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Sample records for human glioblastoma t98g

  1. Molecular mechanism of inositol hexaphosphate-mediated apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells.

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    Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2007-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Current therapies are mostly ineffective and new agents need to be explored for controlling this devastating disease. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a phytochemical that is widely found in corns, cereals, nuts, and high fiber-content foods. Previous studies demonstrated anti-cancer properties of IP6 in several in vitro and in vivo tumor models. However, therapeutic efficacy of IP6 has not yet been evaluated in glioblastoma. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism of action of IP6 in human malignant glioblastoma T98G cells. The viability of T98G cells decreased following treatment with increasing doses of IP6. T98G cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM IP6 for 24 h showed morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Western blotting indicated changes in expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins resulting in an increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and upregulation of cytosolic levels of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, suggesting involvement of mitochondria-dependent caspase cascade in apoptosis. IP6 downregulated cell survival factors such as baculovirus inhibitor-of-apoptosis repeat containing-2 (BIRC-2) protein and telomerase to promote apoptosis. Upregulation of calpain and caspase-9 occurred in course of apoptosis. Increased activities of calpain and caspase-3 cleaved 270 kD alpha-spectrin at specific sites generating 145 kD spectrin break down product (SBDP) and 120 kD SBDP, respectively. Increased caspase-3 activity also cleaved inhibitor of caspase-3-activated DNase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Collectively, our results demonstrated that IP6 down regulated the survival factors BIRC-2 and telomerase and upregulated calpain and caspase-3 activities for apoptosis in T98G cells.

  2. Infected T98G glioblastoma cells support human cytomegalovirus reactivation from latency.

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    Cheng, Shuang; Jiang, Xuan; Yang, Bo; Wen, Le; Zhao, Fei; Zeng, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xi-Juan; Dong, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Yan; Ming, Ying-Zi; Zhu, Hua; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qiyi; Fortunato, Elizabeth; Luo, Min-Hua

    2017-10-01

    T98G cells have been shown to support long-term human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome maintenance without infectious virus release. However, it remains unclear whether these viral genomes could be reactivated. To address this question, a recombinant HCMV (rHCMV) containing a GFP gene was used to infect T98G cells, and the infected cells absent of infectious virus production were designated T98G-LrV. Upon dibutyryl cAMP plus IBMX (cAMP/IBMX) treatment, a serial of phenomena were observed, including GFP signal increase, viral genome replication, lytic genes expression and infectious viruses release, indicating the reactivation of HCMV in T98G-LrV cells from a latent status. Mechanistically, HCMV reactivation in the T98G-LrV cells induced by cAMP/IBMX was associated with the PKA-CREB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that HCMV was latent in T98G-LrV cells and could be reactivated. The T98G-LrV cells represent an effective model for investigating the mechanisms of HCMV reactivation from latency in the context of neural cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effect of Z-Ligustilide on the Mobility of Human Glioblastoma T98G Cells.

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    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Z-ligustilide (LIG, an essential oil extract from Radix Angelica sinensis, has broad pharmaceutical applications in treating cardio-vascular diseases and ischemic brain injury. Recently, LIG has been connected to Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM because of its structural similarity to 3-n-alkyphthalide (NBP, which is specifically cytotoxic to GBM cells. Hence, we investigated LIG's effect on GBM T98G cells. The study shows that LIG can significantly reduce T98G cells' migration in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the attenuation of cellular mobility can be linked to the activity of the Rho GTPases (RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, the three critical molecular switches governing cytoskeleton remodeling; thus, regulating cell migration. LIG significantly reduces the expression of RhoA and affects in a milder manner the expression of Cdc42 and Rac1.

  4. Methylglyoxal (MGO) inhibits proliferation and induces cell death of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G and U87MG cells.

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    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Łasut, Barbara; Pudełko, Adam; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Zieliński, Michał; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor and it is characterized by a poor prognosis and short survival time. Current treatment strategies for GBM using surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are ineffective. Thus new therapeutic strategies to target GBM are urgently needed. The effect of methylglyoxal (MGO) on the cell cycle, cell death and proliferation of human GBM cells was investigated. The T98G and U87MG cell lines were cultured in modified EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and maintained at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. Cells were exposed to methylglyoxal (0.025mM) per 72h. The influence of MGO on T98G and U87MG cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis was evaluated as well. Cell cycle phase distribution, proliferation, apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MGO causes changes in cell cycle and induces accumulation of G1/G0-phase cells and reduced fraction of cells in S and G2/M phases. We have also observed inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We have also revealed that MGO induces senescence of U87MG but not T98G cells, but further studies are necessary in order to clarify and check mechanism of action of methylglyoxal and it Is a positive phenomenon for the treatment of GBM.

  5. 18F-FET and 18F-FCH uptake in human glioblastoma T98G cell lines

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    Persico Marco Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite complex treatment of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, high grade gliomas often recur. Differentiation between post-treatment changes and recurrence is difficult. 18F-methyl-choline (18F-FCH is frequently used in staging and detection of recurrent prostate cancer disease as well as some brain tumours; however accumulation in inflammatory tissue limits its specificity. The 18F-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET shows a specific uptake in malignant cells, resulting from increased expression of amino acid transporters or diffusing through the disrupted blood-brain barrier. 18F-FET exhibits lower uptake in machrophages and other inflammatory cells. Aim of this study was to evaluate 18F-FCH and 18F-FET uptake by human glioblastoma T98G cells.

  6. The suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreased the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cells

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    Novi S. Hardiany

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a primary malignant brain tumor which has poor prognosis. High incidence of oxidative stress-based therapy resistance could be related to the high antioxidant status of GBM cells. Our previous study has reported that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD antioxidant expression was significantly higher in high grade glioma than in low grade. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of MnSOD suppression toward GBM cell survival.Methods: This study is an experimental study using human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cell line. Suppression of MnSOD expression was performed using in vitro transfection MnSOD-siRNA. The MnSOD expression was analyzed by measuring the mRNA using real time RT-PCR, protein using ELISA technique, and specific activity of enzyme using inhibition of xantine oxidase. Concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS intracellular was determined by measuring superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide. Cell survival was analyzed by measuring viability, proliferation, and cell apoptosis.Results: In vitro transfection of MnSOD-siRNA suppressed the mRNA, protein, and specific activity of MnSOD. This treatment significantly increased the concentration of superoxide radical; however, it did not influence the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, viability MnSOD-suppressing cell significantly decreased, accompanied by increase of cell apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation.Conclusion: The suppression of MnSOD expression leads to decrease glioblastoma multiforme cell survival, which was associated to the increase of cell apoptotic.

  7. A novel PPAR alpha/gamma dual agonist inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G cells

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    Da-chuan LIU; Chuan-bing ZANG; Hong-yu LIU; Kurt POSSINGER; Shao-guang FAN; Elena ELSTNER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α/γ dual agonist TZD 18 on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G cells and its possible mechanism. METHODS: RTPCR, MTT, TUNEL, Flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis were employed. RESULTS: TZD18 inhibited the growth of T98G cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which was associated with a G1 to S cell cycle arrest.Besides, significant apoptosis was induced after treatment with a non-toxic dose of TZD 18. During the process,the expression of Bcl-2 protein was down-regulated, while that of Bax and p27kip proteins was up-regulated, and the activity of caspase-3 was elevated. However, this effect appeared to be PPARα and PPARγ independent since their antagonists could not reverse this effect. CONCLUSIONS: TZD18, a novel PPARα/γ dual agonist, inhibited cell growth and induce apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G cells in vitro, indicating a therapeutic potential for TZD 18 in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  8. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Temozolomide Can Elicit an Epigenetic Pro-apoptotic Effect on Glioblastoma T98G Cells.

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    Pasi, Francesca; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Lupo, Giuseppe; Corbella, Franco; Nano, Rosanna; Capelli, Enrica

    2016-11-01

    Treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) is emerging as an interesting therapeutic option for patients with cancer. The literature has demonstrated that low-frequency/low-energy electromagnetic fields do not cause predictable effects on DNA; however, they can epigenetically act on gene expression. The aim of the present work was to study a possible epigenetic effect of a PEMF, mediated by miRNAs, on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). We tested a PEMF (maximum magnetic induction, 2 mT; frequency, 75 Hz) that has been demonstrated to induce autophagy in glioblastoma cells. In particular, we studied the effect of PEMF on the expression of genes involved in cancer progression and a promising synergistic effect with temozolomide, a frequently used drug to treat glioblastoma multiforme. We found that electromagnetic stimulation in combination with temozolomide can elicit an epigenetic pro-apoptotic effect in the chemo- and radioresistant T98G glioblastoma cell line.

  9. Methoxyamine sensitizes the resistant glioblastoma T98G cell line to the alkylating agent temozolomide.

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    Montaldi, Ana P; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T

    2013-11-01

    Chemoresistance represents a major obstacle to successful treatment for malignant glioma with temozolomide. N (7)-methyl-G and N (3)-methyl-A adducts comprise more than 80 % of DNA lesions induced by temozolomide and are processed by the base excision repair, suggesting that the cellular resistance could be caused, in part, by this efficient repair pathway, although few studies have focused on this subject. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular responses to temozolomide treatment associated with methoxyamine (blocker of base excision repair) in glioblastoma cell lines, in order to test the hypothesis that the blockage of base excision repair pathway might sensitize glioblastoma cells to temozolomide. For all the tested cell lines, only T98G showed significant differences between temozolomide and temozolomide plus methoxyamine treatment, observed by reduced survival rates, enhanced the levels of DNA damage, and induced an arrest at G2-phase. In addition, ~10 % of apoptotic cells (sub-G1 fraction) were observed at 48 h. Western blot analysis demonstrated that APE1 and FEN1 presented a slightly reduced expression levels under the combined treatment, probably due to AP sites blockade by methoxyamine, thus causing a minor requirement of base excision repair pathway downstream to the AP removal by APE1. On the other hand, PCNA expression in temozolomide plus methoxyamine-treated cells does not rule out the possibility that such alteration might be related to the blockage of cell cycle (G2-phase), as observed at 24 h of recovery time. The results obtained in the present study demonstrated the efficiency of methoxyamine to overcome glioblastoma resistance to temozolomide treatment.

  10. Knockdown of AKT3 (PKBγ and PI3KCA Suppresses Cell Viability and Proliferation and Induces the Apoptosis of Glioblastoma Multiforme T98G Cells

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    Monika Paul-Samojedny

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor that is difficult to treat and has a very poor prognosis. Thus, new therapeutic strategies that target GBM are urgently needed. The PI3K/AKT/PTEN signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in a wide range of cancers. The present study was designed to examine the inhibitory effect of AKT3 or PI3KCA siRNAs on GBM cell growth, viability, and proliferation.T98G cells were transfected with AKT3 and/or PI3KCA siRNAs. AKT3 and PI3KCA protein-positive cells were identified using FC and Western blotting. The influence of specific siRNAs on T98G cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis was evaluated as well using FC. Alterations in the mRNA expression of AKT3, PI3KCA, and apoptosis-related genes were analyzed using QRT-PCR. Knockdown of AKT3 and/or PI3KCA genes in T98G cells led to a significant reduction in cell viability, the accumulation of subG1-phase cells and, a reduced fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases. Additionally, statistically significant differences in the BAX/BCL-2 ratio and an increased percentage of apoptotic cells were found. The siRNA-induced AKT3 and PI3KCA mRNA knockdown may offer a novel therapeutic strategy to control the growth of human GBM cells.

  11. E series prostaglandins alter the proliferative, apoptotic and migratory properties of T98G human glioma cells in vitro

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    Gomes Renata N

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many types of cancer, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is associated with tumour related processes including proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis. However in gliomas the role of this prostanoid is poorly understood. Here, we report on the proliferative, migratory, and apoptotic effects of PGE1, PGE2 and Ibuprofen (IBP observed in the T98G human glioma cell line in vitro. Methods T98G human glioma cells were treated with IBP, PGE1 or PGE2 at varying concentrations for 24–72 hours. Cell proliferation, mitotic index and apoptotic index were determined for each treatment. Caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity was measured using fluorescent probes in live cells (FITC-LEHD-FMK and FITC-DEVD-FMK respectively. The migratory capacity of the cells was quantified using a scratch migration assay and a transwell migration assay. Results A significant decrease was seen in cell number (54% in the presence of 50 μM IBP. Mitotic index and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation were also decreased 57% and 65%, respectively, by IBP. The apoptotic index was increased (167% and the in situ activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3 was evident in IBP treated cells. The inhibition of COX activity by IBP also caused a significant inhibition of cell migration in the monolayer scratch assay (74% and the transwell migration assay (36%. In contrast, the presence of exogenous PGE1 or PGE2 caused significant increases in cell number (37% PGE1 and 45% PGE2. When mitotic index was measured no change was found for either PG treatment. However, the BrdU incorporation rate was significantly increased by PGE1 (62% and to a greater extent by PGE2 (100%. The apoptotic index was unchanged by exogenous PGs. The addition of exogenous PGs caused an increase in cell migration in the monolayer scratch assay (43% PGE1 and 44% PGE2 and the transwell migration assay (28% PGE1 and 68% PGE2. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that treatments which alter PGE1 and PGE

  12. Oxidative Stress Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extracts in Human Brain Cells (T98G) and Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) in Mono- and Co-Culture.

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    Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in human brain cells (T98G) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in mono- and co-culture systems. Cell viability of T98G cells exposed to CSC (0.05-4 mg/ml) was significantly decreased compared to CSE (0.025-20%). There were no marked differences between quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by either CSE (2, 4, and 10%) or CSC (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/ml) treatment compared to control. However, a significant effect was noted in ROS generation following CSC incubation at 4mg/ml. Cellular integrity of HBMEC decreased to 74 and 64% within 120 h of exposure at the IC50 value of CSE and CSC, respectively. This study suggests that chronic exposure to cigarette smoking might initiate damage to the blood-brain barrier.

  13. The NFL-TBS.40-63 anti-glioblastoma peptide disrupts microtubule and mitochondrial networks in the T98G glioma cell line.

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    Rivalin, Romain; Lepinoux-Chambaud, Claire; Eyer, Joël; Savagner, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Despite aggressive therapies, including combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma remains a highly aggressive brain cancer with the worst prognosis of any central nervous system disease. We have previously identified a neurofilament-derived cell-penetrating peptide, NFL-TBS.40-63, that specifically enters by endocytosis in glioblastoma cells, where it induces microtubule destruction and inhibits cell proliferation. Here, we explore the impact of NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide on the mitochondrial network and its functions by using global cell respiration, quantitative PCR analysis of the main actors directing mitochondrial biogenesis, western blot analysis of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits and confocal microscopy. We show that the internalized peptide disturbs mitochondrial and microtubule networks, interferes with mitochondrial dynamics and induces a rapid depletion of global cell respiration. This effect may be related to reduced expression of the NRF-1 transcription factor and of specific miRNAs, which may impact mitochondrial biogenesis, in regard to default mitochondrial mobility.

  14. The NFL-TBS.40-63 anti-glioblastoma peptide disrupts microtubule and mitochondrial networks in the T98G glioma cell line.

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    Romain Rivalin

    Full Text Available Despite aggressive therapies, including combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma remains a highly aggressive brain cancer with the worst prognosis of any central nervous system disease. We have previously identified a neurofilament-derived cell-penetrating peptide, NFL-TBS.40-63, that specifically enters by endocytosis in glioblastoma cells, where it induces microtubule destruction and inhibits cell proliferation. Here, we explore the impact of NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide on the mitochondrial network and its functions by using global cell respiration, quantitative PCR analysis of the main actors directing mitochondrial biogenesis, western blot analysis of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS subunits and confocal microscopy. We show that the internalized peptide disturbs mitochondrial and microtubule networks, interferes with mitochondrial dynamics and induces a rapid depletion of global cell respiration. This effect may be related to reduced expression of the NRF-1 transcription factor and of specific miRNAs, which may impact mitochondrial biogenesis, in regard to default mitochondrial mobility.

  15. 白藜芦醇通过NF-κB依赖途径下调MGMT增强胶质瘤细胞对替莫唑胺药物的敏感性%Resveratrol reverses temozolomide resistance by down-regulation of O (6)-methylguanine-DNAmethyltransferase in T98G glioblastoma cells via nuclear factor-κB-dependent pathway

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    黄惠勇; 林洪; 苏保义; 章翔

    2014-01-01

    -related transcription factors.Resveratrol is a terpenoid that exhibits broad pro-apoptotic activity in various types of cancers,including glioblastoma.However,the effects of resveratrol on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) -MGMT signaling in glioblastomas have not yet been fully elucidated.In this article,we want to find that the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol reverses temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma cells.Methods Human malignant glioblastomas cell line T98G glioma cells was conventionally cultured in vitro; MTT assay was employed to detect the cell viability after being treated with dimethylsulfoxide (control group),or 100,200,400 and 800 μmol/L resveratrol,or 50,100,200 and 400 μmol/L TMZ or TMZ (100 μmol/L) combined with resveratrol (100 μmol/L); Hoechst33342 staining was employed to observe the effects of 100 μmol/L resveratrol,100 μmol/L TMZ or TMZ (100 μmol/L) combined with resveratrol (100 μmol/L) on T98G nuclear morphology changes; Flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to detect the T98G cell apoptosis and expressions ofMGMT,NF-κB signaling pathway related proteins.Results T98G cells after being treated with different concentrations of resveratrol for 24 and 72 h,the cell vitality decreased with 50% inhibiting concentration (IC50) reaching 127.5 and 86.2 μmol/L,respectively; T98G cells after being treated with different concentrations of TMZ for 24 and 72 h,the cell vitality decreased with IC50 reaching 2.5 and 3.2 mmol/L,respectively; significant decreased cell vitality in the combination treatment with TMZ and resveratrol group was noted as compared with that in the TMZ or resveratrol treatment groups (P<0.05).Hoechst 33258 staining and Western blotting revealed apoptotic morphological changes of T98G cell nuclei and increased apoptosis in the TMZ or resveratrol treatment groups,and more obvious changes were noted in the combination treatment with TMZ and resveratrol group.As compared with that in the control group,significantly increased MGMT

  16. Inter-Relationship between Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity and Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in the Human T98G Glioma and the Epithelial HaCaT Cell Line.

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    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, investigations in both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance have been a focus of radiation oncology and biology research, since both conditions occur primarily in tumor cell lines. There has been significant progress in elucidating their signaling pathways, however uncertainties exist when they are studied together with radiation-induced bystander effects. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further investigate this relationship using the T98G glioma and HaCaT cell lines. T98G glioma cells have demonstrated a strong transition from hyper-radiosensitivity to induced radioresistance, and HaCaT cells do not show low-dose hypersensitivity. Both cell lines were paired using a mix-and-match protocol, which involved growing nonirradiated cells in culture media from irradiated cells and covering all possible combinations between them. The end points analyzed were clonogenic cell survival and live calcium measurements through the cellular membrane. Our data demonstrated that T98G cells produced bystander signals that decreased the survival of both reporter T98G and HaCaT cells. The bystander effect occurred only when T98G cells were exposed to doses below 1 Gy, which was corroborated by the induction of calcium fluxes. However, when bystander signals originated from HaCaT cells, the survival fraction increased in reporter T98G cells while it decreased in HaCaT cells. Moreover, the corresponding calcium data showed no calcium fluxes in T98G cells, while HaCaT cells displayed a biphasic calcium profile. In conclusion, our findings indicate a possible link between low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and bystander effects. This relationship varies depending on which cell line functions as the source of bystander signals. This further suggests that the bystander mechanisms are more complex than previously expected and caution should be taken when extrapolating bystander results across all cell lines and all radiation doses.

  17. 槲皮素对人胶质母细胞瘤T98G凋亡及HSP27蛋白表达的干预作用%Effect of Quercetin on Apoptosis in Glioblastoma Cell Line T98G and the Expression of HSP27 Protein

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    陶晓薇; 毛其芬

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and mechanism of natural medicine quercetin on glioblastoma cells. Methods T98G cells were treated with quercetin and the proliferation was measured by using the MTT as-say. The apoptosis of T98G was measured by flow cytometry and the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and HSP27 in T98G cells treated with quercetin was detected by western blot. The specific siRNA transfected method was used for blocking the expression of HSP27 gene before T98G cells were treated with quercetin, then the prolifera-tion and apoptosis were detected. Results The 48-hour proliferation inhibition rates of T98G cells in control group, 5μM quercetin group, 25μM quercetin group, 50μM quercetin group, 100μM quercetin group, and 200μM quercetin group were 0, (0.05±0.02)%, (21.8±3.4)%, (42.2±5.7)%, (67.6±6.8)%, (76.9±7.0)%, respectively, with significant difference among them (P<0.05). The apoptosis rate of T98G cells in control group, 25μM quercetin group, 50μM quercetin group, and 100μM quercetin group were(0.8±0.3)%, (4.9±0.6)%, (8.1±0.9)%, (21.5±1.7)%, respectively, with significant difference among them (P<0.05); caspase-3 activity ratio in control group, 25μM quercetin group, 50μM quercetin group, and 100μM quercetin group were 0.01±0.01, 0.05±0.03, 0.12±0.03, and 0.22±0.05, with significant difference between control group and 50μM quercetin group and 100μM quercetin group (P<0.05); HSP27 inhibition ratio in control group, 25μM quercetin group, 50μM quercetin group, and 100μM quercetin group were 0.84±0.12, 0.75±0.11, 0.52±0.08, and 0.37±0.06, with significant difference between control group and 50 μM quercetin group and 100 μM quercetin group (P<0.05). Conclusion Quercetin has some anti-glioblastoma effect, and the underlying mechanism may be through down-regulating the expression of HSP27.%目的:探讨天然药物槲皮素对人胶质母细胞瘤的生物效应及机制。方法采用槲皮素治疗人

  18. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.T98G [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.T98G [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.T98G [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS potentiates hydrogen peroxide toxicity in T98G astrocytoma cells by suppression of anti-oxidative and growth factor gene expression

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    Fine Daniel H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria with proved role in pathogenesis of sepsis. Brain injury was observed with both patients dead from sepsis and animal septic models. However, in vitro administration of LPS has not shown obvious cell damage to astrocytes and other relative cell lines while it does cause endothelial cell death in vitro. These observations make it difficult to understand the role of LPS in brain parenchymal injury. Results To test the hypothesis that LPS may cause biological changes in astrocytes and make the cells to become vulnerable to reactive oxygen species, a recently developed highly sensitive and highly specific system for large-scale gene expression profiling was used to examine the gene expression profile of a group of 1,135 selected genes in a cell line, T98G, a derivative of human glioblastoma of astrocytic origin. By pre-treating T98G cells with different dose of LPS, it was found that LPS treatment caused a broad alteration in gene expression profile, but did not cause obvious cell death. However, after short exposure to H2O2, cell death was dramatically increased in the LPS pretreated samples. Interestingly, cell death was highly correlated with down-regulated expression of antioxidant genes such as cytochrome b561, glutathione s-transferase a4 and protein kinase C-epsilon. On the other hand, expression of genes encoding growth factors was significantly suppressed. These changes indicate that LPS treatment may suppress the anti-oxidative machinery, decrease the viability of the T98G cells and make the cells more sensitive to H2O2 stress. Conclusion These results provide very meaningful clue for further exploring and understanding the mechanism underlying astrocyte injury in sepsis in vivo, and insight for why LPS could cause astrocyte injury in vivo, but not in vitro. It will also shed light on the therapeutic strategy of sepsis.

  4. Sulfasalazine intensifies temozolomide cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells.

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    Ignarro, Raffaela Silvestre; Facchini, Gustavo; Vieira, André Schwambach; De Melo, Daniela Rodrigues; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Rogerio, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating agent used to treat glioblastoma. This tumor type synthesizes the antioxidant glutathione through system X c (-) , which is inhibited by sulfasalazine (SAS). We exposed A172 and T98G human glioblastoma cells to a presumably clinically relevant concentration of TMZ (25 µM) and/or 0.5 mM SAS for 1, 3, or 5 days and assessed cell viability. For both cell lines, TMZ alone did not alter viability at any time point, while the coadministration of TMZ and SAS significantly reduced cell viability after 5 days. The drug combination exerted a synergistic effect on A172 cells after 3 and 5 days. Therefore, this particular lineage was subjected to complementary analyses on the genetic (transcriptome) and functional (glutathione and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein) levels. Cellular pathways containing differentially expressed genes related to the cell cycle were modified by TMZ alone. On the other hand, SAS regulated pathways associated with glutathione metabolism and synthesis, irrespective of TMZ. Moreover, SAS, but not TMZ, depleted the total glutathione level. Compared with the vehicle-treated cells, the level of PCNA protein was lower in cells treated with TMZ alone or in combination with SAS. In conclusion, our data showed that the association of TMZ and SAS is cytotoxic to T98G and A172 cells, thus providing useful insights for improving TMZ clinical efficacy through testing this novel drug combination. Moreover, the present study not only reports original information on differential gene expression in glioblastoma cells exposed to TMZ and/or SAS but also describes an antiproliferative effect of TMZ, which has not yet been observed in A172 cells.

  5. Overexpression of miR-100 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and chemosensitivity in human glioblastoma through FGFR3

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    Luan YX

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yongxin Luan,1 Shuyan Zhang,1 Ling Zuo,2 Lixiang Zhou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, First Bethune Hospital of Jilin University, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Second Bethune Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China Background: Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most deadly forms of brain cancer. We investigated the regulatory effects of microRNA-100 (miR-100 on cell proliferation, migration, and chemosensitivity in human glioblastoma. Methods: miR-100 expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in both glioblastoma cells and human tumors. Lentiviruses of miR-100 mimics and inhibitors were transfected into U251 and T98G cells. The regulatory effects of either overexpressing or downregulating miR-100 on glioblastoma were evaluated by a viability assay, growth assay, migration assay, chemosensitivity assay, and an in vivo tumor transplantation assay. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3, the bioinformatically predicted target of miR-100, was examined by Western blot in glioblastoma. FGFR3 was then ectopically overexpressed in U251 and T98G cells, and its effects on miR-100-mediated cancer regulation were evaluated by growth, migration, and chemosensitivity assays. Results: MiR-100 was markedly downregulated in both glioblastoma cell lines and human tumors. Overexpressing miR-100 through lentiviral transfection in U251 and T98G cells significantly inhibited cancer growth (both in vitro and in vivo and migration and increased chemosensitivity to cisplatin and 1, 3-bis (2-chloroethyl-l-nitrosourea, whereas downregulation of miR-100 had no effects on development of cancer. FGFR3 was directly regulated by miR-100 in glioblastoma. Ectopically overexpressing FGFR3 was able to ameliorate the anticancer effects of upregulation of miR-100 on glioblastoma growth, migration, and chemosensitivity. Conclusion: MiR-100 was generally downregulated in glioblastoma. Overexpressing mi

  6. Induction of cell death by ascorbic acid derivatives in human renal carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Y; Sakagami, H; Takeda, M

    1999-01-01

    Sodium-L-ascorbate, L-ascorbic acid, D-isoascorbic acid, sodium 5,6-benzylidene-L-ascorbate and sodium-6-beta-O-galactosyl-L-ascorbate, which produce ascorbyl radicals during the oxidative degradation, also induced cytotoxicity against cultured human renal carcinoma (TC-1) and glioblastoma multiform tumor (T98G) cell lines. On the other hand, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate magnesium and L-ascorbic acid 2-sulfate dipotassium salt, which do not produce the ascorbyl radical, were inactive. This suggests the possible role of the ascorbyl radical for cell death induction. T98G cells were more resistant to ascorbate analogs than TC-1 and HL-60 cells, possibly due to higher intracellular glutathione concentrations. Ascorbate treatment induced rapid elevation of both intracellular concentration of cAMP and Ca2+ in HL-60 cells, but not in TC-1 and T98G cells. However, the elevation of cAMP by theophyline and N,2-dibutyryl adenosine 3,5 cyclic monophosphate (dibutyryl cAMP) resulted in a decrease in the viable cell number. This suggests the possible role of cAMP for ascorbate-induced cell death.

  7. Salinomycin encapsulated nanoparticles as a targeting vehicle for glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tığlı Aydın, R Seda; Kaynak, Gökçe; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-02-01

    Salinomycin has been introduced as a novel alternative to traditional anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to test a strategy designed to deliver salinomycin to glioblastoma cells in vitro. Salinomycin-encapsulated polysorbate 80-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (P80-SAL-PLGA) were prepared and characterized with respect to particle size, morphology, thermal properties, drug encapsulation efficiency and controlled salinomycin-release behaviour. The in vitro cellular uptake of P80-SAL-PLGA (5 and 10 µM) or uncoated nanoparticles was assessed in T98G human glioblastoma cells, and the cell viability was investigated with respect to anti-growth activities. SAL, which was successfully transported to T98G glioblastoma cells via P80 coated nanoparticles (∼14% within 60 min), greatly decreased (p salinomycin delivery system in the treatment of human glioblastoma.

  8. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

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    Tao eSun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefin B (cystatin B is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1. Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin (STS than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and-7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition.

  9. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma cells by increasing reactive oxygen species and activating MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Michela; Capasso, Anna; D'Acunto, Cosimo W; Masullo, Milena; Rossi, Adriano G; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-12-27

    The effect of the biologically active prenylated chalcone and potential anticancer agent xanthohumol (1) has been investigated on apoptosis of the T98G human malignant glioblastoma cell line. Compound 1 decreased the viability of T98G cells by induction of apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis induced by 1 was associated with activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage and was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway, as exemplified by mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Xanthohumol induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), an effect that was reduced by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Intracellular ROS production appeared essential for the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and induction of apoptosis after exposure to 1. Oxidative stress due to treatment with 1 was associated with MAPK activation, as determined by ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 was attenuated using NAC to inhibit ROS production. After treatment with 1, ROS provided a specific environment that resulted in MAPK-induced cell death, with this effect reduced by the ERK1/2 specific inhibitor PD98059 and partially inhibited by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These findings suggest that xanthohumol (1) is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  10. Isolation and functional analysis of the human glioblastoma-specific promoter region of the human GD3 synthase (hST8Sia I) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Mi Dae; Haw-Young Kwon; Nam-Young Kang; Na-Ree Song; Kyoung-Sook Kim; Cheorl-Ho Kim; Jai-Heon Lee; Young-Choon Lee

    2009-01-01

    We identified the promoter region of the human GD3 synthase (hST8Sia I) gene to elucidate the mechanism underlying the regulation of hST8Sia I expression in human glioblastoma cells. The 5-rapid amplification of cDNA end using mRNA prepared from U-87MG cells revealed the presence of transcription start site of hST8Sia I gene, and the 5'-terminal analysis of its product showed that transcription started from 648 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation site. Functional analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the hST8Sia I gene by transient expression method revealed that the region from 638 to 498 is important for transcriptional activity of the hST8Sia I gene in U-87MG and T98G cells. This region lacks apparent TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains putative binding sites for transcription factors AREB6 and Elk-1. Site-directed mutagenesis and transient transfection assays demonstrated that both AREB6 and Elk-1 elements in this region were required for the promoter activity in U-87MG and T98G cells. These results indicated that both AREB6 and Elk-1 might play an essential role in the transcriptional activity of hST8Sia I gene essential for GD3 synthesis in human glioblastoma cells.

  11. A preliminary study of the effect of DBD plasma and osmolytes on T98G brain cancer and HEK non-malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Attri, Pankaj; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-04-25

    Non-thermal plasmas are emerging as a novel tool for the treatment of living tissues for biological and medical purpose. In this study, we described the effect of 4 min dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on both T98G cancer and HEK normal cell lines in the presence of different concentrations of osmolytes. This treatment strategy shows a specific inhibitory effect of a 240 s plasma exposure in the presence of osmolytes against T98G brain cancer cells only, but not on HEK normal cells. Based on these interesting properties of osmolytes, a non-thermal plasma appears to be a potential anticancer treatment strategy for different kinds of cancers in the presence of osmolytes.

  12. Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid compound, inhibits proliferation and invasion in U87-MG and T98G glioma cells through a multitarget effect.

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    Marta Solinas

    Full Text Available In the present study, we found that CBD inhibited U87-MG and T98G cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and caused a decrease in the expression of a set of proteins specifically involved in growth, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, CBD treatment caused a dose-related down-regulation of ERK and Akt prosurvival signaling pathways in U87-MG and T98G cells and decreased hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α expression in U87-MG cells. Taken together, these results provide new insights into the antitumor action of CBD, showing that this cannabinoid affects multiple tumoral features and molecular pathways. As CBD is a non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid that appears to be devoid of side effects, our results support its exploitation as an effective anti-cancer drug in the management of gliomas.

  13. Decreased therapeutic effects of noscapine combined with imatinib mesylate on human glioblastoma in vitro and the effect of midkine

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    Aktas Esin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM develops resistance to the advances in chemotherapy leading to poor prognosis and life quality. Consequently, new treatment modalities are needed. Our aims were to investigate the effects of combined noscapine (NOS and imatinib mesylate (IM on human GBM in vitro and the role of midkine (MK in this new combination treatment. Methods Monolayer and spheroid cultures of T98G human GBM cell line were used to evaluate the effects of IM (10 μM, Nos (10 μM and their combination on cell proliferation and apoptotic indexes, cell cycle, the levels of antiapoptotic MK, MRP-1, p170, PFGFR-α, EGFR, bcl-2 proteins, apoptotic caspase-3 levels, morphology (SEM and ultrastructure (TEM for 72 hrs. Results were statistically analyzed using the Student's t-test. Results The combination group induced highest decrease in cell proliferation and apoptotic indexes, caspase-3 levels, MRP-1 and PDGFR-α levels. The decrease in p170 levels were lower than IM but higher that NOS. The highest increases were in EGFR, MK, bcl-2 and cAMP levels in the combination group. The G0+G1 cell cycle arrest at the end of 72nd hr was the lowest in the combination group. Apoptotic appearence was observed rarely both in the morphologic and ultrastructural evaluation of the combination group. In addition, autophagic vacuoles which were frequently observed in the IM group were observed rarely. Conclusions The combination of Nos with IM showed antagonist effect in T98G human GBM cells in vitro. This antagonist effect was correlated highly with MK levels. The effects of NOS on MRP-1, MK and receptor tyrosine kinase levels were firstly demonstrated in our report. In addition, we proposed that MK is one of the modulator in the switch of autophagy to cell death or survival/resistance.

  14. The critical role of EGF-β-catenin signaling in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human glioblastoma

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    Wang X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xingqiang Wang, Shanshi Wang, Xiaolong Li, Shigang Jin, Feng Xiong, Xin Wang Department of Neurosurgery, People’s Hospital of Rizhao, Jining Medical University, Rizhao, China Abstract: To date, β-catenin has been reported to be implicated in mediating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in a variety of human cancers, which can be triggered by EGF. However, the mechanisms underlying EGF-β-catenin pathway-induced EMT of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have not been reported previously. In the present study, immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot were applied to investigate the effect of EGF-β-catenin pathway on EMT of GBM. Here, we identified that β-catenin mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in GBM tissues and four kinds of glioblastoma cell lines, including T98G, A172, U87, and U251 cells, compared with normal brain tissue and astrocytes. In U87 cell line, inhibition of β-catenin by siRNA suppressed EGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and the expression of EMT activators (Snail and Slug. In addition, the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin was up-regulated and the expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and MMP9 was down-regulated. Finally, inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways inactivated the EGF-β-catenin-induced EMT. In conclusion, β-catenin-EMT pathway induced by EGF is important for GBM progression by the PI3K/Akt pathways. Inhibition of β-catenin leads to suppression of EGF pathway-induced EMT, which provides a new way to treat GBM patients. Keywords: EGF, β-catenin, EMT, GBM

  15. Anti-tumor activities of luteolin and silibinin in glioblastoma cells: overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented luteolin and silibinin to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis in glioblastoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. High systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for controlling glioblastoma. The natural flavonoids luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL) have anti-tumor activities. LUT inhibits autophagy, cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis; while SIL activates caspase-8 cascades to induce apoptosis. However, synergistic anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL in glioblastoma remain unknown. Overexpression of tumor suppressor microRNA (miR) could enhance the anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL. Here, we showed that 20 µM LUT and 50 µM SIL worked synergistically for inhibiting growth of two different human glioblastoma U87MG (wild-type p53) and T98G (mutant p53) cell lines and natural combination therapy was more effective than conventional chemotherapy (10 µM BCNU or 100 µM TMZ). Combination of LUT and SIL caused inhibition of growth of glioblastoma cells due to induction of significant amounts of apoptosis and complete inhibition of invasion and migration. Further, combination of LUT and SIL inhibited rapamycin (RAPA)-induced autophagy, a survival mechanism, with suppression of PKCα and promotion of apoptosis through down regulation of iNOS and significant increase in expression of the tumor suppressor miR-7-1-3p in glioblastoma cells. Our in vivo studies confirmed that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL in RAPA pre-treated both U87MG and T98G tumors. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrated that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented the anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis for controlling growth of different human glioblastomas in vivo.

  16. Long-term In Vitro Treatment of Human Glioblastoma Cells with Temozolomide Increases Resistance In Vivo through Up-regulation of GLUT Transporter and Aldo-Keto Reductase Enzyme AKR1C Expression

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    Benjamin Le Calvé

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most frequent malignant glioma. Treatment of GBM patients is multimodal with maximum surgical resection, followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with the alkylating drug temozolomide (TMZ. The present study aims to identify genes implicated in the acquired resistance of two human GBM cells of astrocytic origin, T98G and U373, to TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was induced by culturing these cells in vitro for months with incremental TMZ concentrations up to 1 mM. Only partial resistance to TMZ has been achieved and was demonstrated in vivo in immunocompromised mice bearing orthotopic U373 and T98G xenografts. Our data show that long-term treatment of human astroglioma cells with TMZ induces increased expression of facilitative glucose transporter/solute carrier GLUT/SLC2A family members, mainly GLUT-3, and of the AKR1C family of proteins. The latter proteins are phase 1 drug-metabolizing enzymes involved in the maintenance of steroid homeostasis, prostaglandin metabolism, and metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. GLUT-3 has been previously suggested to exert roles in GBM neovascularization processes, and TMZ was found to exert antiangiogenic effects in experimental gliomas. AKR1C1 was previously shown to be associated with oncogenic potential, with proproliferative effects similar to AKR1C3 in the latter case. Both AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 proteins are involved in cancer pro-proliferative cell chemoresistance. Selective targeting of GLUT-3 in GBM and/or AKR1C proteins (by means of jasmonates, for example could thus delay the acquisition of resistance to TMZ of astroglioma cells in the context of prolonged treatment with this drug.

