WorldWideScience

Sample records for human glucose sensor

  1. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  2. CALIBRATION OF A WEARABLE GLUCOSE SENSOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHMIDT, FJ; AALDERS, AL; SCHOONEN, AJM; DOORENBOS, H

    1992-01-01

    Calibration of glucose sensors proved difficult for electrodes with immobilized glucose-oxidase. The correlation between the sensitivity of the electrodes in vitro and in vivo appeared to be poor. We developed a new type of glucose sensor, based on a microdialysis system, in which an oxygen electrod

  3. Reusable glucose fiber sensor for measuring glucose concentration in serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Chih Hsu; Yi-Cheng Chen; Ju-Yi Lee; Chyan-Chyi Wu

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a glucose fiber sensor for measuring glucose concentration in serum. High resolution and rapid measurement are achieved through the integration of highly selective enzymes and heterodyne interferometry. The best resolution and response time obtained are 0.14mg/dL and 1.3 s, respectively. The stability of the sensor is also verified by investigating the initial phase variation. Experimental results show that the fiber sensor can be reused more than 10 times.%We demonstrate a glucose fiber sensor for measuring glucose concentration in serum.High resolution and rapid measurement are achieved through the integration of highly selective enzymes and heterodyne interferometry.The best resolution and response time obtained are 0.14 mg/dL and 1.3 s,respectively.The stability of the sensor is also verified by investigating the initial phase variation.Experimental results show that the fiber sensor can be reused more than 10 times.Fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention over the past two decades.Various kinds of fiber sensors have been proposed for measnring specific chemical concentrations[1-8].Most previously reported methods[1-5] involved measuring the variations in fluorescence intensity[2-4] or transmitted light[3,4].Hence,avoiding the inflnence of snrrounding light and the use of expensive photon detection equipment are important requirements.Furthermore,procedures for manufacturing optical biosensors are complicated[3] and qualitv is difficult to control[4]..

  4. Glucokinase, the pancreatic glucose sensor, is not the gut glucose sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, R; Tura, A; Clark, P M

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (GIP) are released from intestinal endocrine cells in response to luminal glucose. Glucokinase is present in these cells and has been proposed as a glucose sensor. The physiological...... role of glucokinase can be tested using individuals with heterozygous glucokinase gene (GCK) mutations. If glucokinase is the gut glucose sensor, GLP-1 and GIP secretion during a 75 g OGTT would be lower in GCK mutation carriers compared with controls. METHODS: We compared GLP-1 and GIP concentrations....../INTERPRETATION: Glucokinase, the major pancreatic glucose sensor, is not the main gut glucose sensor. By modelling OGTT data in GCK mutation carriers we were able to distinguish a specific beta cell glucose-sensing defect. Our data suggest a reduction in potentiation of insulin secretion by glucose that is independent...

  5. Recent developments in blood glucose sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, An-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ... the complications of the condition. This review article deals with current growth areas in the market for blood glucose sensors and possible future alternatives, which are generally considered to be the point sample test...

  6. Biostability of an implantable glucose sensor chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, M.; Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K. E.; Kulse, P.; Fursenko, O.; Katzer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Surface materials of an implantable microelectronic chip intended for medical applications were evaluated with respect to their long-term stability in bio-environments. The sensor chip shall apply in a glucose monitor by operating as a microviscosimeter according to the principle of affinity viscosimetry. A monolithic integration of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) into the sensor chip was successfully performed in a combined 0.25 μm CMOS/BiCMOS technology. In order to study material durability and biostability of the surfaces, sensor chips were exposed to various in vitro and in vivo tests. Corrosional damage of SiON, SiO2 and TiN surfaces was investigated by optical microscopy, ellipsometry and AFM. The results served for optimizing the Back-end-of-Line (BEoL) stack, from which the MEMS was prepared. Corrosion of metal lines could significantly be reduced by improving the topmost passivation layer. The experiments revealed no visible damage of the actuator or other functionally important MEMS elements. Sensor chips were also exposed to human body fluid for three month by implantation into the abdomen of a volunteer. Only small effects were observed for layer thickness and Ra roughness after explantation. In particular, TiN as used for the actuator beam showed no degradation by biocorrosion. The highest degradation rate of about 50 nm per month was revealed for the SiON passivation layer. These results suggest that the sensor chip may safely operate in subcutaneous tissue for a period of several months.

  7. Planar Amperometric Glucose Sensor Based on Glucose Oxidase Immobilized by Chitosan Film on Prussian Blue Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyou Chen

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A planar amperometric glucose microsensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized by chitosan film on Prussian Blue layer has been developed. The experimental results show that the optimum detection potential is 50 mV (versus Ag/AgCl and the optimum pH is 6.5. Under the selective conditions the sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity of 98 nA/M and a linear range of 0.1-6.0 mM. The apparent Michanelis-Menten constant of the sensor is 21 mM. The response time is less than 60 seconds. No apparent change in the response to glucose was observed during one month. Foremost, the interference of ascorbic and uric acids can be avoided due to selective permeability of chitosan film and electrocatalysis of PB layer to H2O2. The sensor has been applied to detect glucose in human blood serum.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy of glucose based on a silicon photonics evanescent sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present a silicon photonics evanescent sensor for glucose absorption spectroscopy. The important design aspects of this miniature sensor are discussed as well as the experimental challenges. We demonstrate detection of glucose down to 14 mmol/L, close to the physiological range of blood glucose in humans.

  9. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yinglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures.

  10. POF based glucose sensor incorporating grating wavelength filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Aasmul, Søren; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    AND RESEARCH IN POLYMER OPTICAL DEVICES; TRIPOD. Within the domain of TRIPOD, research is conducted on "Plastic Optical Fiber based Glucose Sensors Incorporating Grating Wavelength Filters". Research will be focused to optimized fiber tips for better coupling efficiency, reducing the response time of sensor......Medtronic has already developed a plastic fiber based optical sensor to detect the concentration of glucose both in vivo and in-vitro. The glucose sensor is based on a competitive glucose binding affinity assay consisting of a glucose receptor and glucose analog (ligand) contained in a compartment......, more donor acceptor pairs got separated resulting in high intensity and vice versa. This change in optical signal is correlated to glucose concentration. (Fig.1) Medtronic Diabetes and DTU FOTONIK has been working together under the consortium of Marie Curie Research Framework called TRAINING...

  11. Mouthguard biosensor with telemetry system for monitoring of saliva glucose: A novel cavitas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Takahiro; Kuroki, Yusuke; Nitta, Hiroki; Chouhan, Prem; Toma, Koji; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Sekita, Toshiaki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-15

    We develop detachable "Cavitas sensors" to apply to the human oral cavity for non-invasive monitoring of saliva glucose. A salivary biosensor incorporating Pt and Ag/AgCl electrodes on a mouthguard support with an enzyme membrane is developed and tested. Electrodes are formed on the polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) surface of the mouthguard. The Pt working electrode is coated with a glucose oxidase (GOD) membrane. The biosensor seamlessly is integrated with a glucose sensor and a wireless measurement system. When investigating in-vitro performance, the biosensor exhibits a robust relationship between output current and glucose concentration. In artificial saliva composed of salts and proteins, the glucose sensor is capable of highly sensitive detection over a range of 5-1000µmol/L of glucose, which encompasses the range of glucose concentrations found in human saliva. We demonstrate the ability of the sensor and wireless communication module to monitor saliva glucose in a phantom jaw imitating the structure of the human oral cavity. Stable and long-term real-time monitoring (exceeding 5h) with the telemetry system is achieved. The mouthguard biosensor will be useful as a novel method for real-time non-invasive saliva glucose monitoring for better management of dental patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microdialysis glucose sensor system compared with needle type glucose sensor in vivo during OGTT and physical exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon, B. U.; Wientjes, K. J. C.; Schoonen, A. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The 'subcutaneous glucose monitoring system' (SCGM) is based on microdialysis and allows continuous glucose monitoring in abdominal adipose tissue of diabetic patients up to 5 days. In the current in vivo study we compared the SCGM system with a commercially available needle type glucose sensor

  13. Novel glucose fiber sensor combining ThFBG with GOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Zhou, Ciming; Fan, Dian; Ou, Yiwen

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel glucose fiber optic sensor combining a thinned cladding fiber Bragg grating (ThFBG) with glucose oxidase (GOD). By immobilizing GOD on the surface of a ThFBG, the fabricated sensor can obtain a high specificity to glucose. Because of the evanescent field, the sensor is very sensitive to the ambient refractive index change arising from the catalytic reaction between glucose and GOD. A four-level fiber model was simulated and verified the precision of the sensing principle. Two methods, glutaraldehyde crosslinking method (GCM) and 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane covalent coupling method (ATCCM), were experimentally utilized to immobilize GOD. And sensor fabricated with the method ATCCM shows a measurement range of 0-0.82 mg/mL which is better than the sensor fabricated with the method GCM with measurement range of 0-0.67 mg/mL under the same condition. By using ATCCM to immobilize GOD with different concentrations, three sensors were fabricated and used for glucose measurement by monitoring the Bragg wavelength (λb) shifts, the results indicate a good linear relationship between wavelength shift and glucose concentration within a specific range, and the measurement range increases as GOD concentration increases. The highest sensitivity of sensor reaches up to 0.0549 nm/(mg.mL-1). The proposed sensor has distinct advantages in sensing structure, cost and specificity.

  14. First Clinical Evaluation of a New Long-Term Subconjunctival Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Achim Josef; Knuth, Monika; Nikolaus, Katharina Sibylle; Herbrechtsmeier, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the feasibility of an implantable subconjunctival glucose monitoring system (SGMS) for glucose monitoring in humans, we investigated the in vivo performance of the sensor in a clinical trial with five patients. Methods The new SGMS consists of an implantable ocular mini implant (OMI) and a hand-held fluorescence photometer. The implantable subconjunctival glucose sensor is composed of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system based on Concanavalin A chemistry, embedded in a nelfilcon polymer hydrogel disk. Blood glucose changes in humans were induced by oral glucose intake and insulin injections. Results The in vivo response of the new SGMS was tested in a first human clinical study with five diabetes patients. The OMI was well tolerated in the eyes of the patients. The SGMS exhibited high correlation coefficients (>0.88) with blood glucose changes and a good stability of the sensor response to glucose for the study period of 2 weeks. Lag times were in the range of 5–10 min. A total of 98% of all data pairs was in the clinical acceptable ranges A and B of the consensus error grid. Conclusions For the first time, the possibility to measure glucose in vivo in the subconjunctival interstitial fluid for a period of 2 weeks was demonstrated in a human clinical trial. PMID:22920814

  15. Electrocatalytic glucose sensor for long-term in vivo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, W; von Lucadou, I; Nischik, H; Nowak, T; Preidel, W; Ruprecht, L; Stanzel, M J; Tegeder, V

    1994-03-01

    A catheter shaped electrocatalytic glucose sensor for in vivo application has been developed to determine the glucose level in blood and control the insulin dosage in a closed loop system for diabetes therapy. The principle of measurement is based on the electrochemical oxidation of glucose at a membrane-covered platium electrode. For various potential steps, the impedance obtained at two different frequencies is a function of the glucose concentration. A series of implantations in the vena cava of sheep demonstrated the potential feasibility of the sensor. It was possible to determine the glucose concentration in sheep for more than 130 days with tolerable deviations from glucose reference measurements. The mean error was 2.5 mmol/l. The catheter was explanted after 211 days and histological examination revealed a good biocompatibility of all materials used.

  16. An Implantable RFID Sensor Tag toward Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhibin; Tan, Xi; Chen, Xianliang; Chen, Sizheng; Zhang, Zijian; Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Junyu; Huang, Yue; Zhang, Peng; Zheng, Lirong; Min, Hao

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a wirelessly powered implantable electrochemical sensor tag for continuous blood glucose monitoring. The system is remotely powered by a 13.56-MHz inductive link and utilizes an ISO 15693 radio frequency identification (RFID) standard for communication. This paper provides reliable and accurate measurement for changing glucose level. The sensor tag employs a long-term glucose sensor, a winding ferrite antenna, an RFID front-end, a potentiostat, a 10-bit sigma-delta analog to digital converter, an on-chip temperature sensor, and a digital baseband for protocol processing and control. A high-frequency external reader is used to power, command, and configure the sensor tag. The only off-chip support circuitry required is a tuned antenna and a glucose microsensor. The integrated chip fabricated in SMIC 0.13-μm CMOS process occupies an area of 1.2 mm ×2 mm and consumes 50 μW. The power sensitivity of the whole system is -4 dBm. The sensor tag achieves a measured glucose range of 0-30 mM with a sensitivity of 0.75 nA/mM.

  17. Novel fungal FAD glucose dehydrogenase derived from Aspergillus niger for glucose enzyme sensor strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Koji; Loew, Noya; Ohnishi, Yosuke; Tsuruta, Hayato; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; LaBelle, Jeffrey T; Klonoff, David C

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a novel fungus FAD dependent glucose dehydrogenase, derived from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH), was characterized. This enzyme's potential for the use as the enzyme for blood glucose monitor enzyme sensor strips was evaluated, especially by investigating the effect of the presence of xylose during glucose measurements. The substrate specificity of AnGDH towards glucose was investigated, and only xylose was found as a competing substrate. The specific catalytic efficiency for xylose compared to glucose was 1.8%. The specific activity of AnGDH for xylose at 5mM concentration compared to glucose was 3.5%. No other sugars were used as substrate by this enzyme. The superior substrate specificity of AnGDH was also demonstrated in the performance of enzyme sensor strips. The impact of spiking xylose in a sample with physiological glucose concentrations on the sensor signals was investigated, and it was found that enzyme sensor strips using AnGDH were not affected at all by 5mM (75mg/dL) xylose. This is the first report of an enzyme sensor strip using a fungus derived FADGDH, which did not show any positive bias at a therapeutic level xylose concentration on the signal for a glucose sample. This clearly indicates the superiority of AnGDH over other conventionally used fungi derived FADGDHs in the application for SMBG sensor strips. The negligible activity of AnGDH towards xylose was also explained on the basis of a 3D structural model, which was compared to the 3D structures of A. flavus derived FADGDH and of two glucose oxidases.

  18. Biochemical piezoresistive sensors based on pH- and glucose-sensitive hydrogels for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many conventional analysis techniques to detect chemical or biological species are able to achieve a high detection sensitivity, however, they are equipment- or time-expensive due to a multi-step procedure. In this work we describe sensor concepts using piezoresistive pressure sensor chips with integrated analyte-sensitive hydrogels, that enable inexpensive and robust biochemical sensors which are miniaturizable and in-line capable. Biocompatible hydrogels were developed and tested for pH- and glucose-monitoring during the chemical and biochemical processes. For that, monomer mixtures based on hydroxypropyl methacrylate HPMA, 2-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate DMAEMA, tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate TEGDMA and ethylene glycol EG were photo-polymerized. By means of carbodiimide chemistry, glucose oxidase was bound to the pH-sensitive HPMA/DMAEMA/TEGDMA/EG hydrogel squares causing the glucose-sensitivity. The crosslinked hydrogels were integrated in piezoresistive pressure sensors of different designs. pH- and glucose-depending reversible gel swelling processes were observed by means of the output voltage of dip sensors and of a novel implantable flexible sensor set-up. Due to its biocompatible components, the latter could be used inside the human body monitoring physiological blood values, for example glucose.

  19. CMOS image sensors as an efficient platform for glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2013-10-07

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have been used previously in the analysis of biological samples. In the present study, a CMOS image sensor was used to monitor the concentration of oxidized mouse plasma glucose (86-322 mg dL(-1)) based on photon count variation. Measurement of the concentration of oxidized glucose was dependent on changes in color intensity; color intensity increased with increasing glucose concentration. The high color density of glucose highly prevented photons from passing through the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip, which suggests that the photon count was altered by color intensity. Photons were detected by a photodiode in the CMOS image sensor and converted to digital numbers by an analog to digital converter (ADC). Additionally, UV-spectral analysis and time-dependent photon analysis proved the efficiency of the detection system. This simple, effective, and consistent method for glucose measurement shows that CMOS image sensors are efficient devices for monitoring glucose in point-of-care applications.

  20. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensors: Past, Present and Future Algorithmic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Facchinetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM sensors are portable devices that allow measuring and visualizing the glucose concentration in real time almost continuously for several days and are provided with hypo/hyperglycemic alerts and glucose trend information. CGM sensors have revolutionized Type 1 diabetes (T1D management, improving glucose control when used adjunctively to self-monitoring blood glucose systems. Furthermore, CGM devices have stimulated the development of applications that were impossible to create without a continuous-time glucose signal, e.g., real-time predictive alerts of hypo/hyperglycemic episodes based on the prediction of future glucose concentration, automatic basal insulin attenuation methods for hypoglycemia prevention, and the artificial pancreas. However, CGM sensors’ lack of accuracy and reliability limited their usability in the clinical practice, calling upon the academic community for the development of suitable signal processing methods to improve CGM performance. The aim of this paper is to review the past and present algorithmic challenges of CGM sensors, to show how they have been tackled by our research group, and to identify the possible future ones.

  1. Recent developments in nanostructure based electrochemical glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Shabi Abbas; Shin, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem causing 4 million deaths each year and 171 million people suffering worldwide. Although there is no cure for diabetes, nevertheless, the blood glucose level of diabetic patients should be monitored tightly to avoid further complications. Thus, monitoring of glucose in blood has become an inevitable need leading to fabrication of accurate and sensitive advanced blood sugar detection devices for clinical diagnosis and personal care. It led to the development of enzymatic glucose sensing approach. Later on, various types of nanostructures have been utilized owing to their high surface area, great stability, and cost effectiveness for the fabrication of enzymatic as well as for nonenzymatic glucose sensing approach. This work reviews on both categories, however it is not intended to discuss all the research reports published regarding nanostructure based enzymatic and nonenzymatic approaches between mid-2010 and mid-2015. We, do, however, focused to describe the details of many substantial articles explaining the design of sensors, and utilities of the prepared sensors, so that readers might get the principles behind such devices and relevant detection strategies. This work also focuses on biocompatibility and toxicity of nanomaterials as well as provides a critical opinion and discussions about misconceptions in glucose sensors.

  2. Glucose sensor excludes hypoglycaemia as cause of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The cause of death can be difficult to verify post-mortem in unexpected deaths in patients with Type 1 diabetes. This report describes an unexpected death in a 44-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes treated with sensor-augmented pump therapy. Continuous glucose monitoring data proved useful...

  3. Na+/D-glucose cotransporter based bilayer lipid membrane sensor for D-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugao, N; Sugawara, M; Minami, H; Uto, M; Umezawa, Y

    1993-02-15

    A new type of amperometric blosensor for glucose was fabricated using a Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as the signal-transducing sensory element that exploits the D-glucose-triggered Na+ ion current through bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The planar BLM was formed by the folding method across a small aperture of a thin Teflon film. The Na+/D-glucose cotransporter, isolated and purified from small intestinal brush border membrane of guinea pigs, was embedded into BLMs through proteoliposomes. The number of the protein molecules thus incorporated in the present sensing membrane was estimated to be ca. 10(7). The sensor response was measured as an ionic current through the BLM arising from cotransported Na+ ion flux under a constant applied potential and was only induced by D-glucose above 10(-9) M, but not by the other monosaccharides except for D-galactose. The effect of applied potentials, Na+ and K+ ion concentrations, and the addition of a competitive inhibitor, phlorizin, were scrutinized to characterize the sensor output. The results were briefly discussed in terms of the potential use of the Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as a sensory element for D-glucose.

  4. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor.

  5. Preparation of glucose sensors using gold nanoparticles modified diamond electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachrurrazie; Ivandini, T. A.; Wibowo, W.

    2017-04-01

    A glucose sensor was successfully developed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. Prior to GOx immobilization, the BDD was modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). To immobilize AuNPs, the gold surface was modified to nitrogen termination. The characterization of the electrode surface was performed using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope, while the electrochemical properties of the enzyme electrode were characterized using cyclic voltammetry. Cyclic voltammograms of the prepared electrode for D-glucose in phosphate buffer solution pH 7 showed a new reduction peak at +0.16 V. The currents of the peak were linear in the concentration range of 0.1 M to 0.9 M, indicated that the GOx-AuNP-BDD can be applied for electrochemical glucose detection.

  6. Glucose sensor using liquid-crystal droplets made by microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeon; Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-12-26

    Micrometer-sized, 4-cyno-4-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) droplets were developed for glucose detection in an aqueous medium by coating with poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4-oxyundecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP) at the 5CB/water interface and covalently immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) to the PAA chains. This functionalized liquid-crystal (LC) droplet detected glucose from a radial to bipolar configurational change by polarized optical microscopy under crossed polarizers at concentrations as low as 0.03 mM and response times of ~3 min and showed the selective detection of glucose against galactose. This new and sensitive LC-droplet-based glucose biosensor has the merits of low production cost and easy detection by the naked eye and might be useful for prescreening the glucose level in the human body.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A WEARABLE GLUCOSE SENSOR - STUDIES IN HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS AND IN DIABETIC-PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AALDERS, AL; SCHMIDT, FJ; SCHOONEN, AJM; BROEK, IR; MAESSEN, AGFM; DOORENBOS, H

    1991-01-01

    A glucose sensor with a subcutaneous dialysis system was tested in six healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and in ten diabetic patients with hyperglycemia during rapid decline of blood glucose levels. There was a good correlation between sensor and blood glucose values. During o

  8. Dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor using time series analysis of d(+)-glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-Yau; Chen, Nan-Yueh; Chen, Ming-Kun; Wang, Min-Haw; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a rising-edge time-series analysis (TSA) method that can be applied to a dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor (DWOFGS). In the experiment, the concentration of glucose in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined by measuring the absorbance of the solution as determined by variation in the rising edge of the photodiode (PD) voltage response waveform. The DWOFGS principle is based on near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy at selected dual wavelengths (1450 and 1650 nm) in the first overtone band. The DWOFGS comprises two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and two PD detectors. No additional fibers or lenses are required in our device. The output light level of the LEDs is adjusted to a light intensity suitable to the glucose absorption rate in an electronic circuit. Four light absorbance paths enable detection of d(+)-glucose concentrations from 0 to 20 wt % in steps of 5 wt %. The glucose light absorbance process was calculated based on the rising edge of the PD waveform under a low-intensity light source using TSA. The TSA method can be used to obtain the glucose level in PBS and reduce measurement background noise. The application of the rising-edge TSA method improves sensor sensitivity, increases the accuracy of the data analysis, and lowers measurement equipment costs.

  9. Nitric Oxide Generating Polymeric Coatings for Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    this end, we recently began work on with immobilized organoselenium ( RSe ) and organotellurium (RTe) species as potential surfaces to generate NO from...this project). One novel approach to utilize these new RSe and RTe catalysts for coatings on implantable glucose sensors involves the development...and covalently linked RSe sites to this polymer. This species is then alternately dip coated with a polyanionic polymer, alginate, to create the LbL

  10. Zinc dosing and glucose tolerance in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenley, S.; Taylor, M.

    1986-03-05

    Animal data suggest the existence of a physiologic relationship between glucoregulatory hormones and zinc metabolism. In order to investigate this proposed relationship in humans, they examined the effect of moderately elevated plasma zinc levels on blood glucose clearance. Eight women (24-37 yrs) served as subjects for the study. Fasted volunteers were tested under two experimental conditions (a) ingestion of 50 g D-glucose (b) ingestion of 25 mg zinc followed 60 min later by ingestion of 50 g D-glucose. Five ml venous blood was drawn into trace-metal-free, fluoride-containing vacutainer tubes prior to and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after glucose ingestion. Plasma was analyzed for glucose and zinc; glycemic responses were quantified by computing areas under the curves and times to peak concentration. Their human data indicate varied glycemic responses to the acute elevation of plasma zinc: 4 subjects showed little apparent effect; 3 subjects marginally increased either the area under the curve or time to peak and 1 subject (classified as suspect diabetic in the non-zinc condition) showed marked improvement in glycemic response following zinc ingestion. Their preliminary results suggest that blood glucose clearance may be affected in some individuals by the acute elevation of plasma zinc.

  11. [Subcutaneously implantable glucose sensors in patients with diabetes mellitus; still many problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M.G.; Jansen, J.A.; Lutterman, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Despite considerable scientific efforts, no clinical method is currently available for the continuous monitoring of glucose in subcutaneous tissue fluid. In general, good results were obtained during in-vitro experiments with various implantable glucose sensors. However, after implantation these

  12. The Development of a Glucose Dehydrogenase 3D-Printed Glucose Sensor: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Anngela; Malkoc, Aldin; La Belle, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-01

    This work represents a preliminary proof-of-concept design and verification of a 3D-printed glucose biosensor. The proof of concept presented is the first example of glucose dehydrogenase sensor fabricated by a 3D-printer while maintaining similar features to current lab-industry standards. The sensor was verified to detect physiological glucose concentrations between 0 and 400 mg/dL with a linear coefficient as high as .97. This study showed that it was possible to use 3D-printed technology to create a biosensor sensitive to glucose detection. As availability and functionality of 3D-printers expands, this technology has the potential to be an option for diabetes management. This preliminary study shows that the 3D-printed sensor platform holds promise for sensitive glucose detection.

  13. Glucose production during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L;

    1999-01-01

    The present study compared the arteriohepatic venous (a-hv) balance technique and the tracer-dilution method for estimation of hepatic glucose production during both moderate and heavy exercise in humans. Eight healthy young men (aged 25 yr; range, 23-30 yr) performed semisupine cycling for 40 mi...

  14. Polymer Optical Fiber Compound Parabolic Concentrator fiber tip based glucose sensor: In-Vitro Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Janting, Jakob; Aasmul, Soren;

    2016-01-01

    We present in-vitro sensing of glucose using a newly developed efficient optical fiber glucose sensor based on a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) tipped polymer optical fiber (POF). A batch of 9 CPC tipped POF sensors with a 35 mm fiber length is shown to have an enhanced fluorescence pickup...... efficiency with an average increment factor of 1.7 as compared to standard POF sensors with a plane cut fiber tip. Invitro measurements for two glucose concentrations (40 and 400 mg/dL) confirm that the CPC tipped sensors efficiently can detect both glucose concentrations. it sets the footnote at the bottom...

  15. Non-invasive Blood Glucose Quantification Using a Hybrid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundararajan JAYAPAL

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose levels which result from defects in insulin secretion. It is very important for the diabetics and normal people to have a correct blood glucose level. The HbA1c test is the most preferred test by renowned doctors for glucose quantification. But this test is an invasive one. At present, there are many available techniques for this purpose but these are mostly invasive or minimally non-invasive and most of these are under research. Among the different methods available, the photo acoustic (PA methods provide a reliable solution since the acoustical energy loss is much less compared to the optical or other techniques. Here a novel framework is presented for blood glucose level measurement using a combination of the HbA1c test and a PA method to get an absolutely consistent and precise, non-invasive technique. The setup uses a pulsed laser diode with pulse duration of 5-15 ns and at a repetition rate of 10 Hz as the source. The detector setup is based on the piezoelectric detection. It consists of a ring detector that includes two double ring sensors that are attached to the ring shaped module that can be worn around the finger. The major aim is to detect the photo acoustic signals from the glycated hemoglobin with the least possible error. The proposed monitoring system is designed with extreme consideration to precision and compatibility with the other computing devices. The results obtained in this research have been studied and analyzed by comparing these with those of in-vitro techniques like the HPLC. The comparison has been plotted and it shows a least error. The results also show a positive drive for using this concept as a basis for future extension in quantifying the other blood components.

  16. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A.; Tulip, Fahmida S.; MacArthur, Kimberly; McFarlane, Nicole; Islam, Syed K.; Hensley, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  17. Characterizing Accuracy and Precision of Glucose Sensors and Meters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodbard, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is need for a method to describe precision and accuracy of glucose measurement as a smooth continuous function of glucose level rather than as a step function for a few discrete ranges of glucose...

  18. Influence of inflammatory cells and serum on the performance of implantable glucose sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M.; Jansen, J.A.; Kros, A.; Vriezema, D.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Lutterman, J.A.; Hövell, S.W.F.M. van; Gaag, A. van der

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of polymorphonuclear granulocytes on the performance of uncoated and cellulose acetate/Nafion® coated amperometric glucose sensors in vitro. The response of these sensors was also investigated in serum. Uncoated and coated sensors sho

  19. Influence of inflammatory cells and serum on the performance of implantable glucose sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M.; Jansen, J.A.; Kros, A.; Vriezema, D.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Lutterman, J.A.; Hövell, S.W.F.M. van; Gaag, A. van der

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of polymorphonuclear granulocytes on the performance of uncoated and cellulose acetate/Nafion® coated amperometric glucose sensors in vitro. The response of these sensors was also investigated in serum. Uncoated and coated sensors

  20. Influence of inflammatory cells and serum on the performance of implantable glucose sensors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, A.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Kros, A.; Vriezema, D.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Lutterman, J.A.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Hovell, S.W. van; Gaag, A. van der

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of polymorphonuclear granulocytes on the performance of uncoated and cellulose acetate/Nafion coated amperometric glucose sensors in vitro. The response of these sensors was also investigated in serum. Uncoated and coated sensors

  1. Glucose response of near-infrared alginate-based microsphere sensors under dynamic reversible conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ayesha; Harma, Harri; Hanninen, Pekka; McShane, Michael J; Srivastava, Rohit

    2011-08-01

    Minimally invasive optical glucose biosensors with increased functional longevity form one of the most promising techniques for continuous glucose monitoring, because of their long-term stability, reversibility, repeatability, specificity, and high sensitivity. They are based on the principle of competitive binding and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Moving to the near-infrared region of the spectrum has the potential to improve signal throughput for implanted sensors, but requires a change in dye chemistry that could alter response sensitivity, range, and toxicity profiles. The near-infrared dissolved-core alginate microsphere sensors were fabricated by emulsion followed by surface coating by layer-by-layer self-assembly. The particles were characterized for sensor stability, sensor response, and reversibility in deionized water and simulated interstitial fluid. The sensor response to step changes in bulk glucose concentrations was also evaluated under dynamic conditions using a microflow cell unit. Finally, in vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed with L929 mouse fibroblast cell lines to demonstrate preliminary biocompatibility of the sensors. The glucose sensitivity under controlled and dynamic conditions was observed to be 0.86%/mM glucose with an analytical response range of 0-30 mM glucose, covering both the physiological and pathophysiological range. The sensor demonstrated a repeatable, reversible, and reproducible response, with a maximum response time of 120 s. In vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed nearly 95% viability of cells, thereby suggesting that the alginate microsphere sensor system does not exhibit cytotoxicity. The incorporation of near-infrared dyes shows promise in improving sensor response because of their high sensitivity and improved tissue penetration of infrared light. The sensitivity for the sensors was approximately 1.5 times greater than that observed for visible dye sensors, and the new dye chemistry did not significantly

  2. A continuous glucose monitoring device by graphene modified electrochemical sensor in microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhihua; Zou, Chongwei; Wang, Ridong; Lai, Xiaochen; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin; Li, Dachao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous glucose monitoring microsystem consisting of a three-electrode electrochemical sensor integrated into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip, which was used to transdermally extract and collect subcutaneous interstitial fluid, was fabricated from five polydimethylsiloxane layers using micromolding techniques. The electrochemical sensor was integrated into the chip for continuous detection of glucose. Specifically, a single-layer graphene and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were decorated onto the working electrode (WE) of the sensor to construct a composite nanostructured surface and improve the resolution of the glucose measurements. Graphene was transferred onto the WE surface to improve the electroactive nature of the electrode to enable measurements of low levels of glucose. The AuNPs were directly electrodeposited onto the graphene layer to improve the electron transfer rate from the activity center of the enzyme to the electrode to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the composite nanostructured surface to specifically detect glucose. The factors required for AuNPs deposition and GOx immobilization were also investigated, and the optimized parameters were obtained. The experimental results displayed that the proposed sensor could precisely measure glucose in the linear range from 0 to 162 mg/dl with a detection limit of 1.44 mg/dl (S/N = 3). The proposed sensor exhibited the potential to detect hypoglycemia which is still a major challenge for continuous glucose monitoring in clinics. Unlike implantable glucose sensors, the wearable device enabled external continuous monitoring of glucose without interference from foreign body reaction and bioelectricity.

  3. Factory-Calibrated Continuous Glucose Sensors: The Science Behind the Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoss, Udo; Budiman, Erwin Satrya

    2017-05-01

    The use of commercially available continuous glucose monitors for diabetes management requires sensor calibrations, which until recently are exclusively performed by the patient. A new development is the implementation of factory calibration for subcutaneous glucose sensors, which eliminates the need for user calibrations and the associated blood glucose tests. Factory calibration means that the calibration process is part of the sensor manufacturing process and performed under controlled laboratory conditions. The ability to move from a user calibration to factory calibration is based on several technical requirements related to sensor stability and the robustness of the sensor manufacturing process. The main advantages of factory calibration over the conventional user calibration are: (a) more convenience for the user, since no more fingersticks are required for calibration and (b) elimination of use errors related to the execution of the calibration process, which can lead to sensor inaccuracies. The FreeStyle Libre(™) and FreeStyle Libre Pro(™) flash continuous glucose monitoring systems are the first commercially available sensor systems using factory-calibrated sensors. For these sensor systems, no user calibrations are required throughout the sensor wear duration.

  4. Glucose optical fibre sensor based on a luminescent molecularly imprinted polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosua, C.; Wren, S. P.; Sun, T.; Arregui, F. J.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    An optrode able to detect glucose dissolved in water has been implemented. The device is based on the luminescence emission of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer synthesized specifically for glucose detection, therefore its intensity changes in presence of glucose. This sensing material is attached onto a cleaved ended polymer-clad optical fibre and it is excited by light via 1x2 fibre coupler. The reflected fluorescence signal increases when it is immersed into glucose solutions and recovers to the baseline when it is dipped in ultrapure water. This reversible behaviour indicates the measurement repeatability of using such a glucose sensor.

  5. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E.; Stevens, Wanida

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P sensors to participate in appetite regulation. PMID:24477542

  6. Enzymatic Determination of Glucose by Optical-Fiber Sensor Sequential Injection Renewable Surface Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of oxidative decoloration of bromopyrogallol red(BPR) with H2O2, catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase(HRP), and the sequential injection renewable surface technique(SI-RST), a highly sensitive optical-fiber sensor spectrophotometric method for the enzymatic determination of hydrogen peroxide was proposed. By coupling with a glucose oxidase(GOD) -catalyzed reaction, the method was used to determine glucose in human serum. The considerations in system and flow cell design, and factors that influence the determination performance are discussed. With 100 μL of sample loaded and 0. 6 mg of bead trapped, the linear response range from 5.0 × 10-8 to 5. 2 × 10-6mol/L BPR with a detection limit(3σ) of 2. 5 × 10 -8 mol/L BPR, and a precision of 1.1% RSD(n = 11) and a throughput of a 80 samples per hour can be achieved. Under the conditions of a 8. 7 × 10-6 mol/L BPR substrate,0.04 unit/mL HRP, 600 s reaction time and a reaction temperature of 37 ℃, the linear response range for H2O2 was from 5.0 × 10-8 to 7.0 × 10-6 mol/L with a detection limit(3σ) of 1.0 × 10-8 mol/L and a precision of 3.7% RSD(n=11). The linear response range by coupling with a GOD-catalyzed reaction was from 1.0 ×10-7 to 1.0 × 10-5mol/L. The method was directly applied to determine glucose in human serum. Glucose contents obtained by the proposed procedure were compared with those obtained by using the phenol-4-AAP method, the error was found to be less than 3%.

  7. Enzyme-Free Electrochemical Glucose Sensors Prepared by Dealloying Pd-Ni-P Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiao Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the formation of enzyme-free electrochemical glucose sensors by electrochemical dealloying palladium-containing Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses. When metallic glasses with different Pd contents are used as the dealloying precursor alloys, palladium-based nanoporous metals with different ligament and pore sizes can be obtained. The chemical compositions of the nanoporous metals also vary according to the different precursor compositions. All the as-obtained nanoporous metals exhibit electrochemical catalytic activity towards the oxidation of d-glucose, indicating that the nanoporous metals prepared by dealloying the Pd-Ni-P metallic glasses are promising materials for enzyme-free electrochemical glucose sensor.

  8. Hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor for non-invasive and continuous glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Habeen; Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Chul; Koh, Younggook; Cha, Junhoe

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring blood glucose level of diabetic patients is crucial in diabetes care from life threating complications. Selfmonitoring blood glucose (SMBG) that involves finger prick to draw blood samples into the measurement system is a widely-used method of routine measurement of blood glucose levels to date. SMBG includes, however, unavoidable pain problems resulting from the repetitive measurements. We hereby present a hydrogel-based electrochemical (H-EC) sensor to monitor the glucose level, non-invasively. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized in the disc-type hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based hydrogel and kept intact in the hydrogel. Fast electron transfer mediated by Prussian blue (PB, hexacyanoferrate) generated efficient signal amplifications to facilitate the detection of the extracted glucose from the interstitial fluid. The linear response and the selectivity against glucose of the H-EC sensor were validated by chronoamperometry. For the practical use, the outcomes from the correlation of the extracted glucose concentration and the blood glucose value by on-body extraction, as well as the validation of the hydrogel-based electrochemical (H-EC) device, were applied to the on-body glucose monitoring.

  9. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CYTOSOLIC GLUCOSE AND ATP LEVELS IN YEAST WITH OPTICAL SENSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Clara; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Takanaga, Hitomi; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Precise and dynamic measurement of intracellular metabolite levels has been hampered by difficulties in differentiating between adsorbed and imported fractions and the subcellular distribution between cytosol, endomembrane compartments and mitochondria. Here, genetically encoded Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based sensors were deployed for dynamic measurements of free cytosolic glucose and ATP at varying external supply and in glucose transport mutants. Moreover, by using the FRET sensors in a microfluidic platform, we were able to monitor in vivo changes in intracellular free glucose in individual yeast cells. We demonstrate the suitability of the FRET sensors for gaining physiological insight by demonstrating that free intracellular glucose and ATP levels are reduced in an hxt5Δ hexose transporter mutant compared to wild type and to other hxtΔ strains. PMID:20854260

  10. Dynamic analysis of cytosolic glucose and ATP levels in yeast using optical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Clara; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Takanaga, Hitomi; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-12-01

    Precise and dynamic measurement of intracellular metabolite levels has been hampered by difficulties in differentiating between adsorbed and imported fractions and the subcellular distribution between cytosol, endomembrane compartments and mitochondria. In the present study, genetically encoded FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based sensors were deployed for dynamic measurements of free cytosolic glucose and ATP with varying external supply and in glucose-transport mutants. Moreover, by using the FRET sensors in a microfluidic platform, we were able to monitor in vivo changes of intracellular free glucose in individual yeast cells. We demonstrate the suitability of the FRET sensors for gaining physiological insight by demonstrating that free intracellular glucose and ATP levels are reduced in a hxt5Δ hexose-transporter mutant compared with wild-type and other hxtΔ strains.

  11. Direct Growth of Copper Oxide Films on Ti Substrate for Nonenzymatic Glucose Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxu Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO films directly grown on Ti substrate have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method and used to construct an amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor. XRD and SEM were used to characterize the samples. The electrochemical performances of the electrode for detection of glucose were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The CuO films based glucose sensors exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic properties which show very high sensitivity (726.9 μA mM−1 cm−2, low detection limit (2 μM, and fast response (2 s. In addition, reproducibility and long-term stability have been observed. Low cost, convenience, and biocompatibility make the CuO films directly grown on Ti substrate electrodes a promising platform for amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

  12. Design and testing of a fluorescence glucose sensor which incorporates a bioinductive material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H C; Ahmed, J

    2004-01-01

    One main hurdle in the development of implantable biosensors is that their lifetime is limited by scar tissue formation around the implant. One way to ameliorate this issue would be to use a bioinductive coating to allow normal tissue ingrowth around the sensor. Here, we report design, development and in vitro testing of a prototype fluorescence-based glucose sensor that incorporates a bioinductive material at its tip. Glucose is sensed via a fluorescence-based assay system (Amplex reagent) which is confined to a small chamber separated from the bulk glucose solution by a semipermeable membrane. Excitation is provided by a 530 nm laser, while the emitted light is detected by a photomultiplier tube. In vitro testing of this prototype was done in the presence and absence of a bioinductive material covering the membrane at the sensor/solution interface. In response to a step change in glucose concentration, the output of the sensor increased linearly over time due to accumulation of fluorescent marker molecules as glucose diffused into the recording chamber. The slope of this response increased linearly with increasing glucose concentration, with a sensitivity if 2.1 x 10(-4) V/min per ml glucose/dl solution. The presence of the bioinductive layer did not alter the function of the sensor at the lowest glucose concentrations tested, although responses to higher concentrations saturated, presumably because of depletion of the Amplex reagent within the chamber. In summary, we report that the use of a bioinductive material in an implantable biosensor does not appreciably alter sensor function.

  13. Microwave-Based Microfluidic Sensor for Non-Destructive and Quantitative Glucose Monitoring in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chretiennot

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reliable microwave and microfluidic miniature sensor dedicated to the measurement of glucose concentration in aqueous solution. The device; which is integrated with microtechnologies; is made of a bandstop filter implemented in a thin film microstrip technology combined with a fluidic microchannel. Glucose aqueous solutions have been characterized for concentration ranging from 80 g/L down to 0.3 g/L and are identified with the normalized insertion loss at optimal frequency. The sensitivity of the sensor has consequently been estimated at 7.6 × 10−3 dB/(g/L; together with the experimental uncertainty; the resolution of the sensor comes to 0.4 g/L. These results demonstrate the potentialities of such a sensor for the quantitative analysis of glucose in aqueous solution.

  14. Determination of Glucose Levels during Dialysis Treatment: Different Sensors and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sbrignadello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of glycemia in subjects with renal failure, thus treated with hemodialysis, or peritoneal dialysis, is clinically relevant, since glucose levels may influence the determination of other solutes, such as creatinine, as well as some ions, such as sodium, whose degree of removal during dialysis sessions should be controlled carefully. Also, glucose levels should be controlled to avoid possible events of hypoglycemia during the treatment, especially in diabetic subjects. Indeed, even cases of hypoglycemic coma are documented. The glucose measurement during the dialysis treatment can be performed with different sensors and technologies: for instance, with traditional glucose meters, with instruments for continuous glucose monitoring, or with optical sensors. The aim of this review study was to analyze these different approaches and briefly discuss possible advantages and limitations.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of non-enzymatic glucose sensor based on ternary NiO/CuO/polyaniline nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Kh; Babaei, Z

    2016-04-01

    Novel nickel and copper oxide nanoparticle modified polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers (NiO/CuO/PANI) were fabricated and used as a non-enzymatic sensor for detecting glucose. PANI nanofibers were prepared through electrodeposition, whereas nickel and copper oxide nanoparticles were deposited on PANI nanofibers by electrodeposition and electrochemical oxidation in situ. The morphology and structure of NiO/CuO/PANI nanocomposites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The as-prepared NiO/CuO/PANI electrode was employed for non-enzymatic glucose detection in alkaline electrolyte and showed better electrocatalytic activity compared with the PANI, CuO/PANI, and NiO/PANI electrodes. Consequently, an amperometric electrode of glucose was achieved under 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl with a wide linear range from 20 to 2500 μM (R(2) = 0.9978) and a low detection limit of 2.0 μM (signal/noise [S/N] = 3). This electrode can effectively analyze glucose concentration in human serum samples, avoiding interference, and is a promising non-enzymatic glucose sensor due to its low overpotential, high sensitivity, good selectivity and stability, fast response, and low cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic fate of extracted glucose in normal human myocardium.

    OpenAIRE

    Wisneski, J A; Gertz, E W; Neese, R A; Gruenke, L D; D. L. Morris; Craig, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Glucose is an important substrate for myocardial metabolism. This study was designed to determine the effect of circulating metabolic substrates on myocardial glucose extraction and to determine the metabolic fate of glucose in normal human myocardium. Coronary sinus and arterial catheters were placed in 23 healthy male volunteers. [6-14C]Glucose was infused as a tracer in 10 subjects. [6-14C]Glucose and [U-13C]lactate were simultaneously infused in the other 13 subjects. Simultaneous blood s...

  17. Structural basis of cooperativity in human UDP-glucose dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Rajakannan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid. The product is used in xenobiotic glucuronidation in hepatocytes and in the production of proteoglycans that are involved in promoting normal cellular growth and migration. Overproduction of proteoglycans has been implicated in the progression of certain epithelial cancers, while inhibition of UGDH diminished tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A better understanding of the conformational changes occurring during the UGDH reaction cycle will pave the way for inhibitor design and potential cancer therapeutics. METHODOLOGY: Previously, the substrate-bound of UGDH was determined to be a symmetrical hexamer and this regular symmetry is disrupted on binding the inhibitor, UDP-α-D-xylose. Here, we have solved an alternate crystal structure of human UGDH (hUGDH in complex with UDP-glucose at 2.8 Å resolution. Surprisingly, the quaternary structure of this substrate-bound protein complex consists of the open homohexamer that was previously observed for inhibitor-bound hUGDH, indicating that this conformation is relevant for deciphering elements of the normal reaction cycle. CONCLUSION: In all subunits of the present open structure, Thr131 has translocated into the active site occupying the volume vacated by the absent active water and partially disordered NAD+ molecule. This conformation suggests a mechanism by which the enzyme may exchange NADH for NAD+ and repolarize the catalytic water bound to Asp280 while protecting the reaction intermediates. The structure also indicates how the subunits may communicate with each other through two reaction state sensors in this highly cooperative enzyme.

  18. Development of a nanowire based titanium needle probe sensor for glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Devesh C.

    The need for continuous monitoring of various physiological functions such as blood glucose levels, neural functions and cholesterol levels has fostered the research and development of various schemes of biosensors to sense and help control the respective function. The needs of patients for sensors with minimal discomfort, longer life and better performance have necessitated the development towards smaller and more efficient sensors. In addition, the need for higher functionality from smaller sensors has led to the development of sensors with multiple electrodes, each electrode capable of sensing a different body function. Such multi-electrode sensors need to be fabricated using micro-fabrication processes in order to achieve precise control over the size, shape and placement of the electrodes. Multielectrode sensors fabricated using silicon and polymers have been demonstrated. One physiological function that attracts widespread interest is continuous glucose monitoring in our blood, since Diabetes affects millions of people all over the world. Significant deviations of blood glucose levels from the normal levels of 4-8 mM can cause fainting, coma and damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. For chronic patients, continuous monitoring of glucose levels is essential for accurate and timely treatment. A few continuous monitoring sensors are available in the market, but they have problems and cannot replace the strip type one-time glucose monitoring systems as yet. To address this need, large scale research efforts have been targeted towards continuous monitoring. The demand for higher accuracy and sensitivity has motivated researchers to evaluate the use of nanostructures in sensing. The large surface area-to-volume ratio of such structures could enable further miniaturization and push the detection limits, potentially enabling even single molecule detection. This research involved the development of a biocompatible titanium needle probe sensor for

  19. Nanomaterial-based Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Glucose and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadalinezhad, Asieh

    designed glucose biosensor exhibits a wide linear range, up to 18 mM glucose, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. Glucose measurements of human serum using the developed biosensor showed excellent agreement with the data recorded by a commercial blood glucose monitoring assay. Finally, we fabricated an enzyme-free glucose sensor based on nanoporous palladium-cadmium (PdCd) networks. A hydrothermal method was applied in the synthesis of PdCd nanomaterials. The effect of the composition of the PdCd nanomaterials on the performance of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Amperometric studies showed that the nanoporous PdCd electrode was responsive to the direct oxidation of glucose with high electrocatalytic activity. The sensitivity of the sensor for continuous glucose monitoring was 146.21 microAmM--1cm--2, with linearity up to 10 mM and a detection limit of 0.05 mM. In summary, the electrochemical biosensors proposed in my PhD study exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity for the continuous monitoring of analytes in the presence of common interference species. Our results have shown that the performance of the biosensors is significantly dependent on the dimensions and morphologies of nanostructured materials. The unique nanomaterials-based platforms proposed in this dissertation open the door to the design and fabrication of high-performance electrochemical biosensors for medical diagnostics.

  20. Modeling the Error of the Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite Glucose Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Lyvia; Ramkissoon, Charrise M; Facchinetti, Andrea; Leal, Yenny; Vehi, Josep

    2017-06-12

    Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) are prone to inaccuracy due to time lags, sensor drift, calibration errors, and measurement noise. The aim of this study is to derive the model of the error of the second generation Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite (ENL) sensor and compare it with the Dexcom SEVEN PLUS (7P), G4 PLATINUM (G4P), and advanced G4 for Artificial Pancreas studies (G4AP) systems. An enhanced methodology to a previously employed technique was utilized to dissect the sensor error into several components. The dataset used included 37 inpatient sessions in 10 subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D), in which CGMs were worn in parallel and blood glucose (BG) samples were analyzed every 15 ± 5 min Calibration error and sensor drift of the ENL sensor was best described by a linear relationship related to the gain and offset. The mean time lag estimated by the model is 9.4 ± 6.5 min. The overall average mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of the ENL sensor was 11.68 ± 5.07% Calibration error had the highest contribution to total error in the ENL sensor. This was also reported in the 7P, G4P, and G4AP. The model of the ENL sensor error will be useful to test the in silico performance of CGM-based applications, i.e., the artificial pancreas, employing this kind of sensor.

  1. Modeling the Error of the Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite Glucose Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyvia Biagi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs are prone to inaccuracy due to time lags, sensor drift, calibration errors, and measurement noise. The aim of this study is to derive the model of the error of the second generation Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite (ENL sensor and compare it with the Dexcom SEVEN PLUS (7P, G4 PLATINUM (G4P, and advanced G4 for Artificial Pancreas studies (G4AP systems. An enhanced methodology to a previously employed technique was utilized to dissect the sensor error into several components. The dataset used included 37 inpatient sessions in 10 subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D, in which CGMs were worn in parallel and blood glucose (BG samples were analyzed every 15 ± 5 min Calibration error and sensor drift of the ENL sensor was best described by a linear relationship related to the gain and offset. The mean time lag estimated by the model is 9.4 ± 6.5 min. The overall average mean absolute relative difference (MARD of the ENL sensor was 11.68 ± 5.07% Calibration error had the highest contribution to total error in the ENL sensor. This was also reported in the 7P, G4P, and G4AP. The model of the ENL sensor error will be useful to test the in silico performance of CGM-based applications, i.e., the artificial pancreas, employing this kind of sensor.

  2. Conditions With High Intracellular Glucose Inhibit Sensing Through Glucose Sensor Snf3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Wu, B.Q.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression in micro-organisms is regulated according to extracellular conditions and nutrient concentrations. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, non-transporting sensors with high sequence similarity to transporters, that is, transporter-like sensors, have been identified for sugars as well...

  3. Doped graphene/Cu nanocomposite: A high sensitivity non-enzymatic glucose sensor for food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabnam, Luba; Faisal, Shaikh Nayeem; Roy, Anup Kumar; Haque, Enamul; Minett, Andrew I; Gomes, Vincent G

    2017-04-15

    An amperometric non-enzymatic glucose sensor was developed based on nitrogen-doped graphene with dispersed copper nanoparticles (Cu-NGr). The sensing element was tested in conjunction with a modified glassy carbon electrode for glucose detection. The Cu-NGr composite was prepared by one pot synthesis from a mixture of graphene oxide, copper nitrate and uric acid, followed by thermal annealing at 900°C for 1h. Detailed characterizations showed homogeneous copper nanoparticle dispersion and the presence of significant proportion of graphitic nitrogen. The developed electrode presented high electrocatalytic activity towards glucose through synergetic effect of copper nanoparticles and nitrogen-doped graphene. Amperometric analysis confirmed high glucose sensitivity and ultra-low detection of 10nM glucose over a linear range. The sensor was tested for direct application to detect glucose in food samples for which the sensor displayed high selectivity with excellent reproducibility and recovery in complex food materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-enzymatic glucose sensor based on electrodeposited copper on carbon paste electrode (Cu/CPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurani, Dita Arifa, E-mail: d.arifa@sci.ui.ac.id; Wibowo, Rahmat; Fajri, Iqbal Farhan El [Department of Chemistry, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    The development of non-enzymatic glucose sensor has much attention due to their applications in glucose monitoring. In this research, copper oxide is used as a non-enzymatic glucose sensor by oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone. Copper was electrodeposited on Carbon paste electrode (CPE) at constant potential. The experimental condition was varied in electrodeposition of Cu with the following parameters: Electrodeposition time 60 s, 120 s and 180 s and potential reduction -0.166 V, -0.266 V and -0.366 V. The effective performance of these working electrodes in sensing glucose was investigated. The Cu/CPE which used -0.366 V potential reduction and 120 s electrodeposition time shows the best performance. The amperometric response current in concentration range 1.6-62.5 mM of glucose gives the good linearity R{sup 2} = 0.9988, low detection limit 0.6728 mM and high sensitivity 1183.59 µA mM{sup −1}cm{sup −2}. Furthermore this sensor exhibited a good repeatability with %RSD = 1.31% (n=10) and high stability with %RSD = 1.51% (n=5 days). The homogeneity of Cu particles on CPE was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  5. An Integrated Glucose Sensor with an All-Solid-State Sodium Ion-Selective Electrode for a Minimally Invasive Glucose Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kojima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system that uses a microneedle to permeate the skin surface and a small hydrogel to accumulate interstitial fluid glucose. The measurement of glucose and sodium ion levels in the hydrogel is required for estimating glucose levels in blood; therefore, we developed a small, enzyme-fixed glucose sensor with a high-selectivity, all-solid-state, sodium ion-selective electrode (ISE integrated into its design. The glucose sensor immobilized glucose oxidase showed a good correlation between the glucose levels in the hydrogels and the reference glucose levels (r > 0.99, and exhibited a good precision (coefficient of variation = 2.9%, 0.6 mg/dL. In the design of the sodium ISEs, we used the insertion material Na0.33MnO2 as the inner contact layer and DD16C5 exhibiting high Na+/K+ selectivity as the ionophore. The developed sodium ISE exhibited high selectivity (\\( \\log \\,k^{pot}_{Na,K} = -2.8\\ and good potential stability. The sodium ISE could measure 0.4 mM (10−3.4 M sodium ion levels in the hydrogels containing 268 mM (10−0.57 M KCl. The small integrated sensor (ϕ < 10 mm detected glucose and sodium ions in hydrogels simultaneously within 1 min, and it exhibited sufficient performance for use as a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system.

