in vitro and in cartilage explants in situ. Single overexpression of FGF-2 enhanced the survival and proliferation of both normal and OA chondrocytes, without stimulating the matrix synthetic processes in the increased pools of cells. The mitogenic properties of FGF-2 were maintained when SOX9 was co-overexpressed and concomitant with an increase in the production of proteoglycans and type-II collagen, suggesting that the transcription factor was capable of counterbalancing the effects of FGF-2 on matrix accumulation. Also important, expression of type-X collagen, a marker of hypertrophy strongly decreased following treatment by the candidate vectors. Most remarkably, the levels of activities achieved in co-treated human OA cartilage were similar to or higher than those observed in normal cartilage. The present findings show that combined expression of candidate factors in OA cartilage can re-establish key features of normal cartilage and prevent the pathological shift of metabolic homeostasis. These data provide further motivation to develop coupled gene transfer approaches via rAAV for the treatment of human OA.

  14. Shiga Toxin—A Model for Glycolipid-Dependent and Lectin-Driven Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger Johannes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cellular entry of the bacterial Shiga toxin and the related verotoxins has been scrutinized in quite some detail. This is due to their importance as a threat to human health. At the same time, the study of Shiga toxin has allowed the discovery of novel molecular mechanisms that also apply to the intracellular trafficking of endogenous proteins at the plasma membrane and in the endosomal system. In this review, the individual steps that lead to Shiga toxin uptake into cells will first be presented from a purely mechanistic perspective. Membrane-biological concepts will be highlighted that are often still poorly explored, such as fluctuation force-driven clustering, clathrin-independent membrane curvature generation, friction-driven scission, and retrograde sorting on early endosomes. It will then be explored whether and how these also apply to other pathogens, pathogenic factors, and cellular proteins. The molecular nature of Shiga toxin as a carbohydrate-binding protein and that of its cellular receptor as a glycosylated raft lipid will be an underlying theme in this discussion. It will thereby be illustrated how the study of Shiga toxin has led to the proposal of the GlycoLipid-Lectin (GL-Lect hypothesis on the generation of endocytic pits in processes of clathrin-independent endocytosis.

  15. A mathematical model of endovascular heat transfer for human brain cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan Carlos; Yon, Steven; Magers, Mike; Dobak, John

    2000-11-01

    Selective cooling of the brain has been shown to exhibit protective effects in cerebral ischemia, trauma, and spinal injury/ischemia. A multi-compartment, unsteady thermal model of the response of the human brain to endovascular cooling is discussed and its results compared to recent experimental data conducted with sheep and other mammals. The model formulation is based on the extension of the bioheat equation, originally proposed by Pennes(1) and later modified by Wissler(2), Stolwijk(3) and Werner and Webb(4). The temporal response of the brain temperature and that of the various body compartments to the cooling of the blood flowing through the common carotid artery is calculated under various scenarios. The effect of the boundary conditions as well as the closure assumptions used in the model, i.e. perfusion rate, metabolism heat production, etc. on the cooling rate of the brain are systematically investigated. (1) Pennes H. H., “Analysis of tissue and arterial blood temperature in the resting forearm.” J. Appl. Physiol. 1: 93-122, 1948. (2) Wissler E. H., “Steady-state temperature distribution in man”, J. Appl. Physiol., 16: 764-740, 1961. (3) Stolwick J. A. J., “Mathematical model of thermoregulation” in “Physiological and behavioral temperature regulation”, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge and A. J. Stolwijk, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Springfiels, Ill., 703-721, 1971. (4) Werner J., Webb P., “A six-cylinder model of human thermoregulation for general use on personal computers”, Ann. Physiol. Anthrop., 12(3): 123-134, 1993.

  16. The chemical behaviour and ecological transfer in the human food chain of some radionuclides in aqueous ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnica, Gh.

    1980-01-01

    The aqueous ecosystem of the Danube has been investigated in the period of 1976-1979. Data on the ecological transfer of radionuclides in the human food chain made an estimation available on the risk of the affected population. In the assessment of population exposure, the internal radiation dose for a period of one year and the continuous external irradiation determined by TLD have been considered. - The results revealed very low Sr-90 and Cs-137 contents in the Danube water and in the drinking water. The radioactivity contents are higher in the sediment and in some biota than in the water. The H-3 content in the Danube water varies in a wider range and higher concentration was found in fish than in the water. Both the Danube sediment and the irrigated sandy soil contain very low concentrations of fission products. During 1976-1979, the radioiodine content in air, milk and cow thyroid around the 679-Km is continuously decreasing. - Based on the data obtained, the corresponding collective dose equivalent value was calculated and the risk on the health of the population was found to be very low from contamination during 1975-1978. The radioactivity concentration values in critical human food chain, however, are not negligible. (author)

  17. IGF-1 Gene Transfer to Human Synovial MSCs Promotes Their Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential without Induction of the Hypertrophic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutoshi Ikeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC- based therapy is a promising treatment for cartilage. However, repair tissue in general fails to regenerate an original hyaline-like tissue. In this study, we focused on increasing the expression levels for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 to improve repair tissue quality. The IGF-1 gene was introduced into human synovial MSCs with a lentiviral vector and examined the levels of gene expression and morphological status of MSCs under chondrogenic differentiation condition using pellet cultures. The size of the pellets derived from IGF-1-MSCs were significantly larger than those of the control group. The abundance of glycosaminoglycan (GAG was also significantly higher in the IGF-1-MSC group. The histology of the IGF-1-induced pellets demonstrated similarities to hyaline cartilage without exhibiting features of a hypertrophic chondrocyte phenotype. Expression levels for the Col2A1 gene and protein were significantly higher in the IGF-1 pellets than in the control pellets, but expression levels for Col10, MMP-13, ALP, and Osterix were not higher. Thus, IGF-1 gene transfer to human synovial MSCs led to an improved chondrogenic differentiation capacity without the detectable induction of a hypertrophic or osteogenic phenotype.

  18. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the needs of ground-based researcher-analysts to access real-time engineering data in the form of processed information has expanded rapidly. Fortunately, the capacity to deliver that information has also expanded. The development of advanced display systems is essential to the success of a research test activity. Those developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR), range from simple alphanumerics to interactive mapping and graphics. These unique display systems are designed not only to meet basic information display requirements of the user, but also to take advantage of techniques for optimizing information display. Future ground-based display systems will rely heavily not only on new technologies, but also on interaction with the human user and the associated productivity with that interaction. The psychological abilities and limitations of the user will become even more important in defining the difference between a usable and a useful display system. This paper reviews the requirements for development of real-time displays; the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and interactivity of displays; and an analysis of some existing WATR displays.

  19. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  20. Co-localization of a CD1d-binding glycolipid with a radiation-attenuated sporozoite vaccine in LN-resident DCs for a robust adjuvant effect

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiangming; Kawamura, Akira; Andrews, Chasity D.; Miller, Jessica L.; Wu, Douglass; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Oren, Deena; Padte, Neal N.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Ho, David D.; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-01-01

    A CD1d-binding glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), activates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and acts as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying nearly 100-fold stronger CD1d binding affinity. In the present study, 7DW8-5 was found to exert a more potent adjuvant effect than αGalCer for a vaccine based on radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) of a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, also referred to a...

  1. Analysis and simulation of heat transfer in human tooth during the curing of orthodontic appliance and food ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Velazquez-Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze and simulate the heat transfer in the human tooth undergoing fixed orthodontic appliances and food intake. An in vivo representative mathematic model of a layered thermographic profile was developed during the LED curing of Gemini bracket 0.022 in slot (conventional ligating system and Transbond XT adhesive. The characterization of the layered thermic response allowed to identify if during the LED curing process, according to manufacturer's specification (light curing unit, adhesive can induce pulpar necrosis. The profile's thermographic model was the simulation basis of many conditions such as food intake, due to in vivo metrology is affected by the impossibility of a correct apparatus position and the physiologic function of the oral cavity which is exposed to uncontrollable temperature changes. The metrology was carried out with a T-440 thermographic camera during LED curing bracket, using a LED curing light (Elipar S10 placed at 3 ± 1 mm for 5 s at each mesial and distal surface. The thermography outcomes were analyzed in the FLIR Tools Software, Microsoft Excel 2013 and SPSS 22. To adjust the mathematic model error, in vitro studies were performed on third molars for the purpose of realizing extreme exposition temperature condition tests caused by the LED curing unit without jeopardizing the human tooth vitality as would it be on in vivo experimentation. The bracket curing results according to manufacturer's conditions reached 39°C in vivo temperatures and 47°C on in vitro tests, which does not jeopardize human tooth vitality as said by previous researches, although, an LED curing precise protocol established by the manufacturer's LED curing light is sustained.

  2. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF QO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J.; Usselman, Robert J.; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S] 2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S] + cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + between 8 and 18 K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65 K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S] + and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6 ± 1 Å for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  3. Uncertainty analysis in an accidental situation. Radionuclide transfer in environment and assessment of human exposure by food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, Mouhamadou Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Major nuclear accidents of Chernobyl (April, 1986) and Fukushima (March, 2011) have led to a huge environmental contamination with important amounts of radionuclides released in the atmosphere. Risk assessment, in case of nuclear emergency, is confronted to uncertainties on the transfer of radioactive substances in terrestrial ecosystems and to human population through the food chain, which could affect the reliability of decisions. The extent of the repercussions of Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents highlighted the difficulty of managing the consequences of such disasters and specifically to accommodate the different sources of uncertainty within decision-making processes. The objective of this research project is to develop a methodology to take into account uncertainties within environmental and food risk assessment models in order to improve decision support tools used for accidental situations. In this regard, different hierarchical Bayesian models aiming at capturing, within a unique modelling framework, uncertainty and variability about radioecological parameters of great important for accidental situation (dry and wet interception fractions and weathering loss parameter) were developed. Models parameters were estimated by Bayesian inference applied on databases obtained by an extended literature review. The impact on the risk assessment models of uncertainty and variability about these radioecological parameters was then assessed by stochastic simulations and sensitivity analyses applied on two case-studies: a hypothetical accident simulating a standardized deposition of radionuclides and the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant. The works developed in this project contribute to enhance knowledge on key processes governing environmental transfer of radionuclides and to improve the parameterization of the radioecological risk assessment models with respect to the research lines outlined by the scientific community in radioecology. (author)

  4. Estimation and Statistical Analysis of Human Voice Parameters to Investigate the Influence of Psychological Stress and to Determine the Vocal Tract Transfer Function of an Individual

    OpenAIRE

    Mongia, Puneet Kumar; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the principal focus is to examine the influence of psychological stress (both positive and negative stress) on the human articulation and to determine the vocal tract transfer function of an individual using inverse filtering technique. Both of these analyses are carried out by estimating various voice parameters. The outcomes of the analysis of psychological stress indicate that all the voice parameters are affected due to the influence of stress on humans. About 35 out of 51 p...

  5. Assignment of electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) to human chromosome 4q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, E B; Seltzer, W K; Goodman, S I

    1999-08-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a nuclear-encoded protein located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Inherited defects of ETF-QO cause glutaric acidemia type II. We here describe the localization of the ETF-QO gene to human chromosome 4q33 by somatic cell hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  7. How cholesterol constrains glycolipid conformation for optimal recognition of Alzheimer's beta amyloid peptide (Abeta1-40).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahi, Nouara; Aulas, Anaïs; Fantini, Jacques

    2010-02-05

    Membrane lipids play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is associated with conformational changes, oligomerization and/or aggregation of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides. Yet conflicting data have been reported on the respective effect of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) on the supramolecular assembly of Abeta peptides. The aim of the present study was to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulates the interaction between Abeta(1-40) and chemically defined GSLs (GalCer, LacCer, GM1, GM3). Using the Langmuir monolayer technique, we show that Abeta(1-40) selectively binds to GSLs containing a 2-OH group in the acyl chain of the ceramide backbone (HFA-GSLs). In contrast, Abeta(1-40) did not interact with GSLs containing a nonhydroxylated fatty acid (NFA-GSLs). Cholesterol inhibited the interaction of Abeta(1-40) with HFA-GSLs, through dilution of the GSL in the monolayer, but rendered the initially inactive NFA-GSLs competent for Abeta(1-40) binding. Both crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the active conformation of HFA-GSL involves a H-bond network that restricts the orientation of the sugar group of GSLs in a parallel orientation with respect to the membrane. This particular conformation is stabilized by the 2-OH group of the GSL. Correspondingly, the interaction of Abeta(1-40) with HFA-GSLs is strongly inhibited by NaF, an efficient competitor of H-bond formation. For NFA-GSLs, this is the OH group of cholesterol that constrains the glycolipid to adopt the active L-shape conformation compatible with sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions involving residue Y10 of Abeta(1-40). We conclude that cholesterol can either inhibit or facilitate membrane-Abeta interactions through fine tuning of glycosphingolipid conformation. These data shed some light on the complex molecular interplay between cell surface GSLs, cholesterol and Abeta peptides, and on the influence

  8. How cholesterol constrains glycolipid conformation for optimal recognition of Alzheimer's beta amyloid peptide (Abeta1-40.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouara Yahi

    Full Text Available Membrane lipids play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is associated with conformational changes, oligomerization and/or aggregation of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides. Yet conflicting data have been reported on the respective effect of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids (GSLs on the supramolecular assembly of Abeta peptides. The aim of the present study was to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulates the interaction between Abeta(1-40 and chemically defined GSLs (GalCer, LacCer, GM1, GM3. Using the Langmuir monolayer technique, we show that Abeta(1-40 selectively binds to GSLs containing a 2-OH group in the acyl chain of the ceramide backbone (HFA-GSLs. In contrast, Abeta(1-40 did not interact with GSLs containing a nonhydroxylated fatty acid (NFA-GSLs. Cholesterol inhibited the interaction of Abeta(1-40 with HFA-GSLs, through dilution of the GSL in the monolayer, but rendered the initially inactive NFA-GSLs competent for Abeta(1-40 binding. Both crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the active conformation of HFA-GSL involves a H-bond network that restricts the orientation of the sugar group of GSLs in a parallel orientation with respect to the membrane. This particular conformation is stabilized by the 2-OH group of the GSL. Correspondingly, the interaction of Abeta(1-40 with HFA-GSLs is strongly inhibited by NaF, an efficient competitor of H-bond formation. For NFA-GSLs, this is the OH group of cholesterol that constrains the glycolipid to adopt the active L-shape conformation compatible with sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions involving residue Y10 of Abeta(1-40. We conclude that cholesterol can either inhibit or facilitate membrane-Abeta interactions through fine tuning of glycosphingolipid conformation. These data shed some light on the complex molecular interplay between cell surface GSLs, cholesterol and Abeta peptides, and on the

  9. Time-resolved phosphorous magnetization transfer of the human calf muscle at 3 T and 7 T: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkovič, Ladislav, E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Dúbravska cesta 9 (Slovakia); Chmelík, Marek, E-mail: marek.chmelik@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Just Kukurova, Ivica, E-mail: ivica.kukurova@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Krššák, Martin, E-mail: martin.krssak@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Gruber, Stephan, E-mail: stephan@nmr.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Frollo, Ivan, E-mail: umerollo@savba.sk [Institute of Measurement Science, Department of Imaging Methods, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Dúbravska cesta 9 (Slovakia); Trattnig, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria); Bogner, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang@nmr.at [MR Center of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Lazarettgasse 14 (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Phosphorous ({sup 31}P) magnetization transfer (MT) experiments enable the non-invasive investigation of human muscle metabolism in various physiological and pathological conditions. The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of time-resolved MT, and to compare the results of MT experiments at 3 T and 7 T. Six healthy volunteers were examined on a 3 T and a 7 T MR scanner using the same setup and identical measurement protocols. In the calf muscle of all volunteers, four separate MT experiments (each ∼10 min duration) were performed in one session. The forward rate constant of the ATP synthesis reaction (k{sub ATP}) and creatine kinase reaction (k{sub CK}), as well as corresponding metabolic fluxes (F{sub ATP}, F{sub CK}), were estimated. A comparison of these exchange parameters, apparent T{sub 1}s, data quality, quantification precision, and reproducibility was performed. The data quality and reproducibility of the same MT experiments at 7 T was significantly higher (i.e., k{sub ATP} 2.7 times higher and k{sub CK} 3.4 times higher) than at 3 T (p < 0.05). The values for k{sub ATP} (p = 0.35) and k{sub CK} (p = 0.09) at both field strengths were indistinguishable. Even a single MT experiment at 7 T provided better data quality than did a 4 times-longer MT experiment at 3 T. The minimal time-resolution to reliably quantify both F{sub ATP} and F{sub CK} at 7 T was ∼6 min. Our results show that MT experiments at 7 T can be at least 4 times faster than 3 T MT experiments and still provide significantly better quantification. This enables time-resolved MT experiments for the observation of slow metabolic changes in the human calf muscle at 7 T.

  10. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilan Xue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3, which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  11. Time-resolved phosphorous magnetization transfer of the human calf muscle at 3 T and 7 T: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovič, Ladislav; Chmelík, Marek; Just Kukurova, Ivica; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Frollo, Ivan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorous ( 31 P) magnetization transfer (MT) experiments enable the non-invasive investigation of human muscle metabolism in various physiological and pathological conditions. The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of time-resolved MT, and to compare the results of MT experiments at 3 T and 7 T. Six healthy volunteers were examined on a 3 T and a 7 T MR scanner using the same setup and identical measurement protocols. In the calf muscle of all volunteers, four separate MT experiments (each ∼10 min duration) were performed in one session. The forward rate constant of the ATP synthesis reaction (k ATP ) and creatine kinase reaction (k CK ), as well as corresponding metabolic fluxes (F ATP , F CK ), were estimated. A comparison of these exchange parameters, apparent T 1 s, data quality, quantification precision, and reproducibility was performed. The data quality and reproducibility of the same MT experiments at 7 T was significantly higher (i.e., k ATP 2.7 times higher and k CK 3.4 times higher) than at 3 T (p < 0.05). The values for k ATP (p = 0.35) and k CK (p = 0.09) at both field strengths were indistinguishable. Even a single MT experiment at 7 T provided better data quality than did a 4 times-longer MT experiment at 3 T. The minimal time-resolution to reliably quantify both F ATP and F CK at 7 T was ∼6 min. Our results show that MT experiments at 7 T can be at least 4 times faster than 3 T MT experiments and still provide significantly better quantification. This enables time-resolved MT experiments for the observation of slow metabolic changes in the human calf muscle at 7 T

  12. [Gene transfer-induced human heme oxygenase-1 over-expression protects kidney from ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jin-xing; Yan, Chun-yin; Pu, Jin-xian; Hou, Jian-quan; Yuan, He-xing; Ping, Ji-gen

    2010-12-14

    To study the protection of gene transfer-induced human heme oxygenase-1 over-expression against renal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The model of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury was established with Sprague-Dawley rats. In the therapy group (n=18), the left kidney was perfused and preserved with Ad-hHO-1 at 2.5×10(9) pfu/1.0 ml after flushed with 0-4°C HC-A organ storage solution via donor renal aorta. The rats in control groups were perfused with 0.9% saline solution (n=12) or the vector carrying no interest gene Ad-EGFP 2.5×10(9) pfu/1.0 ml (n=18) instead of Ad-hHO-1. BUN and Cr in serum were measured by slide chemical methods. The kidney samples of rats were harvested for assay of histology, immunohistochemistry and quantification of HO enzymatic activity. Apoptosis cells in the kidney were measured by TUNEL. Ad-hHO-1 via donor renal aorta could transfect renal cells of rats effectively, enzymatic activity of HO in treated group [(1.62±0.07) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] is higher than in control groups treated with saline solution team [(1.27±0.07) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] and vector EGFP team [(1.22±0.06) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] (PhHO-1 expressed hHO-1 in kidneys at a high level. Corresponding to this, the level of BUN and Cr, as well as the number of apoptosis cells, were decreased, and the damage in histology by HE staining was ameliorated. Over-expression of human HO-1 can protect the kidney from ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

  13. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Meilan; Ge, Yinlin; Zhang, Jinyu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Wang, Qing [Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Hou, Lin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China)

    2012-09-14

    Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3), which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells). Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  14. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Meilan; Ge, Yinlin; Zhang, Jinyu; Wang, Qing; Hou, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3), which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells). Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings

  15. Cd1b-Mediated T Cell Recognition of a Glycolipid Antigen Generated from Mycobacterial Lipid and Host Carbohydrate during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D. Branch; Guy, Mark R.; Grant, Ethan; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Brenner, Michael B.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    T cells recognize microbial glycolipids presented by CD1 proteins, but there is no information regarding the generation of natural glycolipid antigens within infected tissues. Therefore, we determined the molecular basis of CD1b-restricted T cell recognition of mycobacterial glycosylated mycolates, including those produced during tissue infection in vivo. Transfection of the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β chains from a glucose monomycolate (GMM)-specific T cell line reconstituted GMM recognition in TCR-deficient T lymphoblastoma cells. This TCR-mediated response was highly specific for natural mycobacterial glucose-6-O-(2R, 3R) monomycolate, including the precise structure of the glucose moiety, the stereochemistry of the mycolate lipid, and the linkage between the carbohydrate and the lipid. Mycobacterial production of antigenic GMM absolutely required a nonmycobacterial source of glucose that could be supplied by adding glucose to media at concentrations found in mammalian tissues or by infecting tissue in vivo. These results indicate that mycobacteria synthesized antigenic GMM by coupling mycobacterial mycolates to host-derived glucose. Specific T cell recognition of an epitope formed by interaction of host and pathogen biosynthetic pathways provides a mechanism for immune response to those pathogenic mycobacteria that have productively infected tissues, as distinguished from ubiquitous, but innocuous, environmental mycobacteria. PMID:11015438

  16. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akihisa, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de; Tanaka, Motomu, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Abuillan, Wasim; Körner, Alexander [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Burk, Alexandra S. [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ries, Annika [Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Werz, Daniel B. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Demé, Bruno [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier “bent” Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter “bent” disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3.

  17. Transfer across the human gut of environmental technetium in lobsters (Homarus gammarus L.) from the Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.J. [The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: g.j.hunt@cefas.co.uk; Young, A.K.; Bonfield, R.A. [The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    Few data are available on the uptake by the human gut of the element technetium. Of current radiological interest in connection with discharges of technetium-99 in liquid discharges from BNFL, Sellafield, is uptake from European lobsters (Homarus gammarus), whose edible parts are known to concentrate technetium. In this study, a group of eight adult volunteers (six males and two females) ate samples of edible flesh from lobsters caught off the west Cumbrian coast and provided 24 h samples of urine and faeces for analysis. Detection of uptake from the gut by difference between intake and faecal measurements proved insensitive, suggesting a low value of the gut transfer factor (f{sub 1} value) of up to 0.1 with a maximum (two standard deviations) level of about 0.3. In urine, technetium was detectable at a relatively low level compared with the intakes, consistent with a low absorption across the gut. Values for f{sub 1} were derived with the aid of literature data for excretion following intravenous administration of technetium-95m as pertechnetate, and gave averaged data for f{sub 1} in the range 0.046 to 0.23. These results are in broad conformity with those derived from the faecal measurements, and suggest a lower value than the 0.5 used by ICRP. (author)

  18. Adoptive transfer of EBV specific CD8+ T cell clones can transiently control EBV infection in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Antsiferova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection expands CD8+ T cells specific for lytic antigens to high frequencies during symptomatic primary infection, and maintains these at significant numbers during persistence. Despite this, the protective function of these lytic EBV antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that lytic EBV replication does not significantly contribute to virus-induced B cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components (huNSG mice. However, we report a trend to reduction of EBV-induced lymphoproliferation outside of lymphoid organs upon diminished lytic replication. Moreover, we could demonstrate that CD8+ T cells against the lytic EBV antigen BMLF1 can eliminate lytically replicating EBV-transformed B cells from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs and in vivo, thereby transiently controlling high viremia after adoptive transfer into EBV infected huNSG mice. These findings suggest a protective function for lytic EBV antigen-specific CD8+ T cells against EBV infection and against virus-associated tumors in extra-lymphoid organs. These specificities should be explored for EBV-specific vaccine development.