  17. APOPTOSIS INDUCED BY HYPERTHERMIA IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELL LINE AND MURINE GLIOBLASTOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of apoptosis in tumor cell of malignant glioma death following treatment with hyperthermia and calcium ionophore. Methods: The apoptosis induced by hyperthermia and calcium ionophore, A23187, in human glioblastoma cell line TJ905 and murine glioblastoma G422 was evaluated by characteristic findings in DNA agarose gel electrophresis, ultrastructural examination and flow cytometric analysis. Results: Apoptosis could be induced by moderate hyperthermia, but not by mild hyperthermia, calcium ionophore enhanced significantly the effect of mild hyperthermia on the induction of apoptosis. Conclusion: This result indicates that apoptotic cell death is one of the mechanisms of hyperthermic therapy for malignant glioma and taking measures to increase the cytolic calcium may enhance the effect of hyperthermia.

  18. TWIST1 promotes invasion through mesenchymal change in human glioblastoma

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    Wakimoto Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor cell invasion into adjacent normal brain is a mesenchymal feature of GBM and a major factor contributing to their dismal outcomes. Therefore, better understandings of mechanisms that promote mesenchymal change in GBM are of great clinical importance to address invasion. We previously showed that the bHLH transcription factor TWIST1 which orchestrates carcinoma metastasis through an epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT is upregulated in GBM and promotes invasion of the SF767 GBM cell line in vitro. Results To further define TWIST1 functions in GBM we tested the impact of TWIST1 over-expression on invasion in vivo and its impact on gene expression. We found that TWIST1 significantly increased SNB19 and T98G cell line invasion in orthotopic xenotransplants and increased expression of genes in functional categories associated with adhesion, extracellular matrix proteins, cell motility and locomotion, cell migration and actin cytoskeleton organization. Consistent with this TWIST1 reduced cell aggregation, promoted actin cytoskeletal re-organization and enhanced migration and adhesion to fibronectin substrates. Individual genes upregulated by TWIST1 known to promote EMT and/or GBM invasion included SNAI2, MMP2, HGF, FAP and FN1. Distinct from carcinoma EMT, TWIST1 did not generate an E- to N-cadherin "switch" in GBM cell lines. The clinical relevance of putative TWIST target genes SNAI2 and fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP identified in vitro was confirmed by their highly correlated expression with TWIST1 in 39 human tumors. The potential therapeutic importance of inhibiting TWIST1 was also shown through a decrease in cell invasion in vitro and growth of GBM stem cells. Conclusions Together these studies demonstrated that TWIST1 enhances GBM invasion in concert with mesenchymal change not involving the canonical cadherin switch of carcinoma EMT. Given the recent recognition that mesenchymal change in GBMs is

  19. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Pathogenesis and Outcome of Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Choy, Winward; Lagman, Carlito; Lee, Seung J.; Bui, Timothy T; Safaee, Michael; Yang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in antiviral therapies have been accompanied by an increased frequency of non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we investigated all reported cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with glioblastoma and evaluated their clinical outcomes. A comprehensive review of the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying glioblastoma development in the setting of HIV/AIDS is provided. Met...

  20. DIETARY ISOTHIOCYANATE IBERIN INHIBITS GROWTH AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the isothiocyanate iberin, a bioactive agent in Brassicaceae species, in human glioblastoma cells. The human glioblastoma cell cultures were treated with different concentrations of iberin and tested for growth inhibition...

  1. Characterization of glioma stem-like cells from human glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Shun; Okamoto, Yutaka; Sano, Emiko; Ochiai, Yushi; Ogino, Akiyoshi; Ohta, Takashi; Hara, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Takuya; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2015-07-01

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) could have potential for tumorigenesis, treatment resistance, and tumor recurrence (GSC hypothesis). However, the mechanisms underlying such potential has remained elusive and few ultrastructural features of the cells have been reported in detail. We therefore undertook observations of the antigenic characteristics and ultrastructural features of GSCs isolated from human glioblastomas. Tumor spheres formed by variable numbers of cells, exhibiting a variable appearance in both their size and shape, were frequently seen in GSCs expressing the stem cell surface markers CD133 and CD15. Increased cell nucleus atypia, mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, coated vesicles, and microvilli, were noted in the GSCs. Furthermore, cells at division phases and different phases of the apoptotic process were occasionally observed. These findings could imply that GSCs have certain relations with human neural stem cells (NSCs) but are primitively different from undifferentiated NSCs. The data may provide support for the GSC hypothesis, and also facilitate the establishment of future glioblastoma treatments targeting GSCs.

  2. Effects of stratospheric radiations on human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cristiano, Loredana; Colafarina, Sabrina; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Falone, Stefano; Cinque, Benedetta; Ursini, Ornella; Moscardelli, Roberto; Ragni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of stratospheric radiations on neural tumour cells. ADF human glioblastoma cells were hosted on a stratospheric balloon within the 2002 biological experiment campaign of the Italian Space Agency. The flight at an average height of 37 km lasted about 24 hrs. Cell morphology, number and viability, cell cycle and apoptosis, some antioxidant enzymes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and gene expression were studied. Stratospheric radiations caused a significant decrease in cell number, as well as a block of proliferation, but not apoptosis or necrosis. Radiations also induced activation and induction of some antioxidant enzymes, increase in DNA repair-related proteins (p53 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and variations of the transcription factors Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors. Morphologically, test cells exhibited more electron dense cytoplasm and less condensed chromatin than controls and modification of their surfaces. Our results indicate that glioblastoma cells, exposed to continuous stratospheric radiations for 24 hrs, show activation of cell cycle check point, decrease of cell number, variations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and increase of Reactive Oxygen Species-scavenging enzymes.

  3. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  4. Pro-inflammatory gene expression in solid glioblastoma microenvironment and in hypoxic stem cells from human glioblastoma

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    Santoro Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptation to hypoxia and consequent pro-inflammatory gene expression of prostate and breast carcinomas have been implicated in the progression toward cancer malignant phenotype. Only partial data are available for the human tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. The aim of our study was to analyze the hypoxic and pro-inflammatory microenvironment in GBMs and to demonstrate that in a stem/progenitor cell line derived from human glioblastoma (GBM-SCs, hypoxia activates a coordinated inflammatory response, evidencing an invasive and migratory phenotype. Methods From each of 10 human solid glioblastomas, clinically and histopathologically characterized, we obtained three surgical samples taken from the center and the periphery of the tumor, and from adjacent host normal tissue. Molecular and morphological analyses were carried out using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot (WB. GBM stem and differentiated cells were incubated under hypoxic conditions and analyzed for pro-inflammatory gene expression and for invasive/migratory behavior. Results A panel of selected representative pro-inflammatory genes (RAGE and P2X7R, COX2, NOS2 and, PTX3 were analyzed, comparing tumor, peritumor and host normal tissues. Tumors containing leukocyte infiltrates (as assessed using CD45 immunohistochemistry were excluded. Selected genes were overexpressed in the central regions of the tumors (i.e. in the more hypoxic areas, less expressed in peripheral regions, and poorly expressed or absent in adjacent normal host tissues. Western blot analysis confirmed that the corresponding pro-inflammatory proteins were also differently expressed. Hypoxic stem cell lines showed a clear time-dependent activation of the entire panel of pro-inflammatory genes as compared to differentiated tumor cells. Biological assays showed that invasive and migratory behavior was strengthened by hypoxia only in GBM stem cells. Conclusions In human solid glioblastoma we have

  5. Amplification and overexpression of the EGF receptor gene in primary human glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libermann, T A; Nusbaum, H R; Razon, N; Kris, R; Lax, I; Soreq, H; Whittle, N; Waterfield, M D; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1985-01-01

    The expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in brain tumours of glial origin was studied at the protein, mRNA and genomic levels. Four out of 10 glioblastomas that overexpress EGF receptor also have gene amplification. The amplified genes appear to be rearranged, generating an aberrant mRNA in at least one of these tumours. Such receptor defects may be relevant to tumorigenesis of human glioblastomas.

  6. Induction of cytopathogenicity in human glioblastoma cells by chikungunya virus.

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    Rachy Abraham

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an arthritogenic old-world alphavirus, has been implicated in the central nervous system (CNS infection in infants and elderly patients. Astrocytes are the major immune cells of the brain parenchyma that mediate inflammation. In the present study we found that a local isolate of CHIKV infect and activate U-87 MG cells, a glioblastoma cell line of human astrocyte origin. The infection kinetics were similar in infected U-87 MG cells and the human embryo kidney (HEK293 cells as indicated by immunofluorescence and plaque assays, 24h post-infection (p.i.. In infected U-87 MG cells, apoptosis was detectable from 48h p.i. evidenced by DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear condensation and visible cytopathic effects in a dose and time-dependent manner. XBP1 mRNA splicing and eIF2α phosphorylation studies indicated the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum stress in infected cells. In U-87 MG cells stably expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged light chain-3 (GFP-LC3 protein, CHIKV infection showed increased autophagy response. The infection led to an enhanced expression of the mRNA transcripts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL9 within 24h p.i. Significant up-regulation of the proteins of RIG-I like receptor (RLR pathway, such as RIG-I and TRAF-6, was observed indicating the activation of the cytoplasmic-cellular innate immune response. The overall results show that the U-87 MG cell line is a potential in vitro model for in depth study of these molecular pathways in response to CHIKV infection. The responses in these cells of CNS origin, which are inherently defective in Type I interferon response, could be analogous to that occurring in infants and very old patients who also have a compromised interferon-response. The results also point to the intriguing possibility of using this virus for studies to develop oncolytic virus therapy approaches

  7. Transforming fusions of FGFR and TACC genes in human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devendra; Chan, Joseph Minhow; Zoppoli, Pietro; Niola, Francesco; Sullivan, Ryan; Castano, Angelica; Liu, Eric Minwei; Reichel, Jonathan; Porrati, Paola; Pellegatta, Serena; Qiu, Kunlong; Gao, Zhibo; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Riccardo; Brat, Daniel J; Guha, Abhijit; Aldape, Ken; Golfinos, John G; Zagzag, David; Mikkelsen, Tom; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Lasorella, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Iavarone, Antonio

    2012-09-07

    The brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal forms of human cancer. Here, we report that a small subset of GBMs (3.1%; 3 of 97 tumors examined) harbors oncogenic chromosomal translocations that fuse in-frame the tyrosine kinase coding domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) genes (FGFR1 or FGFR3) to the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) coding domains of TACC1 or TACC3, respectively. The FGFR-TACC fusion protein displays oncogenic activity when introduced into astrocytes or stereotactically transduced in the mouse brain. The fusion protein, which localizes to mitotic spindle poles, has constitutive kinase activity and induces mitotic and chromosomal segregation defects and triggers aneuploidy. Inhibition of FGFR kinase corrects the aneuploidy, and oral administration of an FGFR inhibitor prolongs survival of mice harboring intracranial FGFR3-TACC3-initiated glioma. FGFR-TACC fusions could potentially identify a subset of GBM patients who would benefit from targeted FGFR kinase inhibition.

  8. Decitabine nanoconjugate sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Naz, Asia; Thompson, David H; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed and characterized a delivery system for the epigenetic demethylating drug, decitabine, to sensitize temozolomide-resistant human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells to alkylating chemotherapy. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based nanoconjugate was fabricated to encapsulate decitabine and achieved a better therapeutic response in GBM cells than that with the free drug. After synthesis, the highly efficient uptake process and intracellular dynamics of this nanoconjugate were monitored by single-molecule fluorescence tools. Our experiments demonstrated that, under an acidic pH due to active glycolysis in cancer cells, the PLGA-PEG nanovector could release the conjugated decitabine at a faster rate, after which the hydrolyzed lactic acid and glycolic acid would further acidify the intracellular microenvironment, thus providing positive feedback to increase the effective drug concentration and realize growth inhibition. In temozolomide-resistant GBM cells, decitabine can potentiate the cytotoxic DNA alkylation by counteracting cytosine methylation and reactivating tumor suppressor genes, such as p53 and p21. Owing to the excellent internalization and endolysosomal escape enabled by the PLGA-PEG backbone, the encapsulated decitabine exhibited a better anti-GBM potential than that of free drug molecules. Hence, the synthesized nanoconjugate and temozolomide could act in synergy to deliver a more potent and long-term antiproliferative effect against malignant GBM cells.

  9. Acrylamide inhibits cellular differentiation of human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Chou, Chin-Cheng

    2015-08-01

    This study explores human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and human glioblastoma (U-1240 MG) cellular differentiation changes under exposure to acrylamide (ACR). Differentiation of SH-SY5Y and U-1240 MG cells were induced by retinoic acid (RA) and butyric acid (BA), respectively. Morphological observations and MTT assay showed that the induced cellular differentiation and cell proliferation were inhibited by ACR in a time- and dose-dependent manner. ACR co-treatment with RA attenuated SH-SY5Y expressions of neurofilament protein-L (NF-L), microtubule-associated protein 1b (MAP1b; 1.2 to 0.7, p < 0.001), MAP2c (2.2 to 0.8, p < 0.05), and Janus kinase1 (JAK1; 1.9 to 0.6, p < 0.001), while ACR co-treatment with BA attenuated U-1240 MG expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), MAP1b (1.2 to 0.6, p < 0.001), MAP2c (1.5 to 0.7, p < 0.01), and JAK1 (2.1 to 0.5, p < 0.001), respectively. ACR also decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) in U-1240 MG cells, while caffeine reversed this suppression of ERK and JNK phosphorylation caused by ACR treatment. These results showed that RA-induced neurogenesis of SH-SY5Y and BA-induced astrogliogenesis of U-1240 MG cells were attenuated by ACR and were associated with down-regulation of MAPs expression and JAK-STAT signaling.

  10. Early effects comparison of X-rays delivered at high-dose-rate pulses by a plasma focus device and at low dose rate on human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virelli, A; Zironi, I; Pasi, F; Ceccolini, E; Nano, R; Facoetti, A; Gavoçi, E; Fiore, M R; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Cucchi, G; Castellani, G; Sumini, M; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the effects of high-dose-rate (DR) X-ray beams produced by a plasma focus device (PFMA-3), to exploit its potential medical applications (e.g. radiotherapy), and low-DR X-ray beams produced by a conventional source (XRT). Experiments have been performed at 0.5 and 2 Gy doses on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). Cell proliferation rate and potassium outward currents (IK) have been investigated by time lapse imaging and patch clamp recordings. The results showed that PFMA-3 irradiation has a greater capability to reduce the proliferation rate activity with respect to XRT, while it does not affect IK of T98G cells at any of the dose levels tested. XRT irradiation significantly reduces the mean IK amplitude of T98G cells only at 0.5 Gy. This work confirms that the DR, and therefore the source of radiation, is crucial for the planning and optimisation of radiotherapy applications.

  11. Morusin Induces TRAIL Sensitization by Regulating EGFR and DR5 in Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dain; Ha, In Jin; Park, Sang-Yoon; Choi, Minji; Lim, Sung-Lyul; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jun-Hee; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Yun, Miyong; Lee, Seok-Geun

    2016-02-26

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant primary tumors, and the prognosis for glioblastoma patients remains poor. Tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a promising anticancer agent due to its remarkable ability to selectively kill tumor cells. However, since many cancers are resistant to TRAIL, strategies to overcome resistance are required for the successful use of TRAIL in the clinic. In the present study, the potential of morusin as a TRAIL sensitizer in human glioblastoma cells was evaluated. Treatment with TRAIL or morusin alone showed weak cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells. However, combination treatment of TRAIL with morusin synergistically decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis compared with single treatment. Morusin induced expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), but not DR4 or decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2). Furthermore, morusin significantly decreased anti-apoptotic molecules survivin and XIAP. In addition, morusin reduced expression of EGFR and PDFGR as well as phosphorylation of STAT3, possibly mediating down-regulation of survivin and XIAP. Together these results suggest that morusin enhances TRAIL sensitivity in human glioblastoma cells through regulating expression of DR5 and EGFR. Therefore, the combination treatment of TRAIL and morusin may be a new therapeutic strategy for malignant glioma patients.

  12. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  13. Ultrastructural evidence for differentiation in a human glioblastoma cell line treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.E.; Anderson, K.M. (Rush Presbyterian St. Luke' s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)); Seed, T.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Human glioblastoma cells incubated in the presence of inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis show decreased cellular proliferation without cytotoxicity. The authors studied the ultrastructural morphology of a human glioblastoma cell line cultured with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, or 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor. When glioblastoma cells were treated for 3 days with antiproliferative concentrations of either agent, they shared many morphological characteristics, including evidence for increased astrocytic differentiation with only limited signs of toxicity. The inhibited glioma cells demonstrated an increase in the number and length of astrocytic processes containing greater numbers of glial filaments, and the NDGA-treated cells also demonstrated extensive lateral pseudopod formation along the processes. The glioblastoma cell shape also become more elongated, losing the usual nuclear lobularity and nuclear inclusions, especially in NDGA-treated cells. Many cytoplasmic organelles packed the cytosol of the inhibited glioma cells, including prominent Golgi apparatus, dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum evolving into dilated vesicles, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and numerous concentric laminations. There was limited evidence for toxicity, however, as the mitochondria were more pleomorphic with some mitochondrial distension and disruption of the cristae along with an increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization. The authors conclude that the inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis. NDGA and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, not only suppress glioblastoma cell proliferation, but also include increased astrocytic differentiation.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular-scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S; Ahmad, T; Barth, R F; Kabalka, G W

    2014-06-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 ((10)B) atoms to individual tumour cells. Cell killing results from the (10)B (n, α)(7) Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of (10)B atoms are localized in the tumour cells. Intranuclear (10)B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of (10)B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumour cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular-scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, a secondary ion mass spectrometry based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high-grade gliomas, recurrent tumours of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumour cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This

  15. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S.; Ahmad, T.; Barth, R. F.; Kabalka, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 (10B) atoms to individual tumor cells. Cell killing results from the 10B (n, α)7Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of 10B atoms are localized in the tumor cells. Intranuclear 10B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of 10B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumor cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as PET and MRI. In this study, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high grade gliomas, recurrent tumors of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumor cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This suggests that it might be advantageous if patients were placed on a

  16. Regulation of YKL-40 expression during genotoxic or microenvironmental stress in human glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Hansen, Lasse T;

    2005-01-01

    material from glioblastomas patients. We investigated the expression of YKL-40 in three human malignant glioma cell lines exposed to different types of stress. Whereas a polymerase chain reaction transcript was detectable in all three cell lines, only U87 produced measurable amounts of YKL-40 protein. In U...

  17. Endocannabinoid metabolism in human glioblastomas and meningiomas compared to human non-tumour brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The endogenous levels of the two cannabinoid receptor ligands 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, and their respective congeners, monoacyl glycerols and N-acylethanolamines, as well as the phospholipid precursors of N-acylethanolamines, were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in...... in glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) tissue and meningioma (WHO grade I) tissue and compared with human non-tumour brain tissue. Furthermore, the metabolic turnover of N-acylethanolamines was compared by measurements of the enzymatic activity of N-acyltransferase, N...

  18. miR-22 inhibits the proliferation, motility, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells by directly targeting SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanchun; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Xifeng; Shen, Likui; Jiang, Dongyi; Dai, Dongwei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a kind of small and non-coding RNA, can target the downstream molecules. Increasing evidence demonstrates that miRNAs meditate the onset and progression of a variety of tumors. In the present study, we carried out gene transfection, western blot, and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to explore the role of miR-22 in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Here, we verified that the expression of miR-22 was downregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cells rather than matched non-tumor tissues and normal human astrocyte (NHA) cells (p glioblastoma tissues and cells (p glioblastoma and miR-22-SIRT1 pathway can be recommended as a potential target for treatment of glioblastoma.

  19. P01.02FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 4 CONTRIBUTES TO 3-DIMENSIONAL GROWTH OF HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, D.; Englinger, B.; Pichler, J.; Hainfellner, J.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Knosp, E.; Buchroithner, J.; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S.; Berger, W.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma growth is driven by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signals. One of the RTK systems recently coming into focus are the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) high-affinity receptors (FGFR1-FGFR4) due to mutation, overexpression or translocation in several cancer types. FGF/FGFR represents a complex signal network with essential functions in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis and wound healing but also for malignant transformation and growth as well as tumor neoangiogenesis and therapy failure. Several studies have suggested a role of FGFRs in human glioblastoma whereby the information on FGFR4 is sparse. Here we investigated whether FGFR4 as compared to FGFR1 blockade impacts on glioblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Both in human glioblastoma cell lines (N = 8) and primary cell cultures from clinical samples (N = 26) we found a widespread expression of several FGFs (e.g. FGF1, FGF2, and FGF5) but also a significant overexpression of FGFR1 and FGFR4 in distinct subgroups as compared to non-malignant brain primo cell cultures. Regarding FGFR1 mRNA, all glioma cell models investigated expressed in addition to the FGFR1-IIIb also the mesenchymal and more oncogenic FGFR1-IIIc splice variant. Application of the FGFR inhibitors (nintedanib, ponatinib) as well as expression of dominant-negative (dn) versions of FGFR1 and FGFR4 significantly reduced in vitro cell growth and clonogenicity in the tested glioma cell models whereby dnFGFR1 tended to be more efficient than dnFGFR4. Accordingly, both dominant-negative FGFRs induced significant apoptosis whereby the effects of dnFGFR1 were again significantly stronger. Surprisingly, the inhibitory effects on anchorage-independent growth in soft agar were opposite with significant mitigation by dnFGFR1 but almost complete blockade by dnFGFR4 in the majority of the glioblastoma models analysed. Additionally, neurosphere formation, indicative for the presence of glioma stem cells, was profoundly reduced by

  20. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of bortezomib and gefitinib compared to alkylating agents on human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pédeboscq, Stéphane; L'Azou, Béatrice; Passagne, Isabelle; De Giorgi, Francesca; Ichas, François; Pometan, Jean-Paul; Cambar, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant astrocytic tumor with a median survival of about 12 months for which new therapeutic strategies are required. We therefore examined the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs with different mechanisms of action on two human glioblastoma cell lines expressing various levels of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor). Apoptosis induced by these anticancer agents was evaluated by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of alkylating drugs followed a dose-effect curve and cytotoxicity index values were lower with carboplatin than with BCNU and temozolomide. Anti-EGFR gefitinib (10 microM) cytotoxicity on DBTRG.05-MG expressing high levels of EGFR was significantly higher than on U87-MG expressing low levels of EGFR. Carboplatin and temozolomide cytotoxicity was potentiated with the addition of gefitinib on DBTRG.05-MG. Among the anticancer agents tested, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was the most cytotoxic with very low IC50 on the two cell lines. Moreover, all anticancer drugs tested induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Bortezomib proved to be a more potent inductor of apoptosis than gefitinib and alkylating agents. These results show the efficacy of bortezomib and of the association between conventional chemotherapy and gefitinib on glioblastoma cells and therefore suggest the interest of these molecules in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  1. Fractionated irradiation combined with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide of two human glioblastomas grafted in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Lin-Quan; Buchegger, Franz; Coucke, Philippe; MIRIMANOFF

    2001-01-01

    This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing effect of nicotinamide and/or carbogen on human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. U-87MG and LN-Z308 tumors were irradiated with either 20 fractions over 12 days or 5 fractions over 5 days in air-breathing mice, mice injected with nicotinamide, mice breathing carbogen, or mice receiving nicotinamide plus carbogen. The responses to treatment were assessed using local control and moist desquamation. In U-87MG tumors, the enhancement ratios...

  2. Fractionated irradiation combined with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide of two human glioblastomas grafted in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, Lin-Quan; Buchegger, Franz; Coucke, Philippe; MIRIMANOFF

    2001-01-01

    This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing effect of nicotinamide and/or carbogen on human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. U-87MG and LN-Z308 tumors were irradiated with either 20 fractions over 12 days or 5 fractions over 5 days in air-breathing mice, mice injected with nicotinamide, mice breathing carbogen, or mice receiving nicotinamide plus carbogen. The responses to treatment were assessed using local control and moist desquamation. In U-87MG tumors, the enhancement ratios...

  3. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) is a progesterone (P4) regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM) from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM) blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL) increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h) and U251 (24 and 48 h) cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells. PMID:28168193

  4. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF is a progesterone (P4 regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h and U251 (24 and 48 h cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

  5. A murine model of xenotransplantation of human glioblastoma with imunosupression by orogastric cyclosporin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre M. Cunha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Several animal experimental models have been used in the study of malignant gliomas. The objective of the study was to test the efficacy of a simple, reproducible and low cost animal model, using human cells of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM xenotransplantated in subcutaneous tissue of Wistar rats, immunosuppressed with cyclosporin given by orogastric administration, controlled by nonimunosuppressed rats. The animals were sacrificed at weekly intervals and we have observed gradual growth of tumor in the immunosuppressed group. The average tumor volume throughout the experiment was 4.38 cm³ in the immunosuppressed group, and 0.27 cm³ in the control one (p<0.001. Tumors showed histopathological hallmarks of GBM and retained its glial identity verified by GFAP and vimentin immunoreaction. Immunosuppression of rats with cyclosporin was efficient in allowing the development of human glioblastoma cells in subcutaneous tissues. The model has demonstrated the maintenance of most of the histopathological characteristics of human glioblastoma in an heterotopic site and might by considered in research of molecular and proliferative pathways of malignant gliomas.

  6. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele [Section of Experimental Neurosurgery/Tumor Immunology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Cordes, Nils, E-mail: Nils.Cordes@Oncoray.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  7. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  8. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yichen, E-mail: jeff200064017@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pingwang8000@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhao, Wei, E-mail: 15669746@qq.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Yao, Yilong, E-mail: yaoyilong_322@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Xiaobai, E-mail: paganizonda1991@qq.com [The 96th Class, 7-year Program, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun_724@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Yixue, E-mail: xueyixue888@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Yunhui, E-mail: liuyh@sj-hospital.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  9. Primary ciliogenesis defects are associated with human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattner Jerome B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that have been implicated in signal transduction, cell to cell communication, left and right pattern embryonic development, sensation of fluid flow, regulation of calcium levels, mechanosensation, growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. Defects in the formation and/or function of these structures underlie a variety of human diseases such as Alström, Bardet-Biedl, Joubert, Meckel-Gruber and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes. The expression and function of primary cilia in cancer cells has now become a focus of attention but has not been studied in astrocytomas/glioblastomas. To begin to address this issue, we compared the structure and expression of primary cilia in a normal human astrocyte cell line with five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines. Methods Cultured normal human astrocytes and five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Monospecific antibodies were used to detect primary cilia and map the relationship between the primary cilia region and sites of endocytosis. Results We show that expression of primary cilia in normal astrocytes is cell cycle related and the primary cilium extends through the cell within a unique structure which we show to be a site of endocytosis. Importantly, we document that in each of the five astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines fully formed primary cilia are either expressed at a very low level, are completely absent or have aberrant forms, due to incomplete ciliogenesis. Conclusions The recent discovery of the importance of primary cilia in a variety of cell functions raises the possibility that this structure may have a role in a variety of cancers. Our finding that the formation of the primary cilium is disrupted in cells derived from astrocytoma/glioblastoma tumors provides the first

  10. Metabolic patterns and biotransformation activities of resveratrol in human glioblastoma cells: relevance with therapeutic efficacies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Shu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-resveratrol rather than its biotransformed monosulfate metabolite exerts anti-medulloblastoma effects by suppressing STAT3 activation. Nevertheless, its effects on human glioblastoma cells are variable due to certain unknown reason(s. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Citing resveratrol-sensitive UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and primarily cultured rat brain cells/PBCs as controls, the effect of resveratrol on LN-18 human glioblastoma cells and its relevance with metabolic pattern(s, brain-associated sulfotransferase/SULT expression and the statuses of STAT3 signaling and protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3 were elucidated by multiple experimental approaches. Meanwhile, the expression patterns of three SULTs (SULT1A1, 1C2 and 4A1 in human glioblastoma tumors were profiled immunohistochemically. The results revealed that 100 µM resveratrol-treated LN-18 generated the same metabolites as UW228-3 cells, while additional metabolite in molecular weight of 403.0992 in negative ion mode was found in PBCs. Neither growth arrest nor apoptosis was found in resveratrol-treated LN-18 and PBC cells. Upon resveratrol treatment, the levels of SULT1A1, 1C2 and 4A1 expression in LN-18 cells were more up-regulated than that expressed in UW228-3 cells and close to the levels in PBCs. Immunohistochemical staining showed that 42.0%, 27.1% and 19.6% of 149 glioblastoma cases produced similar SULT1A1, 1C2 and 4A1 levels as that of tumor-surrounding tissues. Unlike the situation in UW228-3 cells, STAT3 signaling remained activated and its protein inhibitor PIAS3 was restricted in the cytosol of resveratrol-treated LN-18 cells. No nuclear translocation of STAT3 and PIAS3 was observed in resveratrol-treated PBCs. Treatment with STAT3 chemical inhibitor, AG490, committed majority of LN-18 and UW228-3 cells but not PBCs to apoptosis within 48 hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LN-18 glioblastoma cells are insensitive to resveratrol due to the

  11. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates.

  12. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  13. Phloretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Fan, Chenghe; Pu, Lv; Wei, Cui; Jin, Haiqiang; Teng, Yuming; Zhao, Mingming; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Junlong; Li, Fan; Peng, Qing; Kong, Jian; Pan, Bing; Zheng, Lemin; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-01

    Phloretin, a flavonoid present in various plants, has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. However, the mechanism of its chemo-preventive effect on human glioblastoma cells is not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of phloretin and its associated chemo-preventive effect in human glioblastoma cells. The results indicate that phloretin inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G0-G1 phase and induced apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells. Phloretin-induced cell cycle arrest was associated with increased expression of p27 and decreased expression of cdk2, cdk4, cdk6, cyclinD and cyclinE. Moreover, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades were suppressed by phloretin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, phloretin triggered the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). This was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax, Bak and c-PARP and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. The antioxidant agents N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione weakened the effect of phloretin on glioblastoma cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that phloretin exerts potent chemo-preventive activity in human glioblastoma cells through the generation of ROS.

  14. Nanomelatonin triggers superior anticancer functionality in a human malignant glioblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sanjeev Kumar; Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Dev, Atul; Kaundal, Babita; Choudhury, Subhasree Roy; Karmakar, Surajit

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin (MEL) has promising medicinal value as an anticancer agent in a variety of malignancies, but there are difficulties in achieving a therapeutic dose due to its short half-life, low bioavailability, poor solubility and extensive first-pass metabolism. In this study chitosan/tripolyphosphate (TPP) nanoparticles were prepared by an ionic gelation method to overcome the therapeutic challenges of melatonin and to improve its anticancer efficacy. Characterization of the melatonin-loaded chitosan (MEL-CS) nanoformulation was performed using transmission and scanning electron microscopies, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. In vitro release, cellular uptake and efficacy studies were tested for their enhanced anticancer potential in human U87MG glioblastoma cells. Confocal studies revealed higher cellular uptake of MEL-CS nanoparticles and enhanced anticancer efficacy in human malignant glioblastoma cancer cells than in healthy non-malignant human HEK293T cells in mono- and co-culture models. Our study has shown for the first time that MEL-CS nanocomposites are therapeutically more effective as compared to free MEL at inducing functional anticancer efficacy in the human brain tumour U87MG cell line.

  15. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Differentially Modulate Cell Proliferation and Endocannabinoid System in Two Human Cancer Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastón, Repossi; María Eugenia, Pasqualini; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo R

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that quantity and quality of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play a role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms involved in this interaction(s) are not clear. Endocannabinoids are lipid metabolites known to have growth modulatory actions. We studied the effect of supplementation with PUFAs ω-6 and ω-3 (essential fatty acids, EFAs), saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (non-EFAs) on the growth of tumor cells and modifications in their endocannabinoid content. Cell cultures of human glioblastoma (T98G) and breast cancer (MCF7) were supplemented with 50 or 100 mmol EFAs and non-EFAs for 72 h. Cell proliferation was then determined by MTT, anandamide (AEA) levels by HPLC, total fatty acids profiles by GLC, CB1 receptor expression by WB and FAAH activity by spectrophotometric method. Fatty acids profile reflected the incorporation of the lipids supplemented in each assay. Arachidonic acid (EFA ω-6) supplementation increased AEA levels and inhibited the growth of T98G, whereas palmitic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. In breast cancer (MCF7) cells, eicosapentaenoic acid (EFA ω-3) reduced and oleic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. CB1 expression was higher in T98G and no differences were observed in FAAH activity. The growth of tumor cells can be differentially modulated by fatty acids and, at least in part, can be attributed to their ability to act on the components of the endocannabinoid system. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular

  17. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular char

  18. RUNX1 Regulates Migration, Invasion, and Angiogenesis via p38 MAPK Pathway in Human Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangpairoj, Kant; Vivithanaporn, Pornpun; Apisawetakan, Somjai; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Sobhon, Prasert; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida

    2016-12-24

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) is essential for the establishment of fetal and adult hematopoiesis and neuronal development. Aberrant expression of RUNX1 led to proliferation and metastasis of several cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RUNX1 in migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma using IL-1β-treated U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells as a model. IL-1β at 10 ng/ml stimulated translocation of RUNX1 into the nucleus with increased expressions of RUNX1, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-19, and VEGFA in U-87 MG cells. In addition, silencing of RUNX1 gene significantly suppressed U-87 MG cell migration and invasion abilities. Moreover, knockdown of RUNX1 mRNA in U-87 MG cells reduced the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Further investigation revealed that IL-1β-induced RUNX1 expression might be mediated via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling molecule for the expression of these invasion- and angiogenic-related molecules. Together with an inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB203580) could decrease RUNX1 mRNA expression. Thus, RUNX1 may be one of the putative molecular targeted therapies against glioma metastasis and angiogenesis through the activation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  19. Extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate: a novel actor in human glioblastoma stem cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Riccitelli

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most frequent and aggressive intracranial neoplasms in humans, and despite advances and the introduction of the alkylating agent temozolomide in therapy have improved patient survival, resistance mechanisms limit benefits. Recent studies support that glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs, a cell subpopulation within the tumour, are involved in the aberrant expansion and therapy resistance properties of glioblastomas, through still unclear mechanisms. Emerging evidence suggests that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P a potent onco-promoter able to act as extracellular signal, favours malignant and chemoresistance properties in GSCs. Notwithstanding, the origin of S1P in the GSC environment remains unknown. We investigated S1P metabolism, release, and role in cell survival properties of GSCs isolated from either U87-MG cell line or a primary culture of human glioblastoma. We show that both GSC models, grown as neurospheres and expressing GSC markers, are resistant to temozolomide, despite not expressing the DNA repair protein MGMT, a major contributor to temozolomide-resistance. Pulse experiments with labelled sphingosine revealed that both GSC types are able to rapidly phosphorylate the long-chain base, and that the newly produced S1P is efficiently degraded. Of relevance, we found that S1P was present in GSC extracellular medium, its level being significantly higher than in U87-MG cells, and that the extracellular/intracellular ratio of S1P was about ten-fold higher in GSCs. The activity of sphingosine kinases was undetectable in GSC media, suggesting that mechanisms of S1P transport to the extracellular environment are constitutive in GSCs. In addition we found that an inhibitor of S1P biosynthesis made GSCs sensitive to temozolomide (TMZ, and that exogenous S1P reverted this effect, thus involving extracellular S1P as a GSC survival signal in TMZ resistance. Altogether our data implicate for the first time GSCs as a pivotal source

  20. Molecular characterization of EGFR and EGFRvIII signaling networks in human glioblastoma tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hannah; Del Rosario, Amanda M; Bryson, Bryan D; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; White, Forest M

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant primary brain tumor with a mean survival of 15 months with the current standard of care. Genetic profiling efforts have identified the amplification, overexpression, and mutation of the wild-type (wt) epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR) in ≈ 50% of GBM patients. The genetic aberration of wtEGFR is frequently accompanied by the overexpression of a mutant EGFR known as EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII, de2-7EGFR, ΔEGFR), which is expressed in 30% of GBM tumors. The molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis driven by EGFRvIII overexpression in human tumors have not been fully elucidated. To identify specific therapeutic targets for EGFRvIII driven tumors, it is important to gather a broad understanding of EGFRvIII specific signaling. Here, we have characterized signaling through the quantitative analysis of protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation across a panel of glioblastoma tumor xenografts established from patient surgical specimens expressing wtEGFR or overexpressing wtEGFR (wtEGFR+) or EGFRvIII (EGFRvIII+). S100A10 (p11), major vault protein, guanylate-binding protein 1(GBP1), and carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) were identified to have significantly increased expression in EGFRvIII expressing xenograft tumors relative to wtEGFR xenograft tumors. Increased expression of these four individual proteins was found to be correlated with poor survival in patients with GBM; the combination of these four proteins represents a prognostic signature for poor survival in gliomas. Integration of protein expression and phosphorylation data has uncovered significant heterogeneity among the various tumors and has highlighted several novel pathways, related to EGFR trafficking, activated in glioblastoma. The pathways and proteins identified in these tumor xenografts represent potential therapeutic targets for this disease.

  1. Analysis of target genes induced by IL-13 cytotoxin in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Yang, Liming; Puri, Raj K

    2005-03-01

    IL-13 cytotoxin comprised of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (fusion protein termed IL-13-PE38QQR) has been shown to inhibit protein synthesis leading to necrotic and apoptotic cell death in glioblastoma cells that express high levels of interleukin-13 receptors (IL-13R). To identify target genes of cell death and other cellular genes with IL-13 receptors in glioblastoma cells, we utilized the cDNA microarrays to analyze global gene expression profiles after IL-13 cytotoxin and IL-13 treatment. IL-13 cytotoxin mediated cytotoxicity to U251 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes in U251 glioma cells at different time points after IL-13 cytotoxin treatment showed three major groups, each representing a specific expression pattern. Randomly selected differentially expressed genes from each group were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Most down-regulated genes belong to cell adhesion, motility, angiogenesis, DNA repair, and metabolic pathways. While up-regulated genes belong to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, signaling and various metabolic pathways. Unexpectedly, at early time points, both IL-13 and IL-13 cytotoxin induced several genes belonging to different pathways most notably IL-8, DIO2, END1, and ALDH1A3 indicating that these genes are early response genes and their products may be associated with IL-13R. In addition, IL-13 cytotoxin induced IL-13Ralpha2 mRNA expression during the treatment in glioma cells. Our results indicate that novel cellular genes are involved with IL-13 receptors and that IL-13 cytotoxin induced cell death involves various target genes in human glioblastoma cells. On going studies will determine the role of associated genes and their products in the IL-13R functions in glioma cells.