  6. Femtosecond laser micromachining of compound parabolic concentrator fiber tipped glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Lacraz, Amédée; Kalli, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    in fluorescence pickup efficiency of a Förster resonance energy transfer-based POF glucose sensor. A Zemax model of the CPC-tipped sensor predicts an optimal improvement of a factor of 3.96 compared to the sensor with a plane-cut fiber tip. The fs laser micromachined CPC tip showed an increase of a factor of 3......We report on highly accurate femtosecond (fs) laser micromachining of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) fiber tip on a polymer optical fiber (POF). The accuracy is reflected in an unprecedented correspondence between the numerically predicted and experimentally found improvement...

  7. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM–4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat. PMID:27306706

  8. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM-4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat.

  9. Label-free glucose detection using cantilever sensor technology based on gravimetric detection principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Po-Chiao; Wu, Chun-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Efficient maintenance of glucose homeostasis is a major challenge in diabetes therapy, where accurate and reliable glucose level detection is required. Though several methods are currently used, these suffer from impaired response and often unpredictable drift, making them unsuitable for long-term therapeutic practice. In this study, we demonstrate a method that uses a functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever as the sensor for reliable glucose detection with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for clinical use. We first modified the AFM tip with aminopropylsilatrane (APS) and then adsorbed glucose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A) onto the surface. The Con A/APS-modified probes were then used to detect glucose by monitoring shifts in the cantilever resonance frequency. To confirm the molecule-specific interaction, AFM topographical images were acquired of identically treated silicon substrates which indicated a specific attachment for glucose-Con A and not for galactose-Con A. These results demonstrate that by monitoring the frequency shift of the AFM cantilever, this sensing system can detect the interaction between Con A and glucose, one of the biomolecule recognition processes, and may assist in the detection and mass quantification of glucose for clinical applications with very high sensitivity.

  10. Label-Free Glucose Detection Using Cantilever Sensor Technology Based on Gravimetric Detection Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchen Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient maintenance of glucose homeostasis is a major challenge in diabetes therapy, where accurate and reliable glucose level detection is required. Though several methods are currently used, these suffer from impaired response and often unpredictable drift, making them unsuitable for long-term therapeutic practice. In this study, we demonstrate a method that uses a functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM cantilever as the sensor for reliable glucose detection with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for clinical use. We first modified the AFM tip with aminopropylsilatrane (APS and then adsorbed glucose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A onto the surface. The Con A/APS-modified probes were then used to detect glucose by monitoring shifts in the cantilever resonance frequency. To confirm the molecule-specific interaction, AFM topographical images were acquired of identically treated silicon substrates which indicated a specific attachment for glucose-Con A and not for galactose-Con A. These results demonstrate that by monitoring the frequency shift of the AFM cantilever, this sensing system can detect the interaction between Con A and glucose, one of the biomolecule recognition processes, and may assist in the detection and mass quantification of glucose for clinical applications with very high sensitivity.

  11. Estimating Human Predictability From Mobile Sensor Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Jensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of human behavior is of prime interest in many applications ranging from behavioral science to practical applications like GSM resource planning and context-aware services. As proxies for humans, we apply multiple mobile phone sensors all conveying information about human behavior...

  12. The Glucose Sensor-Like Protein Hxs1 Is a High-Affinity Glucose Transporter and Required for Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory M.; Fahmy, Hany; Jiang, Linghuo; Xue, Chaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus is a major fungal pathogen that frequently causes systemic infection in patients with compromised immunity. Glucose, an important signal molecule and the preferred carbon source for Cryptococcus, plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. Cryptococcus contains more than 50 genes sharing high sequence homology with hexose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is no report on their function in glucose sensing or transport. In this study, we investigated two hexose transporter-like proteins (Hxs1 and Hxs2) in Cryptococcus that share the highest sequence identity with the glucose sensors Snf3 and Rgt2 in S. cerevisiae. The expression of HXS1 is repressed by high glucose, while the HXS2 expression is not regulated by glucose. Functional studies showed that Hxs1 is required for fungal resistance to oxidative stress and fungal virulence. The hxs1Δ mutant exhibited a significant reduction in glucose uptake activity, indicating that Hxs1 is required for glucose uptake. Heterologous expression of Cryptococcus HXS1 rendered the S. cerevisiae mutant lacking all 20 hexose transporters a high glucose uptake activity, demonstrating that Hxs1 functions as a glucose transporter. Heterologous expression of HXS1 in the snf3Δ rgt2Δ double mutant did not complement its growth in YPD medium containing the respiration inhibitor antimycin A, suggesting that Hxs1 may not function as a glucose sensor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Hxs1 is a high-affinity glucose transporter and required for fungal virulence. PMID:23691177

  13. Performance comparison of the medtronic sof-sensor and enlite glucose sensors in inpatient studies of individuals with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Peter; Lum, John; Beck, Roy W; Kollman, Craig

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices is important for its use as a management tool for individuals with diabetes and for its use to assess outcomes in clinical studies. Using data from several inpatient studies, we compared the accuracy of two sensors, the Medtronic Enlite™ using MiniMed Paradigm(®) Veo™ calibration and the Sof-Sensor(®) glucose sensor using Guardian(®) REAL-Time CGM calibration (all from Medtronic Diabetes, Northridge, CA). Nocturnal data were analyzed from eight inpatient studies in which both CGM and reference glucose measurements were available. The analyses included 1,666 CGM-reference paired glucose values for the Enlite in 54 participants over 69 nights and 3,627 paired values for the Sof-Sensor in 66 participants over 91 nights. The Enlite sensor tended to report glucose levels lower than the reference over the entire range of glucose values, whereas the Sof-Sensor values tended to be higher than reference values in the hypoglycemic range and lower than reference values in the hyperglycemic range. The overall median sensor-reference difference was -15 mg/dL for the Enlite and -1 mg/dL for the Sof-Sensor (P<0.001). The median relative absolute difference was 15% for the Enlite versus 12% for the Sof-Sensor (P=0.06); 66% of Enlite values and 73% of Sof-Sensor values met International Organization for Standardization criteria. We found that the Enlite tended to be biased low over the entire glucose range, whereas the Sof-Sensor showed the more typical sensor pattern of being biased high in the hypoglycemic range and biased low in the hyperglycemic range.

  14. Glucose metabolism in cultured trophoblasts from human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, A.J.; Farmer, D.R.; Nelson, D.M.; Smith, C.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The development of appropriate placental trophoblast isolation and culture techniques enables the study of pathways of glucose utilization by this important cell layer in vitro. Trophoblasts from normal term placentas were isolated and cultured 24 hours and 72 hours in uncoated polystyrene culture tubes or tubes previously coated with a fibrin matrix. Trophoblasts cultured on fibrin are morphologically distinct from those cultured on plastic or other matrices and generally resemble in vivo syncytium. Cells were incubated up to 3 hours with {sup 14}C-labeled glucose and reactions were stopped by addition of perchloric acid. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production by trophoblasts increased linearly with time however the largest accumulation of label was in organic acids. Trophoblasts cultured in absence of fibrin utilized more glucose and accumulated more {sup 14}C in metabolic products compared to cells cultured on fibrin. Glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} by the phosphogluconate (PG) pathway was estimated from specific yields of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose and (6-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose. Approximately 6% of glucose oxidation was by the PG pathway when cells were cultured on fibrin compared to approximately 1% by cells cultured in the absence of fibrin. The presence of a fibrin growth matrix appears to modulate the metabolism of glucose by trophoblast from human placenta in vitro.

  15. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE ON PLASMA GLUCOSE LEVEL IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Chakraborty; Mrigendranath Gantait; Biswapati Mukherjee

    2006-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of plasma glucose level (PGL) in human volunteers after acupuncture. Methods Seventy-seven human volunteers were taken up from the acupuncture clinic. All of pletion of acupuncture. All cases were at four hours abstinence from food before doing acupuncture. Results Plasma glucose level varied 5 mg% or more in 62 cases (80.51%) and only those were considered for computation. PGL increased in cases who had generally plasma glucose level below 90 mg% before acupuncture;and PGL decreased in cases who had plasma glucose 90 mg% or above. In 10 control cases there was no variation of the considerable level of 5 mg% in any case. Conclusion Bi-directional variation of PGL after acupuncture indicates that acupuncture can be used to maintain optimum PGL through endogenous mechanism,suggesting that it is applicable in controlling hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus patients.

  16. Clinical evaluation of a continuous minimally invasive glucose flux sensor placed over ultrasonically permeated skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han; Taylor, Elizabeth; Davison, Thomas W

    2004-02-01

    Frequent monitoring and tight metabolic control of blood glucose levels can reduce microvascular complications and subsequent co-morbidities in patients with diabetes. Self-monitoring with finger sticks provides intermittent data at best, and results in poor compliance. We report on a minimally invasive system that continually measures glucose flux through ultrasonically permeated skin. Ten patients with diabetes were enrolled in a clinical study to determine correlation between data collected by glucose biosensors placed over ultrasonically treated skin sites (two per patient), and blood glucose readings were taken every 20 min over an 8-h period. Glucose flux biosensors measured amperometric current proportional to hydrogen peroxide level, generated from catalytic conversion of glucose by glucose oxidase; the sensor was coupled to the skin by a thin hydrogel containing an osmotic extraction buffer, creating a gradient for glucose transport through the skin. The biosensors were attached to small portable meters that recorded time, current, and temperature readings every 5 s. At the conclusion of the study period, meter recordings were downloaded for data processing. Skin sites were examined for irritation due to biosensor contact. Data from glucose biosensors with completed data sets had a correlation coefficient of 0.84, and 95% of the data pairs (n = 241) were in the A + B region of a Clarke error grid. Ultrasonic pretreatment lasting about 10 s resulted in improved conductance in all patients. No patients complained of pain or irritation at any time during the study. Continuous monitoring of glucose flux through ultrasonically permeable skin is safe and feasible.

  17. Sensor Monitoring of Physical Activity to Improve Glucose Management in Diabetic Patients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Ding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic individuals need to tightly control their blood glucose concentration. Several methods have been developed for this purpose, such as the finger-prick or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs. However, these methods present the disadvantage of being invasive. Moreover, CGMs have limited accuracy, notably to detect hypoglycemia. It is also known that physical exercise, and even daily activity, disrupt glucose dynamics and can generate problems with blood glucose regulation during and after exercise. In order to deal with these challenges, devices for monitoring patients’ physical activity are currently under development. This review focuses on non-invasive sensors using physiological parameters related to physical exercise that were used to improve glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes (T1DM patients. These devices are promising for diabetes management. Indeed they permit to estimate glucose concentration either based solely on physical activity parameters or in conjunction with CGM or non-invasive CGM (NI-CGM systems. In these last cases, the vital signals are used to modulate glucose estimations provided by the CGM and NI-CGM devices. Finally, this review indicates possible limitations of these new biosensors and outlines directions for future technologic developments.

  18. Reversal of type 1 diabetes by engineering a glucose sensor in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Alex; Montané, Joel; Anguela, Xavier M; Muñoz, Sergio; Douar, Anne M; Riu, Efren; Otaegui, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima

    2006-06-01

    Type 1 diabetic patients develop severe secondary complications because insulin treatment does not guarantee normoglycemia. Thus, efficient regulation of glucose homeostasis is a major challenge in diabetes therapy. Skeletal muscle is the most important tissue for glucose disposal after a meal. However, the lack of insulin during diabetes impairs glucose uptake. To increase glucose removal from blood, skeletal muscle of transgenic mice was engineered both to produce basal levels of insulin and to express the liver enzyme glucokinase. After streptozotozin (STZ) administration of double-transgenic mice, a synergic action in skeletal muscle between the insulin produced and the increased glucose phosphorylation by glucokinase was established, preventing hyperglycemia and metabolic alterations. These findings suggested that insulin and glucokinase might be expressed in skeletal muscle, using adeno-associated viral 1 (AAV1) vectors as a new gene therapy approach for diabetes. AAV1-Ins+GK-treated diabetic mice restored and maintained normoglycemia in fed and fasted conditions for >4 months after STZ administration. Furthermore, these mice showed normalization of metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, and food and fluid intake. Therefore, the joint action of basal insulin production and glucokinase activity may generate a "glucose sensor" in skeletal muscle that allows proper regulation of glycemia in diabetic animals and thus prevents secondary complications.

  19. A glucose sensor fabricated by piezoelectric inkjet printing of conducting polymers and bienzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeon Hee; Lee, Byung Kook; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Sungwon; Yoo, Bongyoung; Kim, Yong Shin; Park, Kinam; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric inkjet printing of polymers and proteins holds great promise for fabrication of miniaturized bioelectronic devices, such as biochips and biosensors. In this study, a bienzymatic glucose biosensor prototype based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT-PSS), glucose oxidase (GOD), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was fabricated by a piezoelectric inkjet printer. An aqueous bioelectrical ink containing PEDOT-PSS, GOD, and HRP was prepared and printed on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film. The PEDOT-PSS/GOD/HRP sensor was covered with a cellulose acetate membrane. The use of bienzymatic sensing combined with conducting polymers via piezoelectric inkjet printing showed a synergistic effect resulting in significant amplification of the response signal. The glucose sensor reached steady-state current density within 3 s, indicating a fast response time, and exhibited a linear dose-dependent electrochemical response with high sensitivity. The overall result demonstrates that a glucose sensor with high sensitivity could be readily fabricated by a piezoelectric inkjet printing system.

  20. Glucose Sensors Based on Core@Shell Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Application in Diabetes Management: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Lv, Hongying; Teng, Zhenyuan; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive attempt to conclude and discuss various glucose biosensors based on core@shell magnetic nanomaterials. Owing to good biocompatibility and stability, the core@shell magnetic nanomaterials have found widespread applications in many fields and draw extensive attention. Most magnetic nanoparticles possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity like natural peroxidases, which invests magnetic nanomaterials with great potential in the construction of glucose sensors. We summarize the synthesis of core@shell magnetic nanomaterials, fundamental theory of glucose sensor and the advances in glucose sensors based on core@shell magnetic nanomaterials. The aim of the review is to provide an overview of the exploitation of the core@shell magnetic nanomaterials for glucose sensors construction.

  1. Bacteria-Templated NiO Nanoparticles/Microstructure for an Enzymeless Glucose Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settu Vaidyanathan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial-induced hollow cylinder NiO (HCNiO nanomaterial was utilized for the enzymeless (without GOx detection of glucose in basic conditions. The determination of glucose in 0.05 M NaOH solution with high sensitivity was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV and amperometry (i–t. The fundamental electrochemical parameters were analyzed and the obtained values of diffusion coefficient (D, heterogeneous rate constant (ks, electroactive surface coverage (Г, and transfer coefficient (alpha-α are 1.75 × 10−6 cm2/s, 57.65 M−1·s−1, 1.45 × 10−10 mol/cm2, and 0.52 respectively. The peak current of the i–t method shows two dynamic linear ranges of calibration curves 0.2 to 3.5 µM and 0.5 to 250 µM for the glucose electro-oxidation. The Ni2+/Ni3+ couple with the HCNiO electrode and the electrocatalytic properties were found to be sensitive to the glucose oxidation. The green chemistry of NiO preparation from bacteria and the high catalytic ability of the oxyhydroxide (NiOOH is the good choice for the development of a glucose sensor. The best obtained sensitivity and limit of detection (LOD for this sensor were 3978.9 µA mM−1·cm−2 and 0.9 µM, respectively.

  2. Bacteria-Templated NiO Nanoparticles/Microstructure for an Enzymeless Glucose Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Settu; Cherng, Jong-Yuh; Sun, An-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2016-07-11

    The bacterial-induced hollow cylinder NiO (HCNiO) nanomaterial was utilized for the enzymeless (without GOx) detection of glucose in basic conditions. The determination of glucose in 0.05 M NaOH solution with high sensitivity was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry (i-t). The fundamental electrochemical parameters were analyzed and the obtained values of diffusion coefficient (D), heterogeneous rate constant (ks), electroactive surface coverage (Г), and transfer coefficient (alpha-α) are 1.75 × 10(-6) cm²/s, 57.65 M(-1)·s(-1), 1.45 × 10(-10) mol/cm², and 0.52 respectively. The peak current of the i-t method shows two dynamic linear ranges of calibration curves 0.2 to 3.5 µM and 0.5 to 250 µM for the glucose electro-oxidation. The Ni(2+)/Ni(3+) couple with the HCNiO electrode and the electrocatalytic properties were found to be sensitive to the glucose oxidation. The green chemistry of NiO preparation from bacteria and the high catalytic ability of the oxyhydroxide (NiOOH) is the good choice for the development of a glucose sensor. The best obtained sensitivity and limit of detection (LOD) for this sensor were 3978.9 µA mM(-1)·cm(-2) and 0.9 µM, respectively.

  3. Wireless Remote Monitoring of Glucose Using a Functionalized ZnO Nanowire Arrays Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype wireless remote glucose monitoring system interfaced with a ZnO nanowire arrays-based glucose sensor, glucose oxidase enzyme immobilized onto ZnO nanowires in conjunction with a Nafion® membrane coating, which can be effectively applied for the monitoring of glucose levels in diabetics. Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM services like General Packet Radio Service (GPRS and Short Message Service (SMS have been proven to be logical and cost effective methods for gathering data from remote locations. A communication protocol that facilitates remote data collection using SMS has been utilized for monitoring a patient’s sugar levels. In this study, we demonstrate the remote monitoring of the glucose levels with existing GPRS/GSM network infra-structures using our proposed functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays sensors integrated with standard readily available mobile phones. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purposes. Such applications can reduce health care costs and allow caregivers to monitor and support to their patients remotely, especially those located in rural areas.

  4. Bacteria-Templated NiO Nanoparticles/Microstructure for an Enzymeless Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Settu; Cherng, Jong-Yuh; Sun, An-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial-induced hollow cylinder NiO (HCNiO) nanomaterial was utilized for the enzymeless (without GOx) detection of glucose in basic conditions. The determination of glucose in 0.05 M NaOH solution with high sensitivity was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry (i–t). The fundamental electrochemical parameters were analyzed and the obtained values of diffusion coefficient (D), heterogeneous rate constant (ks), electroactive surface coverage (Г), and transfer coefficient (alpha-α) are 1.75 × 10−6 cm2/s, 57.65 M−1·s−1, 1.45 × 10−10 mol/cm2, and 0.52 respectively. The peak current of the i–t method shows two dynamic linear ranges of calibration curves 0.2 to 3.5 µM and 0.5 to 250 µM for the glucose electro-oxidation. The Ni2+/Ni3+ couple with the HCNiO electrode and the electrocatalytic properties were found to be sensitive to the glucose oxidation. The green chemistry of NiO preparation from bacteria and the high catalytic ability of the oxyhydroxide (NiOOH) is the good choice for the development of a glucose sensor. The best obtained sensitivity and limit of detection (LOD) for this sensor were 3978.9 µA mM−1·cm−2 and 0.9 µM, respectively. PMID:27409615

  5. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Soren; Bang, Ole

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization.

  6. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Soren; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization. PMID:26713213

  7. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile...... and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body...... a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization....

  8. Perovskite LaTiO₃-Ag0.2 nanomaterials for nonenzymatic glucose sensor with high performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-zhu; Zhong, Hui; Li, Xiao-mo; Jia, Fei-fei; Shi, Yi-xiang; Zhang, Wei-guang; Cheng, Zhi-peng; Zhang, Li-li; Wang, Ji-kui

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, a nonenzymatic glucose biosensor based on perovskite LaTiO3-Ag0.2(LTA) modified electrode was presented. The morphology and the composition of the perovskite LaTiO₃-Ag0.2 nanomaterials were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. The LaTiO₃-Ag0.2(LTA) composite was investigated by electrochemical characterization using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimal conditions, CV and chronoamperometry (I-t) study revealed that, compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE), the modified electrode showed a remarkable increase in the efficiency of the electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, starting at around +0.70 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The prepared sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 784.14 µAmM⁻¹ cm⁻², a low detection limit of 2.1×10⁻⁷ M and a wide linear range from 2.5 µM to 4 mM (R=0.9997). More importantly, the LTA modified electrode was also relatively insensitive to commonly interfering species such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA) in high potential. Moreover, the nonenzymatic sensor was applied to the determination of glucose in human serum samples and the results were in good agreement with clinical data. Electrodes modified with perovskite nanomaterials are highly promising for nonenzymatic electrochemical detection of glucose because of their high sensitivity, fast response, excellent stability and good reproducibility.

  9. A potentiometric non-enzymatic glucose sensor using a molecularly imprinted layer bonded on a conducting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Min; Moon, Jong-Min; Lee, Won-Chul; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Cheol Soo; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2017-05-15

    A non-enzymatic potentiometric glucose sensor for the determination of glucose in the micomolar level in saliva was developed based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) binding on a conducting polymer layer. A MIP containing acrylamide, and aminophenyl boronic acid, as a host molecule to glucose, was immobilized on benzoic acid-functionalized poly(terthiophene) (pTBA) by the amide bond formation onto a gold nanoparticles deposited-screen printed carbon electrode (pTBA/AuNPs/SPCE). Aromatic boronic acid was incorporated into the MIP layer to stably capture glucose and create a potentiometric signal through the changed pKa value of polymer film by the formation of boronate anion-glucose complex with generation of H(+) ions by the cis-diol reaction. Reversible binding and extraction of glucose on the sensor surface was observed using a quartz crystal microbalance. Each layer of the sensor probe was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The potentiometric response at the optimized conditions exhibited a wide linear dynamic range of 3.2×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-3)M, with a detection limit of 1.9 (±0.15)×10(-7)M. The sensor probe revealed an excellent selectivity and sensitivity for glucose compared to other saccharides. In addition, the reliability of the proposed glucose sensor was evaluated in physiological fluid samples of saliva and finger prick blood.

  10. In vivo continuous glucose monitoring using a chip based near infrared sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mohammadi, L.; Sigloch, S.; Frese, I.; Welzel, K.; Göddel, M.; Klotzbücher, T.

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious health condition considered to be one of the major healthcare epidemics of modern era. An effective treatment of this disease can be only achieved by reliable continuous information on blood glucose levels. In this work we present a minimally invasive, chip-based near infrared (NIR) sensor, combined with microdialysis, for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The sensor principle is based on difference absorption spectroscopy in the 1st overtone band of the near infrared spectrum. The device features a multi-emitter LED and InGaAs-Photodiodes, which are located on a single electronic board (non-disposable part), connected to a personal computer via Bluetooth. The disposable part consists of a chip containing the fluidic connections for microdialysis, two fluidic channels acting as optical transmission cells and total internally reflecting mirrors for in- and out-coupling of the LED light to the chip and to the detectors. The sensor is combined with an intraveneous microdialysis to separate the glucose from the cells and proteins in the blood and operates without any chemical consumption. In vitro measurements showed a linear relationship between glucose concentration and the integrated difference signal with a coefficient of determination of 99 % in the relevant physiological concentration range from 0 to 400 mg/dl. In vivo measurements on 10 patients showed that the NIR-CGM sensor data reflects the blood reference values adequately, if a proper calibration and signal drift compensation is applied. The MARE (mean absolute relative error) value taken over all patient data is 13.8 %. The best achieved MARE value is at 4.8 %, whereas the worst is 25.8 %, with a standard deviation of 5.5 %.

  11. Ni-Co bimetal nanowires filled multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the highly sensitive and selective non-enzymatic glucose sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, K.; Raj Kumar, T.; Babu, K. Justice; Gnana Kumar, G.

    2016-11-01

    The facile, time and cost efficient and environmental benign approach has been developed for the preparation of Nickel (Ni)-Cobalt (Co) alloy nanowires filled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the aid of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN)/Ni-Co catalyst. The controlled incorporation of Ni-Co nanostructures in the three dimensional (3D) pore structures of MSN yielded the catalytically active system for the MWCNT growth. The inner surface of MWCNTs was quasi-continuously filled with face-centered cubic (fcc) structured Ni-Co nanowires. The as-prepared nanostructures were exploited as non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor probes for the reliable detection of glucose. The electrochemical measurements illustrated that the fabricated sensor exhibited an excellent electrochemical performance toward glucose oxidation with a high sensitivity of 0.695 mA mM‑1 cm‑2, low detection limit of 1.2 μM, a wide linear range from 5 μM–10 mM and good selectivity. The unprecedented electrochemical performances obtained for the prepared nanocomposite are purely attributed to the synergistic effects of Ni-Co nanowires and MWCNTs. The constructed facile, selective and sensitive glucose sensor has also endowed its reliability in analyzing the human serum samples, which wide opened the new findings for exploring the novel nanostructures based glucose sensor devices with affordable cost and good stability.

  12. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system.

  13. Italian Contributions to the Development of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensors for Diabetes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cobelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring glucose concentration in the blood is essential in the therapy of diabetes, a pathology which affects about 350 million people around the World (three million in Italy, causes more than four million deaths per year and consumes a significant portion of the budget of national health systems (10% in Italy. In the last 15 years, several sensors with different degree of invasiveness have been proposed to monitor glycemia in a quasi-continuous way (up to 1 sample/min rate for relatively long intervals (up to 7 consecutive days. These continuous glucose monitoring (CGM sensors have opened new scenarios to assess, off-line, the effectiveness of individual patient therapeutic plans from the retrospective analysis of glucose time-series, but have also stimulated the development of innovative on-line applications, such as hypo/hyper-glycemia alert systems and artificial pancreas closed-loop control algorithms. In this review, we illustrate some significant Italian contributions, both from industry and academia, to the growth of the CGM sensors research area. In particular, technological, algorithmic and clinical developments performed in Italy will be discussed and put in relation with the advances obtained in the field in the wider international research community.

  14. Phenylboronic acid functionalized reduced graphene oxide based fluorescence nano sensor for glucose sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiruddin, SK; Swain, Sarat K., E-mail: swainsk2@yahoo.co.in

    2016-01-01

    Reduced graphene has emerged as promising tools for detection based application of biomolecules as it has high surface area with strong fluorescence quenching property. We have used the concept of fluorescent quenching property of reduced graphene oxide to the fluorescent probes which are close vicinity of its surface. In present work, we have synthesized fluorescent based nano-sensor consist of phenylboronic acid functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO–PBA) and di-ol modified fluorescent probe for detection of biologically important glucose molecules. This fluorescent graphene based nano-probe has been characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Atomic force microscope (AFM), UV–visible, Photo-luminescence (PL) and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Finally, using this PBA functionalized reduced GO based nano-sensor, we were able to detect glucose molecule in the range of 2 mg/mL to 75 mg/mL in aqueous solution of pH 7.4. - Highlights: • Easy and simple synthesis of PBA functionalized reduced GO based nano probe. • PBA functionalized reduced GO graphene based nano-probes are characterized. • PBA functionalized reduced GO nano probe is used to detect glucose molecules. • It is very cost-effective and enzyme-free detection of glucose in solution.

  15. An Overview of Insulin Pumps and Glucose Sensors for the Generalist

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brooke H.; Rizvi, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin, or the insulin pump, has gained popularity and sophistication as a near-physiologic programmable method of insulin delivery that is flexible and lifestyle-friendly. The introduction of continuous monitoring with glucose sensors provides unprecedented access to, and prediction of, a patient’s blood glucose levels. Efforts are underway to integrate the two technologies, from “sensor-augmented” and “sensor-driven” pumps to a fully-automated and independent sensing-and-delivery system. Implantable pumps and an early-phase “bionic pancreas” are also in active development. Fine-tuned “pancreas replacement” promises to be one of the many avenues that offers hope for individuals suffering from diabetes. Although endocrinologists and diabetes specialists will continue to maintain expertise in this field, it behooves the primary care physician to have a working knowledge of insulin pumps and sensors to ensure optimal clinical care and decision-making for their patients. PMID:26742082

  16. An Overview of Insulin Pumps and Glucose Sensors for the Generalist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke H. McAdams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous subcutaneous insulin, or the insulin pump, has gained popularity and sophistication as a near-physiologic programmable method of insulin delivery that is flexible and lifestyle-friendly. The introduction of continuous monitoring with glucose sensors provides unprecedented access to, and prediction of, a patient’s blood glucose levels. Efforts are underway to integrate the two technologies, from “sensor-augmented” and “sensor-driven” pumps to a fully-automated and independent sensing-and-delivery system. Implantable pumps and an early-phase “bionic pancreas” are also in active development. Fine-tuned “pancreas replacement” promises to be one of the many avenues that offers hope for individuals suffering from diabetes. Although endocrinologists and diabetes specialists will continue to maintain expertise in this field, it behooves the primary care physician to have a working knowledge of insulin pumps and sensors to ensure optimal clinical care and decision-making for their patients.

  17. Femtosecond laser micromachining of compound parabolic concentrator fiber tipped glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Lacraz, Amédée; Kalli, Kyriacos; Bang, Ole

    2017-03-01

    We report on highly accurate femtosecond (fs) laser micromachining of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) fiber tip on a polymer optical fiber (POF). The accuracy is reflected in an unprecedented correspondence between the numerically predicted and experimentally found improvement in fluorescence pickup efficiency of a Förster resonance energy transfer-based POF glucose sensor. A Zemax model of the CPC-tipped sensor predicts an optimal improvement of a factor of 3.96 compared to the sensor with a plane-cut fiber tip. The fs laser micromachined CPC tip showed an increase of a factor of 3.5, which is only 11.6% from the predicted value. Earlier state-of-the-art fabrication of the CPC-shaped tip by fiber tapering was of so poor quality that the actual improvement was 43% lower than the predicted improvement of the ideal CPC shape.

  18. A label-free fiber-optic Turbidity Affinity Sensor (TAS) for continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt-Ballerstadt, Ralph; Evans, Colton; Pillai, Arun P; Gowda, Ashok

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we describe the concept of a novel implantable fiber-optic Turbidity Affinity Sensor (TAS) and report on the findings of its in-vitro performance for continuous glucose monitoring. The sensing mechanism of the TAS is based on glucose-specific changes in light scattering (turbidity) of a hydrogel suspension consisting of small particles made of crosslinked dextran (Sephadex G100), and a glucose- and mannose-specific binding protein - Concanavalin A (ConA). The binding of ConA to Sephadex particles results in a significant turbidity increase that is much greater than the turbidity contribution by the individual components. The turbidity of the TAS was measured by determining the intensity of light passing through the suspension enclosed within a small semi-permeable hollow fiber (OD: 220 μm, membrane thickness: 20 μm, molecular weight cut-off: 10 kDa) using fiber optics. The intensity of measured light of the TAS was proportional to the glucose concentration over the concentration range from 50mg/dL to 400mg/dL in PBS and whole blood at 37°C (R>0.96). The response time was approximately 4 min. The stability of the glucose response of the TAS decreased only slightly (by 20%) over an 8-day study period at 37°C. In conclusion, this study demonstrated proof-of-concept of the TAS for interstitial glucose monitoring. Due to the large signal amplitude of the turbidity change, and the lack of need for wavelength-specific emission and excitation filters, a very small, robust and compact TAS device with an extremely short optical pathlength could be feasibly designed and implemented for in-vivo glucose monitoring in people with diabetes.

  19. Liquid-Phase Packaging of a Glucose Oxidase Solution with Parylene Direct Encapsulation and an Ultraviolet Curing Adhesive Cover for Glucose Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Takamatsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a package for disposable glucose sensor chips using Parylene encapsulation of a glucose oxidase solution in the liquid phase and a cover structure made of an ultraviolet (UV curable adhesive. Parylene was directly deposited onto a small volume (1 μL of glucose oxidase solution through chemical vapor deposition. The cover and reaction chamber were constructed on Parylene film using a UV-curable adhesive and photolithography. The package was processed at room temperature to avoid denaturation of the glucose oxidase. The glucose oxidase solution was encapsulated and unsealed. Glucose sensing was demonstrated using standard amperometric detection at glucose concentrations between 0.1 and 100 mM, which covers the glucose concentration range of diabetic patients. Our proposed Parylene encapsulation and UV-adhesive cover form a liquid phase glucose-oxidase package that has the advantages of room temperature processing and direct liquid encapsulation of a small volume solution without use of conventional solidifying chemicals.

  20. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  1. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P diabetic microangiopathy.

  2. Nano-Engineered Biomimetic Optical Sensors for Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Rauf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a rapidly growing disease that can be monitored at an individual level by controlling the blood glucose level, hence minimizing the negative impact of the disease. Significant research efforts have been focused on the design of novel and improved technologies to overcome the limitations of existing glucose analysis methods. In this context, nanotechnology has enabled the diagnosis at the single cell and molecular level with the possibility of incorporation in advanced molecular diagnostic biochips. Recent years have witnessed the exploration and synthesis of various types of nanomaterials with enzyme-like properties, with their subsequent integration into the design of biomimetic optical sensors for glucose monitoring. This review paper will provide insights on the type, nature and synthesis of different biomimetic nanomaterials. Moreover, recent developments in the integration of these nanomaterials for optical glucose biosensing will be highlighted, with a final discussion on the challenges that must be addressed for successful implementation of these nano-devices in the clinical applications is presented.

  3. Nano-Engineered Biomimetic Optical Sensors for Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sajid; Hayat Nawaz, Muhammad Azhar; Badea, Mihaela; Marty, Jean Louis; Hayat, Akhtar

    2016-11-17

    Diabetes is a rapidly growing disease that can be monitored at an individual level by controlling the blood glucose level, hence minimizing the negative impact of the disease. Significant research efforts have been focused on the design of novel and improved technologies to overcome the limitations of existing glucose analysis methods. In this context, nanotechnology has enabled the diagnosis at the single cell and molecular level with the possibility of incorporation in advanced molecular diagnostic biochips. Recent years have witnessed the exploration and synthesis of various types of nanomaterials with enzyme-like properties, with their subsequent integration into the design of biomimetic optical sensors for glucose monitoring. This review paper will provide insights on the type, nature and synthesis of different biomimetic nanomaterials. Moreover, recent developments in the integration of these nanomaterials for optical glucose biosensing will be highlighted, with a final discussion on the challenges that must be addressed for successful implementation of these nano-devices in the clinical applications is presented.

  4. Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Composed of Carbon-Coated Nano-Zinc Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Wang, An-Ni; Liao, Qing-Liang; Chuang, Kai-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays glucose detection is of great importance in the fields of biological, environmental, and clinical analyzes. In this research, we report a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod powder surface-coated with carbon material for non-enzymatic glucose sensor applications through a hydrothermal process and chemical vapor deposition method. A series of tests, including crystallinity analysis, microstructure observation, and electrochemical property investigations were carried out. For the cyclic voltammetric (CV) glucose detection, the low detection limit of 1 mM with a linear range from 0.1 mM to 10 mM was attained. The sensitivity was 2.97 μA/cm2mM, which is the most optimized ever reported. With such good analytical performance from a simple process, it is believed that the nanocomposites composed of ZnO nanorod powder surface-coated with carbon material are promising for the development of cost-effective non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose biosensors with high sensitivity.

  5. Std1 and Mth1 Proteins Interact with the Glucose Sensors To Control Glucose-Regulated Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin C.; McCartney, Rhonda R.; Zhang, Xudong; Tillman, Tommy S.; Solimeo, Harry; Wölfl, Stefan; Almonte, Ciprian; Watkins, Simon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Std1 protein modulates the expression of glucose-regulated genes, but its exact molecular role in this process is unclear. A two-hybrid screen for Std1-interacting proteins identified the hydrophilic C-terminal domains of the glucose sensors, Snf3 and Rgt2. The homologue of Std1, Mth1, behaves differently from Std1 in this assay by interacting with Snf3 but not Rgt2. Genetic interactions between STD1, MTH1, SNF3, and RGT2 suggest that the glucose signaling is mediated, at least in part, through interactions of the products of these four genes. Mutations in MTH1 can suppress the raffinose growth defect of a snf3 mutant as well as the glucose fermentation defect present in cells lacking both glucose sensors (snf3 rgt2). Genetic suppression by mutations in MTH1 is likely to be due to the increased and unregulated expression of hexose transporter genes. In media lacking glucose or with low levels of glucose, the hexose transporter genes are subject to repression by a mechanism that requires the Std1 and Mth1 proteins. An additional mechanism for glucose sensing must exist since a strain lacking all four genes (snf3 rgt2 std1 mth1) is still able to regulate SUC2 gene expression in response to changes in glucose concentration. Finally, studies with green fluorescent protein fusions indicate that Std1 is localized to the cell periphery and the cell nucleus, supporting the idea that it may transduce signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. PMID:10373505

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sun Park

    Full Text Available Glucose transporters (GLUTs provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE, a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM domains and the intracellular helices (ICH domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states.

  7. [A conductometric enzymatic glucose sensor. A search for ways to improve analytical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadevych, S V; Soldatkin, O P; Arkhypova, V M; Shulha, O A; Ielśka, H V

    1995-01-01

    Characteristics of conductometric enzyme glucosensor based on thin-film interdigitated electrodes have been studied. The obtained biosensor exhibits a linear dynamic range of 0.01-2 mM for glucose and sensitivity 5 microS/min*mM for kinetic mode of measurements and 8 microS/mM for steady-state mode of measurements. Additional 2% PVB- and NAFION-membranes are suggested for the extension of the dynamic range. This permits extending the dynamic range of the sensor up to glicose concentration of 10 mM. Dependence of activity of immobilized enzyme on ionic strength and buffer capacity of the solution has been studied. It was shown that formation of additional membranes results in the substantial reduction of the buffer concentration effect on the sensor response. The obtained results are interpreted in terms of permselective properties of the additional membrane formed.

  8. Assessment of glucose metabolism in humans with the simultaneous use of indirect calorimetry and tracer techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappy, L; Paquot, N; Tounian, P; Schneiter, P; Jéquier, E

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant measurements of sytemic glucose delivery and carbohydrate oxidation are frequently performed in human investigations. Systemic glucose delivery (SGD) is usually determined using dilution of infused glucose tracers; net carbohydrate oxidation rate (net CHOOX) can be calculated from respiratory gas exchanges and urinary nitrogen excretion (indirect calorimetry); alternatively, glucose oxidation can be measured from labelled CO2 production during infusion of carbon-labelled glucose tracers. In this paper, the theory underlying the use of each of these techniques is briefly reviewed and qualitative differences are outlined. SGD represents the sum of hepatic glucogenolysis, gluconeogenesis from amino acids or glycerol, and, according to the glucose tracer used, glucose cycles (glucose-phosphate cycle, fructose-phosphate cycle, Cori and glucose-alanine cycles); systemic delivery of exogenous glucose after oral or i.v. glucose administration is also measured. Net CHOOX represents oxidation of glucose arising from hepatic or muscle glycogen or from exogenous glucose; it does not take into account oxidation of glucose formed from amino acids or glycerol, which is included in net protein or lipid oxidation. In contrast, isotopic determination of glucose oxidation corresponds to oxidation of glucose originating from hepatic glycogen breakdown, of exogenously administered glucose, and of glucose formed from amino acids and glycerol. Non-oxidative glucose disposal, calculated as SGD-net CHOOX, corresponds to the sum of gluconeogenesis from amino acids or glycerol (which are included in net protein and lipid oxidation), glucose cycles, and glycogen synthesis.

  9. Osmotic induction of calcium accumulation in human embryonic kidney cells detected with a high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bi-Huei; Takanaga, Hitomi; Griesbeck, Oliver; Frommer, Wolf B

    2009-08-01

    Calcium serves as a second messenger in glucose-triggered insulin secretion of pancreatic cells. Less is known about sugar signaling in non-excitable cells. Here, the high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor TN-XXL was used to characterize glucose-induced calcium responses in non-excitable human embryonic kidney HEK293T cells. HEK293T cells responded to perfusion with glucose with a sustained and concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium levels. Sucrose and mannitol triggered comparable calcium responses, suggesting that the increase of the calcium concentration was caused by osmotic effects. HEK293T cells are characterized by low endogenous glucose uptake capacity as shown with a high sensitivity glucose sensor. Consistently, when glucose influx was artificially increased by co-expression of GLUT glucose transporters, the glucose-induced calcium increase was significantly reduced. Neither calcium depletion, nor gadolinium or thapsigargin were able to inhibit the calcium accumulation. Taken together, membrane impermeable osmolytes such as sucrose and mannitol lead to an increase in calcium levels, while the effect of glucose depends on the cell's glucose uptake capacity and will thus vary between cell types in the body that differ in their glucose uptake capacity.

  10. Intravenous Glucose Acutely Stimulates Intestinal Lipoprotein Secretion in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2016-07-01

    Increased production of intestinal triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) contributes to dyslipidemia and increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We have previously demonstrated that enteral glucose enhances lipid-stimulated intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion. Here, we assessed whether glucose delivered systemically by intravenous infusion also enhances intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion in humans. On 2 occasions, 4 to 6 weeks apart and in random order, 10 healthy men received a constant 15-hour intravenous infusion of either 20% glucose to induce hyperglycemia or normal saline as control. Production of TRL-apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48, primary outcomes) and apoB100 (secondary outcomes) was assessed during hourly liquid-mixed macronutrient formula ingestion with stable isotope enrichment and multicompartmental modeling, under pancreatic clamp conditions to limit perturbations in pancreatic hormones (insulin and glucagon) and growth hormone. Compared with saline infusion, glucose infusion induced both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, increased plasma triglyceride levels, and increased TRL-apoB48 concentration and production rate (Plipoprotein production. Hyperglycemia may contribute to intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in type 2 diabetes. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02607839. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Glucose gradient differences in subcutaneous tissue of healthy volunteers assessed with ultraslow microdialysis and a nanolitre glucose sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiessen, RG; Rhemrev-Boom, MM; Korf, J

    2002-01-01

    The abdominal subcutaneous interstitium is easily accessible for monitoring glucose for Diabetes Mellitus research and management. The available glucose sensing devices demand frequent blood sampling by finger pricking for calibration. Moreover, there is controversy about the exact relationship

  12. A non-enzymatic urine glucose sensor with 2-D photonic crystal hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; He, Qian; Lu, Wei; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Dan; Qiu, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Yu, Yingjie

    2016-11-01

    A novel polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) sensing material for the detection of urine glucose was developed by embedding a two-dimensional (2-D) polystyrene crystalline colloidal array (CCA) in 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (3-APBA)-functionalized hydrogel. After adjusting the cross-linker concentration, this material showed significant sensitivity for glucose under lab conditions, the particle spacing of the PCCA changed from 917 to 824 nm (93 nm) within 3 min as the glucose concentration increased from 0 to 10 mM, and the structural color of the PCCA changed from red through orange, to green, and finally, to cyan. In further experiments, this material was used to semi-quantitatively detect glucose in 20 human urine (HU) samples. Compared with the traditional dry-chemistry method, which was applied widely in clinical diagnosis, the PCCA method was more accurate and cost-effective. Moreover, this method can efficiently avoid the errors induced by most of the urine-interfering elements like vitamin C and ketone body. With a homemade portable optical detector, this low-cost intelligent sensing material can provide a more convenient and efficient strategy for the urine glucose detection in clinical diagnosis and point-of-care monitoring.

  13. Amperometric glucose sensor based on nickel nanoparticles/carbon Vulcan XC-72R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hameed, R M

    2013-09-15

    A stable non-enzymatic glucose sensor was constructed by chemical deposition of nickel nanoparticles on carbon Vulcan XC-72R using microwave irradiation technique. The mode and time of microwave irradiation during nickel salt reduction were varied. This was found to affect the morphology of formed Ni/C powder as evidenced by TEM analysis. Nickel nanoparticles aggregation becomes more serious at longer microwave irradiation times. The electrocatalytic activity of different Ni/C samples towards glucose oxidation was studied in KOH solution by employing cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. Ni/C sample, prepared by pulse mode with total operating time of 150s, showed the highest oxidation current density. An excellent sensitivity value of 1349.7μAmM(-1)cm(-2) with a detection limit of 0.232μM was gained by Ni/C sensor. It also exhibits good reproducibility and long-term stability, as well as high selectivity with insignificant interference from ascorbic acid.

  14. Phenylboronic acid functionalized reduced graphene oxide based fluorescence nano sensor for glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiruddin, S K; Swain, Sarat K

    2016-01-01

    Reduced graphene has emerged as promising tools for detection based application of biomolecules as it has high surface area with strong fluorescence quenching property. We have used the concept of fluorescent quenching property of reduced graphene oxide to the fluorescent probes which are close vicinity of its surface. In present work, we have synthesized fluorescent based nano-sensor consist of phenylboronic acid functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO-PBA) and di-ol modified fluorescent probe for detection of biologically important glucose molecules. This fluorescent graphene based nano-probe has been characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Atomic force microscope (AFM), UV-visible, Photo-luminescence (PL) and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Finally, using this PBA functionalized reduced GO based nano-sensor, we were able to detect glucose molecule in the range of 2 mg/mL to 75 mg/mL in aqueous solution of pH7.4.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Glucose Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjeong; Choi, Hyonkwang; Park, Yunjae; Lee, Wookyoung; Lee, Jewon; Jeon, Minhyon

    2015-10-01

    Glucose in the blood is generally measured by electrochemical method using glucose oxidase (GOx) which acts as enzymes and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite. The rGO, which has low dispersibility, reduces the sensing capability of sensors. In order to solve this problem, the rGO electrodes with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have been reported. However, rGO with low electrical conductivity and mobility is not compatible to the electrochemical system. In this study, graphene with excellent electrical properties was added to PVP protected rGO. The rGO was synthesized using a Hummer and Offeman's method. Graphene was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with a Cu catalyst. Platinum (Pt) electrodes, Ag/AgCl, and PVP protected rGO were used as working electrode, reference electrode, and counter electrode, respectively. Surface morphology and structural properties of graphene were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Cyclic voltametry (CV) and I-V probe station were used to analyze the performance of the electrodes. Glucose concentration was systematically varied and the reduction current was monitored using I-V probe station.

  16. GLUT1 and GLUT9 as major contributors to glucose influx in HepG2 cells identified by a high sensitivity intramolecular FRET glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Chaudhuri, Bhavna; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-04-01

    Genetically encoded FRET glucose nanosensors have proven to be useful for imaging glucose flux in HepG2 cells. However, the dynamic range of the original sensor was limited and thus it did not appear optimal for high throughput screening of siRNA populations for identifying proteins involved in regulation of sugar flux. Here we describe a hybrid approach that combines linker-shortening with fluorophore-insertion to decrease the degrees of freedom for fluorophore positioning leading to improved nanosensor dynamics. We were able to develop a novel highly sensitive FRET nanosensor that shows a 10-fold higher ratio change and dynamic range (0.05-11 mM) in vivo, permitting analyses in the physiologically relevant range. As a proof of concept that this sensor can be used to screen for proteins playing a role in sugar flux and its control, we used siRNA inhibition of GLUT family members and show that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in HepG2 cells and that GLUT9 contributes as well, however to a lower extent. GFP fusions suggest that GLUT1 and 9 are preferentially localized to the plasma membrane and thus can account for the transport activity. The improved sensitivity of the novel glucose nanosensor increases the reliability of in vivo glucose flux analyses, and provides a new means for the screening of siRNA collections as well as drugs using high-content screens.

  17. GLUT1 and GLUT9 as the major contributors to glucose influx in HEPG2 cells identified by a high sensitivity intramolecular FRET glucose sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Chaudhuri, Bhavna; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2008-01-01

    Genetically encoded FRET-glucose nanosensors have proven to be useful for imaging glucose flux in HepG2 cells. However, the dynamic range of the original sensor was limited and thus it did not appear optimal for high throughput screening of siRNA populations for identifying proteins involved in regulation of sugar flux. Here we describe a hybrid approach that combines linker-shortening with fluorophore-insertion to decrease the degrees of freedom for fluorophore positioning leading to improved nanosensor dynamics. We were able to develop a novel highly sensitive FRET nanosensor that shows a 10-fold higher ratio change and dynamic range (0.05–11 mM) in vivo, permitting analyses in the physiologically relevant range. As a proof of concept that this sensor can be used to screen for proteins playing a role in sugar flux and its control, we used siRNA inhibition of GLUT family members and show that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in HepG2 cells and that GLUT9 contributes also, however to a lower extent. GFP fusions suggest that GLUT1 and 9 are preferentially localized to the plasma membrane and thus can account for the transport activity. The improved sensitivity of the novel glucose nanosensor increases the reliability of in vivo glucose flux analyses, and provides a new means for the screening of siRNA collections as well as drugs using high-content screens. PMID:18177733

  18. Human Behavior Cognition Using Smartphone Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Kaistinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on sensing context, modeling human behavior and developing a new architecture for a cognitive phone platform. We combine the latest positioning technologies and phone sensors to capture human movements in natural environments and use the movements to study human behavior. Contexts in this research are abstracted as a Context Pyramid which includes six levels: Raw Sensor Data, Physical Parameter, Features/Patterns, Simple Contextual Descriptors, Activity-Level Descriptors, and Rich Context. To achieve implementation of the Context Pyramid on a cognitive phone, three key technologies are utilized: ubiquitous positioning, motion recognition, and human behavior modeling. Preliminary tests indicate that we have successfully achieved the Activity-Level Descriptors level with our LoMoCo (Location-Motion-Context model. Location accuracy of the proposed solution is up to 1.9 meters in corridor environments and 3.5 meters in open spaces. Test results also indicate that the motion states are recognized with an accuracy rate up to 92.9% using a Least Square-Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM classifier.

  19. Use of Human Senses as Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Sugawara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of our recent findings obtained by the use of human senses as sensors, suggesting that human senses might be indispensable sensors, not only for practical uses but also for gaining a deeper understanding of humans. From this point of view, two kinds of studies, both based on semantic responses of participants, deserve emphasis. One study assessed the efficacy of the photocatalytic elimination of stains or bio-aerosols from an air environment using TiO2 as well as the photocatalytic deodorizing efficacy of a TiO2-type deodorizer; the other study evaluated the changes in perception of a given aroma while inhaling the fragrance of essential oils. In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma. Sensory tests were conducted twice, when participants were undergoing the Kraepelin mental performance test (mental arithmetic or an auditory task (listening to environmental natural sounds, once before the task (pre-task and once after the task (post-task. The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants. The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

  20. Crystal structure of the human glucose transporter GLUT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Xu, Chao; Sun, Pengcheng; Wu, Jianping; Yan, Chuangye; Hu, Mingxu; Yan, Nieng

    2014-06-01

    The glucose transporter GLUT1 catalyses facilitative diffusion of glucose into erythrocytes and is responsible for glucose supply to the brain and other organs. Dysfunctional mutations may lead to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, whereas overexpression of GLUT1 is a prognostic indicator for cancer. Despite decades of investigation, the structure of GLUT1 remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of human GLUT1 at 3.2 Å resolution. The full-length protein, which has a canonical major facilitator superfamily fold, is captured in an inward-open conformation. This structure allows accurate mapping and potential mechanistic interpretation of disease-associated mutations in GLUT1. Structure-based analysis of these mutations provides an insight into the alternating access mechanism of GLUT1 and other members of the sugar porter subfamily. Structural comparison of the uniporter GLUT1 with its bacterial homologue XylE, a proton-coupled xylose symporter, allows examination of the transport mechanisms of both passive facilitators and active transporters.