  19. Expansion of Human Tregs from Cryopreserved Umbilical Cord Blood for GMP-Compliant Autologous Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard R. Seay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood is a traditional and convenient source of cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thymic regulatory T cells (Tregs are also present in cord blood, and there is growing interest in the use of autologous Tregs to provide a low-risk, fully human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched cell product for treating autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. Here, we describe a good manufacturing practice (GMP-compatible Treg expansion protocol using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in a mean 2,092-fold expansion of Tregs over a 16-day culture for a median yield of 1.26 × 109 Tregs from single-donor cryopreserved units. The resulting Tregs passed prior clinical trial release criteria for Treg purity and sterility, including additional rigorous assessments of FOXP3 and Helios expression and epigenetic analysis of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR. Compared with expanded adult peripheral blood Tregs, expanded cord blood Tregs remained more naive, as assessed by continued expression of CD45RA, produced reduced IFN-γ following activation, and effectively inhibited responder T cell proliferation. Immunosequencing of the T cell receptor revealed a remarkably diverse receptor repertoire within cord blood Tregs that was maintained following in vitro expansion. These data support the feasibility of generating GMP-compliant Tregs from cord blood for adoptive cell transfer therapies and highlight potential advantages in terms of safety, phenotypic stability, autoantigen specificity, and tissue distribution.

  20. A simple and sensitive immunoassay for the determination of human chorionic gonadotropin by graphene-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiuqian; Jing, Tao; Zhou, Tingting; Zhou, Yusun; Wu, Wei; Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we report a strategy of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) using graphene as an efficient long-range energy acceptor. Magnetic nanoparticles were also used in CRET for simple magnetic separation and immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-HCG antibody. In the design of CRET system, the sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed between human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, antigen) and two different antibodies bridged the magnetic nanoparticles and graphene (acceptors), which led to the occurrence of CRET from chemiluminescence light source to graphene. After optimizing the experimental conditions, the quenching of chemiluminescence signal depended linearly on the concentration of HCG in the range of 0.1 mIU mL(-1)-10 mIU mL(-1) and the detection limit was 0.06 mIU mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of HCG levels in saliva and serum samples, and the results were in good agreement with the plate ELISA with colorimetric detection. It could also be developed for detection of other antigen-antibody immune complexes by using the corresponding antigens and respective antibodies. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Analysis of a self-propelling sheet with heat transfer through non-isothermal fluid in an inclined human cervical canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walait, Ahsan; Siddiqui, A M; Rana, M A

    2018-02-13

    The present theoretical analysis deals with biomechanics of the self-propulsion of a swimming sheet with heat transfer through non-isothermal fluid filling an inclined human cervical canal. Partial differential equations arising from the mathematical modeling of the proposed model are solved analytically. Flow variables like pressure gradient, propulsive velocity, fluid velocity, time mean flow rate, fluid temperature, and heat-transfer coefficients are analyzed for the pertinent parameters. Striking features of the pumping characteristics are explored. Propulsive velocity of the swimming sheet becomes faster for lower Froude number, higher Reynolds number, and for a vertical channel. Temperature and peak value of the heat-transfer coefficients below the swimming sheet showed an increase by the increment of Brinkmann number, inclination, pressure difference over wavelength, and Reynolds number whereas these quantities decrease with increasing Froude number. Aforesaid parameters have shown opposite effects on the peak value of the heat-transfer coefficients below and above the swimming sheet. Relevance of the current results to the spermatozoa transport with heat transfer through non-isothermal cervical mucus filling an inclined human cervical canal is also explored.

  2. Potential transfer of neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) from mother to infant during breast-feeding: Predictions from human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Marie; Ersson, Lisa; Brandt, Ingvar; Bergström, Ulrika

    2017-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates. BMAA has potential to biomagnify in a terrestrial food chain, and to bioaccumulate in fish and shellfish. We have reported that administration of [ 14 C]l-BMAA to lactating mice and rats results in a mother to off-spring transfer via the milk. A preferential enantiomer-specific uptake of [ 14 C]l-BMAA has also been demonstrated in differentiated murine mammary epithelium HC11 cells. These findings, together with neurotoxic effects of BMAA demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, highlight the need to determine whether such transfer could also occur in humans. Here, we used four cell lines of human origin to examine and compare the transport of the two BMAA enantiomers in vitro. The uptake patterns of [ 14 C]l- and [ 14 C]d-BMAA in the human mammary MCF7 cell line were in agreement with the results in murine HC11 cells, suggesting a potential secretion of BMAA into human breast milk. The permeability coefficients for both [ 14 C]l- and [ 14 C]d-BMAA over monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells supported an efficient absorption from the human intestine. As a final step, transport experiments confirmed that [ 14 C]l-and [ 14 C]d-BMAA can be taken up by human SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells and even more efficiently by human U343 glioblastoma cells. In competition experiments with various amino acids, the ASCT2 specific inhibitor benzylserine was the most effective inhibitor of [ 14 C]l-BMAA uptake tested here. Altogether, our results suggest that BMAA can be transferred from an exposed mother, via the milk, to the brain of the nursed infant. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Use of a collagen-elastin matrix as transport carrier system to transfer proliferating epidermal cells to human dermis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Ulrich, Magda; Middelkoop, Esther; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study describes a novel cell culture, transport, and transfer protocol that may be highly suitable for delivering cultured proliferating keratinocytes and melanocytes to large open skin wounds (e.g., burns). We have taken into account previous limitations identified using other keratinocyte transfer techniques, such as regulatory issues, stability of keratinocytes during transport (single cell suspensions undergo terminal differentiation), ease of handling during application, and the degree of epidermal blistering resulting after transplantation (both related to transplanting keratinocyte sheets). Large numbers of proliferating epidermal cells (EC) (keratinocytes and melanocytes) were generated within 10-14 days and seeded onto a three-dimensional matrix composed of elastin and collagen types I, III, and V (Matriderm®), which enabled easy and stable transport of the EC for up to 24 h under ambient conditions. All culture conditions were in accordance with the regulations set by the Dutch Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). As an in vitro model system for clinical in vivo transfer, the EC were then transferred from Matriderm onto human acellular dermis during a period of 3 days. After transfer the EC maintained the ability to regenerate into a fully differentiated epidermis containing melanocytes on the human dermis. Proliferating keratinocytes were located in the basal layer and keratin-10 expression was located in differentiating suprabasal layers similar to that found in human epidermis. No blistering was observed (separation of the epidermis from the basement membrane). Keratin-6 expression was strongly upregulated in the regenerating epidermis similar to normal wound healing. In summary, we show that EC-Matriderm contains viable, metabolically active keratinocytes and melanocytes cultured in a manner that permits easy transportation and contains epidermal cells with the potential to form a pigmented reconstructed

  4. Correlation between human maternal-fetal placental transfer and molecular weight of PCB and dioxin congeners/isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Chisato; Nakamura, Noriko; Todaka, Emiko; Fujisaki, Takeyoshi; Matsuno, Yoshiharu; Nakaoka, Hiroko; Hanazato, Masamichi

    2014-11-01

    Establishing methods for the assessment of fetal exposure to chemicals is important for the prevention or prediction of the child's future disease risk. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of molecular weight on the likelihood of chemical transfer from mother to fetus via the placenta. The correlation between molecular weight and placental transfer rates of congeners/isomers of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins was examined. Twenty-nine sample sets of maternal blood, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood were used to measure PCB concentration, and 41 sample sets were used to analyze dioxins. Placental transfer rates were calculated using the concentrations of PCBs, dioxins, and their congeners/isomers within these sample sets. Transfer rate correlated negatively with molecular weight for PCB congeners, normalized using wet and lipid weights. The transfer rates of PCB or dioxin congeners differed from those of total PCBs or dioxins. The transfer rate for dioxin congeners did not always correlate significantly with molecular weight, perhaps because of the small sample size or other factors. Further improvement of the analytical methods for dioxin congeners is required. The findings of the present study suggested that PCBs, dioxins, or their congeners with lower molecular weights are more likely to be transferred from mother to fetus via the placenta. Consideration of chemical molecular weight and transfer rate could therefore contribute to the assessment of fetal exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic modification of adeno-associated viral vector type 2 capsid enhances gene transfer efficiency in polarized human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, April F; Mazur, Marina; Sorscher, Eric J; Zinn, Kurt R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2008-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease characterized by defects in the expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Gene therapy offers better hope for the treatment of CF. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are capable of stable expression with low immunogenicity. Despite their potential in CF gene therapy, gene transfer efficiency by AAV is limited because of pathophysiological barriers in these patients. Although a few AAV serotypes have shown better transduction compared with the AAV2-based vectors, gene transfer efficiency in human airway epithelium has still not reached therapeutic levels. To engineer better AAV vectors for enhanced gene delivery in human airway epithelium, we developed and characterized mutant AAV vectors by genetic capsid modification, modeling the well-characterized AAV2 serotype. We genetically incorporated putative high-affinity peptide ligands to human airway epithelium on the GH loop region of AAV2 capsid protein. Six independent mutant AAV were constructed, containing peptide ligands previously reported to bind with high affinity for known and unknown receptors on human airway epithelial cells. The vectors were tested on nonairway cells and nonpolarized and polarized human airway epithelial cells for enhanced infectivity. One of the mutant vectors, with the peptide sequence THALWHT, not only showed the highest transduction in undifferentiated human airway epithelial cells but also indicated significant transduction in polarized cells. Interestingly, this modified vector was also able to infect cells independently of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor. Incorporation of this ligand on other AAV serotypes, which have shown improved gene transfer efficiency in the human airway epithelium, may enhance the application of AAV vectors in CF gene therapy.

  6. Biomechanics and muscle coordination of human walking. Part I: introduction to concepts, power transfer, dynamics and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Felix E; Neptune, Richard R; Kautz, Steven A

    2002-12-01

    Current understanding of how muscles coordinate walking in humans is derived from analyses of body motion, ground reaction force and EMG measurements. This is Part I of a two-part review that emphasizes how muscle-driven dynamics-based simulations assist in the understanding of individual muscle function in walking, especially the causal relationships between muscle force generation and walking kinematics and kinetics. Part I reviews the strengths and limitations of Newton-Euler inverse dynamics and dynamical simulations, including the ability of each to find the contributions of individual muscles to the acceleration/deceleration of the body segments. We caution against using the concept of biarticular muscles transferring power from one joint to another to infer muscle coordination principles because energy flow among segments, even the adjacent segments associated with the joints, cannot be inferred from computation of joint powers and segmental angular velocities alone. Rather, we encourage the use of dynamical simulations to perform muscle-induced segmental acceleration and power analyses. Such analyses have shown that the exchange of segmental energy caused by the forces or accelerations induced by a muscle can be fundamentally invariant to whether the muscle is shortening, lengthening, or neither. How simulation analyses lead to understanding the coordination of seated pedaling, rather than walking, is discussed in this first part because the dynamics of pedaling are much simpler, allowing important concepts to be revealed. We elucidate how energy produced by muscles is delivered to the crank through the synergistic action of other non-energy producing muscles; specifically, that a major function performed by a muscle arises from the instantaneous segmental accelerations and redistribution of segmental energy throughout the body caused by its force generation. Part II reviews how dynamical simulations provide insight into muscle coordination of walking.

  7. Full genotyping of a highly polymorphic human gene trait by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Totè

    Full Text Available The ability of detecting the subtle variations occurring, among different individuals, within specific DNA sequences encompassed in highly polymorphic genes discloses new applications in genomics and diagnostics. DQB1 is a gene of the HLA-II DQ locus of the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA system. The polymorphisms of the trait of the DQB1 gene including codons 52-57 modulate the susceptibility to a number of severe pathologies. Moreover, the donor-receiver tissue compatibility in bone marrow transplantations is routinely assessed through crossed genotyping of DQB and DQA. For the above reasons, the development of rapid, reliable and cost-effective typing technologies of DQB1 in general, and more specifically of the codons 52-57, is a relevant although challenging task. Quantitative assessment of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET efficiency between chromophores labelling the opposite ends of gene-specific oligonucleotide probes has proven to be a powerful tool to type DNA polymorphisms with single-nucleotide resolution. The FRET efficiency can be most conveniently quantified by applying a time-resolved fluorescence analysis methodology, i.e. time-correlated single-photon counting, which allows working on very diluted template specimens and in the presence of fluorescent contaminants. Here we present a full in-vitro characterization of the fluorescence responses of two probes when hybridized to oligonucleotide mixtures mimicking all the possible genotypes of the codons 52-57 trait of DQB1 (8 homozygous and 28 heterozygous. We show that each genotype can be effectively tagged by the combination of the fluorescence decay constants extrapolated from the data obtained with such probes.

  8. Dynamic response and transfer function of social systems: A neuro-inspired model of collective human activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Ilias N

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of social networks with the external environment gives rise to non-stationary activity patterns reflecting the temporal structure and strength of exogenous influences that drive social dynamical processes far from an equilibrium state. Following a neuro-inspired approach, based on the dynamics of a passive neuronal membrane, and the firing rate dynamics of single neurons and neuronal populations, we build a state-of-the-art model of the collective social response to exogenous interventions. In this regard, we analyze online activity patterns with a view to determining the transfer function of social systems, that is, the dynamic relationship between external influences and the resulting activity. To this end, first we estimate the impulse response (Green's function) of collective activity, and then we show that the convolution of the impulse response with a time-varying external influence field accurately reproduces empirical activity patterns. To capture the dynamics of collective activity when the generating process is in a state of statistical equilibrium, we incorporate into the model a noisy input convolved with the impulse response function, thus precisely reproducing the fluctuations of stationary collective activity around a resting value. The outstanding goodness-of-fit of the model results to empirical observations, indicates that the model explains human activity patterns generated by time-dependent external influences in various socio-economic contexts. The proposed model can be used for inferring the temporal structure and strength of external influences, as well as the inertia of collective social activity. Furthermore, it can potentially predict social activity patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human METTL20 methylates lysine residues adjacent to the recognition loop of the electron transfer flavoprotein in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F; Carroll, Joe; He, Jiuya; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2014-08-29

    In mammalian mitochondria, protein methylation is a relatively uncommon post-transcriptional modification, and the extent of the mitochondrial protein methylome, the modifying methyltransferases, and their substrates have been little studied. As shown here, the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is one such methylated protein. The ETF is a heterodimer of α- and β-subunits. Lysine residues 199 and 202 of mature ETFβ are almost completely trimethylated in bovine heart mitochondria, whereas ETFα is not methylated. The enzyme responsible for the modifications was identified as methyltransferase-like protein 20 (METTL20). In human 143B cells, the methylation of ETFβ is less extensive and is diminished further by suppression of METTL20. Tagged METTL20 expressed in HEK293T cells specifically associates with the ETF and promotes the trimethylation of ETFβ lysine residues 199 and 202. ETF serves as a mobile electron carrier linking dehydrogenases involved in fatty acid oxidation and one-carbon metabolism to the membrane-associated ubiquinone pool. The methylated residues in ETFβ are immediately adjacent to a protein loop that recognizes and binds to the dehydrogenases. Suppression of trimethylation of ETFβ in mouse C2C12 cells oxidizing palmitate as an energy source reduced the consumption of oxygen by the cells. These experiments suggest that the oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria and the passage of electrons via the ETF may be controlled by modulating the protein-protein interactions between the reduced dehydrogenases and the β-subunit of the ETF by trimethylation of lysine residues. METTL20 is the first lysine methyltransferase to be found to be associated with mitochondria. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. In vivo transfer of cholesteryl ester from high and low density plasma lipoproteins into human aortic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, S.; Hjelms, E.

    1988-01-01

    For the study of cholesteryl ester transfer from different plasma lipoproteins into human aortic tissue, patients scheduled for reconstructive aortic surgery were intravenously injected with autologous in vitro labeled lipoproteins 20 to 24 hours before aortic intima-media samples were obtained during the operation. The injectate contained high density lipoproteins (d greater than 1.063) labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ester and lipoproteins of lower density (d less than 1.063) labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester or lipoproteins with the opposite labeling. In 16 aortic tissue samples (some with visible atherosclerosis) from 11 normocholesterolemic patients, the aortic influx of total cholesteryl ester was 1 to 50 nmol x cm-2 x day-1. Some 39% +/- 3% (mean +/- SEM) of the influx was derived from high density lipoproteins, which in plasma accounted for only 22% +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM) of the esterified cholesterol. The findings suggest that: 1) esterified cholesterol from the two lipoprotein fractions in plasma enter the aortic intima by the same mechanism, and 2) influx of cholesteryl ester from the smaller, high density lipoproteins is greater than influx from the larger, lower density lipoproteins considering their concentrations in plasma. In some patients, the cholesterol content in the intima-media tissue with no visible atherosclerosis corresponded to only a few months of continuous cholesteryl ester influx. This time is short considering the age of the patients and, therefore, indicates that removal of esterified cholesterol from the intima-media is of major importance in preventing cholesterol deposition in the arterial wall

  11. Scalability and process transfer of mesenchymal stromal cell production from monolayer to microcarrier culture using human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathman, Thomas R J; Stolzing, Alexandra; Fabian, Claire; Rafiq, Qasim A; Coopman, Karen; Nienow, Alvin W; Kara, Bo; Hewitt, Christopher J

    2016-04-01

    The selection of medium and associated reagents for human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) culture forms an integral part of manufacturing process development and must be suitable for multiple process scales and expansion technologies. In this work, we have expanded BM-hMSCs in fetal bovine serum (FBS)- and human platelet lysate (HPL)-containing media in both a monolayer and a suspension-based microcarrier process. The introduction of HPL into the monolayer process increased the BM-hMSC growth rate at the first experimental passage by 0.049 day and 0.127/day for the two BM-hMSC donors compared with the FBS-based monolayer process. This increase in growth rate in HPL-containing medium was associated with an increase in the inter-donor consistency, with an inter-donor range of 0.406 cumulative population doublings after 18 days compared with 2.013 in FBS-containing medium. Identity and quality characteristics of the BM-hMSCs are also comparable between conditions in terms of colony-forming potential, osteogenic potential and expression of key genes during monolayer and post-harvest from microcarrier expansion. BM-hMSCs cultured on microcarriers in HPL-containing medium demonstrated a reduction in the initial lag phase for both BM-hMSC donors and an increased BM-hMSC yield after 6 days of culture to 1.20 ± 0.17 × 10(5) and 1.02 ± 0.005 × 10(5) cells/mL compared with 0.79 ± 0.05 × 10(5) and 0.36 ± 0.04 × 10(5) cells/mL in FBS-containing medium. This study has demonstrated that HPL, compared with FBS-containing medium, delivers increased growth and comparability across two BM-hMSC donors between monolayer and microcarrier culture, which will have key implications for process transfer during scale-up. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential transfer of neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) from mother to infant during breast-feeding: Predictions from human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Marie; Ersson, Lisa; Brandt, Ingvar; Bergström, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates. BMAA has potential to biomagnify in a terrestrial food chain, and to bioaccumulate in fish and shellfish. We have reported that administration of [ 14 C]L-BMAA to lactating mice and rats results in a mother to off-spring transfer via the milk. A preferential enantiomer-specific uptake of [ 14 C]L-BMAA has also been demonstrated in differentiated murine mammary epithelium HC11 cells. These findings, together with neurotoxic effects of BMAA demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, highlight the need to determine whether such transfer could also occur in humans. Here, we used four cell lines of human origin to examine and compare the transport of the two BMAA enantiomers in vitro. The uptake patterns of [ 14 C]L- and [ 14 C]D-BMAA in the human mammary MCF7 cell line were in agreement with the results in murine HC11 cells, suggesting a potential secretion of BMAA into human breast milk. The permeability coefficients for both [ 14 C]L- and [ 14 C]D-BMAA over monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells supported an efficient absorption from the human intestine. As a final step, transport experiments confirmed that [ 14 C]L-and [ 14 C]D-BMAA can be taken up by human SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells and even more efficiently by human U343 glioblastoma cells. In competition experiments with various amino acids, the ASCT2 specific inhibitor benzylserine was the most effective inhibitor of [ 14 C]L-BMAA uptake tested here. Altogether, our results suggest that BMAA can be transferred from an exposed mother, via the milk, to the brain of the nursed infant. - Highlights: • Transport of BMAA in human intestinal, mammary and CNS cell lines was examined. • The transport of L-BMAA over intestinal cell monolayers was unidirectional. • Enantiomer-selective uptake of L-BMAA in breast, neuron and glia cells was evident. • Competition experiments indicate that L-BMAA uptake

  13. Potential transfer of neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) from mother to infant during breast-feeding: Predictions from human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Marie [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Ersson, Lisa [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Box 591, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Brandt, Ingvar, E-mail: Ingvar.Brandt@ebc.uu.se [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Bergström, Ulrika [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-164 90 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates. BMAA has potential to biomagnify in a terrestrial food chain, and to bioaccumulate in fish and shellfish. We have reported that administration of [{sup 14}C]L-BMAA to lactating mice and rats results in a mother to off-spring transfer via the milk. A preferential enantiomer-specific uptake of [{sup 14}C]L-BMAA has also been demonstrated in differentiated murine mammary epithelium HC11 cells. These findings, together with neurotoxic effects of BMAA demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, highlight the need to determine whether such transfer could also occur in humans. Here, we used four cell lines of human origin to examine and compare the transport of the two BMAA enantiomers in vitro. The uptake patterns of [{sup 14}C]L- and [{sup 14}C]D-BMAA in the human mammary MCF7 cell line were in agreement with the results in murine HC11 cells, suggesting a potential secretion of BMAA into human breast milk. The permeability coefficients for both [{sup 14}C]L- and [{sup 14}C]D-BMAA over monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells supported an efficient absorption from the human intestine. As a final step, transport experiments confirmed that [{sup 14}C]L-and [{sup 14}C]D-BMAA can be taken up by human SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells and even more efficiently by human U343 glioblastoma cells. In competition experiments with various amino acids, the ASCT2 specific inhibitor benzylserine was the most effective inhibitor of [{sup 14}C]L-BMAA uptake tested here. Altogether, our results suggest that BMAA can be transferred from an exposed mother, via the milk, to the brain of the nursed infant. - Highlights: • Transport of BMAA in human intestinal, mammary and CNS cell lines was examined. • The transport of L-BMAA over intestinal cell monolayers was unidirectional. • Enantiomer-selective uptake of L-BMAA in breast, neuron and glia cells was evident. • Competition

  14. Transfer between local and global processing levels by pigeons (Columba livia) and humans (Homo sapiens) in exemplar- and rule-based categorization tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ulrike; Braunöder, Elisabeth

    2015-02-01

    The present experiment investigated pigeons' and humans' processing styles-local or global-in an exemplar-based visual categorization task in which category membership of every stimulus had to be learned individually, and in a rule-based task in which category membership was defined by a perceptual rule. Group Intact was trained with the original pictures (providing both intact local and global information), Group Scrambled was trained with scrambled versions of the same pictures (impairing global information), and Group Blurred was trained with blurred versions (impairing local information). Subsequently, all subjects were tested for transfer to the 2 untrained presentation modes. Humans outperformed pigeons regarding learning speed and accuracy as well as transfer performance and showed good learning irrespective of group assignment, whereas the pigeons of Group Blurred needed longer to learn the training tasks than the pigeons of Groups Intact and Scrambled. Also, whereas humans generalized equally well to any novel presentation mode, pigeons' transfer from and to blurred stimuli was impaired. Both species showed faster learning and, for the most part, better transfer in the rule-based than in the exemplar-based task, but there was no evidence of the used processing mode depending on the type of task (exemplar- or rule-based). Whereas pigeons relied on local information throughout, humans did not show a preference for either processing level. Additional tests with grayscale versions of the training stimuli, with versions that were both blurred and scrambled, and with novel instances of the rule-based task confirmed and further extended these findings. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence e...