  2. Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation potentiates myricetin-induced cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Gui, Hui; Wang, Jun-Jie; Lu, Jun-Ti; Dai, Long-Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Gang

    As one of the natural herbal flavonoids, myricetin has attracted much research interest, mainly owing to its remarkable anticancer properties and negligible side effects. It holds great potential to be developed as an ideal anticancer drug through improving its bioavailability. This study was performed to investigate the effects of Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation on myricetin-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms underlying its anticancer properties in human glioblastoma cells. Cell viability was assessed using a methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and a real-time cell analyzer. Immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction techniques were used for determining the expression levels of related molecules in protein and mRNA. The results indicated that myricetin-induced cytotoxicity was highly potentiated by the encapsulation of myricetin. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was demonstrated to be involved in myricetin-induced glioblastoma cell death. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/PI3K/Akt pathway located in the plasma membrane and cytosol and the RAS-ERK pathway located in mitochondria served as upstream and downstream targets, respectively, in myricetin-induced apoptosis. MiR-21 inhibitors interrupted the expression of EGFR, p-Akt, and K-Ras in the same fashion as myricetin-loaded mixed micelles (MYR-MCs) and miR-21 expression were dose-dependently inhibited by MYR-MCs, indicating the interaction of miR-21 with MYR-MCs. This study provided evidence supportive of further development of MYR-MC formulation for preferentially targeting mitochondria of glioblastoma cells.

  3. Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation potentiates myricetin-induced cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang XJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Jun Tang,1,* Kuan-Ming Huang,1,* Hui Gui,1,* Jun-Jie Wang,2 Jun-Ti Lu,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,3 Li Zhang,1 Gang Wang2 1Department of Neurosurgery, TaiHe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Shanghai Eighth People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: As one of the natural herbal flavonoids, myricetin has attracted much research interest, mainly owing to its remarkable anticancer properties and negligible side effects. It holds great potential to be developed as an ideal anticancer drug through improving its bioavailability. This study was performed to investigate the effects of Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation on myricetin-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms underlying its anticancer properties in human glioblastoma cells. Cell viability was assessed using a methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and a real-time cell analyzer. Immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction techniques were used for determining the expression levels of related molecules in protein and mRNA. The results indicated that myricetin-induced cytotoxicity was highly potentiated by the encapsulation of myricetin. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was demonstrated to be involved in myricetin-induced glioblastoma cell death. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/PI3K/Akt pathway located in the plasma membrane and cytosol and the RAS-ERK pathway located in mitochondria served as upstream and downstream targets, respectively, in myricetin-induced apoptosis. MiR-21 inhibitors interrupted the expression of EGFR, p-Akt, and K-Ras in the same fashion as myricetin-loaded mixed micelles (MYR-MCs and miR-21 expression were dose-dependently inhibited by MYR-MCs, indicating the interaction of miR-21 with MYR-MCs. This study provided evidence

  4. Selective lentiviral gene delivery to CD133-expressing human glioblastoma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sumru Bayin

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a deadly primary brain malignancy. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSC, which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into tumor lineages, are believed to cause tumor recurrence due to their resistance to current therapies. A subset of GSCs is marked by cell surface expression of CD133, a glycosylated pentaspan transmembrane protein. The study of CD133-expressing GSCs has been limited by the relative paucity of genetic tools that specifically target them. Here, we present CD133-LV, a lentiviral vector presenting a single chain antibody against CD133 on its envelope, as a vehicle for the selective transduction of CD133-expressing GSCs. We show that CD133-LV selectively transduces CD133+ human GSCs in dose-dependent manner and that transduced cells maintain their stem-like properties. The transduction efficiency of CD133-LV is reduced by an antibody that recognizes the same epitope on CD133 as the viral envelope and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of CD133. Conversely, the rate of transduction by CD133-LV is augmented by overexpression of CD133 in primary human GBM cultures. CD133-LV selectively transduces CD133-expressing cells in intracranial human GBM xenografts in NOD.SCID mice, but spares normal mouse brain tissue, neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells and primary human astrocytes. Our findings indicate that CD133-LV represents a novel tool for the selective genetic manipulation of CD133-expressing GSCs, and can be used to answer important questions about how these cells contribute to tumor biology and therapy resistance.

  5. Synergistic suppression of noscapine and conventional chemotherapeutics on human glioblastoma cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi QI; Xia LIU; Shiyong LI; Harish C JOSHI; Keqiang YE

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Noscapine (NOS) is a non-narcotic opium alkaloid with anti-tumor activity.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the combination of NOS with conventional chemotherapeutics temozolamide (TMZ),bis-chloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU),or cisplatin (ClS)on human glioblastoma cells.Methods:U87MG human glioblastoma cells were examined.Cell proliferation was quantified using MTT assay.Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to examine apoptosis and the expression of active caspase-3 and cleaved PARP.Mouse tumor xenograft model bearing U87MG cells was treated with TMZ (2 mg·kg1~-1,ip) or ClS (2 mg/kg,ip 3 times a week) alone or in combination with NOS (200 mg·kg-l·d-1,ig) for 3 weeks.Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of active caspase-3 and Ki67 following treatment in vivo.The safety of the combined treatments was evaluated based on the body weight and histological studies of the animal's organs.Results:NOS (10 or 20 mol/L) markedly increased the anti-proliferation effects of TMZ,BCNU,and ClS on U87MG cells in vitro.The calculated combination index (Cl) values of NOS-ClS,NOS-TMZ,and NOS-BCNU (20 μmoVL) were 0.45,0.51,and 0.57,respectively,demonstrating synergistic inhibition of the drug combinations.In tumor xenograft models,combined treatment with NOS robustly augmented the anti-cancer actions of TMZ and ClS,and showed no detectable toxicity.The combined treatments significantly enhanced the apoptosis,the activated caspase-3 and PARP levels in U87MG cells in vitro,and reduced Ki67 staining and increased the activated caspase-3 level in the shrinking xenografts in vivo.Conclusion:NOS synergistically potentiated the efficacy of FDA-approved anti-cancer drugs against human glioblastoma cells,thereby allowing them to be used at lower doses and hence minimizing their toxic side effects.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of human glioblastoma cells in response to ITE treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo; Zhou, Yanwen; Zheng, Min; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2015-09-01

    A ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is recently revealed to play a key role in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis (Feng et al. [1], Safe et al. [2]) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) (Song et al. [3]) is an endogenous AhR ligand that possesses anti-tumor activity. In order to gain insights into how ITE acts via the AhR in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptional profiles of the following three groups of cells: the human glioblastoma U87 parental cells, U87 tumor sphere cells treated with vehicle (DMSO) and U87 tumor sphere cells treated with ITE. Here, we provide the details of the sample gathering strategy and show the quality controls and the analyses associated with our gene array data deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession code of GSE67986.

  7. Glioblastoma-dependent differentiation and angiogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Tobias; Hildebrandt, Jenna; Nuebling, Georg; Sostak, Petra; Straube, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is of central importance in the malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). As previously shown, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) migrate towards GBM and are incorporated into tumor microvessels. However, phenotype and function of recruited hMSC remain unclear. We evaluated the differentiation and angiogenic potential of hMSC after stimulation with glioblastoma-conditioned medium in vitro. Immunostaining with endothelial, smooth muscle cell and pericyte markers was used to analyze hMSC differentiation in different concentrations of tumor-conditioned medium (CM), and the angiogenic potential was evaluated by matrigel-based tube-formation assay (TFA). Immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumor-conditioned hMSC (CM-hMSC) expressed CD 151, VE-cadherin, desmin, α-smooth muscle actin, nestin, and nerval/glial antigen 2 (NG2) in a CM concentration-dependent manner, whereas no expression of von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and smooth myosin could be detected. These findings are indicative of GBM-dependent differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like cells, rather than endothelial or smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, TFA of hMSC and CM-hMSC revealed CM-dependent formation of capillary-like networks, which differed substantially from those formed by human endothelial cells (HUVEC), also implying pericyte-like tube formation. These results are indicative of GBM-derived differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like mural cells, which might contribute to the neovascularization and stabilization of tumor vessels.

  8. The involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in eugenol-induced cell death in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Zhe; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Tseng, Hui-Wen; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-01-05

    Eugenol, a natural phenolic constituent of clove oil, has a wide range of applications in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. However, the effect of eugenol on human glioblastoma is unclear. This study examined whether eugenol elevated intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) and induced apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises which were reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+). Eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises were not altered by store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers but were inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8) antagonist capsazepine. In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 significantly inhibited eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Eugenol killed cells which were not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Eugenol induced apoptosis through increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, releasing cytochrome c and activating caspase-9/caspase-3. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells, eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises by inducing PLC-dependent release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum and caused Ca(2+) influx possibly through TRPM8 or PKC-sensitive channels. Furthermore, eugenol induced the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  9. Ophiobolin A induces paraptosis-like cell death in human glioblastoma cells by decreasing BKCa channel activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bury, M.; Girault, Alban; Mégalizzi, V.; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S.; Mathieu, V.; Berger, W; Evidente, A.; Kornienko, A.; Gailly, P.; Vandier, Christophe; Kiss, R.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and common malignant human brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of highly invasive GBM cells to radiation- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis accounts for the generally dismal treatment outcomes. This study investigated ophiobolin A (OP-A), a fungal metabolite from Bipolaris species, for its promising anticancer activity against human GBM cells exhibiting varying degrees of resistance to proapoptotic stimuli. We found t...

  10. Development of induced glioblastoma by implantation of a human xenograft in Yucatan minipig as a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Mehrdad; Carozzo, Claude; Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Belluco, Sara; Leveneur, Olivia; Chuzel, Thomas; Pillet-Michelland, Elodie; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François; Ponce, Frédérique

    2017-04-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor for humans. Despite many efforts toward the improvement of therapeutic methods, prognosis is poor and the disease remains incurable with a median survival of 12-14.5 months after an optimal treatment. To develop novel treatment modalities for this fatal disease, new devices must be tested on an ideal animal model before performing clinical trials in humans. A new model of induced glioblastoma in Yucatan minipigs was developed. Nine immunosuppressed minipigs were implanted with the U87 human glioblastoma cell line in both the left and right hemispheres. Computed tomography (CT) acquisitions were performed once a week to monitor tumor growth. Among the 9 implanted animals, 8 minipigs showed significant macroscopic tumors on CT acquisitions. Histological examination of the brain after euthanasia confirmed the CT imaging findings with the presence of an undifferentiated glioma. Yucatan minipig, given its brain size and anatomy (gyrencephalic structure) which are comparable to humans, provides a reliable brain tumor model for preclinical studies of different therapeutic METHODS: in realistic conditions. Moreover, the short development time, the lower cyclosporine and caring cost and the compatibility with the size of commercialized stereotactic frames make it an affordable and practical animal model, especially in comparison with large breed pigs. This reproducible glioma model could simulate human anatomical conditions in preclinical studies and facilitate the improvement of novel therapeutic devices, designed at the human scale from the outset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anticancer potential and mechanism of action of mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) supercritical CO₂ extract in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Cheppail; Lollett, Ivonne V; Escalon, Enrique; Quirin, Karl-Werner; Melnick, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is among the less-investigated species of Curcuma for anticancer properties. We have investigated the anticancer potential and the mechanism of action of a supercritical CO2 extract of mango ginger (CA) in the U-87MG human glioblastoma cell line. CA demonstrated higher cytotoxicity than temozolomide, etoposide, curcumin, and turmeric force with IC50, IC75, and IC90 values of 4.92 μg/mL, 12.87 μg/mL, and 21.30 μg/mL, respectively. Inhibitory concentration values of CA for normal embryonic mouse hypothalamus cell line (mHypoE-N1) is significantly higher than glioblastoma cell line, indicating the specificity of CA against brain tumor cells. CompuSyn analysis indicates that CA acts synergistically with temozolomide and etoposide for the cytotoxicity with combination index values of <1. CA treatment also induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and downregulates genes associated with apoptosis, cell proliferation, telomerase activity, oncogenesis, and drug resistance in glioblastoma cells. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future.

  13. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zi-xuan [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Rao, Wei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Nan-ding [Department of Cardiology, Xi' an Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Zong-ren, E-mail: zongren@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  14. Cordyceps militaris and mycelial fermentation induced apoptosis and autophagy of human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-H; Kao, Y-H; Huang, K-S; Wang, C-Y; Lin, L-W

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first report that investigated the apoptosis-inducing effects of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its mycelial fermentation in human glioblastoma cells. Both fractions arrested the GBM8401 cells in the G0/G1 phase, whereas the U-87MG cells were arrested at the G2/M transitional stage. Western blot data suggested that upregulation of p53 and p21 might be involved in the disruption of cell cycle progression. Induction of chromosomal condensation and the appearance of a sub-G1 hypodipoid population further supported the proapoptogenicity, possibly through the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8, and the downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and the upregulation of proapoptotic Bax protein expression. Downregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin and upregulation of Atg5 and LC3 II levels in GBM8401 cells implicated the involvement of autophagy. The signaling profiles with mycelial fermentation treatment indicated that mycelial fermentation triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK, and JNK, but suppressed constitutively high levels of ERK1/2 in GBM8401 cells. Mycelial fermentation treatment only significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but decreased constitutively high levels of Akt, ERK1/2, and JNK phosphorylation in U-87MG cells. Pretreatment with PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 prevented the mycelial fermentation-induced cytotoxicity in GBM8401 and U-87MG cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3K/Akt and MEK1 pathways in mycelial fermentation-driven glioblastoma cell apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23190603

  15. Analysis of the c-src gene product structure, abundance, and protein kinase activity in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Deseau, V; Amini, S; Rosen, N; Bolen, J B

    1987-01-01

    We have compared in different human neuroblastoma cell lines and human glioblastoma cells the expression level, structure, and tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity of pp60c-src. Our results show that not all human neuroblastoma cell lines express pp60c-src molecules with amino-terminal structural alterations. In neuroblastoma cells which possess pp60c-src with altered gel migration, the diminished polyacrylamide gel mobility of pp60c-src was found not to be dependent upon amino-terminal phosphorylations since extensive treatment of these molecules with phosphatase did not significantly change their gel migration properties. Similar differences in gel migration were observed when RNA from the various neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells was translated in vitro using either rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysates. White the level of c-src mRNA in the different cells analyzed was found to be similar, the abundance of pp60c-src in these same cells was found to vary by as much as 12-fold. This suggests that the abundance of pp60c-src in human neuroendocrine tumors is regulated through post-transcriptional and/or post-translational events which may be related to the stage of neuronal differentiation of the cells. Based upon determination of pp60c-src abundance by immunoblot analysis, we demonstrate that pp60c-src molecules derived from human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells have very similar in vitro protein kinase activities.

  16. Antineoplastic activity of taurolidine and its derivatives on human ex vivo glioblastoma bulk cells and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kälin, M B

    2010-01-01

    Despite multimodal therapy, patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM) still have a dismal prognosis. The identification of cancer stem cells (CSC) in brain tumour tissue, yielded hope that the vulnerable target to combat GBM has been found. Several study groups worldwide concentrate nowadays on therapeutic strategies that effectively target CSC. Since in our laboratory has been revealed that taurolidine, a derivate of the amino acid taurin, displays a potent antineoplastic effect in human gl...

  17. FGF5 as an oncogenic factor in human glioblastoma multiforme: autocrine and paracrine activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerstorfer, S; Sonvilla, G; Fischer, H; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S; Gauglhofer, C; Setinek, U; Czech, T; Marosi, C; Buchroithner, J; Pichler, J; Silye, R; Mohr, T; Holzmann, K; Grasl-Kraupp, B; Marian, B; Grusch, M; Fischer, J; Micksche, M; Berger, W

    2008-07-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) is widely expressed in embryonic but scarcely in adult tissues. Here we report simultaneous overexpression of FGF5 and its predominant high-affinity receptor (FGFR1 IIIc) in astrocytic brain tumour specimens (N=49) and cell cultures (N=49). The levels of both ligand and receptor increased with enhanced malignancy in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, secreted FGF5 protein was generally present in the supernatants of glioblastoma (GBM) cells. siRNA-mediated FGF5 downmodulation reduced moderately but significantly GBM cell proliferation while recombinant FGF5 (rFGF5) increased this parameter preferentially in cell lines with low endogenous expression levels. Apoptosis induction by prolonged serum starvation was significantly prevented by rFGF5. Moreover, tumour cell migration was distinctly stimulated by rFGF5 but attenuated by FGF5 siRNA. Blockade of FGFR1-mediated signals by pharmacological FGFR inhibitors or a dominant-negative FGFR1 IIIc protein inhibited GBM cell proliferation and/or induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, rFGF5 and supernatants of highly FGF5-positive GBM cell lines specifically stimulated proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that FGF5 contributes to the malignant progression of human astrocytic brain tumours by both autocrine and paracrine effects.

  18. SSEA-1 is an enrichment marker for tumor-initiating cells in human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Jin; Woolard, Kevin; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Fine, Howard A

    2009-05-08

    CD133+ populations of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells are reportedly enriched for tumor stem cells (TSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Approximately 40% of freshly isolated GBM specimens, however, do not contain CD133+ tumor cells, raising the possibility that CD133 may not be a universal enrichment marker for GBM TSCs/TICs. Here we demonstrate that stage-specific embryonic antigen 1(SSEA-1/LeX)+ GBM cells fulfill the functional criteria for TSC/TIC, since (1) SSEA-1+ cells are highly tumorigenic in vivo, unlike SSEA-1- cells; (2) SSEA-1+ cells can give rise to both SSEA-1+ and SSEA-1- cells, thereby establishing a cellular hierarchy; and (3) SSEA-1+ cells have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. A distinct subpopulation of SSEA-1+ cells was present in all but one of the primary GBMs examined (n = 24), and most CD133+ tumor cells were also SSEA-1+, suggesting that SSEA-1 may be a general TSC/TIC enrichment marker in human GBMs.

  19. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  20. Characterization of radioresistant variant from U251 human glioblastoma cell line and the role of antioxdant enzymes in its radioresistancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Chahn; Park, In Chul; Park, Myung Jin; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Rhee, Chang Hum; Hong, Seok-II [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the radioresistant mechanism in glioblastoma multiforme(GBM), we isolated the radioresistant clone (RRC) from U251 human glioblastoma cell line by exposing to repeated fractions of 3 Gy {gamma}-radiation for six months. RRC had higher radioresistance than the parent cell line as measured by clonogenic survival assay. FACS analysis showed that RRC had a delayed G2 arrest after radiation. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), were activated up to 5 folds in RRC after radiation. Erk 1/2 activation was higher in RRC than in the parent cell. Therefore, radioresistancy in RRC might be due to the delayed cell cycle, the coordinated high activation of antioxidant enzyme rather than a single enzyme alone,and higher activation of Erk 1/2.

  1. [Biology molecular of glioblastomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Hernández, C; Martínez-Glez, V; Rey, J A

    2007-10-01

    Glioblastomas, the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, may develop de novo (primary glioblastoma) or by progression from low-grade or anapalsic astrocytoma (secondary glioblastoma). The molecular alteration most frequent in these tumor-like types is the loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10, in which several genes have been identified as tumors suppressor. The TP53/MDM2/P14arf and CDK4/RB1/ P16ink4 genetic pathways involved in cycle control are deregulated in the majority of gliomas as well as genes that promote the cellular division, EGFR. Finally the increase of growth and angiogenics factors is also involved in the development of glioblastomas. One of the objectives of molecular biology in tumors of glial ancestry is to try to find the genetic alterations that allow to approach better the classification of glioblastomas, its evolution prediction and treatment. The new pathmolecular classification of gliomas should improve the old one, especially being concerned about the oncogenesis and heterogeneity of these tumors. It is desirable that this classification had clinical applicability and integrates new molecular findings with some known histological features with pronostic value. In this paper we review the most frequent molecular mechanisms involved in the patogenesis of glioblastomas.

  2. Inhibition of AKT signaling by supercritical CO2 extract of mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Cheppail; Portalatin, Gilda; Quirin, Karl-W; Escalon, Enrique; Khatib, Ziad; Melnick, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a less-investigated herb for anticancer properties than other related Curcuma species. AKT (a serine/threonine protein kinase B, originally identified as an oncogene in the transforming retrovirus AKT8) plays a central role in the development and promotion of cancer. In this investigation, we have analyzed the effect of supercritical CO2 extract of mango ginger (CA) on the genetic pathways associated with AKT signaling in human glioblastoma cells. The inhibitory effect of supercritical CO2 extract of mango ginger (Curcuma amada) on AKT signaling was investigated in U-87MG glioblastoma cells. CA was highly cytotoxic to glioblastoma cell line (IC50=4.92±0.81 µg/mL) compared to mHypoE-N1 normal mouse hypothalamus cell line (IC50=40.57±0.06 µg/mL). CA inhibits AKT (protein Kinase B) and adenosine monophophate -activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) phosphorylation significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The cell migration which is necessary for invasion and metastasis was also inhibited by CA treatment, with about 43% reduction at 20 µg/mL concentration. Analysis of mRNA and protein expression of genes associated with apoptosis, cell proliferation and angiogenesis showed that CA modulates expression of genes associated with apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-X, BNIP3, caspase-3, mutant p53 and p21), cell proliferation (Ki67) and angiogenesis vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Additionally, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and AMPKα genes interacting with the AKT signaling pathway were also downregulated by CA treatment. These results indicate the molecular targets and mechanisms underlying the anticancer effect of CA in human glioblastoma cells.

  3. Autotaxin inhibition with PF8380 enhances the radiosensitivity of human and murine glioblastoma cell lines

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    Sandeep R Bhave

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain tumor that is radio-resistant and recurs despite aggressive surgery, chemo and radiotherapy. Autotaxin (ATX is over expressed in various cancers including GBM and is implicated in tumor progression, invasion, and angiogenesis. Using the ATX specific inhibitor, PF-8380, we studied ATX as a potential target to enhance radiosensitivity in GBM.Methods and Materials: Mouse GL-261 and Human U87MG cells were used as GBM cell models. Clonogenic survival assays and tumor transwell invasion assays were performed using PF-8380 to evaluate role of ATX in survival and invasion. Radiation dependent activation of Akt was analyzed by immunoblotting. Tumor induced angiogenesis was studied using the dorsal skin-fold model in Gl-261. Heterotopic mouse GL-261 tumors were used to evaluate the efficacy of PF-8380 as a radiosensitizer.Results: Pretreatment of GL-261 and U87-MG cells with 1µM PF-8380 followed by 4Gy irradiation resulted in decreased clonogenic survival, decreased migration (33% in GL-261;P = 0.002 and 17.9% in U87; P = 0.012 decreased invasion (35.6% in GL-261; P = 0.0037 and 31.8% in U87; P = 0.002, and attenuated radiation induced Akt phosphorylation. In the tumor window model inhibition of ATX abrogated radiation-induced tumor neovascularization (65%; P=0.011. In a heterotopic mouse GL-261 tumors untreated mice took 11.2 days to reach a tumor volume of 7000 mm3 , however combination of PF-8380 (10mg/kg with irradiation (5 fractions of 2Gy took more than 32 days to reach a tumor volume of 7000 mm3 .Conclusion: Inhibition of ATX by PF8380 led to decreased invasion and enhanced radiosensitization of glioma cells. Radiation induced activation of Akt was abrogated by inhibition of ATX. Furthermore, inhibition of ATX led to diminished tumor vascularity and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that inhibition of ATX may ameliorate glioblastoma response to radiotherapy.

  4. High-Throughput Chemical Screens Identify Disulfiram as an Inhibitor of Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells

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    Hothi, Parvinder; Martins, Timothy J.; Chen, LiPing; Deleyrolle, Loic; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Reynolds, Brent; Foltz, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) continues to have a poor patient prognosis despite optimal standard of care. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been implicated as the presumed cause of tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy. With this in mind, we screened a diverse chemical library of 2,000 compounds to identify therapeutic agents that inhibit GSC proliferation and therefore have the potential to extend patient survival. High-throughput screens (HTS) identified 78 compounds that repeatedly inhibited cellular proliferation, of which 47 are clinically approved for other indications and 31 are experimental drugs. Several compounds (such as digitoxin, deguelin, patulin and phenethyl caffeate) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) in the low nanomolar range. In particular, the FDA approved drug for the treatment of alcoholism, disulfiram (DSF), was significantly potent across multiple patient samples (IC50 of 31.1 nM). The activity of DSF was potentiated by copper (Cu), which markedly increased GSC death. DSF–Cu inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity in cultured GSCs, consistent with inactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the subsequent induction of tumor cell death. Given that DSF is a relatively non-toxic drug that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, we suggest that DSF should be tested (as either a monotherapy or as an adjuvant) in pre-clinical models of human GBM. Data also support targeting of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of GBM. PMID:23165409

  5. Bax Activation Blocks Self-Renewal and Induces Apoptosis of Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

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    Daniele, Simona; Pietrobono, Deborah; Costa, Barbara; Giustiniano, Mariateresa; La Pietra, Valeria; Giacomelli, Chiara; La Regina, Giuseppe; Silvestri, Romano; Taliani, Sabrina; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Da Settimo, Federico; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Marinelli, Luciana

    2017-04-11

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is characterized by a poor response to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, attributed to the insurgence of drug resistance mechanisms and to the presence of a subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs). GBM cells and GSCs present, among others, an overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins and an inhibition of pro-apoptotic ones, which help to escape apoptosis. Among pro-apoptotic inducers, the Bcl-2 family protein Bax has recently emerged as a promising new target in cancer therapy along with first BAX activators (BAM7, Compound 106, and SMBA1). Herein, a derivative of BAM-7, named BTC-8, was employed to explore the effects of Bax activation in different human GBM cells and in their stem cell subpopulation. BTC-8 inhibited GBM cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis through the induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Most importantly, BTC-8 blocked proliferation and self-renewal of GSCs and induced their apoptosis. Notably, BTC-8 was demonstrated to sensitize both GBM cells and GSCs to the alkylating agent Temozolomide. Overall, our findings shed light on the effects and the relative molecular mechanisms related to Bax activation in GBM, and they suggest Bax-targeting compounds as promising therapeutic tools against the GSC reservoir.

  6. Silver nanoparticles impregnated alginate-chitosan-blended nanocarrier induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpa; Chockalingam, S; Sanpui, Pallab; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Herein, a green method for the development of a novel biodegradable silver nanoparticles (NPs) impregnated alginate-chitosan-blended nanocarrier (Ag NPs-Alg-Chi NC) is reported. The synthesis of Ag NPs-Alg-Chi NC is based on the polyelectrolyte complex formation between alginate and chitosan. The composite NC is characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The Ag NPs in the NC are found to elicit anticell proliferative effect on refractory U87MG (human glioblastoma) cells at IC50 of 2.4 μg mL(-1) for Ag NPs. The cell cycle analysis shows extensive DNA damage. Elevation in reactive oxygen species level indicates induction of oxidative stress in treated cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cell death is evident from the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ). Fluorescence and SEM images of the treated cells reveal nuclear and morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, which is further confirmed by TUNEL assay. The induction of apoptosis at low concentration of Ag NPs present in Ag NPs-Alg-Chi NC in comparison with free Ag NPs makes it a promising tool for cancer therapy.

  7. REST controls self-renewal and tumorigenic competence of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Luciano; Crisafulli, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Tortoreto, Monica; Brilli, Elisa; Conforti, Paola; Zunino, Franco; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Schiffer, Davide; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF) is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets.

  8. Proton and photon beams interaction with radiosensitizing agents in human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafiandra, M.

    2016-03-01

    In oncological field, chemoradiotherapy treatments that combine radiations to radiosensitizing chemical agents are spreading out. The aim of this kind of treatment is to obtain a better tumor local control and at the same time to reduce the distant failure. The combination of radiation with microtubule-stabilizing agents is very promising in cancer therapy. In the present study, the combination of clinical proton beams and the microtubule-stabilizing agent Epothilone B has been investigated in human glioblastoma cells cultured in vitro. Photon beams have been used for comparison. Cell survival has been evaluated by colony forming assay and the interaction mechanism between radiation and Epothilone B has been investigated: survival curves relative to the combined treatment (protons or photons with Epothilone B) showed a linear trend, different from the linear quadratic behavior found with radiation alone. The analysis performed showed a synergism in the radiation-drug interaction. Thus, Epothilone B in conjunction with radiation acts as a radiosensitizer. Finally proton Relative Biological Effectiveness has been determined and results are reported in this paper.

  9. Oxymatrine Inhibits Proliferation and Migration While Inducing Apoptosis in Human Glioblastoma Cells

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    Feili Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxymatrine (OMT, an alkaloid derived from the traditional Chinese medicine herb Sophora flavescens Aiton, has been shown to exhibit anticancer properties on various types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigate the anticancer properties of OMT on human glioblastoma (GBM cells and evaluate their underlying mechanisms. MTT assays were performed and demonstrated that OMT significantly inhibits the proliferation of GBM cells. Flow cytometry suggested that OMT at a concentration of 10−5 M may induce apoptosis in U251 and A172 cells. Western blot analyses demonstrated a significant increase in the expression of Bax and caspase-3 and a significant decrease in expression of Bcl-2 in both U251 and A172 cells. Additionally, OMT was found by transwell and high-content screening assays to decrease the migratory ability of the evaluated GBM cells. These findings suggest that the antitumor effects of OMT may be the result of inhibition of cell proliferation and migration and the induction of apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins. OMT may represent a novel anticancer therapy for the treatment of GBM.

  10. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  11. Spectromicroscopy of boron in human glioblastomas following administration of Na2B12H11SH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, L.; Fauchoux, O.; Redondo, J.; Baudat, P.-A.; Andres, R.; Neumann, M.; Steen, S.; Gabel, D.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; de Stasio, Gelsomina

    2000-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental, binary treatment for brain cancer which requires as the first step that tumor tissue is targeted with a boron-10 containing compound. Subsequent exposure to a thermal neutron flux results in destructive, short range nuclear reaction within 10 μm of the boron compound. The success of the therapy requires than the BNCT agents be well localized in tumor, rather than healthy tissue. The MEPHISTO spectromicroscope, which performs microchemical analysis by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy from microscopic areas, has been used to study the distribution of trace quantities of boron in human brain cancer tissues surgically removed from patients first administered with the compound Na2B12H11SH (BSH). The interpretation of XANES spectra is complicated by interference from physiologically present sulfur and phosphorus, which contribute structure in the same energy range as boron. We addressed this problem with the present extensive set of spectra from S, B, and P in relevant compounds. We demonstrate that a linear combination of sulfate, phosphate and BSH XANES can be used to reproduce the spectra acquired on boron-treated human brain tumor tissues. We analyzed human glioblastoma tissue from two patients administered and one not administered with BSH. As well as weak signals attributed to BSH, x-ray absorption spectra acquired from tissue samples detected boron in a reduced chemical state with respect to boron in BSH. This chemical state was characterized by a sharp absorption peak at 188.3 eV. Complementary studies on BSH reference samples were not able to reproduce this chemical state of boron, indicating that it is not an artifact produced during sample preparation or x-ray exposure. These data demonstrate that the chemical state of BSH may be altered by in vivo metabolism.

  12. Cytogenetic Damages from Iododeoxyuridine -induced Radiosensitivity with and without Methoxyamine in Human Glioblastoma Spheroids

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    Ali Neshasteh-Riz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iododeoxyuridine-induced Radiosensitivityi (IUdR is ahalogenated thymidine analogue recognized to be effective in vitro andin vivo radiosensitizer in human cancers. It is reported that Methoxyamine (MXpotentiates DNA damages in cancer cells with blocking the repair pathway ofIUdR damages. But studies, entirely, are restricted on monolayer culture cellsfrom human colon cancer cells. Spheroids are 3D form of cells that aggregateand grow together which resemble in vivo tumor models in several aspects andthe the results of such studies can be extended to tumor in vivo. The aim of thecurrent study was to evaluate DNA damages from IUdR and gamma rays withand without Methoxyamine in human Glioblastoma spheroids.Materials and Methods: The DNA induced damages in U87MG cell line werecompared using alkaline comet assay method. Experiments were performedwith two different sizes of spheroids (100μm and 300μm.Results: Evaluation of the effects of IUdR with and without MX pretreatmenton spheroids following ionizing radiation showed that MX increased the celldamages of IUdR with and without irradiation in both diameters spheroids. Thedamages were further increased in 100μm compared with 300μm diameter.Conclusion: Comparisons of tail moments in spheroids with 100 and 300μmdiameter showed that cell damages in larger spheroids, 300μm, are lesserthan smaller one, 100μm. This could be due to existence of G0 cells and cellswith longer cycle which IUdR was less incorporated into them. Thus, decreasein IUdR radiosensitization and base wxcision repair (BER, results in reductionof MX activities. Using agents for Inhibiting the activities of proteins whichare responsible for carrying the cells to G0 may be beneficial in solving suchproblems.

  13. Tectal glioblastoma Glioblastoma tetal

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    Feres Chaddad Neto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising mostly in paediatric patients. Tectal plate gliomas represent a particular type of brain stem tumours usually with a benign, indolent clinical course, presenting with signs of raised intracranial hipertension due to supra-tentorialhydrocephalous caused by aqueductal stenosis. Seldom high-grade lesions arise in this location with tremendous therapeutic implications. When a malignant tumour is clinically and radiographically suspected a biopsy should be performed to obtain histhological confirmation. Treatment is then planned in a case-by-case basis. We present the case of a glioblastoma of the tectal plate in a 22 years-old woman operated upon by a supracerebellar-infratentorial approach.Os gliomas do tronco cerebral são um grupo heterogêneo de neoplasias que acometem habitualmente crianças. Os gliomas da placa quadrigeminal representam um tipo particular de tumores do tronco cerebral, habitualmente com um curso benigno e indolente, surgindo com sinais de hipertensão intracraniana devido a hidrocefalia supra-tentorial provocada por compressão do aqueduto cerebral. Raramente surgem lesões de alto grau nesta região, mas as implicações terapêuticas são tremendas. Quando existe suspeita clínica e imagiológica de que se trata de lesão maligna, esta deve ser biopsada para se obter confirmação histológica. O tratamento deve então ser planejado caso a caso. Apresentamos o caso de glioblastoma da placa quadrigeminal em uma paciente de 22 anos intervencionado por via supracerebelar-infratentorial.

  14. Down-regulation of ribosomal protein S15A inhibits proliferation of human glioblastoma cells in vivo and in vitro via AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiqun; Liu, Yongjian; Lv, Xiupeng; Dong, Bin; Wang, Feng; Li, Jun; Zhang, Qiuping; Xu, Ruixue; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-04-01

    Ribosomal protein s15a (RPS15A), a highly conserved cytoplasmic protein, promotes mRNA/ribosome interaction in translation. Recent evidence showed that RPS15A is essential for tumor growth. RPS15A expression level was measured in glioblastoma tissue samples and normal brain (NB) tissue samples. RPS15A RNAi stable cell line U87 and U251 was generated by the pLVTHM-GFP lentiviral RNAi expression system. The knockdown efficiency was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. Molecular mechanisms and the effect of RPS15A on cell growth and migration were investigated by using western blot, MTT assay, wound healing assay, transwell migration assay, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. Here, we report that RPS15A is overexpressed in human glioblastoma tumor tissues. RPS15A knockdown inhibits proliferation and migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Knocking down RPS15A leads to the level of p-Akt decrease and cell cycle arrested in G0/G1 phase in U87 and U251 cells. Furthermore, the growth of glioblastoma cell-transplanted tumors in nude mice is inhibited by transduction with Lv-shRPS15A. Our findings indicate that RPS15A promotes cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma for the first time. RPS15A might play a distinct role in glioblastoma and serve as a potential target for therapy.

  15. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles show high efficacy and specificity at DNA delivery to human glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Cázares, Hugo; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Young, Noah P; Abutaleb, Ameer O; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Green, Jordan J

    2014-05-27

    Current glioblastoma therapies are insufficient to prevent tumor recurrence and eventual death. Here, we describe a method to treat malignant glioma by nonviral DNA delivery using biodegradable poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs), with a focus on the brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), the tumor cell population believed to be responsible for the formation of new tumors and resistance to many conventional therapies. We show transfection efficacy of >60% and low biomaterial-mediated cytotoxicity in primary human BTICs in vitro even when the BTICs are grown as 3-D oncospheres. Intriguingly, we find that these polymeric nanoparticles show intrinsic specificity for nonviral transfection of primary human BTICs over primary healthy human neural progenitor cells and that this specificity is not due to differences in cellular growth rate or total cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Moreover, we demonstrate that biodegradable PBAE/DNA nanoparticles can be fabricated, lyophilized, and then stored for at least 2 years without losing efficacy, increasing the translational relevance of this technology. Using lyophilized nanoparticles, we show transgene expression by tumor cells after intratumoral injection into an orthotopic murine model of human glioblastoma. PBAE/DNA nanoparticles were more effective than naked DNA at exogenous gene expression in vivo, and tumor cells were transfected more effectively than noninvaded brain parenchyma in vivo. This work shows the potential of nonviral gene delivery tools to target human brain tumors.

  16. First in human nanotechnology doxorubicin delivery system to target epidermal growth factor receptors in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, James R; Lickliter, Jason D; Gan, Hui K; Scott, Andrew M; Simes, John; Solomon, Benjamin J; MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Rosenthal, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    There are limited treatment options for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The EnGeneIC delivery vehicle (EDV) is a novel nanocellular (minicell) compound which packages theoretically effective concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs that are designed to target tumors via minicell-surface attached bispecific proteins (EnGeneIC, Lane Cove West, NSW, Australia). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in 40-50% of patients with GBM and is a promising target for new therapeutics. (V)EDVDox contains doxorubicin (Dox) within the minicells and targets EGFR through Vectibix (V; Amgen Biologicals, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). We conducted a first in human Phase I study of (V)EDVDox in adults with recurrent GBM expressing EGFR on immunohistochemistry, following standard therapy including radiation and temozolomide, to establish a safe maximum tolerated dose and determine a recommended Phase II dose (RPTD). (V)EDVDox was administered weekly in an 8week cycle, with dose escalation in successive cohorts of patients using a standard 3+3 design. In total, 14 patients were treated at three dose levels, and the RPTD was identified as 5×10(9)(V)EDVDox. Overall (V)EDVDox was well tolerated, with no dose limiting toxicity and no withdrawals from the study due to adverse events. The most common adverse events were nausea, fever, and chills or rigors, experienced in seven, five and five patients, respectively. Transient uncomplicated hypophosphatemia was seen in seven patients and was not dose-related. Our results demonstrate that (V)EDVDox, up to a dose of 5×10(9)(V)EDVDox weekly, is well tolerated in patients with recurrent GBM.