  1. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2000-01-01

    amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation......, but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas...... after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle...

  2. Novel Nanocomposite of Chitosan-protected Platinum Nanoparticles Immobilized on Nickel Hydroxide: Facile Synthesis and Application as Glucose Electrochemical Sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEJIANG RAO; QINGLIN SHENG; JIANBIN ZHENG

    2016-09-01

    Novel nanocomposite of nickel hydroxide/chitosan/platinum was successfully synthesised with chitosan (CS) as a dispersing and protecting agent. Its potential application in non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose sensor was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterize the composition and morphology of this nanocomposite. The electrochemical investigations of this glucose sensor exhibited remarkable analyticalperformances towards the oxidation of glucose. In particular, glucose can be selectively and sensitively detected in a wide linear range from 3.0×10⁻⁶ to 1.1×10⁻² mol·L⁻¹with a detection limit of 0.56±0.03 μmol·L⁻¹ at a signal-tonoise ratio of 3 (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the Ni(OH)₂/CS/Pt nanocomposite-modified GCE also showed an acceptable anti-interference ability and stability. Importantly, the Ni(OH)₂/CS/Pt based sensor can be used to detect trace amount of glucose in serum samples. The results demonstrated that the Ni(OH)₂/CS/Pt nanocomposite can be potentially useful to construct a new glucose sensing platform.

  3. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  4. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    2001-01-01

    The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin......-blockade group vs. the control group, hormones, metabolites, VO(2), and RER followed the same pattern of changes in ACE-blockade and control groups during exercise. Splanchnic blood flow (at rest: 1.67 +/- 0.12, ACE blockade; 1.59 +/- 0.18 l/min, control) decreased during moderate exercise (0.78 +/- 0.07, ACE...

  5. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring shows high accuracy within 6 hours after sensor calibration: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Yue

    Full Text Available Accurate and timely glucose monitoring is essential in intensive care units. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS has been advocated for many years to improve glycemic management in critically ill patients. In order to determine the effect of calibration time on the accuracy of CGMS, real-time subcutaneous CGMS was used in 18 critically ill patients. CGMS sensor was calibrated with blood glucose measurements by blood gas/glucose analyzer every 12 hours. Venous blood was sampled every 2 to 4 hours, and glucose concentration was measured by standard central laboratory device (CLD and by blood gas/glucose analyzer. With CLD measurement as reference, relative absolute difference (mean±SD in CGMS and blood gas/glucose analyzer were 14.4%±12.2% and 6.5%±6.2%, respectively. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was 74.8% in CGMS, and 98.4% in blood gas/glucose analyzer. The relative absolute difference of CGMS obtained within 6 hours after sensor calibration (8.8%±7.2% was significantly less than that between 6 to 12 hours after calibration (20.1%±13.5%, p<0.0001. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was also significantly higher in data sets within 6 hours after calibration (92.4% versus 57.1%, p<0.0001. In conclusion, real-time subcutaneous CGMS is accurate in glucose monitoring in critically ill patients. CGMS sensor should be calibrated less than 6 hours, no matter what time interval recommended by manufacturer.

  6. Wearable system for acquisition, processing and storage of the signal from amperometric glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabietti, P G; Massi Benedetti, M; Bronzo, F; Reboldi, G P; Sarti, E; Brunetti, P

    1991-03-01

    A wearable device for the acquisition, processing and storage of the signal from needle-type glucose sensors has been designed and developed as part of a project aimed at developing a portable artificial pancreas. The device is essential to assess the operational characteristics of miniaturized sensors in vivo. It can be connected to sensors operating at a constant potential of 0.65 Volts, and generating currents in the order of 10(-9) Amp. It is screened and equipped with filters that permit data recording and processing even in the presence of electrical noise. It can operate with sensors with different characteristics (1-200 nA full scale). The device has been designed to be worn by patients, so its weight and size have been kept to a minimum (250 g; 8.5 x 14.5 x 3.5 cm). It is powered by rechargeable Ni/Cd batteries allowing continuous operation for 72 h. The electronics consists of an analog card with operational amplifiers, and a digital one with a microprocessor (Intel 80C196, MCS-96 class, with internal 16-bit CPU supporting programs written in either C or Assembler language), a 32 Kb EPROM, and an 8 Kb RAM where the data are stored. The microprocessor can run either at 5 or 10 Mhz and features on-chip peripherals: an analog/digital (A/D) converter, a serial port (used to transfer data to a Personal Computer at the end of the 72 h), input-output (I/O) units at high-speed, and two timers. The device is programmed and prepared to operate by means of a second hand-held unit equipped with an LCD display and a 16-key numeric pad.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Glucose Sensor MdHXK1 Phosphorylates and Stabilizes MdbHLH3 to Promote Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Apple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Gang Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucose induces anthocyanin accumulation in many plant species; however, the molecular mechanism involved in this process remains largely unknown. Here, we found that apple hexokinase MdHXK1, a glucose sensor, was involved in sensing exogenous glucose and regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo assays suggested that MdHXK1 interacted directly with and phosphorylated an anthocyanin-associated bHLH transcription factor (TF MdbHLH3 at its Ser361 site in response to glucose. Furthermore, both the hexokinase_2 domain and signal peptide are crucial for the MdHXK1-mediated phosphorylation of MdbHLH3. Moreover, phosphorylation modification stabilized MdbHLH3 protein and enhanced its transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, thereby increasing anthocyanin biosynthesis. Finally, a series of transgenic analyses in apple calli and fruits demonstrated that MdHXK1 controlled glucose-induced anthocyanin accumulation at least partially, if not completely, via regulating MdbHLH3. Overall, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the glucose sensor HXK1 modulation of anthocyanin accumulation, which occur by directly regulating the anthocyanin-related bHLH TFs in response to a glucose signal in plants.

  8. Integrating solid-state sensor and microfluidic devices for glucose, urea and creatinine detection based on enzyme-carrying alginate microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Wang, Shih-Hao; Wu, Min-Hsien; Pan, Tung-Ming; Lai, Chao-Sung; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    2013-05-15

    A solid-state sensor embedded microfluidic chip is demonstrated for the detection of glucose, urea and creatinine in human serum. In the presented device, magnetic powder-containing enzyme-carrying alginate microbeads are immobilized on the surface of an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) sensor by means of a step-like obstacle in the microchannel and an external magnetic force. The sample is injected into the microchannel and reacts with the enzyme contained within the alginate beads; prompting the release of hydrogen ions. The sample concentration is then evaluated by measuring the resulting change in the voltage signal of the EIS sensor. The reaction time and alginate bead size are optimized experimentally using a standard glucose solution. The experimental results show that the device has a detection range of 2-8mM, 1-16mM and 10(-2)-10mM for glucose, urea and creatinine, respectively. Furthermore, it is shown that the device is capable of sequentially measuring all three indicators in a human serum sample. Finally, it is shown that the measured values of the glucose, urea and creatinine concentrations obtained using the device deviate from those obtained using a commercial kit by just 5.17%, 6.22% and 13.53%, respectively. This method can be extended to sequentially measure multiple blood indicators in the sample chip by replacing different types of enzyme in alginate bead and can address the enzyme preservation issue in the microfluidic device. Overall, the results presented in this study indicate that the microfluidic chip has significant potential for blood monitoring in point-of-care applications.

  9. An Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Composed of Carbon-Coated Nano Tin Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Wang, An-Ni; Peng, Shiuan-Ying

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a biosensor, based on a glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized, carbon-coated tin sulfide (SnS) assembled on a glass carbon electrode (GCE) was developed, and its direct electrochemistry was investigated. The carbon coated SnS (C-SnS) nanoparticle was prepared through a simple two-step process, using hydrothermal and chemical vapor deposition methods. The large reactive surface area and unique electrical potential of C-SnS could offer a favorable microenvironment for facilitating electron transfer between enzymes and the electrode surface. The structure and sensor ability of the proposed GOx/C-SnS electrode were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and cyclic voltammetry study (CV).

  10. Interleukin-6 directly increases glucose metabolism in resting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glund, Stephan; Deshmukh, Atul; Long, Yun Chau

    2007-01-01

    suggested to promote insulin-mediated glucose utilization. In this study, we determined the direct effects of IL-6 on glucose transport and signal transduction in human skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle strips were prepared from vastus lateralis biopsies obtained from 22 healthy men. Muscle strips were...... incubated with or without IL-6 (120 ng/ml). We found that IL-6 increased glucose transport in human skeletal muscle 1.3-fold (P ... exposure increases glucose metabolism in resting human skeletal muscle. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport and insulin signaling were unchanged after IL-6 exposure....

  11. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Attal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle. Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM, and Random Forest (RF as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM and Hidden Markov Model (HMM, are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of the Glucose Homeostatic System in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-07-01

    of carbohydrates), glycogenolysis (break-down of glycogen to glucose-1-phosphate) and gluconeogenesis (formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate...glycogen (glycogenesis), (ii) conversion of glycogen to glucose to be released into the blood ( glycogenolysis ), and (iii) conversion of 22 noncarbohydrate...to glucose-1- phosphate. Thus, lowering cAMP levels inhibits glycogenolysis and decreases the direct output of glucose by the liver. A second way in

  13. Glucose Homeostatic Law: Insulin Clearance Predicts the Progression of Glucose Intolerance in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Ohashi

    Full Text Available Homeostatic control of blood glucose is regulated by a complex feedback loop between glucose and insulin, of which failure leads to diabetes mellitus. However, physiological and pathological nature of the feedback loop is not fully understood. We made a mathematical model of the feedback loop between glucose and insulin using time course of blood glucose and insulin during consecutive hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 113 subjects with variety of glucose tolerance including normal glucose tolerance (NGT, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We analyzed the correlation of the parameters in the model with the progression of glucose intolerance and the conserved relationship between parameters. The model parameters of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion significantly declined from NGT to IGT, and from IGT to T2DM, respectively, consistent with previous clinical observations. Importantly, insulin clearance, an insulin degradation rate, significantly declined from NGT, IGT to T2DM along the progression of glucose intolerance in the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was positively correlated with a product of insulin sensitivity and secretion assessed by the clamp analysis or determined with the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was correlated negatively with postprandial glucose at 2h after oral glucose tolerance test. We also inferred a square-law between the rate constant of insulin clearance and a product of rate constants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in the model, which is also conserved among NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. Insulin clearance shows a conserved relationship with the capacity of glucose disposal among the NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. The decrease of insulin clearance predicts the progression of glucose intolerance.

  14. Design, synthesis and structure of new potential electrochemically active boronic acid-based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.; Søtofte, Inger

    2002-01-01

    In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report the synthe......In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report...... the synthesis of the compounds and our investigations on glucose complexation as studied by C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of 2,4,6-tris[2-(N-ferrocenylmethyl-N-methylaminomethyl) phenyl] boroxin (13) (boroxin of boronic acid 3) (boroxin = cyclotriboroxane) was obtained and compared...... with structures obtained of 2,4,6-tris[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boroxin (14) and 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-diyl[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boronate (15). The structure of 13 shows the existence of intramolecular B-N bonds in the solid phase....

  15. A Small U-Shaped Bending-Induced Interference Optical Fiber Sensor for the Measurement of Glucose Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Chen-Tung; Chiang, Chia-Chin

    2016-09-09

    The study proposes a small U-shaped bending-induced interference optical fiber sensor; this novel sensor is a probe-type sensor manufactured using a mechanical device, a heat source, optical fiber and a packaging module. This probe-type sensor overcomes the shortcomings of conventional optical fibers, including being difficult to repair and a tendency to be influenced by external forces. We manufactured three types of sensors with different curvature radiuses. Specifically, sensors with three radiuses (1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm) were used to measure common water and glucose solutions with concentrations of between 6% and 30% (the interval between concentrations was 4%). The results show that the maximal sensitivity was 0.85 dB/% and that the linearly-dependent coefficient was 0.925. The results further show that not only can the small U-shaped bending-induced interference optical fiber sensor achieve high sensitivity in the measurement of glucose solutions, but that it can also achieve great stability and repeatability.

  16. Glucose sensor based on redox-cycling between selectively modified and unmodified combs of carbon interdigitated array nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepti; Lim, Yeongjin; Lee, Yunjeong; Shin, Heungjoo

    2015-08-19

    We present a novel electrochemical glucose sensor employing an interdigitated array (IDA) of 1:1 aspect ratio carbon nanoelectrodes for the electrochemical-enzymatic redox cycling of redox species (ferricyanide/ferrocyanide) between glucose oxidase (GOx) and the two comb-shaped nanoelectrodes of the IDA. The carbon nanoelectrodes were fabricated using a simple, cost-effective, reproducible microfabrication technology known as the carbon-microelectromechanical-systems (C-MEMS) process. One comb (comb 1) of the IDA was selectively modified with GOx via the electrochemical reduction of an aryl diazonium salt, while the other comb (comb 2) remained unmodified; this facilitates electrochemically more active surface of comb 2, resulting in sensitive glucose detection. Ferricyanide is reduced to ferrocyanide by the GOx in the presence of glucose, and ferrocyanide diffuses to both combs of the IDA where it is oxidized. The limited electrochemical current collection at the surface-modified comb 1 is counterbalanced by the efficient redox cycling between the enzyme sites at comb 1 and the bare carbon surface of comb 2. Reducing the electrode-to-electrode gap between the two combs (gap = 1.9 μm) increases the diffusion flux of redox species at comb 2 hence, enhanced the sensitivity and limit of detection of the glucose sensor by ∼2.3 and ∼295 times, respectively at comb 2 compared to comb 1. The developed IDA-based glucose sensor demonstrated good amperometric response to glucose, affording two linear ranges from 0.001 to 1 mM and from 1 to 10 mM, with limits of detection of 0.4 and 61 μM and sensitivities of 823.2 and 70.0 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), respectively.

  17. Employing FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase within a glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell operating in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Ross D; Lim, Koun; Hickey, David P; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-12-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) is emerging as an oxygen-insensitive alternative to glucose oxidase (GOx) as the biocatalyst for bioelectrodes and bioanodes in glucose sensing and glucose enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs). Glucose EFCs, which utilize oxygen as the oxidant and final electron acceptor, have the added benefit of being able to be implanted within living hosts. These can then produce electrical energy from physiological glucose concentrations and power internal or external devices. EFCs were prepared with FAD-GDH and bilirubin oxidase (BOx) to evaluate the suitability of FAD-GDH within an implantable setting. Maximum current and power densities of 186.6±7.1 μA cm(-2) and 39.5±1.3 μW cm(-2) were observed when operating in human serum at 21 °C, which increased to 285.7±31.3 μA cm(-2) and 57.5±5.4 μW cm(-2) at 37 °C. Although good stability was observed with continual near-optimal operation of the EFCs in human serum at 21 °C for 24 h, device failure was observed between 13-14 h when continually operated at 37 °C.

  18. Natural User Interface Sensors for Human Body Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, J.

    2012-08-01

    The recent push for natural user interfaces (NUI) in the entertainment and gaming industry has ushered in a new era of low cost three-dimensional sensors. While the basic idea of using a three-dimensional sensor for human gesture recognition dates some years back it is not until recently that such sensors became available on the mass market. The current market leader is PrimeSense who provide their technology for the Microsoft Xbox Kinect. Since these sensors are developed to detect and observe human users they should be ideally suited to measure the human body. We describe the technology of a line of NUI sensors and assess their performance in terms of repeatability and accuracy. We demonstrate the implementation of a prototype scanner integrating several NUI sensors to achieve full body coverage. We present the results of the obtained surface model of a human body.

  19. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Linda R.; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R.; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-hum...

  20. Why Do SGLT2 Inhibitors Inhibit Only 30–50% of Renal Glucose Reabsorption in Humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiwen; Lee, TaeWeon; DeFronzo, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition is a novel and promising treatment for diabetes under late-stage clinical development. It generally is accepted that SGLT2 mediates 90% of renal glucose reabsorption. However, SGLT2 inhibitors in clinical development inhibit only 30–50% of the filtered glucose load. Why are they unable to inhibit 90% of glucose reabsorption in humans? We will try to provide an explanation to this puzzle in this perspective analysis of the unique pharmacokineti...

  1. Spherulitic copper-copper oxide nanostructure-based highly sensitive nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gautam; Tran, Thao Quynh Ngan; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different spherulitic nanostructures Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC were synthesized in water-in-oil microemulsions by varying the surfactant concentration (30 mM, 40 mM, and 50 mM, respectively). The structural and morphological characteristics of the Cu-CuO nanostructures were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques. The synthesized nanostructures were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes to fabricate a nonenzymatic highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensor. The performance of the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuO electrodes in the glucose assay was examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric studies. The sensitivity of the sensor varied with the spherulite type; Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC exhibited a sensitivity of 1,229, 3,012, and 3,642 µA mM(-1)·cm(-2), respectively. Moreover, the linear range is dependent on the structure types: 0.023-0.29 mM, 0.07-0.8 mM, and 0.023-0.34 mM for Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC, respectively. An excellent response time of 3 seconds and a low detection limit of 2 µM were observed for Cu-CuOB at an applied potential of +0.34 V. In addition, this electrode was found to be resistant to interference by common interfering agents such as urea, cystamine, L-ascorbic acid, and creatinine. The high performance of the Cu-CuO spherulites with nanowire-to-nanorod outgrowths was primarily due to the high surface area and stability, and good three-dimensional structure. Furthermore, the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuOB electrode applied to real urine and serum sample showed satisfactory performance.

  2. Highly Dispersed NiO Nanoparticles Decorating graphene Nanosheets for Non-enzymatic Glucose Sensor and Biofuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guisheng; Li, Weiping; Ci, Suqin; Jia, Jingchun; Wen, Zhenhai

    2016-11-01

    Nickel oxide-decorated graphene nanosheet (NiO/GNS), as a novel non-enzymatic electrocatalyst for glucose oxidation reaction (GOR), was synthesized through a facile hydrothermal route followed by the heat treatment. The successful synthesis of NiO/GNS was characterized by a series of techniques including XRD, BET, SEM and TEM. Significantly, the NiO/GNS catalyst show excellent catalytic activity toward GOR, and was employed to develop a sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor. The developed glucose sensor could response to glucose in a wide range from 5 μM-4.2 mM with a low detection limit (LOD) of 5.0 μM (S/N = 3). Importantly, compared with bare NiO, the catalytic activity of NiO/GNS was much higher. The reason might be that the 2D structure of graphene could prevent the aggregation of NiO and facilitate the electron transfer at electrode interface. Moreover, the outstanding catalytic activity of NiO/GNS was further demonstrated by applying it to construct a biofuel cell using glucose as fuel, which exhibited high stability and current density.

  3. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  4. Detecting alterations of glucose and lipid components in human serum by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Borges,Rita de Cássia Fernandes; NAVARRO, Ricardo Scarparo; Giana,Hector Enrique; Tavares,Fernanda Grubisich; Fernandes,Adriana Barrinha; Silveira Junior, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Raman spectroscopy may become a tool for the analysis of glucose and triglycerides in human serum in real time. This study aimed to detect spectral differences in lipid and glucose components of human serum, thus evaluating the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy for diagnostic purposes. Methods A total of 44 samples of blood serum were collected from volunteers and submitted for clinical blood biochemical analysis. The concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and low...

  5. Glucose Metabolism of Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the glucose metabolism of prostate cancer is modulated by androgen. We performed in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies of [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG accumulation in androgen-sensitive (CWR-22 and androgen-independent (PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts implanted in castrated and noncastrated male athymic mice. The growth pattern of the CWR-22 tumor was best approximated by an exponential function (tumor size in mm3 = 14.913 e0.108 × days, R2 = .96, n = 5. The growth pattern of the PC-3 tumor was best approximated by a quadratic function (tumor size in mm3 = 0.3511 × days2 + 49.418 × day −753.33, R2 = .96, n = 3. The FDG accumulation in the CWR-22 tumor implanted in the castrated mice was significantly lower, by an average of 55%, in comparison to that implanted in the noncastrated host (1.27 vs. 2.83, respectively, p < .05. The 3-week maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax was 0.99 ± 0.43 (mean ± SD for CWR-22 and 1.21 ± 0.32 for PC-3, respectively. The 5-week SUVmax was 1.22 ± 0.08 for CWR-22 and 1.35 ± 0.17 for PC-3, respectively. The background muscle SUVmax was 0.53 ± 0.11. Glucose metabolism was higher in the PC-3 tumor than in the CWR-22 tumor at both the 3-week (by 18% and the 5-week (by 9.6% micro-PET imaging sessions. Our results support the notions that FDG PET may be useful in the imaging evaluation of response to androgen ablation therapy and in the early prediction of hormone refractoriness in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans.

  7. Passivating protein coatings for implantable glucose sensors: evaluation of protein retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhood, Steven J; Horbett, Thomas A; Ward, W Kenneth; Wood, Michael D; Quinn, Matthew J

    2007-04-01

    The long-term function of implantable biosensors is limited by the foreign-body reaction (FBR). Since the acute phase of the FBR involves macrophage attachment mediated by adsorbed fibrinogen, preadsorption, and retention of other proteins might reduce the FBR. The retention of preadsorbed albumin, hemoglobin, von Willebrand's factor, and high-molecular-weight kininogen was therefore measured after exposure to plasma. The retention of preadsorbed proteins after incubation with monocyte cultures and implantation in rats was also measured. Fibrinogen adsorption from plasma to the preadsorbed surfaces was also measured. Hemoglobin adsorption was higher than that for other proteins, and it also had the greatest retention after exposure to blood plasma. When surfaces preadsorbed with hemoglobin were incubated with monocytes, more of the hemoglobin was displaced than that after incubation in plasma, while still more hemoglobin was displaced when the surfaces were implanted in vivo. Protein preadsorption on polystyrene greatly reduced fibrinogen adsorption. However, polyurethane surfaces used for glucose sensors had low fibrinogen adsorption compared with polystyrene, and this low level was not further reduced by preadsorption with other proteins. Preadsorbed proteins on polymers appear to be removed by passive exchange and/or displacement by plasma proteins and by proteases released by monocytes. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Human-computer interface glove using flexible piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Seo, Jeonggyu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Park, Jung-Min

    2017-05-01

    In this note, we propose a human-computer interface glove based on flexible piezoelectric sensors. We select polyvinylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric material for the sensors because of advantages such as a steady piezoelectric characteristic and good flexibility. The sensors are installed in a fabric glove by means of pockets and Velcro bands. We detect changes in the angles of the finger joints from the outputs of the sensors, and use them for controlling a virtual hand that is utilized in virtual object manipulation. To assess the sensing ability of the piezoelectric sensors, we compare the processed angles from the sensor outputs with the real angles from a camera recoding. With good agreement between the processed and real angles, we successfully demonstrate the user interaction system with the virtual hand and interface glove based on the flexible piezoelectric sensors, for four hand motions: fist clenching, pinching, touching, and grasping.

  9. Converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat prevents high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro; Asada, Akira; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    We examined the involvement of the oxidative stress in high glucose-induced suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 h concentration-dependently (5.6-22.2 mol/l) inhibited human coronary endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, at 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose (22.2 mmol/l)-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat at 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-induced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity in human aortic endothelial cells. The protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C 100 nmol/l or chelerythrine 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 h increased intracellular oxidative stress, directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by temocaprilat 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l. Bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant 100 nmol/l significantly reduced the action of temocaprilat; whereas bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-bradykinin 100 nmol/l had no effect. These findings suggest that high glucose inhibits human aortic endothelial cell proliferation and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat inhibits high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation, possibly through suppression of protein kinase C, bradykinin B2 receptors and oxidative stress.

  10. Onboard Sensor Data Qualification in Human-Rated Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edmond; Melcher, Kevin J.; Maul, William A.; Chicatelli, Amy K.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Fulton, Christopher; Bickford, Randall

    2012-01-01

    The avionics system software for human-rated launch vehicles requires an implementation approach that is robust to failures, especially the failure of sensors used to monitor vehicle conditions that might result in an abort determination. Sensor measurements provide the basis for operational decisions on human-rated launch vehicles. This data is often used to assess the health of system or subsystem components, to identify failures, and to take corrective action. An incorrect conclusion and/or response may result if the sensor itself provides faulty data, or if the data provided by the sensor has been corrupted. Operational decisions based on faulty sensor data have the potential to be catastrophic, resulting in loss of mission or loss of crew. To prevent these later situations from occurring, a Modular Architecture and Generalized Methodology for Sensor Data Qualification in Human-rated Launch Vehicles has been developed. Sensor Data Qualification (SDQ) is a set of algorithms that can be implemented in onboard flight software, and can be used to qualify data obtained from flight-critical sensors prior to the data being used by other flight software algorithms. Qualified data has been analyzed by SDQ and is determined to be a true representation of the sensed system state; that is, the sensor data is determined not to be corrupted by sensor faults or signal transmission faults. Sensor data can become corrupted by faults at any point in the signal path between the sensor and the flight computer. Qualifying the sensor data has the benefit of ensuring that erroneous data is identified and flagged before otherwise being used for operational decisions, thus increasing confidence in the response of the other flight software processes using the qualified data, and decreasing the probability of false alarms or missed detections.

  11. Recognition of human activities with wearable sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weihua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Li, Xinke

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors is investigated in this article. The key techniques of this approach include the generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) and the relevance vector machines (RVM). The feature vectors extracted from the measured signal are processed by GDA, with its dimension remarkably reduced from 350 to 12 while fully maintaining the most discriminative information. The reduced feature vectors are then classified by the RVM technique according to an extended multiclass model, which shows good convergence characteristic. Experimental results on the Wearable Action Recognition Dataset demonstrate that our approach achieves an encouraging recognition rate of 99.2%, true positive rate of 99.18% and false positive rate of 0.07%. Although in most cases, the support vector machines model has more than 70 support vectors, the number of relevance vectors related to different activities is always not more than 4, which implies a great simplicity in the classifier structure. Our approach is expected to have potential in real-time applications or solving problems with large-scale datasets, due to its perfect recognition performance, strong ability in feature reduction, and simple classifier structure.

  12. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  13. Development of Cu2O/Carbon Vulcan XC-72 as non-enzymatic sensor for glucose determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khatib, K M; Abdel Hameed, R M

    2011-04-15

    A novel and stable non-enzymatic glucose sensor was developed based on the chemical reduction of Cu(2)O nanoparticles on Carbon Vulcan XC-72 using NaBH(4) as the reducing agent via the impregnation method. Different molar ratios of NaBH(4) to the copper salt were employed during the reduction step. This was found to affect the morphology; composition and structure of the prepared samples as investigated by TEM, EDX and XRD analyses. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were applied to examine the electrocatalytic activity of the different samples of Cu(2)O/Carbon Vulcan XC-72 towards glucose oxidation in alkaline medium. The 'x70' sample got the highest oxidation current density and the lowest oxidation potential. The performance of this sensor was evaluated showing a wide linear range up to 6mM with sensitivity of 629 μA cm(-2)mM(-1) and detection limit of 2.4 μM. Its good tolerance to ascorbic acid with long-term stability elects Cu(2)O/Carbon Vulcan XC-72 as a promising glucose sensor.

  14. Fabrication and Optimization of a Nanoporous Platinum Electrode and a Non-enzymatic Glucose Micro-sensor on Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Kim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, optimal conditions for fabrication of nanoporous platinum (Pt were investigated in order to use it as a sensitive sensing electrode for silicon CMOS integrable non-enzymatic glucose micro-sensor applications. Applied charges, voltages, and temperatures were varied during the electroplating of Pt into the formed nonionic surfactant C16EO8 nano-scaled molds in order to fabricate nanoporous Pt electrodes with large surface roughness factor (RF, uniformity, and reproducibility. The fabricated nanoporous Pt electrodes were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM and electrochemical cyclic voltammograms. Optimal electroplating conditions were determined to be an applied charge of 35 mC/mm2, a voltage of -0.12 V, and a temperature of 25 °C, respectively. The optimized nanoporous Pt electrode had an electrochemical RF of 375 and excellent reproducibility. The optimized nanoporous Pt electrode was applied to fabricate non-enzymatic glucose micro-sensor with three electrode systems. The fabricated sensor had a size of 3 mm x 3 mm, air gap of 10 µm, working electrode (WE area of 4.4 mm2, and sensitivity of 37.5 µA•L/mmol•cm2. In addition, it showed large detection range from 0.05 to 30 mmolL-1 and stable recovery responsive to the step changes in glucose concentration.

  15. Honeycomb-like Porous Carbon-Cobalt Oxide Nanocomposite for High-Performance Enzymeless Glucose Sensor and Supercapacitor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Rajesh; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Manikandan, Arumugam; Lo, An-Ya; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-07-29

    Herein, we report the preparation of Pongam seed shells-derived activated carbon and cobalt oxide (∼2-10 nm) nanocomposite (PSAC/Co3O4) by using a general and facile synthesis strategy. The as-synthesized PSAC/Co3O4 samples were characterized by a variety of physicochemical techniques. The PSAC/Co3O4-modified electrode is employed in two different applications such as high performance nonenzymatic glucose sensor and supercapacitor. Remarkably, the fabricated glucose sensor is exhibited an ultrahigh sensitivity of 34.2 mA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a very low detection limit (21 nM) and long-term durability. The PSAC/Co3O4 modified stainless steel electrode possesses an appreciable specific capacitance and remarkable long-term cycling stability. The obtained results suggest the as-synthesized PSAC/Co3O4 is more suitable for the nonenzymatic glucose sensor and supercapacitor applications outperforming the related carbon based modified electrodes, rendering practical industrial applications.

  16. Enzymatic glucose sensor based on Au nanoparticle and plant-like ZnO film modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Kun [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alex, Saji [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Government College for Women, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695014 (India); Siegel, Gene [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Tiwari, Ashutosh, E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A novel electrochemical glucose sensor was developed by employing a composite film of plant-like Zinc oxide (ZnO) and chitosan stabilized spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on which Glucose oxidaze (GOx) was immobilized. The ZnO was deposited on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and the AuNPs of average diameter of 23 nm were loaded on ZnO as the second layer. The prepared ITO/ZnO/AuNPs/GOx bioelectrode exhibited a low value of Michaelis–Menten constant of 1.70 mM indicating a good bio-matrix for GOx. The studies of electrochemical properties of the electrode using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that, the presence of AuNPs provides significant enhancement of the electron transfer rate during redox reactions. The linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) shows that the ITO/ZnO/AuNPs/GOx based sensor has a high sensitivity of 3.12 μA·mM{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} in the range of 50 mg/dL to 400 mg/dL glucose concentration. The results show promising application of the gold nanoparticle modified plant-like ZnO composite bioelectrode for electrochemical sensing of glucose.

  17. Smart Integrated Sensor for Multiple Detections of Glucose and L-Lactate Using On-Chip Electrochemical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamazaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sensor electrodes, a supplementary electrode, a reference electrode, and signal-processing circuits were integrated on a single chip to develop a chip-shaped electrochemical sensing system. L-lactate and glucose were measured using on-chip working electrodes modified by polyion complex to immobilize lactate oxidase and glucose oxidase, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry measurements were conducted using an on-chip potentiostat. Selective and quantitative detection of glucose and L-lactate and the interference behavior were studied. Hydrogen peroxide generated by enzymatic reactions was detected by an increase in anodic oxidation current. Reaction currents at +0.7 V versus Ag/AgCl were used to obtain calibration plots. The measured dynamic ranges for L-lactate and glucose were 0.2–1.0 mM and 2.0–8.0 mM, respectively. The sensitivities were 65 nA/mM and 15 nA/mM, respectively, using a working electrode of 0.5 mm2. The 3σ detection limit was 0.19 mM and 1.1 mM, respectively. We have achieved multiple biomaterial detections on a circuit-equipped single chip. This integrated electrochemical sensor chip could be the best candidate for realizing point-of-care testing due to its portability and potential for mass production.

  18. Effect of adrenaline on glucose kinetics during exercise in adrenalectomised humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howlett, K; Galbo, H; Lorentsen, J

    1999-01-01

    1. The role of adrenaline in regulating hepatic glucose production and muscle glucose uptake during exercise was examined in six adrenaline-deficient, bilaterally adrenalectomised humans. Six sex- and age-matched healthy individuals served as controls (CON). 2. Adrenalectomised subjects cycled...... for 45 min at 68 +/- 1 % maximum pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2,max), followed by 15 min at 84 +/- 2 % VO2, max without (-ADR) or with (+ADR) adrenaline infusion, which elevated plasma adrenaline levels (45 min, 4.49 +/- 0.69 nmol l-1; 60 min, 12.41 +/- 1.80 nmol l-1; means +/- s.e.m.). Glucose kinetics were...... measured using [3-3H]glucose. 3. Euglycaemia was maintained during exercise in CON and -ADR, whilst in +ADR plasma glucose was elevated. The exercise-induced increase in hepatic glucose production was similar in +ADR and -ADR; however, adrenaline infusion augmented the rise in hepatic glucose production...

  19. Effect of adrenaline on glucose kinetics during exercise in adrenalectomised humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howlett, K; Galbo, H; Lorentsen, J;

    1999-01-01

    trials. Adrenaline infusion suppressed growth hormone and elevated plasma free fatty acids, glycerol and lactate. Alanine and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were similar between trials. 5. The results demonstrate that glucose homeostasis was maintained during exercise in adrenalectomised subjects......1. The role of adrenaline in regulating hepatic glucose production and muscle glucose uptake during exercise was examined in six adrenaline-deficient, bilaterally adrenalectomised humans. Six sex- and age-matched healthy individuals served as controls (CON). 2. Adrenalectomised subjects cycled...... measured using [3-3H]glucose. 3. Euglycaemia was maintained during exercise in CON and -ADR, whilst in +ADR plasma glucose was elevated. The exercise-induced increase in hepatic glucose production was similar in +ADR and -ADR; however, adrenaline infusion augmented the rise in hepatic glucose production...

  20. Automatic Identification of Inertial Sensors on the Human Body Segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; Beijnum, van B.J.F.; Veltink, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) in combination with magnetic sensors was proven to be a suitable ambulatory alternative to traditional human motion tracking systems based on optical position measurements. While accurate full 6 degrees of freedom information is

  1. Automatic Identification of Inertial Sensors on the Human Body Segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    In the last few years, inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) in combination with magnetic sensors was proven to be a suitable ambulatory alternative to traditional human motion tracking systems based on optical position measurements. While accurate full 6 degrees of freedom information is

  2. Natural User Interface Sensors For Human Body Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Boehm, J.

    2012-01-01

    The recent push for natural user interfaces (NUI) in the entertainment and gaming industry has ushered in a new era of low cost three-dimensional sensors. While the basic idea of using a three-dimensional sensor for human gesture recognition dates some years back it is not until recently that such sensors became available on the mass market. The current market leader is PrimeSense who provide their technology for the Microsoft Xbox Kinect. Since these sensors are developed to detect and obser...

  3. Detecting failures of the glucose sensor-insulin pump system: improved overnight safety monitoring for Type-1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Andrea; Del Favero, Simone; Sparacino, Giovanni; Cobelli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    New sensors for real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and pumps for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), possibly mounted on the same device, opened new scenarios for Type-1 diabetes treatment. However, possible failures of either CGM or CSII can expose diabetic patients to risks that can be dangerous especially overnight. In this contribution we present a proof-of-concept method, developed in a state-space context and implemented through a Kalman estimator, to detect in real time possible overnight failures of the sensor-pump system by simultaneously using CGM and CSII data. The method is tested on two simulated and one real subject. Results show that the method is able to correctly generate alerts for sensor-pump failures and stimulates further investigation on its development.

  4. Self-assembly of palladium nanoparticles on functional TiO{sub 2} nanotubes for a nonenzymatic glucose sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianlan [School of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); College of Chemistry, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Li, Gang; Zhang, Guowei [School of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Hou, Keyu [College of Chemistry, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Pan, Haibo, E-mail: hbpan@fzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Du, Min [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride, PDDA, was used as a stabilizer and linker for functionalized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs). Self-assembled process with palladium nanoparticles (NPs) was successfully synthesized and used for the oxidation of glucose on glassy carbon electrodes. Based on the voltammetric and amperometric results, Pd NPs efficiently catalyzed the oxidation of glucose at − 0.05 V in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl and showed excellent resistance toward interference poisoning from such interfering species as ascorbic acid, uric acid and urea. To further increase sensitivity, the Pd NPs-PDDA-TiO{sub 2} NTs/GCE was electrochemically treated with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH, the glucose oxidation current was magnified 2.5 times than that before pretreatments due to greatly enhancing the electron transport property of the sensor based on the increased defect sites and surface oxide species. In view of the physiological level of glucose, the wide linear concentration range of glucose (4 × 10{sup −7}–8 × 10{sup −4} M) with a detection limit of 8 × 10{sup −8} M (S/N = 3) was obviously good enough for clinical application. - Highlights: • PDDA was used as a stabilizer and linker for functionalized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. • Self-assembled process with palladium nanoparticles was synthesized. • After treated both H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH, the glucose response was magnified to 2.5 times. • The wide linear concentration range of glucose was obtained with a limit of 8 × 10{sup −8} M.

  5. Novel Low-Cost Sensor for Human Bite Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred Fastier-Wooller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and development of a low cost and reliable maximal voluntary bite force sensor which can be manufactured in-house by using an acrylic laser cutting machine. The sensor has been designed for ease of fabrication, assembly, calibration, and safe use. The sensor is capable of use within an hour of commencing production, allowing for rapid prototyping/modifications and practical implementation. The measured data shows a good linear relationship between the applied force and the electrical resistance of the sensor. The output signal has low drift, excellent repeatability, and a large measurable range of 0 to 700 N. A high signal-to-noise response to human bite forces was observed, indicating the high potential of the proposed sensor for human bite force measurement.

  6. Wearable Sensor System for Human Dynamics Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko; Zheng, Rencheng

    2010-01-01

    A new wearable sensor system was developed for measuring tri-directional ground reaction force (GRF) and segment orientations. A stationary force plate can not measure more than one stride; moreover, in studies of stair ascent and descent measurements, a complex system consisting of many stationary force plates and a data fusion method must be constructed (Stacoff et al., 2005; Della and Bonato, 2007). The wearable sensor system proposed in this chapter can be applied to successive walking tr...

  7. Negative Effects of High Glucose Exposure in Human Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Morelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are often associated with male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, suggesting that hypothalamic defects involving GnRH neurons may impair the reproductive function. Among metabolic factors hyperglycemia has been implicated in the control of the reproductive axis at central level, both in humans and in animal models. To date, little is known about the direct effects of pathological high glucose concentrations on human GnRH neurons. In this study, we investigated the high glucose effects in the human GnRH-secreting FNC-B4 cells. Gene expression profiling by qRT-PCR, confirmed that FNC-B4 cells express GnRH and several genes relevant for GnRH neuron function (KISS1R, KISS1, sex steroid and leptin receptors, FGFR1, neuropilin 2, and semaphorins, along with glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. High glucose exposure (22 mM; 40 mM significantly reduced gene and protein expression of GnRH, KISS1R, KISS1, and leptin receptor, as compared to normal glucose (5 mM. Consistent with previous studies, leptin treatment significantly induced GnRH mRNA expression at 5 mM glucose, but not in the presence of high glucose concentrations. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a deleterious direct contribution of high glucose on human GnRH neurons, thus providing new insights into pathogenic mechanisms linking metabolic disorders to reproductive dysfunctions.

  8. The human Na+-glucose cotransporter is a molecular water pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinild, A; Klaerke, D A; Loo, D D

    1998-01-01

    1. The human Na+-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The transport activity, given by the Na+ current, was monitored as a clamp current and the concomitant flux of water followed optically as the change in oocyte volume. 2. When glucose was added to the bathing...

  9. Preparation of the glucose sensor based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous gold film and room temperature ionic liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A novel type of glucose sensor was fabricated based on a glucose oxidase(GOD)-N,N-dimethtylformamide(DMF)-[BMIm][BF4] composites modified three-dimensional ordered macroporous(3DOM) gold film electrode.The immobilized GOD exhibits a pair of well-defined reversible peaks in 50 mM pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solutions(PBS),which could be attributed to the redox of flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) in GOD.The research results show that ionic liquid([BMIm][BF4]),DMF and 3DOM gold film are crucial for GOD to exhibit a pair of stable and reversible peaks.It is believed that the large active area of 3DOM gold film can increase the amount of immobilized GOD.Simultaneously,the application of IL enhances the stability of GOD and facilitates the electron transfer between GOD and the electrode.The synergetic effect of DMF can help the GOD to maintain its bioactivity better.GOD immobilized on the electrode exhibits the favorable electrocatalytic property to glucose,and the prepared sensor has a linear range from 10 to 125 nM with a detection limit of 3.3 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3σ.The apparent Km(Michaelis-Menten constant) for the enzymatic reaction is 0.018 mM.

  10. Substrate overload: Glucose oxidation in human myotubes conquers palmitate oxidation through anaplerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To date, two cardinal principles govern oxidation of glucose and fatty acids in skeletal muscle; exogenous fatty acid reduces glucose oxidation and glucose reduces fatty acid oxidation. Both glucose and palmitate (PA) oxidation was increased by increasing their concentration and inhibited...... by increasing concentrations of the other in human myotubes established from healthy, lean subjects exposed to acute stepwise increases in glucose and PA levels. At high substrate levels; PA oxidation was reduced while release of acid soluble metabolites was increased and, both glucose oxidation and release...... of citrate was increased which could be abolished by phenylacetic acid (inhibitor of pyruvate carboxylase (PC)). The present data challenges above preconceptions. Although they operate at low-moderate substrate levels additional two principles determine substrate oxidation at higher substrate concentrations...

  11. Impaired glucose-induced thermogenesis and arterial norepinephrine response persist after weight reduction in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Andersen, T; Christensen, N J;

    1990-01-01

    A reduced thermic response and an impaired activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been reported after oral glucose in human obesity. It is, however, not known whether the reduced SNS activity returns to normal along with weight reduction. The thermic effect of glucose was lower...... in eight obese patients than in matched control subjects (1.7% vs 9.2%, p less than 0.002). The increase in arterial norepinephrine after glucose was also blunted in the obese patients. After a 30-kg weight loss their glucose and lipid profiles were markedly improved but the thermic effect of glucose...... was still lower than that of the control subjects (4.2%, p less than 0.001). The glucose-induced arterial norepinephrine response remained diminished in the reduced obese patients whereas the changes in plasma epinephrine were similar in all three groups. The results suggest that a defective SNS may...

  12. Glucose homeostasis during spontaneous labor in normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, P C; Bonin, B; Dizazo, A; Guimond, P; Monier, D; Bourque, J; Chiasson, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using stable isotope, glucose turnover was measured in six normal pregnant women during the various stages of labor; during the latent (A1) and active (A2) phases of cervical dilatation, during fetal expulsion (B), and during placental expulsion (C). These data were compared to measurements made in five postpartum women. Pancreatic hormones and cortisol were also measured. In four other normal women undergoing spontaneous labor, catecholamines and free fatty acids were measured. Plasma glucose increased throughout labor from 4.0 +/- 0.2 (A1) to 5.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (C) (P period. Epinephrine and norepinephrine also increased during labor from 218 +/- 132 pmol/L and 1.09 +/- 0.16 nmol/L to 1119 +/- 158 and 3.61 +/- 1.04, respectively. It is concluded that labor is associated with a marked increase in glucose utilization and production. These findings suggest that muscle contraction (uterus and skeletal) independent of insulin is a major regulator of glucose utilization during labor. Furthermore, the increase in hepatic glucose production could be favored by an increase in glucagon, catecholamines, and cortisol.

  13. A triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Huang; Xian Li; Ye Sun

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study is to design a novel triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition. Physical activity recognition is widely used in well-being management, medical diagnosis and rehabilitation. Other than traditional accelerometers, we design a novel wearable sensor system based on triboelectrification. The triboelectric motion sensor can be easily attached to human body and collect motion signals caused by physical activities. The experiments are conducted to collect five common activity data: sitting and standing, walking, climbing upstairs, downstairs, and running. The k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) clustering algorithm is adopted to recognize these activities and validate the feasibility of this new approach. The results show that our system can perform physical activity recognition with a successful rate over 80% for walking, sitting and standing. The triboelectric structure can also be used as an energy harvester for motion harvesting due to its high output voltage in random low-frequency motion.

  14. Methamphetamine inhibits the glucose uptake by human neurons and astrocytes: stabilization by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Abdul Muneer

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3. Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1. The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers.

  15. Solvent-assisted morphology confinement of a nickel sulfide nanostructure and its application for non-enzymatic glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soochan; Lee, Sang Ha; Cho, Misuk; Lee, Youngkwan

    2016-11-15

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of nickel sulfide (Ni3S2) was performed directly on Ni foam using thioacetamide as a sulfur ion source. Various morphologies of nickel sulfide were fabricated using a hydrothermal process by adjusting the solvent composition of ethanol and water. In the water-dominant condition, a dendrite structure was obtained; otherwise, a flaky structure was achieved. A hierarchical cauliflower-like structure was obtained at a solvent mixture composition of 1:1 and was used as non-enzymatic glucose sensor. The hierarchical Ni3S2 electrode showed a high level of electro-catalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose (16,460μAmM(-1)cm(-2)) over a wide range of detection (0.0005-3mM) and a low detection limit (0.82μM) with excellent selectivity in the presence of several electroactive species.

  16. Controllable preparation of hierarchically core–shell structure NiO/C microspheres for non-enzymatic glucose sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Zhenzhen; Yin, Haoyong; Nie, Qiulin, E-mail: nieqiulin@hdu.edu.cn

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Hierarchically core–shell structure NiO/C microspheres were prepared. • The NiO/C microspheres were obtained via layer-by-layer assembly methods. • The NiO/C sensor shows excellent performance in glucose detection. • Good stability and anti-interference were also obtained on the NiO/C sensor. - Abstract: Hierarchically core–shell structure NiO/C microspheres were controllably fabricated with a facile hydrothermal method via layer-by-layer assembly. The single-/double-/triple-/quadri-shelled NiO/C microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results showed that the NiO/C composites are flower-like hierarchically structured microspheres composed of the interconnecting porous nanoplates with the thickness of about 50 nm. Every nanoplate is assembled by NiO nanoparticles with diameter about 10 nm. All the multi-shelled NiO/C microspheres show high electro-catalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose. The double-shelled NiO/C glucose sensor exhibits the best performance with a much wider linear range of 2 μM–1.279 mM, higher sensitivity of 30.19 mA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and lower detection limit of 2 μM. Importantly, long-term stability and favorable anti-interference were obtained thanks to the hierarchically core–shell structure.

  17. Magnetic-field-assisted assembly of layered double hydroxide/metal porphyrin ultrathin films and their application for glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mingfei; Xu, Xiangyu; Han, Jingbin; Zhao, Jingwen; Shi, Wenying; Kong, Xianggui; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2011-07-01

    The ordered ultrathin films (UTFs) based on CoFe-LDH (layered double hydroxide) nanoplatelets and manganese porphyrin (Mn-TPPS) have been fabricated on ITO substrates via a magnetic-field-assisted (MFA) layer-by-layer (LBL) method and were demonstrated as an electrochemical sensor for glucose. The XRD pattern for the film indicates a long-range stacking order in the normal direction of the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the MFA LDH/Mn-TPPS UTFs reveal a continuous and uniform surface morphology. Cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry were used to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the film, and the results show that the MFA-0.5 (0.5 T magnetic field) CoFe-LDH/Mn-TPPS-modified electrode displays the strongest redox current peaks and fastest electron transfer process compared with those of MFA-0 (without magnetic-field) and MFA-0.15 (0.15 T magnetic field). Furthermore, the MFA-0.5 CoFe-LDH/Mn-TPPS exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose with a linear response range (0.1-15 mM; R(2) = 0.999), low detection limit (0.79 μM) and high sensitivity (66.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)). In addition, the glucose sensor prepared by the MFA LBL method also shows good selectivity and reproducibility as well as resistance to poisoning in a chloride ion solution. Therefore, the novel strategy in this work creates new opportunities for the fabrication of nonenzyme sensors with prospective applications in practical detection.

  18. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide inhibits bone resorption in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Anne; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    -minute glucose clamps with co-infusion of GIP (4 pmol/kg/min for 15 min, followed by 2 pmol/kg/min for 45 min) or placebo. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of degradation products of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), a bone resorption marker. RESULTS regarding effects...

  19. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  20. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  1. Metabolism of [U-13C]glucose in Human Brain Tumors In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Elizabeth A.; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bachoo, Robert M.; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Raisanen, Jack; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Jindal, Ashish; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Choi, Changho; Madden, Christopher; Mathews, Dana; Pascual, Juan M.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) and brain metastases demonstrate avid uptake of 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and display perturbations of intracellular metabolite pools by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These observations suggest that metabolic reprogramming contributes to brain tumor growth in vivo. The Warburg effect, excess metabolism of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen, is a hallmark of cancer cells in culture. FDG-positive tumors are assumed to metabolize glucose in a similar manner, with high rates of lactate formation compared to mitochondrial glucose oxidation, but few studies have specifically examined the metabolic fates of glucose in vivo. In particular, the capacity of human brain malignancies to oxidize glucose in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is unknown. Here we studied the metabolism of human brain tumors in situ. [U-13C]glucose was infused during surgical resection, and tumor samples were subsequently subjected to 13C NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of tumor metabolites revealed lactate production, as expected. We also determined that pyruvate dehydrogenase, turnover of the TCA cycle, anaplerosis and de novo glutamine and glycine synthesis contributed significantly to the ultimate disposition of glucose carbon. Surprisingly, less than 50% of the acetyl-CoA pool was derived from blood-borne glucose, suggesting that additional substrates contribute to tumor bioenergetics. This study illustrates a convenient approach that capitalizes on the high information content of 13C NMR spectroscopy and enables the analysis of intermediary metabolism in diverse malignancies growing in their native microenvironment. PMID:22419606

  2. A Distributed Tactile Sensor for Intuitive Human-Robot Interfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cirillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety of human-robot physical interaction is enabled not only by suitable robot control strategies but also by suitable sensing technologies. For example, if distributed tactile sensors were available on the robot, they could be used not only to detect unintentional collisions, but also as human-machine interface by enabling a new mode of social interaction with the machine. Starting from their previous works, the authors developed a conformable distributed tactile sensor that can be easily conformed to the different parts of the robot body. Its ability to estimate contact force components and to provide a tactile map with an accurate spatial resolution enables the robot to handle both unintentional collisions in safe human-robot collaboration tasks and intentional touches where the sensor is used as human-machine interface. In this paper, the authors present the characterization of the proposed tactile sensor and they show how it can be also exploited to recognize haptic tactile gestures, by tailoring recognition algorithms, well known in the image processing field, to the case of tactile images. In particular, a set of haptic gestures has been defined to test three recognition algorithms on a group of 20 users. The paper demonstrates how the same sensor originally designed to manage unintentional collisions can be successfully used also as human-machine interface.