  16. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Mathiesen, Line

    2010-01-01

    high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. METHODS: A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored...... should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age....

  17. Some observations on plutonium transfers in human and animal food-chains and Gi tract: plutonium complexation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittel, R.

    1986-06-01

    Although many data have been accumulated concerning the distribution of Pu in waters, soils, and foodchains, recent studies have raised the question of the Pu physico-chemical species and their differential availability. Accordingly, we reviewed published data on the transfer of Pu in foodchains and in the gastrointestinal tracts. Dietetic, physico-chemical, biochemical and microbiological parameters have been studied and their incidence on the intestinal transfer factor f 1 of Pu in man briefly discussed: the transfer in the trophic chains often increases Pu mobility and perhaps f 1 . Experimental research is needed to obtain quantitative data [fr

  18. Transfer of human genes conferring resistance to methylating mutagens, but not to UV irradiation and cross-linking agents, into Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaina, B.; Van Zeeland, A.A.; Backendorf, C.; Thielmann, H.W.; Van de Putte, P.

    1987-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by human DNA ligated to the bacterial gpt (xanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyltransferase) gene which was used either in its native form or after partial inactivation with methylnitrosourea. The gpt+ transfectants were screened for resistance to high doses of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Using this approach, we showed that Chinese hamster ovary cells can acquire N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine resistance upon transfection with DNA from diploid human fibroblasts, that this resistance is transferable by secondary transfection and is specific for methylating mutagens, and that it is not caused by increased removal of O6-methylguanine, 3-methyladenine, and 7-methylguanine from DNA

  19. In-situ electric field in human body model in different postures for wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2015-01-01

    The in-situ electric field of an adult male model in different postures is evaluated for exposure to the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle. The transfer system is located below the centre of the vehicle body and the transferred power and frequency are 7 kW and 85 kHz, respectively. The in-situ electric field is evaluated for a human model (i) crouching near the vehicle, (ii) lying on the ground with or without his arm stretched, (iii) sitting in the driver’s seat, and (iv) standing on a transmitting coil without a receiving coil. In each scenario, the maximum in-situ electric fields are lower than the allowable limit prescribed by international guidelines, although the local magnetic field strength in regions of the human body is higher than the allowable external magnetic field strength. The highest in-situ electric field is observed when the human body model is placed on the ground with his arm extended toward the coils, because of a higher magnetic field around the arm. (paper)

  20. In-situ electric field in human body model in different postures for wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2015-01-07

    The in-situ electric field of an adult male model in different postures is evaluated for exposure to the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle. The transfer system is located below the centre of the vehicle body and the transferred power and frequency are 7 kW and 85 kHz, respectively. The in-situ electric field is evaluated for a human model (i) crouching near the vehicle, (ii) lying on the ground with or without his arm stretched, (iii) sitting in the driver's seat, and (iv) standing on a transmitting coil without a receiving coil. In each scenario, the maximum in-situ electric fields are lower than the allowable limit prescribed by international guidelines, although the local magnetic field strength in regions of the human body is higher than the allowable external magnetic field strength. The highest in-situ electric field is observed when the human body model is placed on the ground with his arm extended toward the coils, because of a higher magnetic field around the arm.

  1. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  2. Alpha-tocopherol transfer factor (aTTF) from rat liver mediates the transfer of d-alpha-[3H]-tocopherol from liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts and exhibits saturation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdon, C.P.; Blumberg, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    aTTF was observed to transfer d-alpha-[ 3 H]-tocopherol ( 3 HaT) from egg lecithin liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts (EG). aTTF may be associated with the 32,000-35,000 MW alpha-Tocopherol Binding Protein previously described to transfer 3 HaT from liposomes to rat liver microsomes and mitochondria prepared by ammonium sulfate precipitation of rat liver cytosol followed by dialysis against 50 mM TRIS-HCl/1 mM EDTA buffer, pH 7.4. Assay for aTTF activity consisted of incubating liposomal 3 HaT and EG in the presence of aTTF or buffer blank for various time periods at 37 0 C, then counting the resulting radioactivity in washed EG after pelleting by centrifugation. Liposomes were prelabeled-with non-exchangable glycerol-[ 14 C]-trioleate to correct for liposomes adhering to pelleted EG. Greater than 50% of the tritium found with the EG pellet was recovered by HPLC as 3 HaT. aTTF activity increased with increasing liposomal 3 HaT concentration before reaching a plateau. aTTF activity was similarly saturated by increasing EG concentrations. The same assay conditions with buffer blank along resulted in negligible transfer activity

  3. Phytoavailability, human risk assessment and transfer characteristics of cadmium and zinc contamination from urban gardens in Kano, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Nafiu; Agbenin, John O; Buerkert, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative data about phytoavailability and transfer into consumed plant parts for heavy metals in intensively managed urban vegetable production areas of sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We therefore studied the transfer of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) from soil to the root and subsequent translocation to edible portions of four vegetables in six urban gardens. While respective diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-available Zn and Cd concentrations ranged from 18 to 66 mg kg(-1) and from 0.19 to 0.35 mg kg(-1) , respectively, in soils, total Zn and Cd were 8.4-256 mg kg(-1) and 0.04-1.7 mg kg(-1) in shoot parts. Metal transfer factor (MTF) ratios were higher in Zn (0.2-0.9) than in Cd (0.1-0.6). Our data suggest that total Zn concentration in soil is a reliable indicator to assess its transfer from soil to crop in lettuce, carrot and parsley, while for Cd DTPA-extractable concentration may be used to estimate soil-crop transfer of Cd in amaranthus and carrot. Overall, Cd was more easily translocated to the aerial plant parts than Zn. Zinc and Cd accumulation by vegetables in our soils is mainly a metabolically controlled process. Such accumulation can contaminate the ecosystem but under our conditions intake and ingestion of these metals will likely have to occur over a prolonged period to experience health hazard. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Expert Performance Transfer: Making Knowledge Transfer Count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.L.; Braudt, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    'Knowledge Transfer' is a high-priority imperative as the nuclear industry faces the combined effects of an aging workforce and economic pressures to do more with less. Knowledge Transfer is only a part of the solution to these challenges, however. The more compelling and immediate need faced by industry is Accomplishment Transfer, or the transference of the applied knowledge necessary to assure optimal performance transfer from experienced, high-performing staff to inexperienced staff. A great deal of industry knowledge and required performance information has been documented in the form of procedures. Often under-appreciated either as knowledge stores or as drivers of human performance, procedures, coupled with tightly-focused and effective training, are arguably the most effective influences on human and plant performance. (author)

  5. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.H.; van Diepen, A.; Nguyen, D.L.; Wuhrer, M.; Hoffmann, K.F.; Deelder, A.M.; Hokke, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles

  6. Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Yee, Michael B; Glick, Yair; Gerber, Doron; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.

  7. Transfer of memory trace of cerebellum-dependent motor learning in human prism adaptation: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Soichi; Honda, Takeru; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2013-11-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that the memory trace of ocular reflex adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei for consolidation through repetitions of training. However, the memory transfer is not well characterized in the learning of voluntary movement. Here, we implement our model of memory transfer to interpret the data of prism adaptation (Martin, Keating, Goodkin, Bastian, & Thach, 1996a, 1996b), assuming that the cerebellar nuclear memory formed by memory transfer is used for normal throwing. When the subject was trained to throw darts wearing prisms in 30-40 trials, the short-term memory for recalibrating the throwing direction by gaze would be formed in the cerebellar cortex, which was extinguished by throwing with normal vision in a similar number of trials. After weeks of repetitions of short-term prism adaptation, the long-term memory would be formed in the cerebellar nuclei through memory transfer, which enabled one to throw darts to the center wearing prisms without any training. These two long-term memories, one for throwing with normal vision and the other for throwing wearing prisms, are assumed to be utilized automatically under volitional control. Moreover, when the prisms were changed to new prisms, a new memory for adapting to the new prisms would be formed in the cerebellar cortex, just to counterbalance the nuclear memory of long-term adaptation to the original prisms in a similar number of trials. These results suggest that memory transfer may occur in the learning of voluntary movements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fully-human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Human EphrinB2 and EphB4 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing fully-human monoclonal antibodies against human EphrinB2 and EphB4.

  9. Social protection investments, human capital, and income growth: Simulating the returns to social cash transfers in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Stephan; Malerba, Daniele; Barrientos, Armando; Gassmann, Franziska; Mohnen, Pierre; Tirivayi, Nyasha; Kavuma, Susan; Matovu, Fred

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we assess the short- and mid-term effects of two cash transfer programmes in Uganda in terms of child underweight, school attainment, and the monetary returns to these indirect effects. Using a micro-simulation approach we test how the scale-up of these pilot interventions could affect

  10. Technology transfer in human vaccinology: a retrospective review on public sector contributions in a privatizing science field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Jan

    2012-09-28

    As health intervention, vaccination has had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality and morbidity caused by infectious diseases. Traditionally vaccines were developed and made in the western, industrialised world and from there on gradually and with considerable delay became available for developing countries. Today that is beginning to change. Most vaccine doses are now produced in emerging economies, although industrialised countries still have a lead in vaccine development and in manufacturing innovative vaccines. Technology transfer has been an important mechanism for this increase in production capacity in emerging economies. This review looks back on various technology transfer initiatives and outlines the role of WHO and other public and private partners. It goes into a more detailed description of the role of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) in Bilthoven, the Netherlands. For many decades RIVM has been providing access to vaccine technology by capacity building and technology transfer initiatives not only through multilateral frameworks, but also on a bilateral basis including a major project in China in the 90 s of the previous century. Looking forward it is expected that, in a globalizing world, the ambition of BRICS countries to play a role in global health will lead to an increase of south-south technology transfers. Further, it is argued that push approaches including technology transfer from the public domain, connecting innovative enabling platforms with competent developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVM), will be critical to ensure a sustainable supply of affordable and quality vaccines to national immunization programmes in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg −1  and 91 mV m −1  for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg −1 ) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m −1 ) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines. (paper)

  12. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  13. Smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer with the human maxi-k channel improves erectile function and enhances sexual behavior in atherosclerotic cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, George J; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Williams, Koudy; Zhao, Weixin; D'Agostino, Ralph; Kaplan, Jay; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Yoo, James; Calenda, Giulia; Davies, Kelvin P; Sellers, Rani S; Melman, Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Despite the advent of effective oral therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED), many patients are not successfully treated, and side effects have been documented. To further evaluate the potential utility of naked DNA-based gene transfer as an attractive treatment option for ED. The effects of gene transfer on erectile function and sexual behavior were evaluated in eight male cynomolgus monkeys with ED secondary to moderately severe, diet-induced atherosclerosis. Following establishment of baseline characteristics, animals were subjected to intracavernous injection of a smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer vector (pSMAA-hSlo) encoding the pore-forming subunit of the human large-conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (Maxi-K). For the sexual behavior studies, 2 wk of baseline data were obtained, and then animals were placed in the presence of estrogen-implanted females (n=2) three times per week for 30 min, and sexual behavior was recorded. The intracavernous pressure response to papaverine injection was also monitored. Dramatic changes in erectile function and sexual behavior were observed after intracorporal gene transfer. The frequency of partial (6±2 to 10±2) and full (2±1.5 to 5±1.4) erections were significantly increased, with a parallel 2-3-fold increase in the duration of the observed erections. The frequency and latency of ejaculation were increased and decreased, respectively. Frequency and duration of grooming by the female were increased, and the latency decreased. Increased latency and decreased frequency of body contact was also observed, and this is characteristic of the typical drop in consort intimacy that occurs after mating in most macaque species. In addition, an increased responsiveness to intracavernous papaverine injection was observed. The data indicate that intracorporal Maxi-K-channel gene transfer enhances erectile capacity and sexual behavior; the data imply that increased erectile function per se may lead to increased sexual

  14. H5N1 whole-virus vaccine induces neutralizing antibodies in humans which are protective in a mouse passive transfer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Howard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H5N1 vaccines have been extensively tested in clinical trials and consistently demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic; however, clinical efficacy is difficult to evaluate in the absence of wide-spread human disease. A lethal mouse model has been utilized which allows investigation of the protective efficacy of active vaccination or passive transfer of vaccine induced sera following lethal H5N1 challenge. METHODS: We used passive transfer of immune sera to investigate antibody-mediated protection elicited by a Vero cell-derived, non-adjuvanted inactivated whole-virus H5N1 vaccine. Mice were injected intravenously with H5N1 vaccine-induced rodent or human immune sera and subsequently challenged with a lethal dose of wild-type H5N1 virus. RESULTS: Passive transfer of H5N1 vaccine-induced mouse, guinea pig and human immune sera provided dose-dependent protection of recipient mice against lethal challenge with wild-type H5N1 virus. Protective dose fifty values for serum H5N1 neutralizing antibody titers were calculated to be ≤1∶11 for all immune sera, independently of source species. CONCLUSIONS: These data underpin the confidence that the Vero cell culture-derived, whole-virus H5N1 vaccine will be effective in a pandemic situation and support the use of neutralizing serum antibody titers as a correlate of protection for H5N1 vaccines.

  15. Cytomegalovirus Survival and Transferability and the Effectiveness of Common Hand-Washing Agents against Cytomegalovirus on Live Human Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Stowell, Jennifer D.; Forlin-Passoni, Daniela; Radford, Kay; Bate, Sheri L.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Cannon, Michael J.; Schmid, D. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) transmission can occur when women acquire CMV while pregnant. Infection control guidelines may reduce risk for transmission. We studied the duration of CMV survival after application of bacteria to the hands and after transfer from the hands to surfaces and the effectiveness of cleansing with water, regular and antibacterial soaps, sanitizer, and diaper wipes. Experiments used CMV AD169 in saliva at initial titers of 1 × 105 infectious particles/ml. Samples fr...

  16. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed...

  17. Ricinus communis agglutinin-mediated agglutination and fusion of glycolipid-containing phospholipid vesicles: effect of carbohydrate head group size, calcium ions, and spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, D; Düzgüneş, N

    1986-03-25

    The glycolipids galactosylcerebroside (GalCer), lactosylceramide (LacCer), and trihexosylceramide (Gb3) were inserted into phospholipid vesicles, consisting of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid. The extent to which their carbohydrate head groups protruded beyond the vesicle surface and their interference with membrane approach were examined by determining vesicle susceptibility toward type I Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1) induced agglutination and Ca2+- and spermine-induced aggregation and fusion either in the presence or in the absence of the lectin. The initial agglutination rates increased in the order GalCer much less than LacCer less than Gb3, while a reversed order was obtained for Ca2+- and spermine-induced aggregation and fusion, indicating an enhanced steric interference on close approach of bilayers with increasing head group size. The lectin-mediated agglutination rates for LacCer- and Gb3-containing vesicles increased by an order of magnitude when Ca2+ was also included in the medium, at a concentration that did not induce aggregation per se. Charge neutralization could not account for this observation as the polyvalent cation spermine did not display this synergistic effect with RCA1. Addition of Ca2+ to preagglutinated vesicles substantially reduced the threshold cation concentration for fusion (micromolar vs. millimolar). Quantitatively, this concentration decreased with decreasing carbohydrate head group size, indicating that the head group protrusion determined the interbilayer distance within the vesicle aggregate. The distinct behavior of Ca2+ vs. spermine on RCA1-induced agglutination on the one hand and fusion on the other indicated that Ca2+ regulates the steric orientation of the carbohydrate head group, which appears to be related to its ability to dehydrate the bilayer. As a result, lectin agglutinability becomes enhanced while fusion will be interrupted as the interbilayer distance increases, the threshold head group size

  18. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  19. An Interdistrict Transfer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Norman

    1975-01-01

    This testimony, before the May 1974 public hearings of the New York City Commission on Human Rights by the Administrator, Urban-Suburban Transfer Program and Inter district Transfer Program, West Irondequoit School District, New York, reviews a program which began with 25 minority group youngsters from one racially-imbalanced Rochester school…

  20. Immunohistological Analysis of In Situ Expression of Mycobacterial Antigens in Skin Lesions of Leprosy Patients Across the Histopathological Spectrum : Association of Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid-I (PGL-I) with Leprosy Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, Claudia; Faber, William; Klatser, Paul; Buffing, Anita; Naafs, Ben; Das, Pranab

    1999-01-01

    The presence of mycobacterial antigens in leprosy skin lesions was studied by immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) and to cross-reactive mycobacterial antigens of 36 kd, 65 kd, and lipoarabinomannan (LAM). The staining patterns with MAb to 36 kd and 65 kd were heterogeneous and were also seen in the lesions of other skin diseases. The in situ staining of PGL-I and LAM was seen only in ...

  1. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  2. Analysis of linear energy transfers and quality factors of charged particles produced by spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf and 244Pu in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, A.; Sato, T.

    2013-01-01

    Absorbed doses, linear energy transfers (LETs) and quality factors of secondary charged particles in organs and tissues, generated via the interactions of the spontaneous fission neutrons from. 252 Cf and. 244 Pu within the human body, were studied using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) coupled with the ICRP Reference Phantom. Both the absorbed doses and the quality factors in target organs generally decrease with increasing distance from the source organ. The analysis of LET distributions of secondary charged particles led to the identification of the relationship between LET spectra and target-source organ locations. A comparison between human body-averaged mean quality factors and fluence-averaged radiation weighting factors showed that the current numerical conventions for the radiation weighting factors of neutrons, updated in ICRP103, and the quality factors for internal exposure are valid. (authors)

  3. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell–cell interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietilä, Mika [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Division of Surgery, University of Oulu and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Surgery and Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5a, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kuvaja, Paula [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Department of Pathology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, FIN-90029 OYS, Oulu (Finland); Kaakinen, Mika [Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 (Finland); Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Uemura, Toshimasa, E-mail: t.uemura@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48 h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell–cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  4. Estimation and Statistical Analysis of Human Voice Parameters to Investigate the Influence of Psychological Stress and to Determine the Vocal Tract Transfer Function of an Individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Kumar Mongia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the principal focus is to examine the influence of psychological stress (both positive and negative stress on the human articulation and to determine the vocal tract transfer function of an individual using inverse filtering technique. Both of these analyses are carried out by estimating various voice parameters. The outcomes of the analysis of psychological stress indicate that all the voice parameters are affected due to the influence of stress on humans. About 35 out of 51 parameters follow a unique course of variation from normal to positive and negative stress in 32% of the total analyzed signals. The upshot of the analysis is to determine the vocal tract transfer function for each vowel for an individual. The analysis indicates that it can be computed by estimating the mean of the pole zero plots of that individual’s vocal tract estimated for the whole day. Besides this, an analysis is presented to find the relationship between the LPC coefficients of the vocal tract and the vocal tract cavities. The results of the analysis indicate that all the LPC coefficients of the vocal tract are affected due to change in the position of any cavity.

  5. Analysis of human plasma metabolites across different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry platforms: Cross-platform transferable chemical signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telu, Kelly H; Yan, Xinjian; Wallace, William E; Stein, Stephen E; Simón-Manso, Yamil

    2016-03-15

    The metabolite profiling of a NIST plasma Standard Reference Material (SRM 1950) on different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) platforms showed significant differences. Although these findings suggest caution when interpreting metabolomics results, the degree of overlap of both profiles allowed us to use tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra to evaluate to what extent these results are transferable across platforms and to develop cross-platform chemical signatures. Non-targeted global metabolite profiles of SRM 1950 were obtained on different LC/MS platforms using reversed-phase chromatography and different chromatographic scales (conventional HPLC, UHPLC and nanoLC). The data processing and the metabolite differential analysis were carried out using publically available (XCMS), proprietary (Mass Profiler Professional) and in-house software (NIST pipeline). Repeatability and intermediate precision showed that the non-targeted SRM 1950 profiling was highly reproducible when working on the same platform (relative standard deviation (RSD) HPLC, UHPLC and nanoLC) on the same platform. A substantial degree of overlap (common molecular features) was also found. A procedure to generate consistent chemical signatures using tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra is proposed. Different platforms rendered significantly different metabolite profiles, but the results were highly reproducible when working within one platform. Tandem mass spectral libraries of recurrent spectra are proposed to evaluate the degree of transferability of chemical signatures generated on different platforms. Chemical signatures based on our procedure are most likely cross-platform transferable. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Cytomegalovirus survival and transferability and the effectiveness of common hand-washing agents against cytomegalovirus on live human hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jennifer D; Forlin-Passoni, Daniela; Radford, Kay; Bate, Sheri L; Dollard, Sheila C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Cannon, Michael J; Schmid, D Scott

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) transmission can occur when women acquire CMV while pregnant. Infection control guidelines may reduce risk for transmission. We studied the duration of CMV survival after application of bacteria to the hands and after transfer from the hands to surfaces and the effectiveness of cleansing with water, regular and antibacterial soaps, sanitizer, and diaper wipes. Experiments used CMV AD169 in saliva at initial titers of 1 × 10(5) infectious particles/ml. Samples from hands or surfaces (points between 0 and 15 min) were placed in culture and observed for at least 2 weeks. Samples were also tested using CMV real-time PCR. After application of bacteria to the hands, viable CMV was recovered from 17/20 swabs at 0 min, 18/20 swabs at 1 min, 5/20 swabs at 5 min, and 4/20 swabs at 15 min. After transfer, duration of survival was at least 15 min on plastic (1/2 swabs), 5 min on crackers and glass (3/4 swabs), and 1 min or less on metal and cloth (3/4 swabs); no viable virus was collected from wood, rubber, or hands. After cleansing, no viable virus was recovered using water (0/22), plain soap (0/20), antibacterial soap (0/20), or sanitizer (0/22). Viable CMV was recovered from 4/20 hands 10 min after diaper wipe cleansing. CMV remains viable on hands for sufficient times to allow transmission. CMV may be transferred to surfaces with reduced viability. Hand-cleansing methods were effective at eliminating viable CMV from hands.