  17. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Khushboo; Mohapatra, Saroj Kant; Srivastava, Chitrangda; Garg, Harshit; Mishra, Seema; Dikshit, Bhawana; Sarkar, Chitra; Gupta, Deepak; Chandra, Poodipedi Sarat; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sinha, Subrata; Chosdol, Kunzang

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s) characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN) was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2). Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  18. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Irshad

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM. Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2. Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  19. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

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    Luis Marrero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo, aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo, which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3. Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Musto, Alberto E.; Wilk, Anna; Vashistha, Himanshu; Zapata, Adriana; Walker, Chelsey; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Parsons, Christopher; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Prakash, Om

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo), aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo), which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc) was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD)], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD)], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67) and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3). Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM. PMID:25379024

  1. SV40 DNA in a carrier system of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, V I; Norkin, L C

    1988-04-01

    The state of the SV40 DNA in a stable carrier system of A172 human glioblastoma cells was examined by Southern blot hybridization analysis. At a sensitivity of 0.1 viral genome equivalents per cell, we detected only free, apparently nondefective, viral genomes. However, when we overexposed our autoradiograms or examined cloned cell populations, integrated viral sequences were observed. Furthermore, aberrant forms of free viral DNA were seen as well. Four clones, isolated at 15 weeks, produced T antigen and displayed enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency characteristic of SV40 transformation. None of these clones produced capsid proteins or infectious virus, even upon fusion with CV-1 cells, Viral DNA in the clones ranged from 0.5 to 50 equivalents per cell, on the average. Two of the Week-15 clones contained a similar (but not identical) predominant truncated SV40 sequence which was present both in a free state and integrated at a single major site in a reiterated head-to-tail array. These clones also contained other minor integrated sequences. Another Week-15 clone contained viral sequences integrated at two major sites as well as heterogeneous free DNA. Only free aberrant DNA was detected in the fourth Week-15 clone. Seven of eight clones isolated at 23 weeks produced no infectious virus or T antigen. No viral DNA was detected in those clones. The eighth clone did produce infectious virus and contained a predominance of free viral DNA. All of the clones were susceptible to superinfection with wild-type SV40, although less so than uninfected A172 cultures.

  2. Identification of a novel antagonist of the ErbB1 receptor capable of inhibiting migration of human glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel; Riemer, Christian; Xu, Ruodan

    2013-01-01

    B1 targeting peptide, termed Herfin-1, was designed based on a model of the tertiary structure of the EGF-EGFR ternary complex. The binding kinetics of this peptide were determined employing surface plasmon resonance analyses. ErbB1-4 expression and phosphorylation in human glioblastoma cell lines U......BACKGROUND: Receptors of the ErbB family are involved in the development of various cancers, and the inhibition of these receptors represents an attractive therapeutic concept. Upon ligand binding, ErbB receptors become activated as homo- or heterodimers, leading to the activation of downstream...

  3. Dexamethasone-Mediated Activation of Fibronectin Matrix Assembly Reduces Dispersal of Primary Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Shannon

    Full Text Available Despite resection and adjuvant therapy, the 5-year survival for patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is less than 10%. This poor outcome is largely attributed to rapid tumor growth and early dispersal of cells, factors that contribute to a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. An understanding of the cellular and molecular machinery that drive growth and dispersal is essential if we are to impact long-term survival. Our previous studies utilizing a series of immortalized GBM cell lines established a functional causation between activation of fibronectin matrix assembly (FNMA, increased tumor cohesion, and decreased dispersal. Activation of FNMA was accomplished by treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex, a drug routinely used to treat brain tumor related edema. Here, we utilize a broad range of qualitative and quantitative assays and the use of a human GBM tissue microarray and freshly-isolated primary human GBM cells grown both as conventional 2D cultures and as 3D spheroids to explore the role of Dex and FNMA in modulating various parameters that can significantly influence tumor cell dispersal. We show that the expression and processing of fibronectin in a human GBM tissue-microarray is variable, with 90% of tumors displaying some abnormality or lack in capacity to secrete fibronectin or assemble it into a matrix. We also show that low-passage primary GBM cells vary in their capacity for FNMA and that Dex treatment reactivates this process. Activation of FNMA effectively "glues" cells together and prevents cells from detaching from the primary mass. Dex treatment also significantly increases the strength of cell-ECM adhesion and decreases motility. The combination of increased cohesion and decreased motility discourages in vitro and ex vivo dispersal. By increasing cell-cell cohesion, Dex also decreases growth rate of 3D spheroids. These effects could all be reversed by an inhibitor of FNMA and by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU

  4. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Francesco; Dallatomasina, Alice; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Wälchli, Thomas; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Frei, Karl; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG) recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM) components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS, discriminating

  5. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Girolamo

    Full Text Available NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS

  6. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  7. Combination of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses Armed with Angiostatin and IL-12 Enhances Antitumor Efficacy in Human Glioblastoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV can potentially spread throughout the tumor, reach isolated infiltrating cells, kill them, and deliver anticancer agents. However, the host responds to oHSV by inducing intratumoral infiltration of macrophages that can engulf the virus, limiting the potential of this therapeutic strategy. Hypervascularity is a pathognomonic feature of glioblastoma (GBM and is a promising therapeutic target. Antiangiogenic treatments have multiple benefits, including the capacity to increase oHSV efficacy by suppressing macrophage extravasation and infiltration into the tumor. Angiostatin is an antiangiogenic polypeptide, and interleukin-12 (IL-12 is an immunostimulatory cytokine with strong antiangiogenic effects. Clinical use of each has been limited by delivery issues and systemic toxicity.We tested a combination treatment strategy using oHSVs expressing angiostatin (G47Δ-mAngio and IL-12 (G47Δ-mIL12 in two orthotopic human GBMmodels. Intratumoral injection of G47Δ-mAngio and G47Δ-mIL12 in mice bearing intracranial U87 or tumors derived from glioblastoma stem cells significantly prolonged survival compared to each armed oHSV alone. This was associated with increased antiangiogenesis and virus spread and decreased macrophages. These data support the paradigm of using oHSV expressing different antiangiogenic agents and show for the first time that oHSVs expressing angiostatin and IL-12 can improve efficacy in human GBM models.

  8. NFKBIA Deletion in Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredel, Markus; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Alvarez, Angel A.; Renfrow, Jaclyn J.; Chandler, James P.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Carro, Maria S.; Dai, Fangping; Tagge, Michael J.; Ferrarese, Roberto; Bredel, Claudia; Phillips, Heidi S.; Lukac, Paul J.; Robe, Pierre A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Vogel, Hannes; Dubner, Steven; Mobley, Bret; He, Xiaolin; Scheck, Adrienne C.; Sikic, Branimir I.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Harsh, Griffith R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amplification and activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) oncogene are molecular hallmarks of glioblastomas. We hypothesized that deletion of NFKBIA (encoding nuclear factor of κ-light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-α), an inhibitor of the EGFR-signaling pathway, promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastomas that do not have alterations of EGFR. METHODS We analyzed 790 human glioblastomas for deletions, mutations, or expression of NFKBIA and EGFR. We studied the tumor-suppressor activity of NFKBIA in tumor-cell culture. We compared the molecular results with the outcome of glioblastoma in 570 affected persons. RESULTS NFKBIA is often deleted but not mutated in glioblastomas; most deletions occur in nonclassical subtypes of the disease. Deletion of NFKBIA and amplification of EGFR show a pattern of mutual exclusivity. Restoration of the expression of NFKBIA attenuated the malignant phenotype and increased the vulnerability to chemotherapy of cells cultured from tumors with NFKBIA deletion; it also reduced the viability of cells with EGFR amplification but not of cells with normal gene dosages of both NFKBIA and EGFR. Deletion and low expression of NFKBIA were associated with unfavorable outcomes. Patients who had tumors with NFKBIA deletion had outcomes that were similar to those in patients with tumors harboring EGFR amplification. These outcomes were poor as compared with the outcomes in patients with tumors that had normal gene dosages of NFKBIA and EGFR. A two-gene model that was based on expression of NFKBIA and O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase was strongly associated with the clinical course of the disease. CONCLUSIONS Deletion of NFKBIA has an effect that is similar to the effect of EGFR amplification in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma and is associated with comparatively short survival. PMID:21175304

  9. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Syu, Jhih-Pu; Way, Tzong-Der; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lin, Chung-Tien; Lin, Chih-Li

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti‑glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti‑proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell‑cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy‑mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B‑induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug‑resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ.

  10. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important causes of human encephalitis cases, which result in a high mortality ratio and neurological sequelae after recovery. Understanding the mechanism of neuropathogenicity in these viral infections is important for the development of specific antiviral therapy. Here, we focused on human-derived neuronal and glial cells to understand the cellular responses against WNV and JEV infection. It was demonstrated that early IFN-β induction regulated virus replication in glioblastoma tbl98G cells, whereas delayed IFN-β induction resulted in efficient virus replication in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, the concealing of viral dsRNA in the intracellular membrane resulted in the delayed IFN response in SK-N-SH cells. These results, which showed different IFN responses between human neuronal and glial cells after WNV or JEV infection, are expected to contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for neuropathology in these viral infections.

  11. Isolation, cultivation and characterization of CD133+ stem cells from human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Favaro Pavon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the method of isolation and culture ofhuman glioblastoma neurospheres, and the purification of theirstem cells, followed by the process of obtaining tumor subspheres,immunophenotypically characterizing this clonogenic set. Methods:Through the processing of glioblastoma samples (n=3, the followingstrategy of action was adopted: (i establish primary culture ofglioblastoma; (ii isolation and culture of tumor neurospheres; (iiipurify cells that initiate tumors (CD133+ by magnetic separationsystem (MACS; (iv obtain tumor subspheres; (v study theexpression of the markers nestin, CD133, and GFAP. Results: Thestudy successfully described the process of isolation and culture ofglioblastoma subspheres, which consist of a number of clonogeniccells immunophenotypically characterized as neural, which areable to initiate tumor formation. Conclusion: These findings maycontribute to a better understanding of the process of gliomagenesis.

  12. P01.02FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 4 CONTRIBUTES TO 3-DIMENSIONAL GROWTH OF HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lötsch, D.; Englinger, B.; Pichler, J; Hainfellner, J; Marosi, C; Czech, T.; Knosp, E.; Buchroithner, J; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S.; Berger, W

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma growth is driven by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signals. One of the RTK systems recently coming into focus are the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) high-affinity receptors (FGFR1-FGFR4) due to mutation, overexpression or translocation in several cancer types. FGF/FGFR represents a complex signal network with essential functions in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis and wound healing but also for malignant transformation and growth as well as tumor neoangiogenesis...

  13. Expression of the neurotrophin receptors Trk A and Trk B in adult human astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashi Wadhwa; Tapas C Nag; Anupam Jindal; Rahul Kushwaha; Ashok K Mahapatra; Chitra Sarkar

    2003-03-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors of the Trk family play a critical role in proliferation, differentiation and survival of the developing neurons. There are reports on their expression in neoplasms too, namely, the primitive neuroectodermal tumours of childhood, and in adult astrocytic gliomas. The involvement of Trk receptors in tumour pathogenesis, if any, is not known. With this end in view, the present study has examined 10 tumour biopsy samples (identified as astrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma and glioblastoma) and peritumoral brain tissue of adult patients, for the presence of Trk A and Trk B receptors, by immunohistochemistry. The nature of the tumour samples was also confirmed by their immunoreactivity (IR) to glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the peritumoral brain tissue, only neurons showed IR for Trk A and Trk B. On the contrary, in the tumour sections, the IR to both receptors was localized in the vast majority of glia and capillary endothelium. There was an obvious pattern of IR in these gliomas: high levels of IR were present in the low-grade (type I and II) astrocytoma; whereas in the advanced malignant forms (WHO grade IV giant cell glioblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme) the IR was very weak. These findings suggest that Trk A and Trk B are involved in tumour pathogenesis, especially in the early stage, and may respond to signals that elicit glial proliferation, and thus contribute to progression towards malignancy.

  14. Dexamethasone protected human glioblastoma U87MG cells from temozolomide induced apoptosis by maintaining Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and preventing proteolytic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sunil J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is the deadliest and most prevalent brain tumor. Dexamethasone (DXM is a commonly used steroid for treating glioblastoma patients for alleviation of vasogenic edema and pain prior to treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent, has recently been introduced in clinical trials for treating glioblastoma. Here, we evaluated the modulatory effect of DXM on TMZ induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87MG cells. Results Freshly grown cells were treated with different doses of DXM or TMZ for 6 h followed by incubation in a drug-free medium for 48 h. Wright staining and ApopTag assay showed no apoptosis in cells treated with 40 μM DXM but considerable amounts of apoptosis in cells treated with 100 μM TMZ. Apoptosis in TMZ treated cells was associated with an increase in intracellular free [Ca2+], as determined by fura-2 assay. Western blot analyses showed alternations in the levels of Bax (pro-apoptotic and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic proteins resulting in increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio in TMZ treated cells. Western blot analyses also detected overexpression of calpain and caspase-3, which cleaved 270 kD α-spectrin at specific sites for generation of 145 and 120 kD spectrin break down products (SBDPs, respectively. However, 1-h pretreatment of cells with 40 μM DXM dramatically decreased TMZ induced apoptosis, decreasing Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and SBDPs. Conclusion Our results revealed an antagonistic effect of DXM on TMZ induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87MG cells, implying that treatment of glioblastoma patients with DXM prior to chemotherapy with TMZ might result in an undesirable clinical outcome.

  15. PKC-ι promotes glioblastoma cell survival by phosphorylating and inhibiting BAD through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S; Pillai, P; Win-Piazza, H; Acevedo-Duncan, M

    2011-06-01

    The focus of this research was to investigate the role of protein kinase C-iota (PKC-ι) in regulation of Bad, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only molecule of the Bcl-2 family in glioblastoma. Robust expression of PKC-ι is a hallmark of human glioma and benign and malignant meningiomas. The results were obtained from the two human glial tumor derived cell lines, T98G and U87MG. In these cells, PKC-ι co-localized and directly associated with Bad, as shown by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and Western blotting. Furthermore, in-vitro kinase activity assay showed that PKC-ι directly phosphorylated Bad at phospho specific residues, Ser-112, Ser-136 and Ser-155 which in turn induced inactivation of Bad and disruption of Bad/Bcl-XL dimer. Knockdown of PKC-ι by siRNA exhibited a corresponding reduction in Bad phosphorylation suggesting that PKC-ι may be a Bad kinase. PKC-ι knockdown also induced apoptosis in both the cell lines. Since, PKC-ι is an essential downstream mediator of the PI (3)-kinase, we hypothesize that glioma cell survival is mediated via a PI (3)-kinase/PDK1/PKC-ι/Bad pathway. Treatment with PI (3)-kinase inhibitors Wortmannin and LY294002, as well as PDK1 siRNA, inhibited PKC-ι activity and subsequent phosphorylation of Bad suggesting that PKC-ι regulates the activity of Bad in a PI (3)-kinase dependent manner. Thus, our data suggest that glioma cell survival occurs through a novel PI (3)-kinase/PDK1/PKC-ι/BAD mediated pathway.

  16. Intracranial elimination of human glioblastoma brain tumors in nude rats using the bispecific ligand-directed toxin, DTEGF13 and convection enhanced delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seunguk; Ohlfest, John R; Todhunter, Deborah A; Vallera, Vincent D; Hall, Walter A; Chen, Hua; Vallera, Daniel A

    2009-12-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) consisting of human interleukin-13, epithelial growth factor, and the first 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin was assembled in order to target human glioblastoma. In vitro, DTEGF13 selectively killed the human glioblastoma cell line U87-luc as well as other human glioblastomas. DTEGF13 fulfilled the requirement of a successful BLT by having greater activity than either of its monospecific counterparts or their mixture proving it necessary to have both ligands on the same single chain molecule. Aggressive brain tumors established intracranially (IC) in nude rats with U87 glioma genetically marked with a firefly luciferase reporter gene were treated with two injections of DTEGF13 using convection enhanced delivery resulting in tumor eradication in 50% of the rats which survived with tumor free status at least 110 days post tumor inoculation. An irrelevant BLT control did not protect establishing specificity. The bispecific DTEGF13 MTD dose was measured at 2 microg/injection or 0.5 microg/kg and toxicity studies indicated safety in this dose. Combination of monospecific DTEGF and DTIL13 did not inhibit tumor growth. ELISA assay indicated that anti-DT antibodies were not generated in normal immunocompetent rats given identical intracranial DTEGF13 therapy. Thus, DTEGF13 is safe and efficacious as an alternative drug for glioblastoma therapy and warrants further study.

  17. High and low dose rate irradiation have opposing effects on cytokine gene expression in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H J; Canada, A L; Antoniono, R J; Redpath, J L

    1997-01-01

    Effects of radiation on five cytokine expressing human glioblastoma cell lines were studied. In comparison to unirradiated controls, IL-1 beta and IL-6 mRNAs were generally reduced after low (LDR, 1.0 cGy/min) and very low (VLDR, 0.35 cGy/min) dose rate irradiation. In contrast, high (HDR, 200 cGy/min) and intermediate (IDR, 4.1 cGy/min) dose rates increased steady-state levels of IL-1 beta and IL-6 mRNAs. The surviving fraction was generally inversely proportional to the dose rate; however, these glioma cells were unusually susceptible to LDR. In the two cell lines tested, IDR was less cytotoxic than either HDR or LDR irradiation. Although cytokine gene expression had no clear effect on radiation survival in vitro, autologous cytokines could be important to radiation response in vivo by affecting immune response, tumour stroma, vasculature or surrounding tissues. Adjusting dose rates to account for inverse dose rate effects and altered gene expression may be a useful strategy in optimising radiation therapy of glioblastomas.

  18. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Burke, Ryan C.; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2017-01-01

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules. PMID:28117459

  19. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Burke, Ryan C; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-01-24

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules.

  20. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  1. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zeniou

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM, the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  2. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniou, Maria; Fève, Marie; Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A;

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express......-expression of these two proteins predicted poor patient survival. Infection of GBM cells with HCMV led to upregulation of CD133 and other GSCS markers (Notch1, Sox2, Oct4, Nestin). HCMV infection also promoted the growth of GBM cells as neurospheres, a behavior typically displayed by GCSCs, and this phenotype...... was prevented by either chemical inhibition of the Notch1 pathway or by treatment with the anti-viral drug ganciclovir. GBM cells that maintained expression of HCMV-IE failed to differentiate into neuronal or astrocytic phenotypes. Our findings imply that HCMV infection induces phenotypic plasticity of GBM...

  4. Pharmacological blockade of FAK autophosphorylation decreases human glioblastoma tumor growth and synergizes with temozolomide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Huang, Grace; Ho, Baotran; Yemma, Michael; Morrison, Carl D.; Lee, Jisook; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Cance, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by aggressive tumor growth with a mean survival of 15–18 months and frequently developed resistance to temozolomide. Therefore, strategies that sensitize glioma cells to temozolomide have a high translational impact. We have studied focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a tyrosine kinase and emerging therapeutic target that is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma. In this report we tested the FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15 in DBTRG and U87 glioblastoma cells. Y15 significantly decreased viability and clonogenicity in a dose-dependent manner, increased detachment in a dose and time-dependent manner, caused apoptosis and inhibited cell invasion in both cell lines. In addition, Y15 treatment decreased autophosphorylation of FAK in a dose-dependent manner and changed cell morphology by causing cell rounding in DBTRG and U87 cells. Administration of Y15 significantly decreased subcutaneous DBTRG tumor growth with decreased Y397-FAK autophosphorylation, activated caspase-3 and PARP. Y15 was administered in an orthotopic glioma model, leading to an increase in mouse survival. The combination of Y15 with temozolomide was more effective than either agent alone in decreasing viability and activating caspase-8 in DBTRG and U87 cells in vitro. In addition, the combination of Y15 and temozolomide synergistically blocked U87 brain tumor growth in vivo. Thus, pharmacologic blockade of FAK autophosphorylation with the oral administration of a small molecule inhibitor Y15 has a potential to be an effective therapy approach for glioblastoma either alone or in combination with chemotherapy agents such as temozolomide. PMID:23243059

  5. Pharmacologic blockade of FAK autophosphorylation decreases human glioblastoma tumor growth and synergizes with temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Huang, Grace; Ho, Baotran; Yemma, Michael; Morrison, Carl D; Lee, Jisook; Eliceiri, Brian P; Cance, William G

    2013-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by aggressive tumor growth with a mean survival of 15 to 18 months and frequently developed resistance to temozolomide. Therefore, strategies that sensitize glioma cells to temozolomide have a high translational impact. We have studied focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a tyrosine kinase and emerging therapeutic target that is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma. In this report, we tested the FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15, in DBTRG and U87 glioblastoma cells. Y15 significantly decreased viability and clonogenicity in a dose-dependent manner, increased detachment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, caused apoptosis, and inhibited cell invasion in both cell lines. In addition, Y15 treatment decreased autophosphorylation of FAK in a dose-dependent manner and changed cell morphology by causing cell rounding in DBTRG and U87 cells. Administration of Y15 significantly decreased subcutaneous DBTRG tumor growth with decreased Y397-FAK autophosphorylation, activated caspase-3 and PARP. Y15 was administered in an orthotopic glioma model, leading to an increase in mouse survival. The combination of Y15 with temozolomide was more effective than either agent alone in decreasing viability and activating caspase-8 in DBTRG and U87 cells in vitro. In addition, the combination of Y15 and temozolomide synergistically blocked U87 brain tumor growth in vivo. Thus, pharmacologic blockade of FAK autophosphorylation with the oral administration of a small-molecule inhibitor Y15 has a potential to be an effective therapy approach for glioblastoma either alone or in combination with chemotherapy agents such as temozolomide.

  6. Methotrexate-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and evaluation of its cytotoxic potential against U-343 MGa human neuronal glioblastoma cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kranti P Musmade; Praful B Deshpande; Prashant B Musmade; M Naseer Maliyakkal; A Ranjith Kumar; M Sreenivasa Reddy; N Udupa

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles represent one of the attractive alternatives in the effective treatment of cancer chemotherapy. In the present work, formulation and development of a novel methotrexate (MTX)-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was carried out. The prepared nanoparticles were evaluated for physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, release studies, etc and also evaluated for its in vitro cytotoxic potential against U-343 MGa human neuronal glioblastoma cells. Particle size of optimized formulation was < 200 nm. There was a considerable decrease in cell viability and enhancement in cytotoxic activity of MTX-loaded nanoparticles compared to MTX alone when tested against U-343 MGa human neuronal glioblastoma cells.

  7. Prospective Isolation and Comparison of Human Germinal Matrix and Glioblastoma EGFR+ Populations with Stem Cell Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Tome-Garcia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of non-neoplastic and malignant human stem cell populations in their native state can provide new insights into gliomagenesis. Here we developed a purification strategy to directly isolate EGFR+/− populations from human germinal matrix (GM and adult subventricular zone autopsy tissues, and from de novo glioblastoma (GBM resections, enriching for cells capable of binding EGF ligand (LBEGFR+, and uniquely compared their functional and molecular properties. LBEGFR+ populations in both GM and GBM encompassed all sphere-forming cells and displayed proliferative stem cell properties in vitro. In xenografts, LBEGFR+ GBM cells showed robust tumor initiation and progression to high-grade, infiltrative gliomas. Whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed enrichment of proliferative pathways in both developing and neoplastic freshly isolated EGFR+ populations, and identified both unique and shared sets of genes. The ability to prospectively isolate stem cell populations using native ligand-binding capacity opens new doors onto understanding both normal human development and tumor cell biology.

  8. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Validation of a Human Biopsy–Derived Orthotopic Mouse Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika A. Jarzabek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive brain malignancy, is characterized by extensive cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and single-cell infiltration into the brain. We have previously shown that a xenograft model based on serial xenotransplantation of human biopsy spheroids in immunodeficient rodents maintains the genotype and phenotype of the original patient tumor. The present work further extends this model for optical assessment of tumor engraftment and growth using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. A method for successful lentiviral transduction of the firefly luciferase gene into multicellular spheroids was developed and implemented to generate optically active patient tumor cells. Luciferase-expressing spheroids were injected into the brains of immunodeficient mice. BLI photon counts and tumor volumes from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were correlated. Luciferase-expressing tumors recapitulated the histopathologic hallmarks of human GBMs and showed proliferation rates and microvessel density counts similar to those of wild-type xenografts. Moreover, we detected widespread invasion of luciferase-positive tumor cells in the mouse brains. Herein we describe a novel optically active model of GBM that closely mimics human pathology with respect to invasion, angiogenesis, and proliferation indices. The model may thus be routinely used for the assessment of novel anti-GBM therapeutic approaches implementing well-established and cost-effective optical imaging strategies.

  9. Novel anti-apoptotic microRNAs 582-5p and 363 promote human glioblastoma stem cell survival via direct inhibition of caspase 3, caspase 9, and Bim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree Hunt Floyd

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor. Tumor initiation and recurrence are likely caused by a sub-population of glioblastoma stem cells, which may derive from mutated neural stem and precursor cells. Since CD133 is a stem cell marker for both normal brain and glioblastoma, and to better understand glioblastoma formation and recurrence, we looked for dys-regulated microRNAs in human CD133+ glioblastoma stem cells as opposed to CD133+ neural stem cells isolated from normal human brain. Using FACS sorting of low-passage cell samples followed by microRNA microarray analysis, we found 43 microRNAs that were dys-regulated in common in three separate CD133+ human glioblastomas compared to CD133+ normal neural stem cells. Among these were several microRNAs not previously associated with cancer. We then verified the microRNAs dys-regulated in glioblastoma using quantitative real time PCR and Taqman analysis of the original samples, as well as human GBM stem cell and established cell lines and many human specimens. We show that two candidate oncogenic microRNAs, miR-363 and miR-582-5p, can positively influence glioblastoma survival, as shown by forced expression of the microRNAs and their inhibitors followed by cell number assay, Caspase 3/7 assay, Annexin V apoptosis/fluorescence activated cell sorting, siRNA rescue of microRNA inhibitor treatment, as well as 3'UTR mutagenesis to show luciferase reporter rescue of the most successful targets. miR-582-5p and miR-363 are shown to directly target Caspase 3, Caspase 9, and Bim.

  10. Modulation of Sonic hedgehog signaling and WW domain containing oxidoreductase WOX1 expression enhances radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Hong; Chi, Chih-Wen; Sze, Chun-I; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Lin, Chin-Ping; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-03-01

    WW domain containing oxidoreductase, designated WWOX, FOR or WOX1, is a known pro-apoptotic factor when ectopically expressed in various types of cancer cells, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The activation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, especially paracrine Shh secretion in response to radiation, is associated with impairing the effective irradiation of cancer cells. Here, we examined the role of Shh signaling and WOX1 overexpression in the radiosensitivity of human GBM cells. Our results showed that ionizing irradiation (IR) increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content in GBM U373MG and U87MG cells. GBM cells with exogenous Shh treatment exhibited similar results. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected U373MG and U87MG cells against IR in a dose-dependent manner. Cyclopamine, a Hedgehog/Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor, reversed the protective effect of Shh in U87MG cells. Cyclopamine increased Shh plus IR-induced H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, in these cells. To verify the role of Shh signaling in the radiosensitivity of GBM cells, we tested the effect of the Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) inhibitor zerumbone and found that it could sensitize GBM cells to IR. We next examined the role of WOX1 in radiosensitivity. Overexpression of WOX1 enhanced the radiosensitivity of U87MG (possessing wild type p53 or WTp53) but not U373MG (harboring mutant p53 or MTp53) cells. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected both WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells against IR and increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content. Zerumbone enhanced the radiosensitivity of WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells. In conclusion, overexpression of WOX1 preferentially sensitized human GBM cells possessing wild type p53 to radiation therapy. Blocking of Shh signaling may enhance radiosensitivity independently of the expression of p53 and WOX1. The crosstalk between Shh signaling and WOX1 expression in human glioblastoma warrants further

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B Down-Regulates the Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-Beta (TGF-β) Signaling Transducers in Human Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Farahnejad, Zohreh; Akhtari, Javad; Abastabar, Mahdi; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Mehbod, Amir Seied Ali

    2016-05-01

    It has been revealed that Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB) may feature anti-cancer and anti-metastatic advantages due to its ability to modify cell immunity processes and signaling pathways. Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive human cancers; it has a high mortality nature, which makes it an attractive area for the development of novel therapies. We examined whether the SEB could exert its growth inhibitory effects on glioblastoma cells partially through the manipulation of a key tumor growth factor termed transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). A human primary glioblastoma cell line, U87, was treated with different concentrations of SEB. The cell quantity was measured by the MTT assay at different exposure times. For molecular assessments, total ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted from either non-treated or SEB-treated cells. Subsequently, the gene expression of TGF-β transducers, smad2/3, at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level, was analyzed via a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using the SYBR Green method. Significant differences between cell viability and gene expression levels were determined (Prism 5.0 software) using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) test. We reported that SEB could effectively down-regulate smad2/3 expression in glioblastoma cells at concentrations as quantity as 1 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The SEB concentrations effective at regulating smad2/3 expression were correlated with those used to inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells. Our results also showed that SEB was able to decrease smad2/3 expression at the mRNA level in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. We suggested that SEB could represent an agent that can significantly decrease smad2/3 expression in glioblastoma cells, leading to moderate TGF-β growth signaling and the reduction of tumor cell proliferation.

  12. Radiosensitivity in vitro of clonogenic and non-clonogenic glioblastoma cells obtained from a human brain tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buronfosse, A.; Thomas, C.P.; Ginestet, C.; Dore, J.F. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-11-01

    Cells obtained from a human glioblastoma (G5) were characterized and used to develop an assay measuring their radiosensitivity in vitro. Surviving fractions were estimated 12 days after irradiation by image analysis of the total surface occupied by the cells. This report evaluates 4 experimental factors which may influence the radiosensitivity in vitro of G5 cells: passage number, delay between plating and irradiation, cell density and clonal heterogeneity. The radiosensitivity of the G5 cell line was found to be passage-independent at least between passages 12 and 75. Experimental conditions influence the radiosensitivity as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) range from 90% (5 000 cells/well, irradiation 72 h after seeding) to 49% (2 500 cells per well, irradiation 24 h after seeding). The heterogeneity of the radiosensitivity is large at the clonal level as SF2 of six clones isolated from the G5 line were 45%, 50%, 72%, 74%, 79% and 84%. Finally, when G5 cells were irradiated at low cell density and at the beginning of the growth phase, the radiosensitivity measured with this assay is comparable to that obtained with a standard colony assay. We propose that this assay may be useful to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells obtained from human tumours. (authors). 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Ophiobolin A induces paraptosis-like cell death in human glioblastoma cells by decreasing BKCa channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, M; Girault, A; Mégalizzi, V; Spiegl-Kreinecker, S; Mathieu, V; Berger, W; Evidente, A; Kornienko, A; Gailly, P; Vandier, C; Kiss, R

    2013-03-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and common malignant human brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of highly invasive GBM cells to radiation- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis accounts for the generally dismal treatment outcomes. This study investigated ophiobolin A (OP-A), a fungal metabolite from Bipolaris species, for its promising anticancer activity against human GBM cells exhibiting varying degrees of resistance to proapoptotic stimuli. We found that OP-A induced marked changes in the dynamic organization of the F-actin cytoskeleton, and inhibited the proliferation and migration of GBM cells, likely by inhibiting big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BKCa) channel activity. Moreover, our results indicated that OP-A induced paraptosis-like cell death in GBM cells, which correlated with the vacuolization, possibly brought about by the swelling and fusion of mitochondria and/or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In addition, the OP-A-induced cell death did not involve the activation of caspases. We also showed that the expression of BKCa channels colocalized with these two organelles (mitochondria and ER) was affected in this programmed cell death pathway. Thus, this study reveals a novel mechanism of action associated with the anticancer effects of OP-A, which involves the induction of paraptosis through the disruption of internal potassium ion homeostasis. Our findings offer a promising therapeutic strategy to overcome the intrinsic resistance of GBM cells to proapoptotic stimuli.

  14. Anti-tumor effects of progesterone in human glioblastoma multiforme: role of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Fahim; Yousuf, Seema; Stein, Donald G

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain tumor with a mean patient survival of 13-15 months despite surgical resection, radiation therapy and standard-of-care chemotherapy. We investigated the chemotherapeutic effects of the hormone progesterone (P4) on the growth of human GBM in four genetically different cell lines (U87MG, U87dEGFR, U118MG, LN-229) in vitro and in a U87MG subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. At high concentrations (20, 40, and 80 μM), P4 significantly (Pmatrix metalloproteinase-9. Apoptosis in tumor tissue was detected by the expression of cleaved caspase-3, BCl-2, BAD and p53 proteins and confirmed by TUNEL assay. P4 treatment also suppressed PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, which regulates tumor growth, as demonstrated by the suppression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Our data can be interpreted to suggest that P4 suppresses the growth of human GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo and enhances survival time in mice without any demonstrable side effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Sex steroids and brain disorders'.

  15. Gene expression profiles of human glioblastomas are associated with both tumor cytogenetics and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Ana Luísa; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Castrillo, Abel; Rebelo, Olinda; Tão, Hermínio; Gomes, Fernando; Nieto, Ana Belen; Resende Oliveira, Catarina; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Orfao, Alberto

    2010-09-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge about the genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in gliomas, few studies have investigated the association between the gene expression profiles (GEP) and both cytogenetics and histopathology of gliomas. Here, we analyzed the GEP (U133Plus2.0 chip) of 40 gliomas (35 astrocytic tumors, 3 oligodendrogliomas, and 2 mixed tumors) and their association with tumor cytogenetics and histopathology. Unsupervised and supervised analyses showed significantly different GEP in low- vs high-grade gliomas, the most discriminating genes including genes involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and signal transduction. In turn, among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 3 subgroups of tumors were identified according to their GEP, which were closely associated with the cytogenetic profile of their ancestral tumor cell clones: (i) EGFR amplification, (ii) isolated trisomy 7, and (iii) more complex karyotypes. In summary, our results show a clear association between the GEP of gliomas and tumor histopathology; additionally, among grade IV astrocytoma, GEP are significantly associated with the cytogenetic profile of the ancestral tumor cell clone. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our observations.

  16. An off-target nucleostemin RNAi inhibits growth in human glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Gil-Ranedo

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM may contain a variable proportion of active cancer stem cells (CSCs capable of self-renewal, of aggregating into CD133(+ neurospheres, and to develop intracranial tumors that phenocopy the original ones. We hypothesized that nucleostemin may contribute to cancer stem cell biology as these cells share characteristics with normal stem cells. Here we report that nucleostemin is expressed in GBM-CSCs isolated from patient samples, and that its expression, conversely to what it has been described for ordinary stem cells, does not disappear when cells are differentiated. The significance of nucleostemin expression in CSCs was addressed by targeting the corresponding mRNA using lentivirally transduced short hairpin RNA (shRNA. In doing so, we found an off-target nucleostemin RNAi (shRNA22 that abolishes proliferation and induces apoptosis in GBM-CSCs. Furthermore, in the presence of shRNA22, GBM-CSCs failed to form neurospheres in vitro or grow on soft agar. When these cells are xenotransplanted into the brains of nude rats, tumor development is significantly delayed. Attempts were made to identify the primary target/s of shRNA22, suggesting a transcription factor involved in one of the MAP-kinases signaling-pathways or multiple targets. The use of this shRNA may contribute to develop new therapeutic approaches for this incurable type of brain tumor.

  17. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma.

  18. Phenethyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression and the levels of protein associated with cell cycle regulation in human glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a member of the isothiocyanate family, can induce apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous study disclosed that PEITC induces apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, dysfunction of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway in human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. To the best of our knowledge, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels of GBM 8401 cells in vitro. PEITC may induce G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest through affecting the proteins such as cdk2, cyclin E, and p21 in GBM 8401 cells. Many genes associated with cell-cycle regulation of GBM 8401 cells were changed after PEITC treatment: 48 genes were upregulated and 118 were downregulated. The cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), Budding uninhibited by benzimidazole 1 homolog beta (BUB1B), and cyclin B1 were downregulated, and clusterin was upregulated in GBM 8401 cells treated with PEITC. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels and potential biomarkers for glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 176-187, 2017.

  19. Lentivirus-Mediated Nox4 shRNA Invasion and Angiogenesis and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioresistance remains a significant therapeutic obstacle in glioblastoma. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. Nox4 NADPH oxidase is abundantly expressed and has proven to be a major source of ROS production in glioblastoma. Here we investigated the effects of Nox4 on GBM tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, and radiosensitivity. A lentiviral shRNA vector was utilized to stably knockdown Nox4 in U87MG and U251 glioblastoma cells. ROS production was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Radiosensitivity was evaluated by clonogenic assay and survival curve was generated. Cell proliferation activity was assessed by a cell counting proliferation assay and invasion/migration potential by Matrigel invasion assay. Tube-like structure formation assay was used to evaluate angiogenesis ability in vitro and VEGF expression was assessed by MTT assay. Nox4 knockdown reduced ROS production significantly and suppressed glioblastoma cells proliferation and invasion and tumor associated angiogenesis and increased their radiosensitivity in vitro. Our results indicate that Nox4 may play a crucial role in tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and radioresistance in glioblastoma. Inhibition of Nox4 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA could be a strategy to overcome radioresistance and then improve its therapeutic efficacy for glioblastoma.

  20. The Role of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC GTPases in Cell Morphology, Proliferation and Migration in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV Infected Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Tseliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rho GTPases are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and cell signaling and their importance in cell migration and invasion is well- established. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a widespread pathogen responsible for generally asymptomatic and persistent infections in healthy people. Recent evidence indicates that HCMV gene products are expressed in over 90% of malignant type glioblastomas (GBM. In addition, the HCMV Immediate Early-1 protein (IE1 is expressed in >90% of tumors analyzed. Methods: RhoA, RhoB and RhoC were individually depleted in U373MG glioblastoma cells as well as U373MG cells stably expressing the HCMV IE1 protein (named U373MG-IE1 cells shRNA lentivirus vectors. Cell proliferation assays, migration as well as wound-healing assays were performed in uninfected and HCMV-infected cells. Results: The depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC protein resulted in significant alterations in the morphology of the uninfected cells, which were further enhanced by the cytopathic effect caused by HCMV. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of HCMV, the knockdown of RhoB and RhoC proteins decreased the proliferation rate of the parental and the IE1-expressing glioblastoma cells, whereas the knockdown of RhoA protein in the HCMV infected cell lines restored their proliferation rate. In addition, wound healing assays in U373MG cells revealed that depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC differentially reduced their migration rate, even in the presence or the absence of HCMV. Conclusion: Collectively, these data show for the first time a differential implication of Rho GTPases in morphology, proliferation rate and motility of human glioblastoma cells during HCMV infection, further supporting an oncomodulatory role of HCMV depending on the Rho isoforms' state.