  3. Estimation of glucose-alanine-lactate-glutamine cycles in postabsorptive humans: role of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perriello, G; Jorde, R; Nurjhan, N; Stumvoll, M; Dailey, G; Jenssen, T; Bier, D M; Gerich, J E

    1995-09-01

    To evaluate transfer of carbon between plasma glucose and plasma alanine (glucose-alanine cycle) and lactate (Cori cycle), to assess the contribution of skeletal muscle to these cycles, and to determine whether a glucose-glutamine cycle exists in postabsorptive humans, we infused 11 normal overnight-fasted volunteers with [2-3H]glucose, [6-14C]glucose, and [3-13C]alanine to isotopic steady state and in 7 of these simultaneously measured forearm net balance, uptake, and release of labeled and unlabeled glucose, lactate, and alanine. We found that 40.9 +/- 3.3, 66.8 +/- 3.2, and 13.4 +/- 1.1%, respectively, of plasma alanine, lactate, and glutamine carbon came from plasma glucose. More plasma glucose was converted to plasma alanine than could be derived from plasma alanine (1.89 +/- 0.20 vs. 1.48 +/- 0.15 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P < 0.001). A similar direction of net carbon flux was found for lactate (8.5 vs. 4.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1), with only glutamine adding more carbon to plasma glucose than was received from it (1.0 vs. 0.75 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Skeletal muscle accounted for 50.2 +/- 3.9 and 45.5 +/- 5.7% of the overall appearance of alanine and lactate in plasma and 54.2 +/- 5.4 and 36.4 +/- 4.2% of their respective origins from plasma glucose. Skeletal muscle release of alanine and lactate that had been formed from plasma glucose accounted for 19.1 +/- 2.1 and 48.4 +/- 4.8%, respectively, of muscle glucose uptake and 42.4 +/- 5.5 and 49.9 +/- 5.8% of the overall release of alanine and lactate from muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, J Q; Klopfenstein, B A; Stevens, A A; Havel, P J; Adams, S H; Dunn, T N; Krisky, C; Rooney, W D

    2011-03-01

    In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during glucose ingestion or infusion have demonstrated suppression of hypothalamic signalling, but no studies have compared the effects of glucose and fructose. We therefore sought to determine if the brain response differed to glucose vs. fructose in humans independently of the ingestive process. Nine healthy, normal weight subjects underwent blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI measurements during either intravenous (IV) glucose (0.3 mg/kg), fructose (0.3 mg/kg) or saline, administered over 2 min in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Blood was sampled every 5 min during a baseline period and following infusion for 60 min in total for glucose, fructose, lactate and insulin levels. No significant brain BOLD signal changes were detected in response to IV saline. BOLD signal in the cortical control areas increased during glucose infusion (p = 0.002), corresponding with increased plasma glucose and insulin levels. In contrast, BOLD signal decreased in the cortical control areas during fructose infusion (p = 0.006), corresponding with increases of plasma fructose and lactate. Neither glucose nor fructose infusions significantly altered BOLD signal in the hypothalamus. In normal weight humans, cortical responses as assessed by BOLD fMRI to infused glucose are opposite to those of fructose. Differential brain responses to these sugars and their metabolites may provide insight into the neurologic basis for dysregulation of food intake during high dietary fructose intake. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Reusable urine glucose sensor based on functionalized graphene oxide conjugated Au electrode with protective layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical based system with multiple layers coated on a functionalized graphene oxide Au electrode was developed to measure glucose concentration in urine in a more stable way. Two types of gold printed circuit boards were fabricated and graphene oxide was immobilized on their surface by chemical adsorption. Multiple layers, composed of a couple of polymers, were uniformly coated on the surface electrode. This device exhibited higher electrochemical responses against glucose, a greater resistivity in the presence of interferential substances in urine, and durable stabilities for longer periods of time than conventional units. The efficiency in current level according to the order and ratio of solution was evaluated during the immobilization of the layer. The fabricated electrodes were then also evaluated using hyperglycemic clinical samples and compared with the patterns of blood glucose measured with commercially available glucose meters. Our findings show that not only was their pattern similar but this similarity is well correlated.

  6. Influence of Artificial Sweetener on Human Blood Glucose Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Skokan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin or cyclamic acid are synthetically manufactured sweetenings. Known for their low energetic value they serve especially diabetic and adipose patients as sugar substitutes. It has been hypothesized that the substitution of sugar with artificial sweeteners may induce a decrease of the blood glucose. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of this hypothesis by comparing the influence of regular table sugar and artificial sweeteners on the blood glucose concentration. In this pilot-study 16 patients were included suffering from adiposity, pre-diabetes and hypertension. In the sense of a cross-over design, three test trials were performed at intervals of several weeks. Each trial was followed by a test free interval. Within one test trial each patient consumed 150 ml test solution (water that contained either 6 g of table sugar (“Kandisin” with sweetener free serving as control group. Tests were performed within 1 hr after lunch to ensure conditions comparable to patients having a desert. Every participant had to determine their blood glucose concentration immediately before and 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after the intake of the test solution. For statistics an analysis of variance was performed. The data showed no significant changes in the blood glucose concentration. Neither the application of sugar (F4;60 = 1.645; p = .175 nor the consumption of an artificial sweetener (F2.068;31.023 = 1.551; p > .05 caused significant fluctuations in the blood sugar levels. Over a time frame of 60 minutes in the control group a significant decrease of the blood sugar concentration was found (F2.457;36.849 = 4.005; p = .020 as a physiological reaction during lunch digestion.

  7. Disposable all-solid-state pH and glucose sensors based on conductive polymer covered hierarchical AuZn oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Min; Cho, Seong Je; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Kim, Min-Yeong; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-05-15

    Poly(terthiophene benzoic acid) (pTBA) layered-AuZn alloy oxide (AuZnOx) deposited on the screen printed carbon electrode (pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE) was prepared to create a disposable all-solid-state pH sensor at first. Further, FAD-glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE to fabricate a glucose sensor. The characterizations of the sensor probe reveal that AuZnOx forms a homogeneous hierarchical structure, and that the polymerized pTBA layer on the alloy oxide surface captures GOx covalently. The benzoic acid group of pTBA coated on the probe layer synergetically improved the pH response of the alloy oxide and provide chemical binding sites to enzyme, which resulted in a Nernstian behavior (59.2 ± 0.5 mV/pH) in the pH range of 2-13. The experimental parameters affecting the glucose analysis were studied in terms of pH, temperature, humidity, and interferences. The sensor exhibited a fast response time <1s and a dynamic range between 30 and 500 mg/dL glucose with a detection limit of 17.23 ± 0.32 mg/dL. The reliabilities of the disposable pH and glucose sensors were examined for biological samples.

  8. Human Movement Detection and Identification Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseok Yun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric infrared (PIR sensors are widely used as a presence trigger, but the analog output of PIR sensors depends on several other aspects, including the distance of the body from the PIR sensor, the direction and speed of movement, the body shape and gait. In this paper, we present an empirical study of human movement detection and identification using a set of PIR sensors. We have developed a data collection module having two pairs of PIR sensors orthogonally aligned and modified Fresnel lenses. We have placed three PIR-based modules in a hallway for monitoring people; one module on the ceiling; two modules on opposite walls facing each other. We have collected a data set from eight subjects when walking in three different conditions: two directions (back and forth, three distance intervals (close to one wall sensor, in the middle, close to the other wall sensor and three speed levels (slow, moderate, fast. We have used two types of feature sets: a raw data set and a reduced feature set composed of amplitude and time to peaks; and passage duration extracted from each PIR sensor. We have performed classification analysis with well-known machine learning algorithms, including instance-based learning and support vector machine. Our findings show that with the raw data set captured from a single PIR sensor of each of the three modules, we could achieve more than 92% accuracy in classifying the direction and speed of movement, the distance interval and identifying subjects. We could also achieve more than 94% accuracy in classifying the direction, speed and distance and identifying subjects using the reduced feature set extracted from two pairs of PIR sensors of each of the three modules.

  9. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One–Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayalakshmi Varma; Boros, László G; Nolen, Greg T.; Ching-Wei Chang; Martin Wabitsch; Beger, Richard D.; Jim Kaput

    2015-01-01

    Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate asso...

  10. Lys169 of human glucokinase is a determinant for glucose phosphorylation: implication for the atomic mechanism of glucokinase catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK, a glucose sensor, maintains plasma glucose homeostasis via phosphorylation of glucose and is a potential therapeutic target for treating maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI. To characterize the catalytic mechanism of glucose phosphorylation by GK, we combined molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculations, experimental mutagenesis and enzymatic kinetic analysis on both wild-type and mutated GK. Our three-dimensional (3D model of the GK-Mg(2+-ATP-glucose (GMAG complex, is in agreement with a large number of mutagenesis data, and elucidates atomic information of the catalytic site in GK for glucose phosphorylation. A 10-ns MD simulation of the GMAG complex revealed that Lys169 plays a dominant role in glucose phosphorylation. This prediction was verified by experimental mutagenesis of GK (K169A and enzymatic kinetic analyses of glucose phosphorylation. QM/MM calculations were further used to study the role of Lys169 in the catalytic mechanism of the glucose phosphorylation and we found that Lys169 enhances the binding of GK with both ATP and glucose by serving as a bridge between ATP and glucose. More importantly, Lys169 directly participates in the glucose phosphorylation as a general acid catalyst. Our findings provide mechanistic details of glucose phorphorylation catalyzed by GK, and are important for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of MODY.

  11. Smart sensor systems for human health breath monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G W; Xu, J C; Biaggi-Labiosa, A M; Laskowski, D; Dutta, P K; Mondal, S P; Ward, B J; Makel, D B; Liu, C C; Chang, C W; Dweik, R A

    2011-09-01

    Breath analysis techniques offer a potential revolution in health care diagnostics, especially if these techniques can be brought into standard use in the clinic and at home. The advent of microsensors combined with smart sensor system technology enables a new generation of sensor systems with significantly enhanced capabilities and minimal size, weight and power consumption. This paper discusses the microsensor/smart sensor system approach and provides a summary of efforts to migrate this technology into human health breath monitoring applications. First, the basic capability of this approach to measure exhaled breath associated with exercise physiology is demonstrated. Building from this foundation, the development of a system for a portable asthma home health care system is described. A solid-state nitric oxide (NO) sensor for asthma monitoring has been identified, and efforts are underway to miniaturize this NO sensor technology and integrate it into a smart sensor system. It is concluded that base platform microsensor technology combined with smart sensor systems can address the needs of a range of breath monitoring applications and enable new capabilities for healthcare.

  12. Preclinical Performance Evaluation of Percutaneous Glucose Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Robert J.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of continuous glucose monitoring devices remains limited by an obstinate foreign body response (FBR) that degrades the analytical performance of the in vivo sensor. A number of novel materials that resist or delay the FBR have been proposed as outer, tissue-contacting glucose sensor membranes as a strategy to improve sensor accuracy. Traditionally, researchers have examined the ability of a material to minimize the host response by assessing adsorbed cell morphology and tissue histology. However, these techniques do not adequately predict in vivo glucose sensor function, necessitating sensor performance evaluation in a relevant animal model prior to human testing. Herein, the effects of critical experimental parameters, including the animal model and data processing methods, on the reliability and usefulness of preclinical sensor performance data are considered. PMID:26085566

  13. A field effect glucose sensor with a nanostructured amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaosong; Li, Yajuan; Herman, Gregory S

    2016-11-03

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) field effect transistors (FETs) are a promising technology for a wide range of electronic applications. Herein, we fabricated and characterized FETs with a nanostructured IGZO network as a sensing transducer. The IGZO was patterned using colloidal lithography and electrohydrodynamic printing, where an 8 μm wide nanostructured close-packed hexagonal IGZO network was obtained. Electrical characterization of the nanostructured IGZO network FET demonstrated a drain-source current on-off ratio of 6.1 × 10(3) and effective electron mobilities of 3.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The nanostructured IGZO network was functionalized by aminosilane groups with cross-linked glucose oxidase. The devices demonstrated a decrease in drain-source conductance and a more positive VON with increasing glucose concentration. These changes are ascribed to the acceptor-like surface states associated with positively charged aminosilane groups attached to the nanostructured IGZO surface. Continuous monitoring of the drain-source current indicates a stepwise and fully reversible response to glucose concentrations with a short response time. The specific catalytic reaction between the GOx enzyme and glucose eliminates interference from acetaminophen/ascorbic acid. We demonstrate that nanostructured IGZO FETs have improved sensitivity compared to non-nanostructured IGZO for sensing glucose and can be potentially extended to other biosensor technologies.

  14. Thumb-size ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imager for in-situ glucose monitoring as optional sensor of conventional dialyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Mori, Keita; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    We proposed the ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imaging for the realization of blood-glucose-level monitoring during dialytic therapy. Optical scattering and absorption caused by blood cells deteriorate the detection accuracy of glucose dissolved in plasma. Ultrasonic standing waves can agglomerate blood cells at nodes. In contrast, around anti-node regions, the amount of transmitted light increases because relatively clear plasma appears due to decline the number of blood cells. Proposed method can disperse the transmitted light of plasma without time-consuming pretreatment such as centrifugation. To realize the thumb-size glucose sensor which can be easily attached to dialysis tubes, an ultrasonic standing wave generator and a spectroscopic imager are required to be small. Ultrasonic oscillators are ∅30[mm]. A drive circuit of oscillators, which now size is 41×55×45[mm], is expected to become small. The trial apparatus of proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager, whose size is 30×30×48[mm], also can be little-finger size in principal. In the experiment, we separated the suspension mixed water and micro spheres (Θ10[mm) into particles and liquid regions with the ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]). Furthermore, the spectrum of transmitted light through the suspension could be obtained in visible light regions with a white LED.

  15. Carob pulp preparation rich in insoluble dietary fibre and polyphenols increases plasma glucose and serum insulin responses in combination with a glucose load in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendel, Sindy; Otto, Baerbel; Garcia, Ada L; Wagner, Karen; Mueller, Corinna; Weickert, Martin O; Heldwein, Walter; Koebnick, Corinna

    2007-07-01

    Dietary fibre consumption is associated with improved glucose homeostasis. In contrast, dietary polyphenols have been suggested to exert both beneficial and detrimental effects on glucose and insulin metabolism. Recently, we reported that a polyphenol-rich insoluble dietary fibre preparation from carob pulp (carob fibre) resulted in lower postprandial acylated ghrelin levels after a liquid meal challenge test compared with a control meal without supplementation. The effects may, however, differ when a different food matrix is used. Thus, we investigated the effects of carob fibre on glucose, insulin and ghrelin responses in healthy humans in combination with a glucose load. In a randomized single-blind cross-over study involving twenty healthy subjects (aged 22-62 years), plasma glucose, total and acylated ghrelin, and serum insulin were repeatedly assessed before and after the ingestion of 200 ml water with 50 g glucose and 0, 5, 10 or 20 g carob fibre over a period of 180 min. The intake of 5 and 10 g carob fibre increased the plasma glucose by 47 % and 64 % (P carob-enriched glucose solution. Total ghrelin decreased only after 10 g carob fibre (P carob fibre, administered within a water-glucose solution, increases postprandial glucose and insulin responses, suggesting a deterioration in glycaemic control.

  16. Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuying; Shen, Dongqian; Fang, Zhiwei; Jie, Zhuye; Qiu, Xinmin; Zhang, Chunfang; Chen, Yingli; Ji, Linong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationship of gut microbiota with the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we analyzed 121 subjects who were divided into 3 groups based on their glucose intolerance status: normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 44), prediabetes (Pre-DM; n = 64), or newly diagnosed T2DM (n = 13). Gut microbiota characterizations were determined with 16S rDNA-based high-throughput sequencing. T2DM-related dysbiosis was observed, including the separation of microbial communities and a change of alpha diversity between the different glucose intolerance statuses. To assess the correlation between metabolic parameters and microbiota diversity, clinical characteristics were also measured and a significant association between metabolic parameters (FPG, CRP) and gut microbiota was found. In addition, a total of 28 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found to be related to T2DM status by the Kruskal-Wallis H test, most of which were enriched in the T2DM group. Butyrate-producing bacteria (e.g. Akkermansia muciniphila ATCCBAA-835, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii L2-6) had a higher abundance in the NGT group than in the pre-DM group. At genus level, the abundance of Bacteroides in the T2DM group was only half that of the NGT and Pre-DM groups. Previously reported T2DM-related markers were also compared with the data in this study, and some inconsistencies were noted. We found that Verrucomicrobiae may be a potential marker of T2DM as it had a significantly lower abundance in both the pre-DM and T2DM groups. In conclusion, this research provides further evidence of the structural modulation of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of diabetes.

  17. High glucose repatterns human podocyte energy metabolism during differentiation and diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasawa, Toshiyuki; Obre, Emilie; Bellance, Nadège; Lavie, Julie; Imasawa, Tomoko; Rigothier, Claire; Delmas, Yahsou; Combe, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Benard, Giovanni; Claverol, Stéphane; Bonneu, Marc; Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2017-01-01

    Podocytes play a key role in diabetic nephropathy pathogenesis, but alteration of their metabolism remains unknown in human kidney. By using a conditionally differentiating human podocyte cell line, we addressed the functional and molecular changes in podocyte energetics during in vitro development or under high glucose conditions. In 5 mM glucose medium, we observed a stepwise activation of oxidative metabolism during cell differentiation that was characterized by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)–dependent stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, with concomitant reduction of the glycolytic enzyme content. Conversely, when podocytes were cultured in high glucose (20 mM), stepwise oxidative phosphorylation biogenesis was aborted, and a glycolytic switch occurred, with consecutive lactic acidosis. Expression of the master regulators of oxidative metabolism transcription factor A mitochondrial, PGC-1α, AMPK, and serine–threonine liver kinase B1 was altered by high glucose, as well as their downstream signaling networks. Focused transcriptomics revealed that myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and myogenic factor 5 (MYF5) expression was inhibited by high glucose levels, and endoribonuclease-prepared small interfering RNA–mediated combined inhibition of those transcription factors phenocopied the glycolytic shift that was observed in high glucose conditions. Accordingly, a reduced expression of MEF2C, MYF5, and PGC-1α was found in kidney tissue sections that were obtained from patients with diabetic nephropathy. These findings obtained in human samples demonstrate that MEF2C-MYF5–dependent bioenergetic dedifferentiation occurs in podocytes that are confronted with a high-glucose milieu.—Imasawa, T., Obre, E., Bellance, N., Lavie, J., Imasawa, T., Rigothier, C., Delmas, Y., Combe, C., Lacombe, D., Benard, G., Claverol, S., Bonneu, M., Rossignol, R. High glucose repatterns human podocyte energy

  18. Paper-based maskless enzymatic sensor for glucose determination combining ink and wire electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Gutiérrez, O; Costa Rama, E; Costa-García, A; Fernández-Abedul, M T

    2017-07-15

    In this work we have developed an amperometric enzymatic biosensor in a paper-based platform with a mixed electrode configuration: carbon ink for the working electrode (WE) and metal wires (from a low-cost standard electronic connection) for reference (RE) and auxiliary electrodes (AE). A hydrophobic wax-defined paper area was impregnated with diluted carbon ink. Three gold-plated pins of the standard connection are employed, one for connecting the WE and the other two acting as RE and AE. The standard connection works as a clip in order to support the paper in between. As a proof-of-concept, glucose sensing was evaluated. The enzyme cocktail (glucose oxidase, horseradish peroxidase and potassium ferrocyanide as mediator of the electron transfer) was adsorbed on the surface. After drying, glucose solution was added to the paper, on the opposite side of the carbon ink. It wets RE and AE, and flows by capillarity through the paper contacting the carbon WE surface. The reduction current of ferricyanide, product of the enzymatic reaction, is measured chronoamperometrically and correlates to the concentration of glucose. Different parameters related to the bioassay were optimized, adhering the piece of paper onto a conventional screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). In this way, the RE and the AE of the commercial card were employed for optimizing the paper-WE. After evaluating the assay system in the hybrid paper-SPCE cell, the three-electrode system consisting of paper-WE, wire-RE and wire-AE, was employed for glucose determination, achieving a linear range between 0.3 and 15mM with good analytical features and being able of quantifying glucose in real food samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High glucose-induced oxidative stress increases transient receptor potential channel expression in human monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wuensch, Tilo; Thilo, Florian; Krueger, Katharina;

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel-induced cation influx activates human monocytes, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high glucose-induced oxidative stress on TRP channel expression in human monocytes....

  20. Transport of alpha- and beta-D-glucose by the intact human red cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, A.; Melchior, D.L.

    1985-07-16

    The kinetics of alpha- and beta-D-glucose mutarotation and the transport of these anomers by intact human red cells were determined at 0.6 and 36.6 degrees C. The mutarotation coefficients for alpha- and beta-D-glucose in cell-free tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane medium (pH 7.4) at 0.6 degrees C are (2.25 +/- 0.2) and (1.73 +/- 0.42) X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, and at 36.6 degrees C are (69 +/- 12) and (75 +/- 5) X 10(-3) min-1, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previous estimates. At 0.6 degrees C, the red cell contains no detectable mutarotase activity. Initial rates of sugar uptake were measured by using radiolabeled D-glucose and time courses of uptake by turbidimetry. The time courses of alpha- and beta-D-glucose and an equilibrium mixture of alpha- and beta-D-glucose infinite-cis entry are identical at 0.66 degrees C (n = 41) where negligible mutarotation is observed. The apparent Ki values for inhibition of radiolabeled D-glucose initial uptake by unlabeled alpha- or beta-D-glucose at 0.6 degrees C are identical (1.6 mM). The calculated Vmax parameters for uptake of the radiolabeled anomers at this temperature are also indistinguishable. The time courses of infinite-cis alpha- and beta-D-glucose uptake at 36.66 degrees C are identical (n = 40). While D-glucose mutarotation is more rapid at this temperature, the anomers of D-glucose are not transported differently by the red cell hexose transfer system.

  1. Ultrasensitive binder-free glucose sensors based on the pyrolysis of in situ grown Cu MOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xuan; Luo, Jiangshui; Tang, Pengyi

    2017-01-01

    . It is found that the Cu nanoparticles are uniformly embedded in the carbon matrix, attached on the carbon layer closely. The electrocatalytic activity of the Cu@porous carbon matrix electrode for glucose sensing was explored by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. The resulting Cu@porous carbon...

  2. PEGylation of Concanavalin A to decrease nonspecific interactions in a fluorescent glucose sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alexander A.; Cummins, Brian M.; Locke, Andrea K.; Grunlan, Melissa A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-02-01

    The ability of people with diabetes to both monitor and regulate blood sugar levels is limited by the conventional "finger-prick" test that provides intermittent, single point measurements. Toward the development of a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, the lectin, Concanavalin A (ConA), has been utilized as a component in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), competitive glucose binding assay. Recently, to avoid reversibility problems associated with ConA aggregation, a suitable competing ligand labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (APTS) has been engineered. However, its ability to function as part of a glucose sensing assay is compromised due to the negative charge (at physiological pH) of native ConA that gives rise to non-specific binding with other ConA groups as well as with electrostatically charged assay-delivery carriers. To minimize these undesirable interactions, we have conjugated ConA with monomethoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) (i.e. "PEGylation"). In this preliminary research, fluorescently-labeled ConA was successfully PEGylated with mPEG-Nhydroxylsuccinimide( succinimidyl carbonate) (mPEG-NHS(SC)). The FRET response of APTS-labeled competing ligand (donor) conveyed an increase in the fluorescence intensity with increasing glucose concentrations.

  3. Effect of insulin and glucose on adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes several aspects of immunity are altered, including the immunomodulatory action of adenosine. Our study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different glucose and insulin concentrations on activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes line SKW 6.4. The activity of adenosine deaminase in the cytosolic fraction was very low and was not affected by different glucose concentration, but in the membrane fraction of cells cultured with 25 mM glucose it was decreased by about 35% comparing to the activity in cells maintained in 5 mM glucose, irrespective of insulin concentration. The activities of 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) and ecto-5'-NT in SKW 6.4 cells depended on insulin concentration, but not on glucose. Cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin displayed an about 60% lower activity of cytosolic 5'-NT comparing to cells maintained at 10(-11) M insulin. The activity of ecto-5'-NT was decreased by about 70% in cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin comparing to cells grown in 10(-11) M insulin. Neither insulin nor glucose had an effect on adenosine kinase (AK) activity in SKW 6.4 cells or in human B cells isolated from peripheral blood. The extracellular level of adenosine and inosine during accelerated catabolism of cellular ATP depended on glucose, but not on insulin concentration. Concluding, our study demonstrates that glucose and insulin differentially affect the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes, but changes in those activities do not correlate with the adenosine level in cell media during accelerated ATP catabolism, implying that nucleoside transport is the primary factor determining the extracellular level of adenosine.

  4. Decreased glucose uptake by hyperglycemia is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chae Kyun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Hong, Mee Kyoung; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To clarify the difference in glucose uptake between human cancer cells and monocytes, we studied ({sup 18}F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in three human colon cancer cell lines (SNU-C2A, SNU-C4, SNU-C5), one human lung cancer cell line (NCI-H522), and human peripheral blood monocytes. The FDG uptake of both cancer cells and monocytes was increased in glucose-free medium, but decreased in the medium containing 16.7 mM glucose (hyperglycemic). The level of Glut1 mRNA decreased in human colon cancer cells and NCI-H522 under hyperglycemic condition. Glut1 protein expression was also decreased in the four human cancer cell lines under hyperglycemic condition, whereas it was consistently undetectable in monocytes. SNU-C2A, SNU-C4 and NCI-H522 showed a similar level of hexokinase activity (7.5-10.8 mU/mg), while SNU-C5 and moncytes showed lower range of hexokinase activity (4.3-6.5 mU/mg). These data suggest that glucose uptake is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes.

  5. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  6. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide induces cytokine expression, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timper, Katharina; Grisouard, Jean; Sauter, Nadine S; Herzog-Radimerski, Tanja; Dembinski, Kaethi; Peterli, Ralph; Frey, Daniel M; Zulewski, Henryk; Keller, Ulrich; Müller, Beat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is linked to a chronic state of systemic and adipose tissue-derived inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone also acting on adipocytes. We investigated whether GIP affects inflammation, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes. Human subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, differentiated in vitro, were treated with human GIP to analyze mRNA expression and protein secretion of cytokines, glycerol, and free fatty acid release and insulin-induced glucose uptake. GIP induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-1β, and the IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra, whereas TNFα, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 remained unchanged. Cytokine induction involved PKA and the NF-κB pathway as well as an autocrine IL-1 effect. Furthermore, GIP potentiated IL-6 and IL-1Ra secretion in the presence of LPS, IL-1β, and TNFα. GIP induced lipolysis via activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and was linked to NF-κB activation. Finally, chronic GIP treatment impaired insulin-induced glucose uptake possibly due to the observed impaired translocation of glucose transporter GLUT4. In conclusion, GIP induces an inflammatory and prolipolytic response via the PKA -NF-κB-IL-1 pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in human adipocytes.

  7. Metabolic alterations in the human erythrocyte produced by increases in glucose concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Susan F.; Morrison, Anthony D.; Clements, Rex S.; Winegrad, Albert I.; Oski, Frank A.

    1971-01-01

    Human erythrocytes incubated in medium containing 50 mM glucose have increased intracellular sorbitol and fructose concentrations as compared with samples incubated with 5 mM glucose. Increased medium glucose concentration did not significantly alter total glucose consumption or lactate production. However, the intracellular lactate:pyruvate ratio rose, the concentrations of fructose diphosphate, and triose phosphates increased, and the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration fell. [14C]O2 production from glucose-1-14C also increased with increased medium glucose concentration. These changes are believed to reflect changes in the redox states of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide/reduced form of diphosphopyridine nucleotide (NAD/NADH) and nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate/reduced form of nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP/NADPH) couples resulting from increased activity of the polyol pathway. Addition of pyruvate to the incubation media prevented these changes. These studies illustrate that an increase in the red cell's normal substrate, glucose, can produce changes in red cell metabolism. PMID:4398937

  8. The effect of caffeine on glucose kinetics in humans - influence of adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battram, Danielle S.; Graham, Terry E.; Richter, Erik

    2005-01-01

    While caffeine impedes insulin-mediated glucose disposal in humans, its effect on endo-genous glucose production (EGP) remains unknown. In addition, the mechanism involved in these effects is unclear, but may be due to the accompanying increase in adrenaline concentration. We studied the effect...... of caffeine on EGP and glucose infusion rates (GIR), and whether or not adrenaline can account for all of caffeine's effects. Subjects completed three isoglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamps (with 3-[3H]glucose infusion) 30 min after ingesting: (1) placebo capsules (n= 12); (2) caffeine capsules (5 mg kg-1) (n......= 12); and either (3) placebo plus a high-dose adrenaline infusion (HAdr; adrenaline concentration, 1.2 nM; n= 8) or (4) placebo plus a low-dose adrenaline infusion (LAdr; adrenaline concentration, 0.75 nM; n= 6). With caffeine, adrenaline increased to 0.6 nM but no effect on EGP was observed. While...

  9. Fabrication of Nonenzymatic Glucose Sensors Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Bimetallic Pt-M (M = Ru and Sn Catalysts by Radiolytic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Young Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonenzymatic glucose sensors employing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs with highly dispersed Pt-M (M = Ru and Sn nanoparticles (Pt-M@PVP-MWNTs were fabricated by radiolytic deposition. The Pt-M nanoparticles on the MWNTs were characterized by transmittance electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and X-ray diffraction. They were found to be well dispersed and to exhibit alloy properties on the MWNT support. Electrochemical testing showed that these nonenzymatic sensors had larger currents (mA than that of a bare glassy carbon (GC electrode and one modified with MWNTs. The sensitivity (A mM−1, linear range (mM, and detection limit (mM (S/N = 3 of the glucose sensor with the Pt-Ru catalyst in NaOH electrolyte were determined as 18.0, 1.0–2.5, 0.7, respectively. The corresponding data of the sensor with Pt-Sn catalyst were 889.0, 1.00–3.00, and 0.3, respectively. In addition, these non-enzymatic sensors can effectively avoid interference arising from the oxidation of the common interfering species ascorbic acid and uric acid in NaOH electrolyte. The experimental results show that such sensors can be applied in the detection of glucose in commercial red wine samples.

  10. Non-contact optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using a magneto-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; García, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we aim to experimentally verify a speckle based technique for non-contact measurement of glucose concentration in blood stream while the vision for the final device aims to contain a single wristwatch-style device containing an AC (alternating) electro-magnet generated by a solenoid, a laser and a camera. The experiments presented in work are performed in-vitro in order to verify the effects that are responsible for the operation principle. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an alternating magnetic field it exhibits Faraday rotation which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle patterns distribution. The temporal frequency resulting from the AC magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  11. Noncontact speckle-based optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using magneto-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally verify a speckle-based technique for noncontact measurement of glucose concentration in the bloodstream. The final device is intended to be a single wristwatch-style device containing a laser, a camera, and an alternating current (ac) electromagnet generated by a solenoid. The experiments presented are performed in vitro as proof of the concept. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an ac magnetic field, it exhibits Faraday rotation, which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle pattern distributions. The temporal frequency resulting from the ac magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role, which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  12. The initial noncovalent binding of glucose to human hemoglobin in nonenzymatic glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shelley L D; Santin, Angela E; Bryant, Priscilla A; Holman, Rw; Rodnick, Kenneth J

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms for nonenzymatic protein glycation have been extensively studied albeit with an emphasis at the later stages that gives rise to advanced glycation end products. No detailed investigation of the initial, noncovalent binding of d-glucose to human hemoglobin A (HbA) exists in the literature. Although anionic molecules 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and HCO3(-) have been implicated in the latter stages of glycation, their involvement at the initial binding of glucose to HbA has not yet been assessed. Results from this computational study involving crystal structures of HbA predict that the transient, ring-opened glucose isomer, assumed to be critical in the later stages of glycation, is not directly involved in initial binding to the β-chain of HbA. All the five structures of glucose generated upon mutorotation will undergo reversible, competitive and slow binding at multiple amino acid residues. The ring-opened structure is most likely generated from previously bound pyranoses that undergo mutarotation while bound. BPG, Pi and HCO3(-) also reversibly bind to HbA with similar energies as glucose isomers (~3-5 kcal/mol) and share common binding sites with glucose isomers. However, there was modest amino acid residue selectivity for binding of certain anionic molecules (1-3 regions) but limited selectivity for glucose structures (≥ 7 regions). The clinical difference between average blood glucose and predicted HbA1c, and the presence of unstable HbA-glucose complexes may be more fully explained by initial noncovalent binding interactions and different concentrations of BPG, Pi and HCO3(-) in serum vs. erythrocytes.

  13. The ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires; structural characterization and their application as glucose non-enzymatic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun, K., E-mail: kimleang.khun@liu.se [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden); Ibupoto, Z.H. [Dr M.A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Sindh Jamshoro (Pakistan); Liu, X. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping (Sweden); Beni, V. [Biosensors and Biolelectronics Centre, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping (Sweden); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Ethylene glycol assisted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The grown Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires were used for sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor. • The proposed glucose sensor shows a wide linear range with fast response. • The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} modified electrode is a highly specific enzyme-less glucose sensor. - Abstract: In the work reported herein the ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis, onto Au substrate, of thin and highly dense cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanowires and their characterization and their application for non-enzymatic glucose sensing are reported. The structure and composition of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires have been fully characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires resulted to have high purity and showed diameter of approximately 10 nm. The prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires coated gold electrodes were applied to the non-enzymatic detection of glucose. The developed sensor showed high sensitivity (4.58 × 10{sup 1} μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}), a wide linear range of concentration (1.00 × 10{sup −4}–1.2 × 10{sup 1} mM) and a detection limit of 2.65 × 10{sup −5} mM. The developed glucose sensor has also shown to be very stable and selective over interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the proposed fabrication process was shown to be highly reproducible response (over nine electrodes)

  14. The Human Factors of Sensor Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    humans tend to use a combination of deductive and inductive logic, as well as intuition and emotion to reach general conclusions; however, if...into a machine but only resulting in a warning or caution and not as the actual emotion felt by the observer. The element of fear induced by the...extract meaning from text or spoken language which is veiled by semantic features such as sarcasm or formalism that contain a very great amount of

  15. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    OpenAIRE

    Veltink, Peter H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Chris T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; Spek, van der, R.J.; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need for sensory feedback in FES control systems and gives an overview of available artificial sensors for human use and progress in the derivation and application of signals from natural sensors

  16. Simultaneous transdermal extraction of glucose and lactate from human subjects by reverse iontophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak S Ching

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Tak S Ching1, Patricia Connolly21Asia University, Taiwan; 2Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: This study investigated the possibility of simultaneously extracting glucose and lactate from human subjects, at the same skin location, using transdermal reverse iontophoresis. Transdermal monitoring using iontophoresis is made possible by the skin’s permeability to small molecules and the nanoporous and microporous nature of the structure of skin. The study was intended to provide information which could be used to develop a full, biosensor-based, monitoring system for multiple parameters from transdermal extraction. As a precursor to the human study, in vitro reverse iontophoresis experiments were performed in an artificial skin system to establish the optimum current waveforms to be applied during iontophoresis. In the human study, a bipolar DC current waveform (with reversal of the electrode current direction every 15 minutes was applied to ten healthy volunteers via skin electrodes and utilized for simultaneous glucose and lactate transdermal extraction at an applied current density of 300 µA/cm2. Glucose and lactate were successfully extracted through each subject’s skin into the conducting gel that formed part of each iontophoresis electrode. The results suggest that it will be possible to noninvasively and simultaneously monitor glucose and lactate levels in patients using this approach and this could have future applications in diagnostic monitoring for a variety of medical conditions.Keywords: transdermal, iontophoresis, glucose, lactate, diagnostic monitoring

  17. A novel enzymatic glucose sensor based on Pt nanoparticles-decorated hollow carbon spheres-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhana, Charles; Bo Xiangjie; Ju Jian; Guo Liping, E-mail: guolp078@nenu.edu.cn [Northeast Normal University, Faculty of Chemistry (China)

    2012-10-15

    A new glucose biosensor was developed based on hollow carbon spheres decorated with platinum nanoparticles (Pt/HCSs)-modified glassy carbon electrode immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOx) with the help of Nafion. The Pt nanoparticles were well dispersed on the HCSs with an average size of 2.29 nm. The detection of glucose was achieved via electrochemical detection of the enzymatically liberated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at +0.5 V versus Ag/AgCl at physiologic pH of 7.4. The Pt/HCSs-modified electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activities toward both the oxidation and reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The glucose biosensor showed good electrocatalytic performance in terms of high sensitivity (4.1 {mu}A mM{sup -1}), low detection limit (1.8 {mu}M), fast response time <3 s, and wide linear range (0.04-8.62 mM). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) and the maximum current density (i{sub max}) values for the biosensor were 10.94 mM and 887 {mu}A cm{sup -2} respectively. Furthermore, this biosensor showed an acceptable reproducibility and high stability. The interfering signals from ascorbic acid and uric acid at concentration levels normally found in human blood were not much compared with the response to glucose. Blood serum samples were also tested with this biosensor and a good recovery was achieved for the two spiked serum samples.

  18. Effects of adiponectin on oxidative stress and apoptosis in human cardiac myocytes cultured with high glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xing; LI Mei-rong; GUO Zhi-xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients.Oxidative stress plays an important role in diabetic cardiomyopathy.This study aimed to investigate the effects of adiponectin on oxidative stress and apoptosis in human cardiac myocytes (HCM) cultured with high glucose.Methods The cells were assigned to three group: control group,high glucose group and high glucose plus adiponectin group.After culture for 24,48,72 hours,oxidative stress was evaluated by detecting levels of malondialdehyde (MDA)and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the supernatant of culture media.The expression of p66Shc and Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Flow cytometry was designed to observe and detect cellular apoptosis.Results Our findings showed significant increase in MDA levels and decrease in SOD activity in the high glucose group compared with the control group (P <0.05).However,MDA levels were significantly decreased and SOD activity was significantly increased in the adiponectin group compared with those in the high-glucose group (P <0.05).The mRNA expression of HO-1 in the high glucose group was significantly increased in a time-dependent manner compared with that in the control group (P <0.05).Adiponectin further increased the mRNA expression of HO-1 induced by high glucose in a time-dependent manner (P <0.05).The expression of p66Shc was significantly increased in high glucose group compared with that in the control group (P <0.05).Adiponectin significantly suppressed the upregulation of p66Shc induced by high glucose (P <0.05).The apoptotic rate of cardiomyocytes was significantly increased in the high glucose group compared with that in the control group while the apoptotic rate in the adiponectin group was remarkably declined in comparison with that in the high glucose group.Conclusion Adiponectin reduces high glucose-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis and plays a

  19. Aldose reductase inhibitor improves insulin-mediated glucose uptake and prevents migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-05-01

    We examined involvement of the polyol pathway in high glucose-induced human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration using Boyden's chamber method. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 hours potentiated, in a concentration-dependent manner (5.6 to 22.2 mol/L), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB-mediated SMC migration. This potentiation was accompanied by an increase in PDGF BB binding, because of an increased number of PDGF-beta receptors, and this potentiation was blocked by the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat. Epalrestat at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/L inhibited high glucose-potentiated (22.2 mmol/L), PDGF BB-mediated migration. Epalrestat at 100 nmol/L inhibited a high glucose-induced increase in the reduced/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio and membrane-bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in SMCs. PKC inhibitors calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L) each inhibited high glucose-induced, PDGF BB-mediated SMC migration. High glucose-induced suppression of insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, which was blocked by both calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L), was decreased by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 hours increased intracellular oxidative stress, which was directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Antisense oligonucleotide to PKC-beta isoform inhibited high glucose-mediated changes in SMC migration, insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that high glucose concentrations potentiate SMC migration in coronary artery and that the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat inhibits high glucose-potentiated, PDGF BB-induced SMC migration, possibly through suppression of PKC (PKC-beta), impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake, and oxidative stress.

  20. Sensors system design for discrimination between humans and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ǎgulinescu, Ana-Maria Claudia, Dr; Marcu, Ioana; Halunga, Simona; Fratu, Octavian

    2016-12-01

    The applicability areas for sensor networks vary from industrial automation, environmental observation to medical domain [1]. As the quality of life has improved, the life expectancy also increased during the last years, fact that leads to an aging of the population. It is well known that elderly people need special treatment and resources due to their decreasing capacity of self-caring. It is, thus, desirable to increase the length of independent living for this category without depriving them from the known life environment and personal habits. Another possible application is the one of child care and monitoring in closed precincts. This paper illustrates the implementation steps of a sensor network used for discriminating between the presence of a human being and of an animal that may be useful in case of medical emergency situations. The design takes into account the main challenges that may occur such as achievement of not accurate results due to the fact that children are moving much more than an adult. The basic structure is designed using Arduino platform, sensors for distance measurements, for height determination as well as DHT22 temperature sensor and sensors for motion detection and takes into account cases of walking and standing subjects. Several configurations have been tested in order to improve the relative error for discrimination between children and pet entering a room.

  1. Ambivalent role of gallated catechins in glucose tolerance in humans: a novel insight into non-absorbable gallated catechin-derived inhibitors of glucose absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Jin, J Y; Baek, W K; Park, S H; Sung, H Y; Kim, Y K; Lee, J; Song, D K

    2009-12-01

    Prolonged postprandial hyperglycemia is a detrimental factor for type 2 diabetes and obesity. The benefit of green tea extract (GTE) consumption still requires confirmation. We report the effects of circulating green tea catechins on blood glucose and insulin levels. Oral glucose loading 1 h after GTE ingestion in humans led to higher blood glucose and insulin levels than in control subjects. Gallated catechins were required for these effects, although within the intestinal lumen they have been known to decrease glucose and cholesterol absorption. Treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate hindered 2-deoxyglucose uptake into liver, fat, pancreatic beta-cell, and skeletal muscle cell lines. The glucose intolerance was ameliorated by gallated catechin-deficient GTE or GTE mixed with polyethylene glycol, which was used as an inhibitor of intestinal absorption of gallated catechins. These findings may suggest that the gallated catechin when it is in the circulation elevates blood glucose level by blocking normal glucose uptake into the tissues, resulting in secondary hyperinsulinemia, whereas it decreases glucose entry into the circulation when they are inside the intestinal lumen. These findings encourage the development of non-absorbable derivatives of gallated catechins for preventative treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which would specifically induce only the positive luminal effect.

  2. Effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on glucose-induced human serum albumin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Hagerman, A E

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in plant-based foods and beverages such as green tea. Although EGCg can eliminate carbonyl species produced by glucose autoxidation and thus can inhibit protein glycation, it is also reported to be a pro-oxidant that stimulates protein glycation in vitro. To better understand the balance between antioxidant and pro-oxidant features of EGCg, we evaluated EGCg-mediated bioactivities in a human serum albumin (HSA)/glucose model by varying three different parameters (glucose level, EGCg concentration, and time of exposure to EGCg). Measurements of glycation-induced fluorescence, protein carbonyls, and electrophoretic mobility showed that the level of HSA glycation was positively related to the glucose level over the range 10-100 mM during a 21-day incubation at 37°C and pH: 7.4. Under mild glycemic pressure (10 mM), long exposure to EGCg enhanced HSA glycation, while brief exposure to low concentrations of EGCg did not. Under high glycemic pressure (100 mM glucose), long exposure to EGCg inhibited glycation. For the first time we showed that brief exposure to EGCg reversed glycation-induced fluorescence, indicating a restorative effect. In conclusion, our research identified glucose level, EGCg concentration, and time of exposure as critical factors dictating EGCg bioactivities in HSA glycation. EGCg did not affect HSA glycation under normal physiological conditions but had a potential therapeutic effect on HSA severely damaged by glycation.

  3. Glycosylated hemoglobin in human and animal red cells. Role of glucose permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P J; Garlick, R L; Bunn, H F

    1982-09-01

    We have compared red cells from man and selected animals in order to determine the effect of glucose permeability on nonenzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin. Glucose permeability was highest in the primates (human, baboon, rhesus monkey), lower in dogs and rabbits, and nearly zero in pigs. Glycosylation of hemoglobin was measured by three independent methods: cation-exchange chromatography on Bio-Rex 70 (Bio-Rad, Inc., Richmond, California), agar gel electrophoresis, and affinity chromatography. The colorimetric thiobarbituric acid test did not provide valid data on animal hemolysates. However, this test was useful for identifying glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) components isolated on Bio-Rex chromatography. In all animals tested, levels of HbA1c (from Bio-Rex chromatography) and total glycosylated hemoglobin (from affinity chromatography) correlated well with glucose exposure, the product of intracellular glucose concentration, and red cell life span. These results indicate that nonenzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin in mammals is determined by three major variables: mean plasma glucose concentration, red cell life span, and red cell glucose permeability.

  4. Morroniside protects cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells from damage by high ambient glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qin XU; Hai-ping HAO; Xu ZHANG; Yang PAN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether morroniside, a compound in Comus officinalis Sieb et Zucc can prevent cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from damage by high ambient glucose. METHODS: HUVEC was incubated in glucose, 5 or 30 mmol/L, either alone or in the presence of morroniside (final concentration 100, 10,and 1 μmol/L, respectively) for 48 h. The proliferation of HUVEC was quantified by MTT method; its cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry; morphological change was observed with fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS:Survival of HUVEC cultured in high ambient glucose was significantly decreased when compared to that in normal concentration of glucose (P<0.01). High ambient glucose also lowered the rate of cells entering into S-phase, along with severe morphological damage. With the intervention of morroniside (final concentration 100 and 10 μmol/L),the cell survival was significantly recovered (P<0.01, P<0.05, respectively), accompanied with increased S-phase rate and less extent of morphological damage. CONCLUSION: Morroniside protected HUVEC against high ambient glucose induced injury, which suggested that morroniside could exert a beneficial effect on preventing diabetic angiopathies.

  5. Plasma adiponectin and endogenous glucose production in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Norbert; Stumvoll, Michael; Vozarova, Barbora

    2003-01-01

    High plasma adiponectin is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, probably a consequence of its insulin-sensitizing properties. In vivo data in rodents suggest that the insulin-sensitization responsible for improvement of glycemia occurs in muscle and liver. Whereas associations of plasma...... adiponectin with muscle insulin sensitivity in humans have been examined, this has not been done for the liver....

  6. Amperometric glucose sensor based on enhanced catalytic reduction of oxygen using glucose oxidase adsorbed onto core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-silica-Au magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Aijun [College of Geography and Environmental Science, College of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Li Yongfang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Li Zhonghua [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Feng Jiuju, E-mail: jjfengnju@gmail.com [College of Geography and Environmental Science, College of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Sun Yanli [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Chen Jianrong [College of Geography and Environmental Science, College of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Monodisperse Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared under facile solvothermal conditions and successively functionalized with silica and Au to form core/shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-silica-Au NPs. Furthermore, the samples were used as matrix to construct a glucose sensor based on glucose oxidase (GOD). The immobilized GOD retained its bioactivity with high protein load of 3.92 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} mol{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and exhibited a surface-controlled quasi-reversible redox reaction, with a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate of 7.98 {+-} 0.6 s{sup -1}. The glucose biosensor showed a broad linear range up to 3.97 mM with high sensitivity of 62.45 {mu}A{center_dot}mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and fast response (less than 5 s). - Graphical abstract: Core-shell structured Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-silica-Au nanoparticles were prepared and used as matrix to construct an amperometric glucose sensor based on glucose oxidase, which showed broad linear range, high sensitivity, and fast response. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of monodispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabrication of core/shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-silica-Au nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Construction of a novel glucose sensor with wide linear range, high sensitivity and fast response.

  7. Effects of growth hormone on glucose and fat metabolism in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Louise; Krag, Morten Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo data from tests performed in normal subjects and in patients who had abnormal growth hormone (GH) status. Experimental data in human subjects demonstrate that GH acutely inhibits glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. At the same time GH stimulates the turnover...

  8. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P<0.05. High glucose induced a significant increase in NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β expression in THP-1-derived macrophages. M1 macrophage surface marker with CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound.

  9. Detection of glucose in the human brain with (1) H MRS at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lana G; Hirokazu, Kawaguchi; Fukunaga, Masaki; B Matson, Gerald

    2016-12-01

    A new method is proposed for noninvasive detection of glucose in vivo using proton MR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla. The proposed method utilizes J-difference editing to uncover the resonance of beta-glucose (β-glc) at 3.23 ppm, which is strongly overlapped with choline. Calculations using the density matrix formalism are used to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the β-glc resonance at 3.23 ppm. The calculations are verified using phantom and in vivo data collected at 7 Tesla. The proposed method allows observation of the glucose signal at 3.23 ppm in the human brain spectrum. Additional co-edited resonances of N-acetylaspartylglutamatate and glutathione are also detected in the same experiment. The proposed method does not require carbon ((13) C)- labeled glucose injections and (13) C hardware; as such, it has a potential to provide valuable information on intrinsic glucose concentration in the human brain in vivo. Magn Reson Med 76:1653-1660, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-09-11

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding.

  11. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Increases the Copy Number of Mitochondrial DNA in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Al-Kafaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has been linked to the pathogenicity of diabetic nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that mtDNA copy number may be increased in human mesangial cells in response to high glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS to compensate for damaged mtDNA. The effect of manganese superoxide dismutase mimetic (MnTBAP on glucose-induced mtDNA copy number was also examined. The copy number of mtDNA was determined by real-time PCR in human mesangial cells cultured in 5 mM glucose, 25 mM glucose, and mannitol (osmotic control, as well as in cells cultured in 25 mM glucose in the presence and absence of 200 μM MnTBAP. Intracellular ROS was assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in human mesangial cells. The copy number of mtDNA was significantly increased when human mesangial cells were incubated with 25 mM glucose compared to 5 mM glucose and mannitol. In addition, 25 mM glucose rapidly generated ROS in the cells, which was not detected in 5 mM glucose. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number was significantly decreased and maintained to normal following treatment of cells with 25 mM glucose and MnTBAP compared to 25 mM glucose alone. Inclusion of MnTBAP during 25 mM glucose incubation inhibited mitochondrial superoxide in human mesangial cells. Increased mtDNA copy number in human mesangial cells by high glucose could contribute to increased mitochondrial superoxide, and prevention of mtDNA copy number could have potential in retarding the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Human Ensuing Self-balancing Automaton Based on Motion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kishhanth

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Travel has become one among rudimentary necessities for every individual. Handling baggage plays an important role while travelling and for typical nomads it is cumbersome when heavy. With the proposed concept which will be dealt in this study, the baggage need not be pulled by us; it just follows us detecting our presence. Hence, the baggage is simply nothing but a robot. Prototype of motion sensor based human following robot that can balance itself in two wheels, thus behaving as a suitcase with intelligence and hence named Smart Suitcase. Concept of inverted pendulum helps in balancing. Regenerative power saving is established, when on its normal movement by the user wherein the saved power can be used for charging mobiles, laptops, torch lights etc. (low voltage applications. Passive infrared sensors fed with inbuilt intelligence in responding only to human presence helps this robot get even smarter.

  13. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios. G. Aggelis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the acoustic emission (AE activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis. The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure.

  14. Segmentation of human upper body movement using multiple IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takashi; Lin, Jonathan Feng-Shun; Kulic, Dana; Venture, Gentiane

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes an approach for the segmentation of human body movements measured by inertial measurement unit sensors. Using the angular velocity and linear acceleration measurements directly, without converting to joint angles, we perform segmentation by formulating the problem as a classification problem, and training a classifier to differentiate between motion end-point and within-motion points. The proposed approach is validated with experiments measuring the upper body movement during reaching tasks, demonstrating classification accuracy of over 85.8%.

  15. Glucose stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in islets transplanted into NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, H. E.; Cyphert, T. J.; Pascoe, J. L.; Hollern, D. A.; Abraham, N.; Lundell, R. J.; Rosa, T.; Romano, L. C.; Zou, B.; O’Donnell, C. P.; Stewart, A. F.; Garcia-Ocaña, A.; Alonso, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We determined whether hyperglycaemia stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in an islet transplant model Methods Human islets were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Blood glucose was measured serially during a 2 week graft revascularisation period. Engrafted mice were then catheterised in the femoral artery and vein, and infused intravenously with BrdU for 4 days to label replicating beta cells. Mice with restored normoglycaemia were co-infused with either 0.9% (wt/vol.) saline or 50% (wt/vol.) glucose to generate glycaemic differences among grafts from the same donors. During infusions, blood glucose was measured daily. After infusion, human beta cell replication and apoptosis were measured in graft sections using immunofluorescence for insulin, and BrdU or TUNEL. Results Human islet grafts corrected diabetes in the majority of cases. Among grafts from the same donor, human beta cell proliferation doubled in those exposed to higher glucose relative to lower glucose. Across the entire cohort of grafts, higher blood glucose was strongly correlated with increased beta cell replication. Beta cell replication rates were unrelated to circulating human insulin levels or donor age, but tended to correlate with donor BMI. Beta cell TUNEL reactivity was not measurably increased in grafts exposed to elevated blood glucose. Conclusions/interpretation Glucose is a mitogenic stimulus for transplanted human beta cells in vivo. Investigating the underlying pathways may point to mechanisms capable of expanding human beta cell mass in vivo. PMID:20936253

  16. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One-Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Boros, László G; Nolen, Greg T; Chang, Ching-Wei; Wabitsch, Martin; Beger, Richard D; Kaput, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate association approach was employed to examine the influence of fructose on the intermediary metabolism of glucose. Increasing concentrations of fructose robustly increased the oxidation of [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose to 13CO2 (p < 0.000001). However, glucose-derived 13CO2 negatively correlated with 13C labeled glutamate, 13C palmitate, and M+1 labeled lactate. These are strong markers of limited tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid synthesis, pentose cycle fluxes, substrate turnover and NAD+/NADP+ or ATP production from glucose via complete oxidation, indicating diminished mitochondrial energy metabolism. Contrarily, a positive correlation was observed between glucose-derived 13CO2 formed and 13C oleate and doses of fructose which indicate the elongation and desaturation of palmitate to oleate for storage. Collectively, these results suggest that fructose preferentially drives glucose through serine oxidation glycine cleavage (SOGC pathway) one-carbon cycle for NAD+/NADP+ production that is utilized in fructose-induced lipogenesis and storage in adipocytes.