  7. Chemical treatments to reduce the transfer of caesium radioisotopes to the human foodchain after a serious nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the project is to produce a reduction of the transfer factors of radiocesium in plants, milk and meat owing to a deposition of radioactive products following a severe nuclear accident. The project includes two distinct working departments. The first studies the possibility to reduce the translocation of radiocesium from the areal parts to the edible products of crops. The second studies the possibility to reduce the radiocesium in the milk and in the meat as a consequence of the feeding with contaminated fodder. (R.P.) 4 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Co-localization of a CD1d-binding glycolipid with an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine for a potent adjuvant effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Kawamura, Akira; Funakoshi, Ryota; Porcelli, Steven A; Tsuji, Moriya

    2017-05-31

    A CD1d-binding, invariant (i) natural killer T (NKT)-cell stimulatory glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), has been shown to act as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying a higher binding affinity for CD1d molecule and more potent adjuvant activity than αGalCer. In the present study, 7DW8-5 co-administered intramuscularly (i.m.) with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), AdPyCS, has led to a co-localization of 7DW8-5 and a PyCSP in draining lymph nodes (dLNs), particularly in dendritic cells (DCs). This occurrence initiates a cascade of events, such as the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and their activation and maturation, and the enhancement of the ability of DCs to prime CD8+ T cells induced by AdPyCS and ultimately leading to a potent adjuvant effect and protection against malaria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative studies on the transfer of radionuclides to the fetus in the rat - implications for human dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; Adams, N.; Gray, S.A.; Rees, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a series of studies in which the transfer of isotopes of Cs, Sr, Ru, Ce and Am to newborn rats has been measured following their administration to the mother either before or during gestation. The results have shown that transfer to the fetus depends not only on the radionuclide administered but also on the time of administration relative to the onset of pregnancy. They have also demonstrated that average concentrations of radionuclides in the newborn infant and mother can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. Of the radionuclides studied 85 Sr and 137 Cs were the most effectively translocated to the fetus when administered towards the end of gestation, and 141 Ce and 241 Am the least. Thus following administration on the 14th day of pregnancy the relative concentrations of 85 Sr and 241 Am in the newborn rat and mother at birth were respectively 0.21 and 0.004, and on the 19th day 5.3 and 0.02. The development of a dosimetric model for 241 Am is also described. 23 refs.; 3 tabs

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus mediates a high level of gene transfer but less efficient integration in the K562 human hematopoietic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, P; McQuiston, S A; Yu, X J; Pepper, K A; Krall, W J; Podsakoff, G M; Kurtzman, G J; Kohn, D B

    1997-03-01

    We tested the ability of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to express and integrate exogenous DNA into human hematopoietic cells in the absence of selection. We developed an rAAV vector, AAV-tNGFR, carrying a truncated rat nerve growth factor receptor (tNGFR) cDNA as a cell surface reporter under the control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) long terminal repeat. An analogous MoMuLV-based retroviral vector (L-tNGFR) was used in parallel, and gene transfer and expression in human hematopoietic cells were assessed by flow cytometry and DNA analyses. Following gene transfer into K562 cells with AAV-tNGFR at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 13 infectious units (IU), 26 to 38% of cells expressed tNGFR on the surface early after transduction, but the proportion of tNGFR expressing cells steadily declined to 3.0 to 3.5% over 1 month of culture. At an MOI of 130 IU, nearly all cells expressed tNGFR immediately posttransduction, but the proportion of cells expressing tNGFR declined to 62% over 2 months of culture. The decline in the proportion of AAV-tNGFR-expressing cells was associated with ongoing losses of vector genomes. In contrast, K562 cells transduced with the retroviral vector L-tNGFR expressed tNGFR in a constant fraction. Integration analyses on clones showed that integration occurred at different sites. Integration frequencies were estimated at about 49% at an MOI of 130 and 2% at an MOI of 1.3. Transduction of primary human CD34+ progenitor cells by AAV-tNGFR was less efficient than with K562 cells and showed a declining percentage of cells expressing tNGFR over 2 weeks of culture. Thus, purified rAAV caused very high gene transfer and expression in human hematopoietic cells early after transduction, which steadily declined during cell passage in the absence of selection. Although the efficiency of integration was low, overall integration was markedly improved at a high MOI. While prolonged episomal persistence may be adequate

  11. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  12. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins on human keratinocyte attachment, proliferation and transfer to a dermal wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, R A; Goberdhan, N J; Freedlander, E; MacNeil, S

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prior culture of cells on ECM proteins might positively influence the performance of keratinocytes when cells are transferred to a dermal in vitro wound bed model. Keratinocytes were cultured using a method for producing cultured epithelial autografts for severely burned patients (essentially using Green's medium, a mitogen-rich medium containing fetal calf serum, cholera toxin, EGF, insulin, transferrin and triiodothyronine). Cells were cultured either on irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts (as in the standard Rheinwald and Green technique) or, alternatively, on collagen I, collagen IV, matrigel, RGD, vitronectin or fibronectin. Under these conditions matrigel, collagen I and IV enhanced initial attachment, RGD, vitronectin, fibronectin and irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts did not. Proliferation of cells was positively influenced by matrigel, collagen I and IV and irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts; of these, however, only matrigel and 3T3 fibroblasts had sustained significant effects on keratinocyte proliferation over 4 days. Cells on fibronectin showed significantly reduced proliferation. An acellular non-viable dermis was then used to mimic the homograft allodermis onto which cultured epithelial autograft sheets are grafted clinically and cells cultured on the various ECM proteins for 96 h were transferred to this in vitro wound model. None of the substrates enhanced keratinocyte performance on this model. It was concluded that under these conditions some ECM proteins can significantly affect keratinocyte attachment and, to a lesser extent, proliferation but that the culture of keratinocytes on these ECM proteins does not appear to confer any lasting benefit to the attachment of these keratinocytes to an in vitro wound-bed model.

  13. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products

  14. Lewis X component in human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 transfer to CD4(+) T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Groot, Fedde; Berkhout, Ben; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2005-01-01

    DC-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which is expressed on DCs, can interact with a variety of pathogens such as HIV-1, hepatitis C, Ebola, cytomegalovirus, Dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leisbmania, and Candida albicans. We demonstrate that human milk can inhibit the DC-SIGN-mediated

  15. Effect of human vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer on endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression in a rat fibroblast and osteoblast culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Li, Claire H; Nauth, Aaron; McKee, Michael D; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2010-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in promoting angiogenesis and osteogenesis during fracture repair. Our previous studies have shown that cell-based VEGF gene therapy enhances bone healing of a rabbit tibia segmental bone defect in vivo. The aim of this project was to examine the effect of exogenous human VEGF on the endogenous rat VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in a cell-based gene transfer model. Rat fibroblasts and osteoblasts were harvested from the dermal tissue and periosteum, respectively, of Fisher 344 rats. The cells were then cultured and transfected with pcDNA-human VEGF using Superfect reagent (Qiagen). Four experimental groups were created: 1) fibroblast-VEGF; 2) osteoblast-VEGF; 3) nontransfected fibroblast controls; and 4) nontransfected osteoblast controls. The cultured cells were harvested at 1, 3, and 7 days after the gene transfection. The total mRNA was extracted (Trizol; Invitrogen); both human VEGF and rat VEGF mRNA were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and quantified by VisionWorksLS. The human VEGF165 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction from transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts at 1, 3, and 7 days after gene transfection. The human VEGF165 levels peaked at Day 1 and then gradually reduced expression in both transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts. Two endogenous rat VEGF isoforms were detected in this cell culture model: rat VEGF120 and rat VEGF164. We compared the rat VEGF120 and rat VEGF164 expression level of the fibroblasts or osteoblasts that were transfected with human VEGF165, with nontransfected control cells. Both the transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts showed greater expression of rat VEGF164 than nontransfected controls at Day 1 (peak level) and Day 3, but not at Day 7. The expression of rat VEGF120 was lower in transfected fibroblasts, but higher in transfected osteoblasts, than the relevant control groups at any time point

  16. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  17. Bystander effect in human hepatoma HepG2 cells caused by medium transfers at different times after high-LET carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qingfeng; Li Qiang; Jin Xiaodong; Liu Xinguo; Dai Zhongying

    2011-01-01

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, whether irradiated cells have the ability to generate bystander signaling persistently is still unclear and the clinical relevance of bystander effects in radiotherapy remains to be elucidated. This study examines tumor cellular bystander response to autologous medium from cell culture irradiated with high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at a therapeutically relevant dose in terms of clonogenic cell survival. In vitro experiments were performed using human hepatoma HepG2 cell line exposed to 100 keV/μm carbon ions at a dose of 2 Gy. Two different periods (2 and 12 h) after irradiation, irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and replenished fresh medium were harvested and then transferred to unirradiated bystander cells. Cellular bystander responses were measured with the different medium transfer protocols. Significant higher survival fractions of unirradiated cells receiving the media from the irradiated cultures at the different times post-irradiation than those of the control were observed. Even replenishing fresh medium for unirradiated cells which had been exposed to the ICCM for 12 h could not prevent the bystander cells from the increased survival fraction. These results suggest that the irradiated cells could release unidentified signal factor(s), which induced the increase in survival fraction for the unirradiated bystander cells, into the media sustainedly and the carbon ions triggered a cascade of signaling events in the irradiated cells rather than secreting the soluble signal factor(s) just at a short period after irradiation. Based on the observations in this study, the importance of bystander effect in clinical radiotherapy was discussed and incorporating the bystander effect into the current radiobiological models, which are applicable to heavy ion radiotherapy, is needed urgently.

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Muenchen from Pigs and Humans and Potential Interserovar Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are important reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance. Recently, we reported on multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains among pigs with resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (resistance [R] type AKSSuT) and resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R type AxACSSuT). In the present study, 67 isolates (39 from humans...

  19. Influence of estrogenic pesticides on membrane integrity and membrane transfer of monosaccharide into the human red cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingermann, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Some natural and synthetic estrogens inhibit carrier-mediated transport of glucose into human red blood cells and membrane vesicles from the placenta. The inhibitory action of these estrogens on transport appears to be a direct effect at the membrane and does not involve receptor binding and protein synthesis. It is not clear, however, whether such inhibition is a common feature among estrogenic agents. Several chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides have been shown to possess estrogenic activity. These pesticides could have inhibitory effects on the human sodium-independent glucose transporter. Owing to the apparent importance of this membrane transporter in human tissues, direct interaction of hormones and xenobiotics with the glucose transporter is of fundamental significance. Some pesticides have been shown to alter membrane structure directly and alter the passive permeability of membranes. Whether the estrogenic pesticides influence passive diffusion of sugars across membranes has not been established. Finally, preliminary observations have suggested that some estrogens and pesticides have lytic effects on intact cells. Consequently, this study focuses on the ability of several estrogens and estrogenic pesticides to disrupt the cell membrane, influence the monosaccharide transporter, and alter the rate of monosaccharide permeation through the membrane by simple diffusion

  20. Characterisation of the Metabolites of 1,8-Cineole Transferred into Human Milk: Concentrations and Ratio of Enantiomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Frauke; Buettner, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    1,8-Cineole is a widely distributed odorant that also shows physiological effects, but whose human metabolism has hitherto not been extensively investigated. The aim of the present study was, thus, to characterise the metabolites of 1,8-cineole, identified previously in human milk, after the oral intake of 100 mg of this substance. Special emphasis was placed on the enantiomeric composition of the metabolites since these data may provide important insights into potential biotransformation pathways, as well as potential biological activities of these substances, for example on the breastfed child. The volatile fraction of the human milk samples was therefore isolated via Solvent Assisted Flavour Evaporation (SAFE) and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The absolute concentrations of each metabolite were determined by matrix calibration with an internal standard, and the ratios of enantiomers were analysed on chiral capillaries. The concentrations varied over a broad range, from traces in the upper ng/kg region up to 40 µg/kg milk, with the exception of the main metabolite α2-hydroxy-1,8-cineole that showed concentrations of 100–250 µg/kg. Also, large inter- and intra-individual variations were recorded for the enantiomers, with nearly enantiomerically pure α2-hydroxy- and 3-oxo-1,8-cineole, while all other metabolites showed ratios of ~30:70 to 80:20. PMID:24957890

  1. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer of human phenylalanine hydroxylase into NIH 3T3 and hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledley, F.D.; Grenett, H.E.; McGinnis-Shelnutt, M.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). A full-length human PAH cDNA sequence has been inserted into pzip-neoSV(X), which is a retroviral vector containing the bacterial neo gene. The recombinant has been transfected into Psi2 cells, which provide synthesis of the retroviral capsid. Recombinant virus was detected in the culture medium of the transfected Psi2 cells, which is capable of transmitting the human PAH gene into mouse NIH 3T3 cells by infection leading to stable incorporation of the recombinant provirus. Infected cells express PAH mRNA, immunoreactive PAH protein, and exhibit pterin-dependent phenylaline hydroxylase activity. The recombinant virus is also capable of infecting a mouse hepatoma cell line that does not normal synthesize PAH. PAH activity is present in the cellular extracts and the entire hydroxylation system is reconstituted in the hepatoma cells infected with the recombinant viruses. Thus, recombinant viruses containing human PAH cDNA provide a means for introducing functional PAH into mammalian cells of hepatic origin and can potentially be introduced into whole animals as a model for somatic gene therapy for PKU.

  2. The nucleotide sequence and a first generation gene transfer vector of species B human adenovirus serotype 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirena, Dominique; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Schaffner, Walter; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2005-12-20

    Human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 3 causes respiratory infections. It is considered highly virulent, accounting for about 13% of all Ad isolates. We report here the complete Ad3 DNA sequence of 35,343 base pairs (GenBank accession DQ086466). Ad3 shares 96.43% nucleotide identity with Ad7, another virulent subspecies B1 serotype, and 82.56 and 62.75% identity with the less virulent species B2 Ad11 and species C Ad5, respectively. The genomic organization of Ad3 is similar to the other human Ads comprising five early transcription units, E1A, E1B, E2, E3, and E4, two delayed early units IX and IVa2, and the major late unit, in total 39 putative and 7 hypothetical open reading frames. A recombinant E1-deleted Ad3 was generated on a bacterial artificial chromosome. This prototypic virus efficiently transduced CD46-positive rodent and human cells. Our results will help in clarifying the biology and pathology of adenoviruses and enhance therapeutic applications of viral vectors in clinical settings.

  3. Binding of the human "electron transferring flavoprotein" (ETF) to the medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) involves an arginine and histidine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony R

    2003-10-01

    The interaction between the "electron transferring flavoprotein" (ETF) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) enables successful flavin to flavin electron transfer, crucial for the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The exact biochemical determinants for ETF binding to MCAD are unknown. Here we show that binding of human ETF, to MCAD, was inhibited by 2,3-butanedione and diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) and reversed by incubation with free arginine and hydroxylamine respectively. Spectral analyses of native ETF vs modified ETF suggested that flavin binding was not affected and that the loss of ETF activity with MCAD involved modification of one ETF arginine residue and one ETF histidine residue respectively. MCAD and octanoyl-CoA protected ETF against inactivation by both 2,3-butanedione and DEPC indicating that the arginine and histidine residues are present in or around the MCAD binding site. Comparison of exposed arginine and histidine residues among different ETF species, however, indicates that arginine residues are highly conserved but that histidine residues are not. These results lead us to conclude that this single arginine residue is essential for the binding of ETF to MCAD, but that the single histidine residue, although involved, is not.

  4. Mass transfer of therapeutics through natural human plaque biofilms: a model for therapeutic delivery to pathological bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Colin

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the mouth are prime mediators of the destruction of the dental and oral tissues. This brief review summarises recent work using a device for generating intact plaque in the mouth on natural enamel surfaces such that quantitative studies of mass transfer through natural plaque biofilms could be carried out in relation to plaque architecture. This data is discussed against the background of existing information. The device revealed complex plaque architecture with high a surface area to mass ratio decreasing from the exterior of the biofilm towards the tissue surface. Fluoride, a potent inhibitor of caries was concentrated in the outer regions of the biofilm. This implies some restriction of diffusion and possibly binding to the high surface area of the outer biofilm. Whilst all components examined conformed to this distribution pattern, some relatively uncharged materials penetrated the bacterial biomass whilst other, more highly charged materials tended to be restricted to the channels or biomass surface. Plaque architecture was robust but could be altered using detergent indicating that biomass architecture and chemistry could be manipulated as a possible means of facilitating mass transport of therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transfer of thallium from rape seed to rape oil is negligible and oil is fit for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loula, Martin; Kaňa, Antonín; Vosmanská, Magda; Koplík, Richard; Mestek, Oto

    2016-01-01

    Rape and other Brassicaceae family plants can accumulate appreciable amounts of thallium from the soil. Because some species of this family are common crops utilised as food for direct consumption or raw materials for food production, thallium can enter the food chain. A useful method for thallium determination is inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The limit of detection (0.2 pg ml(-1) Tl or 0.02 ng g(-1) Tl, taking in the account dilution during sample decomposition) found in the current study was very low, and the method can be used for ultra-trace analysis. Possible transfer of thallium from rape seed to the rape oil was investigated in two ways. The balance of thallium in rape seed meal (content 140-200 ng g(-1) Tl) and defatted rape seed meal indicated that thallium did not pass into the oil (p thallium in six kinds of edible rape seed oil and three kinds of margarines showed that the amount of thallium in rape seed oil is negligible.

  6. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient's somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  7. Use of retroviral-mediated gene transfer to deliver and test function of chimeric antigen receptors in human T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Parente-Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are genetically delivered fusion molecules that elicit T-cell activation upon binding of a native cell surface molecule. These molecules can be used to generate a large number of memory and effector T-cells that are capable of recognizing and attacking tumor cells. Most commonly, stable CAR expression is achieved in T-cells using retroviral vectors. In the method described here, retroviral vectors are packaged in a two-step procedure. First, H29D human retroviral packaging cells (a derivative of 293 cells are transfected with the vector of interest, which is packaged transiently in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G pseudotyped particles. These particles are used to deliver the vector to PG13 cells, which achieve stable packaging of gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV-pseudotyped particles that are suitable for infection of human T-cells. The key advantage of the method reported here is that it robustly generates polyclonal PG13 cells that are 100% positive for the vector of interest. This means that efficient gene transfer may be repeatedly achieved without the need to clone individual PG13 cells for experimental pre-clinical testing. To achieve T-cell transduction, cells must first be activated using a non-specific mitogen. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA provides an economic and robust stimulus to achieve this. After 48-72 h, activated T-cells and virus-conditioned medium are mixed in RetroNectin-coated plasticware, which enhances transduction efficiency. Transduced cells are analyzed for gene transfer efficiency by flow cytometry 48 h following transduction and may then be tested in several assays to evaluate CAR function, including target-dependent cytotoxicity, cytokine production and proliferation.

  8. Characterization of membrane lipid fluidity in human embryo cells malignantly transfer med post 238Pu α irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zirong; Sun Ling; Liu Guolian; Shen Zhiyuan

    1992-01-01

    The membrane lipid fluidity of malignantly transformed human embryo cells following 238 Pu α particlce irradiation in vitro has been studied. The results indicate that the ontogenesis depends on irradiation dose (Gy) and the membrane lipid fluidity in malignantly transformed cells is higher than that in normal embryo cells. With the microviscosity (η) of cells plotted against the cell counts, the correlation coefficient (γ) is calculated to be between 0.9936 and 0.9999. Since the malignant transformation of irradiated embryo cells is manifested early on cell membrane lipid, the fluidity of membrane lipid can be used as an oncologic marker

  9. The Holocene sedimentary record of cyanobacterial glycolipids in the Baltic Sea: an evaluation of their application as tracers of past nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sollai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterocyst glycolipids (HGs are lipids exclusively produced by heterocystous dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. The Baltic Sea is an ideal environment to study the distribution of HGs and test their potential as biomarkers because of its recurring summer phytoplankton blooms, dominated by a few heterocystous cyanobacterial species of the genera Nodularia and Aphanizomenon. A multi-core and a gravity core from the Gotland Basin were analyzed to determine the abundance and distribution of a suite of selected HGs at a high resolution to investigate the changes in past cyanobacterial communities during the Holocene. The HG distribution of the sediments deposited during the Modern Warm Period (MoWP was compared with those of cultivated heterocystous cyanobacteria, including those isolated from Baltic Sea waters, revealing high similarity. However, the abundance of HGs dropped substantially with depth, and this may be caused by either a decrease in the occurrence of the cyanobacterial blooms or diagenesis, resulting in partial destruction of the HGs. The record also shows that the HG distribution has remained stable since the Baltic turned into a brackish semi-enclosed basin ∼ 7200 cal. yr BP. This suggests that the heterocystous cyanobacterial species composition remained relatively stable as well. During the earlier freshwater phase of the Baltic (i.e., the Ancylus Lake and Yoldia Sea phases, the distribution of the HGs varied much more than in the subsequent brackish phase, and the absolute abundance of HGs was much lower than during the brackish phase. This suggests that the cyanobacterial community adjusted to the different environmental conditions in the basin. Our results confirm the potential of HGs as a specific biomarker of heterocystous cyanobacteria in paleo-environmental studies.