  1. Immune genes are associated with human glioblastoma pathology and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vauléon Elodie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Several recent transcriptomic studies in GBM have identified different signatures involving immune genes associated with GBM pathology, overall survival (OS or response to treatment. Methods In order to clarify the immune signatures found in GBM, we performed a co-expression network analysis that grouped 791 immune-associated genes (IA genes in large clusters using a combined dataset of 161 GBM specimens from published databases. We next studied IA genes associated with patient survival using 3 different statistical methods. We then developed a 6-IA gene risk predictor which stratified patients into two groups with statistically significantly different survivals. We validated this risk predictor on two other Affymetrix data series, on a local Agilent data series, and using RT-Q-PCR on a local series of GBM patients treated by standard chemo-radiation therapy. Results The co-expression network analysis of the immune genes disclosed 6 powerful modules identifying innate immune system and natural killer cells, myeloid cells and cytokine signatures. Two of these modules were significantly enriched in genes associated with OS. We also found 108 IA genes linked to the immune system significantly associated with OS in GBM patients. The 6-IA gene risk predictor successfully distinguished two groups of GBM patients with significantly different survival (OS low risk: 22.3 months versus high risk: 7.3 months; p  Conclusions This study demonstrates the immune signatures found in previous GBM genomic analyses and suggests the involvement of immune cells in GBM biology. The robust 6-IA gene risk predictor should be helpful in establishing prognosis in GBM patients, in particular in those with a proneural GBM subtype, and even in the well-known good prognosis group of patients with methylated MGMT promoter-bearing tumors.

  2. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H.; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R.; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F.; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M.; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B.; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model. PMID:28139732

  3. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Activated by PI3K and ERK Transduced Growth Signals in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M. Haverty; Zhi-Ping Weng; Ulla Hansen

    2005-01-01

    Determining how cells regulate their transcriptional response to extracellular signals is key to the understanding of complex eukaryotic systems. This study was initiated with the goals of furthering the study of mammalian transcriptional regulation and analyzing the relative benefits of related computational methodologies. One dataset available for such an analysis involved gene expression profiling of the early growth factor response to platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)in a human glioblastoma cell line; this study differentiated genes whose expression was regulated by signaling through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) versus the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. We have compared the inferred transcription factors from this previous study with additional predictions of regulatory transcription factors using two alternative promoter sequence analysis techniques. This comparative analysis, in which the algorithms predict overlapping,although not identical, sets of factors, argues for meticulous benchmarking of promoter sequence analysis methods to determine the positive and negative attributes that contribute to their varying results. Finally, we inferred transcriptional regulatory networks deriving from various signaling pathways using the CARRIE program suite. These networks not only included previously described transcriptional features of the response to growth signals, but also predicted new regulatory features for the propagation and modulation of the growth signal.

  4. Enhancement of the effect of X-irradiation against cultured human glioblastoma cells by pretreatment with ACNU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashiyama, Shoji; Katakura, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Kou; Kitahara, Masakazu; Suzuki, Jiro (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Brain Diseases); Sasaki, Takehito

    1989-12-01

    Human glioblastoma A-7 (GB A-7) cells can apparently recover from potentially lethal X-irradiation. The authors, using a colony-forming assay, studied the influence of pretreatment with 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3- (2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU) on the effectiveness of X-irradiation against GB A-7 cells grown in monolayers and as multicellular spheroids. Pre-exposure to ACNU inhibited the recovery of irradiated GB A-7 cells. In monolayer cells, the combination treatment was most effective when ACNU was applied 2 to 8 hours prior to irradiation, and the larger the X-ray dose, the more potent the effect. ACNU pretreatment was more effective against large spheroids (enhancement ratio 1.86) than against small ones (1.34). Large spheroids showed necrosis, whereas small ones did not. Isobolographic analysis disclosed that the effect of combining X-irradiation and ACNU is within an additive envelope at the surviving fraction of 10{sup -2}, while supra-additive at the surviving fraction of 10{sup -3}. These results suggest that the potency of X-irradiation is augmented by ACNU pretreatment through an interactive mechanism. Further, suppression of recovery from X-ray induced potentially lethal damage was influenced by the presence of necrosis. (author).

  5. Evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of Hypericum spp. on human glioblastoma A1235 and breast cancer MDA MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madunić, Josip; Matulić, Maja; Friščić, Maja; Pilepić, Kroata Hazler

    2016-11-01

    Cytotoxic activity of 16 Hypericum ethanolic extracts was evaluated by MTT assay on two human cancer cell lines: glioblastoma A1235 and breast cancer MDA MB-231. Morphology and the type of induced cell death were determined using light and fluorescence microscopy. The majority of Hypericum extracts had no significant cytotoxic effect on MDA MB-231 cells. Eight extracts exhibited mild cytotoxic effect on A1235 cells after 24 h incubation, ranging from 8.0% (H. patulum) to 21.7% (H. oblongifolium). After 72 h of treatment, the strongest inhibition of A1235 viability was observed for extracts of H. androsaemum (26.4-43.9%), H. balearicum (25.8-36.3%), H. delphicum (14.8-27.4%) and H. densiflorum (11.2-24.1%). Micro-scopic examination of cells showed apoptosis as the dominant type of cell death. Due to observed high viability of treated cells, we propose that cytotoxic effects of Hypericum extracts could be related to alternations/interruptions in the cell cycle.

  6. Heterogeneous intratumoral distribution of gadolinium nanoparticles within U87 human glioblastoma xenografts unveiled by micro-PIXE imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; L'Homel, Baptiste; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Bonnet-Boissinot, Sarah; Prezado, Yolanda; Ortega, Richard

    2017-04-15

    Metallic nanoparticles have great potential in cancer radiotherapy as theranostic drugs since, they serve simultaneously as contrast agents for medical imaging and as radio-therapy sensitizers. As with other anticancer drugs, intratumoral diffusion is one of the main limiting factors for therapeutic efficiency. To date, a few reports have investigated the intratumoral distribution of metallic nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative distribution of gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles after direct intratumoral injection within U87 human glioblastoma tumors grafted in mice, using micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) imaging. AGuIX (Activation and Guiding of Irradiation by X-ray) 3 nm particles composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates were used. PIXE results indicate that the direct injection of Gd nanoparticles in tumors results in their heterogeneous diffusion, probably related to variations in tumor density. All tumor regions contain Gd, but with markedly different concentrations, with a more than 250-fold difference. Also Gd can diffuse to the healthy adjacent tissue. This study highlights the usefulness of mapping the distribution of metallic nanoparticles at the intratumoral level, and proposes PIXE as an imaging modality to probe the quantitative distribution of metallic nanoparticles in tumors from experimental animal models with micrometer resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High and low dose rate irradiation have opposing effects on cytokine gene expression in human glioblastoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.J.; Canada, A.L.; Antoniono, R.J.; Redpath, J.L. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Effects of radiation on five cytokine expressing human glioblastoma cell lines were studied. In comparison to unirradiated controls, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 mRNAs were generally reduced after low (LDR, 1.0 cGy/min) and very low (VLDR, 0.35 cGy/min) dose rate irradiation. In contrast, high (HDR, 200 cGy/min) and intermediate (IDR, 4.1 cGy/min) dose rates increased steady-state levels of IL-1{beta} and IL-6 mRNAs. The surviving fraction was generally inversely proportional to the dose rate; however, these glioma cells were unusually to susceptible LDR. In the two cell lines tested, IDR was less cytotoxic than either HDR or LDR irradiation. Although cytokine gene expression had no clear effect on radiation survival in vitro, autologous cytokines could be important to radiation response in vivo by affecting immune response, tumour stroma, vasculature or surrounding tissues. Adjusting dose rates to account for inverse dose rate effects and altered gene expression may be a useful strategy in optimising radiation therapy of gliobastomas. (Author).

  8. Flavonoids suppress human glioblastoma cell growth by inhibiting cell metabolism, migration, and by regulating extracellular matrix proteins and metalloproteinases expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Balbino L; Oliveira, Mona N; Coelho, Paulo L C; Pitanga, Bruno P S; da Silva, Alessandra B; Adelita, Taís; Silva, Victor Diógenes A; Costa, Maria de F D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Tardy, Marcienne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Costa, Silvia L

    2015-12-01

    The malignant gliomas are very common primary brain tumors with poor prognosis, which require more effective therapies than the current used, such as with chemotherapy drugs. In this work, we investigated the effects of several polyhydroxylated flavonoids namely, rutin, quercetin (F7), apigenin (F32), chrysin (F11), kaempferol (F12), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone (F2) in human GL-15 glioblastoma cells. We observed that all flavonoids decreased the number of viable cells and the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, they damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, inducing apoptosis. Flavonoids also induced a delay in cell migration, related to a reduction in filopodia-like structures on the cell surface, reduction on metalloproteinase (MMP-2) expression and activity, as well as an increase in intra- and extracellular expression of fibronectin, and intracellular expression of laminin. Morphological changes were also evident in adherent cells characterized by the presence of a condensed cell body with thin and long cellular processes, expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Therefore, these flavonoids should be tested as potential antitumor agents in vitro and in vivo in other malignant glioma models.

  9. 1-Oxoeudesm-11(13)-eno-12,8a-lactone induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-shan LIU; Yan-feng WANG; Li-sha MA; Bei-bei ZHENG; Lin LI; Wei-dong XiE; Xia LI

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of 1-oxoeudesm-11(13)eno-12,8a-lactone (OEL),a novel eudesmane-type sesquiterpene isolated from Aster himalaicus,on the cell cycle and apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells in vitro.Methods: Human malignant glioblastoma cell lines U87 and A172 were used.The cytotoxicity of OEL was examined using the MTT assay.Cell apoptosis was assessed with DAPI staining and flow cytometry.DNA damage was determined by measuring the phosphorylation of H2AX using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting.Cell cycle profiles were measured with flow cytometry.The mRNA expression of p53 and p21Waf1/Cip1 was investigated using real-time PCR.The protein expression of γ-H2AX,caspase-9,caspase-3,p53,p21Waf1/Cip1,cyclin B1,and cdc2 was analyzed with Western blotting.Results: Treatment of the malignant glioblastoma cells with OEL inhibited the cell growth in dose-and time-dependent manners (thevalues of IC50 at 48 and 72 h were 29.5 and 16.99 μmol/L,respectively,in U87 cells; 7.2 and 9.5 μmol/L,respectively,in A172 cells).OEL (10-30μmol/L) induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in both U87 and A172 cells.OEL induced the phosphorylation of cdc2,a G2/M phase cyclin-dependent kinase,and decreased the expression of cyclin B1 required for progression through the G2/M phase in U87 cells.The compound remarkably increased the phosphorylation of H2AX in U87 cells.Moreover,OEL increased the mRNA and protein levels of p53 and its target gene p21waf1/cip1 in U87 cells.The compound also induced p53 phosphorylation.Pretreatment withPFT-α,a specific inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity,could partially reverse the inhibition of OEL on the viability of U87 and A172 cells.Conclusion: OEL suppresses the growth of human glioblastoma cells in vitro via inducing DNA damage,p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis,thus warrants further studies as a lead compound of anti-glioblastoma drug.

  10. Key concepts in glioblastoma therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Ng, Kimberly; Bartek, Jiri;

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common form of primary brain cancer and remains one of the most aggressive forms of human cancer. Current standard of care involves maximal surgical resection followed by concurrent therapy with radiation and the DNA alkylating agent temozolomide. Despite this aggressive...

  11. Quercetin abrogates IL-6/STAT3 signaling and inhibits glioblastoma cell line growth and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud-Levesque, Jonathan; Bousquet-Gagnon, Nathalie; Beliveau, Richard, E-mail: oncomol@nobel.si.uqam.ca

    2012-05-01

    Evidence has suggested that STAT3 functions as an oncogene in gliomagenesis. As a consequence, changes in the inflammatory microenvironment are thought to promote tumor development. Regardless of its origin, cancer-related inflammation has many tumor-promoting effects, such as the promotion of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell survival. Given that IL-6, a major cancer-related inflammatory cytokine, regulates STAT3 activation and is upregulated in glioblastoma, we sought to investigate the inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive flavonoid quercetin on glioblastoma cell proliferation and migration triggered by IL-6, and to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. In this study, we show that quercetin is a potent inhibitor of the IL-6-induced STAT3 signaling pathway in T98G and U87 glioblastoma cells. Exposure to quercetin resulted in the reduction of GP130, JAK1 and STAT3 activation by IL-6, as well as a marked decrease of the proliferative and migratory properties of glioblastoma cells induced by IL-6. Interestingly, quercetin also modulated the expression of two target genes regulated by STAT3, i.e. cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, quercetin reduced the recruitment of STAT3 at the cyclin D1 promoter and inhibited Rb phosphorylation in the presence of IL-6. Overall, these results provide new insight into the role of quercetin as a blocker of the STAT3 activation pathway stimulated by IL-6, with a potential role in the prevention and treatment of glioblastoma.

  12. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  13. Sensitivity to PRIMA-1MET is associated with decreased MGMT in human glioblastoma cells and glioblastoma stem cells irrespective of p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyka, Mariia; Sharifi, Zeinab; Petrecca, Kevin; Mansure, Jose; Jean-Claude, Bertrand; Sabri, Siham

    2016-09-13

    Alterations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene occur in ~30% of primary glioblastoma (GBM) with a high frequency of missense mutations associated with the acquisition of oncogenic "gain-of-function" (GOF) mutant (mut)p53 activities. PRIMA-1MET/APR-246, emerged as a promising compound to rescue wild-type (wt)p53 function in different cancer types. Previous studies suggested the role of wtp53 in the negative regulation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a major determinant in resistance to therapy in GBM treatment. The potential role of MGMT in expression of p53 and the efficacy of PRIMA-1MET with respect to TP53 status and expression of MGMT in GBM remain unknown. We investigated response to PRIMA-1MET of wtp53/MGMT-negative (U87MG, A172), mutp53/MGMT-positive U138, LN-18, T98/Empty vector (T98/EV) and its isogenic MGMT/shRNA gene knockdown counterpart (T98/shRNA). We show that MGMT silencing decreased expression of mutp53/GOF in T98/shRNA. PRIMA-1MET further cleared T98/shRNA cells of mutp53, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential, abrogated the G2 checkpoint control, increased susceptibility to apoptotic cell death, expression of GADD45A and sustained expression of phosphorylated Erk1/2. PRIMA-1MET increased expression of p21 protein in U87MG and A172 and promoted senescence in U87MG cell line. Importantly, PRIMA-1MET decreased relative cell numbers, disrupted the structure of neurospheres of patient-derived GBM stem cells (GSCs) and enabled activation of wtp53 with decreased expression of MGMT in MGMT-positive GSCs or decreased expression of mutp53. Our findings highlight the cell-context dependent effects of PRIMA-1MET irrespective of p53 status and suggest the role of MGMT as a potential molecular target of PRIMA-1MET in MGMT-positive GSCs.

  14. Expression of elongation factor-2 kinase contributes to anoikis resistance and invasion of human glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHANG; Yi ZHANG; Xiao-yuan LIU; Zheng-hong QIN; Jin-ming YANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF-2 kinase) contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme by promoting the migration and invasion of glioma cells. The mechanism involved was also explored.Methods: Human glioma cell lines T98G and LN-229 were used. The expression of eEF-2 kinase was silenced using siRNA, and the invasive potential of tumor cells was assessed using a wound-healing assay and a Matrigel invasion assay. Apoptosis was determined using propidium iodide (PI) staining and Western blot analysis of cleaved caspase-3.Results: Silencing the expression of eEF-2 kinase by siRNA significantly suppressed both the migration and invasion of human glioma cells. Silencing eEF-2 kinase expression also sensitized glioma cells to anoikis, thereby decreasing tumor cell viability in the absence of attachment. Treatment of tumor cells with the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk down-regulated Bim accumulation and abolished glioma cell sensitivity to anoikis.Conclusion: The results suggest that the expression of eEF-2 kinase contributes to migration and invasion of human glioma cells by protecting them from anoikis. eEF-2 kinase expression may serve as a prognostic marker and a novel target for cancer therapy.

  15. Ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU) suppresses in vitro population expansion and in vivo tumor progression of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Heather H; Rahman, Maryam; Levkoff, Lindsay H; Millette, Sebastien; Martin-Carreras, Teresa; Dunbar, Erin M; Reynolds, Brent A; Laywell, Eric D

    2011-12-01

    Thymidine analogs (TAs) are synthetic nucleosides that incorporate into newly synthesized DNA. Halogenated pyrimidines (HPs), such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), are a class of TAs that can be detected with antibodies and are commonly used for birthdating individual cells and for assessing the proliferative index of cell populations. It is well established that HPs can act as radiosensitizers when incorporated into DNA chains, but they are generally believed not to impair normal cell function in the absence of secondary stressors. However, we and others have shown that HP incorporation leads to a sustained suppression of cell cycle progression in mammalian cells, resulting in cellular senescence in somatic cells. In addition, we have shown that HP incorporation results in delayed tumor progression in a syngeneic rat model of glioma. Here we examine ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU), a newly developed and alkylated TA, for its anti-cancer activity, both in vitro and in vivo. We show that EdU, like HPs, leads to a severe reduction in the proliferation rate of normal and transformed cells in vitro. Unlike HPs, however, EdU incorporation also causes DNA damage resulting in the death of a substantial subset of treated cells. When administered over an extended time as a monotherapy to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of human glioblastoma multiforme tumors, EdU significantly reduces tumor volume and increases survival without apparent significant toxicity. These results, combined with the fact that EdU readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, support the continued investigation of EdU as a potential therapy for malignant brain tumors.

  16. Computational Identification of Tumor Anatomic Location Associated with Survival in 2 Large Cohorts of Human Primary Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T T; Achrol, A S; Mitchell, L A; Du, W A; Loya, J J; Rodriguez, S A; Feroze, A; Westbroek, E M; Yeom, K W; Stuart, J M; Chang, S D; Harsh, G R; Rubin, D L

    2016-04-01

    Tumor location has been shown to be a significant prognostic factor in patients with glioblastoma. The purpose of this study was to characterize glioblastoma lesions by identifying MR imaging voxel-based tumor location features that are associated with tumor molecular profiles, patient characteristics, and clinical outcomes. Preoperative T1 anatomic MR images of 384 patients with glioblastomas were obtained from 2 independent cohorts (n = 253 from the Stanford University Medical Center for training and n = 131 from The Cancer Genome Atlas for validation). An automated computational image-analysis pipeline was developed to determine the anatomic locations of tumor in each patient. Voxel-based differences in tumor location between good (overall survival of >17 months) and poor (overall survival of location groups, for which clinical features, messenger RNA expression, and copy number changes were compared to elucidate the biologic basis of tumors located in different brain regions. Tumors in the right occipitotemporal periventricular white matter were significantly associated with poor survival in both training and test cohorts (both, log-rank P locations. Tumors in the right periatrial location were associated with hypoxia pathway enrichment and PDGFRA amplification, making them potential targets for subgroup-specific therapies. Voxel-based location in glioblastoma is associated with patient outcome and may have a potential role for guiding personalized treatment. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. The regulating role of mutant IκBα in expression of TIMP-2 and MMP-9 in human glioblastoma multiform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yu-hua; YU Li-Jie; SHAO En-de; WU Jian-liang; JI Jian-wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Our previous studies demonstrated that mutant IκBα (IκBαM) inhibited the occurrence, growth and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma multiform (GBM). However, the specific mechanism by which IKBαM regulates protein-degrading enzymes secreted from GBM to inhibit invasion and metastasis has remained unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulatory role and significance of IκBαM genes in the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human GBM. Methods We established the following four GBM cell lines stably expressing IκBαM by plasmid construction, gene transfection and screening for IκBαM protein expression: mutant IκBα-transfected cells (G36△-M), wild-type IκBα-transfected cells (G36△-W), empty plasmid transfected cells (G36△-P) and untransfected cells (G36△). The TIMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Tumor cells were then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to establish an animal model of ectopic tumor growth, and TIMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was determined by immunohistochemical methods. Results The results showed that there was a significant increase in TIMP-2 expression and a significant decrease in MMP-9 expression in the G36A-M group at both the RNA and protein levels compared with the G36A-W group, G36△-P group and G36△ group. Similar results were observed in the immunohistochemical staining analysis of tumor tissues. In the G36A-M group, TIMP-2 expression was significantly higher while MMP-9 expression was significantly lower than in the other three groups. Conclusions Our findings indicate that IκBαM inhibits the activation of NF-κB. It significantly up-regulates TIMP-2 expression in human malignant glioma cells and down-regulates the expression of MMP-9. Thus, IκBαM maintains the integrity of the extracellular matrix and further inhibits the growth and metastasis of tumor tissues.

  18. DNA double-strand break rejoining in human follicular lymphoma and glioblastoma tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macann, AMJ; Britten, RA; Poppema, S; Pearcey, R; Rosenberg, E; Allalunis-Turner, MJ; Murray, D

    2000-01-01

    Follicle center cell lymphoma is among the most radioresponsive of human cancers. To assess whether this radioresponsiveness might be a result of a compromised ability of the tumor cells to accomplish the biologically-effective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we have measured i) the exten

  19. Sulforaphane inhibits invasion via activating ERK1/2 signaling in human glioblastoma U87MG and U373MG cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunliu Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma has highly invasive potential, which might result in poor prognosis and therapeutic failure. Hence, the key we study is to find effective therapies to repress migration and invasion. Sulforaphane (SFN was demonstrated to inhibit cell growth in a variety of tumors. Here, we will further investigate whether SFN inhibits migration and invasion and find the possible mechanisms in human glioblastoma U87MG and U373MG cells. METHODS: First, the optimal time and dose of SFN for migration and invasion study were determined via cell viability and cell morphological assay. Further, scratch assay and transwell invasion assay were employed to investigate the effect of SFN on migration and invasion. Meanwhile, Western blots were used to detect the molecular linkage among invasion related proteins phosphorylated ERK1/2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and CD44v6. Furthermore, Gelatin zymography was performed to detect the inhibition of MMP-2 activation. In addition, ERK1/2 blocker PD98059 (25 µM was integrated to find the link between activated ERK1/2 and invasion, MMP-2 and CD44v6. RESULTS: The results showed that SFN (20 µM remarkably reduced the formation of cell pseudopodia, indicating that SFN might inhibit cell motility. As expected, scratch assay and transwell invasion assay showed that SFN inhibited glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. Western blot and Gelatin zymography showed that SFN phosphorylated ERK1/2 in a sustained way, which contributed to the downregulated MMP-2 expression and activity, and the upregulated CD44v6 expression. These molecular interactions resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion. CONCLUSIONS: SFN inhibited migration and invasion processes. Furthermore, SFN inhibited invasion via activating ERK1/2 in a sustained way. The accumulated ERK1/2 activation downregulated MMP-2 expression and decreased its activity and upregulated CD44v6. SFN might be a potential therapeutic agent by activating ERK1

  20. Small ubiquitin-like modifier 1-3 conjugation [corrected] is activated in human astrocytic brain tumors and is required for glioblastoma cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Liangli; Roehn, Gabriele; Pearlstein, Robert D; Ali-Osman, Francis; Pan, Hongjie; Goldbrunner, Roland; Krantz, Matthew; Harms, Christoph; Paschen, Wulf

    2013-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO1-3) constitutes a group of proteins that conjugate to lysine residues of target proteins thereby modifying their activity, stability, and subcellular localization. A large number of SUMO target proteins are transcription factors and other nuclear proteins involved in gene expression. Furthermore, SUMO conjugation plays key roles in genome stability, quality control of newly synthesized proteins, proteasomal degradation of proteins, and DNA damage repair. Any marked increase in levels of SUMO-conjugated proteins is therefore expected to have a major impact on the fate of cells. We show here that SUMO conjugation is activated in human astrocytic brain tumors. Levels of both SUMO1- and SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins were markedly increased in tumor samples. The effect was least pronounced in low-grade astrocytoma (WHO Grade II) and most pronounced in glioblastoma multiforme (WHO Grade IV). We also found a marked rise in levels of Ubc9, the only SUMO conjugation enzyme identified so far. Blocking SUMO1-3 conjugation in glioblastoma cells by silencing their expression blocked DNA synthesis, cell growth, and clonogenic survival of cells. It also resulted in DNA-dependent protein kinase-induced phosphorylation of H2AX, indicative of DNA double-strand damage, and G(2) /M cell cycle arrest. Collectively, these findings highlight the pivotal role of SUMO conjugation in DNA damage repair processes and imply that the SUMO conjugation pathway could be a new target of therapeutic intervention aimed at increasing the sensitivity of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  1. Human glioblastoma stem-like cells accumulate protoporphyrin IX when subjected to exogenous 5-aminolaevulinic acid, rendering them sensitive to photodynamic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanski, Adrian; Ebbert, Lara; Sabel, Michael C; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Lamszus, Katrin; Ewelt, Christian; Etminan, Nima; Fischer, Johannes C; Sorg, Rüdiger V

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Despite multimodal therapy combining resection, radio- and alkylating chemotherapy, disease recurrence is universal and prognosis of patients is poor. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSC), which can be grown as neurospheres from primary tumors in vitro, appear to be resistant to the established therapies and are suspected to be the driving force for disease recurrence. Thus, efficacy of emerging therapies may depend on targeting GSC. 5-aminolaevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (5-ALA/PDT) is a promising therapeutic approach in GBM. It utilizes the selective accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in GBM cells after application of 5-ALA. When exposed to laser light of 635nm wavelength, PPIX initiates a photochemical reaction resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, which kill the tumor cells. Whether GSC accumulate PPIX and are sensitive to 5-ALA/PDT is currently unknown. Therefore, human GSC were derived from primary tumors and grown as neurospheres under serum free conditions. When subjected to exogenous 5-ALA, a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of PPIX in GSC was observed by flow cytometry, which varied between individual GSC preparations. Subsequent exposure to laser light of 635nm wavelength substantially killed GSC, whereas treatment with 5-ALA or exposure to laser light only had no effect. LD50 values differed between GSC preparations, but were negatively correlated with PPIX accumulation in GSC. In summary, we report for the first time that glioblastoma stem-like cells accumulate PPIX when subjected to 5-aminolaevulinic acid and are sensitive to 5-aminolaevulinc acid based photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  3. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  4. Immunosuppressive mechanisms in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduom, Edjah K; Weller, Michael; Heimberger, Amy B

    2015-11-01

    Despite maximal surgical and medical therapy, the treatment of glioblastoma remains a seriously vexing problem, with median survival well under 2 years and few long-term survivors. Targeted therapy has yet to produce significant advances in treatment of these lesions in spite of advanced molecular characterization of glioblastoma and glioblastoma cancer stem cells. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising mode for some of the hardest to treat tumors, including metastatic melanoma. Although immunotherapy has been evaluated in glioblastoma in the past with limited success, better understanding of the failures of these therapies could lead to more successful treatments in the future. Furthermore, there is a persistent challenge for the use of immune therapy to treat glioblastoma secondary to the existence of redundant mechanisms of tumor-mediated immune suppression. Here we will address these mechanisms of immunosuppression in glioblastoma and therapeutic approaches.

  5. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Ewa Zakrzewska

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests.

  6. A New Approach in Gene Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells as a Novel Carrier for Suicide Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mansoureh; Fallah, Ali; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Arjmand, Babak; Yazdani, Nasrin; Verdi, Javad; Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Miri, Seyed Mojtaba; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza

    2016-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) of human olfactory mucosa are a type of glial-like cells that possess good migratory and tropism properties. We believe that neuronal-derived vehicle may have better capability to receive to the site of injury. In addition to, obtaining of such vehicle from the patient reduces risk of unwanted complications. So, in this study, we investigate whether human olfactory ensheathing cells can be used as a cell source for the first time in gene delivery to assay the tumoricidal effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We obtained OECs from superior turbinate of human nasal cavity mucosa, and cell phenotype was confirmed by the expression of cell-specific antigens including low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75 neurotrophin receptor), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2), and S100 calcium binding protein B (S100-beta) using immunocytochemistry. Then, these cells were transduced by lentiviral vector for transient and stable expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (OEC-tk). The migratory capacity of OEC-tk, their potency to convert prodrug ganciclovir to toxic form, and cytotoxic effect on astrocyte cells were assayed in vitro. The OECs showed fibroblast-like morphology and expressed specific antigens such as p75 neurotrophin receptor, S100-beta, and MAP2. Our results indicated that OECs-tk were able to migrate toward primary cultured human glioblastoma multiforme and affected survival rate of tumor cells according to exposure time and concentration of ganciclovir. Also, OECs-HSV-tk was capable of inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Our findings suggest that human OECs could employ as a possible tool to transfer anticancer agent in gene therapy of brain tumor.

  7. Clinical application of dendritic cell vaccine of human glioblastoma%人脑胶质瘤树突状细胞疫苗的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐杰; 陆华; 吴卫江; 葛风; 房文峰; 朱爱华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of tteating human glioblastoma with dendritic cells(DCs) vaccine. Methods A total of 25 fresh human glioblastoma samples was taken during operartioa The apoptosis of DCs then was induced by heat-shock protein. The glioblastoma-DC vaccine was prepared by loading peripheral blood-derived DCs. Twenty-five patients were randomized into two groups of C(12 cases,treated with conventional regime of surgical resection followed by radiochemotherapy) and DC (13 cases, treated with additional DCs vaccine). The local control rate (LCR) of the tumor.Karnofsky grading of live quality,survival rate and complication were evaluated. Results The patients were followed up for two years. At the 9th month after complition of therapy, the LCR of the tumor was higher in group DC than that in group C(69. 2% vs. 25.0%)(P<0. 05). At the 6th and 9th month after completion of therapy, Karnofsky grades were better in group DC than those in group C. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were higher in group DC than those in group C (69. 2% and 7. 7% vs. 41. 7% and 0)(P<0. 05). The priod of tumor recurrence was longer in group DC than that in group C[(ll. 92±25. 31) months vs. (7.75±4.16) months](P<0. 05). There were no DC vaccine-related side effects in group DC. Conclusion Combined use of glioblastoma-DC vaccine and conventional surgery plus radiochemotherapy can provide an effective treatment for the patients with glioblastoma.%目的 探讨人脑胶质瘤树突状细胞(DC)疫苗的临床疗效.方法 采集患者胶质母细胞瘤手术标本,用热休克诱导肿瘤细胞凋亡,制备符合临床应用的人脑胶质瘤DC疫苗.25例脑胶质瘤患者分为C组(12例)和DC组(13例):C组采用传统的手术及术后放化疗治疗;DC组加用DC疫苗.比较两组肿瘤局部控制率(LCR)、生存时间和生活质量的Karnofsky评级,记录并发症.结果 随访2年.治疗结束后9个月时,DC组肿瘤LCR明显高于C组(69.2%vs,25.0%)(P<0

  8. Time until initiation of tumor growth is an effective measure of the anti-angiogenic effect of TNP-470 on human glioblastoma in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, M; Spang-Thomsen, M; Kristjansen, P E

    1999-01-01

    , 11, or 15 days after inoculation. The time from inoculation until initiation of exponential tumor growth was determined along with the post-therapeutic growth delay and the initial tumor doubling time (TD) for each individual tumor (n=103) on the basis of tumor volume growth curves. We found that: i......We examined the effect of the anti-angiogenic compound TNP-470 on early tumor growth characteristics following subcutaneous implantation of 1 mm3 tissue blocks of human glioblastoma U87, in nude mice. The mice received daily injections with TNP-470, 7 mg/kg, from one day before until either 3, 7......) the onset of growth of U87 xenografts was effectively inhibited by concurrent treatment with TNP-470 beyond the first three days after inoculation, ii) this effect was fully reversible upon termination of therapy, and iii) the post-therapeutic growth delay was independent of the accumulated dose...

  9. In silico enhanced restriction enzyme based methylation analysis of the human glioblastoma genome using Agilent 244K CpG Island microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide methylation profiling of gliomas is likely to provide important clues to improving treatment outcomes. Restriction enzyme based approaches have been widely utilized for methylation profiling of cancer genomes and will continue to have importance in combination with higher density microarrays. With the availability of the human genome sequence and microarray probe sequences, these approaches can be readily characterized and optimized via in silico modeling. We adapted the previously described HpaII/MspI based Methylation Sensitive Restriction Enzyme (MSRE assay for use with two-color Agilent 244K CpG island microarrays. In this assay, fragmented genomic DNA is digested in separate reactions with isoschizomeric HpaII (methylation-sensitive and MspI (methylation-insensitive restriction enzymes. Using in silico hybridization, we found that genomic fragmentation with BfaI was superior to MseI, providing a maximum effective coverage of 22,362 CpG islands in the human genome. In addition, we confirmed the presence of an internal control group of fragments lacking HpaII/MspI sites which enable separation of methylated and unmethylated fragments. We used this method on genomic DNA isolated from normal brain, U87MG cells, and a glioblastoma patient tumor sample and confirmed selected differentially methylated CpG islands using bisulfite sequencing. Along with additional validation points, we performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis to determine the optimal threshold (p ≤ 0.001. Based on this threshold, we identified ~2400 CpG islands common to all three samples and 145 CpG islands unique to glioblastoma. These data provide more general guidance to individuals seeking to maximize effective coverage using restriction enzyme based methylation profiling approaches.

  10. Bacterial Carriers for Glioblastoma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mehta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of aggressive glioblastoma brain tumors is challenging, largely due to diffusion barriers preventing efficient drug dosing to tumors. To overcome these barriers, bacterial carriers that are actively motile and programmed to migrate and localize to tumor zones were designed. These carriers can induce apoptosis via hypoxia-controlled expression of a tumor suppressor protein p53 and a pro-apoptotic drug, Azurin. In a xenograft model of human glioblastoma in rats, bacterial carrier therapy conferred a significant survival benefit with 19% overall long-term survival of >100 days in treated animals relative to a median survival of 26 days in control untreated animals. Histological and proteomic analyses were performed to elucidate the safety and efficacy of these carriers, showing an absence of systemic toxicity and a restored neural environment in treated responders. In the treated non-responders, proteomic analysis revealed competing mechanisms of pro-apoptotic and drug-resistant activity. This bacterial carrier opens a versatile avenue to overcome diffusion barriers in glioblastoma by virtue of its active motility in extracellular space and can lead to tailored therapies via tumor-specific expression of tumoricidal proteins.

  11. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  12. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    with mutation of EGFR, and the constitutive activated deletion variant EGFRvIII is the most common EGFR mutation found in GBM. Activated EGFR signaling, through overexpression and/or mutation, is involved in increased tumorigenic potential. As such, EGFR is an attractive target for GBM therapy. However...... the expressions of EGFR and EGFRvIII are maintained both in xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on mice and in cell cultures established in stem cell conditions. With this model it will be possible to further study the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII, and response to targeted therapy, in GBM.......Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, and most aggressive primary brain tumor among adults. A vast majority of the tumors express high levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a consequence of gene amplification. Furthermore, gene amplification is often associated...

  13. 4-IBP, a σ1 Receptor Agonist, Decreases the Migration of Human Cancer Cells, Including Glioblastoma Cells, In Vitro and Sensitizes Them In Vitro and In Vivo to Cytotoxic Insults of Proapoptotic and Proautophagic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Mégalizzi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the molecular function of cr receptors has not been fully defined and the natural ligand(s is still not known, there is increasing evidence that these receptors and their ligands might play a significant role in cancer biology. 4-(N-tibenzylpiperidin-4-yl-4iodobenzamide (4-IBP, a selective σ1, agonist, has been used to investigate whether this compound is able to modify: 1 in vitro the migration and proliferation of human cancer cells; 2 in vitro the sensitivity of human glioblastoma cells to cytotoxic drugs; and 3 in vivo in orthotopic glioblastoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC models the survival of mice coadministered cytotoxic agents. 4-IBP has revealed weak anti proliferative effects on human U373-MG glioblastoma and C32 melanoma cells but induced marked concentration-dependent decreases in the growth of human A549 NSCLC and PC3 prostate cancer cells. The compound was also significantly antimigratory in all four cancer cell lines. This may result, at least in U373-MG cells, from modifications to the actin cytoskeleton. 4-IBP modified the sensitivity of U373-MG cells in vitro to proapoptotic lomustin and proautophagic temozolomide, and markedly decreased the expression of two proteins involved in drug resistance: glucosylceramide synthase and Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. In vivo, 4-IBP increased the antitumor effects of temozolomide and irinotecan in immunodeficient mice that were orthotopically grafted with invasive cancer cells.

  14. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  15. Radiosensitisation by pharmacological ascorbate in glioblastoma multiforme cells, human glial cells, and HUVECs depends on their antioxidant and DNA repair capabilities and is not cancer specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M Leticia; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that 5 mM ascorbate radiosensitized early passage radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells derived from one patient tumor. Here we investigate the sensitivity of a panel of cell lines to 5 mM ascorbate and 6 Gy ionizing radiation, made up of three primary human GBM cells, three GBM cell lines, a human glial cell line, and primary human vascular endothelial cells. The response of different cells lines to ascorbate and/or radiation was determined by measuring viability, colony-forming ability, generation and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), cell cycle progression, antioxidant capacity and generation of reactive oxygen species. Individually, radiation and ascorbate both decreased viability and clonogenicity by inducing DNA damage, but had differential effects on cell cycle progression. Radiation led to G2/M arrest in most cells whereas ascorbate caused accumulation in S phase, which was moderately associated with poor DSB repair. While high dose ascorbate radiosensitized all cell lines in clonogenic assays, the sensitivity to radiation, high dose ascorbate, and combined treatment varied between cell lines. Normal glial cells were similar to GBM cells with respect to free radical scavenging potential and effect of treatment on DNA damage and repair, viability, and clonogenicity. Both GBM cells and normal cells coped equally poorly with oxidative stress caused by radiation and/or high dose ascorbate, dependent primarily on their antioxidant and DSB repair capacity.