  17. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One–Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Varma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate association approach was employed to examine the influence of fructose on the intermediary metabolism of glucose. Increasing concentrations of fructose robustly increased the oxidation of [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose to 13CO2 (p < 0.000001. However, glucose-derived 13CO2 negatively correlated with 13C labeled glutamate, 13C palmitate, and M+1 labeled lactate. These are strong markers of limited tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis, pentose cycle fluxes, substrate turnover and NAD+/NADP+ or ATP production from glucose via complete oxidation, indicating diminished mitochondrial energy metabolism. Contrarily, a positive correlation was observed between glucose-derived 13CO2 formed and 13C oleate and doses of fructose which indicate the elongation and desaturation of palmitate to oleate for storage. Collectively, these results suggest that fructose preferentially drives glucose through serine oxidation glycine cleavage (SOGC pathway one-carbon cycle for NAD+/NADP+ production that is utilized in fructose-induced lipogenesis and storage in adipocytes.

  18. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Holst, Jens Juul; Rattigan, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone, glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery...... in overnight fasted healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by co-infusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg...

  19. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  20. Simultaneous transdermal extraction of glucose and lactate from human subjects by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Tak S; Connolly, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of simultaneously extracting glucose and lactate from human subjects, at the same skin location, using transdermal reverse iontophoresis. Transdermal monitoring using iontophoresis is made possible by the skin's permeability to small molecules and the nanoporous and microporous nature of the structure of skin. The study was intended to provide information which could be used to develop a full, biosensor-based, monitoring system for multiple parameters from transdermal extraction. As a precursor to the human study, in vitro reverse iontophoresis experiments were performed in an artificial skin system to establish the optimum current waveforms to be applied during iontophoresis. In the human study, a bipolar DC current waveform (with reversal of the electrode current direction every 15 minutes) was applied to ten healthy volunteers via skin electrodes and utilized for simultaneous glucose and lactate transdermal extraction at an applied current density of 300 microA/cm2. Glucose and lactate were successfully extracted through each subject's skin into the conducting gel that formed part of each iontophoresis electrode. The results suggest that it will be possible to noninvasively and simultaneously monitor glucose and lactate levels in patients using this approach and this could have future applications in diagnostic monitoring for a variety of medical conditions.

  1. Interaction of Hyperoside with Human Serum Albumin and Effect of Glucose on the Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of hyperoside (Hyp with human serum albumin (HSA and effect of glucose on the binding were studied in simulating physiological condition (pH 7.40. The results suggested that Hyp quenched the endogenous fluorescence of HSA via a static quenching process with the distance of 1.95 nm between Hyp and HSA. Hydrophobic forces played a major role in stabilizing the Hyp-HSA complex. Through synchronous fluorescence monitoring of conformation of HSA, we found that the binding to Hyp can change the microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp residues. Increasing in glucose concentration over a range from 0 to 9 mM decreased the binding ability of HSA to Hyp, implying that increasing in glucose concentration would increase the concentration of free Hyp.

  2. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, Bente; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J;

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... [insulin infusion rates: 10,000 (step I), 20,000 (step II), and 150,000 (step III) microU x min(-1) x m(-2)]. Glucose and glycerol concentrations were measured in arterial blood and also by microdialysis in interstitial fluid in periumbilical, subcutaneous adipose tissue and in quadriceps femoris muscle...... (glucose only). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. In the basal state, adipose tissue blood flow tended to be higher in T compared with S subjects, and in both groups blood flow was constant during the clamp. The change from basal in arterial-interstitial glucose concentration...

  3. [Achievement of the noninvasive measurement for human blood glucose with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-yan; Ding, Dong; Song, Li-qiang; Gu, Lin-na; Yang, Peng; Tang, Yu-guo

    2005-06-01

    The noninvasive measurement of human blood glucose was achieved with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method. The thumb fingertip NIR diffusion reflectance spectra of six different age healthy volunteers were collected using Nexus-870 and its NIR fiber port smart accessory. The test was implemented with changing the blood glucose concentration for the limosis and satiation of every volunteer. The calibration model was set up using PLS method with the smoothing, baseline correction and first derivatives pretreatment spectrum in the 7500-8500 cm(-1) region for single volunteer, the same age combination and that of different age. When the spectrum was obtained, the actual blood glucose value of every spectrun sample was demarcated using ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The correlation between the calibration value and true value for single volunteer is better than that for the combination of volunteers, the correlative coefficients are all over 0.90471, RMSECs are all less than 0.171.

  4. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (PPiracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  5. Visualization and quantitation of GLUT4 translocation in human skeletal muscle following glucose ingestion and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S; Bendtsen, Claus; Worthington, Philip L; Wilson, Oliver J; Strauss, Juliette A; Wallis, Gareth A; Turner, Alice M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2015-05-11

    Insulin- and contraction-stimulated increases in glucose uptake into skeletal muscle occur in part as a result of the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane (PM). This study aimed to use immunofluorescence microscopy in human skeletal muscle to quantify GLUT4 redistribution from intracellular stores to the PM in response to glucose feeding and exercise. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of ten insulin-sensitive men in the basal state and following 30 min of cycling exercise (65% VO2 max). Muscle biopsy samples were also taken from a second cohort of ten age-, BMI- and VO2 max-matched insulin-sensitive men in the basal state and 30 and 60 min following glucose feeding (75 g glucose). GLUT4 and dystrophin colocalization, measured using the Pearson's correlation coefficient, was increased following 30 min of cycling exercise (baseline r = 0.47 ± 0.01; post exercise r = 0.58 ± 0.02; P GLUT4 clusters were partially depleted following 30 min cycling exercise, but not 30 min after glucose feeding. This study has, for the first time, used immunofluorescence microscopy in human skeletal muscle to quantify increases in GLUT4 and dystrophin colocalization and depletion of GLUT4 from large and smaller clusters as evidence of net GLUT4 translocation to the PM.

  6. Protective effects of antioxidants on high Glucose-induced malfunctions in human glomerular mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini R

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Altered functions of mesangial cells induced by high glucose concentrations are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore investigated the effect of high glucose (39.2 mM alone and in combination with taurine (500 µM or vitamin E (100 µM in serum free medium (RPMI 1640 on the proliferative growth response and turnover of type IV collagen by human glomerular mesangial cells (GMC. The results showed that the high glucose level decreases the proliferation of the GMC which is reversed by taurine and vitamin E. In order to control the osmotic effects of high glucose, the GMC were also cultured in the presence of manitol. Manitol had no effect on the proliferation of GMC. Furthermore, the results showed that addition of vitamin E or taurine to media containing high glucose could reverse and normalize the collagen turn-over by the cultured mesangial cells. These results suggest that taurie and vitamin E may function as endogenous agents in the kidney to limit the development of glomerulosclerosis in diabetic renal disease.

  7. Interleukin-1 beta stimulates glucose uptake of human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, M; Mahiout, A; Kliem, V; Kurz, P; Koch, K M; Brunkhorst, R

    1996-01-01

    To investigate whether the glucose uptake (GU) of human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) is mediated by glucose transporters and whether this uptake is influenced by interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 beta), we measured 2-deoxy-(3H)-GU of HPMC in vitro, after exposing the cells for different times (two and 12 hours) to increasing concentrations (0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 ng/mL) of IL-1 beta. To exclude a noncarrier-mediated transport, GU was also tested in the presence of cytochalasin B. All experiments were performed in triplicate in the cells of two donors. Cytochalasin B inhibits GU of HPMC almost completely. GU of HPMC is not stimulated by insulin. GU is stimulated by IL-1 beta in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate a GU of HPMC, which is mediated by a glucose transporter and stimulated by IL-1 beta. The increased uptake of glucose from the dialysate in patients with peritonitis may be mediated by a (cytokine-induced) increased activity of HPMC glucose transporters.

  8. A potential role for glucose transporters in the evolution of human brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrigo, Olivier; Pfefferle, Adam D; Babbitt, Courtney C; Haygood, Ralph; Wall, Christine E; Wray, Gregory A

    2011-01-01

    Differences in cognitive abilities and the relatively large brain are among the most striking differences between humans and their closest primate relatives. The energy trade-off hypothesis predicts that a major shift in energy allocation among tissues occurred during human origins in order to support the remarkable expansion of a metabolically expensive brain. However, the molecular basis of this adaptive scenario is unknown. Two glucose transporters (SLC2A1 and SLC2A4) are promising candidates and present intriguing mutations in humans, resulting, respectively, in microcephaly and disruptions in whole-body glucose homeostasis. We compared SLC2A1 and SLC2A4 expression between humans, chimpanzees and macaques, and found compensatory and biologically significant expression changes on the human lineage within cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, consistent with mediating an energy trade-off. We also show that these two genes are likely to have undergone adaptation and participated in the development and maintenance of a larger brain in the human lineage by modulating brain and skeletal muscle energy allocation. We found that these two genes show human-specific signatures of positive selection on known regulatory elements within their 5'-untranslated region, suggesting an adaptation of their regulation during human origins. This study represents the first case where adaptive, functional and genetic lines of evidence implicate specific genes in the evolution of human brain size. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Dynamic imaging of glucose flux impedance using FRET sensors in wild-type Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Bhavna; Hörmann, Friederike; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative and dynamic analysis of metabolites and signalling molecules is limited by technical challenges in obtaining temporally resolved information at the cellular and compartmental level. Real-time information on signalling and metabolite levels with subcellular granularity can be obtained with the help of genetically encoded FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) nanosensors. FRET nanosensors represent powerful tools for gene discovery, and analysis of regulatory networks, for example by screening mutants. However, RNA silencing has impaired our ability to express FRET nanosensors functionally in Arabidopsis plants. This drawback was overcome here by expressing the nanosensors in RNA silencing mutants. However, the use of silencing mutants requires the generation of homozygous lines deficient in RNA silencing as well as the mutation of interest and co-expression of the nanosensor. Here it is shown that dynamic changes in cytosolic glucose levels can readily be quantified in wild-type Arabidopsis plants at early stages of development (7-15 d) before silencing had a major effect on fluorescence intensity. A detailed protocol for screening 10-20 mutant seedlings per day is provided. The detailed imaging protocol provided here is suitable for analysing sugar flux in young wild-type plants as well as mutants affected in sugar signalling, metabolism, or transport using a wide spectrum of FRET nanosensors.

  10. Graphene-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids Synthesized by Gamma Radiations: Application as a Glucose Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Shahriary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional hybrid nanomaterial of graphene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (G-MWCNTs was synthesized using gamma rays emitted by a 60Co source with a dose rate of 3.95 Gy min−1. The products were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis, photoluminescence (PL, and micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. FTIR and UV-Vis analysis reveals the formation of hybrid nanomaterial which is confirmed by XRD, micro-Raman analysis, and PL. SEM micrograph depicts the composite structure of graphene layers and MWCNTs, while the TEM micrograph exhibits graphene layers covered by MWCNTs. The G-MWCNTs hybrid used as electrode for electrochemical studies in K3Fe(CN6 shows enhancement in electrocatalytic behavior, compared to each individual starting material, therefore, has been applied for amperometric sensing of glucose in alkaline solution and exhibits sensitivity of 12.5 μAmM-1 cm−2 and low detection limit 1.45 μM (S/N=3 in a linear range of 0.1 to 14 mM (R2=0.985.

  11. Cross feeding of glucose metabolism byproducts of Escherichia coli human gut isolates and probiotic strains affect survival of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Chirantana; Ekka, Manjula; Arora, Saurabh; Dhaware, Prashant D; Chowdhury, Rukhsana; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae converts glucose into either acid or the neutral end product acetoin and its survival in carbohydrate enriched media is linked to the nature of the byproducts produced. It has been demonstrated in this study that Escherichia coli strain isolated from the gut of healthy human volunteers and the commonly used probiotic E. coli Nissle strain that metabolize glucose to acidic byproducts drastically reduce the survival of V. cholerae strains irrespective of their glucose sensitivity and acetoin production status. Accordingly, E. coli glucose transport mutants that produce lower amounts of acidic metabolites had little effect on the survival of V. cholerae in cocultures. Thus, cross feeding of byproducts of glucose metabolism by heterologous bacteria modulates the survival of V. cholerae in glucose rich medium suggesting that composition of the gut microbiota could influence the outcome of V. cholerae infection especially when glucose based ORS is administered.

  12. Endogenous glucose production increases in response to metformin treatment in the glycogen-depleted state in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie H; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    had two reduced-function alleles in OCT1). Three were excluded from the analysis because of early dropout. Metformin significantly stimulated glucose disposal rates and non-oxidative glucose metabolism with no effect on glucose oxidation. This increase in glucose utilisation was explained...... of metformin on glucose metabolism in humans after a glycogen-depleting fast and the role of reduced-function alleles in OCT1 (also known as SLC22A1). METHODS: In a randomised, crossover trial, healthy individuals with or without reduced-function alleles in OCT1 were fasted for 42 h twice, either...... metabolism were assessed using [3-(3)H]glucose, indirect calorimetry and measurement of substrates and counter-regulatory hormones. The primary outcome was endogenous glucose production (EGP). RESULTS: Thirty-seven individuals were randomised. Thirty-four completed the study (12 had none, 13 had one and nine...

  13. Nonenzymatic glucose sensor based on flower-shaped Au-Pd core-shell nanoparticles-ionic liquids composite film modified glassy carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xianlan [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument and Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Institute of Research for Functional Materials, Fuzhou University, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Pan Hiabo, E-mail: hbpan@fzu.edu.c [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument and Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Institute of Research for Functional Materials, Fuzhou University, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Liu Hongfang [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument and Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Du Min [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument and Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2010-12-30

    A novel nonenzymatic glucose sensor based on flower-shaped (FS) Au -Pd core-shell nanoparticles-ionic liquids (ILs i.e., trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, [P(C{sub 6}){sub 3}C{sub 14}][Tf{sub 2}N]) composite film modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) was reported. The Au-Pd nanocatalysts were prepared by seed-mediated growth method, forming the three-dimensional FS nanoparticles, where tens of small Pd nanoparticles ({approx}3 nm) aggregated on gold seeds ({approx}20 nm). The FS Au-Pd nanoparticle was a good candidate for the catalytic efficiency of nanometallic surfaces because of its flower-shaped nature, which has greater adsorption capacity. XPS analysis and zeta potential indicated that the surface of Pd atoms is positively charged, profiting the oxidation process of glucose. And ILs acted as bridge connecting Au-Pd one another and bucky gel as platform within the whole nanocomposite. So the modified electrode has higher sensitivity and selectivity owing to intrinsic synergistic effects of this nanocomposite. Amperometric measurements allow observation of the electrochemical oxidation of glucose at 0.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the glucose oxidation current is linear to its concentration in the range of 5 nM-0.5 {mu}M, and the detection limit was found to be 1.0 nM (S/N = 3). The as-prepared nonenzyme glucose sensor exhibited excellent stability, repeatability, and selectivity.

  14. Energy harvesting for human wearable and implantable bio-sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcheson, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    There are clear trade-offs between functionality, battery lifetime and battery volume for wearable and implantable wireless-biosensors which energy harvesting devices may be able to overcome. Reliable energy harvesting has now become a reality for machine condition monitoring and is finding applications in chemical process plants, refineries and water treatment works. However, practical miniature devices that can harvest sufficient energy from the human body to power a wireless bio-sensor are still in their infancy. This paper reviews the options for human energy harvesting in order to determine power availability for harvester-powered body sensor networks. The main competing technologies for energy harvesting from the human body are inertial kinetic energy harvesting devices and thermoelectric devices. These devices are advantageous to some other types as they can be hermetically sealed. In this paper the fundamental limit to the power output of these devices is compared as a function of generator volume when attached to a human whilst walking and running. It is shown that the kinetic energy devices have the highest fundamental power limits in both cases. However, when a comparison is made between the devices using device effectivenesses figures from previously demonstrated prototypes presented in the literature, the thermal device is competitive with the kinetic energy harvesting device when the subject is running and achieves the highest power density when the subject is walking.

  15. Metabolic plasticity of human T cells: Preserved cytokine production under glucose deprivation or mitochondrial restriction, but 2-deoxy-glucose affects effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Kathrin; Geiselhöringer, Anna-Lena; Fante, Matthias; Bruss, Christina; Färber, Stephanie; Schönhammer, Gabriele; Peter, Katrin; Singer, Katrin; Andreesen, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Petra; Oefner, Peter; Herr, Wolfgang; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-09-01

    The strong link between T-cell metabolism and effector functions is well characterized in the murine system but hardly investigated in human T cells. Therefore, we analyzed glycolytic and mitochondrial activity in correlation to function in activated human CD4 and CD8 T cells. Glycolysis was barely detectable upon stimulation but accelerated beyond 24 h, whereas mitochondrial activity was elevated immediately in both T-cell populations. Glucose deprivation or mitochondrial restriction reduced proliferation, had only a transient impact on "on-blast formation" and no impact on viability, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 production, whereas TNF was reduced. Similar results were obtained in bulk T cells and T-cell subsets. Elevated respiration under glucose restriction demonstrated metabolic flexibility. Administration of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-glucose suppressed both glycolysis and respiration and exerted a strong impact on cytokine production that persisted for IFN-γ after removal of 2-deoxy-glucose. Taken together, glycolytic or mitochondrial restriction alone compromised proliferation of human T cells, but barely affected their effector functions. In contrast, effector functions were severely affected by 2-deoxy-glucose treatment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  17. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Dai, Jiezhi; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound. PMID:28164132

  18. Human monoclonal antibodies against glucagon receptor improve glucose homeostasis by suppression of hepatic glucose output in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook-Dong Kim

    Full Text Available AIM: Glucagon is an essential regulator of hepatic glucose production (HGP, which provides an alternative therapeutic target for managing type 2 diabetes with glucagon antagonists. We studied the effect of a novel human monoclonal antibody against glucagon receptor (GCGR, NPB112, on glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. METHODS: The glucose-lowering efficacy and safety of NPB112 were investigated in DIO mice with human GCGR for 11 weeks, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study was conducted to measure HGP. RESULTS: Single intraperitoneal injection of NPB112 with 5 mg/kg effectively decreased blood glucose levels in DIO mice for 5 days. A significant reduction in blood glucose was observed in DIO mice treated with NPB112 at a dose ≥5 mg/kg for 6 weeks, and its glucose-lowering effect was dose-dependent. Long-term administration of NPB112 also caused a mild 29% elevation in glucagon level, which was returned to the normal range after discontinuation of treatment. The clamp study showed that DIO mice injected with NPB112 at 5 mg/kg were more insulin sensitive than control mice, indicating amelioration of insulin resistance by treatment with NPB112. DIO mice treated with NPB112 showed a significant improvement in the ability of insulin to suppress HGP, showing a 33% suppression (from 8.3 mg/kg/min to 5.6 mg/kg/min compared to the 2% suppression (from 9.8 mg/kg/min to 9.6 mg/kg/min in control mice. In addition, no hypoglycemia or adverse effect was observed during the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A novel human monoclonal GCGR antibody, NPB112, effectively lowered the glucose level in diabetic animal models with mild and reversible hyperglucagonemia. Suppression of excess HGP with NPB112 may be a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Exogenous normal mammary epithelial mitochondria suppress glycolytic metabolism and glucose uptake of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xian-Peng; Elliott, Robert L; Head, Jonathan F

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that normal mitochondria inhibited cancer cell proliferation and increased drug sensitivity by the mechanism of suppression of cancer aerobic glycolysis. To demonstrate the mechanism, we used real-time PCR and glycolysis cell-based assay to measure gene expression of glycolytic enzymes and glucose transporters, and extracellular lactate production of human breast cancer cells. We found that isolated fluorescent probe-stained mitochondria of MCF-12A (human mammary epithelia) could enter into human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231, confirmed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy. Mitochondria from the untransformed human mammary epithelia increased drug sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Real-time PCR showed that exogenous normal mitochondria of MCF-12A suppressed gene expression of glycolytic enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase A, and glucose transporter 1 and 3 of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Glycolysis cell-based assay revealed that normal mitochondria significantly suppressed lactate production in culture media of MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, normal mitochondria suppress cancer proliferation and increase drug sensitivity by the mechanism of inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis and glucose uptake.

  20. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  1. Pathways of hepatic glycogen formation in humans following ingestion of a glucose load in the fed state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1989-06-01

    The relative contributions of the direct and the indirect pathways to hepatic glycogen formation following a glucose load given to humans four hours after a substantial breakfast have been examined. Glucose loads labeled with (6-(/sup 14/)C)glucose were given to six healthy volunteers along with diflunisal (1 g) or acetaminophen (1.5 g), drugs excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distribution of /sup 14/C in the glucose unit of the glucuronide was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited directly in liver glycogen (ie, glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen) rather than indirectly (ie, glucose----C3-compound----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 77% +/- 4%, which is somewhat higher than previous estimates in humans fasted overnight (65% +/- 1%, P less than 0.05). Thus, the indirect pathway of liver glycogen formation following a glucose load is operative in both the overnight fasted and the fed state, although its contribution may be somewhat less in the fed state.

  2. Characteristics of glucose transport across the microvillous membranes of human term placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinderjit Kaur Anand

    Full Text Available Transport characteristics of D-glucose were studied in the microvillous vesicles isolated from the human term placenta. Transport occurred by selective and rapid facilitated diffusion system which was inhibitable by phloretin and HgCl2. The transport was dependent on a transmembrane. Na+-gradient indicating a "secondary active transport" system operating. The transport influx was saturable and the kinetic analysis based on Hanes-Woolf plot produced a kt and Jmax value of 1.2 mM and 34 nmoles. mgprotein-1.min-1, respectively. The efflux of D-glucose from the membrane vesicles in a pre-equilibrated assay conditions showed a distinct biphasic pattern differing significantly in the half time efflux. The t1/2 of the fast and slow components was found to be 15 sec and 660 sec, respectively. The transport showed distinct sensitivity to temperature and the Ea values both below and above the transition temperature of 37 ºC, as calculated from the Arrhenius plot were found to be 7600 and 5472 kCa1.mol-1, respectively. Inhibition studies with a number of sugars for hexose transport pathway showed that the glucose epimers, phosphorylated sugars, and even the disaccharides and the pentose sugars competed effectively with D-glucose. The influx was also inhibited by a number of steroids such as progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone and estrogen. Insulin was found to increase glucose transport in a dose- dependent fashion at a concentration of 0.2-1 unit.ml-1. Ouabain, dinitrophenoi and nicotine strongly inhibited D-glucose uptake in the membrane vesicles.

  3. A direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell operating in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coman, V.; Gorton, L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry/Biochemistry, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Ludwig, R. [Research Centre Applied Biocatalysis, 8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Harreither, W.; Haltrich, D. [Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Ruzgas, T. [Biomedical Laboratory Science, Health and Society, Malmoe University, 20506 Malmoe (Sweden); Laboratory of Chemical Enzymology, A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, 119071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shleev, S.

    2010-02-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterisation of the very first direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell (BFC) operating in neutral glucose-containing buffer and human serum. Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase were used as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of the mediator-, separator- and membrane-less, a priori, non-toxic and simple miniature BFC, was obtained: an open-circuit voltage of 0.62 and 0.58 V, a maximum power density of ca. 3 and 4 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at 0.37 and 0.19 V of cell voltage, in phosphate buffer and human serum, respectively. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. High glucose levels reduce fatty acid oxidation and increase triglyceride accumulation in human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Visiedo, Francisco; Bugatto, Fernando; Sánchez, Viviana; Cózar-Castellano, Irene; Bartha, Jose L.; Perdomo, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Placentas of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) exhibit an altered lipid metabolism. The mechanism by which GDM is linked to alterations in placental lipid metabolism remains obscure. We hypothesized that high glucose levels reduce mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and increase triglyceride accumulation in human placenta. To test this hypothesis, we measured FAO, fatty acid esterification, de novo fatty acid synthesis, triglyceride levels, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase...

  5. Simultaneous transdermal extraction of glucose and lactate from human subjects by reverse iontophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly,Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Tak S Ching1, Patricia Connolly21Asia University, Taiwan; 2Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: This study investigated the possibility of simultaneously extracting glucose and lactate from human subjects, at the same skin location, using transdermal reverse iontophoresis. Transdermal monitoring using iontophoresis is made possible by the skin’s permeability to small molecules and the nanoporous and microporous nature of the structure of ski...

  6. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium: Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (CGMS) for Hospitalized and Ambulatory Patients at Risk for Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, and Glycemic Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C; Strasma, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non-critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost.

  7. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  8. Human Carboxylesterase 2 Reverses Obesity-Induced Diacylglycerol Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Massart, Julie; Hunerdosse, Devon M; Schönke, Milena; Correia, Jorge C; Louie, Sharon M; Ruas, Jorge L; Näslund, Erik; Nomura, Daniel K; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-17

    Serine hydrolases are a large family of multifunctional enzymes known to influence obesity. Here, we performed activity-based protein profiling to assess the functional level of serine hydrolases in liver biopsies from lean and obese humans in order to gain mechanistic insight into the pathophysiology of metabolic disease. We identified reduced hepatic activity of carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) and arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC) in human obesity. In primary human hepatocytes, CES2 knockdown impaired glucose storage and lipid oxidation. In mice, obesity reduced CES2, whereas adenoviral delivery of human CES2 reversed hepatic steatosis, improved glucose tolerance, and decreased inflammation. Lipidomic analysis identified a network of CES2-regulated lipids altered in human and mouse obesity. CES2 possesses triglyceride and diacylglycerol lipase activities and displayed an inverse correlation with HOMA-IR and hepatic diacylglycerol concentrations in humans. Thus, decreased CES2 is a conserved feature of obesity and plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disturbances. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Carboxylesterase 2 Reverses Obesity-Induced Diacylglycerol Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell A. Ruby

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydrolases are a large family of multifunctional enzymes known to influence obesity. Here, we performed activity-based protein profiling to assess the functional level of serine hydrolases in liver biopsies from lean and obese humans in order to gain mechanistic insight into the pathophysiology of metabolic disease. We identified reduced hepatic activity of carboxylesterase 2 (CES2 and arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC in human obesity. In primary human hepatocytes, CES2 knockdown impaired glucose storage and lipid oxidation. In mice, obesity reduced CES2, whereas adenoviral delivery of human CES2 reversed hepatic steatosis, improved glucose tolerance, and decreased inflammation. Lipidomic analysis identified a network of CES2-regulated lipids altered in human and mouse obesity. CES2 possesses triglyceride and diacylglycerol lipase activities and displayed an inverse correlation with HOMA-IR and hepatic diacylglycerol concentrations in humans. Thus, decreased CES2 is a conserved feature of obesity and plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disturbances.

  10. Astaxanthin alleviates oxidative stress insults-related derangements in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to glucose fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Lobna A; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Suzuki, Tokiko; Tomita, Kengo; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    Glycemic fluctuations may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether the oxycarotenoid astaxanthin can reduce the detrimental effects of fluctuating glucose on vascular endothelial cells. Human umbilical venous endothelial cells were incubated for 3 days in media containing 5.5mM glucose, 22 mM glucose, or 5.5mM glucose alternating with 22 mM glucose in the absence or presence of astaxanthin or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Constant high glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, but such an effect was more pronounced in fluctuating glucose. This was associated with up-regulated p22(phox) expression and down-regulated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC-1α) expression. Astaxanthin inhibited ROS generation, p22(phox) up-regulation, and PGC-1α down-regulation by the stimuli of glucose fluctuation. Fluctuating glucose, but not constant high glucose, significantly decreased the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation level at Ser-1177 without affecting total eNOS expression, which was prevented by astaxanthin as well as by the anti-oxidant NAC. Transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed increased cell apoptosis in fluctuating glucose. Glucose fluctuation also resulted in up-regulating gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These adverse changes were subdued by astaxanthin. The phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were significantly increased by glucose fluctuations, and astaxanthin significantly inhibited the increase in JNK and p38 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that astaxanthin can protect vascular endothelial cells against glucose fluctuation by reducing ROS generation.

  11. Hyperosmolarity induced by high glucose promotes senescence in human glomerular mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Nogal, Maria; Troyano, Nuria; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2014-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is involved in the diabetic complication of different organs and can elevate serum osmolarity. Here, we tested whether hyperosmolarity promoted by high glucose levels induces cellular senescence in renal cells. We treated Wistar rats with streptozotocin to induce diabetes or with consecutive daily injections of mannitol to increase serum osmolarity and analyzed p53 and p16 genes in renal cortex by immunohistochemistry. Both diabetic and mannitol treated rats showed a significant increase in serum osmolarity, without significant signs of renal dysfunction, but associated with increased staining for p53 and p16 in the renal cortex. An increase in p53 and p16 expression was also found in renal cortex slices and glomeruli isolated from healthy rats, which were later treated with 30 mM glucose or mannitol. Intracellular mechanisms involved were analyzed in cultured human glomerular mesangial cells treated with 30 mM glucose or mannitol. After treatments, cells showed increased p53, p21 and p16 expression and elevated senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Senescence was prevented when myo-inositol was added before treatment. High glucose or mannitol induced constitutive activation of Ras and ERK pathways which, in turn, were activated by oxidative stress. In summary, hyperosmolarity induced renal senescence, particularly in glomerular mesangial cells, increasing oxidative stress, which constitutively activated Ras-ERK 1/2 pathway. Cellular senescence could contribute to the organ dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  12. Monitoring of glucose, salt and pure water in human whole blood: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Ullah, Hafeez; Akhtar, Munir; Sial, Muhammad Aslam; Ahmed, Ejaz; Durr-E-Sabeeh; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Hussain, Fayyaz

    2016-07-01

    Designing and implementation of non-invasive methods for glucose monitoring in blood is main focus of biomedical scientists to provide a relief from skin puncturing of diabete patient. The objective of this research work is to investigate the shape deformations and the aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) in the human blood after addition of three different analytes i) (0mM-400mM: Range) of glucose (C(6)H(12)O(6)), ii) (0mM-400mM: range) of pure salt (NaCl) and iii) (0mM- 350mM: range) of pure water (H(2)O). We have observed that the changes in the shape of individual cells from biconcave discs to spherical shapes and eventually the lysis of the cells at optimum concentration of glucose, salts and pure water. This demonstration also provides a base line to facilitate diabetes during partial diagnosis and monitoring of the glucose levels qualitatively both in research laboratories and clinical environment.

  13. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Christian T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; van der Spek, J.H.; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need

  14. Artificial and Natural Sensors in FES-assisted Human Movement Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Baten, Chris T.M.; Bergveld, Piet; Spek, van der Jaap; Haugland, Morten

    1998-01-01

    The availability of small and light micromachined sensors for human use and the demonstration that useful signals can be derived from the natural sensors of the human body have enabled new developments in the area of feedback controlled FES assistance of human movements. This paper presents the need

  15. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    /PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose...

  16. Tryptic digestion of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter: effects on ligand binding and tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J M; Qu, Z C; Beechem, J M

    1993-09-21

    The conformation of the human erythrocyte glucose transport protein has been shown to determine its susceptibility to enzymatic cleavage on a large cytoplasmic loop. We took the converse approach and investigated the effects of tryptic digestion on the conformational structure of this protein. Exhaustive tryptic digestion of protein-depleted erythrocyte ghosts decreased the affinity of the residual transporter for cytochalasin B by 3-fold but did not affect the total number of binding sites. Tryptic digestion also increased the affinity of the residual transporter for D-glucose and inward-binding sugar phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside but decreased that for the outward-binding 4,6-O-ethylidene glucose. These results suggest that tryptic cleavage stabilized the remaining transporter in an inward-facing conformation, but one with decreased affinity for cytochalasin B. The steady-state fluorescence emission scan of the purified reconstituted glucose transport protein was unaffected by tryptic digestion. Addition of increasing concentrations of potassium iodide resulted in linear Stern-Volmer plots, which were also unaffected by prior tryptic digestion. The tryptophan oxidant N-bromosuccinimide was investigated to provide a more sensitive measure of tryptophan environment. This agent irreversibly inhibited 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact erythrocytes and cytochalasin B binding in protein-depleted ghosts, with a half-maximal effect observed for each activity at about 0.3-0.4 nM. Treatment of purified glucose transport protein with N-bromosuccinimide resulted in a time-dependent quench of tryptophan fluorescence, which was resolved into two components by nonlinear regression using global analysis. Tryptic digestion retarded the rate of oxidation of the more slowly reacting class of tryptophans. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Green tea extract ingestion, fat oxidation, and glucose tolerance in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Michelle C; Hulston, Carl J; Cox, Hannah R; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-03-01

    Green tea consumption is reportedly associated with various health-promoting properties. For example, it has been shown to promote fat oxidation in humans at rest and to prevent obesity and improve insulin sensitivity in mice. We investigated the effects of acute ingestion of green tea extract (GTE) on glucose tolerance and fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise in humans. Two studies were performed, both with a counter-balanced crossover design. In study A, 12 healthy men performed a 30-min cycling exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) before and after supplementation. In study B, 11 healthy men took an oral-glucose-tolerance test before and after supplementation. In the 24-h period before the experimental trials, participants ingested 3 capsules containing either GTE (total: 890 +/- 13 mg polyphenols and 366 +/- 5 mg EGCG) or a corn-flour placebo (total: 1729 +/- 22 mg). Average fat oxidation rates were 17% higher after ingestion of GTE than after ingestion of placebo (0.41 +/- 0.03 and 0.35 +/- 0.03 g/min, respectively; P fat oxidation to total energy expenditure was also significantly higher, by a similar percentage, after GTE supplementation. The insulin area under the curve decreased in both the GTE and placebo trials (3612 +/- 301 and 4280 +/- 309 microIU/dL . 120 min, respectively; P fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise and can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy young men.

  18. Automatic identification of inertial sensor placement on human body segments during walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Baten, Christian T.M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the automatic identification of inertial sensors on human body segments during walking. This method allows the user to place (wireless) inertial sensors on arbitrary body segments. Next, the user walks for just a few seconds and the segment to which each sensor is

  19. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... [insulin infusion rates: 10,000 (step I), 20,000 (step II), and 150,000 (step III) microU x min(-1) x m(-2)]. Glucose and glycerol concentrations were measured in arterial blood and also by microdialysis in interstitial fluid in periumbilical, subcutaneous adipose tissue and in quadriceps femoris muscle......-time: T, 44 +/- 9 min (n = 7); S, 102 +/- 23 min (n = 5); P insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, interstitial glycerol data suggest that training also increases insulin sensitivity of lipolysis...

  20. Correlation between human placental lactogen levels and glucose metabolism in pregnant women with intrauterine growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, R; Vasishta, K; Majumdar, S; Garg, S K

    1990-11-01

    Twenty pregnant women with fetal growth retardation and 20 pregnant women with appropriate for gestational age fetuses (controls) were recruited after the 28th week of gestation. Samples were collected for estimation of serum insulin and human placental lactogen (HPL) levels in the fasting state and a glucose tolerance test was carried out on all the subjects. The results showed the glucose and HPL levels to be significantly lower in the fetal growth retardation group compared to controls. There were no differences in the fasting serum insulin levels in the 2 groups. Fetal growth retardation appears to be linked with the absence of development of the physiological 'diabetogenic' state in the second half of pregnancy. This maternal hypoglycaemic state is associated with low HPL levels and not with raised maternal insulin levels as measured in the fasting state.

  1. Effect of phorbol and glucose on insulin secretion from the human fetal pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuch, B E; Williams, P F; Handelsman, D; Dunlop, M; Grigoriou, S; Turtle, J R

    1987-04-01

    It has been reported previously that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate is capable of stimulating the release of insulin from adult and neonatal pancreatic tissue. The data from this study show that this agent at a concentration of 1.3 uM, in the presence of 2.8 mM glucose, was unable to cause significant secretion of insulin from cultured human fetal pancreatic explants. By contrast 20 mM glucose was able to cause a small but significant immediate increase in secretion of insulin, but was unable to maintain this response beyond ten minutes. When the two agents were combined, a synergistic effect was seen throughout the entire 50 minute period of stimulation. The reason for this synergism is unclear since, whilst both secretagogues were able to cause a rise in the levels of diacylglycerol, together no extra effect was observed.

  2. A Human Variant of Glucose-Regulated Protein 94 That Inefficiently Supports IGF Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Hawkes, Colin P; Eletto, Davide

    2016-01-01

    IGFs are critical for normal intrauterine and childhood growth and sustaining health throughout life. We showed previously that the production of IGF-1 and IGF-2 requires interaction with the chaperone glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and that the amount of secreted IGFs is proportional...... to the GRP94 activity. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that functional polymorphisms of human GRP94 affect IGF production and thereby human health. We describe a hypomorphic variant of human GRP94, P300L, whose heterozygous carriers have 9% lower circulating IGF-1 concentration. P300L was found first....... Furthermore, recombinant P300L showed impaired nucleotide binding activity. These in vitro data strongly support a causal relationship between the GRP94 variant and the decreased concentration of circulating IGF-1, as observed in human carriers of P300L. Thus, mutations in GRP94 that affect its IGF chaperone...

  3. Human regional cerebral glucose metabolism during non-rapid eye movement sleep in relation to waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Miewald, Jean M; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Sembrat, Robert C; Ombao, Hernando; Reynolds, Charles F; Monk, Timothy H; Hall, Martica; Kupfer, David J; Moore, Robert Y

    2002-05-01

    Sleep is an essential human function. Although the function of sleep has generally been regarded to be restorative, recent data indicate that it also plays an important role in cognition. The neurobiology of human sleep is most effectively analysed with functional imaging, and PET studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In this study, PET was used to determine patterns of regional glucose metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking. We hypothesized that brain structures related to waking cognitive function would show a persistence of function into the NREM sleep state. Fourteen healthy subjects (age range 21-49 years; 10 women, 4 men) underwent concurrent EEG sleep studies and [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET scans during waking and NREM sleep. Whole-brain glucose metabolism declined significantly from waking to NREM sleep. Relative decreases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM sleep occurred in wide areas of frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital association cortex, primary visual cortex, and in anterior/dorsomedial thalamus. After controlling for the whole-brain declines in absolute metabolism, relative increases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM were found bilaterally in the dorsal pontine tegmentum, hypothalamus, basal forebrain, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex and extensive regions of the mesial temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, and in the right dorsal parietal association cortex and primary somatosensory and motor cortices. The reductions in relative metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking are consistent with prior findings from blood flow studies. The relative increases in glucose utilization in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, ventral striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and pontine reticular formation are new observations that are in accordance with the view that NREM sleep is important to brain

  4. Interactions of androgens, green tea catechins and the antiandrogen flutamide with the external glucose-binding site of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter GLUT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Halai, Mansur; Ross, Clare; Salleh, Naguib; Milligan, Stuart R

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of androgens, the antiandrogen flutamide and green tea catechins on glucose transport inhibition in human erythrocytes. These effects may relate to the antidiabetogenic effects of green tea. Testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA-3-acetate inhibit glucose exit from human erythrocytes with half-maximal inhibitions (Ki) of 39.2±8.9, 29.6±3.7, 48.1±10.2 and 4.8±0.98 μM, respectively. The antiandrogen flutamide competitively relieves these inhibitions and of phloretin. Dehydrotestosterone has no effect on glucose transport, indicating the differences between androgen interaction with GLUT1 and human androgen receptor (hAR). Green tea catechins also inhibit glucose exit from erythrocytes. Epicatechin 3-gallate (ECG) has a Ki ECG of 0.14±0.01 μM, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) has a Ki EGCG of 0.97±0.13 μM. Flutamide reverses these effects. Androgen-screening tests show that the green tea catechins do not act genomically. The high affinities of ECG and EGCG for GLUT1 indicate that this might be their physiological site of action. There are sequence homologies between GLUT1 and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of hAR containing the amino-acid triads Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 288, and Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 29, with similar 3D topology to the polar groups binding 3-keto and 17-β OH steroid groups in hAR LBD. These triads are appropriately sited for competitive inhibition of glucose import at the external opening of the hydrophilic pore traversing GLUT1. PMID:12970085

  5. Scutellarein inhibits hypoxia- and moderately-high glucose-induced proliferation and VEGF expression in human retinal endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong GAO; Bang-hao ZHU; Shi-bo TANG; Jiang-feng WANG; Jun REN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to examine the effect of scutellarein on high glu-cose- and hypoxia-stimulated proliferation of human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). Methods: HREC were cultured under normal glucose (NG), moderate, and high glucose (NG supplemented with 10 or 25 mmol/L D-glucose) and/or hypoxic (cobalt chloride treated) conditions. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cell counting kit. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results: The proliferation of HREC was significantly elevated in response to moderately-high glucose and hypoxic conditions. The combination of high glucose and hypoxia did not have any additive effects on cell proliferation. Consistent with the proliferation data, the expression of VEGF was also upregulated under both moderately-high glucose and hypoxic conditions. The treatment with scutellarein (1 × 10-11-1 × 10-5 mol/L) significantly inhibited high glucose- or hypoxia-induced cell proliferation and VEGF expression. Conclusion: Both hypoxia and moderately-high glucose were potent stimuli for cell proliferation and VEGF expression in HREC without any significant additive effects. Scutellarein is capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HREC, which is possibly related to its ability to suppress the VEGF expression.

  6. Effect of heparin on high glucose induced proliferation and expression of matrix metalloproteinases in normal human mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-ling; Arima Terukatsu; Yasumoto Yuichiro; Tsukamoto Masatoshi; Nozaki Tsuyoshi; Sogabe Atsushi; Harada Kouji; ZHANG Yi-xiang; LIN Xiao-yan; ZHANG Yang-de

    2005-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a complex pathophysiological process.Its precise mechanism is not fully known. In recent years it has been recognized that synthesis of various extracelluar matrix (ECM) components may increase, and that degradation of ECM may decrease in DN. It was reported heparin could inhibit mesangial cells proliferation in vitro. The main aim of this study is to explore whether heparin inhibits proliferation of mesangial cells grown in high glucose concentration and to measure the effect of heparin on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression in mesangial cells. Methods The medium contained either low glucose (5 mmol/L) or high glucose (25 mmol/L). The concentrations of heparin in the culture medium were 0, 25, 50,100, 200 or 400 μg/mL. A metabolic (WST-1) assay was used to measure mesangial cell proliferation and Western blot analysis was used to measure MMPs expression of mesangial cells. Results Normal human mesangial cell (NHMC) proliferation was higher in high glucose (HG) medium than in low glucose (LG) medium. They showed a 1.93 fold expansion after 72 h in high glucose in contrast to a 1.63 fold expansion in low glucose. In the presence of heparin, mesangial cells proliferation was inhibited, which was more obvious at high glucose concentrations than at low glucose concentrations. In high glucose, with heparin concentration of 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg/mL, the mesangial cells showed a 0. 61 fold, 0.52 fold, 0.52 fold and 0.41 fold reductions in cell number compared to cells grown without heparin. In low glucose, only concentrations of 200 μg/mL and 400 μg/mL showed reduction in cell number, namely 0.54 fold and 0.45 fold, when compared to cells grown without heparin. In Western blot analysis,MMP1, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 was expressed by mesangial cells expressed in both high and low glucose concentrations, which was more prominent in high glucose medium. Incubation of heparin further increased expression of

  7. Study on the mechanism of human blood glucose concentration measuring using mid-infrared spectral analysis technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    All forms of diabetes increase the risk of long-term complications. Blood glucose monitoring is of great importance for controlling diabetes procedure, preventing the complications and improving the patient's life quality. At present, the clinical blood glucose concentration measurement is invasive and could be replaced by noninvasive spectroscopy analytical techniques. The mid-infrared spectral region contains strong characteristic and well-defined absorption bands. Therefore, mid-infrared provides an opportunity for monitoring blood glucose invasively with only a few discrete bonds. Although the blood glucose concentration measurement using mid-infrared spectroscopy has a lot of advantages, the disadvantage is also obvious. The absorption in this infrared region is fundamental molecular group vibration. Absorption intensity is very strong, especially for biological molecules. In this paper, it figures out that the osmosis rate of glucose has a certain relationship with the blood glucose concentration. Therefore, blood glucose concentration could be measured indirectly by measuring the glucose exudate in epidermis layer. Human oral glucose tolerance tests were carried out to verify the correlation of glucose exudation in shallow layer of epidermis layer and blood glucose concentration. As it has been explained above, the mid-infrared spectral region contains well-defined absorption bands, the intensity of absorption peak around 1123 cm-1 was selected to measure the glucose and that around 1170 cm-1 was selected as reference. Ratio of absorption peak intensity was recorded for each set of measurement. The effect and importance of the cleaning the finger to be measured before spectrum measuring are discussed and also verified by experiment.

  8. Investigation of the Influence of the As-Grown ZnO Nanorods and Applied Potentials on an Electrochemical Sensor for In-Vitro Glucose Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Marie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the as-grown zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs on the fabricated electrochemical sensor for in vitro glucose monitoring were investigated. A direct growth of ZnO NRs was performed on the Si/SiO2/Au electrode, using hydrothermal and sol-gel techniques at low temperatures. The structure, consisting of a Si/SiO2/Au/GOx/Nafion membrane, was considered as a baseline, and it was tested under several applied potential 0.1–0.8 V. The immobilized working electrode, with GOx and a nafion membrane, was characterized amperometrically using a source meter Keithely 2410, and an electrochemical impedance Gamry potentiostat. The sensor exhibited the following: a high sensitivity of ~0.468 mA/cm2 mM, a low detection limit in the order of 166.6 µM, and a fast and sharp response time of around 2 s. The highest sensitivity and the lowest limit of detection were obtained at 0.4 volt, after the growth of ZnO NRs. The highest net sensitivity was obtained after subtracting the sensitivity of the baseline, and it was in the order of 0.315 mA/cm2·mM. The device was tested with a range of glucose concentrations from 1–10 mM, showing a linear line from 3–8 mM, and the device was saturated after exceeding high concentrations of glucose. Such devices can be used for in vitro glucose monitoring, since glucose changes can be accurately detected.

  9. Effect of Human Myotubes-Derived Media on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Luis R.; Gutierrez, Juan; Santos, José L.; Casas, Mariana; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel E.; Moro, Cedric; Bouzakri, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Fasting to postprandial transition requires a tight adjustment of insulin secretion to its demand, so tissue (e.g., skeletal muscle) glucose supply is assured while hypo-/hyperglycemia are prevented. High muscle glucose disposal after meals is pivotal for adapting to increased glycemia and might drive insulin secretion through muscle-released factors (e.g., myokines). We hypothesized that insulin influences myokine secretion and then increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In conditioned media from human myotubes incubated with/without insulin (100 nmol/L) for 24 h, myokines were qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using an antibody-based array and ELISA-based technology, respectively. C57BL6/J mice islets and Wistar rat beta cells were incubated for 24 h with control and conditioned media from noninsulin- and insulin-treated myotubes prior to GSIS determination. Conditioned media from insulin-treated versus nontreated myotubes had higher RANTES but lower IL6, IL8, and MCP1 concentration. Qualitative analyses revealed that conditioned media from noninsulin- and insulin-treated myotubes expressed 32 and 23 out of 80 myokines, respectively. Islets incubated with conditioned media from noninsulin-treated myotubes had higher GSIS versus control islets (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, conditioned media from insulin-treated myotubes did not influence GSIS. In beta cells, GSIS was similar across conditions. In conclusion, factors being present in noninsulin-stimulated muscle cell-derived media appear to influence GSIS in mice islets. PMID:28286777

  10. Effects of glucose and insulin on secretion of amyloid-β by human adipose tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, William G; Gupta, Dhananjay; Smith, Joshua; Jones, Karen P; Jones, Amanda M; Pratley, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease. Overlapping patterns of metabolic dysfunction may be common molecular links between these complex diseases. Amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein and associated β- and γ-secretases are expressed in adipose tissue. Aβ precursor protein is up-regulated with obesity and correlated to insulin resistance. Aβ may be secreted by adipose tissue, its production may be regulated through metabolic pathways, and Aβ may exert effects on adipose tissue insulin receptor signaling. Human stromal-vascular cells and differentiated adipocytes were cultured with different combinations of glucose and insulin and then assayed for Aβ in conditioned media. Aβ was measured in vivo using adipose tissue microdialysis. Aβ secretion was increased by glucose and insulin in vitro. Adipose tissue microdialysates contained Aβ. Adipocytes treated with Aβ had decreased expression of insulin receptor substrate-2 and reduced Akt-1 phosphorylation. Aβ was made by adipose tissue cells in vitro at concentrations similar to in vivo measurements. Regulation of Aβ production by glucose and insulin and effects of Aβ on the insulin receptor pathway suggest similar cellular mechanisms may exist between neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer disease and adipose dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  11. Effects of some drugs on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkemik, Ebru; Budak, Harun; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory effects of some drugs on glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the erythrocytes of human have been investigated. For this purpose, at the beginning, erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified 2256 times in a yield of 44.22% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel. Temperature of +4°C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method by using a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. This method was utilized for all kinetic studies. Ketotifen, dacarbazine, thiocolchicoside, meloxicam, methotrexate, furosemide, olanzapine, methylprednizolone acetate, paricalcitol, ritodrine hydrochloride, and gadobenate-dimeglumine were used as drugs. All the drugs indicated the inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Ki constants for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were found by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. While methylprednizolone acetate showed competitive inhibition, the others displayed non-competitive inhibition. In addition, IC(50) values of the drugs were determined by plotting Activity% vs [I].

  12. Effect of Human Myotubes-Derived Media on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Mizgier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting to postprandial transition requires a tight adjustment of insulin secretion to its demand, so tissue (e.g., skeletal muscle glucose supply is assured while hypo-/hyperglycemia are prevented. High muscle glucose disposal after meals is pivotal for adapting to increased glycemia and might drive insulin secretion through muscle-released factors (e.g., myokines. We hypothesized that insulin influences myokine secretion and then increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. In conditioned media from human myotubes incubated with/without insulin (100 nmol/L for 24 h, myokines were qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using an antibody-based array and ELISA-based technology, respectively. C57BL6/J mice islets and Wistar rat beta cells were incubated for 24 h with control and conditioned media from noninsulin- and insulin-treated myotubes prior to GSIS determination. Conditioned media from insulin-treated versus nontreated myotubes had higher RANTES but lower IL6, IL8, and MCP1 concentration. Qualitative analyses revealed that conditioned media from noninsulin- and insulin-treated myotubes expressed 32 and 23 out of 80 myokines, respectively. Islets incubated with conditioned media from noninsulin-treated myotubes had higher GSIS versus control islets (p<0.05. Meanwhile, conditioned media from insulin-treated myotubes did not influence GSIS. In beta cells, GSIS was similar across conditions. In conclusion, factors being present in noninsulin-stimulated muscle cell-derived media appear to influence GSIS in mice islets.

  13. SIRT1 Disruption in Human Fetal Hepatocytes Leads to Increased Accumulation of Glucose and Lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Tobita

    Full Text Available There are unprecedented epidemics of obesity, such as type II diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD in developed countries. A concerning percentage of American children are being affected by obesity and NAFLD. Studies have suggested that the maternal environment in utero might play a role in the development of these diseases later in life. In this study, we documented that inhibiting SIRT1 signaling in human fetal hepatocytes rapidly led to an increase in intracellular glucose and lipids levels. More importantly, both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis related genes were upregulated upon SIRT1 inhibition. The AKT/FOXO1 pathway, a major negative regulator of gluconeogenesis, was decreased in the human fetal hepatocytes inhibited for SIRT1, consistent with the higher level of gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that SIRT1 is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms within human fetal hepatocytes, acting as an adaptive transcriptional response to environmental changes.

  14. Octamerization is essential for enzymatic function of human UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führing, Jana; Damerow, Sebastian; Fedorov, Roman; Schneider, Julia; Münster-Kühnel, Anja-Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Uridine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) occupies a central position in carbohydrate metabolism in all kingdoms of life, since its product uridine diphosphate-glucose (UDP-glucose) is essential in a number of anabolic and catabolic pathways and is a precursor for other sugar nucleotides. Its significance as a virulence factor in protists and bacteria has given momentum to the search for species-specific inhibitors. These attempts are, however, hampered by high structural conservation of the active site architecture. A feature that discriminates UGPs of different species is the quaternary organization. While UGPs in protists are monomers, di- and tetrameric forms exist in bacteria, and crystal structures obtained for the enzyme from yeast and human identified octameric UGPs. These octamers are formed by contacts between highly conserved amino acids in the C-terminal β-helix. Still under debate is the question whether octamerization is required for the functionality of the human enzyme. Here, we used single amino acid replacements in the C-terminal β-helix to interrogate the impact of highly conserved residues on octamer formation and functional activity of human UGP (hUGP). Replacements were guided by the sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana UGP, known to be active as a monomer. Correlating the data obtained in blue native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography and enzymatic activity testing, we prove that the octamer is the active enzyme form. This new insight into structure-function relationships in hUGP does not only improve the understanding of the catalysis of this important enzyme, but in addition broadens the basis for studies aimed at designing drugs that selectively inhibit UGPs from pathogens.