  10. Comparison of (31)P saturation and inversion magnetization transfer in human liver and skeletal muscle using a clinical MR system and surface coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2015-02-01

    (31)P MRS magnetization transfer ((31)P-MT) experiments allow the estimation of exchange rates of biochemical reactions, such as the creatine kinase equilibrium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Although various (31)P-MT methods have been successfully used on isolated organs or animals, their application on humans in clinical scanners poses specific challenges. This study compared two major (31)P-MT methods on a clinical MR system using heteronuclear surface coils. Although saturation transfer (ST) is the most commonly used (31)P-MT method, sequences such as inversion transfer (IT) with short pulses might be better suited for the specific hardware and software limitations of a clinical scanner. In addition, small NMR-undetectable metabolite pools can transfer MT to NMR-visible pools during long saturation pulses, which is prevented with short pulses. (31)P-MT sequences were adapted for limited pulse length, for heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils with inhomogeneous B1 , for the need for volume selection and for the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a clinical 3-T MR system. The ST and IT sequences were applied to skeletal muscle and liver in 10 healthy volunteers. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the behavior of the IT measurements with increasing imperfections. In skeletal muscle of the thigh, ATP synthesis resulted in forward reaction constants (k) of 0.074 ± 0.022 s(-1) (ST) and 0.137 ± 0.042 s(-1) (IT), whereas the creatine kinase reaction yielded 0.459 ± 0.089 s(-1) (IT). In the liver, ATP synthesis resulted in k = 0.267 ± 0.106 s(-1) (ST), whereas the IT experiment yielded no consistent results. ST results were close to literature values; however, the IT results were either much larger than the corresponding ST values and/or were widely scattered. To summarize, ST and IT experiments can both be implemented on a clinical body scanner with heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils; however, ST results are

  11. Association Between Progesterone Elevation on the Day of Human Chronic Gonadotropin Trigger and Pregnancy Outcomes After Fresh Embryo Transfer in In Vitro Fertilization/Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C; Khastgir, Gautam; Shah, Jatin; Murdia, Kshitiz; Gupta, Shweta Mittal; Rao, Durga G; Dash, Soumyaroop; Ingale, Kundan; Patil, Milind; Moideen, Kunji; Thakor, Priti; Dewda, Pavitra

    2018-01-01

    Progesterone elevation (PE) during the late follicular phase of controlled ovarian stimulation in fresh embryo transfer in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles has been claimed to be associated with decreased pregnancy rates. However, the evidence is not unequivocal, and clinicians still have questions about the clinical validity of measuring P levels during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles. We reviewed the existing literature aimed at answering four relevant clinical questions, namely (i) Is gonadotropin type associated with PE during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles? (ii) Is PE on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) associated with negative fresh embryo transfer IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles outcomes in all patient subgroups? (iii) Which P thresholds are best to identify patients at risk of implantation failure due to PE in a fresh embryo transfer? and (iv) Should a freeze all policy be adopted in all the cycles with PE on the day of hCG? The existing evidence indicates that late follicular phase progesterone rise in gonadotropin releasing analog cycles is mainly caused by the supraphysiological stimulation of granulosa cells with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone. Yet, the type of gonadotropin used for stimulation seems to play no significant role on progesterone levels at the end of stimulation. Furthermore, PE is not a universal phenomenon with evidence indicating that its detrimental consequences on pregnancy outcomes do not affect all patient populations equally. Patients with high ovarian response to control ovarian stimulation are more prone to exhibit PE at the late follicular phase. However, in studies showing an overall detrimental effect of PE on pregnancy rates, the adverse effect of PE on endometrial receptivity seems to be offset, at least in part, by the availability of good quality embryo for transfer in women with a high ovarian response. Given the limitations of

  12. Association Between Progesterone Elevation on the Day of Human Chronic Gonadotropin Trigger and Pregnancy Outcomes After Fresh Embryo Transfer in In Vitro Fertilization/Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone elevation (PE during the late follicular phase of controlled ovarian stimulation in fresh embryo transfer in vitro fertilization (IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles has been claimed to be associated with decreased pregnancy rates. However, the evidence is not unequivocal, and clinicians still have questions about the clinical validity of measuring P levels during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles. We reviewed the existing literature aimed at answering four relevant clinical questions, namely (i Is gonadotropin type associated with PE during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles? (ii Is PE on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG associated with negative fresh embryo transfer IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles outcomes in all patient subgroups? (iii Which P thresholds are best to identify patients at risk of implantation failure due to PE in a fresh embryo transfer? and (iv Should a freeze all policy be adopted in all the cycles with PE on the day of hCG? The existing evidence indicates that late follicular phase progesterone rise in gonadotropin releasing analog cycles is mainly caused by the supraphysiological stimulation of granulosa cells with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone. Yet, the type of gonadotropin used for stimulation seems to play no significant role on progesterone levels at the end of stimulation. Furthermore, PE is not a universal phenomenon with evidence indicating that its detrimental consequences on pregnancy outcomes do not affect all patient populations equally. Patients with high ovarian response to control ovarian stimulation are more prone to exhibit PE at the late follicular phase. However, in studies showing an overall detrimental effect of PE on pregnancy rates, the adverse effect of PE on endometrial receptivity seems to be offset, at least in part, by the availability of good quality embryo for transfer in women with a high ovarian response. Given the

  13. Association Between Progesterone Elevation on the Day of Human Chronic Gonadotropin Trigger and Pregnancy Outcomes After Fresh Embryo Transfer in In Vitro Fertilization/Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C.; Khastgir, Gautam; Shah, Jatin; Murdia, Kshitiz; Gupta, Shweta Mittal; Rao, Durga G.; Dash, Soumyaroop; Ingale, Kundan; Patil, Milind; Moideen, Kunji; Thakor, Priti; Dewda, Pavitra

    2018-01-01

    Progesterone elevation (PE) during the late follicular phase of controlled ovarian stimulation in fresh embryo transfer in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles has been claimed to be associated with decreased pregnancy rates. However, the evidence is not unequivocal, and clinicians still have questions about the clinical validity of measuring P levels during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles. We reviewed the existing literature aimed at answering four relevant clinical questions, namely (i) Is gonadotropin type associated with PE during the follicular phase of stimulated cycles? (ii) Is PE on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) associated with negative fresh embryo transfer IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles outcomes in all patient subgroups? (iii) Which P thresholds are best to identify patients at risk of implantation failure due to PE in a fresh embryo transfer? and (iv) Should a freeze all policy be adopted in all the cycles with PE on the day of hCG? The existing evidence indicates that late follicular phase progesterone rise in gonadotropin releasing analog cycles is mainly caused by the supraphysiological stimulation of granulosa cells with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone. Yet, the type of gonadotropin used for stimulation seems to play no significant role on progesterone levels at the end of stimulation. Furthermore, PE is not a universal phenomenon with evidence indicating that its detrimental consequences on pregnancy outcomes do not affect all patient populations equally. Patients with high ovarian response to control ovarian stimulation are more prone to exhibit PE at the late follicular phase. However, in studies showing an overall detrimental effect of PE on pregnancy rates, the adverse effect of PE on endometrial receptivity seems to be offset, at least in part, by the availability of good quality embryo for transfer in women with a high ovarian response. Given the limitations of

  14. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  15. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  16. The effects of combining ionizing radiation and adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfer in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feifei; Li Jianhua; Lax, Stuart; Klamut, Henry

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: We have previously demonstrated that the introduction of human recombinant wild-type p53 carried by the adenoviral vector (Ad5CMV-p53) into two human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines (CNE-1 and CNE-2Z) resulted in significant cytotoxicity. In the current work, we wanted to evaluate the results of this strategy when combined with ionizing radiation (XRT). Materials and Methods: CNE-1, CNE-2Z, and a normal human nasopharyngeal fibroblast strain KS1, were infected with iso-effective doses of 2, 6 and 6 pfu/cell of Ad5CMV-p53 respectively. XRT was administered 24 hours post-infection, to coincide with the time of maximal recombinant p53 expression. Western blot analyses were conducted for p53, p21 WAF1/CIP1 , bax and bcl-2. Cell viability was evaluated using both the MTT and clonogenic assays. Presence of apoptosis was determined by using DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: We observed that the combination of Ad5CMV-p53 + XRT (2, 4, and 6 Gy) resulted in an approximately 1-log greater level of cytotoxicity compared to that observed with XRT alone for both NPC cell lines. The MTT assay indicated sparing of the KS1 cells when subjected to the identical treatments. XRT alone stimulated minimal p53 expression; Ad5CMV-p53 alone induced significant recombinant p53 expression, which was not further enhanced by the addition of XRT. Similar observations were made for p21 WAF1/CIP1 expression. No changes were observed for bax and bcl-2 expression with any of these treatments. Apoptosis was induced following 4 Gy of XRT alone, but was observed earlier, at 2 Gy when combined with Ad5CMV-p53. Conclusion: Additional cytotoxicity was observed for the NPC cell lines when XRT was combined with Ad5CMV-p53 infection, with concurrent sparing of normal cells (KS1). This cytotoxicity also appeared to be mediated through the induction of the apoptotic pathway. These results support our previous observation of the potential application of this strategy in the

  17. Spontaneous transfer of ganglioside GM1 between phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.E.; Thompson, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The transfer kinetics of the negatively charged glycosphingolipid II 3 -N-acetylneuraminosyl-gangliotetraosylceramide (GM 1 ) were investigated by monitoring tritiated GM 1 movement between donor and acceptor vesicles. After appropriate incubation times at 45 0 C, donor and acceptor vesicles were separated by molecular sieve chromatography. Donors were small unilamellar vesicles produced by sonication, whereas acceptors were large unilamellar vesicles produced by either fusion or ethanol injection. Initial GM 1 transfer to acceptors followed first-order kinetics with a half-time of about 40 h assuming that GM 1 is present in equal mole fractions in the exterior and interior surfaces of the donor vesicle bilayer and that no glycolipid flip-flop occurs. GM 1 net transfer was calculated relative to that of [ 14 C]cholesteryl oleate, which served as a nontransferable marker in the donor vesicles. Factors affecting the GM 1 interbilayer transfer rate included phospholipid matrix composition, initial GM 1 concentration in donor vesicles, and the GM 1 distribution in donor vesicles with respect to total lipid symmetry. The findings provide evidence that GM 1 is molecularly dispersed at low concentrations within liquid-crystalline phospholipid bilayers

  18. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  19. Theoretical assessment of the maximum obtainable power in wireless power transfer constrained by human body exposure limits in a typical room scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi Lin; De Santis, Valerio; Umenei, Aghuinyue Esai

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the maximum received power obtainable through wireless power transfer (WPT) by a small receiver (Rx) coil from a relatively large transmitter (Tx) coil is numerically estimated in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 10 MHz based on human body exposure limits. Analytical calculations were first conducted to determine the worst-case coupling between a homogeneous cylindrical phantom with a radius of 0.65 m and a Tx coil positioned 0.1 m away with the radius ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 m. Subsequently, three high-resolution anatomical models were employed to compute the peak induced field intensities with respect to various Tx coil locations and dimensions. Based on the computational results, scaling factors which correlate the cylindrical phantom and anatomical model results were derived. Next, the optimal operating frequency, at which the highest transmitter source power can be utilized without exceeding the exposure limits, is found to be around 2 MHz. Finally, a formulation is proposed to estimate the maximum obtainable power of WPT in a typical room scenario while adhering to the human body exposure compliance mandates. (paper)

  20. Theoretical assessment of the maximum obtainable power in wireless power transfer constrained by human body exposure limits in a typical room scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi Lin; De Santis, Valerio; Umenei, Aghuinyue Esai

    2014-07-07

    In this study, the maximum received power obtainable through wireless power transfer (WPT) by a small receiver (Rx) coil from a relatively large transmitter (Tx) coil is numerically estimated in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 10 MHz based on human body exposure limits. Analytical calculations were first conducted to determine the worst-case coupling between a homogeneous cylindrical phantom with a radius of 0.65 m and a Tx coil positioned 0.1 m away with the radius ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 m. Subsequently, three high-resolution anatomical models were employed to compute the peak induced field intensities with respect to various Tx coil locations and dimensions. Based on the computational results, scaling factors which correlate the cylindrical phantom and anatomical model results were derived. Next, the optimal operating frequency, at which the highest transmitter source power can be utilized without exceeding the exposure limits, is found to be around 2 MHz. Finally, a formulation is proposed to estimate the maximum obtainable power of WPT in a typical room scenario while adhering to the human body exposure compliance mandates.

  1. Transfer RNA species in human lymphocytes stimulated by mitogens and in leukemic cells. [/sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, /sup 32/P tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.D.; Yang, W.K.; Novelli, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) profiles in human lymphocytes stimulated by various mitogens have been compared with profiles from nonstimulated cells and from leukemic cells using reversed-phase chromatography. Comparisons of (/sup 3/H)- or (/sup 11/C)uridine- or (/sup 32/P)phosphate-labeled tRNAs showed that the greatest changes in tRNA composition upon phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation occurred in the first 8 h after mitogen addition. Stimulation of lymphocytes by pokeweed mitogen, anti-human immunoglobulin, or bacterial lipopolysaccharide resulted in tRNA species which showed distinct differences from each other and also from the tRNAs produced by phytohemagglutinin stimulation. Leukemic lymphocyte tRNAs showed the most extensive differences in profile when compared with chromatograms from non-neoplastic cells stimulated by a variety of mitogens. Specific isoaccepting species of tyrosyl-, aspartyl-, and phenylalanyl-tRNAs were also compared in PHA-stimulated and resting lymphocytes and no differences were found. When these same species were studied in leukemic cells, tyrosyl-tRNA profiles were shifted to elute at a lower salt concentration, while the aspartyl-tRNA profile showed a new peak not present in noncancerous cells.

  2. Detection of tumor-like inclusions embedded within human liver tissue using a short-pulsed near-infrared laser beam: Parallel simulations with radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Addoum, Ahmad; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    An efficient solution to detect tumor-like inclusions embedded within a human liver tissue model is presented, using illumination by a short-pulsed laser beam. Light propagation was accurately solved using the time-dependent radiative transfer equation, with multithreaded parallel computing. A modified finite volume method based on unstructured grids and the fourth-order Runge–Kutta approach was employed to solve the equation in the (2-D/3-D) spatial and time domains. The normalization technique applied to the Henyey–Greenstein phase function was adopted to ensure numerical stability for values of the anisotropy factor that were close to unity. The presence of one or two circular/spherical inclusions was analyzed from the time and spatially resolved reflectance on the medium bounding surface. The results allowed a minimal size and a maximum distance for the detection of the inclusion to be highlighted. - Highlights: • We detect tumor-like inclusions embedded within a (2D/3D) human liver tissue model. • The technique is based on a short-pulsed near-infrared laser beam. • We solve the (2D/3D) time-dependent RTE, with multithreaded parallel computing. • The presence of one or two circular/spherical inclusions is analyzed. • The results allows a minimal size and a maximum distance for the detection

  3. A new recycling technique for human placental cotyledon perfusion: application to studies of the fetomaternal transfer of glucose, inulin, and antipyrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, J.M.; Tavoloni, N.; Potter, B.J.; Sarkozi, L.; Shepard, M.D.; Berk, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    A previously described technique has been modified to permit the continuously recirculating perfusion of the separate maternal and fetal circulations of an isolated cotyledon of human placenta. Viability of the perfused cotyledons was established by measurements of oxygen consumption (average, 0.18 ml/gm/hr), glucose utilization (average, 1.0 mg/gm/hr), and lactate production (less than 0.01 mumol/gm/hr), and integrity of the placental barrier by the failure of India ink, 125I-albumin, or 35S-sulfobromophthalein to cross from fetal to maternal circulation. Clearance of 3H-inulin from the fetal circuit, 0.0059 +/- 0.0005 (SE) ml/min/gm, corresponded to 2.5% of its clearance by the adult human kidney. Clearance of 14C-antipyrine was 0.013 +/- 0.003 ml/min/gm. After introduction into the fetal circuit, the observed appearance of both inulin and antipyrine in the maternal circuit closely paralleled curves predicted by a simple mathematical model. The use of a continuously recirculating perfusion system is technically feasible, and has advantages over the single-pass technique for studying transplacental transfer of metabolites with a low efficiency of extraction

  4. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  5. A Glycolipid Adjuvant, 7DW8-5, Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses Induced by an Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine in Non-Human Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Padte, Neal N.; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Andrews, Chasity D.; McManus, Jenny; Grasperge, Brooke F.; Gettie, Agegnehu; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Li, Xiangming; Wu, Douglass; Bruder, Joseph T.; Sedegah, Martha; Patterson, Noelle; Richie, Thomas L.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D.

    2013-01-01

    A key strategy to a successful vaccine against malaria is to identify and develop new adjuvants that can enhance T-cell responses and improve protective immunity. Upon co-administration with a rodent malaria vaccine in mice, 7DW8-5, a recently identified novel analog of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), enhances the level of malaria-specific protective immune responses more strongly than the parent compound. In this study, we sought to determine whether 7DW8-5 could provide a similar potent ad...

  6. Transfer of unstable chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes at cell division and their significance for the aberration frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, G.; Chang Tsangpi.

    1986-04-01

    In 48 h cultures, the fraction of human lymphocytes in 2nd mitosis was found to be between 0 and 42.5% (mean value 8.7%). The X-ray exposure from irradiating with 2 Gy resulted in a cell cycle delay which varied from donor to donor. A loss of nearly 50% of dicentric chromosomes and acentric fragments from unstable chromosomes occurred at cell division, while centric rings were not impeded. When dicentric chromosomes, or acentric fragments are found in 2nd mitosis, they show a characteristic differential staining, which means that chromatides at cell division fall free and are replicated in daughter cells. When plotting dose effect curves of dicentric chromosomes, up to 20% of 2nd mitosis fractions have little influence on the aberration rate. This may be additionally verified as part of the 'biological dosimetry' in a person with 24% of 2nd mitosis. When the rates of dicentric chromosomes exclusively evaluated from 1st mitosis after irradiation with 2.0 Gy were related to the donors age, no age-dependent sensitivity to radiation could be observed. Aberration rates which deviate from person to person are comparable to the results achieved by conventional staining methods. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  8. DNA from radiation resistant human tumor cells transfers resistance to NIH/3T3 cells with varying degrees of penetrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasid, U.; Dritschilo, A.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that clinical radiation resistance may correlate with in vitro radiation survival parameters. Specifically, they isolated several cell lines from radioresistant head and neck carcinomas with D/sub 0/ values greater than 2 Gy. The authors co-transfected DNA from cell line SQ2OB (D/sub 0/ = 2.4 Gy) with the rhoSVNeO plasmid into NIH/3T3 cells (D/sub 0/ = 1.7 Gy). Antibiotic G418 resistant, transformed clones were isolated and confirmed by Southern blotting to contain human alu, as well as rhoSVNeO sequences. Screening for radiation resistance with 8Gy (Cs-137) revealed that 3 of 4 tested hybrid clones show a radiation survival intermediate between NIH/3T3 and SQ2OB. This suggests that radiation resistance is a dominant, transfectable phenotype of mammalian cells and can be expressed in more sensitive cells. Karyotyping of resistant hybrid clones shows the presence of double minute chromosomes. Secondary transfection results and experiments to clone the genetic factors responsible for radiation resistance are in progress and results will be reported

  9. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of a human c-fos cDNA into mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Verrier, B; Klein, B; Niccolino, M; Marty, L; Alexandre, C; Piechaczyk, M

    1991-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a complete human c-fos protein was isolated and inserted into two different murine MoMuLV-derived recombinant retroviruses allowing expression of c-fos protein in different cell types. One c-fos-expressing retrovirus, chosen for its ability to express high levels of proteins in fibroblast-like cells, was shown to potentiate long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and therefore constitutes a potential tool for immortalizing such cells. Moreover, when tested in an in vitro differentiation assay, stromal cells constitutively expressing c-fos favor the granulocyte differentiation of hematopoietic precursors. Interestingly, retroviruses expressing v-src and v-abl oncogenes, included as controls in our experiments, do not produce any detectable effects, whereas those expressing polyoma virus middle T antigen facilitate long-term growth in vitro of stromal cells that favor the macrophage differentiation pathway of bone marrow stem cells. Our observation supports the idea that constitutive expression of some oncogenes, including c-fos and polyoma virus middle T antigen, may influence cytokine production by bone marrow stromal cells.

  10. Initial damage in human interphase chromosomes from alpha particles with linear energy transfers relevant to radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loucas, B.D.; Geard, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the efficiency at which α particles at LETs chosen to simulate exposure to radon progeny break chromosomes, the premature chromosome condensation technique was used to measure breaks soon after irradiation. Noncycling human fibroblasts were irradiated with graded doses of monoenergetic α particles accelerated to produce LETs of 90, 120, 150, 180 and 200 keV/pm at the midpoint of the cell nuclei. Premature chromosome condensation was initiated immediately after irradiation and cells were scored for the total number of prematurely condensed chromosomes and fragments per cell. Similar experiments were conducted with 250 kVp X rays for comparison. Irradiation with α particles produced 8.6 to 13.1 excess fragments per gray, while X rays produced 5.8 excess fragments, resulting in RBEs around 2. Calculations of the number of breaks produced on average by a single particle traversal of a cell nucleus indicated that at the LETs tested more than one break was produced by each traversal, the maximum being that produced by 180 keV/μm α particles. When chromosome aberrations are scored at metaphase after high-LET irradiation, RBEs considerably greater than those recorded here have been reported. These results showing relatively small differences in initial break levels for α particles in the LET range of the radon progeny relative to X rays indicate that the great aberration frequencies are not due principally to an increase in breakage efficiency, but interactions between breaks along the same particle track are important. 16 refs., 4 figs

  11. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J; Usselman, Robert J; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S](2+,1+) cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S](+) cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) between 8 and 18K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S](+) and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6+/-1A for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  12. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederiksen Marie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. Methods A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored in the maternal and fetal compartments. In addition, the perfused cotyledon, the surrounding placental tissue as well as pre-perfusion placental tissue and umbilical cord plasma were also analysed. The PBDE analysis included Soxhlet extraction, clean-up by adsorption chromatography and GC-MS analysis. Results and Discussion Placental transfer of BDE-47 was faster and more extensive than for BDE-99. The fetal-maternal ratios (FM-ratio after four hours of perfusion were 0.47 and 0.25 for BDE-47 and BDE-99, respectively, while the indicative permeability coefficient (IPC measured after 60 minutes of perfusion was 0.26 h-1 and 0.10 h-1, respectively. The transport of BDE-209 seemed to be limited. These differences between the congeners may be related to the degree of bromination. Significant accumulation was observed for all congeners in the perfused cotyledon as well as in the surrounding placental tissue. Conclusion The transport of BDE-47 and BDE-99 indicates in utero exposure to these congeners. Although the transport of BDE-209 was limited, however, possible metabolic debromination may lead to products which are both more toxic and transportable. Our study demonstrates fetal exposure to PBDEs, which should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age.

  13. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudana Girija Sanal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC, we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient’s somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is

  14. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  15. Transfer of L-selenomethionine-/sup 75/Se to human milk and the potential radiation dose to a breast-fed infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D M; McCready, V R; Cosgrove, D O [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Strahlentoxikologie

    1981-04-01

    Following the administration of L-selenomethionine-/sup 75/Se for a pancreas scan of a lactating mother, it was shown that there was a rapid and high level of incorporation of /sup 75/Se into the breast milk and the milk proteins. Between 5 and 29 hours after injection, the /sup 75/Se concentration in the whole milk and the milk solids decreased by a factor of more than 2; from 29 to 123 hours the concentrations appeared to decrease exponentially with a biological half-time of 78 +- 6 hours. At 123 hours post injection the concentrations of /sup 75/Se in the milk was 68% of that in the maternal plasma. An estimate of the /sup 75/Se intake by the infant was made from the measurements made on the single urine sample obtained 41 hours after the last breast feed. A whole body radiation dose to the infant was estimated to be about 500 ..mu..Gy, i.e. about one-tenth of the ICRP dose equivalent limit for a member of the general public. If breast feeding had been allowed to continue, the whole boent localization tumours and the principles of transferring the experimental data from animals to human beings.

  16. Human chorionic gonadotropin-administered natural cycle versus spontaneous ovulatory cycle in patients undergoing two pronuclear zygote frozen-thawed embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, You-Jung; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Young; Ahn, Jun-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2018-03-01

    To compare human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-administered natural cycle with spontaneous ovulatory cycle in patients undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FTET) in natural cycles. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the clinical outcome of a total of 166 consecutive FTET cycles that were performed in either natural cycle controlled by HCG for ovulation triggering (HCG group, n=110) or natural cycle with spontaneous ovulation (control group, n=56) in 166 infertile patients between January 2009 and November 2013. There were no differences in patients' characteristics between the 2 groups. The numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes, fertilized oocytes, grade I or II embryos and frozen embryos in the previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle in which embryos were frozen were comparable between the HCG and control groups. Significant differences were not also observed between the 2 groups in clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), embryo implantation rate, miscarriage rate, live birth rate and multiple CPR. However, the number of hospital visits for follicular monitoring was significantly fewer in the HCG group than in the control group ( P cycle reduces the number of hospital visits for follicular monitoring without any detrimental effect on FTET outcome when compared with spontaneous ovulatory cycles in infertile patients undergoing FTET in natural ovulatory cycles.