  16. MiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in glioblastoma multiforme by inhibition of IκBα both in vitro and in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Guang

    2014-01-23

    BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that miR-196a is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and that it correlates with the clinical outcome of patients with GBM. However, its potential regulatory mechanisms in GBM have never been reported.MethodsWe used quantitative real-time PCR to assess miR-196a expression levels in 132 GBM specimens in a single institution. Oncogenic capability of miR-196a was detected by apoptosis and proliferation assays in U87MG and T98G cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of IκBα in GBM tissues, and a luciferase reporter assay was carried out to confirm whether IκBα is a direct target of miR-196a. In vivo, xenograft tumors were examined for an antiglioma effect of miR-196a inhibitors.ResultsWe present for the first time evidence that miR-196a could directly interact with IκBα 3′-UTR to suppress IκBα expression and subsequently promote activation of NF-κB, consequently promoting proliferation of and suppressing apoptosis in GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our study confirmed that miR-196a was upregulated in GBM specimens and that high levels of miR-196a were significantly correlated with poor outcome in a large cohort of GBM patients. Our data from human tumor xenografts in nude mice treated with miR-196 inhibitors demonstrated that inhibition of miR-196a could ameliorate tumor growth in vivo.ConclusionsMiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in GBM by inhibiting IκBα both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of GBM and indicate that miR-196a may predict clinical outcome of GBM patients and serve as a new therapeutic target for GBM. © 2014 © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In vitro angiogenesis by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced by three-dimensional co-culture with glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijian; Htay, Andre; Dos Santos, Wagner; Gillies, George T; Fillmore, Helen L; Sholley, Milton M; Broaddus, William C

    2009-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most highly vascularized of all human tumors. Our objective was to characterize a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro angiogenesis model by co-culturing HUVEC and GBM cells, and to study the role of VEGF in mediating capillary tubule formation in this model. HUVEC-coated dextran beads were suspended in fibrin gel with human glioma cells on top. The number of sprouts and the length of the processes were measured. HUVEC can be induced to form sprouts and longer processes with lumens, in co-culture with glioma cells that secrete VEGF. Addition of exogenous VEGF enhances this effect. In the absence of glioma cells, many single HUVEC migrate away from the beads, without significant tubule formation. Hypoxia further stimulated sprout formation by 50-100%. Anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody suppressed HUVEC sprouting by 75% in co-culture with glioma cells. This 3-D in vitro co-culture system provides a robust and useful model for analysis of the major steps of glioma-induced angiogenesis.

  18. Self-Styled ZnO Nanostructures Promotes the Cancer Cell Damage and Supresses the Epithelial Phenotype of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Kaushik, Neha; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive researches have been done on the applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) for the biological purposes. However, the role and toxicity mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures (ZnO-NSts) such as nanoplates (NPls), nanorods (NRs), nanosheets (NSs), nanoflowers (NFs) on cancer cells are not largely known. Present study was focused to investigate the possible mechanisms of apoptosis induced by self-designed ZnO-NSts, prepared at fix pH via solution process and exposed against human T98G gliomas including various cancers and non-malignant embryonic kidney HEK293, MRC5 fibroblast cells. NSts were used for the induction of cell death in malignant human T98G gliomas including various cancers and compared with the non-malignant cells. Notably, NRs were found to induce higher cytotoxicity, inhibitory effects on cancer and normal cells in a dose dependent manner. We also showed that NRs induced cancer cell death through oxidative stress and caspase-dependent pathways. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative analysis of ZnO-NSts have also been confirmed by statistical analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy, linearity, limits of detection and limit of quantitation. These self-styled NSts could provide new perception in the research of targeted cancer nanotechnology and have potentiality to improve new therapeutic outcomes with poor diagnosis.

  19. Cytomegalovirus pp71 protein is expressed in human glioblastoma and promotes pro-angiogenic signaling by activation of stem cell factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Matlaf

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly malignant primary central nervous system neoplasm characterized by tumor cell invasion, robust angiogenesis, and a mean survival of 15 months. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is present in >90% of GBMs, although the role the virus plays in GBM pathogenesis is unclear. We report here that HCMV pp71, a viral protein previously shown to promote cell cycle progression, is present in a majority of human GBMs and is preferentially expressed in the CD133+, cancer stem-like cell population. Overexpression of pp71 in adult neural precursor cells resulted in potent induction of stem cell factor (SCF, an important pro-angiogenic factor in GBM. Using double immunofluorescence, we demonstrate in situ co-localization of pp71 and SCF in clinical GBM specimens. pp71 overexpression in both normal and transformed glial cells increased SCF secretion and this effect was specific, since siRNA mediated knockdown of pp71 or treatment with the antiviral drug cidofovir resulted in decreased expression and secretion of SCF by HCMV-infected cells. pp71- induced upregulation of SCF resulted in downstream activation of its putative endothelial cell receptor, c-kit, and angiogenesis as measured by increased capillary tube formation in vitro. We demonstrate that pp71 induces a pro-inflammatory response via activation of NFΚB signaling which drives SCF expression. Furthermore, we show that pp71 levels and NFKB activation are selectively augmented in the mesenchymal subtype of human GBMs, characterized by worst patient outcome, suggesting that HCMV pp71-induced paracrine signaling may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of this human malignancy.

  20. Cytotoxic effect of disulfiram/copper on human glioblastoma cell lines and ALDH-positive cancer-stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P; Brown, S; Goktug, T; Channathodiyil, P; Kannappan, V; Hugnot, J-P; Guichet, P-O; Bian, X; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells are resistant to anticancer drugs. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a key mediator of chemoresistance. We have reported that disulfiram (DS), an aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitor, targets breast CSC-like cells. In this study, the effect of DS and combination of DS and gemcitabine (dFdC) on GBM cells and GBM stem-like cells was investigated. Methods: 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), combination index (CI)-isobologram, western blot, luciferase reporter gene assay, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and ALDH analysis were used in this study. Results: Disulfiram is cytotoxic in GBM cell lines in a copper (Cu)-dependent manner. Disulfiram/copper enhances the cytotoxicity of dFdC. Combination index-isobologram analysis indicates a synergistic effect between DS/Cu and dFdC. Disulfiram/copper induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), activates JNK and p38 pathways and inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activity in GBM cell lines. Disulfiram/copper may trigger intrinsic apoptotic pathway via modulation of the Bcl2 family. Disulfiram/copper abolishes stem-like cell population in GBM cell lines. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the cytotoxicity of DS/Cu and the enhancing effect of DS/Cu on the cytotoxicity of dFdC in GBM stem-like cells may be caused by induction of ROS and inhibition of both ALDH and the NFkB pathway. Both DS and dFdC can traverse the blood–brain barrier. Further study may lead them into GBM chemotherapy. PMID:23033007

  1. Evaluation of heterogeneous metabolic profile in an orthotopic human glioblastoma xenograft model using compressed sensing hyperpolarized 3D 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ilwoo; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Ozawa, Tomoko; Ito, Motokazu; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Phillips, Joanna J; James, C David; Pieper, Russell O; Ronen, Sabrina M; Vigneron, Daniel B; Nelson, Sarah J

    2013-07-01

    High resolution compressed sensing hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was applied in orthotopic human glioblastoma xenografts for quantitative assessment of spatial variations in (13)C metabolic profiles and comparison with histopathology. A new compressed sensing sampling design with a factor of 3.72 acceleration was implemented to enable a factor of 4 increase in spatial resolution. Compressed sensing 3D (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data were acquired from a phantom and 10 tumor-bearing rats following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate using a 3T scanner. The (13)C metabolic profiles were compared with hematoxylin and eosin staining and carbonic anhydrase 9 staining. The high-resolution compressed sensing (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data enabled the differentiation of distinct (13)C metabolite patterns within abnormal tissues with high specificity in similar scan times compared to the fully sampled method. The results from pathology confirmed the different characteristics of (13)C metabolic profiles between viable, non-necrotic, nonhypoxic tumor, and necrotic, hypoxic tissue. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, Rajaa; Iacovelli, Anthony J; Kulaga, Alan; Gumprecht, Michelle; Martin, Philip L; Baran, Maureen; Householder, Deborah B; Van Dyke, Terry; Weaver Ohler, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN) that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment.

  3. An intrinsic DFF40/CAD endonuclease deficiency impairs oligonucleosomal DNA hydrolysis during caspase-dependent cell death: a common trait in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Martínez-Escardó, Laura; Granados-Colomina, Carla; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Pascual-Guiral, Sònia; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Velasco, Roser; Plans, Gerard; Vidal, Noemi; Tortosa, Avelina; Barcia, Carlos; Bruna, Jordi; Yuste, Victor J

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV astrocytoma is one of the most devastating human cancers. The loss of DFF40/CAD, the key endonuclease that triggers oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, has been linked to genomic instability and cell survival after radiation. Despite the near inevitability of GBM tumor recurrence after treatment, the relationship between DFF40/CAD and GBM remains unexplored. We studied the apoptotic behavior of human GBM-derived cells after apoptotic insult. We analyzed caspase activation and the protein levels and subcellular localization of DFF40/CAD apoptotic endonuclease. DFF40/CAD was also evaluated in histological sections from astrocytic tumors and nontumoral human brain. We showed that GBM cells undergo incomplete apoptosis without generating oligonucleosomal DNA degradation despite the correct activation of executioner caspases. The major defect of GBM cells relied on the improper accumulation of DFF40/CAD at the nucleoplasmic subcellular compartment. Supporting this finding, DFF40/CAD overexpression allowed GBM cells to display oligonucleosomal DNA degradation after apoptotic challenge. Moreover, the analysis of histological slices from astrocytic tumors showed that DFF40/CAD immunoreactivity in tumoral GFAP-positive cells was markedly reduced when compared with nontumoral samples. Our data highlight the low expression levels of DFF40/CAD and the absence of DNA laddering as common molecular traits in GBM. These findings could be of major importance for understanding the malignant behavior of remaining tumor cells after radiochemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Flow cytometry analysis of neural differentiation markers expression in human glioblastomas may predict their response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Vladimir; Mirossay, Peter; Bohus, Peter; Sulla, Igor; Mirossay, Ladislav; Sarissky, Marek

    2009-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents an extremely chemoresistant tumour type. Here, authors analysed the immunophenotype of GBM tumours by flow cytometry and correlated the immunophenotypic characteristics with sensitivity to chemotherapy. The expression of selected neural and non-neural differentiation markers including A2B5, CD34, CD45, CD56, CD117, CD133, EGFR, GFAP, Her-2/neu, LIFR, nestin, NGFR, Pgp and vimentin was analysed by flow cytometry in eleven GBM (WHO gr.IV) patients. The sensitivity of tumour cells to a panel of chemotherapeutic agents was tested by the MTT assay. All tumours were positive for A2B5, CD56, nestin and vimentin. CD133, EGFR, LIFR, NGFR and Pgp were expressed only by minor tumour cell subpopulations. CD34, CD45, CD117, GFAP and Her-2/neu were constantly negative. Direct correlations were found between the immunophenotypic markers and chemosensitivity: A2B5 vs lomustine (r(2) = 0.642, P = 0.033), CD56 vs cisplatin (r(2) = 0.745, P = 0.013), %Pgp(+) vs vincristine (r(2) = 0.846, P = 0.008), and %NGFR(+) vs daunorubicine (r(2) = 0.672, P = 0.047) and topotecan (r(2) = 0.792, P = 0.011). In contrast, inverse correlations were observed between: EGFR vs paclitaxel (r(2) = -0.676, P = 0.046), CD133 vs dacarbazine (r(2) = -0.636, P = 0.048) and LIFR vs daunorubicine (r(2) = -0.878, P = 0.004). Finally, significant associations were also found among sensitivities to different chemotherapeutic agents and among different immunophenotypic markers. In conclusion, histopathologically identical GBM tumours displayed a marked immunophenotypic heterogeneity. The expression of A2B5, CD56, NGFR and Pgp appeared to be associated with chemoresistance whereas CD133, EGFR and LIFR expression was characteristic of chemosensitive tumours. We suggest that flow cytometric imunophenotypic analysis of GBM may predict chemoresponsiveness and help to identify patients who could potentially benefit from chemotherapy.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression Modulates Antitumor Efficacy of Vandetanib or Cediranib Combined With Radiotherapy in Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsberger, Phyllis R., E-mail: Phyllis.wachsberger@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Liu Yi; Daroczi, Borbala [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xu Xia [Merck Research Laboratories, North Wales, Pennsylvania (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of radiation therapy (RT) combined with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) vandetanib (antiepidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] plus antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor [anti-VEGFR]) and cediranib (anti-VEGFR) to inhibit glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) growth. A secondary aim was to investigate how this regimen is modulated by tumor EGFR expression. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic cell survival assay. VEGF secretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GBM (U87MG wild-type EGFR [wtEGFR] and U87MG EGFR-null) xenografts were treated with vandetanib, cediranib, and RT, alone or in combinations. Excised tumor sections were stained for proliferative and survival biomarkers. Results: In vitro, U87MG wtEGFR and U87 EGFR-null cells had similar growth kinetics. Neither TKI affected clonogenic cell survival following RT. However, in vivo, exogenous overexpression of wtEGFR decreased tumor doubling time (T2x) in U87MG xenografts (2.70 vs. 4.41 days for U87MG wtEGFR vs. U87MG vector, respectively). In U87MG EGFR-null cells, TKI combined with radiation was no better than radiation therapy alone. In U87MG wtEGFR, RT in combination with vandetanib (but not with cediranib) significantly increased tumor T2x compared with RT alone (T2x, 10.4 days vs. 4.8 days; p < 0.001). In vivo, growth delay correlated with suppression of pAkt, survivin, and Ki67 expression in tumor samples. The presence of EGFR augmented RT-stimulated VEGF release; this effect was inhibited by vandetanib. Conclusions: EGFR expression promoted tumor growth in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting a microenvironmental effect. GBM xenografts expressing EGFR exhibited greater sensitivity to both cediranib and vandetanib than EGFR-null tumors. Hence EGFR status plays a major role in determining a tumor's in vivo response to radiation combined with TKI, supporting a &apos

  6. Pine (Pinus morrisonicola Hayata) needle extracts sensitize GBM8901 human glioblastoma cells to temozolomide by downregulating autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chia-Leng; Chen, Chien-Min; Chang, Yan-Zin; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Lin, Chih-Li

    2014-10-29

    Pine needle extracts of Pinus morrisonicola (Hayata) are commonly used as a functional health beverage. However, it remains unclear what the mechanism is underlying the antitumor activity of pine needle extract. The aims of present study were to investigate the anti-glioblastoma effects of pine needle extracts as well as its bioactive compounds. From three different solvent extracts of pine needles, the water extract displayed the strongest cytotoxicity effects on GBM8901 glioblastoma cells. The isolated compounds were identified as pinocembrin, chrysin, and tiliroside. Chrysin was the most active ingredient of pine needle extract for the induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration and invasion. It also markedly inhibited temozolomide (TMZ)-induced autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression. Because both autophagy and MGMT overexpression have been implicated to TMZ-induced drug resistance in glioblastoma, our results showed that pine needle extract and chrysin may serve as a potential anticancer agent against glioblastoma, especially with regard to sensitizing glioblastoma cells resistant to TMZ.

  7. Differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme and cerebral hemangioblastoma of cytoplasmic proteins that bind two different domains within the 3'-untranslated region of the human glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, H; Boado, R J; Pardridge, W M

    1996-01-01

    The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) protein is underexpressed in human glioblastoma multiforme and is overexpressed in human cerebral hemangioblastoma. To gain in-sight into possible posttranscriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of the GLUT1 protein in human brain tumors, cytosolic proteins were prepared from these two tumors and used in RNase T1 protection assays that employed [32P]human GLUT1 synthetic RNA prepared from transcription plasmids. Gel shift mobility assays and ultra-violet light cross-linking studies demonstrated the formation of specific RNA/protein complexes that migrated with a mol mass of 120, 44, and 41 kD. RNase T1 mapping and oligodeoxynucleotide competition studies showed that the 120 kD complex was comprised of an RNA fragment that localized to nucleotides 2186-2203 of the GLUT1 mRNA. The 44 kD complex contained an adenosine-uridine-rich RNA fragment that localized to nucleotides 1885-1906 of the human GLUT1 mRNA, and the formation of this complex was inhibited by synthetic RNA enriched in adenosine-uridine sequences. The 44 kD complex was selectively downregulated in hemangioblastoma as compared to glioblastoma multiforme. These studies demonstrate that human brain tumors have differential regulation of cytosolic proteins that specifically interact with two different domains in the 3'-untranslated region of the GLUT1 mRNA, which may serve to mediate the posttranscriptional regulation of GLUT1 gene expression in these tumors. PMID:8675694

  8. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarte, F.S. Neto; Tirapelli, D.P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, S.R. [Universidade de Franca, Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências e Tecnologia, Franca, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Novais, P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Peria, F.M.; Oliveira, H.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Carlotti, C.G. Junior; Tirapelli, L.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-11

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  9. SI113, a SGK1 inhibitor, potentiates the effects of radiotherapy, modulates the response to oxidative stress and induces cytotoxic autophagy in human glioblastoma multiforme cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Cristina; Dattilo, Vincenzo; D'Antona, Lucia; Barone, Agnese; Amodio, Nicola; Belviso, Stefania; Musumeci, Francesca; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Bianco, Cataldo; Trapasso, Francesco; Schenone, Silvia; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco; Florio, Tullio; Paggi, Marco G.; Perrotti, Nicola; Amato, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive CNS tumor and is characterized by a very high frequency of clinical relapse after therapy and thus by a dismal prognosis, which strongly compromises patients survival. We have recently identified the small molecule SI113, as a potent and selective inhibitor of SGK1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, that modulates several oncogenic signaling cascades. The SI113-dependent SGK1 inhibition induces cell death, blocks proliferation and perturbs cell cycle progression by modulating SGK1-related substrates. SI113 is also able to strongly and consistently block, in vitro and in vivo, growth and survival of human hepatocellular-carcinomas, either used as a single agent or in combination with ionizing radiations. In the present paper we aim to study the effect of SI113 on human GBM cell lines with variable p53 expression. Cell viability, cell death, caspase activation and cell cycle progression were then analyzed by FACS and WB-based assays, after exposure to SI113, with or without oxidative stress and ionizing radiations. Moreover, autophagy and related reticulum stress response were evaluated. We show here, that i) SGK1 is over-expressed in highly malignant gliomas and that the treatment with SI113 leads to ii) significant increase in caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in GBM cell lines but not in normal fibroblasts; iii)enhancement of the effects of ionizing radiations; iv) modulation of the response to oxidative reticulum stress; v) induction of cytotoxic autophagy. Evidence reported here underlines the therapeutic potential of SI113 in GBM, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:26908461

  10. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Lizarte Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA. We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21 and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8 genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3 and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP. KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  11. In vitro cytotoxicity of SiO2 or ZnO nanoparticles with different sizes and surface charges on U373MG human glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jung-Eun Kim,1,* Hyejin Kim,1,* Seong Soo A An,2 Eun Ho Maeng,3 Meyoung-Kon Kim,4 Yoon-Jae Song1 1Department of Life Science, 2Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon University, Seongnam-Si, South Korea; 3Korea Testing and Research Institute, Seoul, South Korea; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Silicon dioxide (SiO2 and zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles are widely used in various applications, raising issues regarding the possible adverse effects of these metal oxide nanoparticles on human cells. In this study, we determined the cytotoxic effects of differently charged SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles, with mean sizes of either 100 or 20 nm, on the U373MG human glioblastoma cell line. The overall cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles against U373MG cells was significantly higher than that of SiO2 nanoparticles. Neither the size nor the surface charge of the ZnO nanoparticles affected their cytotoxicity against U373MG cells. The 20 nm SiO2 nanoparticles were more toxic than the 100 nm nanoparticles against U373MG cells, but the surface charge had little or no effect on their cytotoxicity. Both SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles activated caspase-3 and induced DNA fragmentation in U373MG cells, suggesting the induction of apoptosis. Thus, SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles appear to exert cytotoxic effects against U373MG cells, possibly via apoptosis. Keyword: apoptosis

  12. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarte Neto, F S; Tirapelli, D P C; Ambrosio, S R; Tirapelli, C R; Oliveira, F M; Novais, P C; Peria, F M; Oliveira, H F; Carlotti Junior, C G; Tirapelli, L F

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  13. Narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, activates Rho and stress fibers in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Florence; Sauvage, Sébastien; Van Goietsenoven, Gwendoline; Mégalizzi, Véronique; Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Debeir, Olivier; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Berger, Walter; Mathieu, Véronique; Decaestecker, Christine; Kiss, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Cell motility and resistance to apoptosis characterize glioblastoma multiforme growth and malignancy. Narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, could represent a powerful new weapon targeting the Achilles' heel of glioblastoma multiforme and may offer the potential to better combat these devastating malignancies. The in vitro effects of narciclasine on cell proliferation, morphology, actin cytoskeleton organization, and the Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase/cofilin pathway and its antitumor activity in vivo have been determined in models of human glioblastoma multiforme. Narciclasine impairs glioblastoma multiforme growth by markedly decreasing mitotic rates without inducing apoptosis. The compound also modulates the Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase/cofilin signaling pathway, greatly increasing GTPase RhoA activity as well as inducing actin stress fiber formation in a RhoA-dependent manner. Lastly, the treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme orthotopic xenograft- bearing mice with nontoxic doses of narciclasine significantly increased their survival. Narciclasine antitumor effects were of the same magnitude as those of temozolomide, the drug associated with the highest therapeutic benefits in treating glioblastoma multiforme patients. Our results show for the first time that narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, activates Rho and stress fibers in glioblastoma multiforme cells and significantly increases the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme preclinical models. This statement is made despite the recognition that to date, irrespective of treatment, no single glioblastoma multiforme patient has been cured.

  14. Treatment of brain glioblastoma multiforme with pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 combined with gamma knife radiation: An experimental study on nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High post-operative recurrence and poor prognosis are likely to be related to the infiltrative growth of the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to investigate the possible synergistic effect of the combined treatment of gamma knife radio-surgery (GKRS and gene therapy for GBM and secondary objective is to explore the role of GKRS for the temporal and spatial regulation of the gene expression. Materials and Methods: The study performed on 70 nude mice and randomly divided into seven groups. Subcutaneous injection of human GBM tumor cells (T98G was carried out to establish the animal models. Various doses of liposome-mediated pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 recombinant plasmid were transfected through intra-tumor injection. GKRS was scheduled following the plasmid transfection. Tumor volumes were measured every 4 days after the treatment. Subcutaneous tumor nodule specimens were collected to analyze the cell apoptosis and p16 gene expression using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor volumes, levels of cell apoptosis and p16 gene expression were compared between groups. Results: Rates of tumor growth were significantly lower in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS groups than that in the remaining groups 28 days following the GKRS management. The p16mRNA expression was noted in both of the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid group and the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS with marginal-dose of 20 Gy group. The level of messenger ribonucleic acid expression was higher in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS with the marginal-dose of 20 Gy group, with a markedly increased apoptotic and necrotic cells, than that in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid group. Conclusions: In animal studies, pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 in combination with GKRS is a preferable management option for the GBM to the sole use of GKRS or gene

  15. MicroRNA-139-5p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shouping [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Wang, Xianjun [Department of Neurology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Li, Xiao [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cao, Yuandong, E-mail: yuandongcao@sina.com [Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-11-13

    MicroRNA-139-5p was identified to be significantly down-regulated in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) by miRNA array. In this report we aimed to clarify its biological function, molecular mechanisms and direct target gene in GBM. Twelve patients with GBM were analyzed for the expression of miR-139-5p by quantitative RT-PCR. miR-139-5p overexpression was established by transfecting miR-139-5p-mimic into U87MG and T98G cells, and its effects on cell proliferation were studied using MTT assay and colony formation assays. We concluded that ectopic expression of miR-139-5p in GBM cell lines significantly suppressed cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Bioinformatics coupled with luciferase and western blot assays also revealed that miR-139-5p suppresses glioma cell proliferation by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle. - Highlights: • miR-139-5p is downregulated in GBM. • miR-139-5p regulates cell proliferation through inducing apoptosis. • miR-139-5p regulates glioblastoma tumorigenesis by targeting 3′UTR of ELTD1. • miR-139-5p is involved in cell cycle regulation.

  16. Antigens in human glioblastomas and meningiomas: Search for tumour and onco-foetal antigens. Estimation of S-100 and GFA protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, L; Axelsen, N H; Norgaard-Pedersen, B

    1977-01-01

    Extracts of glioblastomas and meningiomas were analysed by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis for the presence of foetal brain antigens and tumour-associated antigens, and levels of 2 normal brain-specific proteins were also determined. The following antibodies were used: monospecific anti-S-100......-alpha-foetoprotein; and monospecific anti-ferritin. Using the antibodies raised against the tumours, several antigens not present in foetal or adult normal brain were found in the glioblastomas and the meningiomas. These antigens cross-reacted with antigens present in normal liver and were therefore not tumour-associated. S-100...

  17. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  18. The effect of gallic acid on cytotoxicity, Ca(2+) homeostasis and ROS production in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells and CTX TNA2 rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-05-25

    Gallic acid, a polyhydroxylphenolic compound, is widely distributed in various plants, fruits and foods. It has been shown that gallic acid passes into blood brain barrier and reaches the brain tissue of middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. However, the effect of gallic acid on Ca(2+) signaling in glia cells is unknown. This study explored whether gallic acid affected Ca(2+) homeostasis and induced Ca(2+)-associated cytotoxicity in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells and CTX TNA2 rat astrocytes. Gallic acid (20-40 μM) concentration-dependently induced cytotoxicity and intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)]i) increases in DBTRG-05MG cells but not in CTX TNA2 cells. In DBTRG-05MG cells, the Ca(2+) response was decreased by half by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). In Ca(2+)-containing medium, gallic acid-induced Ca(2+) entry was inhibited by store-operated Ca(2+) channel inhibitors (2-APB, econazole and SKF96365). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin abolished gallic acid-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Conversely, incubation with gallic acid also abolished thapsigargin-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 abolished gallic acid-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Gallic acid significantly caused cytotoxicity in DBTRG-05MG cells, which was partially prevented by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with BAPTA-AM. Moreover, gallic acid activated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved ROS production. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells but not in CTX TNA2 cells, gallic acid induced [Ca(2+)]i increases by causing Ca(2+) entry via 2-APB, econazole and SKF96365-sensitive store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and phospholipase C-dependent release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This Ca(2+) signal subsequently evoked mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis that involved ROS production.

  19. LIN28A facilitates the transformation of human neural stem cells and promotes glioblastoma tumorigenesis through a pro-invasive genetic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xing-gang; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Orr, Brent A; Weingart, Melanie; Taylor, Isabella; Rajan, Anand K D; Odia, Yazmin; Kahlert, Ulf; Maciaczyk, Jarek; Nikkhah, Guido; Eberhart, Charles G; Raabe, Eric H

    2013-07-01

    The cellular reprogramming factor LIN28A promotes tumorigenicity in cancers arising outside the central nervous system, but its role in brain tumors is unknown. We detected LIN28A protein in a subset of human gliomas observed higher expression in glioblastoma (GBM) than in lower grade tumors. Knockdown of LIN28A using lentiviral shRNA in GBM cell lines inhibited their invasion, growth and clonogenicity. Expression of LIN28A in GBM cell lines increased the number and size of orthotopic xenograft tumors. LIN28A expression also enhanced the invasiveness of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Increasing LIN28A was associated with down-regulation of tumor suppressing microRNAs let-7b and let-7g and up-regulation of the chromatin modifying protein HMGA2. The increase in tumor cell aggressiveness in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by an upregulation of pro-invasive gene expression, including SNAI1. To further investigate the oncogenic potential of LIN28A, we infected hNSC with lentiviruses encoding LIN28A together with dominant negative R248W-TP53, constitutively active KRAS and hTERT. Resulting subclones proliferated at an increased rate and formed invasive GBM-like tumors in orthotopic xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Similar to LIN28A-transduced GBM neurosphere lines, hNSC-derived tumor cells showed increased expression of HMGA2. Taken together, these data suggest a role for LIN28A in high grade gliomas and illustrate an HMGA2-associated, pro-invasive program that can be activated in GBM by LIN28A-mediated suppression of let-7 microRNAs.

  20. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  1. The SGK1 Kinase Inhibitor SI113 Sensitizes Theranostic Effects of the 64CuCl2 in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Catalogna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The importance of copper in the metabolism of cancer cells has been widely studied in the last 20 years and a clear-cut association between copper levels and cancer deregulation has been established. Copper-64, emitting positrons and β-radiations, is indicated for the labeling of a large number of molecules suitable for radionuclide imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the CNS tumor with the worse prognosis, characterized by high number of recurrences and strong resistance to chemo-radio therapy, strongly affecting patients survival. We have recently discovered and studied the small molecule SI113, as inhibitor of SGK1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, that affects several neoplastic phenotypes and signaling cascades. The SI113-dependent SGK1 inhibition induces cell death, blocks proliferation, perturbs cell cycle progression and restores chemo-radio sensibility by modulating SGK1-related substrates. In the present paper we aim to characterize the combined effects of 64CuCl2 and SI113 on human GBM cell lines with variable p53 expression. Methods: Cell viability, cell death and stress/authopagic related pathways were then analyzed by FACS and WB-based assays, after exposure to SI113 and/or 64CuCl2. Results: We demonstrate here, that i 64CuCl2 is able to induce a time and dose dependent modulation of cell viability (with different IC50 values in highly malignant gliomas and that the co-treatment with SI113 leads to ii additive/synergistic effects in terms of cell death; iii enhancement of the effects of ionizing radiations, probably by a TRC1 modulation; iv modulation of the autophagic response. Conclusions: Evidence reported here underlines the therapeutic potential of the combined treatment with SI113 and 64CuCl2 in GBM cells.

  2. Characterization of human glioblastoma cell lines in vitro and their xenografts in nude mice by DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Türeci, O; Fischer, H; Lagoda, P

    1990-01-01

    Human gliomas were grown as permanent tissue cultures and xenografts in nude mice. DNA fingerprint patterns from two human gliomas were established using two different hypervariable multilocus probes [( GTG]5 and 33.15). In general the cell lines investigated showed an overall stability in the DNA...

  3. Characterization of human glioblastoma cell lines in vitro and their xenografts in nude mice by DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Türeci, O; Fischer, H; Lagoda, P;

    1990-01-01

    Human gliomas were grown as permanent tissue cultures and xenografts in nude mice. DNA fingerprint patterns from two human gliomas were established using two different hypervariable multilocus probes [( GTG]5 and 33.15). In general the cell lines investigated showed an overall stability in the DNA...

  4. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Magaña-Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma.

  5. The involvement of hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human spinal glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deliang; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Xinjun; Xiong, Hui

    2016-05-01

    To date, hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein (HPIP), a co-repressor for the transcription factor PBX, has been involved into the initiation and onset in a wide variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HPIP-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the spinal glioblastoma have been under investigation. In the present study, spinal glioblastoma tissues, U87, and U251 cell lines were used and subjected to in vitro assays, such as RT-PCR, and Western blot. Here, in vitro assays revealed that HPIP mRNA and protein were highly expressed in five cases of spinal glioblastoma tissues, compared with non-tumor tissues. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrated HPIP promoted the U87 and U251 cell growth and regulated the G1/S phase transitions in U87 and U251 cell cycle, respectively, accompanied by the increased expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. Furthermore, HPIP increased the expression of N-cadherin, Slug, and MMP2, and decreased the expression of E-cadherin. By contrast, knockdown of HPIP reversed HPIP-induced EMT biomarkers, migration, and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings identified HPIP plays an important role in the progression and EMT of spinal glioblastoma, by which cell growth is improved. Thus, HPIP gene or protein could act as a useful target in the clinical practice.

  6. Imaging of human glioblastoma cells and their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio embryonic brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittori Milos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An attractive approach in the study of human cancers is the use of transparent zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos, which enable the visualization of cancer progression in a living animal.

  7. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells as cellular delivery vehicles for prodrug gene therapy of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Xiao Ying; Lam, Dang Hoang; Yang, Jingye; Ye, Kai; Wei, Esther Lee Xing; Lim, Sai Kiang; Wang, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess tumor-tropic properties and consequently have been used to deliver therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Their potential in cancer therapy highlights the need for a consistent and renewable source for the production of uniform human MSCs suitable for clinical applications. In this study, we seek to investigate whether human embryonic stem cells can be used as a cell source to fulfill this goal. We generated MSC-like cells from two human embryonic stem cell lines, HuES9 and H1, and observed that MSC-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells were able to migrate into human glioma intracranial xenografts after being injected into the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to the tumor inoculation site. We engineered these cells with baculoviral and lentiviral vectors, respectively, for transient and stable expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. In tumor-bearing mice the engineered MSC-like cells were capable of inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in the presence of ganciclovir after they were injected either directly into the xenografts or into the opposite hemisphere. Our findings suggest that human embryonic stem cell-derived MSCs may be a viable and attractive alternative for large-scale derivation of targeting vehicles for cancer therapy.

  8. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  9. Genetics and epigenetics of glioblastoma: applications and overall incidence of IDH1 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan eZong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most fatal brain cancer found in humans. Patients suffering from glioblastoma have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of 15 months. The tumor may develop rapidly de novo in older patients or through progression from anaplastic astrocytomas in younger patients if glioblastoma is primary or secondary, respectively. During the past decade, significant advances have been made in the understanding of processes leading to glioblastoma, and several important genetic defects that appear to be important for the development and progression of this tumor have been identified. Particularly, the discovery of recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 gene has shed new light on the molecular landscape in glioblastoma. Indeed, emerging research on the consequences of mutant IDH1 protein expression suggests that its neomorphic enzymatic activity catalyzing the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate influences a range of cellular programs that affect the epigenome and contribute to glioblastoma development. One of the exciting observations is the presence of IDH1 mutation in the vast majority of secondary glioblastoma, while it is almost absent in primary glioblastoma. Growing data indicate that this particular mutation has clinical and prognostic importance and will become a critical early distinction in diagnosis of glioblastoma.

  10. Enhanced accumulation of curcumin and temozolomide loaded magnetic nanoparticles executes profound cytotoxic effect in glioblastoma spheroid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly lethal primary brain tumours. Treatment of these malignant gliomas remains ineffective as these are extremely resistant to chemotherapeutic applications. Furthermore, combination therapy for cancer treatment is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, by reducing individual drug-related toxicity and associated side effects. Currently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based drug delivery system has attracted much more attention owing to its intrinsic magnetic properties and drug loading capacity. In the present study, MNPs based drug delivery approach for co-delivering of potent chemotherapeutic drugs such as Curcumin (herbal drug) and Temozolomide (DNA methylating agent) has been implemented. The dual drug loaded MNPs formulations were evaluated in two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer culture and three-dimensional (3-D) tumour spheroid culture of T-98G cells for understanding the therapeutic discrepancy. The dual drug loaded MNPs formulations demonstrated higher cytotoxic effect than single drug loaded MNPs formulations as compared to their corresponding native drugs in 2-D and 3-D culture. The combination index (CI) analysis revealed synergistic mode of action of dual drug loaded MNPs formulations, which was further confirmed by cell death induction assay mediated by acridine orange (AO)/propidium iodide (PI) staining, illustrating higher efficacy of the formulation towards GBM therapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Differential modulation of a radiation-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma cells by pifithrin-α and wortmannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunlin; Zhang, Jianghong; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The implication of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) for both radiation protection and radiotherapy has attracted significant attention, but a key question is how to modulate the RIBE. The present study found that, when a fraction of glioblastoma cells in T98G population were individually targeted with precise helium particles through their nucleus, micronucleus (MN) were induced and its yield increased non-linearly with radiation dose. After co-culturing with irradiated cells, additional MN could be induced in the non-irradiated bystander cells and its yield was independent of irradiation dose, giving direct evidence of a RIBE. Further results showed that the RIBE could be eliminated by pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) but enhanced by wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor). Moreover, it was found that nitric oxide (NO) contributed to this RIBE, and the levels of NO of both irradiated cells and bystander cells could be extensively diminished by pifithrin-α but insignificantly reduced by wortmannin. Our results indicate that RIBE can be modulated by p53 and PI3K through a NO-dependent and NO-independent pathway, respectively.

  12. In combination with cisplatin to increase durg sensitivity of temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma multiforme cells%联合顺铂提高对替莫唑胺耐药的多形性胶质母细胞瘤细胞药物敏感性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶波; 史恩红; 董裕翠; 金华; 任欢

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨多形性胶质母细胞瘤(glioblastoma multiforme,GBM)细胞中O6甲基鸟嘌呤DNA甲基转移酶(O6 methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase,MGMT)的甲基化状态在替莫唑胺(temozolomide,TMZ)耐药机制中的作用,并检测TMZ与周期非特异性化疗药顺铂(cisplatin,CDDP)联合应用对GBM细胞的增殖抑制效应.方法 将胶质瘤细胞系接种于DMEM培养基(含10%胎牛血清),MTT检测细胞增殖,甲基化特异性PCR(methylation specific polymerase chain reaction,MS-PCR)检测MGMT甲基化状态,Hoechst33342/PI检测凋亡,Chou-Talalay软件分析联合用药的机制.结果 U87MG细胞不具有MG-MT活性,无MGMT蛋白表达;T98G细胞具有MGMT活性,有MGMT蛋白表达;有MGMT活性的T98G细胞抵抗TMZ诱导的凋亡;MGMT抑制剂O6-BG提高了T98G细胞对TMZ敏感性;TMZ与CDDP联合用药效果在T98G细胞中更明显.结论 无MGMT活性的U87MG细胞对TMZ更敏感;有MGMT活性的T98G细胞对TMZ和CDDP的联合化疗更敏感.%Objective To investigate O6 methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase(MGMT) meth-ylation status mediated temozolomide(TMZ) resistant and evaluate the anti-proliferation effect of TMZ in combination with cell cycle non-specific agent cisplatin (CDDP). Methods Glioblastoma multiforme to be inoculated in DMEM ( 10% fetal bovine serum). MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction ( MS-PCR) was applied to detect the methylation status of MGMT gene, Hoechst 33342/PI fluorescent staining was employed to detect the apoptosis, and mechanism of combine medication was evaluated by Chou-Talalay method. Results MGMT was methylated in U87MG which not expressing MGMT protein while incompletely methylated in T98G which expressing MGMT protein. T98G was less sensitive to apoptosis induction following TMZ treatment, while 0 -BG improved the sensitivity of T98G cells to TMZ, and Chou-Talalay analysis showed that TMZ combination with CDDP was more

  13. Caffeine-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO1 triggers Bim-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Han, Dong-Feng; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Dong, Nan; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly ingested neuroactive compounds and exhibits anticancer effects through induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of caffeine-induced apoptosis in U251 cells (human glioma cell line). We analyzed the inhibitory effects of caffeine on cell proliferation by performing WST-8 and colony formation assays; in addition, cell survival was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to investigate the role played by FoxO1 in the proapoptotic effects of caffeine on glioma cells. Results showed that caffeine inhibited proliferation and survival of human glioma cells, induced apoptosis, and increased the expression of FoxO1 and its proapoptotic target Bim. In addition, we found that FoxO1 enhanced the transcription of its proapoptotic target Bim. In summary, our data indicates that FoxO1-Bim mediates caffeine-induced regression of glioma growth by activating cell apoptosis, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the possible use of caffeine in treating human cancer.