  15. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Lactate, Glucose and Oxygen Uptake in Human Brain During Recovery from Maximal Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojiro, I.; Schmalbruch, I.K.; Quistorff, B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake......Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake...

  17. Mining networks of human contact with wearable sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Alain

    2012-02-01

    Due to the development of sensors of various types and the use of digital media and computational devices, we increasingly leave digital traces of our daily activities. The scale at which such data can be gathered and analyzed makes possible a novel, data-driven approach to the investigation of various aspects of human behavior. In this talk, I will focus on the research done within the SocioPatterns project (www.sociopatterns.org), in which we have developed the SocioPatterns sensing platform to obtain longitudinal datasets on face-to-face contact events between individuals in a variety of contexts ranging from scientific conferences to museum, schools or hospitals. The gathered data sets consists in dynamic networks of human contacts, and their analysis reveal interesting similarities and differences of human interaction patterns across contexts. I will also consider the impact of the temporal resolution, which allows to take into account causality constraints, on dynamical processes occurring on networks, such as spreading processes.

  18. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes—tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1—in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E and enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG.

  19. In Vitro Infection of Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Decrease in Glucose Transporter Protein-1 (GLUT1 Expression in Explants of Human Placental Villi Cultured under Normal and High Glucose Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mezzano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic Chagas' disease agent, induces changes in protein pattern of the human placenta syncytiotrophoblast. The glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 is the primary isoform involved in transplacental glucose transport. We carried out in vitro assays to determine if T. cruzi infection would induce changes in placental GLUT1 protein expression under normal and high concentration of glucose. Using Western blot and immunohistological techniques, GLUT1 expression was determined in normal placental villi cultured under normal or high concentrations of glucose, with or without in vitro T. cruzi infection, for 24 and 48 hours. High glucose media or T. cruzi infection alone reduced GLUT1 expression. A yet more accentuated reduction was observed when infection and high glucose condition took place together. We inform, for the first time, that T. cruzi infection may induce reduction of GLUT1 expression under normal and high glucose concentrations, and this effect is synergic to high glucose concentrations.

  20. The effect of graded exercise on IL-6 release and glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Stallknecht, Bente; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the hypothesis that the release of interleukin (IL)-6 from human muscle is linked to exercise intensity and muscle glucose uptake was investigated. In the overnight fasted state, seven healthy males performed knee extension exercise, kicking with both legs, each at 25 % of maximal...... % and 85 % W(max), respectively) increased with increasing exercise intensity (P ....75 +/- 0.16, 1.07 +/- 0.15 mmol min(-1) thigh(-1) at rest and 25 %, 65 % and 85 % W(max), respectively) increased with increasing exercise intensity (P exercise, arterial catecholamine concentrations were higher (P exercise...

  1. Effects of endomorphins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells under high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wei, Suhong; Tian, Limin; Yan, Liping; Guo, Qian; Ma, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    The endomorphin-1 (EM1) and endomorphin-2 (EM2) are endogenous opioid peptides, which modulate extensive bioactivities such as pain, cardiovascular responses, immunological responses and so on. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of EM1/EM2 on the primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) damaged by high glucose. PI AnnexinV-FITC detection was performed to evaluate the apoptosis rate. Levels of nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were measured by the Griess reaction and the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline, respectively. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell proliferation was determined by the MTT viability assay. mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ET-1 were measured by real-time PCR. Our data showed that EM1/EM2 inhibited cell apoptosis. The high glucose induced increase in expression of NO, NOS and ET-1 were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with EM1/EM2 in a dose dependent manner. In addition, EM1/EM2 suppressed the mRNA eNOS and mRNA ET-1 expression in HUVECs under high glucose conditions. Naloxone, the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, did not influence the mRNA eNOS expression when it was administrated on its own; but it could significantly antagonize the effects induced by EM1/EM2. Furthermore, in all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2. The results suggest that EM1/EM2 have a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose in vitro, and these effects were mediated by the opioid receptors in HUVECs.

  2. A tale of two glucose transporters: how GLUT2 re-emerged as a contender for glucose transport into the human beta cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bunt, M; Gloyn, A L

    2012-09-01

    Finding novel causes for monogenic forms of diabetes is important as, alongside the clinical implications of such a discovery, it can identify critical proteins and pathways required for normal beta cell function in humans. It is increasingly apparent that there are significant differences between rodent and human islets. One example that has generated interest is the relative importance of the glucose transporter GLUT2 in rodent and human beta cells. The central role of GLUT2 in rodent beta cells is well established, but a number of studies have suggested that other glucose transporters, namely GLUT1 and GLUT3, may play an important role in facilitating glucose transport into human beta cells. In this issue of Diabetologia Sansbury et al (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2595-0 ) report homozygous loss of function mutations in SLC2A2, which encodes GLUT2, as a rare cause of neonatal diabetes. Evidence for a beta cell defect in these subjects comes from very low birthweights, lack of endogenous insulin secretion and a requirement for insulin therapy. Neonatal diabetes is not a consistent feature of SLC2A2 mutations. It is only found in a small percentage of cases (~4%) and the diabetes largely resolves before 18 months of age. This discovery is significant as it suggests that GLUT2 plays an important role in human beta cells, but the interplay and relative roles of other transporters differ from those in rodents. This finding should encourage efforts to delineate the precise role of GLUT2 in the human beta cell at different developmental time points and is a further reminder of critical differences between human and rodent islets.

  3. Automatic Identification and Localization of Inertial Sensors on the Human Body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Human motion capture is used for many purposes like sports training and rehabilitation. In the last few years, inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) in combination with magnetic sensors was proven to be a suitable ambulatory alternative to traditional human motion tracking systems based

  4. Oral glucose ingestion attenuates exercise-induced activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard

    2006-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested to be a 'metabolic master switch' regulating various aspects of muscle glucose and fat metabolism. In isolated rat skeletal muscle, glucose suppresses the activity of AMPK and in human muscle glycogen loading decreases exercise-induced AMPK...... activation. We hypothesized that oral glucose ingestion during exercise would attenuate muscle AMPK activation. Nine male subjects performed two bouts of one-legged knee-extensor exercise at 60% of maximal workload. The subjects were randomly assigned to either consume a glucose containing drink or a placebo...... drink during the two trials. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and after 2 h of exercise. Plasma glucose was higher (6.0 +/- 0.2 vs. 4.9 +/- 0.1 mmol L-1, P

  5. Highly stretchable and wearable graphene strain sensors with controllable sensitivity for human motion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jin; Hyun, Woo Jin; Mun, Sung Cik; Park, Yong Tae; Park, O Ok

    2015-03-25

    Because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties, graphene strain sensors have attracted extensive attention for electronic applications in virtual reality, robotics, medical diagnostics, and healthcare. Although several strain sensors based on graphene have been reported, the stretchability and sensitivity of these sensors remain limited, and also there is a pressing need to develop a practical fabrication process. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of new types of graphene strain sensors based on stretchable yarns. Highly stretchable, sensitive, and wearable sensors are realized by a layer-by-layer assembly method that is simple, low-cost, scalable, and solution-processable. Because of the yarn structures, these sensors exhibit high stretchability (up to 150%) and versatility, and can detect both large- and small-scale human motions. For this study, wearable electronics are fabricated with implanted sensors that can monitor diverse human motions, including joint movement, phonation, swallowing, and breathing.

  6. Sensitivity improvement of one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager for realization of noninvasive blood glucose sensors in smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Nogo, Kosuke; Hosono, Satsuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-11-01

    The use of the wide-field-stop and beam-expansion method for sensitivity enhancement of one-shot Fourier spectroscopy is proposed to realize health care sensors installed in smartphones for daily monitoring. When measuring the spectral components of human bodies noninvasively, diffuse reflected light from biological membranes is too weak for detection using conventional hyperspectral cameras. One-shot Fourier spectroscopy is a spatial phase-shift-type interferometer that can determine the one-dimensional spectral characteristics from a single frame. However, this method has low sensitivity, so that only the spectral characteristics of light sources with direct illumination can be obtained, because a single slit is used as a field stop. The sensitivity of the proposed spectroscopic method is improved by using the wide-field-stop and beam-expansion method. The use of a wider field stop slit width increases the detected light intensity; however, this simultaneously narrows the diffraction angle. The narrower collimated objective beam diameter degrades the visibility of interferograms. Therefore, a plane-concave cylindrical lens between the objective plane and the single slit is introduced to expand the beam diameter. The resulting sensitivity improvement achieved when using the wide-field-stop and beam-expansion method allows the spectral characteristics of hemoglobin to be obtained noninvasively from a human palm using a midget lamp.

  7. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C; Fontès, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A; Norbeck, Angela D; Anderson, David J; Waters, Katrina M; Adkins, Joshua N; Smith, Richard D; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent regulator of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, identification of the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of human beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins (∼p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to neuron navigator 1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and synaptotagmin-17. Up-regulation of dicer 1 and SLC27A2 and down-regulation of phospholipase Cβ4 were confirmed by Western blots. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation are annotated as uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  8. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  9. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  10. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  11. Glucagon like peptide-1-induced glucose metabolism in differentiated human muscle satellite cells is attenuated by hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas but also has extra-pancreatic effects. GLP-1 may stimulate glucose uptake in cultured muscle cells but the mechanism is not clearly defined. Furthermore, while the pancreatic effects of GLP-1 are glucose-dependent, the glucose-dependency of its extra-pancreatic effects has not been examined. METHODS: Skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from young (22.5 ± 0.97 yr, lean (BMI 22.5 ± 0.6 kg/m(2, healthy males were differentiated in media containing either 22.5 mM (high or 5 mM (normal glucose for 7 days in the absence or presence of insulin and/or various GLP-1 concentrations. Myocellular effects of GLP-1, insulin and glucose were assessed by western-blot, glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. RESULTS: We firstly show that the GLP-1 receptor protein is expressed in differentiated human muscle satellite cells (myocytes. Secondly, we show that in 5 mM glucose media, exposure of myocytes to GLP-1 results in a dose dependent increase in glucose uptake, GLUT4 amount and subsequently glycogen synthesis in a PI3K dependent manner, independent of the insulin signaling cascade. Importantly, we provide evidence that differentiation of human satellite cells in hyperglycemic (22.5 mM glucose conditions increases GLUT1 expression, and renders the cells insulin resistant and interestingly GLP-1 resistant in terms of glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Hyperglycemic conditions did not affect the ability of insulin to phosphorylate downstream targets, PKB or GSK3. Interestingly we show that at 5 mM glucose, GLP-1 increases GLUT4 protein levels and that this effect is abolished by hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: GLP-1 increases glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis into fully-differentiated human satellite cells in a PI3-K dependent mechanism potentially through increased GLUT4 protein levels. The latter occurs independently of the insulin signaling pathway. Attenuation

  12. ECG Sensor Card with Evolving RBP Algorithms for Human Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuo-Kun; Huang, Huang-Nan; Zeng, Fufu; Tu, Shu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    It is known that cardiac and respiratory rhythms in electrocardiograms (ECGs) are highly nonlinear and non-stationary. As a result, most traditional time-domain algorithms are inadequate for characterizing the complex dynamics of the ECG. This paper proposes a new ECG sensor card and a statistical-based ECG algorithm, with the aid of a reduced binary pattern (RBP), with the aim of achieving faster ECG human identity recognition with high accuracy. The proposed algorithm has one advantage that previous ECG algorithms lack—the waveform complex information and de-noising preprocessing can be bypassed; therefore, it is more suitable for non-stationary ECG signals. Experimental results tested on two public ECG databases (MIT-BIH) from MIT University confirm that the proposed scheme is feasible with excellent accuracy, low complexity, and speedy processing. To be more specific, the advanced RBP algorithm achieves high accuracy in human identity recognition and is executed at least nine times faster than previous algorithms. Moreover, based on the test results from a long-term ECG database, the evolving RBP algorithm also demonstrates superior capability in handling long-term and non-stationary ECG signals. PMID:26307995

  13. ECG Sensor Card with Evolving RBP Algorithms for Human Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Kun Tseng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that cardiac and respiratory rhythms in electrocardiograms (ECGs are highly nonlinear and non-stationary. As a result, most traditional time-domain algorithms are inadequate for characterizing the complex dynamics of the ECG. This paper proposes a new ECG sensor card and a statistical-based ECG algorithm, with the aid of a reduced binary pattern (RBP, with the aim of achieving faster ECG human identity recognition with high accuracy. The proposed algorithm has one advantage that previous ECG algorithms lack—the waveform complex information and de-noising preprocessing can be bypassed; therefore, it is more suitable for non-stationary ECG signals. Experimental results tested on two public ECG databases (MIT-BIH from MIT University confirm that the proposed scheme is feasible with excellent accuracy, low complexity, and speedy processing. To be more specific, the advanced RBP algorithm achieves high accuracy in human identity recognition and is executed at least nine times faster than previous algorithms. Moreover, based on the test results from a long-term ECG database, the evolving RBP algorithm also demonstrates superior capability in handling long-term and non-stationary ECG signals.

  14. ECG Sensor Card with Evolving RBP Algorithms for Human Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuo-Kun; Huang, Huang-Nan; Zeng, Fufu; Tu, Shu-Yi

    2015-08-21

    It is known that cardiac and respiratory rhythms in electrocardiograms (ECGs) are highly nonlinear and non-stationary. As a result, most traditional time-domain algorithms are inadequate for characterizing the complex dynamics of the ECG. This paper proposes a new ECG sensor card and a statistical-based ECG algorithm, with the aid of a reduced binary pattern (RBP), with the aim of achieving faster ECG human identity recognition with high accuracy. The proposed algorithm has one advantage that previous ECG algorithms lack-the waveform complex information and de-noising preprocessing can be bypassed; therefore, it is more suitable for non-stationary ECG signals. Experimental results tested on two public ECG databases (MIT-BIH) from MIT University confirm that the proposed scheme is feasible with excellent accuracy, low complexity, and speedy processing. To be more specific, the advanced RBP algorithm achieves high accuracy in human identity recognition and is executed at least nine times faster than previous algorithms. Moreover, based on the test results from a long-term ECG database, the evolving RBP algorithm also demonstrates superior capability in handling long-term and non-stationary ECG signals.

  15. High glucose concentrations alter the biomineralization process in human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, A; Arzate, H; Gil-Chavarría, I; Rojo, R; Moreno-Fierros, L

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) may alter bone remodeling, as osteopenia and osteoporosis are among the complications. Moreover, DM increases the risk and severity of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease, in which bone resorption occurs. Broad evidence suggests that chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of DM and its complications. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of DM that may contribute to sustained inflammation by increasing proinflammatory cytokines, which are known to cause insulin resistance, via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4-mediated mechanisms. However, the mechanisms by which bone-related complications develop in DM are still unknown. Studies done on the effect of high glucose concentrations on osteoblast functions are contradictory because some suggest increases (although others suggest reductions) in the biomineralization process. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of high glucose levels on biomineralization and inflammation markers in a human osteoblastic cell line. Cells were treated with either physiological 5.5 mM or increasing concentrations of glucose up to 24 mM, and we determined the following: i) the quantity and quality of calcium-deposit crystals in culture and ii) the expression of the following: a) proteins associated with the process of biomineralization, b) the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), c) cytokines IL1, IL6, IL8, IL10, MCP-1 and TNF alpha, and d) TLR-2, -3, -4 and -9. Our results show that high glucose concentrations (12 mM and particularly 24 mM) alter the biomineralization process in osteoblastic cells and provoke the following: i) a rise in mineralization, ii) an increase in the mRNA expression of RANKL and a decrease of OPG, iii) an increase in the mRNA expression of osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein and the transcription factor Runx2, iv) a diminished quality of the mineral, and v) an increase in the expression of IL1beta, IL6, IL8, MCP-1 and IL10 mRNAs. In addition we

  16. Utilization of highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in polymer thin films for an improved performance of an electrochemical glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goornavar, Virupaxi; Jeffers, Robert; Biradar, Santoshkumar; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2014-07-01

    In this work we report the improved performance an electrochemical glucose sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) that has been modified with highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed in polyethyleneimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polypyrrole (PPy). The single wall carbon nanotubes were purified by both thermal and chemical oxidation to achieve maximum purity of ~98% with no damage to the tubes. The SWCNTs were then dispersed by sonication in three different organic polymers (1.0mg/ml SWCNT in 1.0mg/ml of organic polymer). The stable suspension was coated onto the GCE and electrochemical characterization was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Amperometry. The electroactive enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on the surface of the GCE/(organic polymer-SWCNT) electrode. The amperometric detection of glucose was carried out at 0.7 V versus Ag/AgCl. The GCE/(SWCNT-PEI, PEG, PPY) gave a detection limit of 0.2,633 μM, 0.434 μM, and 0.9,617 μM, and sensitivities of 0.2411 ± 0.0033 μA mM(-1), r(2)=0.9984, 0.08164 ± 0.001129 μA mM(-1), r(2)=0.9975, 0.04189 ± 0.00087 μA mM(-1), and r(2)=0.9944 respectively and a response time of less than 5s. The use of purified SWCNTs has several advantages, including fast electron transfer rate and stability in the immobilized enzyme. The significant enhancement of the SWCNT modified electrode as a glucose sensor can be attributed to the superior conductivity and large surface area of the well dispersed purified SWCNTs.

  17. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  18. Flexible and Stretchable Physical Sensor Integrated Platforms for Wearable Human-Activity Monitoringand Personal Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung, Tran Quang; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable physical sensors that can measure and quantify electrical signals generated by human activities are attracting a great deal of attention as they have unique characteristics, such as ultrathinness, low modulus, light weight, high flexibility, and stretchability. These flexible and stretchable physical sensors conformally attached on the surface of organs or skin can provide a new opportunity for human-activity monitoring and personal healthcare. Consequently, in recent years there has been considerable research effort devoted to the development of flexible and stretchable physical sensors to fulfill the requirements of future technology, and much progress has been achieved. Here, the most recent developments of flexible and stretchable physical sensors are described, including temperature, pressure, and strain sensors, and flexible and stretchable sensor-integrated platforms. The latest successful examples of flexible and stretchable physical sensors for the detection of temperature, pressure, and strain, as well as their novel structures, technological innovations, and challenges, are reviewed first. In the next section, recent progress regarding sensor-integrated wearable platforms is overviewed in detail. Some of the latest achievements regarding self-powered sensor-integrated wearable platform technologies are also reviewed. Further research direction and challenges are also proposed to develop a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform for monitoring human activity and personal healthcare in the near future.

  19. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  20. Electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride)/poly(aminophenylboronic acid) composite nanofibrous membrane as a novel glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesh, K M; Santhosh, P; Gopalan, A; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2007-01-15

    Electrospinning was used to prepare the nanofibrous membrane (NFM) of the composite comprising poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(aminophenylboronic acid) (PVdF/PAPBA-NFM). The PVdF/PAPBA-NFM displayed an excellent linear response to the detection of glucose for the concentration range of 1 to 15mM with a response time of less than 6s. Further experiments on amperometric sensing of glucose were performed in the presence of interferents such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, fructose, mannose, etc. using PVdF/PAPBA-NFM. The interferents did not give significant overlapping current signal during the determination of glucose. Also, PVdF/PAPBA-NFM possesses better reproducibility toward glucose detection and storage stability.

  1. The proapoptotic function of Noxa in human leukemia cells is regulated by the kinase Cdk5 and by glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Xazmin H; McDonnell, Maureen A; Kosloske, Ashley; Odumade, Oludare A; Jenness, Christopher; Karim, Christine B; Jemmerson, Ronald; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2010-12-10

    The BH3-only protein, Noxa, is induced in response to apoptotic stimuli, such as DNA damage, hypoxia, and proteasome inhibition in most human cells. Noxa is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells of hematopoietic lineage and required for apoptosis in response to glucose stress. We show that Noxa is phosphorylated on a serine residue (S(13)) in the presence of glucose. Phosphorylation promotes its cytosolic sequestration and suppresses its apoptotic function. We identify Cdk5 as the Noxa kinase and show that Cdk5 knockdown or expression of a Noxa S(13) to A mutant increases sensitivity to glucose starvation, confirming that the phosphorylation is protective. Both glucose deprivation and Cdk5 inhibition promote apoptosis by dephosphorylating Noxa. Paradoxically, Noxa stimulates glucose consumption and may enhance glucose turnover via the pentose phosphate pathway rather than through glycolysis. We propose that Noxa plays both growth-promoting and proapoptotic roles in hematopoietic cancers with phospho-S(13) as the glucose-sensitive toggle switch controlling these opposing functions.

  2. Inhibitory effects of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae constituents on human UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoglio, Stefano; Lo Curcio, Valeria; Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Benedetti, Serena

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro inhibitory effects of the edible microalga Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) on human UDP-α-d-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (UGDH) activity, a cytosolic enzyme involved both in tumor progression and in phytochemical bioavailability. Both the hydrophilic and ethanolic AFA extracts as well as the constitutive active principles phycocyanin (PC), phycocyanobilin (PCB) and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were tested. Among AFA components, PCB presented the strongest inhibitory effect on UGDH activity, acting as a competitive inhibitor with respect to UDP-glucose and a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to NAD(+). In preliminary experiments, AFA PCB was also effective in reducing the colony formation capacity of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells. Overall, these findings confirmed that AFA and its active principles are natural compounds with high biological activity. Further studies evaluating the effects of AFA PCB in reducing tumor cell growth and phytochemical glucuronidation are encouraged.

  3. Glucose Metabolism and Oxygen Availability Govern Reactivation of the Latent Human Retrovirus HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anurag; Mateus, Manuel; Thinnes, Cyrille C; McCullagh, James S; Schofield, Christopher J; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2017-09-06

    The human retrovirus HTLV-1 causes a hematological malignancy or neuroinflammatory disease in ∼10% of infected individuals. HTLV-1 primarily infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and persists as a provirus integrated in their genome. HTLV-1 appears transcriptionally latent in freshly isolated cells; however, the chronically active anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cell response observed in infected individuals indicates frequent proviral expression in vivo. The kinetics and regulation of HTLV-1 proviral expression in vivo are poorly understood. By using hypoxia, small-molecule hypoxia mimics, and inhibitors of specific metabolic pathways, we show that physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia, as routinely encountered by circulating T cells in the lymphoid organs and bone marrow, significantly enhance HTLV-1 reactivation from latency. Furthermore, culturing naturally infected CD4(+) T cells in glucose-free medium or chemical inhibition of glycolysis or the mitochondrial electron transport chain strongly suppresses HTLV-1 plus-strand transcription. We conclude that glucose metabolism and oxygen tension regulate HTLV-1 proviral latency and reactivation in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucose and TGF β2 Modulate the Viability of Cultured Human Retinal Pericytes and Their VEGF Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidro, Eileen K.; Gee, Stephen; Unda, Richard; Ma, Jian-xing; Tsin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Determine the effects of glucose and exogenous TGFβ2 on viability and VEGF release by human retinal pericytes (HRP). Methods Human retinal pericytes (HRP) were cultured in 5 mM (physiologic) or high (18 mM) glucose with or without added TGFβ2. Viable cells were counted; TGFβ2 and VEGF in the conditioned media (CM) were measured by ELISA. Results High glucose significantly reduced viable cell number and increased the levels of TGFβ2 and VEGF. TGFβ2 caused a significant dose-dependent effect on viable cell number and on the level of VEGF secreted into the CM by HRP in physiologic glucose, decreasing viable cell number, and increasing VEGF release per 1000 cells at a low concentration (0.1 ng/ml) and increasing viable cell number and decreasing VEGF release per 1000 cells at higher concentrations (1.0 and 10 ng/ml). TGFβ2 affected neither parameter in high glucose. Conclusions Elevated glucose decreased HRP viability and modulated changes in TGFβ2 and VEGF release. This suggests a novel mechanism for HRP dropout in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:19085381

  5. Ionophore-Based Potentiometric Sensors for the Flow-Injection Determination of Promethazine Hydrochloride in Pharmaceutical Formulations and Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Mustafa Al-Araji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasticised poly(vinyl chloride-based membranes containing the ionophores (α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins (CD, dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6 and dibenzo-30-crown-10 (DB30C10 were evaluated for their potentiometric response towards promethazine (PM in a flow injection analysis (FIA set-up. Good responses were obtained when β- and γ-CDs, and DB30C10 were used. The performance characteristics were further improved when tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl borate (KTPB was added to the membrane. The sensor based on β-CD, bis(2-ethylhexyl adipate (BEHA and KTPB exhibited the best performance among the eighteen sensor compositions that were tested. The response was linear from 1 x 10−5 to 1 x 10−2 M, slope was 61.3 mV decade−1, the pH independent region ranged from 4.5 to 7.0, a limit of detection of 5.3 x 10−6 M was possible and a lifetime of more than a month was observed when used in the FIA system. Other plasticisers such as dioctyl phenylphosphonate and tributyl phosphate do not show significant improvements in the quality of the sensors. The promising sensors were further tested for the effects of foreign ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Cr3+, Fe3+, glucose, fructose. FIA conditions (e.g., effects of flow rate, injection volume, pH of the carrier stream were also studied when the best sensor was used (based on β-CD. The sensor was applied to the determination of PM in four pharmaceutical preparations and human urine that were spiked with different levels of PM. Good agreement between the sensor and the manufacturer’s claimed values (for pharmaceutical preparations was obtained, while mean recoveries of 98.6% were obtained for spiked urine samples. The molecular recognition features of the sensors as revealed by molecular modelling were rationalised by the nature of the interactions and complexation energies between the host and guest molecules.

  6. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  7. Direct determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum by a tunable quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, M.; Volgger, L.; Genner, A.; Jungbauer, C.; Lendl, B.

    2013-02-01

    This work reports on a compact sensor for fast and reagent-free point-of-care determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum based on a tunable (1030-1230 cm-1) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL). For simple and robust operation a single beam set-up was designed and only thermoelectric cooling was used for the employed laser and detector. Full computer control of analysis including liquid handling and data analysis facilitated routine measurements. A high optical pathlength (>100 μm) is a prerequisite for robust measurements in clinical practice. Hence, the optimum optical pathlength for transmission measurements in aqueous solution was considered in theory and experiment. The experimentally determined maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was around 140 μm for the QCL blood sensor and around 50 μm for a standard FT-IR spectrometer employing a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector. A single absorption spectrum was used to calculate the analyte concentrations simultaneously by using a partial-least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. Glucose was determined in blood serum with a prediction error (RMSEP) of 6.9 mg/dl and triglycerides with an error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 17.5 mg/dl in a set of 42 different patients. In spiked serum samples the lactate concentration could be determined with an RMSECV of 8.9 mg/dl.

  8. Exercise-induced increase in glucose transport, GLUT-4, and VAMP-2 in plasma membrane from human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Hargreaves, Mark; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    contractions may induce trafficking of GLUT-4-containing vesicles via a mechanism similar to neurotransmitter release. Our results demonstrate for the first time exercise-induced translocation of GLUT-4 and VAMP-2 to the plasma membrane of human muscle and increased sarcolemmal glucose transport.......A major effect of muscle contractions is an increase in sarcolemmal glucose transport. We have used a recently developed technique to produce sarcolemmal giant vesicles from human muscle biopsy samples obtained before and after exercise. Six men exercised for 10 min at 50% maximal O2 uptake (Vo2max...

  9. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ameri, Jacqueline; Borup, Rehannah; Prawiro, Christy

    2017-01-01

    cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2) as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs) from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin......-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our...... results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells....

  10. Detailed Physiologic Characterization Reveals Diverse Mechanisms for Novel Genetic Loci Regulating Glucose and Insulin Metabolism in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelsson, Erik; Langenberg, Claudia; Hivert, Marie-France; Prokopenko, Inga; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Dupuis, Josée; Mägi, Reedik; Sharp, Stephen; Jackson, Anne U.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Shrader, Peter; Knowles, Joshua W.; Zethelius, Björn; Abbasi, Fahim A.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Antje; Berne, Christian; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Chines, Peter; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Cyrus C.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Erdos, Michael R.; Ferrannini, Ele; Fox, Caroline S.; Graessler, Jürgen; Hao, Ke; Isomaa, Bo; Jameson, Karen A.; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Ladenvall, Claes; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Nathan, David M.; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Petrie, John R.; Sayer, Avan A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tönjes, Anke; Valle, Timo T.; Williams, Gordon H.; Lind, Lars; Barroso, Inês; Quertermous, Thomas; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Meigs, James B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Groop, Leif; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed loci associated with glucose and insulin-related traits. We aimed to characterize 19 such loci using detailed measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity to help elucidate their role in regulation of glucose control, insulin secretion and/or action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated associations of loci identified by the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) with circulating proinsulin, measures of insulin secretion and sensitivity from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), euglycemic clamps, insulin suppression tests, or frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests in nondiabetic humans (n = 29,084). RESULTS The glucose-raising allele in MADD was associated with abnormal insulin processing (a dramatic effect on higher proinsulin levels, but no association with insulinogenic index) at extremely persuasive levels of statistical significance (P = 2.1 × 10−71). Defects in insulin processing and insulin secretion were seen in glucose-raising allele carriers at TCF7L2, SCL30A8, GIPR, and C2CD4B. Abnormalities in early insulin secretion were suggested in glucose-raising allele carriers at MTNR1B, GCK, FADS1, DGKB, and PROX1 (lower insulinogenic index; no association with proinsulin or insulin sensitivity). Two loci previously associated with fasting insulin (GCKR and IGF1) were associated with OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity indices in a consistent direction. CONCLUSIONS Genetic loci identified through their effect on hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in associations with measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity. Our findings emphasize the importance of detailed physiological characterization of such loci for improved understanding of pathways associated with alterations in glucose homeostasis and eventually type 2 diabetes. PMID:20185807

  11. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Durmaz Incel, Ozlem; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such

  12. Quantifying glucose and lipid components in human serum by Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Landulfo; Borges, Rita de Cássia Fernandes; Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Giana, Hector Enrique; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2017-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed in the quantitative analysis of biochemical components in human serum. This study aimed to develop a spectral model to estimate the concentration of glucose and lipid fractions in human serum, thus evaluating the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy technique for diagnostic purposes. A total of 44 samples of blood serum were collected from volunteers submitted to routine blood biochemical assay analysis. The biochemical concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and high-density and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were obtained by colorimetric method. Serum samples (200 μL) were submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830 nm, 250 mW, 50-s accumulation). The spectra of sera present peaks related to the main constituents, particularly proteins and lipids. A quantitative model based on partial least squares (PLS) regression has been developed to estimate the concentration of these compounds, taking the biochemical concentrations assayed by the colorimetric method as sample's actual concentrations. The PLS model based on leave-one-out cross-validation approach estimated the concentration of triglycerides and cholesterol with r = 0.98 and 0.96, and root mean square error of 35.4 and 15.9 mg/dL, respectively. For the other biochemicals, the r was ranging from 0.75 to 0.86. These results evidenced the possibility of performing biochemical assay in blood serum samples by Raman spectroscopy and PLS regression and may be employed as a means of diagnosis in routine clinical analysis.

  13. Shape-dependent electron transfer kinetics and catalytic activity of NiO nanoparticles immobilized onto DNA modified electrode: fabrication of highly sensitive enzymeless glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Ensiyeh; Salimi, Abdollah; Shams, Esmaeil; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah; Amini, Mohammad K

    2014-06-15

    Herein we describe improved electron transfer properties and catalytic activity of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) via the electrochemical deposition on DNA modified glassy carbon electrode (DNA/GCE) surface. NiONPs deposited on the bare and DNA-coated GCE showed different morphologies, electrochemical kinetics and catalytic activities. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) images revealed the formation of triangular NPs on the DNA/GCE that followed the shape produced by the DNA template, while the electrodeposition of NiONPs on the bare GCE surface led to the formation of spherical nanoparticles. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements revealed lower charge-transfer resistance (Rct) of triangular NiONPs compared to spherical NPs. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic activity of triangular NiONPs compared to spherical NPs toward glucose oxidation in alkaline media was significantly improved. The amperometric oxidation of glucose at NiONP-DNA/GCE, yielded a very high sensitivity of 17.32 mA mM(-1)cm(-2) and an unprecedented detection limit of 17 nM. The enhanced electron transfer properties and electrocatalytic activity of NiONP-DNA/GCE can be attributed to the higher fraction of sharp corners and edges present in the triangular NiONPs compared to the spherical NPs. The developed sensor was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in serum samples.

  14. Utilization of highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in polymer thin films for an improved performance of an electrochemical glucose sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goornavar, Virupaxi [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 555 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Jeffers, Robert [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Luna Innovations, Inc., 706 Forest St., Suite A, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Biradar, Santoshkumar [RICE University, 6100 Main St, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Ramesh, Govindarajan T., E-mail: gtramesh@nsu.edu [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 555 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this work we report the improved performance an electrochemical glucose sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) that has been modified with highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed in polyethyleneimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polypyrrole (PPy). The single wall carbon nanotubes were purified by both thermal and chemical oxidation to achieve maximum purity of ∼ 98% with no damage to the tubes. The SWCNTs were then dispersed by sonication in three different organic polymers (1.0 mg/ml SWCNT in 1.0 mg/ml of organic polymer). The stable suspension was coated onto the GCE and electrochemical characterization was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Amperometry. The electroactive enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on the surface of the GCE/(organic polymer–SWCNT) electrode. The amperometric detection of glucose was carried out at 0.7 V versus Ag/AgCl. The GCE/(SWCNT–PEI, PEG, PPY) gave a detection limit of 0.2633 μM, 0.434 μM, and 0.9617 μM, and sensitivities of 0.2411 ± 0.0033 μA mM{sup −1}, r{sup 2} = 0.9984, 0.08164 ± 0.001129 μA mM{sup −1}, r{sup 2} = 0.9975, 0.04189 ± 0.00087 μA mM{sup −1}, and r{sup 2} = 0.9944 respectively and a response time of less than 5 s. The use of purified SWCNTs has several advantages, including fast electron transfer rate and stability in the immobilized enzyme. The significant enhancement of the SWCNT modified electrode as a glucose sensor can be attributed to the superior conductivity and large surface area of the well dispersed purified SWCNTs. - Highlights: • Purification method employed here use cheap and green oxidants. • The method does not disrupt the electronic structure of nanotubes. • This method removes nearly < 2% metallic impurities. • Increases the sensitivity and performance of glassy carbon electrode • This system can detect as low as 0.066 μM of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 0.2633 μM of glucose.

  15. IMM Filter Based Human Tracking Using a Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a human tracking approach in a distributed wireless sensor network. Most of the efforts on human tracking focus on vision techniques. However, most vision-based approaches to moving object detection involve intensive real-time computations. In this paper, we present an algorithm for human tracking using low-cost range wireless sensor nodes which can contribute lower computational burden based on a distributed computing system, while the centralized computing system often makes some information from sensors delay. Because the human target often moves with high maneuvering, the proposed algorithm applies the interacting multiple model (IMM filter techniques and a novel sensor node selection scheme developed considering both the tracking accuracy and the energy cost which is based on the tacking results of IMM filter at each time step. This paper also proposed a novel sensor management scheme which can manage the sensor node effectively during the sensor node selection and the tracking process. Simulations results show that the proposed approach can achieve superior tracking accuracy compared to the most recent human motion tracking scheme.

  16. Human Location Detection System Using Micro-Electromechanical Sensor for Intelligent Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnin, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presented the development of sensory system for detection of both the presence and the location of human in a room spaces using MEMS Thermal sensor. The system is able to detect the surface temperature of occupants by a non-contact detection at the maximum of 6 meters far. It can be integrated to any swing type of electrical appliances such as standing fan or a similar devices. Differentiating human from other moving and or static object by heat variable is nearly impossible since human, animals and electrical appliances produce heat. The uncontrollable heat properties which can change and transfer will add to the detection issue. Integrating the low cost MEMS based thermal sensor can solve the first of human sensing problem by its ability to detect human in stationary. Further discrimination and analysis must therefore be made to the measured temperature data to distinguish human from other objects. In this project, the fan is properly designed and program in such a way that it can adapt to different events starting from the human sensing stage to its dynamic and mechanical moving parts. Up to this stage initial testing to the Omron D6T microelectromechanical thermal sensor is currently under several experimental stages. Experimental result of the sensor tested on stationary and motion state of human are behaviorally differentiable and successfully locate the human position by detecting the maximum temperature of each sensor reading.

  17. Effects of sodium benzoate, a widely used food preservative, on glucose homeostasis and metabolic profiles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Belinda S; Vafai, Scott B; Delaney, Nigel F; Clish, Clary B; Deik, Amy A; Pierce, Kerry A; Ludwig, David S; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2015-01-01

    Sodium benzoate is a widely used preservative found in many foods and soft drinks. It is metabolized within mitochondria to produce hippurate, which is then cleared by the kidneys. We previously reported that ingestion of sodium benzoate at the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) dose leads to a robust excursion in the plasma hippurate level [1]. Since previous reports demonstrated adverse effects of benzoate and hippurate on glucose homeostasis in cells and in animal models, we hypothesized that benzoate might represent a widespread and underappreciated diabetogenic dietary exposure in humans. Here, we evaluated whether acute exposure to GRAS levels of sodium benzoate alters insulin and glucose homeostasis through a randomized, controlled, cross-over study of 14 overweight subjects. Serial blood samples were collected following an oral glucose challenge, in the presence or absence of sodium benzoate. Outcome measurements included glucose, insulin, glucagon, as well as temporal mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiles. We did not find a statistically significant effect of an acute oral exposure to sodium benzoate on glucose homeostasis. Of the 146 metabolites targeted, four changed significantly in response to benzoate, including the expected rise in benzoate and hippurate. In addition, anthranilic acid, a tryptophan metabolite, exhibited a robust rise, while acetylglycine dropped. Although our study shows that GRAS doses of benzoate do not have an acute, adverse effect on glucose homeostasis, future studies will be necessary to explore the metabolic impact of chronic benzoate exposure.

  18. Energetic domains and conformational analysis of human serum albumin upon co-incubation with sodium benzoate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, F; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Bohlooli, M; Habibi-Rezaei, M; Hadi Alijanvand, H; Amanlou, M; Sheibani, N; Saboury, A A; Ahmad, F

    2014-01-01

    Sodium benzoate (SB), a powerful inhibitor of microbial growth, is one of the most commonly used food preservative. Here, we determined the effects of SB on human serum albumin (HSA) structure in the presence or absence of glucose after 35 days of incubation under physiological conditions. The biochemical, biophysical, and molecular approaches including free amine content assay (TNBSA assay), fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and molecular docking and LIGPLOT studies were utilized for structural studies. The TNBSA results indicated that SB has the ability to bind Lys residues in HSA through covalent bonds. The docking and LIGPLOT studies also determined another specific site via hydrophobic interactions. The CD results showed more structural helicity for HSA incubated with SB, while HSA incubated with glucose had the least, and HSA incubated with glucose + SB had medium helicity. Fluorescence spectrophotometry results demonstrated partial unfolding of HSA incubated with SB in the presence or absence of glucose, while maximum partial unfolding was observed in HSA incubated with glucose. These results were confirmed by DSC and its deconvoluted thermograms. The DSC results also showed significant changes in HSA energetic structural domains due to HSA incubation with SB in the presence or absence of glucose. Together, our studies showed the formation of three different intermediates and indicate that biomolecular investigation are effective in providing new insight into safety determinations especially in health-related conditions including diabetes.

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of the glucose transporters Glut-1 and Glut-3 in human malignant melanomas and benign melanocytic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parente Paola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reported data indicate that cancer cells have increased rates of glucose metabolism, as determined by 18FDG-PET imaging in patients with malignancies. The results of many studies have demonstrated that the expression of glucose transporters, especially Glut-1, is increased in a variety of malignancies. This study was undertaken to assess the differential expression of Glut-1 and Glut-3 by benign and malignant melanocytic lesions. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for Glut-1 and Glut-3 was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections prepared from melanocytic nevi (12 cases, Spitz nevi (12 cases and primary cutaneous malignant melanomas (20 cases. Results We observed immunoreactivity for Glut-1 in all melanocytic nevi, 9 of the 12 Spitz nevi and in 9 of the 20 malignant melanomas, whereas Glut-3 was expressed in all the melanocytic lesions, both benign and malignant. Conclusion These findings indicate that the glucose transporters Glut-1 and Glut-3 play a role in the glucose metabolism of melanocytic cells. Glut-1 was present in the majority of benign nevi, whereas its expression was downregulated in 55% of malignant melanomas. Our results suggest that glucose transporter Glut-1 expression can significantly discriminate between human malignant melanoma and benign melanocytic nevi, and support the idea that additional mechanisms other than Glut-1 may contribute to glucose uptake in melanomas.

  20. Naringin Protects Against High Glucose-Induced Human Endothelial Cell Injury Via Antioxidation and CX3CL1 Downregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The induction of endothelial injury by hyperglycemia in diabetes has been widely accepted. Naringin is a bio-flavonoid. Some studies showed that naringin alleviates diabetic complications, but the exact mechanisms by which naringin improves diabetic anomalies are not yet fully understood. The aim of this research was to study the protective effect of naringin on high glucose-induced injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods: HUVECs were cultured with or without high glucose in the absence or presence of naringin for 5 days. The expression of CX3CL1 was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR and western blot. The cellular bioenergetic analysis oxygen consumption rate (OCR was measured with a Seahorse Bioscience XF analyzer. Results: The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the expression of CX3CL1 and the level of AKT phosphorylation were increased in HUVECs cultured with high glucose compared with controls. However, naringin rescued these increases in ROS production, CX3CL1 expression and AKT phosphorylation. Nitric oxide (NO production and OCR were lower in the high glucose group, and naringin restored the changes induced by high glucose. Molecular docking results suggested that Naringin might interact with the CX3CL1 protein. Conclusion: Naringin protects HUVECs from high-glucose-induced damage through its antioxidant properties by downregulating CX3CL1 and by improving mitochondrial function.

  1. Contextual Sensing: Integrating Contextual Information with Human and Technical Geo-Sensor Information for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagl, Günther; Resch, Bernd; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-07-14

    In this article we critically discuss the challenge of integrating contextual information, in particular spatiotemporal contextual information, with human and technical sensor information, which we approach from a geospatial perspective. We start by highlighting the significance of context in general and spatiotemporal context in particular and introduce a smart city model of interactions between humans, the environment, and technology, with context at the common interface. We then focus on both the intentional and the unintentional sensing capabilities of today's technologies and discuss current technological trends that we consider have the ability to enrich human and technical geo-sensor information with contextual detail. The different types of sensors used to collect contextual information are analyzed and sorted into three groups on the basis of names considering frequently used related terms, and characteristic contextual parameters. These three groups, namely technical in situ sensors, technical remote sensors, and human sensors are analyzed and linked to three dimensions involved in sensing (data generation, geographic phenomena, and type of sensing). In contrast to other scientific publications, we found a large number of technologies and applications using in situ and mobile technical sensors within the context of smart cities, and surprisingly limited use of remote sensing approaches. In this article we further provide a critical discussion of possible impacts and influences of both technical and human sensing approaches on society, pointing out that a larger number of sensors, increased fusion of information, and the use of standardized data formats and interfaces will not necessarily result in any improvement in the quality of life of the citizens of a smart city. This article seeks to improve our understanding of technical and human geo-sensing capabilities, and to demonstrate that the use of such sensors can facilitate the integration of different

  2. Impact of Sensor Misplacement on Dynamic Time Warping Based Human Activity Recognition using Wearable Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Nimish; Lee, Jaeseong; Lotfian, Reza; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2012-10-01

    Daily living activity monitoring is important for early detection of the onset of many diseases and for improving quality of life especially in elderly. A wireless wearable network of inertial sensor nodes can be used to observe daily motions. Continuous stream of data generated by these sensor networks can be used to recognize the movements of interest. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) is a widely used signal processing method for time-series pattern matching because of its robustness to variations in time and speed as opposed to other template matching methods. Despite this flexibility, for the application of activity recognition, DTW can only find the similarity between the template of a movement and the incoming samples, when the location and orientation of the sensor remains unchanged. Due to this restriction, small sensor misplacements can lead to a decrease in the classification accuracy. In this work, we adopt DTW distance as a feature for real-time detection of human daily activities like sit to stand in the presence of sensor misplacement. To measure this performance of DTW, we need to create a large number of sensor configurations while the sensors are rotated or misplaced. Creating a large number of closely spaced sensors is impractical. To address this problem, we use the marker based optical motion capture system and generate simulated inertial sensor data for different locations and orientations on the body. We study the performance of the DTW under these conditions to determine the worst-case sensor location variations that the algorithm can accommodate.

  3. A Wearable Capacitive Sensor for Monitoring Human Respiratory Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata Kumar; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2013-04-01

    Realizing an untethered, low-cost, and comfortably wearable respiratory rate sensor for long-term breathing monitoring application still remains a challenge. In this paper, a conductive-textile-based wearable respiratory rate sensing technique based on the capacitive sensing approach is proposed. The sensing unit consists of two conductive textile electrodes that can be easily fabricated, laminated, and integrated in garments. Respiration cycle is detected by measuring the capacitance of two electrodes placed on the inner anterior and posterior sides of a T-shirt at either the abdomen or chest position. A convenient wearable respiratory sensor setup with a capacitance-to-voltage converter has been devised. Respiratory rate as well as breathing mode can be accurately identified using the designed sensor. The sensor output provides significant information on respiratory flow. The effectiveness of the proposed system for different breathing patterns has been evaluated by experiments.

  4. The use of wearable inertial motion sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  5. The Use of Wearable Inertial Motion Sensors in Human Lower Limb Biomechanics Studies: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Yan Chan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  6. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Propofol protects against high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Minmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia could induce oxidative stress, activate transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, up-regulate expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and lead to endothelial injury. Studies have indicated that propofol could attenuate oxidative stress and suppress NF-κB activation in some situations. In the present study, we examined whether and how propofol improved high glucose-induced up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods Protein expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, NF-κB, inhibitory subunit of NF-κBα (IκBα, protein kinase Cβ2 (PKCβ2, and phosphorylation of PKCβ2 (Ser660 were measured by Western blot. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PKC activity was measured with SignaTECT PKC assay system. Superoxide anion (O2.- accumulation was measured with the reduction of ferricytochrome c assay. Human peripheral mononuclear cells were prepared with Histopaque-1077 solution. Results High glucose induced the expression of endothelial selectin (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. High glucose induced O2.- accumulation, PKCβ2 phosphorylation and PKC activation. Further, high glucose decreased IκBα expression in cytoplasm, increased the translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nuclear, and induced NF-κB activation. Importantly, we found these high glucose-mediated effects were attenuated by propofol pretreatment. Moreover, CGP53353, a selective PKCβ2 inhibitor, decreased high glucose-induced NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules expression, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Conclusion Propofol, via decreasing O2.- accumulation, down-regulating PKCβ2 Ser660 phosphorylation and PKC as well as NF-κB activity, attenuated high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression

  8. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide may enhance fatty acid re-esterification in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in lean humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Simonsen, Lene; Madsbad, Sten;

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been implicated in lipid metabolism in animals. In humans, however, there is no clear evidence of GIP effecting lipid metabolism. The present experiments were performed in order to elucidate the effects of GIP on regional adipose tissue metab...

  9. High glucose modifies transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channels via increased oxidative stress and syndecan-4 in human podocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Lee, Marlene; Xia, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels type 6 play an important role in the function of human podocytes. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by altered TRPC6 expression and functions of podocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that high glucose modifies TRPC6 channels via increased oxid...

  10. Effect of metformin on proliferation and related genes expression of human osteoblast MG63 under high glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹小俊

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of metformin on proliferation and related genes expression of human osteoblast.Methods The proliferation of MG63 cells under high glucose intervened with metformin was measured by CCK-8 assay. The activity of intracellular alkaline phosphatase

  11. Changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity following 2 weeks of daily cinnamon ingestion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Blannin, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    Cinnamon can improve fasting glucose in humans yet data on insulin sensitivity are limited and controversial. Eight male volunteers (aged 25 +/- 1 years, body mass 76.5 +/- 3.0 kg, BMI 24.0 +/- 0.7 kg m(-2); mean +/- SEM) underwent two 14-day interventions involving cinnamon or placebo supplement...

  12. Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Robyn A; Sidani, Reem M; Garcia, Anna E; Antoun, Joseph; Isbell, James M; Albaugh, Vance L; Abumrad, Naji N

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion.

  13. Design of an interface peptide as new inhibitor of human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiol-Pardo, Cristian; Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; Díaz-Moralli, Santiago; Cascante, Marta; Rubio-Martinez, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is an essential enzyme involved in the first reaction of the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Recently, G6PDH was suggested as a novel target protein for cancer therapy as one of the final products of the PPP, ribose-5-phosphate, is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis and tumor progression. After analyzing the protein-protein interface of the crystal structure of human G6PDH by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we designed six interface peptides based on the natural sequence of the protein. The three most promising peptides, as predicted by binding free energy calculations, were synthesized and one of them was confirmed as a novel inhibitor of human G6PDH in experimental assays. Together, the active peptide found and its suggested binding mode proposes a new strategy for inhibiting this enzyme and should aid the further design of novel, potent and non-peptidic G6PDH inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Wearable carbon nanotube-based fabric sensors for monitoring human physiological performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2017-05-01

    A target application of wearable sensors is to detect human motion and to monitor physical activity for improving athletic performance and for delivering better physical therapy. In addition, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provides rich information that can be used to assess a subject’s physiological or psychological condition. This study aims to design a multifunctional, wearable, fabric-based sensing system. First, carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin films were fabricated by spraying. Second, the thin films were integrated with stretchable fabrics to form the fabric sensors. Third, the strain and temperature sensing properties of sensors fabricated using different CNT concentrations were characterized. Furthermore, the sensors were demonstrated to detect human finger bending motions, so as to validate their practical strain sensing performance. Finally, to monitor human respiration, the fabric sensors were integrated with a chest band, which was directly worn by a human subject. Quantification of respiration rates were successfully achieved. Overall, the fabric sensors were characterized by advantages such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, lightweight, low-cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  15. Effect of 2-(3-carboxy-1-oxopropyl) amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose on human esophageal cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wu; Hong Lu; Yun Zhou; Liang Qiao; Rui Ji; Ai-Qing Wang; Wei-Min Liu; Qun-Ji Xue

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether 2-(3-carboxy-1-oxopropy1)amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose (COPADG), a derivative of Damino-glucose, inhibited the growth of human esophageal cancer cell line Eca-109.METHODS: Effects of COPADG on Eca-109 cells cultured in RPMI 1640 medium were examined by a tetrazoliumbased colorimetric assay (MTT assay).RESULTS: COPADG inhibited the growth of Eca-109 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner; the maximum inhibition rate was 83.75%.CONCLUSION: COPADG can directly inhibit the proliferation of Eca-109 cells, which may serve as the experimental evidence for development of new drugs for esophageal cancer therapy.

  16. Human Mobility Monitoring in Very Low Resolution Visual Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyan Bo Bo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automated system for monitoring mobility patterns using a network of very low resolution visual sensors (30 × 30 pixels. The use of very low resolution sensors reduces privacy concern, cost, computation requirement and power consumption. The core of our proposed system is a robust people tracker that uses low resolution videos provided by the visual sensor network. The distributed processing architecture of our tracking system allows all image processing tasks to be done on the digital signal controller in each visual sensor. In this paper, we experimentally show that reliable tracking of people is possible using very low resolution imagery. We also compare the performance of our tracker against a state-of-the-art tracking method and show that our method outperforms. Moreover, the mobility statistics of tracks such as total distance traveled and average speed derived from trajectories are compared with those derived from ground truth given by Ultra-Wide Band sensors. The results of this comparison show that the trajectories from our system are accurate enough to obtain useful mobility statistics.

  17. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-07-05

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  18. Highly Stretchable and Transparent Microfluidic Strain Sensors for Monitoring Human Body Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun Geun; Koo, Hyung-Jun; Chang, Suk Tai

    2015-12-16

    We report a new class of simple microfluidic strain sensors with high stretchability, transparency, sensitivity, and long-term stability with no considerable hysteresis and a fast response to various deformations by combining the merits of microfluidic techniques and ionic liquids. The high optical transparency of the strain sensors was achieved by introducing refractive-index matched ionic liquids into microfluidic networks or channels embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The microfluidic strain sensors offer the outstanding sensor performance under a variety of deformations induced by stretching, bending, pressing, and twisting of the microfluidic strain sensors. The principle of our microfluidic strain sensor is explained by a theoretical model based on the elastic channel deformation. In order to demonstrate its capability of practical usage, the simple-structured microfluidic strain sensors were performed onto a finger, wrist, and arm. The highly stretchable and transparent microfluidic strain sensors were successfully applied as potential platforms for distinctively monitoring a wide range of human body motions in real time. Our novel microfluidic strain sensors show great promise for making future stretchable electronic devices.