  17. Transfer of the amino-terminal nuclear envelope targeting domain of human MX2 converts MX1 into an HIV-1 resistance factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Caroline; Moncorgé, Olivier; Bauby, Hélène; Doyle, Tomas; Barclay, Wendy S; Malim, Michael H

    2014-08-01

    The myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) protein of humans has been identified recently as an interferon (IFN)-inducible inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that acts at a late postentry step of infection to prevent the nuclear accumulation of viral cDNA (C. Goujon et al., Nature 502:559-562, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12542; M. Kane et al., Nature 502:563-566, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12653; Z. Liu et al., Cell Host Microbe 14:398-410, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2013.08.015). In contrast, the closely related human MX1 protein, which suppresses infection by a range of RNA and DNA viruses (such as influenza A virus [FluAV]), is ineffective against HIV-1. Using a panel of engineered chimeric MX1/2 proteins, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal 91-amino-acid domain of MX2 confers full anti-HIV-1 function when transferred to the amino terminus of MX1, and that this fusion protein retains full anti-FluAV activity. Confocal microscopy experiments further show that this MX1/2 fusion, similar to MX2 but not MX1, can localize to the nuclear envelope (NE), linking HIV-1 inhibition with MX accumulation at the NE. MX proteins are dynamin-like GTPases, and while MX1 antiviral function requires GTPase activity, neither MX2 nor MX1/2 chimeras require this attribute to inhibit HIV-1. This key discrepancy between the characteristics of MX1- and MX2-mediated viral resistance, together with previous observations showing that the L4 loop of the stalk domain of MX1 is a critical determinant of viral substrate specificity, presumably reflect fundamental differences in the mechanisms of antiviral suppression. Accordingly, we propose that further comparative studies of MX proteins will help illuminate the molecular basis and subcellular localization requirements for implementing the noted diversity of virus inhibition by MX proteins. Interferon (IFN) elicits an antiviral state in cells through the induction of hundreds of IFN

  18. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluating the predictability of the in vitro transfer model and in vivo rat studies as a surrogate to investigate the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of different Albendazole formulations for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Aaron; Holm, René; Kostewicz, Edmund S

    2017-07-15

    The present study investigated the ability of the in vitro transfer model and an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats to investigate the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of albendazole (ABZ) relative to data from a human intestinal aspiration study reported in the literature. Two lipid based formulation systems, a hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) solution and the addition of a crystallization inhibitor (HPMC-E5) on the behaviour of ABZ was investigated. These formulations were investigated to represent differences in their ability to facilitate supersaturation within the small intestine. Overall, both the in vitro transfer model and the in vivo rat study were able to rank order the formulations (as aqueous suspension±HPMChuman aspiration study. The results therefore demonstrated that both the in vivo rat model and the in vitro transfer model could reflect the performance of the ABZ formulations in the human study. Whilst the rat was able to provide information on the overall plasma exposure, through the use of the in vitro transfer model, a more mechanistic understanding of the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of ABZ using the different formulation strategies, could be attained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling heat transfer in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijns, A.J.H.; Leeuwen, van G.M.J.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature plays an important role in the functioning of biological systems. To predict tissue temperatures, the influence of blood flow must be accounted for. The collective effect of blood vessels in a tissue volume may be reasonably successfully described by a heatsink. This is for instance the

  1. Correction of acid beta-galactosidase deficiency in GM1 gangliosidosis human fibroblasts by retrovirus vector-mediated gene transfer: higher efficiency of release and cross-correction by the murine enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Esteves, M; Camp, S M; Alroy, J; Breakefield, X O; Kaye, E M

    2000-03-20

    Mutations in the lysosomal acid beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) underlie two different disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis, which involves the nervous system and visceral organs to varying extents, and Morquio's syndrome type B (Morquio B disease), which is a skeletal-connective tissue disease without any CNS symptoms. This article shows that transduction of human GM1 gangliosidosis fibroblasts with retrovirus vectors encoding the human acid beta-galactosidase cDNA leads to complete correction of the enzymatic deficiency. The newly synthesized enzyme is correctly processed and targeted to the lysosomes in transduced cells. Cross-correction experiments using retrovirus-modified cells as enzyme donors showed, however, that the human enzyme is transferred at low efficiencies. Experiments using a different retrovirus vector carrying the human cDNA confirmed this observation. Transduction of human GM1 fibroblasts and mouse NIH 3T3 cells with a retrovirus vector encoding the mouse beta-galactosidase cDNA resulted in high levels of enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the mouse enzyme was found to be transferred to human cells at high efficiency. Enzyme activity measurements in medium conditioned by genetically modified cells suggest that the human beta-galactosidase enzyme is less efficiently released to the extracellular space than its mouse counterpart. This study suggests that lysosomal enzymes, contrary to the generalized perception in the field of gene therapy, may differ significantly in their properties and provides insights for design of future gene therapy interventions in acid beta-galactosidase deficiency.

  2. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  3. Biophysical analysis of the dose-dependent overdispersion and the restricted linear energy transfer dependence expressed in dicentric chromosome data from alpha-irradiated human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R; Harder, D

    1997-06-01

    Experimental data for the induction of dicentric chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human T lymphocytes by 241Am alpha-particles obtained by Schmid et al. have been analyzed in the light of biophysical theory. As usual in experiments with alpha-particles, the relative variance of the intercellular distribution of the number of aberrations per cell exceeds unity, and the multiplicity of the aberrations per particle traversal through the cell is understood as the basic effect causing this overdispersion. However, the clearly expressed dose dependence of the relative variance differs from the dose-independent relative variance predicted by the multiplicity effect alone. Since such dose dependence is often observed in experiments with alpha-particles, protons, and high-energy neutrons, the interpretation of the overdispersion needs to be supplemented. In a new, more general statistical model, the distribution function of the number of aberrations is interpreted as resulting from the convolution of a Poisson distribution for the spontaneous aberrations with the overdispersed distributions for the aberrations caused by intratrack or intertrack lesion interaction, and the fluctuation of the cross-sectional area of the cellular chromatin must also be considered. Using a suitable mathematical formulation of the resulting dose-dependent over-dispersion, the mean number lambda 1 of the aberrations produced by a single particle traversal through the cell nucleus and the mean number lambda 2 of the aberrations per pairwise approach between two alpha-particle tracks could be estimated. Coefficient alpha of the dose-proportional yield component, when compared between 241Am alpha-particle irradiation and 137Cs gamma-ray exposure, is found to increase approximately in proportion to dose-mean restricted linear energy transfer, which indicates an underlying pairwise molecular lesion interaction on the nanometer scale.

  4. Quantitative studies of transfer in vivo of low density, Sf 12-60, and Sf 60-400 lipoproteins between plasma and arterial intima in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.; Wootton, R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Baskerville, P.; Lumley, J.S.; La Ville, A.E.; Quiney, J.; Lewis, B.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the potential of various plasma lipoprotein classes to contribute to the lipid content of the arterial intima, influx and efflux of these plasma lipoprotein fractions into and from the intima of human carotid arteries were measured in vivo. While low density lipoprotein (LDL) is known to transfer from plasma into the arterial wall, there is less information on the atherogenic potential of lipoproteins of intermediate density (Sf 12-60) or of very low density (Sf 60-400). Aliquots of the same lipoprotein (LDL, Sf 12-60 lipoprotein particles, or Sf 60-400 lipoprotein particles) iodinated with iodine-125 and iodine-131 were injected intravenously 18-29 hours and 3-6 hours, respectively, before elective surgical removal of atheromatous arterial tissue, and the intimal clearance of lipoproteins, lipoprotein influx, and fractional loss of newly entered lipoproteins were calculated. Intimal clearance of Sf 60-400 particles was not detectable (less than 0.3 microliter x hr-1 x cm-2), whereas the average value for both LDL and Sf 12-60 lipoprotein particles was 0.9 microliter x hr-1 x cm-2. Since the fractional loss of newly entered LDL and Sf 12-60 lipoprotein particles was also similar, the results suggest similar modes of entry and exit for these two particles. However, due to lower plasma concentrations of Sf 12-60 lipoproteins as compared with LDL, the mass influx of cholesterol in the Sf 12-60 particles was on the order of one 10th of that in LDL, and that of apolipoprotein B was about one 20th

  5. Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) is a mechanism with which EPA can patent its inventions and license them to companies, through which innovative technologies can enter the marketplace to improve the environment and human health.

  6. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  7. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  8. Modelling Radiation Exposure and Radionuclide Transfer for Non-human Species. Report of the Biota Working Group of EMRAS Theme 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    Internationally, the ICRP, IAEA and European Commission (EC) are addressing environmental protection as an element of their revision of Recommendations and Basic Safety Standards. Some countries already have requirements and guidelines for the protection of non-human biota. For instance, in England and Wales, the requirement to assess impacts affecting Natura 2000 sites has been interpreted to include ionising radiation. In the USA, biota protection guidelines and dose rates are contained in USDOE Orders 5400.5 and 450.1. In response to these developments, a number of models and approaches have been developed specifically to estimate the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiations. Some countries (e.g. Canada, Finland, England and Wales, and the USA) are now using these within their national regulatory frameworks for (existing and proposed) nuclear and other sites that may release radioactivity to the environment. Software and/or documentation for some of these approaches are readily available and hence third parties are able to use them when conducting assessments. The Biota Working Group (BWG) of the IAEA Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety programme was formed in 2004 to address the relative lack of validation and intercomparison of the different models and approaches. The primary objective of the BWG, was: 'to improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides'. Group members included modellers, regulators, industry and researchers. In total, 15 models and approaches were applied to one or more of the four exercises conducted by the BWG. The models/approaches applied encompass those being developed, and in some instances, used in a regulatory context, in Belgium, Canada, France, Lithuania, Russia, the UK and the USA

  9. Modelling Radiation Exposure and Radionuclide Transfer for Non-human Species. Report of the Biota Working Group of EMRAS Theme 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, the ICRP, IAEA and European Commission (EC) are addressing environmental protection as an element of their revision of Recommendations and Basic Safety Standards. Some countries already have requirements and guidelines for the protection of non-human biota. For instance, in England and Wales, the requirement to assess impacts affecting Natura 2000 sites has been interpreted to include ionising radiation. In the USA, biota protection guidelines and dose rates are contained in USDOE Orders 5400.5 and 450.1. In response to these developments, a number of models and approaches have been developed specifically to estimate the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiations. Some countries (e.g. Canada, Finland, England and Wales, and the USA) are now using these within their national regulatory frameworks for (existing and proposed) nuclear and other sites that may release radioactivity to the environment. Software and/or documentation for some of these approaches are readily available and hence third parties are able to use them when conducting assessments. The Biota Working Group (BWG) of the IAEA Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety programme was formed in 2004 to address the relative lack of validation and intercomparison of the different models and approaches. The primary objective of the BWG, was: 'to improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides'. Group members included modellers, regulators, industry and researchers. In total, 15 models and approaches were applied to one or more of the four exercises conducted by the BWG. The models/approaches applied encompass those being developed, and in some instances, used in a regulatory context, in Belgium, Canada, France, Lithuania, Russia, the UK and the USA

  10. HRM Practices and MNC knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana

    2004-01-01

    and support organizational learning environment, is positively related to the degree ofknowledge transfer to the subsidiary. Moreover, the higher degree of knowledge transfer isexpected when human resource management practices are applied as an integrated system ofinterdependent practices. Hypotheses derived......The purpose of the paper is to determine and empirically examine the effect of human resourcemanagement practices on knowledge transfer within multinational corporations. It is suggested thatthe employment of human resource practices, which affect absorptive capacity of knowledgereceivers...

  11. ABCG2/BCRP decreases the transfer of a food-born chemical carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in perfused term human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllynen, Paeivi; Kummu, Maria; Kangas, Tiina; Ilves, Mika; Immonen, Elina; Rysae, Jaana; Pirilae, Rauna; Lastumaeki, Anni; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in fetal exposure to carcinogens using 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) a known substrate for ABC transporters as a model compound. In perfusion of human term placenta, transfer of 14 C-PhIP (2 μM) through the placenta resulted in fetal-to-maternal concentration ratio (FM ratio) of 0.72 ± 0.09 at 6 h. The specific ABCG2 inhibitor KO143 increased the transfer of 14 C-PhIP from maternal to fetal circulation (FM ratio 0.90 ± 0.08 at 6 h, p 14 C-PhIP (R = - 0.81, p 14 C-PhIP in perfused human placenta. Also, PhIP may modify ABC transporter expression in choriocarinoma cells

  12. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the human embryo: can empiric application of microarray comparative genomic hybridization reduce multiple gestation rate by single fresh blastocyst transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Eric Scott; Yang, Zhihong; Walsh, David J; Salem, Shala A

    2012-09-01

    The unacceptable multiple gestation rate currently associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) would be substantially alleviated if the routine practice of transferring more than one embryo were reconsidered. While transferring a single embryo is an effective method to reduce the clinical problem of multiple gestation, rigid adherence to this approach has been criticized for negatively impacting clinical pregnancy success in IVF. In general, single embryo transfer is viewed cautiously by IVF patients although greater acceptance would result from a more effective embryo selection method. Selection of one embryo for fresh transfer on the basis of chromosomal normalcy should achieve the dual objective of maintaining satisfactory clinical pregnancy rates and minimizing the multiple gestation problem, because embryo aneuploidy is a major contributing factor in implantation failure and miscarriage in IVF. The initial techniques for preimplantation genetic screening unfortunately lacked sufficient sensitivity and did not yield the expected results in IVF. However, newer molecular genetic methods could be incorporated with standard IVF to bring the goal of single embryo transfer within reach. Aiming to make multiple embryo transfers obsolete and unnecessary, and recognizing that array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) will typically require an additional 12 h of laboratory time to complete, we propose adopting aCGH for mainstream use in clinical IVF practice. As aCGH technology continues to develop and becomes increasingly available at lower cost, it may soon be considered unusual for IVF laboratories to select a single embryo for fresh transfer without regard to its chromosomal competency. In this report, we provide a rationale supporting aCGH as the preferred methodology to provide a comprehensive genetic assessment of the single embryo before fresh transfer in IVF. The logistics and cost of integrating aCGH with IVF to enable fresh embryo transfer are also

  13. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  14. Selective binding of pyrene in subdomain IB of human serum albumin: Combining energy transfer spectroscopy and molecular modelling to understand protein binding flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Irene; Taha, Mohamed; Al-Sharji, Nada A.; Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to bind medium-sized hydrophobic molecules is important for the distribution, metabolism, and efficacy of many drugs. Herein, the interaction between pyrene, a hydrophobic fluorescent probe, and HSA was thoroughly investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A slight quenching of the fluorescence signal from Trp214 (the sole tryptophan residue in the protein) in the presence of pyrene was used to determine the ligand binding site in the protein, using Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. The estimated FRET apparent distance between pyrene and Trp214 was 27 Å, which was closely reproduced by the docking analysis (29 Å) and MD simulation (32 Å). The highest affinity site for pyrene was found to be in subdomain IB from the docking results. The calculated equilibrium structure of the complex using MD simulation shows that the ligand is largely stabilized by hydrophobic interaction with Phe165, Phe127, and the nonpolar moieties of Tyr138 and Tyr161. The fluorescence vibronic peak ratio I1/I3 of bound pyrene inside HSA indicates the presence of polar effect in the local environment of pyrene which is less than that of free pyrene in buffer. This was clarified by the MD simulation results in which an average of 5.7 water molecules were found within 0.5 nm of pyrene in the binding site. Comparing the fluorescence signals and lifetimes of pyrene inside HSA to that free in buffer, the high tendency of pyrene to form dimer was almost completely suppressed inside HSA, indicating a high selectivity of the binding pocket toward pyrene monomer. The current results emphasize the ability of HSA, as a major carrier of several drugs and ligands in blood, to bind hydrophobic molecules in cavities other than subdomain IIA which is known to bind most hydrophobic drugs. This ability stems from the nature of the amino acids forming the binding

  15. Transfer of C-terminal residues of human apolipoprotein A-I to insect apolipophorin III creates a two-domain chimeric protein with enhanced lipid binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James V C; Ellena, Rachel A; Tran, Jesse J; Beck, Wendy H J; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Weers, Paul M M

    2017-08-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is an insect apolipoprotein (18kDa) that comprises a single five-helix bundle domain. In contrast, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a 28kDa two-domain protein: an α-helical N-terminal domain (residues 1-189) and a less structured C-terminal domain (residues 190-243). To better understand the apolipoprotein domain organization, a novel chimeric protein was engineered by attaching residues 179 to 243 of apoA-I to the C-terminal end of apoLp-III. The apoLp-III/apoA-I chimera was successfully expressed and purified in E. coli. Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I within the chimera. While parent apoLp-III did not self-associate, the chimera formed oligomers similar to apoA-I. The chimera displayed a lower α-helical content, but the stability remained similar compared to apoLp-III, consistent with the addition of a less structured domain. The chimera was able to solubilize phospholipid vesicles at a significantly higher rate compared to apoLp-III, approaching that of apoA-I. The chimera was more effective in protecting phospholipase C-treated low density lipoprotein from aggregation compared to apoLp-III. In addition, binding interaction of the chimera with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles and lipopolysaccharides was considerably improved compared to apoLp-III. Thus, addition of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I to apoLp-III created a two-domain protein, with self-association, lipid and lipopolysaccharide binding properties similar to apoA-I. The apoA-I like behavior of the chimera indicate that these properties are independent from residues residing in the N-terminal domain of apoA-I, and that they can be transferred from apoA-I to apoLp-III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. T1 relaxation time constants, influence of oxygen, and the oxygen transfer function of the human lung at 1.5 T—A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Olaf, E-mail: od@dtrx.net [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Gaass, Thomas [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Comprehensive Pneumology Center, German Center for Lung Research, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To pool and summarize published data from magnetic resonance longitudinal relaxation measurements of the human lung at 1.5 T to provide a reliable basis of T{sub 1} relaxation time constants of healthy lung tissue both under respiration of room air and of pure oxygen. In particular, the oxygen-induced shortening of T{sub 1} was evaluated. Materials and methods: The PubMed database was comprehensively searched up to June 2016 for original publications in English containing quantitative T{sub 1} data (at least mean values and standard deviations) of the lung parenchyma of healthy subjects (minimum subject number: 3) at 1.5 T. From all included publications, T{sub 1} values of the lung of healthy subjects were extracted (inhaling room air and, if available, inhaling pure oxygen). Weighted mean values and standard deviations of all extracted data and the oxygen transfer function (OTF) were calculated. Results: 22 publications were included with a total number of 188 examined healthy subjects. 103 of these subjects (from 13 studies) were examined while breathing pure oxygen and room air; 85 subjects were examined only under room-air conditions. The weighted mean value (weighted sample standard deviation) of the room-air T{sub 1} values over all 22 studies was 1196 ms (152 ms). Based on studies with room-air and oxygen results, the mean T{sub 1} value at room-air conditions was 1172 ms (161 ms); breathing pure oxygen, the mean T{sub 1} value was reduced to 1054 ms (138 ms). This corresponds to a mean T{sub 1} reduction by 118 ms (35 ms) or 10.0 % (2.3 %) and to a mean OTF value of 1.22 (0.32) × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}/(%O{sub 2}). Conclusion: This meta-analysis with data from 188 subjects indicates that the average T{sub 1} relaxation time constant of healthy lung tissue at 1.5 T is distributed around 1200 ms with a standard deviation of about 150 ms; breathing pure oxygen reduces this value significantly by 10 % to about 1050 ms.

  17. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Recombinant Human β-Defensin-3 Secreted in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Produced by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90–111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5–10.5, 21.8–23.0 and 17.3–18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×103 and 95.4×103 CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×105 and 622.2×105 cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals. PMID:23799010

  18. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper emphasizes in the specific areas of design, engineering and component production. This paper presents what Framatome has to offer in these areas and its export oriented philosophy. Then, a typical example of this technology transfer philosophy is the collaboration with the South Korean firm, Korea Heavy Industries Corporation (KHIC) for the supply of KNU 9 and KNU 10 power stations

  19. ATTACHMENT AND TRANSFER

    OpenAIRE

    Pasare, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Bowlby's concept of attachment and Freud's concept of transference are two of the most influential theories of how we construct mental representations of human relationships. The attachment’s theory offers one more strategy for the therapeutic approach. Factors that lead to a secure attachment between mother and child may also be applied to the relationship between patient and psychotherapist. Psychotherapy may help a patient create himself new attachment and relationship patterns. Creating a...

  20. Transfer of Sr-90 in the environment to human bone, and radiation dose due to the atomic bomb and weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Shiraishi, K.; Igarashi, Y.; Sakurai, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The major source of artificial radioactivities in Japan has been the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Some results obtained for activities of Sr-90 in bone, particulary in Japanese, are mentioned, including trends in levels, distribution in bone, transfer from diet to bone and absorbed doses. Some litterature data on pathways of Sr-90 from environment to man are referred to, that is on contribution of different foods to the ingestion intake and transfer of Sr-90 from soil to crops. Recent topics of radioecological studies on soil-plant relationships are shortly introduced

  1. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  2. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrated by the example of the FRG's nuclear energy exports, it is shown that the nuclear technology transfer leads to new dimensions of intergovernmental relations, which hold within themselves on account of multiple state-to-state, scientific, industrial and - last but not least - personal contacts the chance of far-reaching friendships between countries and people. If the chance is taken, this can also be seen as an important contribution towards maintaining the peace. (orig.) [de

  3. Transfer Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The technique described here, transfer zymography, was developed to overcome two limitations of conventional zymography. When proteolytic enzymes are resolved by nonreducing SDS-PAGE into a polyacrylamide gel with copolymerized protein substrate, the presence of the protein substrate can result in anomalous, often slower, migration of the protease and an estimated mass higher than its actual mass. A further drawback is that the presence of a high background of substrate protein interferes with proteomic analysis of the protease band by excision, tryptic digestion, and LC-MS/MS analysis. In transfer zymography, the proteolytic enzymes are resolved by conventional nonreducing SDS-PAGE, without protein substrate in the gel. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel that contains the protein substrate, by a process similar to western blotting. The receiving gel is then processed in a manner similar to conventional zymography. SDS is removed by Triton X-100 and incubated in conditions suitable for the proteolytic activity. After protein staining, followed by destaining, bands representing regions with active protease are visualized as clear bands in a darkly stained background. For proteomic analysis, electrophoresis is carried out simultaneously on a second resolving gel, and the bands corresponding to the clear regions in the receiving gel after zymogram development are excised for proteomic analysis.

  4. Cash transfers and domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidrobo, Melissa; Fernald, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Violence against women is a major health and human rights problem yet there is little rigorous evidence as to how to reduce it. We take advantage of the randomized roll-out of Ecuador's cash transfer program to mothers to investigate how an exogenous increase in a woman's income affects domestic violence. We find that the effect of a cash transfer depends on a woman's education and on her education relative to her partner's. Our results show that for women with greater than primary school education a cash transfer significantly decreases psychological violence from her partner. For women with primary school education or less, however, the effect of a cash transfer depends on her education relative to her partner's. Specifically, the cash transfer significantly increases emotional violence in households where the woman's education is equal to or more than her partner's. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Science transfer for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1985-01-01

    Despite the recent realisation that science and technology are the sustenance and major hope for economic betterment, the third world, barring a few countries like Argentina, Brazil, China and India, has taken to science - as distinct from technology - as only a marginal activity. This is also true of the aid - giving agencies of the richer countries, of the agencies of the UN and also unfortunately of the scientific communities of the developed countries which might naturally be expected to be the Third World's foremost allies. Policy makers, prestigious commissions (like the Brandt Commission) as well as aid-givers, speak uniformly of problems of technology transfer to the developing countries as if that is all that is involved. Very few within the developing world appear to stress that for long term effectiveness, technology transfers must always be accompanied by science transfers; that the science of today is the technology of tomorrow. Science transfer is effected by and to communities of scientists. Such communities (in developing countries) need building up to a critical size in their human resources and infrastructure. This building up calls for wise science policies, with long term commitment, generous patronage, self governance and free international contacts. Further, in our countries, the high level scientist must be allowed to play a role in nation building as an equal partner to the professional planner, the economist and the technologist. Few developing countries have promulgated such policies: few aid agencies have taken it as their mandate to encourage and help build up the scientific infrastructure. (author)

  6. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    to specific logics of temporalisation and spatial expansion of a diverse set of social processes in relation to, for example, the economy, politics, science and the mass media. On this background, the paper will more concretely develop a conceptual framework for classifying different contextual orders...... that the essential functional and normative purpose of regulatory governance is to facilitate, stabilise and justify the transfer of condensed social components (such as economic capital and products, political decisions, legal judgements, religious beliefs and scientific knowledge) from one social contexts...