  14. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF cDNA FRAGMENTS AND FULL-LENGTH cDNA DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSEDIN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELL LINE BT-325 VERSUS ALL-TRANS RETINOIC ACID INDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金虎林; 胡松年; 李光涛; 涂纯; 袁建刚; 强伯勤

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the differentiation process of the human glioblastoma cells. Methods. Differential display reverse transcribed-PCR(DDRT-PCR) was used to isolate the genes differentially expressed in control and all-trans retinoic acid treated human glioblastoma cell line BT-325. Routine method of cDNA library screening was performed to clone full-length cDNA. Results. Thirty-six RT-PCR reactions were performed and 64 differentially expressed fragments were recovered, amplified and cloned. Of them,46 ESTs were sequenced and delivered into the GenBank. The homology comparison us-ing BLAST algorithm revealed that 22ESFs are highly homologous with the known genes and many of them play impor-tant roles in the cell differentiation progress. A dot-blot hybridization was conducted to certify the differemiation expres-sion. The result showed that 27 EST clones are expressed at different level in control and all-traus retinoic acid treated BT-325 cells. A full-length cDNA was cloned using the EST-HGBB098.Conclusion. DDRT-PCR was a simple and effective method to segally analyze the differentially expressed genes.

  15. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF cDNA FRAGMENTS AND FULL-LENGTH cDNA DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELL LINE BT-325 VERSUS ALL-TRANS RETINOIC ACID INDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金虎林; 胡松年; 李光涛; 涂纯; 袁建刚; 强伯勤

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the differentiation process of the human glioblastoma cells. Methods. Differential display reverse transcribed-PCR(DDRT-PCR) was used to isolate the genes differentially expressed in control and all-trans retinoic acid treated human glioblastoma cell line BT-325. Routine method of cDNA library screening was performed to clone full-length cDNA. Results. Thirty-six RT-PCR reactions were performed and 64 differentially expressed fragments were recovered, amplified and cloned. Of them,46 ESTs were sequenced and delivered into the GenBank. The homology comparison us ing BLAST algorithm revealed that 22ESTs are highly homologous with the known genes and many of them play impor tant roles in the cell differentiation progress. A dot-blot hybridization was conducted to certify the differentiation expres sion. The result showed that 27 EST clones are expressed at different level in control and all-trans retinoi c acid treated BT-325 cells. A full-length cDNA was cloned using the ES T-HGBB098. Conclusion. DDRT-PCR was a simple and effective method to serially analyze the differentially expressed genes.

  16. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs.

  17. A comparative study of the structural organization of spheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone and glioblastoma biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik-Mo, Einar Osland, E-mail: e.o.vik-mo@medisin.uio.no [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Sandberg, Cecilie [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Joel, Mrinal [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo (Norway); Stangeland, Biljana [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Watanabe, Yasuhiro [Division of Neurology, Department of Brain and Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8504 (Japan); Mackay-Sim, Alan [National Centre for Adult Stem Cell Research, Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Moe, Morten Carstens [Center for Eye Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Murrell, Wayne [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Langmoen, Iver Arne [Vilhelm Magnus Laboratory for Neurosurgical Research, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-04-15

    Sphere forming assays have been useful to enrich for stem like cells in a range of tumors. The robustness of this system contrasts the difficulties in defining a stem cell population based on cell surface markers. We have undertaken a study to describe the cellular and organizational composition of tumorspheres, directly comparing these to neurospheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone (SVZ). Primary cell cultures from brain tumors were found to contain variable fractions of cells positive for tumor stem cell markers (CD133 (2-93%)/SSEA1 (3-15%)/CXCR4 (1-72%)). All cultures produced tumors upon xenografting. Tumorspheres contained a heterogeneous population of cells, but were structurally organized with stem cell markers present at the core of spheres, with markers of more mature glial progenitors and astrocytes at more peripheral location. Ultrastructural studies showed that tumorspheres contained a higher fraction of electron dense cells in the core than the periphery (36% and 19%, respectively). Neurospheres also contained a heterogeneous cell population, but did not have an organization similar to tumorspheres. Although tumorspheres clearly display irregular and neoplastic cells, they establish an organized structure with an outward gradient of differentiation. We suggest that this organization is central in maintaining the tumor stem cell pool.

  18. Combining Bevacizumab with Temozolomide Increases the Antitumor Efficacy of Temozolomide in a Human Glioblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Mathieu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of the present work were to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic effects of chronic temozolomide treatment on various glioma models and to demonstrate whether bevacizumab (Avastin increased the therapeutic benefits contributed by temozolomide in glioma. Experimental Design: The expression levels of various antiangiogenic factors in four glioma cell lines were evaluated after chronic in vitro treatment with temozolomide by Western blot. Proliferation and migration assays were performed on human endothelial cells incubated with supernatants of glioma cells treated with and without temozolomide. Orthotopic glioma models were used to evaluate the antiangiogenic effects of temozolomide in vivo and the therapeutic benefits of different temozolomide treatment schedules used alone or in combination with bevacizumab. Results: Temozolomide, a proautophagic and proapoptotic drug, decreased the expression levels of HIF-1α, ID-1, ID-2, and cMyc in the glioma models investigated, all of which playing major roles in angiogenesis and the switch to hypoxic metabolism. These changes could be, at least partly, responsible for the impairment of angiogenesis observed in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, combining bevacizumab with temozolomide increased the survival of glioma-bearing mice in comparison to each compound administered alone. Conclusions: In addition to the numerous mechanisms of action already identified for temozolomide, we report here that it also exerts antitumor effects by impairing angiogenic processes. We further emphasize that bevacizumab, which is an antiangiogenic drug with a different mechanism of action, could be useful in combination with temozolomide to increase the latter's therapeutic benefit in glioma patients.

  19. Genomic understanding of glioblastoma expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was the first cancer type to be systematically studied by TCGA in 2008. In a new, complementary report, TCGA experts examined more than 590 GBM samples--the largest to date utilizing genomic characterization techniques and ne

  20. Current management of glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Moscote-Salazar Luís Rafael; Meneses-García Carlos; Sáenz-Amuruz Miguel; Penagos Pedro; Zubieta Camilo; Romero Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    The glioblastoma multiforme is a agressive tumor in the brain. Despite aggressive multimodal treatment including surgical excision, local and systemic chemotherapy, median survival is in the range of 12 months. Patients with glioblastoma multiforme are considered to receive only palliative treatment with no hope of cure. Surgical resection is based on the premise that provides themaximum possible lengthen survival but with lower neurological deficit. Radiation therapy increases the duration o...

  1. Glioblastoma stem-like cells give rise to tumour endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Wang; K. Chadalavada; J. Wilshire; U. Kowalik; K.E. Hovinga; A. Geber; B. Fligelman; M. Leversha; C. Brennan; V. Tabar

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most aggressive of human cancers(1). A key feature of GBMs is the extensive network of abnormal vasculature characterized by glomeruloid structures and endothelial hyperplasia(2). Yet the mechanisms of angiogenesis and the origin of tumour endothelial cells remain poo

  2. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Jiang, Huili [Friendship Nephrology and Blood Purification Center, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Gao, Jun, E-mail: gaoj1666@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China)

    2016-01-22

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  3. Citotoxic activity evaluation of essential oils and nanoemulsions of Drimys angustifolia and D. brasiliensis on human glioblastoma (U-138 MG and human bladder carcinoma (T24 cell lines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madson R. F. Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The species Drimys angustifolia Miers and D. brasiliensis Miers, commonly known as "casca-de-anta", have in their leaves essential oils that can confer cytotoxic effects. In this study, we evaluated the citotoxic effects of the volatile oils from these two species. We also proposed a nanoemulsion formulation for each of the species and assessed the in vitro cytotoxicity on U-138 MG (human glioblastoma and T24 (human bladder carcinoma cell lines. The plant chemical composition was evaluated by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the nanoemulsions were prepared and characterized. Our results showed that; bicyclogermacrene (19.6% and cyclocolorenone (18.2% were the most abundant for the D angustifolia oil and D brasiliensis oil, respectively. Both nanoemulsions, D angustifolia and D brasiliensis appeared macroscopically homogeneous and opalescent bluish liquids, with nanometric mean diameters of 168 nm for D brasiliensis and 181 nm for D angustifolia. The polydispersity indices were below 0.10, with an acid pH of 4.7-6.3, and negative zeta potentials about -34 mV. The results of transmission electron microscopy showed that droplets are present in the nanometer range. Only the D brasiliensis oil was efficient in reducing the cell viability of both U-138 MG (42.5%±7.0 and 67.8%±7.8 and T24 (33.2%±2.8, 60.3%±1.6 and 80.5%±8.8 cell lines, as assessed by MTT assay. Noteworthy, similar results were obtained with cell counting. Finally, D brasiliensis oil incubation caused an increase of annexin-V and propidium iodite population, according to evaluation by cytometry analysis, what is characteristic of late apoptosis. The results presented herein lead us to consider the potential therapeutic effects of the essential oils and nanoformulations as novel strategies to inhibit tumor growth.

  4. Shikonin Inhibits the Migration and Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells by Targeting Phosphorylated β-Catenin and Phosphorylated PI3K/Akt: A Potential Mechanism for the Anti-Glioma Efficacy of a Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ying; Hu, Yi; Que, Zhong-You; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-Hui; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-10-09

    Shikonin is an anthraquinone derivative extracted from the root of lithospermum. Shikonin is traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases such as hepatitis. Shikonin also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in various tumors. However, the effect of shikonin on gliomas has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of shikonin on the migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells as well as the underlying mechanisms. U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cells were treated with shikonin at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μmol/L and cell viability, migration and invasiveness were assessed with CCK8, scratch wound healing, in vitro Transwell migration, and invasion assays. The expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the expression of phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin) and phosphorylated PI3K/Akt were also checked. Results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in U87 and U251 cells. The expression of p-β-catenin showed contrary trends in two cell lines. It was significantly inhibited in U87 cells and promoted in U251 cells. Results in this work indicated that shikonin displayed an inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of glioma cells by inhibiting the expression and activity of MMP-2 and -9. In addition, shikonin also inhibited the expression of p-PI3K and p-Akt to attenuate cell migration and invasion and MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in both cell lines, which could be reversed by the PI3K/Akt pathway agonist, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).

  5. Shikonin Inhibits the Migration and Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells by Targeting Phosphorylated β-Catenin and Phosphorylated PI3K/Akt: A Potential Mechanism for the Anti-Glioma Efficacy of a Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ying Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shikonin is an anthraquinone derivative extracted from the root of lithospermum. Shikonin is traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases such as hepatitis. Shikonin also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in various tumors. However, the effect of shikonin on gliomas has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of shikonin on the migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells as well as the underlying mechanisms. U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cells were treated with shikonin at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μmol/L and cell viability, migration and invasiveness were assessed with CCK8, scratch wound healing, in vitro Transwell migration, and invasion assays. The expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and the expression of phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin and phosphorylated PI3K/Akt were also checked. Results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in U87 and U251 cells. The expression of p-β-catenin showed contrary trends in two cell lines. It was significantly inhibited in U87 cells and promoted in U251 cells. Results in this work indicated that shikonin displayed an inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of glioma cells by inhibiting the expression and activity of MMP-2 and -9. In addition, shikonin also inhibited the expression of p-PI3K and p-Akt to attenuate cell migration and invasion and MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in both cell lines, which could be reversed by the PI3K/Akt pathway agonist, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1.

  6. Comparative expression study of the endo-G protein coupled receptor (GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells, U87-MG cells and non malignant cells of neural origin unveils new potential therapeutic targets.

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    Marie Fève

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs, U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs. The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs. Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Resistance to hypoxia-induced, BNIP3-mediated cell death contributes to an increase in a CD133-positive cell population in human glioblastomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Ulf Dietrich; Maciaczyk, Donata; Dai, Fangping; Claus, Rainer; Firat, Elke; Doostkam, Soroush; Bogiel, Tomasz; Carro, Maria Stella; Döbrössy, Mate; Herold-Mende, Christel; Niedermann, Gabriele; Prinz, Marco; Nikkhah, Guido; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw

    2012-12-01

    In addition to intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, brain tumor stemlike cells (BTSCs), a small subpopulation of malignant glial tumor-derived cells, are influenced by environmental factors. Previous reports showed that lowering oxygen tension induced an increase of BTSCs expressing CD133 and other stem cell-related genes and more pronounced clonogenic capacity in vitro. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for hypoxia-dependent induction of CD133-positive BTSCs in glioblastomas. We confirmed that cultures exposed to lowered oxygen levels showed a severalfold increase of CD133-positive BTSCs. Both the increase of CD133-positive cells and deceleration of the growth kinetics were reversible after transfer to normoxic conditions. Exposure to hypoxia induced BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3)-dependent apoptosis preferentially in CD133-negative cells. In contrast, CD133-positive cells proved to be more resistant to hypoxia-induced programmed cell death. Application of the demethylating agent 5'-azacitidine resulted in an increase of BNIP3 expression levels in CD133-positive cells. Thus, epigenetic modifications led to their better survival in lowered oxygen tension. Moreover, the, hypoxia-induced increase of CD133-positive cells was inhibited after 5'-azacitidine treatment. These results suggest the possible efficacy of a novel therapy for glioblastoma focused on eradication of BTSCs by modifications of epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  8. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Mairéad G.; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Mason, Warren P., E-mail: warren.mason@uhn.ca [Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6)-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]), microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  9. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  10. Coordinate activation of Shh and PI3K signaling in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma: new therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Mariella Gruber; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Kung, Andrew L; Pak, Ekaterina; Chung, Jarom; Theisen, Matthew A; Sun, Yanping; Franchetti, Yoko; Sun, Yu; Shulman, David S; Redjal, Navid; Tabak, Barbara; Beroukhim, Rameen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Jean; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Ligon, Keith L; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2013-11-01

    In glioblastoma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is frequently activated by loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). However, it is not known whether inhibiting PI3K represents a selective and effective approach for treatment. We interrogated large databases and found that sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is activated in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. We demonstrate that the SHH and PI3K pathways synergize to promote tumor growth and viability in human PTEN-deficient glioblastomas. A combination of PI3K and SHH signaling inhibitors not only suppressed the activation of both pathways but also abrogated S6 kinase (S6K) signaling. Accordingly, targeting both pathways simultaneously resulted in mitotic catastrophe and tumor apoptosis and markedly reduced the growth of PTEN-deficient glioblastomas in vitro and in vivo. The drugs tested here appear to be safe in humans; therefore, this combination may provide a new targeted treatment for glioblastoma.

  11. MicroRNA-153 regulates glutamine metabolism in glioblastoma through targeting glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Junyu; Li, Yunjun; Fan, Juan; Chen, Lihua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive manifestation of malignant gliomas and considered to be among the deadliest forms of human cancers. MicroRNAs are found to tightly regulate diverse biological processes and considered to play important roles in cancer etiology. In this study, we found that microRNA-153 was significantly downregulated in glioblastoma tissues compared to matched non-tumor tissues and in glioblastoma cell lines. To investigate the potential function of microRNA-153 in glioblastoma, we transfected glioblastoma cell line U87MG as well as U373MG with synthetic microRNA-153 oligos and observed decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We further found that microRNA-153 restrained glutamine utilization and glutamate generation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that glutaminase, which catalyzed the formation of glutamate from glutamine, is the potential target of microRNA-153. Indeed, microRNA-153 cannot further reduce glutamine utilization when glutaminase was knocked down. Overexpression of glutaminase abrogates the effect of microRNA-153 on glutamine utilization. Furthermore, the relative expression of microRNA-153 and glutaminase in glioblastoma versus matched non-tumor tissues showed a reverse correlation, further indicating that microRNA-153 may negatively regulate glutaminase in vivo. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of microRNA-153 in regulating glutamine metabolism and strengthen the role of microRNA-153 as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  12. NOTCH blockade combined with radiation therapy and temozolomide prolongs survival of orthotopic glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. The current standard of care includes surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Treatment often fails due to the radiation resistance and intrinsic or acquired TMZ resistance of a small percentage of cells with stem cell-like behavior (CSC). The NOTCH signaling pathway is expressed and active in human glioblastoma and NOTCH inhibitors attenuate tumor growth in vivo in xenogr...

  13. Nuclear SMAD2 Restrains Proliferation of Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhu Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Although TGFβ receptor signaling has been shown to play a role in regulation of the growth and metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the downstream pathway through either SMAD2 or SMAD3 has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigate whether nuclear SMAD2 can restrain the proliferation of glioblastoma. Methods: A total of 23 resected specimens from GBM patients were collected for SMAD2 detection. Human GBM cell line A172, U87mg, D341m and Hs683 were maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and transfected with SMAD2 and SMAD3 shRNA plasmids. Gene expression was detected by RT-qPCR and Western and cell growth were detected by MTT assay. Results: Our results showed that the phosphorylated SMAD2 (pSMAD2, the nuclear and functional form of SMAD2 levels in GBM were significantly lower than the paired normal brain tissue in patients. Depletion of SMAD2, but not SMAD3, significantly abolished the inhibitory effects of TGFβ1 on the growth of GBM cells, possibly through pSMAD2-mediated increases in cell-cycle inhibitor, p27. Conclusion: Our data suggest that TGFβ/SMAD2 signaling cascades restrains growth of GBM.

  14. Corticosteroids compromise survival in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Alikhanyan, Kristina; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Donnola, Shannon; Dai, Charles; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Chang, Maria; Chan, Timothy A; Beal, Kathryn; Bishop, Andrew J; Barker, Christopher A; Jones, Terreia S; Hentschel, Bettina; Gorlia, Thierry; Schlegel, Uwe; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumour. Standard of care consists of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (temozolomide/radiotherapy→temozolomide). Corticosteroids are commonly used perioperatively to control cerebral oedema and are frequently continued throughout subsequent treatment, notably radiotherapy, for amelioration of side effects. The effects of corticosteroids such as dexamethasone on cell growth in glioma models and on patient survival have remained controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of glioblastoma patient cohorts to determine the prognostic role of steroid administration. A disease-relevant mouse model of glioblastoma was used to characterize the effects of dexamethasone on tumour cell proliferation and death, and to identify gene signatures associated with these effects. A murine anti-VEGFA antibody was used in parallel as an alternative for oedema control. We applied the dexamethasone-induced gene signature to The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma dataset to explore the association of dexamethasone exposure with outcome. Mouse experiments were used to validate the effects of dexamethasone on survival in vivo Retrospective clinical analyses identified corticosteroid use during radiotherapy as an independent indicator of shorter survival in three independent patient cohorts. A dexamethasone-associated gene expression signature correlated with shorter survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas patient dataset. In glioma-bearing mice, dexamethasone pretreatment decreased tumour cell proliferation without affecting tumour cell viability, but reduced survival when combined with radiotherapy. Conversely, anti-VEGFA antibody decreased proliferation and increased tumour cell death, but did not affect survival when combined with radiotherapy. Clinical and mouse experimental data suggest that corticosteroids may decrease the effectiveness of treatment and shorten

  15. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai [Department of Neurology, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163001 (China); Chen, Jing [Department of Neurology, Daqing Longnan Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, 163001 China (China); Zhang, Jinghui [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150026 (China); Sun, Jiahang [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China); Guo, Mian, E-mail: guomian_hyd@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  16. Glioblastoma care in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Justin T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy T; Cahill, Daniel P; Plotkin, Scott R

    2016-01-15

    Glioblastoma is common among elderly patients, a group in which comorbidities and a poor prognosis raise important considerations when designing neuro-oncologic care. Although the standard of care for nonelderly patients with glioblastoma includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, the safety and efficacy of these modalities in elderly patients are less certain given the population's underrepresentation in many clinical trials. The authors reviewed the clinical trial literature for reports on the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma to provide evidence-based guidance for practitioners. In elderly patients with glioblastoma, there is a survival advantage for those who undergo maximal safe resection, which likely includes an incremental benefit with increasing completeness of resection. Radiotherapy extends survival in selected patients, and hypofractionation appears to be more tolerable than standard fractionation. In addition, temozolomide chemotherapy is safe and extends the survival of patients with tumors that harbor O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation. The combination of standard radiation with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide has not been studied in this population. Although many questions remain unanswered regarding the treatment of glioblastoma in elderly patients, the available evidence provides a framework on which providers may base individual treatment decisions. The importance of tumor biomarkers is increasingly apparent in elderly patients, for whom the therapeutic efficacy of any treatment must be weighed against its potential toxicity. MGMT promoter methylation status has specifically demonstrated utility in predicting the efficacy of temozolomide and should be considered in treatment decisions when possible. Cancer 2016;122:189-197. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Overexpression of Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Human Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells and Their Role in Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Paolo; Sforna, Luigi; Carlomagno, Silvia; Mangino, Giorgio; Miscusi, Massimo; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio; Calogero, Antonella; Catacuzzeno, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are brain tumors characterized by diffuse invasion of cancer cells into the healthy brain parenchyma, and establishment of secondary foci. GBM cells abundantly express large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels that are thought to promote cell invasion. Recent evidence suggests that the GBM high invasive potential mainly originates from a pool of stem-like cells, but the expression and function of BK channels in this cell subpopulation have not been studied. We investigated the expression of BK channels in GBM stem-like cells using electrophysiological and immunochemical techniques, and assessed their involvement in the migratory process of this important cell subpopulation. In U87-MG cells, BK channel expression and function were markedly upregulated by growth conditions that enriched the culture in GBM stem-like cells (U87-NS). Cytofluorimetric analysis further confirmed the appearance of a cell subpopulation that co-expressed high levels of BK channels and CD133, as well as other stem cell markers. A similar association was also found in cells derived from freshly resected GBM biopsies. Finally, transwell migration tests showed that U87-NS cells migration was much more sensitive to BK channel block than U87-MG cells. Our data show that BK channels are highly expressed in GBM stem-like cells, and participate to their high migratory activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2478-2488, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. P144, a Transforming Growth Factor beta inhibitor peptide, generates antitumoral effects and modifies SMAD7 and SKI levels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Hau, Peter; Dotor, Javier; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor, accounting for 60-70% of all gliomas. Current median patient survival time is 14-16 months after diagnosis. Numerous efforts in therapy have not significantly altered the nearly uniform lethality of this malignancy. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a key role in GBM and is implicated in proliferation, invasion and therapy resistance. Several inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical trials or are under development. In this work, the therapeutic potential of P144, a TGF-β inhibitor peptide, was analyzed. P144 decreased proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity in vitro, whereas apoptosis and anoikis were significantly increased for GBM cell lines. SMAD2 phosphorylation was reduced, together with a downregulation of SKI and an upregulation of SMAD7 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, P144 was able to impair tumor growth and increase survival in an in vivo flank model. Our findings suggest a potential effect of P144 in vitro and in vivo that is mediated by regulation of transcriptional target genes of the TGF-β pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential of P144 for GBM treatment.

  19. DNA Damage-Induced NF-κB Activation in Human Glioblastoma Cells Promotes miR-181b Expression and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Xue Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and most aggressive form of brain cancer. After surgery, radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for GBM patients. Unfortunately, the vast majority of GBM patients fail responding to radiotherapy because GBM cells remain highly resistant to radiation. Radiotherapy-induced DNA damage response may correlate with therapeutic resistance. Methods: Ionizing radiation (IR was used to induce DNA damage. Cell proliferation and migration were detected by wound-healing, MTT and apoptosis assays. Dual-luciferase assays and Western blot analysis were performed to evaluate NF-κB activation and validate microRNA targets. Real-time PCR was used to study mRNA and microRNA levels. Results: IR-induced DNA damage activated NF-κB in GBM cells which promoted expression of IL-6, IL-8 and Bcl-xL, thereby contributing to cell survival and invasion. Knockdown SENP2 expression enhanced NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO SUMOylation and NF-κB activity following IR exposure. miR-181b targets SENP2 and positively regulated NF-κB activity. Conclusion: NF-κB activation by DNA damage in GBM cells confers resistance to radiation-induced death.

  20. Somatic retrotransposition is infrequent in glioblastomas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Achanta, Pragathi; Steranka, Jared P; Tang, Zuojian; Rodić, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Yang, Wan Rou; Ma, Sisi; Grivainis, Mark; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Schneider, Anna M; Gallia, Gary L; Riggins, Gregory J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Fenyö, David; Boeke, Jef D; Burns, Kathleen H

    2016-01-01

    ... in these malignancies by identifying evidence of somatic retrotransposition in glioblastomas (GBM). We performed transposon insertion profiling of the active subfamily of Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1...

  1. A novel berbamine derivative inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis in cancer stem-like cells of human glioblastoma, via up-regulation of miRNA-4284 and JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor, accounting for approximately 40% of all central nervous system malignancies. Despite standard treatment consisting of surgical resection, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, the prognosis for GBM is poor; with a median survival of 14.6 months. The cancer stem cell or cancer-initiating cell model has provided a new paradigm for understanding development and recurrence of GBM following treatment. Berbamine (BBM is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plant, and along with its derivatives, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in several cancers. Here, we reported that a novel synthetic Berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner when the CSCs from four GBM patients (PBT003, PBT008, PBT022, and PBT030 were cultured. These CSCs grew in neurospheres and expressed CD133 and nestin as markers. Treatment with BBMD3 destroyed the neurosphere morphology, and led to the induction of apoptosis in the CSCs. Induction of apoptosis in these CSCs is dependent upon activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. MicroRNA-4284 (miR-4284 was shown to be over-expressed about 4-fold in the CSCs following BBMD3 treatment. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic anti-sense oligonucleotide against human miR-4284 partially blocked the anticancer effects of BBMD3 on the GBM derived CSCs. BBMD3 also increased phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK, resulting in an increase expression of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos; the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. The JNK-c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis in response to UV irradiation and some drug treatments. Targeting glioblastoma stem-like cells with BBMD3 is therefore novel, and may have promise as an

  2. Polish natural bee honeys are anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic agents in human glioblastoma multiforme U87MG cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Moskwa

    Full Text Available Honey has been used as food and a traditional medicament since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and other properties of honey. In this study, we investigated for the first time an anticancer effect of different honeys from Poland on tumor cell line - glioblastoma multiforme U87MG. Anti-proliferative activity of honeys and its interferences with temozolomide were determined by a cytotoxicity test and DNA binding by [H3]-thymidine incorporation. A gelatin zymography was used to conduct an evaluation of metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in U87MG treatment with honey samples. The honeys were previously tested qualitatively (diastase activity, total phenolic content, lead and cadmium content. The data demonstrated that the examined honeys have a potent anti-proliferative effect on U87MG cell line in a time- and dose-dependent manner, being effective at concentrations as low as 0.5% (multifloral light honey - viability 53% after 72 h of incubation. We observed that after 48 h, combining honey with temozolomide showed a significantly higher inhibitory effect than the samples of honey alone. We observed a strong inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 for the tested honeys (from 20 to 56% and from 5 to 58% compared to control, respectively. Our results suggest that Polish honeys have an anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effect on U87MG cell line. Therefore, natural bee honey can be considered as a promising adjuvant treatment for brain tumors.

  3. CXCL12 MODULATION OF CXCR4 AND CXCR7 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM-LIKE CELLS AND REGULATION OF THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eWurth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells.Glioblastoma (GBM is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain.GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g. CXCL12 causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4.This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include

  4. MIR517C inhibits autophagy and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition phenotype in human glioblastoma through KPNA2-dependent disruption of TP53 nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuntao; Xiao, Limin; Liu, Yawei; Wang, Hai; Li, Hong; Zhou, Qiang; Pan, Jun; Lei, Bingxi; Huang, Annie; Qi, Songtao

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition (EMT), a crucial embryonic development program, has been linked to the regulation of glioblastoma (GBM) progression and invasion. Here, we investigated the role of MIR517C/miR-517c, which belongs to the C19MC microRNA cluster identified in our preliminary studies, in the pathogenesis of GBM. We found that MIR517C was associated with improved prognosis in patients with GBM. Furthermore, following treatment with the autophagy inducer temozolomide (TMZ) and low glucose (LG), MIR517C degraded KPNA2 (karyopherin alpha 2 [RAG cohort 1, importin alpha 1]) and subsequently disturbed the nuclear translocation of TP53 in the GBM cell line U87 in vitro. Interestingly, this microRNA could inhibit autophagy and reduce cell migration and infiltration in U87 cells harboring wild-type (WT) TP53, but not in U251 cells harboring mutant (MU) TP53. Moreover, the expression of epithelial markers (i.e., CDH13/T-cadherin and CLDN1 [claudin 1]) increased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers (i.e., CDH2/N-cadherin, SNAI1/Snail, and VIM [vimentin]) decreased, indicating that the EMT status was blocked by MIR517C in U87 cells. Compared with MIR517C overexpression, MIR517C knockdown promoted infiltration of U87 cells to the surrounding structures in nude mice in vivo. The above phenotypic changes were also observed in TP53(+/+) and TP53(-/-) HCT116 colon cancer cells. In summary, our study provided support for a link between autophagy and EMT status in WT TP53 GBM cells and provided evidence for the signaling pathway (MIR517C-KPNA2-cytoplasmic TP53) involved in attenuating autophagy and eliminating the increased migration and invasion during the EMT.

  5. Acquired temozolomide resistance in human glioblastoma cell line U251 is caused by mismatch repair deficiency and can be overcome by lomustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzelberger, J; Distel, L; Buslei, R; Fietkau, R; Putz, F

    2017-08-20

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. While the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has prolonged overall survival, resistance evolution represents an important clinical problem. Therefore, we studied the effectiveness of radiotherapy and CCNU in an in vitro model of acquired TMZ resistance. We studied the MGMT-methylated GBM cell line U251 and its in vitro derived TMZ-resistant subline, U251/TMZ-R. Cytotoxicity of TMZ, CCNU, and radiation was tested. Both cell lines were analyzed for MGMT promotor status and expression of mismatch repair genes (MMR). The influence of MMR inhibition by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) on the effects of both drugs was evaluated. During the resistance evolution process in vitro, U251/TMZ-R developed MMR deficiency, but MGMT status did not change. U251/TMZ-R cells were more resistant to TMZ than parental U251 cells (cell viability: 92.0% in U251/TMZ-R/69.2% in U251; p = 0.032) yet more sensitive to CCNU (56.4%/80.8%; p = 0.023). The effectiveness of radiotherapy was not reduced in the TMZ-resistant cell line. Combination of CCNU and TMZ showed promising results for both cell lines and overcame resistance. CdCl2-induced MMR deficiency increased cytotoxicity of CCNU. Our results confirm MMR deficiency as a crucial process for resistance evolution to TMZ. MMR-deficient TMZ-resistant GBM cells were particularly sensitive to CCNU and to combined CCNU/TMZ. Effectiveness of radiotherapy was preserved in TMZ-resistant cells. Consequently, CCNU might be preferentially considered as a treatment option for recurrent MGMT-methylated GBM and may even be suitable for prevention of resistance evolution in primary treatment.

  6. In vitro analysis of neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture: a novel methodology paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Favaro Pavon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most lethal primary brain tumour frequently relapse or progress as focal masses after radiation, suggesting that only a fraction of tumour cells are responsible for the tumor regrowth. The identification of a brain tumour cell subpopulation with potent tumorigenic activity supports the cancer stem cell hypothesis in solid tumours. The goal of this study was to determine a methodology for the establishment of primary human glioblastoma stem cell lines. Our aim was achieved by taking the following approaches: i the establishment of primary glioblastoma cell culture; ii isolation of neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture and derived straight from the tumor; iii CD133 microbeads purified neurospheres by MACS, iv Formation of subspheres in the CD133+ population, v Study of the expression level of GFAP, CD133, Nestin, Nanog, CD34 and Sox2 markers on tumor subspheres. Here, we describe a successful method for isolation of CD133+ cell population and establishment of glioblastoma neurospheres from this primary culture, which are more robust than the ones derived straight from the tumor. Highlight that the neurospheres derived from glioblatoma primary culture showed 89% expression of CD133+ cells, whereas tumor-derived neurospheres showed a 60% expression of CD133+ cells. These results show a higher concentration of CD133+ cells in neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture. These CD133+ fractions were able to further generate subspheres. The subspheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture presented a well defined morphology while the ones derived form the fresh tumor were sparce and less robust. The negative fraction of CD133 cells was unable to generate subspheres. The tumor subspheres expressed GFAP, CD133, Nestin and Nanog. The present study describes an optimization of isolation of neurospheres/subspheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture by process of selection of CD133+ adherent stem

  7. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment with targeted agents or cytotoxic chemotherapy, reirradiation, or radiosurgery. Research into novel therapies is investigating alternative temozolomide regimens, convection-enhanced delivery, immunotherapy, gene therapy, antiangiogenic agents, poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors, or cancer stem cell signaling pathways. Given the aggressive and resilient nature of GBM, continued efforts to better understand GBM pathophysiology are required to discover novel targets for future therapy.

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of lipid droplet formation enhances the effectiveness of curcumin in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Issan; Cui, Yiming; Amiri, Abdolali; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E; Maysinger, Dusica

    2016-03-01

    Increased lipid droplet number and fatty acid synthesis allow glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer, to withstand accelerated metabolic rates and resist therapeutic treatments. Lipid droplets are postulated to sequester hydrophobic therapeutic agents, thereby reducing drug effectiveness. We hypothesized that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation in glioblastoma cells using pyrrolidine-2, a cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 alpha inhibitor, can sensitize cancer cells to the killing effect of curcumin, a promising anticancer agent isolated from the turmeric spice. We observed that curcumin localized in the lipid droplets of human U251N glioblastoma cells. Reduction of lipid droplet number using pyrrolidine-2 drastically enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin in both 2D and 3D glioblastoma cell models. The mode of cell death involved was found to be mediated by caspase-3. Comparatively, the current clinical chemotherapeutic standard, temozolomide, was significantly less effective in inducing glioblastoma cell death. Together, our results suggest that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation is an effective way to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin against glioblastoma multiforme.

  9. Expressions and roles of apoprotein E and heme oxygenase-1 in human brain glioblastoma%载脂蛋白E和血红素加氧酶-1在人脑胶质母细胞瘤中的表达及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷荟仔; 余天平; 罗红池; 李昱

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究载脂蛋白E(Apoprotein E,ApoE)和血红素加氧酶-1(Heime oxygenase-1,HO-1)在胶质母细胞瘤中的表达,并探讨二者在胶质母细胞瘤发生发展中的作用.方法 收集人脑胶质母细胞瘤患者肿瘤组织标本41份及胶质母细胞瘤旁脑组织标本14份,采用免疫组化法检测组织标本中ApoE和HO-1蛋白的表达情况,分析ApoE和HO-1的表达与患者临床病理特征之间的相关性.结果 ApoE和HO-1蛋白在胶质母细胞瘤中表达的阳性率(82.9%和92.7%)与瘤旁正常组织(均为7.1%)相比,差异均有统计学意义(P均<0.001),且ApoE与HO-1的表达呈正相关(rs=0.321,P<0.05);患者性别、年龄、术前KPS评分、手术切除范围、肿瘤大小、术后放化疗情况与ApoE、HO-1蛋白的表达无相关性.结论 ApoE和HO-1与胶质母细胞瘤的发生发展密切相关,为判断胶质母细胞瘤的预后及治疗提供了新的参考.%Objective To investigate the expressions of apoprotein E (ApoE) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) in human brain glioblastoma as well as their roles in onset and progress of glioblastoma. Methods Forty-one samples of human brain glioblastoma and 14 samples of normal tissue adjacent to glioblastoma were collected and determined for expressions of ApoE and HO-l by immunohistochemical assay, based on which the relationship of ApoE and HO-l expressions to clinical pathological characters of patients was analyzed. Results Both the expression levels of ApoE and HO-l were significantly in glioblastoma (82. 9% and 92. 7% respectively) than in normal tissue adjacent to glioblastoma (each 7. 1%) (each P < 0. 001). The expression of ApoE was positively related to that of HO-l (r, = 0. 321, P < 0. 05). However, the expressions of ApoE and HO-l showed no relationship to the sex, age, KPS score before surgery, range of resection, tumor size and radiotherapy after surgery. Conclusion ApoE and HO-l were closely related to the onset and progress of

  10. A comprehensive profile of recurrent glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, B.; Olsen, Lars Rønn; Urup, T.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of relentless efforts to devise new treatment strategies, primary glioblastomas invariably recur as aggressive, therapy-resistant relapses and patients rapidly succumb to these tumors. Many therapeutic agents are first tested in clinical trials involving recurrent glioblastomas. Remarkab...... 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.85....

  11. Mutational profiling of kinases in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Bleeker (Fonnet); S. Lamba (Simona); C. Zanon (Carlo); R.J. Molenaar (Remco J.); T. Hulsebos (Theo); D. Troost (Dirk); A.A.G. van Tilborg (Angela); W.P. Vandertop (Peter); S. Leenstra (Sieger); C.J.F. van Noorden (Cornelis); A. Bardelli (Alberto)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Glioblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumor for which no cure is available. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed a mutation analysis of kinase genes in glioblastoma.Methods: Database mining and a literature search identified 76 kinases that have been found to

  12. Genetic alterations in primary glioblastomas in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Takao; Favereaux, Alexandre; Huang, Hervé; Shimizu, Tsuneo; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Nakazato, Yoichi; Ohagki, Hiroko

    2006-01-01

    Current knowledge of genetic alterations in glioblastomas is based largely on genetic analyses of tumors from mainly caucasian patients in the United States and Europe. In the present study, screening for several key genetic alterations was performed on 77 primary (de novo) glioblastomas in Japanese patients. SSCP followed by DNA sequencing revealed TP53 mutations in 16 of 73 (22%) glioblastomas and PTEN mutations in 13 of 63 (21%) cases analyzed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed EGFR amplification in 25 of 77 (32%) cases and p16 homozygous deletion in 32 of 77 (42%) cases. Quantitative microsatellite analysis revealed LOH 10q in 41 of 59 (69%) glioblastomas. The frequencies of these genetic alterations were similar to those reported for primary glioblastomas at the population level in Switzerland. As previously observed for glioblastomas in Europe, there was a positive association between EGFR amplification and p16 deletion (p=0.009), whereas there was an inverse association between TP53 mutations and p16 deletion (p=0.049) in glioblastomas in Japan. Multivariate analyses showed that radiotherapy was significantly predictive for longer survival of glioblastoma patients (p=0.002). SSCP followed by DNA sequencing of the kinase domain (exons 18-21) of the EGFR gene revealed mutations in 2 ou of 69 (3%) glioblastomas in Japan and in 4 of 81 (5%) glioblastomas in Switzerland. The allele frequencies of polymorphisms at codon 787 CAG/CAA (Gln/Gln) in glioblastomas in Japan were G/G (82.4%), G/A (10.8%), A/A (6.8%), corresponding to G 0.878 versus A 0.122, significantly different from those in glioblastomas in Switzerland: G/G (27.2%), G/A (28.4%), A/A (44.4%), corresponding to G 0.414 versus A 0.586 (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that primary glioblastomas in Japan show genetic alterations similar to those in Switzerland, suggesting a similar molecular basis in caucasians and Asians, despite different genetic backgrounds, including different status of a

  13. Endothelial cell‐derived angiopoietin‐2 is a therapeutic target in treatment‐naive and bevacizumab‐resistant glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Alexander; Harter, Patrick N.; Cremer, Sebastian; Yalcin, Burak H; Gurnik, Stefanie; Yamaji, Maiko; Di Tacchio, Mariangela; Sommer, Kathleen; Baumgarten, Peter; Bähr, Oliver; Steinbach, Joachim P; Trojan, Jörg; Glas, Martin; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Krex, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is treated by surgical resection followed by radiochemotherapy. Bevacizumab is commonly deployed for anti‐angiogenic therapy of recurrent GBM; however, innate immune cells have been identified as instigators of resistance to bevacizumab treatment. We identified angiopoietin‐2 (Ang‐2) as a potential target in both naive and bevacizumab‐treated glioblastoma. Ang‐2 expression was absent in normal human brain endothelium, while the highest Ang‐2 levels were ...