  19. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic β cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic β cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of β cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair β cell proliferation and induce β cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive β cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive β cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor β or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected β cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored β cell proliferation, and improved β cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human β cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation. PMID:12060768

  20. New Programmable CMOS Fuzzifier and C2V Circuits Applicable in FLC Chip for Signal Processing of MEMS Glucose Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghader Yosefi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and simulation of improved circuits of Fuzzifier and capacitance to voltage (C2V converter. The Fuzzifier circuit is designed based on analog advantages such as low die area, high accuracy, and simplicity which are added to the fuzzy system advantages. For implementing this idea, a programmable Membership Function Generator (MFG including differential pair circuit as a Fuzzifier is proposed. The MFG generates arbitrary forms of Gaussian, Trapezoidal, and Triangular shapes. The shape types are achieved using control switches and different reference voltages. This structure is also general purpose in tuning the slope of Membership Functions (MFs using scaled transistors with different W/L ratios. With a specific purpose in mind, we used it here to generate fuzzy language terms from sensed classic data of a blood glucose microsensor. Thus we proposed a C2V circuit to convert capacitance variations (from MEMS glucose microsensor to voltage values as classic data. The proposed mentioned circuits can be applicable in design of Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC chips to detect blood glucose, process its data in Fuzzy environment, and control insulin injection of diabetic patients by MEMS micropumps. The simulation results are achieved by MATLAB and Hspice software in 0.35 μm CMOS standard technology.

  1. Disposable Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensors Using Screen-Printed Nickel/Carbon Composites on Indium Tin Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Yong Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Disposable screen-printed nickel/carbon composites on indium tin oxide (ITO electrodes (DSPNCE were developed for the detection of glucose without enzymes. The DSPNCE were prepared by screen-printing the ITO substrate with a 50 wt% nickel/carbon composite, followed by curing at 400 °C for 30 min. The redox couple of Ni(OH2/NiOOH was deposited on the surface of the electrodes via cyclic voltammetry (CV, scanning from 0–1.5 V for 30 cycles in 0.1 M NaOH solution. The DSPNCE were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical methods. The resulting electrical currents, measured by CV and chronoamperometry at 0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl, showed a good linear response with glucose concentrations from 1.0–10 mM. Also, the prepared electrodes showed no interference from common physiologic interferents such as uric acid (UA or ascorbic acid (AA. Therefore, this approach allowed the development of a simple, disposable glucose biosensor.

  2. The Acute Effects of Low-Dose TNF-α on Glucose Metabolism and β-Cell Function in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Fischer, Christian Philip; Plomgaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    and in vivo. However, it is unclear whether TNF-α may also affect endogenous glucose production (EGP) during fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in vivo. We hypothesized that low-dose TNF- α would increase EGP and attenuate GSIS. Recombinant human TNF-α or placebo was infused in healthy......Type 2 diabetes is characterized by increased insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with low-grade inflammation and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α. TNF-α has been shown to impair peripheral insulin signaling in vitro......, nondiabetic young men (n = 10) during a 4-hour basal period followed by an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). TNF-α lowered insulin levels by 12% during the basal period (P

  3. Muecas: A Multi-Sensor Robotic Head for Affective Human Robot Interaction and Imitation

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Cid; Jose Moreno; Pablo Bustos; Pedro Núñez

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, inclu...

  4. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  5. Effects of IL-10 and glucose on expression of OPG and RANKL in human periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of interleukin-10 (IL-10 and glucose on mRNA and protein expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG, and its ligand, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, were investigated in human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs. Primary HPDLFs were treated with different concentrations of IL-10 (0, 1, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ng/mL or glucose (0, 5.5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mmol/L. Changes in mRNA and protein expression were examined using the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. After IL-10 treatment, mRNA and protein levels of OPG were increased, while mRNA and protein levels of RANKL were decreased (P<0.05, both in a concentration-dependent manner. Glucose stimulation had the opposite concentration-dependent effect to that of IL-10 on OPG and RANKL expression. IL-10 upregulated OPG expression and downregulated RANKL expression, whereas high glucose upregulated RANKL and downregulated OPG in HDPLFs. Abnormal levels of IL-10 and glucose may contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  6. Constructing heterostructure on highly roughened caterpillar-like gold nanotubes with cuprous oxide grains for ultrasensitive and stable nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anran; Ding, Yu; Yang, Zhimao; Yang, Shengchun

    2015-12-15

    In this study, a metal-metal oxide heterostructure was designed and constructed by growing cuprous oxide (Cu2O) grains on highly surface roughened caterpillar-like Au nanotubes (CLGNs) for ultrasensitive, selective and stable nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. The Cu2O grains are tightly anchored to the surface of CLGNs by the spines, resulting in a large increase in the contact area between Cu2O grains and the CLGNs, which facilitates the electron transport between metal and metal oxide and improves the sensitivity and stability of the sensors. The electron transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer rate constant (ks) for redox reaction of Cu2O-CLGNs/GCE are found to be 0.50114 and 3.24±0.1 s(-1), respectively. The biosensor shows a linear response to glucose over a concentration range of 0.1-5mM and a high sensitivity of 1215.7 µA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a detection limit of 1.83 μM. Furthermore, the Cu2O-CLGNs biosensor exhibited strong anti-interference capability against uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium ascorbate (SA), as well as a high stability and repeatability. Our current research indicates that the Cu2O-CLGNs hybrid electrode is a promising choice for constructing nonenzyme based electrochemical biosensors.

  7. Efficient Generation of Glucose-Responsive Beta Cells from Isolated GP2+ Human Pancreatic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ameri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes would benefit from implementation of a cell purification step at the pancreatic endoderm stage. This would increase the safety of the final cell product, allow the establishment of an intermediate-stage stem cell bank, and provide a means for upscaling β cell manufacturing. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed glycoprotein 2 (GP2 as a specific cell surface marker for isolating pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs from differentiated hESCs and human fetal pancreas. Isolated GP2+ PECs efficiently differentiated into glucose responsive insulin-producing cells in vitro. We found that in vitro PEC proliferation declines due to enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2A. However, we identified a time window when reducing CDKN1A or CDKN2A expression increased proliferation and yield of GP2+ PECs. Altogether, our results contribute tools and concepts toward the isolation and use of PECs as a source for the safe production of hPSC-derived β cells.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of Blood Glucose Effects on Human Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orquin, Jacob L.; Kurzban, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The academic and public interest in blood glucose and its relationship to decision making has been increasing over the last decade. To investigate and evaluate competing theories about this relationship, we conducted a psychometric meta-analysis on the effect of blood glucose on decision making. We...... identified 42 studies relating to 4 dimensions of decision making: willingness to pay, willingness to work, time discounting, and decision style. We did not find a uniform influence of blood glucose on decision making. Instead, we found that low levels of blood glucose increase the willingness to pay...... and willingness to work when a situation is food related, but decrease willingness to pay and work in all other situations. Low levels of blood glucose increase the future discount rate for food; that is, decision makers become more impatient, and to a lesser extent increase the future discount rate for money...

  9. Weight Loss Partially Restores Glucose-Driven Betatrophin Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Lukas; Brachs, Sebastian; Decker, Anne-Marie; Brachs, Maria; Leupelt, Verena; Jumpertz von Schwartzenberg, Reiner; Ernert, Andrea; Bobbert, Thomas; Krude, Heiko; Spranger, Joachim; Mai, Knut

    2016-11-01

    Recently a potential role of betatrophin was shown in the postprandial switch from lipid to glucose metabolism. The objective of the study was to analyze whether obesity is associated with altered postprandial betatrophin response and whether this could be restored by weight loss. Design, Setting, Participants, and Intervention: Oral glucose load was performed in 12 lean individuals at baseline as well as in 20 obese subjects before and after a 12-week structured weight-loss program at an endocrinology research center. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed in the obese cohort. The effect of insulin and different glucose concentrations on betatrophin expression were analyzed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Circulating betatrophin levels during a glucose challenge were measured. The betatrophin level decreases after an oral glucose intake (P < .001). This correlates with the increase of glucose levels (r = -0.396; P < .05). Hyperinsulinemia results in an increase of betatrophin. In vitro experiments in 3T3-L1 adipocytes confirmed that insulin and low glucose concentration increases betatrophin expression, whereas a further elevation of glucose levels blunts this effect. Obese subjects are characterized by lower fasting betatrophin (600.6 ± 364.4 vs 759.5 ± 197.9 pg/mL; P < .05) and a more pronounced betatrophin suppression during the glucose challenge. The impaired betatrophin response in obese subjects is restored after weight loss and is comparable with lean individuals. Obesity is associated with increased betatrophin suppression after an oral glucose load, which is driven by increased hyperglycemia. Given the metabolic properties of betatrophin, this may indicate that betatrophin is tightly linked to obesity-associated metabolic disturbances. In line with such an assumption, weight loss almost completely eliminated this phenomenon.

  10. Tracking and Recognition of Multiple Human Targets Moving in a Wireless Pyroelectric Infrared Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With characteristics of low-cost and easy deployment, the distributed wireless pyroelectric infrared sensor network has attracted extensive interest, which aims to make it an alternate infrared video sensor in thermal biometric applications for tracking and identifying human targets. In these applications, effectively processing signals collected from sensors and extracting the features of different human targets has become crucial. This paper proposes the application of empirical mode decomposition and the Hilbert-Huang transform to extract features of moving human targets both in the time domain and the frequency domain. Moreover, the support vector machine is selected as the classifier. The experimental results demonstrate that by using this method the identification rates of multiple moving human targets are around 90%.

  11. Glucose-sensitive colorimetric sensor based on peroxidase mimics activity of porphyrin-Fe3O4 nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyun; Li, Hui; Zhao, Qingru; Zhu, Renren; Yang, Yanting; Jia, Qingyan; Bian, Bing; Zhuo, Linhai

    2014-08-01

    5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin-functionalized Fe3O4 nanocomposites (H2TCPP-Fe3O4) were successfully prepared by a simple two-step method. These nanocomposites exhibited ultra-high peroxidase-like activity compared with pure Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Colorless peroxidase substrate 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) was changed by H2O2 to its blue oxidized state. Kinetic studies indicated that the H2TCPP-Fe3O4 nanocomposites exhibited enhanced affinity toward H2O2 with a higher catalytic activity than Fe3O4 nanoparticles alone. Results of a fluorescent probe suggested that the catalase-mimic activity of the H2TCPP-Fe3O4 nanocomposites effectively catalyzed the decomposition of H2O2 into hydroxyl radicals. A simple, sensitive, and selective visual and colorimetric method with TMB as the substrate was designed to detect glucose when combined with glucose oxidase. This colorimetric method can be used for colorimetric detection of H2O2 with a minimum detection limit of 1.07×10(-6) M and a dynamic range of 5×10(-6) mol·L(-1) to 8×10(-5) mol·L(-1). This method can also be used to detect glucose at a minimum detection limit of 2.21×10(-6) M and a dynamic range of 25×10(-6) mol·L(-1) to 5×10(-6) mol·L(-1). Furthermore, the robustness of the nanocomposites makes them suitable for a wide range of applications in biomedicine and environmental chemistry fields.

  12. High glucose mediates endothelial-to-chondrocyte transition in human aortic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Rining

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is one of the common complications in diabetes mellitus. Many studies have shown that high glucose (HG caused cardiovascular calcification, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Recently, medial calcification has been most commonly described in the vessels of patients with diabetes. Chondrocytes were involved in the medial calcification. Recent studies have shown that the conversion into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs via the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT could be triggered in chondrocytes. Our previous research has indicated that HG induced EndMT in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs. Therefore, we addressed the question of whether HG-induced EndMT could be transitioned into MSCs and differentiated into chondrocytes. Methods HAECs were divided into three groups: a normal glucose (NG group, HG group (30 mmol/L, and mannitol (5.5 mmol/L NG + 24.5 mmol/L group. Pathological changes were investigated using fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect the co-expression of endothelial markers, such as CD31, and fibroblast markers, such as fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was detected by real time-PCR and western blots. Endothelial-derived MSCs were grown in MSC medium for one week. The expression of the MSCs markers STRO-1, CD44, CD10 and the chondrocyte marker SOX9 was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blots. Chondrocyte expression was detected by alcian blue staining. Calcium deposits were analyzed by alizarin red staining. Results The incubation of HAECs exposed to HG resulted in a fibroblast-like phenotype. Double staining of the HAECs indicated a co-localization of CD31 and FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was significantly increased in the HG group, and the cells undergoing EndMT also expressed STRO-1, CD44 and SOX9 compared with the controls (P  Conclusions Our

  13. Isoflavone genistein protects high glucose-induced human aortic endothelial cell apoptosis through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwen Zhong; Yang Liu; Guang Yang; Hui Tian

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if isoflavone genistien has protective effects against high glucose-induced cell apoptosis in human aortic endlthelial cells,and investigate the possible mechanism for this protection.Methods Human aortic endothelial cells subjected to normal (5mmol/L) or high glucose (25mmol/L) were treated with genistein at 0,50,100nmol/L.Parallel experiments were performed with 100nM 17b-estradiol,and also in the presence and absence of the pure anti-estrogen ICI-182,780 (100nmol/L).The effects on cell apoptotic DNA fragmentation were determined using cell death ELISA,and the effects on cellular proliferation were determined using tritiated thymidine incorporation assay.Estrogen receptor expression was detected by Taqman quantitative PCR.Results Genistein at 100nmol/L significantly reduced high glucose-induced DNA fragmentation,and reversed cell DNA synthesis inhibition (P<0.001) after 24 hours' incubation.The effect of genistein was completely blocked by ICI-182,780administration.Estrogen receptor beta,but not alpha was found to be expressed in these cells.Conclusion Isoflavone genistein shows protection against high glucose-induced cell damage through estrogen receptor beta,reducing apoptotic DNA damage and protecting from the inhibition of cell proliferation.

  14. High glucose decreases the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahong Xue; Zuyi Yuan; Yue Wu; Yan Zhao; Zhaofei Wan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:ATP-binding cassette transporters(ABC) A1 and G1 play an important role in mediating cholesterol efflux and preventing macrophage foam cell formation. In this study, we examined the regulation of ABC transporters by high glucose in human vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs), the other precursor of foam cells. Methods:Incubation of human VSMCs with D-ghicose(5 to 30 mM) for 1 to 7 days in the presence or absence of antioxidant and nuclear factor(NF)-kB inhibitors, the expressions of ABCA1 and ABCG1 were analyzed by real time PCR and Western blotting. Results:High glucose decreased ABCG1 mRNA and protein expression in cultured VSMCs, whereas the expression of ABCA1 was not significantly decreased. Down-regulation of ABCG1 mRNA expression by high glucose was abolished by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine(NAC) and NF-kB inhibitors, BAY 11-7085 and tosyl-phenylalanine chloromethyl-ketone(TPCK). Conclusion:High glucose suppresses the expression of ABCG1 in VSMCs, which is the possible mechanism of VSMC derived foam cell transformation.

  15. Tumor Environmental Factors Glucose Deprivation and Lactic Acidosis Induce Mitotic Chromosomal Instability – An Implication in Aneuploid Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN) plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis – two tumor microenvironmental factors – could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy. PMID:23675453

  16. mTOR inhibition with rapamycin causes impaired insulin signalling and glucose uptake in human subcutaneous and omental adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Maria J; Palming, Jenny; Rizell, Magnus; Aureliano, Manuel; Carvalho, Eugénia; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2012-05-15

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive agent used after organ transplantation, but its molecular effects on glucose metabolism needs further evaluation. We explored rapamycin effects on glucose uptake and insulin signalling proteins in adipocytes obtained via subcutaneous (n=62) and omental (n=10) fat biopsies in human donors. At therapeutic concentration (0.01 μM) rapamycin reduced basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 20-30%, after short-term (15 min) or long-term (20 h) culture of subcutaneous (n=23 and n=10) and omental adipocytes (n=6 and n=7). Rapamycin reduced PKB Ser473 and AS160 Thr642 phosphorylation, and IRS2 protein levels in subcutaneous adipocytes. Additionally, it reduced mTOR-raptor, mTOR-rictor and mTOR-Sin1 interactions, suggesting decreased mTORC1 and mTORC2 formation. Rapamycin also reduced IR Tyr1146 and IRS1 Ser307/Ser616/Ser636 phosphorylation, whereas no effects were observed on the insulin stimulated IRS1-Tyr and TSC2 Thr1462 phosphorylation. This is the first study to show that rapamycin reduces glucose uptake in human adipocytes through impaired insulin signalling and this may contribute to the development of insulin resistance associated with rapamycin therapy.

  17. Glucose-induced β cell production of IL-1β contributes to glucotoxicity in human pancreatic islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ris, Frédéric; Oberholzer, José; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Kaiser, Nurit; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is suggested to be detrimental to pancreatic β cells, causing impaired insulin secretion. IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine acting during the autoimmune process of type 1 diabetes. IL-1β inhibits β cell function and promotes Fas-triggered apoptosis in part by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, we have shown that increased glucose concentrations also induce Fas expression and β cell apoptosis in human islets. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that IL-1β may mediate the deleterious effects of high glucose on human β cells. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels resulted in increased production and release of IL-1β, followed by NF-κB activation, Fas upregulation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist protected cultured human islets from these deleterious effects. β cells themselves were identified as the islet cellular source of glucose-induced IL-1β. In vivo, IL-1β–producing β cells were observed in pancreatic sections of type 2 diabetic patients but not in nondiabetic control subjects. Similarly, IL-1β was induced in β cells of the gerbil Psammomys obesus during development of diabetes. Treatment of the animals with phlorizin normalized plasma glucose and prevented β cell expression of IL-1β. These findings implicate an inflammatory process in the pathogenesis of glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes and identify the IL-1β/NF-κB pathway as a target to preserve β cell mass and function in this condition. PMID:12235117

  18. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  19. Characteristics of Polysilicon Wire Glucose Sensors with a Surface Modified by Silica Nanoparticles/γ-APTES Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jheng-Jia Jhuang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This report investigates the sensing characteristics of polysilicon wire (PSW glucose biosensors, including thickness characteristics and line-width effects on detection limits, linear range and interference immunity with membranes coated by micropipette/spin-coating and focus-ion-beam (FIB processed capillary atomic-force-microscopy (C-AFM tip scan/coating methods. The PSW surface was modified with a mixture of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (γ-APTES and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-treated hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles (NPs. We found that the thickness of the γ-APTES+NPs nonocomposite could be controlled well at about 22 nm with small relative standard deviation (RSD with repeated C-AFM tip scan/coatings. The detection limit increased and linear range decreased with the line width of the PSW through the tip-coating process. Interestingly, the interference immunity ability improves as the line width increases. For a 500 nm-wide PSW, the percentage changes of the channel current density changes (ΔJ caused by acetaminophen (AP can be kept below 3.5% at an ultra-high AP-to-glucose concentration ratio of 600:1. Simulation results showed that the line width dependence of interference immunity was strongly correlated with the channel electrical field of the PSW biosensor.

  20. Three-dimensional macroporous carbon/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters for nonenzymatic electrochemical glucose sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yayun; Xie, Yingzhen; Yu, Jie; Yang, Han; Miao, Longfei; Song, Yonghai

    2017-04-01

    A novel supporting material named as three-dimensional kenaf stem-derived carbon (3D-KSCs) was used to load hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters for electrochemical sensing glucose. The 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters were constructed by two steps. Los of acicular precursor nanoclusters firstly grew on the channels of 3D-KSCs densely by hydrothermal method and then the as-prepared 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters was obtained by thermal pyrolysis of the 3D-KSCs/precursors nanocomposites at 400 °C. The 3D macroporous configuration of 3D-KSCs resulted in lots of hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters arrayed on the surface of 3D-KSCs owing to its large enough specific surface area, which effectively avoided their aggregations and improved the stability of nanocomposites. The obtained 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters showed a large number of needle-shaped and layered Co3O4 nanoclusters uniformly grew on the macropore's walls of 3D-KSC. Due to its unique nanostructures, the 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters integrated electrode showed superior performance for nonenzymatic electrochemical glucose sensing, showing wide linear range (0.088-7.0 mM) and low detection limit of 26 μM. It might be a new strategy to prepare nanostructures on 3D-KSC for future applications.

  1. A meta-analysis of blood glucose effects on human decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orquin, Jacob L; Kurzban, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The academic and public interest in blood glucose and its relationship to decision making has been increasing over the last decade. To investigate and evaluate competing theories about this relationship, we conducted a psychometric meta-analysis on the effect of blood glucose on decision making. We identified 42 studies relating to 4 dimensions of decision making: willingness to pay, willingness to work, time discounting, and decision style. We did not find a uniform influence of blood glucose on decision making. Instead, we found that low levels of blood glucose increase the willingness to pay and willingness to work when a situation is food related, but decrease willingness to pay and work in all other situations. Low levels of blood glucose increase the future discount rate for food; that is, decision makers become more impatient, and to a lesser extent increase the future discount rate for money. Low levels of blood glucose also increase the tendency to make more intuitive rather than deliberate decisions. However, this effect was only observed in situations unrelated to food. We conclude that blood glucose has domain-specific effects, influencing decision making differently depending on the relevance of the situation to acquiring food. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Nutrients other than carbohydrates: their effects on glucose homeostasis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Egert, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Besides carbohydrates, other nutrients, such as dietary protein and amino acids; the supply of fat, vitamin D, and vitamin K; and sodium intake seem to affect glucose homeostasis. Although their effect is less pronounced than that of the amount and composition of carbohydrates, it seems reasonable to consider how nutrient intake habits may be modified to support an improved glucose homeostasis. For instance, taking into account the effect of some nutrients to lower blood glucose concentration on a day-by-day basis might support improvement of glucose homeostasis in the long run. On the other hand, lowering sodium intake too much, as recommended to avoid the development of hypertension, particularly in sodium-sensitive people, might lead to insulin resistance and thereby might risk increasing fasting as well as postprandial blood glucose concentrations. This review summarizes the state of our knowledge of how several nutrients other than carbohydrates, such as protein, fatty acids, vitamin D, vitamin K, magnesium, zinc, chromium, and sodium, affect blood glucose concentrations. Sufficient evidence exists to show that, in prospective studies based on randomized controlled trials, these selected nutrients affect blood glucose regulation. The review describes potential mechanisms leading to the observed effect. As much as is possible from the available data, the extent of the effect, is considered.

  3. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress.

  4. Propofol inhibits high glucose-induced PP2A expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qichao; Zhao, Yanjun; Duan, Wenming; Liu, Yi; Chen, Xiangyuan; Zhu, Minmin

    2017-04-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is a common clinical metabolic disorder. Hyperglycemia could induce endothelial apoptosis, dysfunction and inflammation, resulting in endothelial injury. Propofol is a widely used anesthetic drug in clinical settings. Our previous studies indicated that propofol, via inhibiting high glucose-induced phosphatase A2 (PP2A) expression, attenuated high glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thus improving endothelial apoptosis, dysfunction and inflammation. However, the mechanisms by which propofol attenuated high glucose-induced PP2A expression is still obscure. In the present study, we examined how propofol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial PP2A expression. Compared with 5mM glucose treatment, 15mM glucose up-regulated expression and activity of PP2A, increased cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II) phosphorylation and Ca(2+) accumulation. More importantly, propofol decreased PP2A expression and activity, attenuated CREB, CaMK II phosphorylation and Ca(2+) accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, we demonstrated that the effect of propofol was similar to that of MK801, an inhibitor of NMDA receptor. In contrast, rapastinel, an activator of NMDA receptor, antagonized the effect of propofol. Also, the effect of KN93, an inhibitor of CaMK II, was similar to that of propofol, except KN93 had no effect on 15mM glucose-mediated Ca(2+) accumulation. Our data indicated that propofol, via inhibiting NMDA receptor, attenuated 15mM glucose-induced Ca(2+) accumulation, CaMK II and CREB phosphorylation, thus inhibiting PP2A expression and improving 15mM glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metformin induces glucose uptake in human preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from various fat depots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Timper, K; Radimerski, T; Dembinski, K; Frey, D M; Zulewski, H; Keller, U; Müller, B; Christ-Crain, M; Grisouard, J

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of metformin on basal and insulin-induced glucose uptake in subcutaneous and visceral preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from obese and non-obese patients, preadipocytes were obtained from subcutaneous and visceral fat depots during abdominal surgery. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated by measurement of intracellular triglyceride accumulation. Preadipocyte-derived adipocytes were treated with metformin (1 mM) for 24 h with or without the addition of insulin (100 nM) for 20 min and glucose uptake was measured. In cells from each donor, intracellular triglyceride accumulation was more abundant in subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes than in visceral preadipocyte-derived adipocytes (p < 0.001). Insulin stimulated glucose uptake in subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from both non-obese and obese patients (p < 0.001 vs. basal). In visceral preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, insulin did not increase basal glucose uptake. In subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from non-obese and obese patients, metformin alone increased glucose uptake to 2.7 +/- 0.2 (p < 0.001) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 fold (p < 0.001) respectively. Metformin increased glucose uptake in visceral preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from non-obese (1.7 +/- 0.1 fold vs. basal, p < 0.001) and obese (2.0 +/- 0.2 fold vs. basal, p < 0.001) patients. Combined treatment with metformin and insulin increased glucose uptake in subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes from both non-obese and obese patients (p < 0.001 vs. insulin alone). In preadipocyte-derived adipocytes glucose uptake is induced by metformin independent of the fat depot origin of the preadipocytes (subcutaneous or visceral) and the obesity state of the patients (non-obese or obese). In adipocytes, metformin seems to induce glucose uptake independent of insulin suggesting an alternative mechanism of action of this drug.

  6. Human-motion energy harvester for autonomous body area sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, M.; Boisseau, S.; Perez, M.; Gasnier, P.; Willemin, J.; Ait-Ali, I.; Perraud, S.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on a method to optimize an electromagnetic energy harvester converting the low-frequency body motion and aimed at powering wireless body area sensors. This method is based on recorded accelerations, and mechanical and transduction models that enable an efficient joint optimization of the structural parameters. An optimized prototype of 14.8 mmØ × 52 mm, weighting 20 g, has generated up to 4.95 mW in a resistive load when worn at the arm during a run, and 6.57 mW when hand-shaken. Among the inertial electromagnetic energy harvesters reported so far, this one exhibits one of the highest power densities (up to 730 μW cm-3). The energy harvester was finally used to power a bluetooth low energy wireless sensor node with accelerations measurements at 25 Hz.

  7. Pyramid wavefront sensors for astronomy and for the human eye

    OpenAIRE

    Bergomi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    WaveFront Sensors (WFSs) may be defined as the heart of an adaptive optics system since they analyze the radiation coming from reference sources and allow to quantify the distortion of a wavefront. Among the varieties of existing WFSs, my PhD research thesis focuses especially on innovative optical systems taking advantage of the peculiarities of the Pyramid WFS. In my PhD project I have designed, implemented, characterized or studied three different applications characterized by the f...

  8. Manufacturing of Wearable Sensors for Human Health and Performance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Azar

    2015-03-01

    Continuous monitoring of physiological and biological parameters is expected to improve performance and medical outcomes by assessing overall health status and alerting for life-saving interventions. Continuous monitoring of these parameters requires wearable devices with an appropriate form factor (lightweight, comfortable, low energy consuming and even single-use) to avoid disrupting daily activities thus ensuring operation relevance and user acceptance. Many previous efforts to implement remote and wearable sensors have suffered from high cost and poor performance, as well as low clinical and end-use acceptance. New manufacturing and system level design approaches are needed to make the performance and clinical benefits of these sensors possible while satisfying challenging economic, regulatory, clinical, and user-acceptance criteria. In this talk we will review several recent design and manufacturing efforts aimed at designing and building prototype wearable sensors. We will discuss unique opportunities and challenges provided by additive manufacturing, including 3D printing, to drive innovation through new designs, faster prototyping and manufacturing, distributed networks, and new ecosystems. We will also show alternative hybrid self-assembly based integration techniques for low cost large scale manufacturing of single use wearable devices. Coauthors: Prabhjot Singh and Jeffrey Ashe.

  9. An optimised system for refolding of human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel Paul C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, active in both dimer and tetramer forms, is the key entry enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, providing NADPH for biosynthesis and various other purposes, including protection against oxidative stress in erythrocytes. Accordingly haemolytic disease is a major consequence of G6PD deficiency mutations in man, and many severe disease phenotypes are attributed to G6PD folding problems. Therefore, a robust refolding method with high recovery yield and reproducibility is of particular importance to study those clinical mutant enzymes as well as to shed light generally on the refolding process of large multi-domain proteins. Results The effects of different chemical and physical variables on the refolding of human recombinant G6PD have been extensively investigated. L-Arg, NADP+ and DTT are all major positive influences on refolding, and temperature, protein concentration, salt types and other additives also have significant impacts. With the method described here, ~70% enzyme activity could be regained, with good reproducibility, after denaturation with Gdn-HCl, by rapid dilution of the protein, and the refolded enzyme displays kinetic and CD properties indistinguishable from those of the native protein. Refolding under these conditions is relatively slow, taking about 7 days to complete at room temperature even in the presence of cyclophilin A, a peptidylprolyl isomerase reported to increase refolding rates. The refolded protein intermediates shift from dominant monomer to dimer during this process, the gradual emergence of dimer correlating well with the regain of enzyme activity. Conclusion L-Arg is the key player in the refolding of human G6PD, preventing the aggregation of folding intermediate, and NADP+ is essential for the folding intermediate to adopt native structure. The refolding protocol can be applied to produce high recovery yield of folded protein with

  10. Effect of polysaccharide of dendrobium candidum on proliferation and apoptosis of human corneal epithelial cells in high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiangxiang; Chen, Jing; Li, Yajia; Chen, Ting; Zou, Jing; Wang, Hua

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effect of polysaccharide of dendrobium candidum (PDC) and high glucose on proliferation, apoptosis of human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). The MTT method was used to screen and take the optimal high-glucose concentration, treatment time, and PDC concentration using HCEC and divide it into 4 groups: control group (C), high glucose group (HG), PDC group, and HG + PDC group. We observed and compared the effect of the 4 groups on HCEC proliferation by MTT, apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/PI double fluorescent staining and flow cytometry (FCM), and expression of bax mRNA and bcl-2 mRNA by RT-qPCR. Compared with the control group, proliferative activity of HCEC cells was reduced; the cells apoptosis ratio was increased; the expression of bax mRNA was increased, and the expression of bcl-2 mRNA was reduced in the HG group. Proliferative activity of HCEC cells in the PDC group was increased, and the expression of bcl-2 mRNA was increased but that of bax mRNA was decreased. Proliferative activity of HCEC cells in the HG + PDC group was increased, but it could not restore to the normal level; the expression of bax mRNA was significantly decreased but the expression of bcl-2 mRNA was significantly increased. Our results demonstrate that high glucose can inhibit proliferative activity and induce apoptosis of HCEC. PDC can improve the proliferative activity of HCEC cells under the high glucose environment and reduce the apoptosis of cells by regulating the expression of bax and bcl-2. PDC play a very important role on protecting and repairing of corneal epithelial cells damage in high glucose.

  11. Insulin and GH signaling in human skeletal muscle in vivo following exogenous GH exposure: impact of an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load. METHODS: Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1 after an intravenous GH bolus 2 after an intravenous GH bolus plus an oral glucose load (OGTT, and 3 after intravenous saline plus OGTT. Muscle biopsies were taken at t = 0, 30, 60, and 120. Blood was sampled at frequent intervals for assessment of GH, insulin, glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA. RESULTS: GH increased AUC(glucose after an OGTT (p<0.05 without significant changes in serum insulin levels. GH induced phosphorylation of STAT5 independently of the OGTT. Conversely, the OGTT induced acute phosphorylation of the insulin signaling proteins Akt (ser(473 and thr(308, and AS160.The combination of OGTT and GH suppressed Akt activation, whereas the downstream expression of AS160 was amplified by GH. WE CONCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: 1 A physiological GH bolus activates STAT5 signaling pathways in skeletal muscle irrespective of ambient glucose and insulin levels 2 Insulin resistance induced by GH occurs without a distinct suppression of insulin signaling proteins 3 The accentuation of the glucose-stimulated activation of AS 160 by GH does however indicate a potential crosstalk between insulin and GH. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00477997.

  12. Direct effects of FGF21 on glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashili, Fredirick L; Austin, Reginald L; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21, a novel member of the FGF family, plays a role in a variety of endocrine functions, including regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. The role of FGF21 in skeletal muscle is currently not known. METHODS: Serum levels and skeletal muscle mRNA of FGF...... phosphorylation of Akt or AMP-activated protein kinase. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma FGF21 is increased in T2D patients, and positively correlated with fasting insulin and BMI. However, FGF21 has direct effects in enhancing skeletal muscle glucose uptake, providing additional points of regulation that may contribute......21 were determined in normal glucose tolerant (n = 40) and type 2 diabetic (T2D; n = 40) subjects. We determined whether FGF21 has direct effects on glucose metabolism in cultured myotubes (n = 8) and extensor digitorum longus skeletal muscle. RESULTS: Serum FGF21 levels increased 20% in T2D versus...

  13. Local forearm and whole-body respiratory quotient in humans after an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of an oral glucose load of 75 g on the local forearm and whole-body energy thermogenesis were measured in normal subjects during the 4 h after the glucose intake. Simultaneous assessment of substrate metabolism in the forearm was performed. Energy expenditure (EE) increased after...... the glucose load and had not returned to baseline level at the end of the experiment. Whole-body respiratory quotient (RQ) was, on average, 0.80 (SD 0.05) in the baseline condition and increased to a maximum of 0.91 (0.03) and then decreased to baseline level at the end of the experiment. The local forearm.......17) to 0.63 (0.17) 30 min after the glucose load (P body RQ...

  14. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  15. Insulin and GH Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle In Vivo following Exogenous GH Exposure: Impact of an Oral Glucose Load

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm; Michael Madsen; Vendelbo, Mikkel H.; Pedersen, Steen B.; Christiansen, Jens S.; Niels Møller; Niels Jessen; Jørgensen, Jens O.L.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load. METHODS: Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1) after an int...

  16. Expression Patterns of Glucose Transporter-1 Gene and Thyroid Specific Genes in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, Junekey; Min Haesook and others

    2014-06-15

    The expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) gene and those of major thyroid-specific genes were examined in papillary carcinoma tissues, and the expressions of these genes were compared with cancer differentiation grades. Twenty-four human papillary carcinoma tissues were included in this study. The expressions of Glut-1- and thyroid-specific genes [sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, TSH receptor and pendrin] were analyzed by RT-PCR. Expression levels were expressed as ratios versus the expression of beta-actin. Pathologic differentiation of papillary carcinoma was classified into a relatively well-differentiated group (n=13) and relatively less differentiated group (n=11). Glut-1 gene expression was significantly higher in the less differentiated group (0.66±0.04) than in the well-differentiated group (0.59±0.07). The expression levels of the NIS, PD and TG genes were significantly higher in the well-differentiated group (NIS: 0.67±0.20, PD: 0.65±0.21, TG: 0.74±0.16) than in the less differentiated group (NIS: 0.36±0.05, PD: 0.49±0.08, TG: 0.60±0.11), respectively. A significant negative correlation was found between Glut-1 and NIS expression, and positive correlations were found between NIS and TG, and between NIS and PD. The NIS, PD and TG genes were highly expressed in well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas, whereas the Glut-1 gene was highly expressed in less differentiated thyroid carcinomas. These findings provide a molecular rationale for the management of papillary carcinoma, especially in the selection of FDG PET or radioiodine whole-body scan and I-131-based therapy.

  17. Real-Time Human Motion Capture Driven by a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-zhan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of a real object model is reconstructed through measurements of the position, direction, and angle of moving objects in 3D space in a process called “motion capture.” With the development of inertial sensing technology, motion capture systems that are based on inertial sensing have become a research hot spot. However, the solution of motion attitude remains a challenge that restricts the rapid development of motion capture systems. In this study, a human motion capture system based on inertial sensors is developed, and the real-time movement of a human model controlled by real people’s movement is achieved. According to the features of the system of human motion capture and reappearance, a hierarchical modeling approach based on a 3D human body model is proposed. The method collects articular movement data on the basis of rigid body dynamics through a miniature sensor network, controls the human skeleton model, and reproduces human posture according to the features of human articular movement. Finally, the feasibility of the system is validated by testing of system properties via capture of continuous dynamic movement. Experiment results show that the scheme utilizes a real-time sensor network-driven human skeleton model to achieve the accurate reproduction of human motion state. The system also has good application value.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Constrained Human Trajectory Generation from the PIR Motion Detector Sensor Network Data: A Geometric Algebra Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaoyuan; Yuan, Linwang; Luo, Wen; Feng, Linyao; Lv, Guonian

    2015-12-30

    Passive infrared (PIR) motion detectors, which can support long-term continuous observation, are widely used for human motion analysis. Extracting all possible trajectories from the PIR sensor networks is important. Because the PIR sensor does not log location and individual information, none of the existing methods can generate all possible human motion trajectories that satisfy various spatio-temporal constraints from the sensor activation log data. In this paper, a geometric algebra (GA)-based approach is developed to generate all possible human trajectories from the PIR sensor network data. Firstly, the representation of the geographical network, sensor activation response sequences and the human motion are represented as algebraic elements using GA. The human motion status of each sensor activation are labeled using the GA-based trajectory tracking. Then, a matrix multiplication approach is developed to dynamically generate the human trajectories according to the sensor activation log and the spatio-temporal constraints. The method is tested with the MERL motion database. Experiments show that our method can flexibly extract the major statistical pattern of the human motion. Compared with direct statistical analysis and tracklet graph method, our method can effectively extract all possible trajectories of the human motion, which makes it more accurate. Our method is also likely to provides a new way to filter other passive sensor log data in sensor networks.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Constrained Human Trajectory Generation from the PIR Motion Detector Sensor Network Data: A Geometric Algebra Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyuan Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive infrared (PIR motion detectors, which can support long-term continuous observation, are widely used for human motion analysis. Extracting all possible trajectories from the PIR sensor networks is important. Because the PIR sensor does not log location and individual information, none of the existing methods can generate all possible human motion trajectories that satisfy various spatio-temporal constraints from the sensor activation log data. In this paper, a geometric algebra (GA-based approach is developed to generate all possible human trajectories from the PIR sensor network data. Firstly, the representation of the geographical network, sensor activation response sequences and the human motion are represented as algebraic elements using GA. The human motion status of each sensor activation are labeled using the GA-based trajectory tracking. Then, a matrix multiplication approach is developed to dynamically generate the human trajectories according to the sensor activation log and the spatio-temporal constraints. The method is tested with the MERL motion database. Experiments show that our method can flexibly extract the major statistical pattern of the human motion. Compared with direct statistical analysis and tracklet graph method, our method can effectively extract all possible trajectories of the human motion, which makes it more accurate. Our method is also likely to provides a new way to filter other passive sensor log data in sensor networks.

  20. Exercise-induced increase in glucose transport, GLUT-4, and VAMP-2 in plasma membrane from human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Hargreaves, Mark; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    ) and then to fatigue at 100% Vo2max (5.7 +/- 0.2 min). Vesicle glucose transport at 5 mM increased from 3.3 +/- 0.6 pmol.microgram-1.min-1 at rest to 6.6 +/- 1.0 pmol.microgram-1.min-1 at fatigue (mean +/- SE, n = 6, P increase in glucose transport was associated with a 1.6-fold increase in vesicle GLUT......A major effect of muscle contractions is an increase in sarcolemmal glucose transport. We have used a recently developed technique to produce sarcolemmal giant vesicles from human muscle biopsy samples obtained before and after exercise. Six men exercised for 10 min at 50% maximal O2 uptake (Vo2max......-4 protein content. Glucose transport normalized to GLUT-4 protein content also increased with exercise, suggesting increased intrinsic activity of GLUT-4. Furthermore, exercise resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in sarcolemmal vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP-2) content, suggesting that muscle...

  1. Reduced phosphorylation of AS160 contributes to glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake in human and murine adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Sherry; Barry, Janelle B; Nisbet, Janelle C; Prins, Johannes B; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2009-04-10

    Excess glucocorticoids induce insulin resistance and reduce glucose uptake although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we demonstrate that Dex (1 microM for 24h) inhibits basal and insulin (1 nM) stimulated glucose uptake in human and murine adipocytes by 50% with a concomitant reduction in the levels of GLUT1/4 at the plasma membrane but no change in total GLUT1/4 levels. Expression and phosphorylation of proximal insulin signalling molecules (IRS1, PI3K, AKT) was unaffected by Dex as was phosphorylation of mTOR and FOXO1. In contrast, phosphorylation of AKT substrate 160kDa (AS160) at T642, which is essential for 14-3-3 recruitment and GLUT4 translocation, was reduced by 50% in basal and insulin-stimulated cells and this was mirrored by decreased 14-3-3 association. Co-treatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 (10 microM) abrogated the Dex effect on AS160-T642 phosphorylation and restored glucose uptake by 80%. These data suggest Dex inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes, at least in part, by reducing AS160 phosphorylation and interaction with 14-3-3.

  2. Ixeris dentata-induced regulation of amylase synthesis and secretion in glucose-treated human salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Seung Hyun; Park, Kyung pyo; Chae, Han-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong

    2013-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle which controls synthesis of secretory and membrane proteins. Alterations in protein folding capacity, leading to ER stress, can be observed in patients with diabetes and related diseases such as xerostomia. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of Ixeris dentata (IXD) extract, which has been used for diabetes treatment, and compounds purified from IXD, 8-epidesacylcynaropicrin-3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (ID-57D), on amylase synthesis and secretion in human salivary gland (HSG) cells exposed to a high concentration of glucose. A high concentration of glucose in the experimental medium of cultured cells can model diabetes in vitro. IXD extracts and ID-57D increased oxidative folding-associated protein expression, including p-IRE-1α, PDI and ERO-1α, with the enhanced oxidative folding pattern seen in HSG cells transiently exposed to a high concentration of glucose. Moreover, the treatments reduced the ER stress response, such as the expression of GRP78, maintaining amylase synthesis and secretion in chronically glucose-exposed HSG cells. This study suggests the potential therapeutic value of IXD extract for the treatment of diabetes or its complications such as xerostomia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spexin peptide is expressed in human endocrine and epithelial tissues and reduced after glucose load in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liping; Ma, Yuhang; Gu, Mingyu; Zhang, Ying; Yan, Shuai; Li, Na; Wang, Yufan; Ding, Xiaoying; Yin, Jiajing; Fan, Nengguang; Peng, Yongde

    2015-09-01

    Spexin mRNA and protein are widely expressed in rat tissues and associate with weight loss in rodents of diet-induced obesity. Its location in endocrine and epithelial cells has also been suggested. Spexin is a novel peptide that involves weight loss in rodents of diet-induced obesity. Therefore, we aimed to examine its expression in human tissues and test whether spexin could have a role in glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The expression of the spexin gene and immunoreactivity in the adrenal gland, skin, stomach, small intestine, liver, thyroid, pancreatic islets, visceral fat, lung, colon, and kidney was higher than that in the muscle and connective tissue. Immunoreactive serum spexin levels were reduced in T2DM patients and correlated with fasting blood glucose (FBG, r=-0.686, Pepithelial tissues, indicating that spexin may be involved in physiological functions of endocrine and in several other tissues. Circulating spexin levels are low in T2DM patients and negatively related to blood glucose and lipids suggesting that the peptide may play a role in glucose and lipid metabolism in T2DM.

  4. The application of force-sensing resistor sensors for measuring forces developed by the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonovas, A; Harrison, A J L; Hoult, S; Sammut, D

    2004-01-01

    Most attempts to measure forces developed by the human hand have been implemented by placing force sensors on the object of interaction. Other researchers have placed sensors just on the subject's fingertips. In this paper, a system is described that measures forces over the entire hand using thin-film sensors and associated electronics. This system was developed by the authors and is able to obtain force readings from up to 60 thin-film sensors at rates of up to 400 samples/s per sensor. The sensors can be placed anywhere on the palm and/or fingers of the hand. The sensor readings, together with a video stream containing information about hand posture, are logged into a portable computer using a multiplexer, analogue-to-digital converter and software developed for the purpose. The system has been successfully used to measure forces involved in a range of everyday tasks such as driving a vehicle, lifting saucepans and hitting a golf ball. In the latter case, results are compared with those from an instrumented golf club. Future applications include the assessment of hand strength following disease, trauma or surgery, and to enable quantitative ergonomic investigations.

  5. A novel nonenzymatic sensor based on LaNi{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Linyi University, 18 TongDa Road, Linyi 276005 (China); Gu Shuqing [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ding Yaping, E-mail: wdingyp@sina.com [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Jin Jindi [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: CVs recorded on the bare CPE (a) and LNC/CPE (c) with 0.3 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, LNC/CPE (b) without H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in 0.1 M NaOH. Scan rate: 100 mV s{sup -1}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor exhibited wide linear range and low detection limit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor possesses high sensitivity and fast response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor was used for detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed sensor has good stability and reproducibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor was applied in toothpaste and serum samples with satisfactory results. - Abstract: In this paper, LaNi{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LNC) nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method, and the structure and morphology of LNC nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrum, scanning electron microscopy and transmitting electron microscopy. And then, LNC was used to modify carbon paste electrode (CPE) without any adhesive to fabricate hydrogen peroxide and glucose sensor, and the results demonstrated that LNC exhibited strong electrocatalytical activity by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. In H{sub 2}O{sub 2} determination, linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 10 nM-100 {mu}M with a detection limit of 1.0 nM. In glucose determination, there was the linear region of 0.05-200 {mu}M with a detection limit of 8.0 nM. Compared with other reports, the proposed sensor also displayed high sensitivity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (1812.84 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) and glucose (643.0 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}). Moreover, this prepared sensor was applied to detect glucose in blood serum and hydrogen peroxide in toothpaste samples with satisfied results, indicating its possibility in practical application.

  6. inertial orientation tracker having automatic drift compensation using an at rest sensor for tracking parts of a human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxlin, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A self contained sensor apparatus generates a signal that corresponds to at least two of the three orientational aspects of yaw, pitch and roll of a human-scale body, relative to an external reference frame. A sensor generates first sensor signals that correspond to rotational accelerations or rates of the body about certain body axes. The sensor may be mounted to the body. Coupled to the sensor is a signal processor for generating orientation signals relative to the external reference frame that correspond to the angular rate or acceleration signals. The first sensor signals are impervious to interference from electromagnetic, acoustic, optical and mechanical sources. The sensors may be rate sensors. An integrator may integrate the rate signal over time. A drift compensator is coupled to the rate sensors and the integrator. The drift compensator may include a gravitational tilt sensor or a magnetic field sensor or both. A verifier periodically measures the orientation of the body by a means different from the drift sensitive sate sensors. The verifier may take into account characteristic features of human motion, such as stillness periods. The drift compensator may be, in part, a Kalman filter, which may utilize statistical data about human head motion.

  7. Data analysis and integration of environmental sensors to meet human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Amilcare Francesco; De Rango, Floriano; Barletta, Domenico; Falbo, Domenico; Imbrogno, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays one of the main task of technology is to make people's life simpler and easier. Ambient intelligence is an emerging discipline that brings intelligence to environments making them sensitive to us. This discipline has developed following the spread of sensors devices, sensor networks, pervasive computing and artificial intelligence. In this work, we attempt to enhance the Internet Of Things (loT) with intelligence and environments exploring various interactions between humans' beings and the environment they live in. In particular, the core of the system is composed of an automation system, which is made up with a domotic control unit and several sensors installed in the environment. The task of the sensors is to collect information from the environment and to send them to the control unit. Once the information is collected, the core combines them in order to infer the most accurate human needs. The knowledge of human needs and the current environment status compose the inputs of the intelligence block whose main goal is to find the right automations to satisfy human needs in a real time way. The system also provides a Speech Recognition service which allow users to interact with the system by their voice so human speech can be considered as additional input for smart automatisms.

  8. Glucose turnover and hormonal changes during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in trained humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Michael; Mikines, K J; Christensen, N J

    1984-01-01

    Eight athletes (T), studied the third morning after the last exercise session, and seven sedentary males (C) (maximal O2 consumption 65 +/- 4 vs. 49 +/- 4 (SE) ml X kg-1 X min-1, for T and C men, respectively) had insulin infused until plasma glucose, at an insulin level of 1,600 pmol X l-1, was ...... of heart rate, free fatty acid, and glycerol was faster. Responses of norepinephrine, cortisol, C-peptide, and lactate were similar in the two groups. Training radically changes hormonal responses but not glucose kinetics in insulin hypoglycemia.......Eight athletes (T), studied the third morning after the last exercise session, and seven sedentary males (C) (maximal O2 consumption 65 +/- 4 vs. 49 +/- 4 (SE) ml X kg-1 X min-1, for T and C men, respectively) had insulin infused until plasma glucose, at an insulin level of 1,600 pmol X l-1, was 1.......9 mmol X l-1. Glucose turnover was determined by primed constant rate infusion of 3-[3H]glucose. Basal C-peptide (0.46 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.73 +/- 0.06 pmol X ml-1) and glucagon (4 +/- 0.4 vs. 10 +/- 2 pmol X l-1) were lower (P less than 0.05) and epinephrine higher (0.30 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.03 nmol X l-1...

  9. Regulation of Autophagy by High Glucose in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy is a self-degradative process that is important for balancing sources of energy at critical times in development and in response to nutrient stress. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE works as the outer blood retina barrier and is vulnerable to energy stress-induced injury. However, the effect of high glucose treatment on autophagy is still unclear in RPE. Methods: Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect the generation of autophagosome. Small interfering RNA (siRNA and MTT was used to determine the effect of autophagy on cell viability. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression pattern of autophagic markers, including LC3 and p62. Results: High glucose treatment results in a significant increase in the generation of autophagosome and altered expression of LC3 and p62. High glucose-induced autophagy is independent of mTOR signaling, but is mainly regulated via ROS-mediated ER stress signaling. Conclusion: In the scenario of high glucose-induced oxidative stress, autophagy may be required for the removal of damaged proteins, and provide a default mechanism to prevent high glucose-induced injury in RPE.

  10. Design and fabrication of a sensor integrated MEMS/NANO-skin system for human physiological response measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Hongjie; Lin, Yingzi

    2010-04-01

    Human state in human-machine systems highly affects the system performance, and should be monitored. Physiological cues are more suitable for monitoring the human state in human-machine system. This study was focused on developing a new sensing system, i.e. NANO-Skin, to non-intrusively measure physiological cues from human-machine contact surfaces for human state recognition. The first part was to analyze the relation between human state and physiological cues. Generally, heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, operating force, blood alcohol concentration, sweat rate, and electromyography have close relation with human state, and can be measured from human skin. The second part was to compare common sensors, MEMS sensors, and NANO sensors. It was found that MEMS sensors and NANO sensors can offer unique contributions to the development of NANO-Skin. The third part was to discuss the design and manufacture of NANO-Skin. The NANO-Skin involves five components, the flexible substrate, sensors, special integrated circuit, interconnection between sensors and special integrated circuit, and protection layer. Experiments were performed to verify the measurement accuracy of NANO-Skin. It is feasible to use NANO-Skins to non-intrusively measure physiological cues from human-machine contact surfaces for human state recognition.

  11. EFFECT OF-GYMNEMA SYLVESTRE, CITRULLUS COLOCYNTHIS AND ARTEMISIA ABSINTHIUM ON BLOOD GLUCOSE AND LIPID PROFILE IN DIABETIC HUMAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youshan; Zheng, Min; Zhai, Xing; Huang, Youliang; Khalid, Anwar; Malik, Aneela; Shah, Pervaiz; Karim, Sabiha; Azhar, Saira; Hou, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to manage diabetes with medicinal plants (Gymnema sylvestre, Artemisia absinthium and Citillus colocynthis) in human patients with type II diabetes. Thirty two patients of type II diabetes from both sexes of 30-60 years age were registered for this study and distributed them into four groups, each having 8 patients. Capsules of each, Gymnema sylvestre, Artemisia absinthium and Citrullus colocynthis were given to patients twice a day for 30 days in 1 g per day dosage and investigated for glucose, triglyceride (TGL) and cholesterol level. Gymnema sylvestre reduced 37% glucose, 5% TGL, 13% cholesterol and 19% low desity lipoproteins (LDL) level in diabetic individuals. Citrullus colocynth reduced glucose, cholesterol and TGL and HDL-cholesterol level by 35, 6, 6, and 5%, respectively. Artemisia absinthium reduced 3% high desity lipoproteins (HDL) and 6% LDL level. From results, it can be concluded that the powdered Gymnema sylvestre, Citrulus colocynthis, and Artemisia absinthium possess good anti-diabetic features, however these herbal products had no significant effect on lipid profiles of the diabetic human.