  7. A polymorphic variant in the human electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-chain (alpha-T171) displays decreased thermal stability and is overrepresented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient patients with mild childhood presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Pedersen, P; Nyholm, M

    1999-01-01

    The consequences of two amino acid polymorphisms of human electron transfer flavoprotein (alpha-T/I171 in the alpha-subunit and beta-M/T154 in the beta-subunit) on the thermal stability of the enzyme are described. The alpha-T171 variant displayed a significantly decreased thermal stability, wher....... This is compatible with a negative modulating effect of the less-stable alpha-T171 ETF variant in this group of VLCAD patients that harbor missense mutations in at least one allele and therefore potentially display residual levels of VLCAD enzyme activity. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Jun...

  8. Targeting human c-Myc promoter duplex DNA with actinomycin D by use of multi-way analysis of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Actinomycin D (Act D), an oncogenic c-Myc promoter binder, interferes with the action of RNA polymerase. There is great demand for high-throughput technology able to monitor the activity of DNA-binding drugs. To this end, binding of 7-aminoactinomycin D (7AAD) to the duplex c-Myc promoter...... pairs resulted in efficient energy transfer from drug to QD via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Multi-way analysis of the three-way data array obtained from titration experiments was performed by use of restricted Tucker3 and hard trilinear decomposition (HTD). These techniques enable...... the important advantage over univariate classical methods of enabling us to investigate the source of variance in the fluorescence signal of the DNA-drug complex. It was established that hard trilinear decomposition analysis of FRET-measured data overcomes the problem of rank deficiency, enabling calculation...

  9. Super-quenched Molecular Probe Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission and Photoinduced Electron Transfer Mechanisms for Formaldehyde Detection in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haitao; Wang, Fujia; Zheng, Jilin; Lin, Hao; Liu, Bin; Tang, Yi-Da; Zhang, Chong-Jing

    2018-06-04

    Energy transfer between fluorescent dyes and quenchers is widely used in the design of light-up probes. Although dual quenchers are more effective in offering lower background signals and higher turn-on ratios than one quencher, such probes are less explored in practice as they require both quenchers to be within the proximity of the fluorescent core. In this contribution, we utilized intramolecular motion and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) as quenching mechanisms to build super-quenched light-up probes based on fluorogens with aggregation-induced emission. The optimized light-up probe possesses negligible background and is able to detect not only free formaldehyde (FA) but also polymeric FA, with an unprecedented turn-on ratio of >4900. We envision that this novel dual quenching strategy will help to develop various light-up probes for analyte sensing. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effects of human management on black carbon sorption/desorption during a water transfer project: Recognizing impacts and identifying mitigation possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong; Zhang, Jinliang; Wang, Peichao; Hu, Ronggui; Song, Yantun; Wu, Yupeng; Qiu, Guohong

    2018-05-15

    Water resources management is an important public concern. In this study, we examined the extent of sorption/desorption of trace pollutants to soil black carbon (BC) in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the middle route of the South to North Water Transfer Project in China. In addition, we investigated the main management measures affecting these processes during the project. The results showed that the pseudo second-order model adequately describes the sorption/desorption of phenanthrene on the soil BC in the WLFZ. Water level fluctuation may indirectly influenced BC sorption/desorption by altering water chemistry. Water level residence time had negative effects on BC sorption in short-term experiments (days to months), but the impact gradually diminished with increased residence time. The results suggested that long-term field monitoring of water chemistry is urgent. During the initial period of water transfer, delaying the water supplies as drinking water source or directly irrigating crops could mitigate the adverse impacts. Future research should focus on the water-soluble products of BC degradation. The findings of this study should be useful in improving sustainable management of water resources for water transfer projects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Oversight framework over oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer: comparative analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk case under South Korean bioethics law and U.S. guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang's potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices while the Guidelines recommend politically-independent, decentralized oversight bodies including a special review body for human embryonic stem cell research at an institutional level and that the Guidelines would have provided more vigorous protection for the women who had undergone oocyte procurement for Hwang's research than the Act. We also suggest additional regulations to protect those who provide oocytes for research in South Korea.

  13. Does confirmed pathogen transfer between sanctuary workers and great apes mean that reintroduction should not occur? Commentary on "Drug-resistant human Staphylococcus aureus findings in sanctuary apes and its threat to wild ape populations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Steve; Robinson, Ian; Schmidt, Vanessa; Colin, Chris; Ford, Lisa; Humle, Tatyana

    2012-12-01

    This commentary discusses the findings and conclusions of the paper "Drug resistant human Staphylococcus aureus findings in sanctuary apes and its threat to wild ape populations." This paper confirms the zoonotic transfer of Staphylococcus aureus in a sanctuary setting. The assertion that this in itself is enough to reconsider the conservation potential of ape reintroduction provides an opportunity to discuss risk analysis of pathogen transmission, following IUCN guidelines, using S. aureus as an example. It is concluded that ape reintroduction projects must have disease risk mitigation strategies that include effective biosecurity protocols and pathogen surveillance. These strategies will assist with creating a well planned and executed reintroduction. This provides one way to enforce habitat protection, to minimise human encroachment and the risks from the illegal wildlife trade. Thus reintroduction must remain a useful tool in the conservation toolbox. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2018-01-01

    Departing from the paradox that globalisation has implied an increase, rather than a decrease, in contextual diversity, this paper re-assesses the function, normative purpose and location of Regulatory Governance Frameworks in world society. Drawing on insights from sociology of law and world...... society studies, the argument advanced is that Regulatory Governance Frameworks are oriented towards facilitating transfers of condensed social components, such as economic capital and products, legal acts, political decisions and scientific knowledge, from one legally-constituted normative order, i.......e. contextual setting, to another. Against this background, it is suggested that Regulatory Governance Frameworks can be understood as schemes which act as ‘rites of passage’ aimed at providing legal stabilisation to social processes characterised by liminality, i.e ambiguity, hybridity and in-betweenness....

  15. ABCG2/BCRP decreases the transfer of a food-born chemical carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in perfused term human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllynen, Päivi; Kummu, Maria; Kangas, Tiina; Ilves, Mika; Immonen, Elina; Rysä, Jaana; Pirilä, Rauna; Lastumäki, Anni; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H

    2008-10-15

    We have studied the role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in fetal exposure to carcinogens using 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) a known substrate for ABC transporters as a model compound. In perfusion of human term placenta, transfer of (14)C-PhIP (2 microM) through the placenta resulted in fetal-to-maternal concentration ratio (FM ratio) of 0.72+/-0.09 at 6 h. The specific ABCG2 inhibitor KO143 increased the transfer of (14)C-PhIP from maternal to fetal circulation (FM ratio 0.90+/-0.08 at 6 h, p<0.05) while the ABCC1/ABCC2 inhibitor probenecid had no effect (FM ratio at 6 h 0.75+/-0.10, p=0.84). There was a negative correlation between the expression of ABCG2 protein in perfused tissue and the FM ratio of (14)C-PhIP (R=-0.81, p<0.01) at the end of the perfusion. The expression of ABCC2 protein did not correlate with FM ratio of PhIP (R: -0.11, p=0.76). In addition, PhIP induced the expression of ABC transporters in BeWo cells at mRNA level. In conclusion, our data indicates that ABCG2 decreases placental transfer of (14)C-PhIP in perfused human placenta. Also, PhIP may modify ABC transporter expression in choriocarcinoma cells.

  16. Efficient in vivo gene transfer to xenotransplanted human skin by lentivirus-mediated, but not by AAV-directed, gene delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria Vad; Askou, Anne Louise; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup

    skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue beneath or surrounding the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin...... graft only. The study demonstrates limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo....

  17. Antibodies to Placental Immunoregulatory Ferritin with Transfer of Polyclonal Lymphocytes Arrest MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Growth in a Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Halpern

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned human gene named “placental immunoregulatory ferritin” (PLIF is a pregnancyrelated immunomodulator. Recombinant PLIF and its bioactive domain C48 are immune-suppressive and induce pronounced IL-10 production by immune cells. PLIF is expressed in the placenta and breast cancer cells. Blocking PLIF in pregnant mice by anti-C48 antibodies inhibited placental and fetal growth and modulated the cytokine network. It has been revealed that anti-C48 treatment inhibited MCF-7 tumor growth in nude mice. However, this significant effect was observed only in those transfused with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blocking PLIF in tumor-engrafted human immune cell transfused mice resulted in massive infiltration of human CD45+ cells (mainly CD8+ T cells, both intratumorally and in the tumor periphery, and a significant number of caspase-3+ cells. In vitro, antiC48 treatment of MCF-7 tumor cells cocultured with human lymphocytes induced a significant increase in interferon-γ secretion. We conclude that blocking PLIF inhibits breast cancer growth, possibly by an effect on the cytokine network in immune cells and on breakdown of immunosuppression.

  18. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  19. Comparing humans and deep learning performance for grading AMD: A study in using universal deep features and transfer learning for automated AMD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlina, Philippe; Pacheco, Katia D; Joshi, Neil; Freund, David E; Bressler, Neil M

    2017-03-01

    When left untreated, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in people over fifty in the US. Currently it is estimated that about eight million US individuals have the intermediate stage of AMD that is often asymptomatic with regard to visual deficit. These individuals are at high risk for progressing to the advanced stage where the often treatable choroidal neovascular form of AMD can occur. Careful monitoring to detect the onset and prompt treatment of the neovascular form as well as dietary supplementation can reduce the risk of vision loss from AMD, therefore, preferred practice patterns recommend identifying individuals with the intermediate stage in a timely manner. Past automated retinal image analysis (ARIA) methods applied on fundus imagery have relied on engineered and hand-designed visual features. We instead detail the novel application of a machine learning approach using deep learning for the problem of ARIA and AMD analysis. We use transfer learning and universal features derived from deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN). We address clinically relevant 4-class, 3-class, and 2-class AMD severity classification problems. Using 5664 color fundus images from the NIH AREDS dataset and DCNN universal features, we obtain values for accuracy for the (4-, 3-, 2-) class classification problem of (79.4%, 81.5%, 93.4%) for machine vs. (75.8%, 85.0%, 95.2%) for physician grading. This study demonstrates the efficacy of machine grading based on deep universal features/transfer learning when applied to ARIA and is a promising step in providing a pre-screener to identify individuals with intermediate AMD and also as a tool that can facilitate identifying such individuals for clinical studies aimed at developing improved therapies. It also demonstrates comparable performance between computer and physician grading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfer of metals and metalloids from soil to shoots in wild rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) growing on a former lead smelter site: human exposure risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affholder, Marie-Cécile; Prudent, Pascale; Masotti, Véronique; Coulomb, Bruno; Rabier, Jacques; Nguyen-The, Bénédicte; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed at estimating exposition risks to wild rosemary used as herbs in the contaminated area of the former smelting factory of L'Escalette (South of Marseille, France). Metals and metalloids i.e. Pb, As, Sb, Zn, and Cu concentrations were analyzed in soils and in rosemary aerial parts (stems and leaves) on two sites: one heavily contaminated and the other far away from the pollution source, considered as reference. The metal and metalloid transfer into water during the brewing process of herbal tea was also determined. A mixed contamination by the above-cited contaminants was demonstrated in soils of the factory site, with average concentrations of 9253, 1127, 309, 2698 and 32 mg/kg for Pb, As, Sb, Zn and Cu, respectively. However, metals and metalloids' transfer in rosemary aerial parts was limited, as bioaccumulation factors were under 1. Thus, Pb, As and Cu concentrations in leaves were below international regulation limits concerning ingestion of medicinal herbs (no regulation values available for Sb and Zn). This study highlighted that, if contaminated rosemary leaves were ingested, health risks may be limited since acceptable daily intake (ADI) for Pb, As, Sb and Cu (no ADI value available for Zn) will only be reached if very high quantities are consumed. Furthermore, we aimed to establish if this mixed contamination could alter rosemary's essential oil quality, and thereby the compositions of essential oils obtained from individuals on the heavily contaminated soil were compared to those obtained from the reference population. An increased biosynthesis of antioxidant compounds was favored in essential oils from rosemary individuals growing in contaminated site. Although the health risk of a long-term exposition of low level of the mixed contamination by rosemary ingestion is not easy to elucidate, the use of rosemary essential oils from contaminated site appears as safe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heat transfer: Pittsburgh 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: Process Heat Transfer; Thermal Hydraulics and Phase Change Phenomena; Analysis of Multicomponent Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer in Advanced Reactors; General Heat Transfer in Solar Energy; Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; High Temperature Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer Aspects of Severe Reactor Accidents; Hazardous Waste On-Site Disposal; and General Papers

  2. Cultural Myths in Stories about Human Resource Development: Analysing the Cross-Cultural Transfer of American Models to Germany and the Cote d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carol D.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of reactions of 14 German and 20 Ivory Coast managers to informant stories from 14 U.S. human resource professionals revealed differences in work myths that reflected national differences, e.g., individual versus collective orientation, business development patterns, and management approaches. Awareness of the ethnocentrism of work myths…

  3. Accumulation of human EGF in nectar of transformed plants of Nicotiana langsdorffii × N. sanderae and transfer to honey by bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Kwakman, P.H.S.; Bleeker, W.K.; Keizer, L.C.P.; Bade, J.B.; Velde, te A.A.; Zaat, S.A.J.; Verbeek, M.; Creemers-Molenaar, J.

    2011-01-01

    Honey has been used successfully in wound healing for thousands of years. The peptide hormone human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is also known to have a beneficial effect in various wound healing processes via mechanisms that differ from those for honey. In this study, we show that hEGF can be

  4. Accumulation of human EGF in nectar of transformed plants of Nicotiana langsdorffii x N. sanderae and transfer to honey by bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsper, J. P. F. G.; Ruyter-Spira, C. P.; Kwakman, P. H. S.; Bleeker, W. K.; Keizer, L. C. P.; Bade, J. B.; te Velde, A. A.; Zaat, S. A. J.; Verbeek, M.; Creemers-Molenaar, J.

    2011-01-01

    Honey has been used successfully in wound healing for thousands of years. The peptide hormone human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is also known to have a beneficial effect in various wound healing processes via mechanisms that differ from those for honey. In this study, we show that hEGF can be

  5. Placental transfer of selected radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegst, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews animal experiments carried out to determine the transfer of radiopharmaceuticals from mother to fetus. Animal data are compared to any human data available. The radiopharmaceuticals included in the discussion are Tc-99m pertechnetate, Tc-99m DTPA, Ga-67 citrate and Tl-201 chloride. (6 tab., 5 refs.)

  6. Quantitative assessment of human exposure to extended spectrum and AmpC β-lactamases bearing E. coli in lettuce attributable to irrigation water and subsequent horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njage, P M K; Buys, E M

    2017-01-02

    The contribution of the fresh produce production environment to human exposure with bacteria bearing extended spectrum β-lactamases and AmpC β-lactamases (ESBL/AmpC) has not been reported. High prevalence of ESBLs/AmpC bearing E. coli as well as a high gene transfer efficiency of lettuce and irrigation water E. coli isolates was previously reported. This stochastic modeling was aimed at quantitatively assessing human exposure to ESBL/AmpC bearing E. coli through lettuce attributable to irrigation water and subsequent horizontal gene transfer. Modular process risk approach was used for the quantitative exposure assessment and models were constructed in Ms. Excel spreadsheet with farm to consumption chain accounted for by primary production, processing, retail and consumer storage. Probability distributions were utilised to take into account the variability of the exposure estimates. Exposure resulting from ESBL/AmpC positive E. coli and gene transfer was taken into account. Monte Carlo simulation was carried out using @Risk software followed by sensitivity and scenario analysis to assess most effective single or combinations of mitigation strategies for the ESBL/AmpC positive E. coli events from farm to fork. Three percent of South African lettuce consumers are exposed to lettuce contaminated with about 10 6.4 ±10 6.7 (95% CI: 10 5.1 -10 7 ) cfu of ESBL/AmpC positive E. coli per serving. The contribution of originally positive isolates and conjugative genetic transfer was 10 6 ±10 6.7 (95% CI: 10 5 -10 7 ) and 10 5.2 ±10 5.6 (95% CI: 10 3.9 -10 5.8 ) cfu per serving respectively. Proportion of ESBL/AmpC positive E. coli (Spearman's correlation coefficient (ρ)=0.85), conjugative gene transfer (ρ=0.05-0.14), washing in chlorine water (ρ=0.18), further rinsing (ρ=0.15), and prevalence of E. coli in irrigation water (ρ=0.16) had highest influence on consumer exposure. The most effective single methods in reducing consumer exposure were reduction in irrigation

  7. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium. Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeaef, C.L.

    2000-05-01

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half time, T eff,eco of fallout radiocaesium, and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half times, T e of 137 Cs and 40 K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of 137 Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of 137 Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for 137 Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average 66±3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81±4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated. The 137 Cs from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s still gave a significant contribution to the total 137 Cs levels in man during the post-Chernobyl study period (1987-1994). About 10% of the peak post-Chernobyl concentration level of 137 Cs (3.5-4 Bq/kg) in 1987, was attributed to pre-Chernobyl 137 Cs. The effective ecological half-time for 137 Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8±0.2 y. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of 137 Cs from ground deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 0.4 Bq/kg/kBq/m 2 . These values may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the Lund reference group in the 1960s, and in time-integrated aggregate transfer factor of 4.4 Bq

  8. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium: Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in Southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaf, Christopher Leopold

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South-Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund (55.7°N, 13.2°E) between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half-time, Teff,eco, of fallout radiocaesium and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half-times, Ts, of 137Cs and 40K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of 137Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of 137Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for 137Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average (+/-1 WSE), 66 +/- 3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81 +/- 4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated in the group during the post-Chernobyl study period. The effective ecological half-time for 137Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8 +/- 0.2 y. The aggregate transfer of 137Cs from deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 1.7 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. These vales may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the reference group in the 1960s, and an aggregate transfer factor of 9.8 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. The average committed effective dose from ingested 137Cs Chernobyl fallout in the study group was estimated to be 0.02 mSv and from the nuclear weapons fallout to 0.20 mSv. The estimates of whole-body content of 137Cs in the Russian subjects obtained through

  9. Proteomic profiling of human embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles reveals a risk of transfer of proteins of bovine and mouse origin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíková, I.; Konečná, H.; Šedo, O.; Zdráhal, Z.; Řehulka, Pavel; Hříbková, H.; Řehulková, Helena; Hampl, Aleš; Chmelík, Josef; Dvořák, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2009), s. 330-340 ISSN 1465-3249 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501; CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : human embryonic stem cell * hESC * proteomic profiling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.204, year: 2009

  10. Comparison of Gene Expression Profiles in Human Germinal Vesicle Before and After Cytoplasmic Transfer From Mature Oocytes in Iranian Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sadat Hoseini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of cytoplasm transfer from mature oocytes to germinal vesicle(GVs on promoting the maturation of cytoplasm of GV at the mRNA level.Materials and methods: Sixty six in vitro fertilization (IVF operations between June 2012 and November 2013 were included in this study. Totally 120 GVs were obtained. Normal GVs were categorized into 3 groups (n = 40 randomly: the first comprised oocytes that did not receive the cytoplasm of mature oocytes; the second group comprised oocytes that did not receive the cytoplasm of mature oocytes but were incubated for 24 h; and the third group comprised oocytes that received 10-15% the cytoplasm of mature oocytes and were then incubated for 24 h. Each group was separately analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and the expression levels of selected genes were assessed.Results: The expression levels of genes involved in the cytoplasmic maturity, and energy-producing mitochondria were significantly higher in the pooled oocytes of 2nd control group than those of the 1st control and intervention groups (p < 0.001. The genes involved in the meiosis, spindle check point, DNA repairing and cell cycle checkpoint did not have any expression in the 1st and intervention groups; however, these genes were expressed in the 2nd group, significantly. In the 2nd group, the highest expression level was observed for genes involved in the DNA repairing and cell cycle checkpoint. In the intervention group, none of the genes were expressed except for energy-producing mitochondria gene; even in this case, the expression level of this gene in this group of oocytes was significantly lower than that in other groups (p < 0.001. After 24 h meiosis assumption was significantly higher in the third group than in the second group (95% vs. 68%, p < 0.001.Conclusion: The cytoplasm transfer technique is not effective in cytoplasmic maturity of the recipient GV oocytes. In contrast, 24-hr in

  11. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein from the drug resistant human bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 does not require cell-to-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-liang; Zheng, Yong-jun; Cheng, Xiao-zhi; Lv, Yi-song; Gao, Rui; Mao, Hou-ping; Chen, Qin

    2013-09-01

    The efflux activity of transmembrane P-glycoprotein prevents various therapeutic drugs from reaching lethal concentrations in cancer cells, resulting in multidrug resistance. We investigated whether drug resistant bladder cancer cells could transfer functional P-glycoprotein to sensitive parental cells. Drug sensitive BIU-87 bladder cancer cells were co-cultured for 48 hours with BIU-87/ADM, a doxorubicin resistant derivative of the same cell line, in a Transwell® system that prevented cell-to-cell contact. The presence of P-glycoprotein in recipient cell membranes was established using fluorescein isothiocyanate, laser scanning confocal microscopy and Western blot. P-glycoprotein mRNA levels were compared between cell types. Rhodamine 123 efflux assay was done to confirm that P-glycoprotein was biologically active. The amount of P-glycoprotein protein in BIU-87 cells co-cultured with BIU-87/ADM was significantly higher than in BIU-87 cells (0.44 vs 0.25) and BIU-87/H33342 cells (0.44 vs 0.26, each p transfer. P-glycoprotein mRNA expression was significantly higher in BIU-87/ADM cells than in co-cultured BIU-87 cells (1.28 vs 0.30), BIU-87/H33342 (0.28) and BIU-87 cells (0.25, each p <0.001), ruling out a genetic mechanism. After 30 minutes of efflux, rhodamine 123 fluorescence intensity was significantly lower in BIU-87/ADM cells (5.55 vs 51.45, p = 0.004) and co-cultured BIU-87 cells than in BIU-87 cells (14.22 vs 51.45, p <0.001), indicating that P-glycoprotein was functional. Bladder cancer cells can acquire functional P-glycoprotein through a nongenetic mechanism that does not require direct cell contact. This mechanism is consistent with a microparticle mediated process. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-10-07

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  13. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest

  14. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) as a probe for a non-essential cysteine residue at the medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase binding site of the human 'electron transferring flavoprotein' (ETF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A; Engel, P C

    1999-01-01

    Human 'electron transferring flavoprotein' (ETF) was inactivated by the thiol-specific reagent 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). The kinetic profile showed the reaction followed pseudo-first-order kinetics during the initial phase of inactivation. Monitoring the release of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate (TNB) showed that modification of 1 cysteine residue was responsible for the loss of activity. The inactivation of ETF by DTNB could be reversed upon incubation with thiol-containing reagents. The loss of activity was prevented by the inclusion of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and octanoyl-CoA. Cyanolysis of the DTNB modified-ETF with KCN led to the release of TNB accompanied presumably by the formation of the thio-cyano enzyme and with almost full recovery of activity. Conservation studies and the lack of 100% inactivation, however, suggested that this cysteine residue is not essential for the interaction with MCAD.