  12. Effect of glucose intake on human leucocyte /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turaihi, K.; Baron, D.N.; Dandona, P.

    1988-02-01

    /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H) ouabain binding by human leucocytes were measured in eight normal nonobese fasting subjects before and after a challenge with 75 g glucose orally. The mean ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx increased significantly from 194 to 283 mmol/kg protein/h (P less than .01), and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding increased from 236 to 403 fmol/mg protein. The mean plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.2 to 3.9 mmol/L (P less than .05). Following intravenous glucose infusion, the median /sup 86/Rb transport increased from 186 to 267 mmol/kg protein/h, while median plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.3 to 3.9 mmol/L. Therefore, glucose intake acutely increases Na-K ATPase units, stimulates potassium (Rb) transport, and causes a concomitant fall in plasma potassium concentrations. Nutritional intake is probably an important determinant of Na-K ATPase units and activity in the human leucocyte.

  13. Propofol attenuates high glucose-induced superoxide anion accumulation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yanjun; Zhu, Yun; Zhu, Minmin

    2016-12-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is a common clinical metabolic disorder. Hyperglycemia could induce endothelial apoptosis, dysfunction, and inflammation, resulting in endothelial injury. Propofol is a widely used anesthetic drug in clinical settings. Our previous studies indicated that propofol attenuated high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis, dysfunction, and inflammation via inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. However, the mechanisms by which propofol reduces high glucose-induced endothelial ROS accumulation are still obscure. In this study, we examined how propofol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial ROS accumulation. Compared with 5 mm glucose treatment, 15 mm glucose upregulated the expression of pin-1, phosphatase A2 (PP2A), p66(shc) and mitochondrial p66(shc) expression, increased p66(shc) -Ser(36) phosphorylation, and O2·- accumulation. More importantly, although propofol had no effect on 15 mm glucose-induced p66(shc) -Ser(36) phosphorylation and pin-1 expression, propofol could downregulated PP2A expression and p66(shc) expression in whole-cell and mitochondrion, resulting in the reduction of O2·- accumulation. Moreover, we demonstrated that the antioxidative effect of propofol was similar to that of calyculin A, an inhibitor of PP2A. In contrast, FTY720, an activator of PP2A, antagonized the effect of propofol. Our data indicated that the antioxidative effect of propofol was achieved by downregulating PP2A expression, resulting in the inhibition of p66(shc) -Ser(36) dephosphorylation and mitochondrial p66(shc) expression. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Neurotrophin and Trk expression by cells of the human lamina cribrosa following oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Abbot F

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia within the optic nerve head (ONH may contribute to retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG. Ischemia has been reported to increase neurotrophin and high affinity Trk receptor expression by CNS neurons and glial cells. We have previously demonstrated neurotrophin and Trk expression within the lamina cribrosa (LC region of the ONH. To determine if ischemia alters neurotrophin and Trk protein expression in cells from the human LC, cultured LC cells and ONH astrocytes were exposed to 48 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Also cells were exposed to 48 hours of OGD followed by 24 hours of recovery in normal growth conditions. Cell number, neurotrophin and Trk receptor protein expression, neurotrophin secretion, and Trk receptor activation were examined. Results Cell number was estimated using an assay for cell metabolism following 24, 48 and 72 hours of OGD. A statistically significant decrease in LC and ONH astrocyte cell number did not occur until 72 hours of OGD, therefore cellular protein and conditioned media were collected at 48 hours OGD. Protein expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 by LC cells and ONH astrocytes increased following OGD, as did NGF secretion. Recovery from OGD increased BDNF protein expression in LC cells. In ONH astrocytes, recovery from OGD increased NGF protein expression, and decreased BDNF secretion. Trk A expression and activation in LC cells was increased following OGD while expression and activation of all other Trk receptors was decreased. A similar increase in Trk A expression and activation was observed in ONH astrocytes following recovery from OGD. Conclusions In vitro conditions that mimic ischemia increase the expression and secretion of neurotrophins by cells from the ONH. Increased Trk A expression and activation in LC cells following OGD and in ONH astrocytes following recovery from OGD suggest autocrine/paracrine neurotrophin signaling could be a

  15. Monounsaturated fatty acids prevent the deleterious effects of palmitate and high glucose on human pancreatic beta-cell turnover and function

    OpenAIRE

    Maedler, Kathrin; Oberholzer, José; Bucher, Pascal Alain Robert; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Donath, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity contribute to the impaired beta-cell function observed in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the effect of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids at different glucose concentrations on human beta-cell turnover and secretory function. Exposure of cultured human islets to saturated fatty acid and/or to an elevated glucose concentration for 4 days increased beta-cell DNA fragmentation and decreased beta-cell proliferation. In contrast, the monounsaturated palmitol...

  16. Augmented Teams -- Assembling Smart Sensors, Intelligent Networks and Humans into Agile Task Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, R.M.; Rijn, M. van; Marck, J.W.; Keus, D.

    2009-01-01

    Safety and security environments are full of networked devices. Despite ample research on sensor networks and network technology, there is little practical comprehensive work on how to incorporate such technologies effectively into human-centered teams. This paper discusses the challenge of assembli

  17. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring.

  19. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones with an Off-the-Shelf Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Püschel, Klaus; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The standard method to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation to the inner ear is measurement of vibration response of the stapes in human cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) by laser Doppler vibrometry. However, this method is reliable only if the intact ossicular chain is stimulated. For other stimulation modes an alternative method is needed. The differential intracochlear sound pressure between scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) is assumed to correlate with excitation. Using a custom-made pressure sensor it has been successfully measured and used to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation. To make this method generally accessible, an off-the-shelf pressure sensor (Samba Preclin 420 LP, Samba Sensors) was tested here for intracochlear sound pressure measurements. During acoustic stimulation, intracochlear sound pressures were simultaneously measurable in SV and ST between 0.1 and 8 kHz with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios with this sensor. The pressure differences were comparable to results obtained with custom-made sensors. Our results demonstrated that the pressure sensor Samba Preclin 420 LP is usable for measurements of intracochlear sound pressures in SV and ST and for the determination of differential intracochlear sound pressures.

  20. Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensing Using Carbon Quantum Dots Decorated with Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houcem Maaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in glucose homeostasis is critical for human health, as hyperglycemia (defining diabetes leads to premature death caused by macrovascular and microvascular complications. However, the simple and accurate detection of glucose in the blood at low cost remains a challenging task, although it is of great importance for the diagnosis and therapy of diabetic patients. In this work, carbon quantum dots decorated with copper oxide nanostructures (CQDs/Cu2O are prepared by a simple hydrothermal approach, and their potential for electrochemical non-enzymatic glucose sensing is evaluated. The proposed sensor exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions. The glucose sensor is characterized by a wide concentration range from 6 µM to 6 mM, a sensitivity of 2.9 ± 0.2 µA·µM−1·cm−2, and a detection limit of 6 µM at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N = 3. The sensors are successfully applied for glucose determination in human serum samples, demonstrating that the CQDs/Cu2O-based glucose sensor satisfies the requirements of complex sample detection with adapted potential for therapeutic diagnostics.

  1. Ubiquitous human upper-limb motion estimation using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wong, Wai-Choong; Wu, Jian-Kang

    2011-07-01

    Human motion capture technologies have been widely used in a wide spectrum of applications, including interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, navigation, and so on. The existing human motion capture techniques, which use structured multiple high-resolution cameras in a dedicated studio, are complicated and expensive. With the rapid development of microsensors-on-chip, human motion capture using wearable microsensors has become an active research topic. Because of the agility in movement, upper-limb motion estimation has been regarded as the most difficult problem in human motion capture. In this paper, we take the upper limb as our research subject and propose a novel ubiquitous upper-limb motion estimation algorithm, which concentrates on modeling the relationship between upper-arm movement and forearm movement. A link structure with 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) is proposed to model the human upper-limb skeleton structure. Parameters are defined according to Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics equations are derived, and an unscented Kalman filter is deployed to estimate the defined parameters. The experimental results have shown that the proposed upper-limb motion capture and analysis algorithm outperforms other fusion methods and provides accurate results in comparison to the BTS optical motion tracker.

  2. Caffeine's impairment of insulin-mediated glucose disposal cannot be solely attributed to adrenaline in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battram, D S; Graham, T E; Dela, F

    2007-01-01

    Caffeine (CAF) impedes insulin-mediated glucose disposal (IMGD) and increases plasma adrenaline concentrations ([ADR]; 0.6 nm). While the antagonism of ADR abolishes the CAF effect, infusion of ADR (0.75 nm) has no effect on IMGD. We have now examined CAF and ADR in concert to determine whether...

  3. Actions of prolonged ghrelin infusion on gastrointestinal transit and glucose homeostasis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkén, Y; Hellström, P M; Sanger, G J

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin is produced by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and stimulates gastric emptying in healthy volunteers and patients with gastroparesis in short-term studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of intravenous ghrelin on gastrointestinal motility and glucose homeostasis...

  4. Effects of intravenous glucose on Dopaminergic function in the human brain in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haltia, Lauri T.; Rinne, Juha O.; Merisaari, Harri; Maguire, Ralph P.; Savontaus, Eriika; Helin, Semi; Nagren, Kjell; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine is known to regulate food intake by modulating food reward via the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of high energy input (i.v. glucose) on striatal and thalamic dopamine release in overweight and lean individuals. We hypothesized that

  5. Ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody based nanohybrid sensor for rapid detection of human heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-01

    An ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody conjugated with graphene quantum dots (GQD) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) nanohybrid modified gold electrode based sensor was developed for the rapid detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in human. Screen printed gold (Au) electrode was decorated with 4-aminothiophenol for amine functionalization of the Au surface. These amino groups were further coupled with carboxyl functionalities of GQD with EDC-NHS reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor, PAMAM dendrimer was successively embedded on GQD through carbodiimide coupling to provide ultra-high surface area for antibody immobilization. The activated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) monoclonal antibody was immobilized on PAMAM to form nanoprobe for sensing specific heart attack marker cTnI. Various concentrations of cardiac marker, cTnI were electrochemically measured using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in human blood serum. The modifications on sensor surface were characterized by FTIR and AFM techniques. The sensor is highly specific to cTnI and showed negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensitivity of the sensor was 109.23μAcm(-2)μg(-1) and lower limit of detection of cTnI was found 20fgmL(-1).

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis on Wearable Acceleration Sensors in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Janidarmian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor-based motion recognition integrates the emerging area of wearable sensors with novel machine learning techniques to make sense of low-level sensor data and provide rich contextual information in a real-life application. Although Human Activity Recognition (HAR problem has been drawing the attention of researchers, it is still a subject of much debate due to the diverse nature of human activities and their tracking methods. Finding the best predictive model in this problem while considering different sources of heterogeneities can be very difficult to analyze theoretically, which stresses the need of an experimental study. Therefore, in this paper, we first create the most complete dataset, focusing on accelerometer sensors, with various sources of heterogeneities. We then conduct an extensive analysis on feature representations and classification techniques (the most comprehensive comparison yet with 293 classifiers for activity recognition. Principal component analysis is applied to reduce the feature vector dimension while keeping essential information. The average classification accuracy of eight sensor positions is reported to be 96.44% ± 1.62% with 10-fold evaluation, whereas accuracy of 79.92% ± 9.68% is reached in the subject-independent evaluation. This study presents significant evidence that we can build predictive models for HAR problem under more realistic conditions, and still achieve highly accurate results.

  7. Wearable Conductive Fiber Sensors for Multi-Axis Human Joint Angle Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asada H Harry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion is one that finds many applications, especially in the medical and rehabilitation fields. There is a lack of acceptable devices available to perform such measurements in the field in a reliable and non-intrusive way over a long period of time. The purpose of this study was therefore to develop such a wearable joint monitoring sensor capable of continuous, day-to-day monitoring. Methods A novel technique of incorporating conductive fibers into flexible, skin-tight fabrics surrounding a joint is developed. Resistance changes across these conductive fibers are measured, and directly related to specific single or multi-axis joint angles through the use of a non-linear predictor after an initial, one-time calibration. Because these sensors are intended for multiple uses, an automated registration algorithm has been devised using a sensitivity template matched to an array of sensors spanning the joints of interest. In this way, a sensor array can be taken off and put back on an individual for multiple uses, with the sensors automatically calibrating themselves each time. Results The wearable sensors designed are comfortable, and acceptable for long-term wear in everyday settings. Results have shown the feasibility of this type of sensor, with accurate measurements of joint motion for both a single-axis knee joint and a double axis hip joint when compared to a standard goniometer used to measure joint angles. Self-registration of the sensors was found to be possible with only a few simple motions by the patient. Conclusion After preliminary experiments involving a pants sensing garment for lower body monitoring, it has been seen that this methodology is effective for monitoring joint motion of the hip and knee. This design therefore produces a robust, comfortable, truly wearable joint monitoring device.

  8. Sensor Data Acquisition and Processing Parameters for Human Activity Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian D. Bersch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that parameter selection for data sampling frequency and segmentation techniques (including different methods and window sizes has an impact on the classification accuracy. For Ambient Assisted Living (AAL, no clear information to select these parameters exists, hence a wide variety and inconsistency across today’s literature is observed. This paper presents the empirical investigation of different data sampling rates, segmentation techniques and segmentation window sizes and their effect on the accuracy of Activity of Daily Living (ADL event classification and computational load for two different accelerometer sensor datasets. The study is conducted using an ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA based on 32 different window sizes, three different segmentation algorithm (with and without overlap, totaling in six different parameters and six sampling frequencies for nine common classification algorithms. The classification accuracy is based on a feature vector consisting of Root Mean Square (RMS, Mean, Signal Magnitude Area (SMA, Signal Vector Magnitude (here SMV, Energy, Entropy, FFTPeak, Standard Deviation (STD. The results are presented alongside recommendations for the parameter selection on the basis of the best performing parameter combinations that are identified by means of the corresponding Pareto curve.

  9. The inhibitory effect of 2-halo derivatives of D-glucose on glycolysis and on the proliferation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Priebe, Waldemar; Saliba, Kevin J

    2008-11-01

    The intraerythrocytic stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum relies on glycolysis for ATP generation, and because it has no energy stores, a constant supply of glucose is necessary for the parasite to grow and multiply. The 2-substituted glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-FG) have been previously shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of P. falciparum and have been suggested to do so by inhibiting glycosylation in the parasite. In this study, we have investigated the antiplasmodial mechanism of action of 2-DG and 2-FG and compared it with that of other 2-substituted-glucose analogs. The compounds tested inhibited parasite growth to varying degrees, with 2-FG being the most effective. The antiplasmodial activity of some, but not all, of the analogs could be altered by varying the glucose concentration in the culture medium, increasing the antiplasmodial activity of the analogs as the glucose concentration is reduced. A trend was observed between the antiplasmodial activity of these analogs and their ability to inhibit glucose accumulation, glucose phosphorylation by hexokinase, and cytosolic pH regulation within the intraerythrocytic stage of the parasite. Our data are consistent with inhibition of glycolysis being a primary mechanism by which 2-DG and 2-FG inhibit parasite growth, and they validate the early steps in glycolysis as viable drug targets.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of Co3O4 ultra-nanosheets and Co3O4 ultra-nanosheet-Ni(OH)2 as non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors for glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, M R; Basirun, W J; Woi, Pei Meng; Sookhakian, M; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, H; Alias, Y

    2016-02-01

    The present study examines the synthesis of Co3O4 ultra-nanosheets (Co3O4 UNSs) and Co3O4 ultra-nanosheet-Ni(OH)2 (Co3O4 UNS-Ni(OH)2) via solvothermal process and their application as non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors for glucose detection. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed the Co3O4 UNS deposition on Ni(OH)2 surface. The presence of Co3O4 UNSs on Ni (OH) 2 surface improved the sensitivity of glucose detection, from the increase of glucose oxidation peak current at the Co3O4 UNS-Ni(OH)2/glassy carbon electrode (current density: 2000μA·cm(-2)), compared to the Co3O4 UNSs. These results confirmed that Ni(OH)2 on glassy carbon electrode is a sensitive material for glucose detection, moreover the Co3O4 UNSs can increase the interaction and detection of glucose due to their high surface area. The estimated limit of detection (S/N=3) and limit of quantification (S/N=10) of the linear segment (5-40μM) are 1.08μM and 3.60μM respectively. The reproducibility experiments confirmed the feasibility of Co3O4 UNS-Ni(OH)2 for the quantitative detection of certain concentration ranges of glucose.

  11. From sensors to human spatial concepts: An annotated data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Z.; Booij, O.; Kröse, B.; Topp, E.A.; Christensen, H.I.

    2008-01-01

    An annotated data set is presented meant to help researchers in developing, evaluating, and comparing various approaches in robotics for building space representations appropriate for communicating with humans. The data consist of omnidirectional images, laser range scans, sonar readings, and robot

  12. [Salidroside attenuates high glucose-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via activating the Ca(2)+/CaM/CAMKIIδ/eNOS pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziwei; Wu, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L, could exert potent antioxidant properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effects, and related mechanism of salidroside against high glucose (33 mmol/L)-induced cell damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were cultured in normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L), high glucose (33 mmol/L), high salidroside (10 µg/ml+33 mmol/L glucose), moderate salidroside (4 µg/ml+33 mmol/L glucose), low salidroside (1 µg/ml+33 mmol/L glucose) and very low salidroside (0.1 µg/ml+33 mmol/L glucose) for 48 h. Cell viability, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) , reactive oxygen species (ROS) , nitric oxide (NO) , [Ca(2)+]i, calmodulin (CaM) , calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) IIδ, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) , active caspase-3 protein expression and eNOS ser 1177 phosphorylation of HUVECs post various treatments were measured. The cell viability was assessed with MTT assay, and the level of ROS, and [Ca(2)+]i was analyzed using flow cytometry. Nitric oxide and MDA was detected by Nitric Oxide Assay Kit and MDA Assay Kit. Western blot was performed to detect the protein expressions of eNOS, active caspase-3 and eNOS ser 1177 phosphorylation. Comparing to the normal glucose group, high glucose treatment increased the cell damage, the level of NO and [Ca(2)+]i (P Salidroside treatment significantly attenuated high glucose-induce cell damage on cultured HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. Comparing to the high glucose group, 10 µg/ml Salidroside significantly increased cell viability (P salidroside could attenuate high glucose induced apoptosis in HUVEC, partly through activating the Ca(2)+/CaM/CAMKIIδ/eNOS pathway.

  13. Use of systems pharmacology modeling to elucidate the operating characteristics of SGLT1 and SGLT2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yasong; Griffen, Steven C; Boulton, David W; Leil, Tarek A

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, glucose in glomerular filtrate is reabsorbed primarily by sodium-glucose cotransporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2) along the proximal tubules. SGLT2 has been characterized as a high capacity, low affinity pathway responsible for reabsorption of the majority of filtered glucose in the early part of proximal tubules, and SGLT1 reabsorbs the residual glucose in the distal part. Inhibition of SGLT2 is a viable mechanism for removing glucose from the body and improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Despite demonstrating high levels (in excess of 80%) of inhibition of glucose transport by SGLT2 in vitro, potent SGLT2 inhibitors, e.g., dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, inhibit renal glucose reabsorption by only 30-50% in clinical studies. Hypotheses for this apparent paradox are mostly focused on the compensatory effect of SGLT1. The paradox has been explained and the role of SGLT1 demonstrated in the mouse, but direct data in humans are lacking. To further explore the roles of SGLT1/2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans, we developed a systems pharmacology model with emphasis on SGLT1/2 mediated glucose reabsorption and the effects of SGLT2 inhibition. The model was calibrated using robust clinical data in the absence or presence of dapagliflozin (DeFronzo et al., 2013), and evaluated against clinical data from the literature (Mogensen, 1971; Wolf et al., 2009; Polidori et al., 2013). The model adequately described all four data sets. Simulations using the model clarified the operating characteristics of SGLT1/2 in humans in the healthy and diabetic state with or without SGLT2 inhibition. The modeling and simulations support our proposition that the apparent moderate, 30-50% inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption observed with potent SGLT2 inhibitors is a combined result of two physiological determinants: SGLT1 compensation and residual SGLT2 activity. This model will enable in silico inferences and predictions related to SGLT1/2 modulation.

  14. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  15. Human speech articulator measurements using low power, 2GHz Homodyne sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F

    1999-06-29

    Very low power, short-range microwave ''radar-like'' sensors can measure the motions and vibrations of internal human speech articulators as speech is produced. In these animate (and also in inanimate acoustic systems) microwave sensors can measure vibration information associated with excitation sources and other interfaces. These data, together with the corresponding acoustic data, enable the calculation of system transfer functions. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications such as speech coding and recognition, speaker or object identification, speech and musical instrument synthesis, noise cancellation, and other applications.

  16. Human behavior understanding in networked sensing theory and applications of networks of sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference provides a broad overview of both the technical challenges in sensor network development, and the real-world applications of distributed sensing. Important aspects of distributed computing in large-scale networked sensor systems are analyzed in the context of human behavior understanding, including such topics as systems design tools and techniques, in-network signals, and information processing. Additionally, the book examines a varied range of application scenarios, covering surveillance, indexing and retrieval, patient care, industrial safety, social and ambient

  17. Swarm Robot Control for Human Services and Moving Rehabilitation by Sensor Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresna Dewi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A current trend in robotics is fusing different types of sensors having different characteristics to improve the performance of a robot system and also benefit from the reduced cost of sensors. One type of robot that requires sensor fusion for its application is the service robot. To achieve better performance, several service robots are preferred to work together, and, hence, this paper concentrates on swarm service robots. Swarm service mobile robots operating within a fixed area need to cope with dynamic changes in the environment, and they must also be capable of avoiding dynamic and static obstacles. This study applies sensor fusion and swarm concept for service mobile robots in human services and rehabilitation environment. The swarm robots follow the human moving trajectory to provide support to human moving and perform several tasks required in their living environment. This study applies a reference control and proportional-integral (PI control for the obstacle avoidance function. Various computer simulations are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes.

  19. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  20. Glucose production, recycling, Cori cycle, and gluconeogenesis in humans: relationship to serum cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayek, J A; Katz, J

    1997-03-01

    Six normal subjects (NL group) and 13 cancer patients (CAI and CAII groups) were fasted overnight and infused with [U-(13)C]glucose (0.016-0.058 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1)). Plasma glucose and lactate were isolated, and mass isotopomer distributions were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Applying equations modified from those previously described [J. A. Tayek and J. Katz. Am. J. Physiol. 270 (Endocrinol. Metab. 33): E709-E717, 1996], we determined glucose production (GP), recycling of glucose carbons, fraction of recycled molecules in blood glucose (Cori cycle), formation of pyruvate from unlabeled carbons, dilution of pyruvate via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and other reactions, and rate of gluconeogenesis. Glucose production was similar in all groups: 2.4 +/- 0.2 mg x min(-1) x kg (-1). The fraction of recycled carbon and of the Cori cycle were elevated in the CAI group vs. the CAII and NL groups: 15 and 33% vs. 7.8 and 19%, respectively (P = 0.01). Gluconeogenesis was 1.9 +/- 0.1, 1.0 +/- 0.1, and 0.83 +/- 0.11 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) in the CAI, CAII, and NL groups, respectively. In the NL and CAII groups, 20% of GP is via recycling, 20% from unlabeled carbon sources (muscle glycogen, amino acids), and 60% from hepatic glycogenolysis; in the CAI group, 30% is from recycling, 50% from unlabeled carbon, and 20% from glycogen and other sources. Serum cortisol was elevated in the CAI group vs. the CAII group: 11.2 +/- 1.2 vs. 7.7 +/- 1.2 microg/dl (P Cori cycle in the NL (r = 0.963) and CAI and CAII groups (r = 0.771). Serum cortisol was directly, and insulin was inversely, correlated with gluconeogenesis in the NL (r2 = 0.967) and CAI and CAII groups (r2 = 0.727). We conclude that whereas the cancer population is heterogeneous with respect to gluconeogenesis, many cancer patients derive their GP predominantly from gluconeogenesis compared with healthy controls, who derive less than one-half of their GP from gluconeogenesis.

  1. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods. PMID:27399696

  2. Human Object Recognition Using Colour and Depth Information from an RGB-D Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin John Southwell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human object recognition and tracking is important in robotics and automation. The Kinect sensor and its SDK have provided a reliable human tracking solution where a constant line of sight is maintained. However, if the human object is lost from sight during the tracking, the existing method cannot recover and resume tracking the previous object correctly. In this paper, a human recognition method is developed based on colour and depth information that is provided from any RGB-D sensor. In particular, the method firstly introduces a mask based on the depth information of the sensor to segment the shirt from the image (shirt segmentation; it then extracts the colour information of the shirt for recognition (shirt recognition. As the shirt segmentation is only based on depth information, it is light invariant compared to colour-based segmentation methods. The proposed colour recognition method introduces a confidence-based ruling method to classify matches. The proposed shirt segmentation and colour recognition method is tested using a variety of shirts with the tracked human at standstill or moving in varying lighting conditions. Experiments show that the method can recognize shirts of varying colours and patterns robustly.

  3. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  4. Stimulation of splanchnic glucose production during exercise in humans contains a glucagon-independent component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coker, R H; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2001-01-01

    euglycemia. In another group (GD), only insulin was replaced at the identical rate used in BG, and basal glucagon was not replaced. Exogenous glucose infusion was necessary to maintain euglycemia during exercise in BG and during rest and exercise in GD. Arterial glucagon was at least twofold greater in BG...... to the residual effect of basal glucagon replacement. However, NSGO increased slightly and remained similar throughout the remainder of moderate and heavy exercise in BG and GD. Therefore, a mechanism independent of changes in pancreatic hormones and/or the level of glycemia contributes toward modest stimulation......To determine the importance of basal glucagon to the stimulation of net splanchnic glucose output (NSGO) during exercise, seven healthy males performed cycle exercise during a pancreatic islet cell clamp. In one group (BG), glucagon was replaced at basal levels and insulin was adjusted to achieve...

  5. Differential Response of Human Hepatocyte Chromatin to HDAC Inhibitors as a Function of Microenvironmental Glucose Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisbino, Marina Barreto; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Mello, Maria Luiza Silveira

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia due to impaired insulin secretion. Recent observations suggest that the complexity of the disease cannot be entirely accounted for genetic predisposition and a compelling argument for an epigenetic component is rapidly emerging. The use of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) in clinical setting is an emerging area of investigation. In this study, we have aimed to understand and compare the response of hepatocyte chromatin to valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) treatments under normoglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions to expand our knowledge about the consequences of HDACi treatment in a diabetes cell model. Under normoglycemic conditions, these treatments promoted chromatin remodeling, as assessed by image analysis and H3K9ac and H3K9me2 abundance. Simultaneously, H3K9ac marks shifted to the nuclear periphery accompanied by HP1 dissociation from the heterochromatin and a G1 cell cycle arrest. More striking changes in the cell cycle progression and mitotic ratios required drastic treatment. Under hyperglycemic conditions, high glucose per se promoted chromatin changes similar to those promoted by VPA and TSA. Nonetheless, these results were not intensified in cells treated with HDACis under hyperglycemic conditions. Despite the absence of morphological changes being promoted, HDACi treatment seems to confer a physiological meaning, ameliorating the cellular hyperglycemic state through reduction of glucose production. These observations allow us to conclude that the glucose level to which the hepatocytes are subjected affects how chromatin responds to HDACi and their action under high-glucose environment might not reflect on chromatin remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2257-2265, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Employing moderate resolution sensors in human rights and international humanitarian law monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Andrew J.

    Organizations concerned with human rights are increasingly using remote sensing as a tool to improve their detection of human rights and international humanitarian law violations. However, as these organizations have transitioned to human rights monitoring campaigns conducted over large regions and extended periods of time, current methods of using fine- resolution sensors and manpower-intensive analyses have become cost- prohibitive. To support the continued growth of remote sensing in human rights and international humanitarian law monitoring campaigns, this study researches how moderate resolution land observatories can provide complementary data to operational human rights monitoring efforts. This study demonstrates the capacity of moderate resolutions to provide data to monitoring efforts by developing an approach that uses Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) as part of a system for the detection of village destruction in Darfur, Sudan. Village destruction is an indicator of a human rights or international humanitarian law violations in Darfur during the 2004 study period. This analysis approach capitalizes on Landsat's historical archive and systematic observations by constructing a historic spectral baseline for each village in the study area that supports automated detection of a potentially destroyed village with each new overpass of the sensor. Using Landsat's near-infrared band, the approach demonstrates high levels of accuracy when compared with a U.S. government database documenting destroyed villages. This approach is then applied to the Darfur conflict from 2002 to 2008, providing new data on when and where villages were destroyed in this widespread and long-lasting conflict. This application to the duration of a real-world conflict illustrates the abilities and shortcomings of moderate resolution sensors in human rights monitoring efforts. This study demonstrates that moderate resolution satellites have the capacity to contribute

  7. Human factors considerations of IR sensors for the Canadian Integrated Soldier System Project (ISSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frim, John; Bossi, Linda; Tack, Dave

    2009-05-01

    The Integrated Soldier System Project (ISSP) is the cornerstone of Canada's future soldier modernization effort, which seeks to "significantly enhance tactical level individual and team Lethality, Mobility and C4I performance in the complex, network-enabled, command-centric, effects-based digitized battlespace." This capital acquisition project is supported by a number of R&D Technology Demonstration Projects within Defence R&D Canada. Several of these projects focus on the human factors aspects of future technologies, such as IR sensors. The Soldier Information Requirements Technology Demonstration (SIREQ TD) project examined the performance impact of NVGs, LWIR imaging systems, and fused systems (both optical and digital fusion) on target detection, recognition and identification. NVGs were shown to provide good identification performance while LWIR systems excelled in detection tasks. Fused systems show promise of augmenting the respective stand alone capabilities of each sensor type, but more work is required to optimize fusion algorithms. The Soldier Integrated Headwear Technology Demonstration (SIHS TD) project is looking at the human factors aspects of mounting a range of vision enhancement sensors on a helmet, including optimal placement of both sensors and displays with respect to center of mass, total head borne weight, and visual offset and parallax issues. Overall headwear system weight should be less than 2.5 kg, and if an offset from the eye is required then a horizontal offset (vice vertical or oblique) of the sensor appears most acceptable. These findings have implications on the design of future IR and fused sensor systems for dismounted soldiers.

  8. Highly Stretchable, Hysteresis-Free Ionic Liquid-Based Strain Sensor for Precise Human Motion Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Yun; Kim, Min Hyeong; Oh, Yong Suk; Jung, Soo-Ho; Jung, Jae Hee; Sung, Hyung Jin; Lee, Hyung Woo; Lee, Hye Moon

    2017-01-18

    A highly stretchable, low-cost strain sensor was successfully prepared using an extremely cost-effective ionic liquid of ethylene glycol/sodium chloride. The hysteresis performance of the ionic-liquid-based sensor was able to be improved by introducing a wavy-shaped fluidic channel diminishing the hysteresis by the viscoelastic relaxation of elastomers. From the simulations on visco-hyperelastic behavior of the elastomeric channel, we demonstrated that the wavy structure can offer lower energy dissipation compared to a flat structure under a given deformation. The resistance response of the ionic-liquid-based wavy (ILBW) sensor was fairly deterministic with no hysteresis, and it was well-matched to the theoretically estimated curves. The ILBW sensors exhibited a low degree of hysteresis (0.15% at 250%), low overshoot (1.7% at 150% strain), and outstanding durability (3000 cycles at 300% strain). The ILBW sensor has excellent potential for use in precise and quantitative strain detections in various areas, such as human motion monitoring, healthcare, virtual reality, and smart clothes.

  9. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  10. Maraviroc shows differential effects on glucose uptake and lipolysis in human subcutaneous cultured adipocytes in comparison with omental adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Perez-Matute

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Maraviroc (MVC, the first approved CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 antagonist, is used for treating HIV-1-infected patients with CCR5 tropism. MVC has been proved safe in all respects and showed beneficial effects on lipid profile of HIV patients with dislipidemia. Adipocyte dysfunction seems to be responsible for many metabolic alterations such as insulin resistance and dislipidemia. Subcutaneous and visceral fat depots are not only physiologically but also metabolically different and metabolic disturbances are more closely associated with visceral than subcutaneous fat accumulation. It has been suggested that antiretrovirals affect both fat depots in a different extent. Thus, whether isolated human adipocytes display regio-specific sensitivity to the metabolic effects of MVC have been tested in this study. Human subcutaneous and omental preadipocytes were used as the source of human adipocytes. These cells were treated with therapeutic concentrations of MVC (0.5–25 µM at day 14 post-differentiation (4 and 24 hours of treatment. Glucose utilization, lactate production and glycerol released into the media were measured using an autoanalyzer. Adiponectin secretion was determined by an ELISA array. A dose-dependent increase in glucose uptake was observed in subcutaneous adipocytes treated with MVC (+72% of stimulation for MVC 25 µM, p < 0.01. This stimulatory effect was tissue specific, as no effects were observed in omental adipocytes. MVC did not exert any significant effect on adiponectin secretion. No significant effects were observed on lactate production neither in subcutaneous nor omental adipocytes. Interestingly, 4 hours of treatment with MVC induced a significant increase in the amount of glycerol released into the media by subcutaneous adipocytes (p < 0.001, but this effect disappeared with longer exposure of adipocytes to MVC (24 h. No effects were observed on lipolysis in omental adipocytes although a slight tendency to

  11. Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase activity in cultured human skeletal muscle cells: relationship to glucose disposal rate in control and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus subjects and regulation by glucose and insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    We examined the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme for hexosamine biosynthesis, glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFA) in human skeletal muscle cultures (HSMC), from 17 nondiabetic control and 13 subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. GFA activity was assayed from HSMC treated with low (5 mM) or high (20 mM) glucose and low (22 pM) or high (30 microM) concentrations of insulin. In control subjects GFA activity decreased with increasing glucose disposal rate (r = -0.68,...

  12. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhai Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone, H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone, and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes. The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  13. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B’ promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B’. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B’ gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B’ promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  14. A sensitive sensor cell line for the detection of oxidative stress responses in cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-25

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  15. Signal transmission in a human body medium-based body sensor network using a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong; Hao, Qun; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jingwen; Jin, Xuefeng; Sun, He

    2012-11-30

    The signal transmission technology based on the human body medium offers significant advantages in Body Sensor Networks (BSNs) used for healthcare and the other related fields. In previous works we have proposed a novel signal transmission method based on the human body medium using a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical (EO) sensor. In this paper, we present a signal transmission system based on the proposed method, which consists of a transmitter, a Mach-Zehnder EO sensor and a corresponding receiving circuit. Meanwhile, in order to verify the frequency response properties and determine the suitable parameters of the developed system, in-vivo measurements have been implemented under conditions of different carrier frequencies, baseband frequencies and signal transmission paths. Results indicate that the proposed system will help to achieve reliable and high speed signal transmission of BSN based on the human body medium.

  16. Signal Transmission in a Human Body Medium-Based Body Sensor Network Using a Mach-Zehnder Electro-Optical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Song

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The signal transmission technology based on the human body medium offers significant advantages in Body Sensor Networks (BSNs used for healthcare and the other related fields. In previous works we have proposed a novel signal transmission method based on the human body medium using a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical (EO sensor. In this paper, we present a signal transmission system based on the proposed method, which consists of a transmitter, a Mach-Zehnder EO sensor and a corresponding receiving circuit. Meanwhile, in order to verify the frequency response properties and determine the suitable parameters of the developed system, in-vivo measurements have been implemented under conditions of different carrier frequencies, baseband frequencies and signal transmission paths. Results indicate that the proposed system will help to achieve reliable and high speed signal transmission of BSN based on the human body medium.

  17. Piezoresistive Chemical Sensors Based on Functionalized Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Guenther

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of analyte-specific hydrogels were combined with microfabricated piezoresistive pressure transducers to obtain chemomechanical sensors that can serve as selective biochemical sensors for a continuous monitoring of metabolites. The gel swelling pressure has been monitored in simulated physiological solutions by means of the output signal of piezoresistive sensors. The interference by fructose, human serum albumin, pH, and ionic concentration on glucose sensing was studied. With the help of a database containing the calibration curves of the hydrogel-based sensors at different values of pH and ionic strength, the corrected values of pH and glucose concentration were determined using a novel calibration algorithm.

  18. An SV-GMR Needle Sensor-Based Estimation of Volume Density of Magnetic Fluid inside Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Gooneratne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A spin-valve giant magneto-resistive (SV-GMR sensor of needle-type configuration is reported to estimate the volume density of magnetic fluid inside human body. The magnetic fluid is usually injected into human body to kill cancerous cell using hyperthermia-based treatment. To control the heat treatment, a good knowledge of temperature is very much essential. The SV-GMR-based needle-type sensor is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic fluid inside the human body from which the temperature is estimated. The needle-type sensor provides a semi-invasive approach of temperature determination.

  19. Highly stretchable strain sensor based on SWCNTs/CB synergistic conductive network for wearable human-activity monitoring and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Yunong; Mao, Leidong; Gao, Le; Pan, Weidong; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Flexible, stretchable, and wearable strain sensors have attracted significant attention for their potential applications in human movement detection and recognition. Here, we report a highly stretchable and flexible strain sensor based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs)/carbon black (CB) synergistic conductive network. The fabrication, synergistic conductive mechanism, and characterization of the sandwich-structured strain sensor were investigated. The experimental results show that the device exhibits high stretchability (120%), excellent flexibility, fast response (∼60 ms), temperature independence, and superior stability and reproducibility during ∼1100 stretching/releasing cycles. Furthermore, human activities such as the bending of a finger or elbow and gestures were monitored and recognized based on the strain sensor, indicating that the stretchable strain sensor based on the SWCNTs/CB synergistic conductive network could have promising applications in flexible and wearable devices for human motion monitoring.

  20. DNA-Based Sensor for Real-Time Measurement of the Enzymatic Activity of Human Topoisomerase I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lærke Bay; Jepsen, Morten Leth; Kristoffersen, Emil Laust;

    2013-01-01

    . The basic design of the sensor relies on two DNA strands that hybridize to form a hairpin structure with a fluorophore-quencher pair. The quencher moiety is released from the sensor upon reaction with human topoisomerase I thus enabling real-time optical measurement of enzymatic activity. The sensor......Sensors capable of quantitative real-time measurements may present the easiest and most accurate way to study enzyme activities. Here we present a novel DNA-based sensor for specific and quantitative real-time measurement of the enzymatic activity of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I...... is specific for topoisomerase I even in raw cell extracts and presents a simple mean of following enzyme kinetics using standard laboratory equipment such as a qPCR machine or fluorimeter. Human topoisomerase I is a well-known target for the clinically used anti-cancer drugs of the camptothecin family...

  1. Effects of Acute Pinitol Supplementation on Plasma Pinitol Concentration, Whole Body Glucose Tolerance, and Activation of the Skeletal Muscle Insulin Receptor in Older Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, A. J.; Wood, K V; Thyfault, J. P.; Campbell, W.W.

    2009-01-01

    Limited research with rodents and humans suggests that oral ingestion of pinitol (3-O-methyl-d-chiro-inositol) might positively influence glucose tolerance. This double-blinded, placebo-controlled, and cross-over study assessed the effects of acute pinitol supplementation on plasma pinitol concentration, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and activation of the skeletal muscle insulin receptor. Fifteen older, nondiabetic subjects (62 ± 1 years, mean ± SEM) completed four, 1-day trials. Su...

  2. A Pattern Mining Approach to Sensor-based Human Activity Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Wu, Zhanqing

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing human activities from sensor readings has recently attracted much research interest in pervasive computing due to its potential in many applications such as assistive living and healthcare. This task is particularly challenging because human activities are often performed in not only...... in real life because activities can be interleaved and performed concurrently in many different ways. In this paper, we propose a novel pattern mining approach to recognize sequential, interleaved and concurrent activities in a unified framework. We exploit Emerging Pattern—a discriminative pattern...... that describes significant changes between classes of data—to identify sensor features for classifying activities. Different from existing learning-based approaches which require different training datasets for building activity models, our activity models are built upon the sequential activity trace only...

  3. Design and characterization of a wearable macrobending fiber optic sensor for human joint angle determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana S.; Catarino, André; Correia, Miguel V.; Frazão, Orlando

    2013-12-01

    The work presented here describes the development and characterization of intensity fiber optic sensor integrated in a specifically designed piece of garment to measure elbow flexion. The sensing head is based on macrobending incorporated in the garment, and the increase of curvature number was studied in order to investigate which scheme provided a good result in terms of sensitivity and repeatability. Results showed the configuration that assured a higher sensitivity (0.644 dBm/deg) and better repeatability was the one with four loops. Ultimately, this sensor can be used for rehabilitation purposes to monitor human joint angles, namely, elbow flexion on stroke survivors while performing the reach functional task, which is the most common upper-limb human gesture.

  4. Identification of glucose-fermenting bacteria present in an in vitro model of the human intestine by RNA-stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.; Graaf, A.A. de; Maathuis, A.; Waard, P. de; Plugge, C.M.; Smidt, H.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Dijkema, C.; Vos, W.M. de; Venema, K.

    2007-01-01

    16S rRNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling were used to identify bacteria fermenting glucose under conditions simulating the human intestine. The TIM-2 in vitro model of the human intestine was inoculated with a GI tract mi

  5. Identification of glucose-fermenting bacteria present in an in-vitro model of the human inetstine by RNA-stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.G.G.; Graaf, de A.A.; Maathuis, A.; Waard, de P.; Plugge, C.M.; Smidt, H.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Dijkema, C.; Vos, de W.M.; Venema, K.

    2007-01-01

    16S rRNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling were used to identify bacteria fermenting glucose under conditions simulating the human intestine. The TIM-2 in vitro model of the human intestine was inoculated with a GI tract mi

  6. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  7. Training Classifiers with Shadow Features for Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Simon; Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Wong, Raymond; Wong, Kelvin K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel training/testing process for building/using a classification model based on human activity recognition (HAR) is proposed. Traditionally, HAR has been accomplished by a classifier that learns the activities of a person by training with skeletal data obtained from a motion sensor, such as Microsoft Kinect. These skeletal data are the spatial coordinates (x, y, z) of different parts of the human body. The numeric information forms time series, temporal records of movement sequences that can be used for training a classifier. In addition to the spatial features that describe current positions in the skeletal data, new features called ‘shadow features’ are used to improve the supervised learning efficacy of the classifier. Shadow features are inferred from the dynamics of body movements, and thereby modelling the underlying momentum of the performed activities. They provide extra dimensions of information for characterising activities in the classification process, and thereby significantly improve the classification accuracy. Two cases of HAR are tested using a classification model trained with shadow features: one is by using wearable sensor and the other is by a Kinect-based remote sensor. Our experiments can demonstrate the advantages of the new method, which will have an impact on human activity detection research. PMID:28264470

  8. Recognition of human emotion using sensor agent robot for interactive and adaptive living spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Sozo; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    Safer, more comfortable and energy-efficient living spaces are always demanded. However, most buildings are designed based on prescribed scenarios so that they do not act on abrupt changes of environments. We propose "Biofication of Living Spaces" that has functions of learning occupants' lifestyles and taking actions based on collected information. By doing so, we can incorporate the high adaptability to the building. Our goal is to make living spaces more "comfortable". However, human beings have emotion that implies the meaning of "comfortable" depends on each individual. Therefore our study focuses on recognition of human emotion. We suggest using robots as sensor agents. By using robots equipped with various sensors, they can interact with occupants and environment. We use a sensor agent robot called "e-bio". In this research, we construct a human tracking system and identified emotions of residents using their walking information. We focus on the influences of illuminance and sound. We classified emotions by calculating the distance of the mapped points in comfortable and uncomfortable spaces with parametric eigen space method, in which parameters are determined by a mapping of tracks in the space. As a method of pattern recognition, a weighted k-nearest neighbor is used. Experiments considering illuminance and sound environments, illustrates good correlation between emotion and environments.

  9. Multiple Hydrogen Bonding Enables the Self-Healing of Sensors for Human-Machine Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Lu, Canhui; Zhuang, Jian; Liu, Manxiao; Zhang, Xinxing; Yu, Yanmei; Tao, Qingchuan

    2017-07-17

    Despite its widespread use in signal collection, flexible sensors have been rarely used in human-machine interactions owing to its indistinguishable signal, poor reliability, and poor stability when inflicted with unavoidable scratches and/or mechanical cuts. A highly sensitive and self-healing sensor enabled by multiple hydrogen bonding network and nanostructured conductive network is demonstrated. The nanostructured supramolecular sensor displays extremely fast (ca. 15 s) and repeatable self-healing ability with high healing efficiency (93 % after the third healing process). It can precisely detect tiny human motions, demonstrating highly distinguishable and reliable signals even after cutting-healing and bending over 20 000 cycles. Furthermore, a human-machine interaction system is integrated to develop a facial expression control system and an electronic larynx, aiming to control the robot to assist the patient's daily life and help the mute to realize real-time speaking. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Training Classifiers with Shadow Features for Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel training/testing process for building/using a classification model based on human activity recognition (HAR is proposed. Traditionally, HAR has been accomplished by a classifier that learns the activities of a person by training with skeletal data obtained from a motion sensor, such as Microsoft Kinect. These skeletal data are the spatial coordinates (x, y, z of different parts of the human body. The numeric information forms time series, temporal records of movement sequences that can be used for training a classifier. In addition to the spatial features that describe current positions in the skeletal data, new features called ‘shadow features’ are used to improve the supervised learning efficacy of the classifier. Shadow features are inferred from the dynamics of body movements, and thereby modelling the underlying momentum of the performed activities. They provide extra dimensions of information for characterising activities in the classification process, and thereby significantly improve the classification accuracy. Two cases of HAR are tested using a classification model trained with shadow features: one is by using wearable sensor and the other is by a Kinect-based remote sensor. Our experiments can demonstrate the advantages of the new method, which will have an impact on human activity detection research.

  11. Up-regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF Expression by Elevated Glucose Concentration and Hypoxia in Cultured Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Qing; ZENG Shuiqing; LING Shiqi; LV Mingliang

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of high glucose concentration and high glucose concentration with hypoxia on the production of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), human RPE cells were cultured in 5.56 mmol/L glucose (control group), 5.56 mmol/L glucose with 150 μ mol/L CoCl2 (hypoxic group), 25 mmol/L glucose (high glucose group)and 25 mmol/L glucose with 150 μ mol/L CoCl2 (combination group). RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNAs. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins. Although the small amount of HIF-1α protein was able to be detected in high glucose group but not in control group, there was no significant difference between the expression of HIF-1α mRNA of RPE cells in high glucose group and that of RPE cells in control group.As compared with RPE cells in control group, the mRNA expression and the protein synthesis of VEGF in high glucose group were up-regulated. As compared with RPE cells in hypoxic group, the expression of HIF-1α mRNA of RPE cells in combination group was not different, but the protein synthesis of HIF-1 α, the mRNA expression and the protein synthesis of VEGF were more obviously up-regulated. In conclusion, high concentration glucose mainly influence the protein synthesis of HIF-1α of RPE cell, and HIF-1α protein is able to be accumulated in high concentration glucose.Under hypoxia, the HIF-1α protein induced by high concentration glucose is more stable, and the expression of VEGF is obviously increased. It is suggested that high concentration glucose may play a role in retinal neovascularization, especially at ischemia stage of diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  13. Glucose Metabolism via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway, Glycolysis and Krebs Cycle in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B.; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM) and a brain metastatic renal tumor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) histology, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-13C2]glucose. The [3-13C]lactate/[2,3-13C2]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and renal tumor and their respective surrounding brains (GBM: 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033 (p=1); CCRCC: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than PPP flux in these tumors, and that PPP flux into the lactate pool was similar in both tissues. Remarkably, 13C-13C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumors, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal tumor, in contrast to GBM and surrounding brain, 13C multiplets of GABA differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. Additionally, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient’s primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a CCRCC tissue microarray suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell-autonomous in at least a subset of renal tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 13C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22383401

  14. Glucose metabolism via the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and Krebs cycle in an orthotopic mouse model of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Malloy, Craig R; Bachoo, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using orthotopic mouse models of human glioblastoma (GBM) and renal cell carcinoma metastatic to brain, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-(13) C(2) ]glucose. The [3-(13) C]lactate/[2,3-(13) C(2) ]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and brain metastasis and their respective surrounding brains (GBM, 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033, respectively (p = 1); metastasis: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than the PPP flux in these tumors, and that the PPP flux into the lactate pool is similar in both tumors. Remarkably, (13) C-(13) C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumor types, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal cell carcinoma, in contrast with GBM, (13) C multiplets of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. In addition, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient's primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a renal cell carcinoma tissue microarray of the same histology, suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell autonomous in at least a subset of renal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (13) C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Modification of a traditional breakfast leads to increased satiety along with attenuated plasma increments of glucose, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Bodil; Höglund, Peter; Roth, Bodil; Darwiche, Gassan

    2016-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that carbohydrate, fat, and protein contents of meals affect satiety, glucose homeostasis, and hormone secretion. The objectives of this crossover trial were to examine satiety, glycemic-insulinemic response, and plasma peptide levels in response to 2 different recommended diabetes diets with equivalent energy content. One traditional reference breakfast and one test breakfast, with lower carbohydrate and higher fat and protein content, were randomly administered to healthy volunteers (8 men, 12 women). Blood samples were collected, and satiety was scored on a visual analog scale before and 3 hours after meals. Plasma glucose was measured, and levels of C-peptide, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), insulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and adipokines were analyzed by Luminex. Greater satiety, visual analog scale, and total and delta area under the curve (P satiety and attenuation of C-peptide, glucose, insulin, and GIP responses compared with the reference breakfast but does not affect adipokines, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

  16. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Brendtke

    Full Text Available Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring.

  17. On using the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, M J; Roth, S

    2014-01-01

    The present paper explores the possibility of using the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion; we attempt the validation of the output of the original version of the sensor on the basis of a marker-based system which is assumed to provide the reference solution (baseline, `ground truth'). The similarity between the two outputs is assessed after comparing a number of waveforms, representing the variation within the gait cycle of quantities which are commonly used in order to characterise (and model) motion. The data acquisition involved a commercially-available treadmill and five velocity settings: walking data were acquired at $5$ km/h, running data at $8$, $10$, $11$, and $12$ km/h. The analysis revealed three problems with such an application of the Kinect sensor: the systematic underestimation of the knee angle by about $25 \\%$, the appearance of artefacts in the motion of the lower leg of the subject, and the inability of the sensor to capture reliably the details regarding th...

  18. Triboelectric Nanogenerator Enabled Body Sensor Network for Self-Powered Human Heart-Rate Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiming; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoshi; Zhou, Zhihao; Meng, Keyu; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jin; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-09-26

    Heart-rate monitoring plays a critical role in personal healthcare management. A low-cost, noninvasive, and user-friendly heart-rate monitoring system is highly desirable. Here, a self-powered wireless body sensor network (BSN) system is developed for heart-rate monitoring via integration of a downy-structure-based triboelectric nanogenerator (D-TENG), a power management circuit, a heart-rate sensor, a signal processing unit, and Bluetooth module for wireless data transmission. By converting the inertia energy of human walking into electric power, a maximum power of 2.28 mW with total conversion efficiency of 57.9% was delivered at low operation frequency, which is capable of immediately and sustainably driving the highly integrated BSN system. The acquired heart-rate signal by the sensor would be processed in the signal process circuit, sent to an external device via the Bluetooth module, and displayed on a personal cell phone in a real-time manner. Moreover, by combining a TENG-based generator and a TENG-based sensor, an all-TENG-based wireless BSN system was developed, realizing continuous and self-powered heart-rate monitoring. This work presents a potential method for personal heart-rate monitoring, featured as being self-powered, cost-effective, noninvasive, and user-friendly.

  19. Human body parts tracking and kinematic features assessment based on RSSI and inertial sensor measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrosen, Gaddi; Luttwak, Ami

    2013-08-23

    Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN), capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts' displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  20. Human Body Parts Tracking and Kinematic Features Assessment Based on RSSI and Inertial Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddi Blumrosen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN, capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts’ displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  1. Human Carboxylesterase 2 Reverses Obesity-Induced Diacylglycerol Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell A. Ruby; Julie Massart; Hunerdosse, Devon M.; Milena Schönke; Jorge C. Correia; Louie, Sharon M.; Ruas, Jorge L.; Erik Näslund; Nomura, Daniel K.; Zierath, Juleen R.

    2017-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are a large family of multifunctional enzymes known to influence obesity. Here, we performed activity-based protein profiling to assess the functional l