  15. Quantitative assessment of human exposure to extended spectrum and AmpC β-lactamases bearing E. coli in lettuce attributable to irrigation water and subsequent horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Buys, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    and irrigation water E. coli isolates was previously reported. This stochastic modeling was aimed at quantitatively assessing human exposure to ESBL/AmpC bearing E. coli through lettuce attributable to irrigation water and subsequent horizontal gene transfer. Modular process risk approach was used.......15), and prevalence of E. coli in irrigation water (ρ=0.16) had highest influence on consumer exposure. The most effective single methods in reducing consumer exposure were reduction in irrigation water microbial quality variation (87.4% reduction), storage period (49.9-87.4% reduction) and growth rate reduction...... irrigation water quality variation. The exposure levels may impose higher consumer risk than acceptable for irrigation water risk. E. coli contamination and growth related measures, as well as measures to reduce contamination with antimicrobial resistant E. coli from lettuce production environment...

  16. Modelling of the transfer of CS-137 from air to crops, milk, beef and human body following the Chernobyl accident, in a location in Central Bohemia. Test of the model PRYMA T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, E.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Suanez, A.; Robles, B. Simon, I.; Cancio, D.

    1994-01-01

    This work was made in the frame of the research programme on validation of models for the transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial, urban and aquatic environments. The acronym of this programme is VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) and is coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The scenario was named CB and was presented by the Multiple Pathway Working group. The scenario description was at the beginning a blind test, that is without knowing the location or the measured concentrations and doses. The input information included data of contamination in Cs-137 from the Chernobyl accident in Central Europe, in air and soils and more description of the scenario (data about crops, cattele, demography, human diet, etc.). The aim of the exercise was the contrast between model results and between observed data and model predictions. In this work the results obtained by the CIEMAT-IMA group of modelers are shown and discussed

  17. To transfer or not to transfer? Kinematics and laterality quotient predict interlimb transfer of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefumat, Hannah Z; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan; Buloup, Frank; Bringoux, Lionel; Bourdin, Christophe; Sarlegna, Fabrice R

    2015-11-01

    Humans can remarkably adapt their motor behavior to novel environmental conditions, yet it remains unclear which factors enable us to transfer what we have learned with one limb to the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that interlimb transfer of sensorimotor adaptation is determined by environmental conditions but also by individual characteristics. We specifically examined the adaptation of unconstrained reaching movements to a novel Coriolis, velocity-dependent force field. Right-handed subjects sat at the center of a rotating platform and performed forward reaching movements with the upper limb toward flashed visual targets in prerotation, per-rotation (i.e., adaptation), and postrotation tests. Here only the dominant arm was used during adaptation and interlimb transfer was assessed by comparing performance of the nondominant arm before and after dominant-arm adaptation. Vision and no-vision conditions did not significantly influence interlimb transfer of trajectory adaptation, which on average was significant but limited. We uncovered a substantial heterogeneity of interlimb transfer across subjects and found that interlimb transfer can be qualitatively and quantitatively predicted for each healthy young individual. A classifier showed that in our study, interlimb transfer could be predicted based on the subject's task performance, most notably motor variability during learning, and his or her laterality quotient. Positive correlations suggested that variability of motor performance and lateralization of arm movement control facilitate interlimb transfer. We further show that these individual characteristics can predict the presence and the magnitude of interlimb transfer of left-handers. Overall, this study suggests that individual characteristics shape the way the nervous system can generalize motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Transfer and Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Transfer involves disembodying knowledge and transferring it for use in different contexts. Vocational knowledge arises in communities of practice, and difficulties arise in transferring it from one distinct community, such as a workplace, to another, such as a classroom. (SK)

  19. International technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Won Gi

    1991-11-01

    This book introduces technology progress and economic growth, theoretical consideration of technology transfer, policy and mechanism on technology transfer of a developed country and a developing country, reality of international technology transfer technology transfer and industrial structure in Asia and the pacific region, technology transfer in Russia, China and Eastern Europe, cooperation of science and technology for development of Northeast Asia and strategy of technology transfer of Korea.

  20. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyantyn Zuzik

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  1. Expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, tryptophan aspartate-containing coat protein, leprae lipoarabinomannan, and phenolic glycolipid-1 on the failure of the phagolysosome process in macrophages of leprosy patients as a viability marker of Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakoeswa, Cita Rosita Sigit; Wahyuni, Ratna; Iswahyudi; Adriaty, Dinar; Yusuf, Irawan; Sutjipto; Agusni, Indropo; Izumi, Shinzo

    2016-06-01

    Phagolysosome process in macrophage of leprosy patients' is important in the early phase of eliminating Mycobacterium leprae invasion. This study was to clarify the involvement of Rab5, Rab7, and trytophan aspartate-containing coat protein (TACO) from host macrophage and leprae lipoarabinomannan (Lep-LAM) and phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) from M. leprae cell wall as the reflection of phagolysosome process in relation to 16 subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) M. leprae as a marker of viability of M. leprae. Using a cross sectional design study, skin biopsies were obtained from 47 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy at Dr Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. RNA isolation and complementary DNA synthesis were performed. Samples were divided into two groups: 16S rRNA M. leprae-positive and 16S rRNA M. leprae-negative. The expressions of Rab5, Rab7, TACO, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 were assessed with an immunohistochemistry technique. Using Mann-Whitney U analysis, a significant difference in the expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 was found (p.05). Spearman analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between the score of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 and the score of 16S rRNA M. leprae (pleprae infection, Rab5, Rab7, and Lep-LAM play important roles in the failure of phagolysosome process via a membrane trafficking pathway, while PGL-1 plays a role via blocking lysosomal activities. These inventions might be used for the development of an early diagnostic device in the future. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recombinant AAV-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections and Tet-On regulation for implanted human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zi-Bo, LI; Zhao-Jun, ZENG; Qian, CHEN; Sai-Qun, LUO; Wei-Xin, HU

    2006-01-01

    HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy has been extensively studied in tumors and relies largely on the gene expression of HSVtk. Most studies, however, have failed to demonstrate any significant benefit of a controlled gene expression strategy in cancer treatment. The Tet-On system is commonly used to regulate gene expression following Dox induction. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy under Tet-On regulation by means of adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2)-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections in mice bearing breast cancer tumors. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV) was constructed and transduced into MCF-7 cell line. GCV treatment to the rAAV infected MCF-7 cells was performed by MTT assay under the doxycycline (Dox) induction or without Dox induction at a vp (viral particle) number of ≥10 4 /cell. The virus was administered intratumorally to nude mice that had also received GCV intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were evaluated by measuring tumor regression and histological analysis. We have demonstrated that GCV treatment to the infected MCF-7 cells under the Dox induction was of more inhibited effects than those without Dox induction at ≥10 4 vp/cell. In ex vivo experiments, tumor growth of BALB/C nude mice breast cancer was retarded after rAAV-2/HSVtk/Tet-On was injected into the tumors under the Dox induction. Infiltrating cells were also observed in tumors after Dox induction followed by GCV treatment and cells were profoundly damaged. The expression of HSVtk gene in MCF-7 cells and BALB/C nude mice tumors was up-regulated by Tet-On under Dox induction with reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. The antitumor effect of rAAV-mediated HSVtk/GCV gene therapy under the Dox induction with direct intratumoral injections may be a useful treatment for breast cancer and other solid tumors

  3. Transfer across the human gut of environmental plutonium, americium, cobalt, caesium and technetium: studies with cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated lower values of the gut transfer factor ('f L values') for plutonium and americium in winkles (Littorina littorea) than adopted by ICRP. The present study was undertaken primarily to investigate whether this observation extends to other species. Samples of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from Ravenglass, Cumbria were eaten by volunteers who provided 24 samples of urine and faeces. Urine samples indicated f L values for cockles which were higher than for winkles; for plutonium these ranged overall up to 7x10 -4 with an arithmetic mean in the range (2-3)x10 -4 , and for americium up to 2.6x10 -4 with an arithmetic mean of 1.2x10 -4 . Limited data based on volunteers eating cockles from the Solway suggest that f L values for americium may be greater at distance from Sellafield. The measured values compare with 5x10 -4 used by the ICRP for environmental forms of both elements, which would appear to provide adequate protection when calculating doses from Cumbrian cockles. Data for other nuclides were obtained by analysing faecal samples from the volunteers who ate the Ravenglass cockles. Cobalt-60 showed an f L value in the region of 0.2, twice the value currently used by ICRP. For 137 Cs, variabilities were indicated in the range 0.08 to 0.43, within the ICRP value of f L =1.0. Technetium-99 gave f L values up to about 0.6, in reasonable conformity with the ICRP value of 0.5. (author)

  4. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo, E-mail: libochen888@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo Guoying [Xinyuan Institute of Medicine and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe [Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated {sup 125}I{sup -} up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T{sub 1/2eff} of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or {sup 131}I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%{+-}2.5%, 43.4%{+-}2.8% and 8.6%{+-}1.2% after exposure to {sup 131}I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  5. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Libo; Guo Guoying; Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe; Zhu Ruisen

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated 125 I - up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T 1/2eff of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or 131 I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%±2.5%, 43.4%±2.8% and 8.6%±1.2% after exposure to 131 I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  6. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium. Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L

    2000-05-01

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half time, T{sub eff,eco} of fallout radiocaesium, and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half times, T{sub e} of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of {sup 137}Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of {sup 137}Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for {sup 137}Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average 66{+-}3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81{+-}4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated. The {sup 137}Cs from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s still gave a significant contribution to the total {sup 137}Cs levels in man during the post-Chernobyl study period (1987-1994). About 10% of the peak post-Chernobyl concentration level of {sup 137}Cs (3.5-4 Bq/kg) in 1987, was attributed to pre-Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs. The effective ecological half-time for {sup 137}Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8{+-}0.2 y. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of {sup 137}Cs from ground deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 0.4 Bq/kg/kBq/m{sup 2}. These values may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the Lund reference group in

  7. Interferon-β lipofection II. Mechanisms involved in cell death and bystander effect induced by cationic lipid-mediated interferon-β gene transfer to human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, M S; Gil-Cardeza, M L; Glikin, G C; Finocchiaro, L M E

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the cytotoxic effects (apoptosis, necrosis and early senescence) of human interferon-β (hIFNβ) gene lipofection. The cytotoxicity of hIFNβ gene lipofection resulted equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) on human tumor cell lines derived from Ewing's sarcoma (EW7 and COH) and colon (HT-29) carcinomas. However, it was stronger than rhIFNβ on melanoma (M8) and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7). To reveal the mechanisms involved in these differences, we compared the effects of hIFNβ gene and rhIFNβ protein on EW7 and M8 (sensitive and resistant to rhIFNβ protein, respectively). Lipofection with hIFNβ gene caused a mitochondrial potential decrease simultaneous with an increase of oxidative stress in both cell lines. However, rhIFNβ protein displayed the same pattern of response only in EW7-sensitive cell line. The great bystander effect of the hIFNβ gene lipofection, involving the production of reactive oxygen species, would be among the main causes of its success. In EW7, this effect killed >60% of EW7 cell population, even though only 1% of cells were expressing the transgene. As hIFNβ gene was effective even in the rhIFNβ protein-resistant M8 cell line and in a way not limited by low lipofection efficiency, these results strongly support the clinical potential of this approach.

  8. Occult abnormal pregnancies after first post-embryo transfer serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin levels of 1.0-5.0 mIU/mL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Bat-Sheva L; Bartolucci, Alison; Sueldo, Carolina; Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; Nulsen, John C

    2016-04-01

    To assess the occult pregnancy rate after "negative" first post-embryo transfer (ET) serum β-hCG results. Two-part retrospective cohort study and nested case series. University-based fertility center. A total of 1,571 negative first post-ET serum β-hCG results were included in the study; 1,326 results (primary cohort, June 2009-December 2013) were initially reported as <5 mIU/mL and 245 results (secondary cohort, January 2014-March 2015) were reported as discrete values from 1.0 to 5.0 mIU/mL. None. Rates of occult pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, and complications after negative first post-ET serum β-hCG results. A total of 88.8% (1,178/1,326) of the negative first post-ET results reported as <5 were actually <1.0 mIU/mL. Occult pregnancy was incidentally identified in 1.2% (12/1,041) of subjects with follow-up. Six had ectopic pregnancies, and seven experienced serious complications; 11 (91.7%) of the 12 occult pregnancies had a first post-ET serum β-hCG level of 1.0-5.0 mIU/mL and 1 (8.3%) <1.0 mIU/mL. All pregnancies with serious complications had initial β-hCG levels of 1.0-5.0 mIU/mL. Of the 245 results reported as discreet values, occult pregnancies were diagnosed in 5.5% (9/163) of subjects with follow-up. One had an ectopic pregnancy, which was treated with methotrexate. There were no serious complications in the secondary cohort. The majority of negative first post-ET serum β-hCG levels are <1.0 mIU/mL. Results from 1.0 to 5.0 mIU/mL may fail to exclude abnormal pregnancy and are associated with poor outcomes compared with β-hCG levels <1.0 mIU/mL. Serial serum β-hCG may be warranted in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer γ-Radiation-Induced NFκB-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S.; Natarajan, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NFκB regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NFκB-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NFκB-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNFκB-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-IκBα-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NFκB activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NFκB. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NFκB becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the κB-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NFκB-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NFκB by the IκBα mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NFκB overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results

  10. Managerial technology transfer

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Organisations need to think globally, but act locally - with a full appreciation of the diversity of local cultures. Major global companies must recognise that policies need to be managed with the broad context of business strategy and integrated into the work culture with the support of all elements of human resources management. Most currently, companies are accommodating national cultural differences while preserving work culture principals that encourage people to effectively execute the company's strategic objectives. Even to the casual observer, it is apparent that culture- a society's programming of the mind- has both a pervasive and changing influence on each national business environment. Global managers must recognise the influence of culture and be prepared to either respond to it or change it. This book examines current research in the study of managerial technology transfer.

  11. Technology transfer 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  12. Sulfogalactosylglycerolipid is involved in human gamete interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerachatyanukul, W; Rattanachaiyanont, M; Carmona, E; Furimsky, A; Mai, A; Shoushtarian, A; Sirichotiyakul, S; Ballakier, H; Leader, A; Tanphaichitr, N

    2001-12-01

    Recent results from our laboratory have revealed the role of sulfogalactosylglycerolipid (SGG) in mouse sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding. In this report, we demonstrated the presence of SGG in Percoll-gradient centrifuged (PGC) human sperm by high performance thin layer chromatography with orcinol and Azure A staining, specific for glycolipids and sulfolipids, respectively. SGG in human PGC sperm was quantified by its affinity to Azure A to be 12-15 mol% of sperm lipids. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that SGG existed on both live and aldehyde fixed human sperm in the head region. Pretreatment of human PGC sperm with affinity purified antiSGG Fab markedly inhibited sperm binding to the ZP in a concentration dependent manner, without any changes in the spontaneous acrosome rate or sperm motility parameters. Fluorescently labeled SGG liposomes also bound uniformly to isolated human ZP, while fluorescently labeled galactosylglycerolipid (GG, SGG's parental lipid) or phosphatidylserine (PS, negatively charged like SGG) liposomes did not. All of these results suggested the role of human sperm SGG in ZP binding. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. E1(-)E4(+) adenoviral gene transfer vectors function as a "pro-life" signal to promote survival of primary human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, R; Rafii, S; Worgall, S; Brough, D E; Crystal, R G

    1999-05-01

    Although endothelial cells are quiescent and long-lived in vivo, when they are removed from blood vessels and cultured in vitro they die within days to weeks. In studies of the interaction of E1(-)E4(+) replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors and human endothelium, the cells remained quiescent and were viable for prolonged periods. Evaluation of these cultures showed that E1(-)E4(+) Ad vectors provide an "antiapoptotic" signal that, in association with an increase in the ratio of Bcl2 to Bax levels, induces the endothelial cells to enter a state of "suspended animation," remaining viable for at least 30 days, even in the absence of serum and growth factors. Although the mechanisms initiating these events are unclear, the antiapoptoic signal requires the presence of E4 genes in the vector genome, suggesting that one or more E4 open reading frames of subgroup C Ad initiate a "pro-life" program that modifies cultured endothelial cells to survive for prolonged periods.

  14. Characterization of recombinant human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidases produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Johana Espejo Mojica

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available β-hexosaminidases (Hex are dimeric enzymes involved in the lysosomal degradation of glycolipids and glycans. They are formed by α- and/or β-subunits encoded byHEXA and HEXB genes, respectively. Mutations in these genes lead to Tay Sachs or Sandhoff diseases, which are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of non-degraded glycolipids. Although tissue-derived Hex have been widely characterized, limited information is available for recombinant β-hexosaminidases. In this study, human lysosomal recombinant Hex (rhHex-A, rhHex-B, and rhHex-S were produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115. The highest specific enzyme activities were 13,124 for rhHexA; 12,779 for rhHex-B; and 14,606 U .mg-1 for rhHex-S. These results were 25- to 50-fold higher than those obtained from normal human leukocytes. Proteins were purified and characterized at different pH and temperature conditions. All proteins were stable at acidic pH, and at 4 °C and 37 °C. At 45 °C rhHex-S was completely inactivated, while rhHex-A and rhHex-B showed high stability. This study demonstrates P. pastoris GS115 potential for polymeric lysosomal enzyme production, and describes the characterization of recombinant β-hexosaminidases produced within the same host.

  15. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  16. Analysis of Heat Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book deals with analysis of heat transfer which includes nonlinear analysis examples, radiation heat transfer, analysis of heat transfer in ANSYS, verification of analysis result, analysis of heat transfer of transition with automatic time stepping and open control, analysis of heat transfer using arrangement of ANSYS, resistance of thermal contact, coupled field analysis such as of thermal-structural interaction, cases of coupled field analysis, and phase change.

  17. Radioactivity transfer to animal products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Information on the behaviour of strontium, caesium, ruthenium, plutonium and americium in a range of domestic animals is reviewed to form a basis for the specification of time-dependent mathematical models describing uptake, distribution and retention in various domestic animals. Transfer factors relating concentration in animal product to daily radioactivity intake are derived after 100 d continuous intake and at equilibrium. These transfer factors are compared with the available published literature and used as a basis for the derivation of feedingstuff conversion factors relating limiting concentrations in animal feedingstuffs to limiting concentrations in human foodstuffs for application to animals receiving commercial feedingstuffs after a nuclear accident. Recommended transfer factors for animal products in conditions of continuous discharge and models for application to field conditions after a nuclear accident are also presented. Transfer of caesium to animal products is more effective than that for the other elements considered here. Transfer to meat of lamb, fattening pig, and chickens is generally more effective than that for other animals and other products

  18. Soil Plant and plant mammal transfer factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs ACM; Vermeire TG

    1990-01-01

    In order to assess the lifetime hazard of ingestion exposure of man to new substances, the RIVM Assessment System for New Substances links environmental concentrations in water and soil to human exposure applying transfer factors. This report discusses indirect human exposure to new substances via

  19. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  20. Modelling of the transfer of Cs-137 from air to crops, milk, beef and human body following the Chernobyl accident in a location in Central Bohemia. Test of the model PRYMA T1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, E; Garcia-Olivares, A; Suanez, A; Robles, B; Simon, I; Cancio, D

    1994-07-01

    This work was made in the frame of the research programme on validation od models for the transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial, urban and aquatic environments. the acronym of this programme is VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) and is co-ordinated by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the european Communities (CEC). The scenario was named CB and Was presented by the Multiple Pathway Working group. the scenario description was at the beginning a blind test, that is without knowing the location or the measured concentrations and doses. the input information included data of contamination in Cs-137 from the Chernobyl accident in Central Europe, in air and soils and ore, description of the scenario (data about crops, cattle, demography, human diet, etc.). the aim of the exercise was the contrast between model results and between observed data and model predictions. In this work the results obtained by the CIEMAT-IMA group of modelers are shown and discussed. (Author) 24 refs.

  1. Effect of semen quality on human sex ratio in in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection: an analysis of 27,158 singleton infants born after fresh single-embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Mikiko; Jwa, Seung Chik; Kuwahara, Akira; Irahara, Minoru; Saito, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of semen quality on human sex ratio in in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Retrospective cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 27,158 singleton infants born between 2007 and 2012 after fresh single-embryo transfer. None. Proportion of male infants among liveborn infants. There were 14,996 infants born after IVF, 12,164 infants born after ICSI with ejaculated sperm, and 646 infants born after ICSI with nonejaculated sperm. The sex ratio of IVF was 53.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52.3-53.9); the sex ratio of ICSI with ejaculated and nonejaculated sperm demonstrated as statistically significant reduction (48.2%; 95% CI, 47.3-49.1 and 47.7%; 95% CI, 43.8-51.6, respectively). In IVF, lower sperm motility, including asthenozoospermia (sperm motility ratio compared with normal sperm (51.0%; 95% CI, 48.6-53.3 vs. 53.4%; 95% CI, 52.5-54.3). In ICSI with ejaculated sperm, there was no association between sperm motility and sex ratio. Sperm concentration was not associated with sex ratio in both IVF and ICSI. In IVF, lower sperm motility was associated with a statistically significant reduction in sex ratio; ICSI with either ejaculated or nonejaculated sperm was associated with a statistically significant reduction in sex ratio regardless of semen quality. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of the transfer of Cs-137 from air to crops, milk, beef and human body following the Chernobyl accident in a location in Central Bohemia. Test of the model PRYMA T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, E.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Suanez, A.; Robles, B.; Simon, I.; Cancio, D.

    1994-01-01

    This work was made in the frame of the research programme on validation od models for the transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial, urban and aquatic environments. the acronym of this programme is VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) and is co-ordinated by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the european Communities (CEC). The scenario was named CB and Was presented by the Multiple Pathway Working group. the scenario description was at the beginning a blind test, that is without knowing the location or the measured concentrations and doses. the input information included data of contamination in Cs-137 from the Chernobyl accident in Central Europe, in air and soils and ore, description of the scenario (data about crops, cattle, demography, human diet, etc.). the aim of the exercise was the contrast between model results and between observed data and model predictions. In this work the results obtained by the CIEMAT-IMA group of modelers are shown and discussed. (Author) 24 refs

  3. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  4. Human cloning. Fact or fiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushama, Mandy D.; Ahmed, Badreldeen I.

    2003-01-01

    Cloning is the production of one or more individual plants or animals that are genetically identical to other plant, animal or human. Scientists even demonstrated that they were able to clone frog tadpoles from frog embryonic cells using nuclear transfer.Many animals have been cloned from adult cells using nuclear transfer. Somatic cell nuclear transfer which refers to the transfer of the nucleous from a somatic cell to an egg cell. Article further deals with benefits and misuses of human cloning

  5. Martini Force Field Parameters for Glycolipids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lopéz, C. A.; Sovová, Žofie; van Eerden, F. J.; de Vries, H.; Marrink, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2013), s. 1694-1708 ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : molecular-dynamics simulations * coarse-grained model * phase-behavior * lipid-bilayer * ganglioside GM1 * domain formation * head groups * membrane * Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol * X-RAY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  6. Introduction to heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    SUNDÉN, B

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the basic mechanisms for transfer of heat, Introduction to Heat Transfer gives a deeper and more comprehensive view than existing titles on the subject. Derivation and presentation of analytical and empirical methods are provided for calculation of heat transfer rates and temperature fields as well as pressure drop. The book covers thermal conduction, forced and natural laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer, thermal radiation including participating media, condensation, evaporation and heat exchangers.

  7. Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Penadés, José R; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen with remarkable adaptive powers. Antibiotic-resistant clones rapidly emerge mainly by acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes from other S. aureus strains or even from other genera. Transfer is mediated by a diverse complement of mobile genetic...... of plasmids that can be transferred by conjugation and the efficiency with which transduction occurs. Here, we review the main routes of antibiotic resistance gene transfer in S. aureus in the context of its biology as a human commensal and a l