  14. The anti-hypertensive drug prazosin inhibits glioblastoma growth via the PKCd-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Assad Kahn, Suzana; Lima Costa, Silvia; Gholamin, Sharareh; Nitta, Ryan T.; Dubois, Gustavo Luiz; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Cerqueira Coelho, Paulo Lucas; El-Habr, Elias; Cadusseau, Josette; Varlet, Pascale; Mitra, Siddharta S.; Devaux, Bertrand; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Cheshier, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Published online; International audience; A variety of drugs targeting monoamine receptors are routinely used in human pharmacology. We assessed the effect of these drugs on the viability of tumor-initiating cells isolated from patients with glioblastoma. Among the drugs targeting monoamine receptors, we identified prazosin, an a1-and a2B-adrenergic receptor antagonist, as the most potent inducer of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cell death. Prazosin triggered apoptosis of glioblasto...

  15. Current concepts in glioblastoma imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Alexiou; Spyridon Tsiouris; Haralabos Bougias; Spyridon Voulgaris; Andreas Fotopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM, WHO grade Ⅳ) is the most common and the most malignant primary brain tumor occurring during adulthood, with an annual incidence of 5 cases per 100 000. Treatment involves surgical resection, followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Despite multimodality treatment, the median survival time is 15 months. Herewith we discuss the value of neuroimaging in differentiating GBM from other types of brain tumors, in guiding tumor biopsy, in making non-invasive assessment of tumor's aggressiveness, in estimating overall prognosis, in differentiating treatment -induced brain necrosis from tumor recurrence and in assessing response to treatment.

  16. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R; Giannini, C; Sarkaria, J N; Schroeder, M; Rogers, J; Mastroeni, D; Scrable, H

    2013-06-27

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10 to 70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, some of which can modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry and reverse transcription-PCR. We found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared with tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions.

  17. Indirect costs associated with glioblastoma: Experience at one hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabeitia, J; Torres-Bayona, S; Samprón, N; Arrázola, M; Bollar, A; Armendariz, M; Torres, P; Ruiz, I; Caballero, M C; Egaña, L; Querejeta, A; Villanua, J; Pardo, E; Etxegoien, I; Liceaga, G; Urtasun, M; Michan, M; Emparanza, J I; Aldaz, P; Matheu, A; Úrculo, E

    2016-07-20

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumour. Despite advances in treatment, its prognosis remains dismal, with a mean survival time of about 14 months. Many articles have addressed direct costs, those associated with the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Indirect costs, those associated with loss of productivity due to the disease, have seldom been described. We conducted a retrospective study in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma at Hospital Universitario Donostia between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. We collected demographics, data regarding the treatment received, and survival times. We calculated the indirect costs with the human capital approach, adjusting the mean salaries of comparable individuals by sex and age and obtaining mortality data for the general population from the Spanish National Statistics Institute. Past salaries were updated to 2015 euros according to the annual inflation rate and we applied a discount of 3.5% compounded yearly to future salaries. We reviewed the records of 99 patients: 46 women (mean age 63.53) and 53 men (mean age 59.94); 29 patients underwent a biopsy and the remaining 70 underwent excisional surgery. Mean survival was 18.092 months for the whole series. The total indirect cost for the series was €11 080 762 (2015). Mean indirect cost per patient was €111 926 (2015). Although glioblastoma is a relatively uncommon type of tumour, accounting for only 4% of all cancers, its poor prognosis and potential sequelae generate disproportionately large morbidity and mortality rates which translate to high indirect costs. Clinicians should be aware of the societal impact of glioblastoma and indirect costs should be taken into account when cost effectiveness studies are performed to better illustrate the overall consequences of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  19. Clinical Neuropathology mini-review 6-2015: PD-L1: emerging biomarker in glioblastoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1, CD279) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1, CD274) are involved in generating tumor-associated immunosuppression by suppression of T-cell proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production and immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting these molecules are showing compelling activity against a variety of human cancers. PD-L1 expression has shown a positive association with response to PD-1 inhibition in noncentral nervous system (CNS) tumors, e.g., melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer, and is discussed as a potential predictive biomarker for patient selection in these tumor types. This review summarizes current knowledge and potential clinical implications of PD-L1 expression in glioblastoma. At present, the following conclusions are drawn: (a) functional data support a role for PD-1/PD-L1 in tumor-associated immunosuppression in glioblastoma; (b) the incidence of PD-L1-expressing glioblastomas seems to be relatively high in comparison to other tumor types, however, the reported rates of glioblastomas with PD-L1 protein expression vary and range from 61 to 88%; (c) there is considerable variability in the methodology of PD-L1 assessment in glioblastoma across studies with heterogeneity in utilized antibodies, tissue sampling strategies, immunohistochemical staining protocols, cut-off definitions, and evaluated staining patterns; (d) there are conflicting data on the prognostic role and so far no data on the predictive role of PD-L1 gene and protein expression in glioblastoma. In summary, the ongoing clinical studies evaluating the activity of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in glioblastoma need to be complemented with well designed and stringently executed studies to understand the influence of PD-1/PD-L1 expression on therapy response or failure and to develop robust means of PD-L1 assessment for meaningful biomarker development.

  20. Radiation-induced glioblastoma signaling cascade regulates viability, apoptosis and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-12-01

    Ionizing radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy is the main treatment modality for brain tumors including glioblastoma. Adult neurons and astrocytes demonstrate substantial radioresistance; in contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC) are highly sensitive to radiation via induction of apoptosis. Irradiation of tumor cells has the potential risk of affecting the viability and function of NSC. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of irradiated glioblastoma cells on viability, proliferation and differentiation potential of non-irradiated (bystander) NSC through radiation-induced signaling cascades. Using media transfer experiments, we demonstrated significant effects of the U87MG glioblastoma secretome after gamma-irradiation on apoptosis in non-irradiated NSC. Addition of anti-TRAIL antibody to the transferred media partially suppressed apoptosis in NSC. Furthermore, we observed a dramatic increase in the production and secretion of IL8, TGFβ1 and IL6 by irradiated glioblastoma cells, which could promote glioblastoma cell survival and modify the effects of death factors in bystander NSC. While differentiation of NSC into neurons and astrocytes occurred efficiently with the corresponding differentiation media, pretreatment of NSC for 8 h with medium from irradiated glioblastoma cells selectively suppressed the differentiation of NSC into neurons, but not into astrocytes. Exogenous IL8 and TGFβ1 increased NSC/NPC survival, but also suppressed neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, IL6 was known to positively affect survival and differentiation of astrocyte progenitors. We established a U87MG neurosphere culture that was substantially enriched by SOX2(+) and CD133(+) glioma stem-like cells (GSC). Gamma-irradiation up-regulated apoptotic death in GSC via the FasL/Fas pathway. Media transfer experiments from irradiated GSC to non-targeted NSC again demonstrated induction of apoptosis and suppression of neuronal differentiation of NSC. In

  1. Rare clinical form of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ejma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (glioblastoma multiforme - GBM is the most malignant tumor classified by WHO. It is also the most common primary CNS tumor with a very aggressive course and unfavourable prognosis, usually develops in adults, and is typically located supratentorially in the fronto-temporal region. However, the literature describes an unusual position of GBM (e.g. spinal cord, pons, pineal region, familial gliomas unconnected with the family of gliomas predisposed to the occurrence of syndromes, unusual glioma and metastatic sites, gliomas transplanted with organs. In this paper, based on the available literature, the authors discuss an unusual and rare form of glioblastoma multiforme.

  2. The role of interleukin-18 in glioblastoma pathology implies therapeutic potential of two old drugs-disulfiram and ritonavir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard E Kast

    2015-01-01

    Based on reporting in the last several years, an impressive but dismal list of cytotoxic chemotherapies that fail to prolong the median overall survival of patients with glioblastoma has prompted the development of treatment protocols designed to interfere with growth-facilitating signaling systems by using non-cytotoxic, non-oncology drugs. Recent recognition of the pro-mobility stimulus, interleukin-18, as a driver of centrifugal glioblastoma cell migration al ows potential treatment adjuncts with disulfiram and ritonavir. Disulfiram and ritonavir are well-tolerated, non-cytotoxic, non-oncology chemotherapeutic drugs that are marketed for the treatment of alcoholism and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, respectively. Both drugs exhibit an interleukin-18–inhibiting function. Given the favorable tolerability profile of disulfiram and ritonavir, the unlikely drug-drug interaction with temozolomide, and the poor prognosis of glioblastoma, trials of addition of disulfiram and ritonavir to current standard initial treatment of glioblastoma would be warranted.

  3. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Julia; Rai, Karan G.; Funk, Cory C.; Arora, Sonali; Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Jun; Price, Nathan D.; Paddison, Patrick J.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Rostomily, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance. PMID:28264064

  4. A REST derived gene signature stratifies glioblastomas into chemotherapy resistant and responsive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagoner Matthew P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastomas are the most common central nervous system neoplasia in adults, with 9,000 cases in the US annually. Glioblastoma multiformae, the most aggressive glioma subtype, has an 18% one-year survival rate, and 3% two year survival rate. Recent work has highlighted the role of the transcription factor RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor, REST in glioblastoma but how REST function correlates with disease outcome has not been described. Method Using a bioinformatic approach and mining of publicly available microarray datasets, we describe an aggressive subtype of gliomas defined by a gene signature derived from REST. Using this REST gene signature we predict that REST function is enhanced in advanced glioblastoma. We compare disease outcomes between tumors based on REST status and treatment regimen, and describe downstream targets of REST that may contribute to the decreased benefits observed with high dose chemotherapy in REM tumors. Results We present human data showing that patients with “REST Enhanced Malignancies” (REM tumors present with a shorter disease free survival compared to non-REM gliomas. Importantly, REM tumors are refractory to multiple rounds of chemotherapy and patients fail to respond to this line of treatment. Conclusions This report is the first to describe a REST gene signature that predicts response to multiple rounds of chemotherapy, the mainline therapy for this disease. The REST gene signature may have important clinical implications for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  5. Targeting ROR1 inhibits the self-renewal and invasive ability of glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun-Hwa; Lee, Han-Na; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant of brain tumours and is difficult to cure because of interruption of drug delivery by the blood-brain barrier system, its high metastatic capacity and the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Although CSCs are present as a small population in malignant tumours, CSCs have been studied as they are responsible for causing recurrence, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer. CSCs have self-renewal characteristics like normal stem cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) is involved in stem cell maintenance and malignant properties in human glioblastoma. Knockdown of ROR1 caused reduction of stemness and sphere formation capacity. Moreover, down-regulation of ROR1 suppressed the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes and the tumour migratory and invasive abilities. The results of this study indicate that targeting ROR1 can induce differentiation of CSCs and inhibit metastasis in glioblastoma. In addition, ROR1 may be used as a potential marker for glioblastoma stem cells as well as a potential target for glioblastoma stem cell therapy.

  6. MicroRNA-663 inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells via targeting TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qizhuang; Cheng, Quan; Chen, Zigui; Peng, Renjun; Chen, Rui; Ma, Zhiming; Wan, Xin; Liu, Jincan; Meng, Ming; Peng, Zhigang; Jiang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration and invasion are key processes involved during tumor metastasis. Recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we aimed to investigate the exact role of miR-663 in the metastasis of glioblastoma as well as the underlying mechanisms. By performing quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, we demonstrated that miR-663 was significantly downregulated in glioblastoma tissues (n=25), when compared to that in normal brain tissues (n=15). In addition, its expression levels were also reduced in human glioblastoma cell lines, A172 and U87. Furthermore, restoration of miR-663 expression led to a significant decrease in the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma A172 and U87 cells. We further identified TGF-β1 as a direct target of miR-663, and found that the expression of TGF-β1 was negatively mediated by miR-663 at the post-transcriptional level in glioblastoma cells. Moreover, overexpression of TGF-β1 significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-663 upregulation on the proliferation, migration and invasion in A172 and U87 cells. In addition, our data suggest that MMP2 and E-cadherin, a key factor in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), are involved in the miR-633/TGF-β1-mediated metastasis of glioblastoma. In summary, miR-663 plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of proliferation, migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells, partly at least, via direct mediation of TGF-β1 as well as downstream MMP2 and E-cadherin. Therefore, we suggest that miR-663 is a potential candidate for the prevention of glioblastoma metastasis.

  7. Molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma: potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Renee Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas, (grade 4 astrocytomas, are aggressive primary brain tumors characterized by histopathological heterogeneity. High resolution sequencing technologies have shown that these tumors also feature significant inter-tumoral molecular heterogeneity. Molecular subtyping of these tumors has revealed several predictive and prognostic biomarkers. However, intra-tumoral heterogeneity may undermine the use of single biopsy analysis for determining tumor genotype and has implications for potential targeted therapies. The clinical relevance and theories of tumoral molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma are discussed.

  8. Real-time visualization of nanoparticles interacting with glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Elliot S; Patel, Kaya; Guo, Sujuan; Dukes, Madeline J; Sheng, Zhi; Kelly, Deborah F

    2015-04-08

    Nanoparticle-based therapy represents a novel and promising approach to treat glioblastoma, the most common and lethal malignant brain cancer. Although similar therapies have achieved significant cytotoxicity in cultured glioblastoma or glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), the lack of an appropriate approach to monitor interactions between cells and nanoparticle-based therapies impedes their further clinical application in human patients. To address this critical issue, we first obtained NOTCH1 positive GSCs from patient-derived primary cultures. We then developed a new imaging approach to directly observe the dynamic nature of nanoparticles at the molecular level using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Utilizing these tools we were able to visualize real-time movements of nanoparticles interacting with GSCs for the first time. Overall, we show strong proof-of-concept results that real-time visualization of nanoparticles in single cells can be achieved at the nanoscale using TEM, thereby providing a powerful platform for the development of nanotherapeutics.

  9. Protein typing of circulating microvesicles allows real-time monitoring of glioblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Balaj, Leonora; Charest, Alain; Bigner, Darell D; Carter, Bob S; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastomas shed large quantities of small, membrane-bound microvesicles into the circulation. Although these hold promise as potential biomarkers of therapeutic response, their identification and quantification remain challenging. Here, we describe a highly sensitive and rapid analytical technique for profiling circulating microvesicles directly from blood samples of patients with glioblastoma. Microvesicles, introduced onto a dedicated microfluidic chip, are labeled with target-specific magnetic nanoparticles and detected by a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance system. Compared with current methods, this integrated system has a much higher detection sensitivity and can differentiate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) microvesicles from nontumor host cell-derived microvesicles. We also show that circulating GBM microvesicles can be used to analyze primary tumor mutations and as a predictive metric of treatment-induced changes. This platform could provide both an early indicator of drug efficacy and a potential molecular stratifier for human clinical trials.

  10. A kinome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila Glia reveals that the RIO kinases mediate cell proliferation and survival through TORC2-Akt signaling in glioblastoma.

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    Renee D Read

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor, is incurable with current therapies. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrate that glioblastomas frequently display mutations that activate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK and Pi-3 kinase (PI3K signaling pathways. In Drosophila melanogaster, activation of RTK and PI3K pathways in glial progenitor cells creates malignant neoplastic glial tumors that display many features of human glioblastoma. In both human and Drosophila, activation of the RTK and PI3K pathways stimulates Akt signaling along with other as-yet-unknown changes that drive oncogenesis. We used this Drosophila glioblastoma model to perform a kinome-wide genetic screen for new genes required for RTK- and PI3K-dependent neoplastic transformation. Human orthologs of novel kinases uncovered by these screens were functionally assessed in mammalian glioblastoma models and human tumors. Our results revealed that the atypical kinases RIOK1 and RIOK2 are overexpressed in glioblastoma cells in an Akt-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that overexpressed RIOK2 formed a complex with RIOK1, mTor, and mTor-complex-2 components, and that overexpressed RIOK2 upregulated Akt signaling and promoted tumorigenesis in murine astrocytes. Conversely, reduced expression of RIOK1 or RIOK2 disrupted Akt signaling and caused cell cycle exit, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by inducing p53 activity through the RpL11-dependent ribosomal stress checkpoint. These results imply that, in glioblastoma cells, constitutive Akt signaling drives RIO kinase overexpression, which creates a feedforward loop that promotes and maintains oncogenic Akt activity through stimulation of mTor signaling. Further study of the RIO kinases as well as other kinases identified in our Drosophila screen may reveal new insights into defects underlying glioblastoma and related cancers and may reveal new therapeutic opportunities for these cancers.

  11. Applicable advances in the molecular pathology of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Melissa; Motomura, Kazuya; Ohka, Fumiharu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Natsume, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Comprising more than 80% of malignant brain tumors, glioma has proven to be a daunting cause of mortality in a vast majority of the human population. Progressive and extensive research on malignant glioma has substantially enhanced our understanding of glioma cell biology and molecular pathology. Subtypes of glioma such as astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma are currently grouped together into one pathological class, where they show many differences in histology and molecular etiology. This indicates that it may be beneficial to consider a new and radical subclassification. Thus, we summarize recent developments in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) subtypes, immunohistochemical analyses useful for diagnoses and the biological evaluation and therapeutic implications of gliomas in this review.

  12. Inhibition of nestin suppresses stem cell phenotype of glioblastomas through the alteration of post-translational modification of heat shock protein HSPA8/HSC71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Hagio, Masahito; Arai, Tomio

    2015-02-28

    Nestin, a class VI intermediate filament, was first described as a neuronal stem/progenitor cell marker. We previously reported that knockdown of nestin expression in human glioblastoma cells suppresses cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In the present study, we examined the effect of nestin on stemness, and identified molecules involved in modulating nestin function in glioblastoma cells. Nestin expression was shown to be higher in high-grade gliomas than in low-grade gliomas. Furthermore, compared with control cells, nestin short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-transfected glioblastoma cells exhibited reduced sphere formation, decreased expression of NANOG, N-cadherin, CD133, and Oct-4, and decreased tumor size in vivo. To examine the proteins regulated by nestin in glioblastomas, we carried out two-dimensional electrophoresis using nestin shRNA-transfected glioblastoma cells. As a result, nestin shRNA-transfected glioblastoma cells exhibited a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein (HSC71; gene HSPA8). From immunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated the direct binding of nestin, HSC71, and cyclin D1 in vitro. Overexpression of nestin in glioblastoma cells increased cell growth, sphere formation, and cell invasion. Transfection with HSC71 siRNA restored nestin expression and cell behavior; therefore, HSC71 knockdown will interfere with enhanced tumorigenic properties of glioblastoma cells that ectopically overexpress nestin. We have demonstrated that HSC71 and nestin regulate each other's expression levels or patterns, and that cyclin D1 is located downstream of nestin and HSC71. In conclusion, nestin regulates stemness, cell growth, and invasion in glioblastoma cells through the alteration of HSC71. Inhibition of nestin and HSC71 may thus be a useful molecular target in the treatment of glioblastomas.

  13. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

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    Michael Preukschas

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  14. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preukschas, Michael; Hagel, Christian; Schulte, Alexander; Weber, Kristoffer; Lamszus, Katrin; Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Hauber, Joachim; Braig, Melanie; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  15. Ketamine suppresses the substance P-induced production of IL-6 and IL-8 by human U373MG glioblastoma/astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Murakami, Taisuke; Someya, Akimasa; Inada, Eiichi; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-03-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is an important mediator of neurogenic inflammation within the central and peripheral nervous systems. SP has been shown to induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the human brain via the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, functions as a competitive antagonist of the excitatory neurotransmission N-methyl-D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and also antagonizes the NK-1R by interfering with the binding of SP. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ketamine on the SP-induced activation of a human astrocytoma cell line, U373MG, which expresses high levels of NK-1R. The results from our experiments indicated that ketamine suppressed the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 by the U373MG cells. Furthermore, ketamine inhibited the SP-induced activation of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these observations suggest that ketamine may suppress the SP-induced activation (IL-6 and IL-8 production) of U373MG cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of signaling molecules (namely ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB), thereby exerting anti‑inflammatory effects. Thus, ketamine may modulate SP-induced inflammatory responses by NK-1R‑expressing cells through the suppression of signaling molecules (such as ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB).

  16. NETRIN-4 Protects Glioblastoma Cells FROM Temozolomide Induced Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Li Li; Yizhou Hu; Irene Ylivinkka; Huini Li; Ping Chen; Jorma Keski-Oja; Marko Hyytiäinen

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ) prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4) and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4), which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via ac...

  17. MicroRNA-197 inhibits cell proliferation by targeting GAB2 in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li-Qiang; Liu, En-Qin; Zhu, Xi-De; Wang, Xin-Gong; Li, Jian; Xu, Guang-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common type of primary brain tumor in adults, and is usually fatal in a short duration. Acquiring a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of glioblastoma is essential to the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Grb2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is a member of the daughter of sevenless/Gab family of scaffolding adapters, and has been reported to be important in the development and progression of human cancer. Previously, it has been reported that GAB2 is expressed at high levels in glioma, and may serve as a useful prognostic marker for glioma and a novel therapeutic target for glioma invasion intervention. Elucidating why GAB2 is overexpressed in glioma, and investigating how to downregulate it will assist in further understanding the pathogenesis and progression of the disease, and to offer novel targets for therapy. The present study used in situ hybridization to detect microRNA (miR)‑197 expression levels and Targetscan to predict that the 3'-UTR of GAB2 was targeted by miR-197. Northern blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction were also conducted in the current study. miR-197 is downregulated in glioblastoma tissues, compared with adjacent normal tissues, however it involvement continues to be detected in the disease. The results of the present study demonstrated that miR‑197, as a tumor suppressor gene, inhibited proliferation by regulating GAB2 in glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, GAB2 was not only upregulated in glioma, but its expression levels were also associated with the grades of glioma severity. In addition, overexpression of GAB2 suppressed the expression of miR‑197 in glioblastoma cells. Therefore, restoration of miR‑197 and targeting GAB2 may be used, in conjunction with other therapies, to prevent the progression of glioblastoma.

  18. Expression of R132H mutational IDH1 in human U87 glioblastoma cells affects the SREBP1a pathway and induces cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Cui, Gang; Chen, Ming; Xu, Qinian; Wang, Xiuyun; Zhou, Dai; Lv, Shengxiang; Fu, Linshan; Wang, Zhong; Zuo, Jianling

    2013-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a (SREBP1a) is a member of the SREBP family of transcription factors, which mainly controls homeostasis of lipids. SREBP1a can also activate the transcription of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) by binding to its promoter region. IDH1 mutations, especially R132H mutation of IDH1, are a common feature of a major subset of human gliomas. There are few data available on the relationship between mutational IDH1 expression and SREBP1a pathway. In this study, we investigated cellular effects and SREBP1a pathway alterations caused by R132H mutational IDH1 expression in U87 cells. Two glioma cell lines, stably expressing mutational (U87/R132H) or wild type (U87/wt) IDH1, were established. A cell line, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+) (U87/vector), was generated as a control. Click-iT EdU assay, sulforhodamine B assay, and wound healing assay respectively showed that the expression of R132H induced cellular proliferation, cell growth, and cell migration. Western blot revealed that SREBP1 was increased in U87/R132H compared with that in U87/wt. Elevated SREBP1a and several its target genes, but not SREBP1c, were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in U87/R132H. All these findings indicated that R132H mutational IDH1 is involved in the regulation of proliferation, growth, and migration of glioma cells. These effects may partially be mediated by SREBP1a pathway.

  19. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  20. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  1. 胶质母细胞瘤经典亚型特征性基因变异的研究进展%Advanced research on characteristics of the classical subtype of human glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恩瑞; 任欢; 赵宇; 苏君

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma(GBM)is one of the most common primary intracranial tumor that has high de-gree of malignancy ,invasive ability and a fatal prognosis .In recent years ,with the development of modern technol-ogy in biomedical sciences ,the understanding on GBM has developed gradually from pathological diagnosis to mo -lecular classifications ,which is based on the molecular characteristics of genetic signatures .Based on gene expres-sion and DNA methylation patterns , primary glioblastoma is divided into four subtypes , including the classical , neural,proneural and mesenchymal .These molecular classifications are closely relevant to the biological charac-teristics of glioblastoma .This review briefly introduces the molecular classifications of primary glioblastoma , but mainly focuses on the changes of the major genetic EGFR ,PTEN and PI3K,CDKN2A in the classical subtype of GBM,and discusses the treatment strategies for primary glioblastoma .%目的:胶质母细胞瘤( Glioblastoma,GBM)是颅内最常见的原发恶性肿瘤,其恶性程度高、侵袭能力强、预后差。近年来随着生物学技术的发展,对GBM的理解也从病理学诊断逐步转向分子病理机制的研究。根据基因表达和DNA甲基化的模式将原发性GBM分为经典型、间质型、前神经元型和神经元型四种亚型。这些分子分型与胶质母细胞瘤的生物学特性密切相关。本文简要介绍了原发胶质母细胞瘤的分子分型,重点关注经典型GBM中EGFR、PTEN、PI3K和CDKN2A四种特征性基因的变异情况,并且对经典型胶质母细胞瘤的治疗策略进行了探讨。

  2. Epithelioid/rhabdoid glioblastoma: a highly aggressive subtype of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Imoto, Hirochika; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Ishii, Aya; Kawano, Hiroo; Ikeda, Eiji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (GBM) and rhabdoid GBM are rare variants that are morphologically similar, but there is no consensus on the characteristics of each disease. These tumors have aggressive features of early recurrence and leptomeningeal dissemination and tend to develop in younger patients compared to typical GBM. The prognosis is normally worse than typical GBM, even with intensive chemoradiotherapy after surgical resection. Thus, accurate diagnosis and effective therapy for epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM are required. Four consecutive patients aged 16-48 years were diagnosed with epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM by pathological and immunohistochemical analysis at Yamaguchi University Hospital from 2006 to 2012. Two of these patients had relatively long-term survival (19 and 23 months after diagnosis). Two cases had a BRAF V600E mutation, whereas no ATRX mutation was present in any cases. All patients suffered leptomeningeal and/or spinal dissemination that worsened their prognosis. These results illustrate the need for a new therapeutic approach, such as molecular targeted drug therapy like BRAF inhibition, in addition to standard chemoradiotherapy for typical GBM.

  3. The use of longitudinal 18F-FET MicroPET imaging to evaluate response to irinotecan in orthotopic human glioblastoma multiforme xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette K Nedergaard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain tumor imaging is challenging. Although 18F-FET PET is widely used in the clinic, the value of 18F-FET MicroPET to evaluate brain tumors in xenograft has not been assessed to date. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance of in vivo 18F-FET MicroPET in detecting a treatment response in xenografts. In addition, the correlations between the 18F-FET tumor accumulation and the gene expression of Ki67 and the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 were investigated. Furthermore, Ki67, LAT1 and LAT2 gene expression in xenograft and archival patient tumors was compared. METHODS: Human GBM cells were injected orthotopically in nude mice and 18F-FET uptake was followed by weekly MicroPET/CT. When tumor take was observed, mice were treated with CPT-11 or saline weekly. After two weeks of treatment the brain tumors were isolated and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed on the xenograft tumors and in parallel on archival patient tumor specimens. RESULTS: The relative tumor-to-brain (T/B ratio of SUV max was significantly lower after one week (123 ± 6%, n = 7 vs. 147 ± 6%, n = 7; p = 0.018 and after two weeks (142 ± 8%, n = 5 vs. 204 ± 27%, n = 4; p = 0.047 in the CPT-11 group compared with the control group. Strong negative correlations between SUV max T/B ratio and LAT1 (r = -0.62, p = 0.04 and LAT2 (r = -0.67, p = 0.02 were observed. In addition, a strong positive correlation between LAT1 and Ki67 was detected in xenografts. Furthermore, a 1.6 fold higher expression of LAT1 and a 23 fold higher expression of LAT2 were observed in patient specimens compared to xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: 18F-FET MicroPET can be used to detect a treatment response to CPT-11 in GBM xenografts. The strong negative correlation between SUV max T/B ratio and LAT1/LAT2 indicates an export transport function. We suggest that 18F-FET PET may be used for detection of early treatment response in patients.

  4. Multiple extraneural metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Undabeitia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent primary tumor in the brain. Despite improvements in its surgical, chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment, prognosis remains poor. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma are a rare complication in this disease. Its appearance has been described in lung, liver, bone or lymph nodes. Case report. We describe the case of a 20 year-old patient who complained of a subacute-onset headache. In the MRI an enhancing right temporal lesion was detected suggesting a high grade glioma as first diagnosis. Surgery was performed, obtaining a gross total resection of the lesion. Our patient underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, according to our hospital´s protocol. Five months after initial surgery our patient complained of chest pain and a hacking cough. A thoracic-abdominal-pelvic CT scan was obtained, which showed bilateral lung infiltrates with pleural effusion, a pancreatic nodule and several vertebral lytic lesions. The lung lesions were biopsied. The pathologic diagnosis was metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. The patient died eight months after initial diagnosis. Conclusion. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma remain a rare event although its incidence is increasing, probably due to the improvement in survival among these patients and better imaging techniques. The mechanisms for extracranial dissemination of glioblastoma are not entirely known, as several theories exist in this regard. Physicians must be aware of this complication and keep it in mind as a differential diagnosis to improve the quality of life of our patients.

  5. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  6. Innovative fluorescent magnetic albumin microbead-assisted cell labeling and intracellular imaging of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqin; Wei, Fang; Yan, Shuang; Zhang, Huiru; Tan, Xiaorong; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Guangzhou; Cui, Liuqing; Li, Cuixiang; Wang, Liang; Li, Yatao

    2014-04-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based polymer microbeads utilized as carriers are attractive materials widely applied in the biomedical field. However, the deficiency of toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability for polymer materials often limits the application of these microbeads. In the present study, magnetic albumin microbeads (MAMbs), i.e., human serum albumin-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, are synthesized to label human U251 glioblastoma multiforme cells. The effects of MAMbs on the biological behavior of U251 glioblastoma cells, including their proliferation, cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate, are investigated. Moreover, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MAMbs are fabricated by reaction with fluorescent dye FITC used for intracellular imaging of U251 glioblastoma cells. MAMbs possess undetectable cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with U251 glioblastoma cells, as demonstrated by the biological behavior and morphology of U251 cells exposed to MAMbs. Furthermore, the constructed fluorescent MAMbs allow effective intracellular imaging, as illustrated by fluorescence microscopic analysis. The fabricated fluorescent MAMbs have promising perspectives in biomedical research, especially in cell-targeted labeling and intracellular fluorescence magnetic dual-mode imaging in cancer-targeted diagnosis and therapy. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Inhibition of Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO in Glioblastoma Cells by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful oncolytic virus treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme depends on widespread tumor-specific lytic virus replication and escape from mitigating innate immune responses to infection. Here we characterize a new HSV vector, JD0G, that is deleted for ICP0 and the joint sequences separating the unique long and short elements of the viral genome. We observed that JD0G replication was enhanced in certain glioblastoma cell lines compared to HEL cells, suggesting that a vector backbone deleted for ICP0 may be useful for treatment of glioblastoma. The innate immune response to virus infection can potentially impede oncolytic vector replication in human tumors. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is expressed in response to interferon γ (IFNγ and has been linked to both antiviral functions and to the immune escape of tumor cells. We observed that IFNγ treatment of human glioblastoma cells induced the expression of IDO and that this expression was quelled by infection with both wild-type and JD0G viruses. The role of IDO in inhibiting virus replication and the connection of this protein to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance suggest that IDO downregulation by HSV infection may enhance the oncolytic activity of vectors such as JD0G.

  8. TSPO Imaging in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per; Feng, Ling; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    -CLINDE is superior to (18)F-FET in predicting progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow-up. METHODS: Three patients with World Health Organization grade IV GBM were scanned with (123)I-CLINDE SPECT, (18)F-FET PET, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Molecular imaging data were compared with follow......UNLABELLED: Here we compare translocator protein (TSPO) imaging using 6-chloro-2-(4'-(123)I-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-diethyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide SPECT ((123)I-CLINDE) and amino acid transport imaging using O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine PET ((18)F-FET) and investigate whether (123)I......-up gadolinium-enhanced MR images or contrast-enhanced CT scans. RESULTS: The percentage overlap between volumes of interest (VOIs) of increased (18)F-FET uptake and (123)I-CLINDE binding was variable (12%-42%). The percentage overlap of MR imaging baseline VOIs was greater for (18)F-FET (79%-93%) than (123)I...

  9. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ju Li; Jin-Quan Cai; Cheng-Yin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease.Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords "molecular", "genetics", "GBM", "isocitrate dehydrogenase", "telomerase reverse transcriptase", "epidermal growth factor receptor", "PTPRZ1-MET", and "clinical treatment".Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GBM, the epidemiology of GBM, genetic alteration of GBM, and the development of treatment for GBM patients were identified, retrieved, and reviewed.Results: There is a large amount of data supporting the view that these recurrent genetic aberrations occur in a specific context of cellular origin, co-oncogenic hits and are present in distinct patient populations.Primary and secondary GBMs are distinct disease entities that affect different age groups of patients and develop through distinct genetic aberrations.These differences are important, especially because they may affect sensitivity to radio-and chemo-therapy and should thus be considered in the identification of targets for novel therapeutic approaches.Conclusion: This review highlights the molecular and genetic alterations of GBM, indicating that they are of potential value in the diagnosis and treatment for patients with GBM.

  10. EGFR as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Siebert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tyrosine kinase receptor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR can be activated by several ligands, thus triggering downstream pathways regulating cell growth and survival. Its dysregula­tion is particularly important for the development and progression of astrocytomas. After the description of its role in glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas, an overview on the therapeutic strategies target­ing EGFR is provided. It analyzes the past and ongoing trials concerning the small molecule tyro­sine kinase inhibitors, i.e. gefitinib, erlotinib and the combination therapies, the EGFR vaccina­tion strategies, the antibodies directed against EGFR and finally the intracranially administered EGFR-targeted therapies. As our understanding of the underlying molecular aberrancies in glioblastoma grows, our ability to better target specific subtypes of glioblastoma should improve. Molecular biomarker enriched clinical trials may lead to improved patient outcomes.

  11. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

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    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  12. Current data and strategy in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, EB

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or astrocytoma grade Ⅳ on WHO classification is the most aggressive and the most frequent of all primary brain tumors. Glioblastoma is multiforme , resistant to therapeutic interventions illustrating the heterogeneity exhibited by this tumor in its every aspect, including clinical presentation, pathology, genetic signature. Current data and treatment strategy in GBM are presented focusing on basic science data and key clinical aspects like surgery, including personal experience; adjuvant modalities: radiotherapy, chemotherapy, but also for experimental approaches. Therapeutic attitude in recurrent GBM is also widely discussed. PMID:20108752

  13. Desert Hedgehog/Patch2 Axis Contributes to Vascular Permeability and Angiogenesis in Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) constitutes the most common and the most aggressive type of human tumors affecting the central nervous system. Prognosis remains dark due to the inefficiency of current treatments and the rapid relapse. Paralleling other human tumors, GBM contains a fraction of tumor initiating cells with the capacity to self-renew, initiate and maintain the tumor mass. These cells were found in close proximity to brain vasculature, suggesting functional i...

  14. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen combining Temozolomide on human glioblastoma cell line U251%高压氧联合替莫唑胺对胶质瘤U251细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹侃; 袁志诚; 陆新宇; 李慧勇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the influence and mechanism on hyperbarie oxygen ( HBO) combining Temozolomide with human glioblastoma cell line U251. Method The cells were divided into four groups,A group is HBO combining Temozolomide,B group is HBO,C group is Temozolomide and D group is control group. By simulation of hypoxia microenviroment in vitro, the rate of growth inhibiting is investigated by MTT method. The rate of cell death is observed by PI staining. The rate of apoptosis is analyzed by the flow cytometry. Elasia method is used to detect the expression of hypoxia-inducible factorl-α (HIFl-α) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 ( MRP-1). Results The group of HBO combining Temozolomide is obviously higher than others in rate of growth inhibiting, rate of cell death, rate of apoptosis, the results have statistics differences(P 0. 05) , but to others it has statistics value (P < 0. 05). Conclusion HBO can enhance the chemotherapy effect of temozolomide, it can correct the hypoxic microenvironment and reduce the expression of HIFl-α and MRP-1 ,these may be the key to effect.%目的 研究高压氧( Hyperbaric Oxygen,HBO)联合替莫唑胺(Temozolomide)对人神经胶质瘤U251细胞株的的影响及其机制.方法 实验分为4组:A组高压氧联合替莫唑胺组、B组高压氧组、C组替莫唑胺组、D组对照组.通过体外模拟缺氧微环境,用四甲基偶氮唑蓝法(MTT法)、碘化丙啶(PI)染色法、流式细胞仪分别检测细胞生长抑制率、细胞死亡率、细胞凋亡率.Elisa法检测缺氧诱导因子1-α(HIF1-α)和多药耐药相关蛋白-1(MRP-1)的表达情况.结果 1高压氧联合替莫唑胺组在细胞生长抑制率、细胞死亡率和细胞凋亡率上明显高于其他组,数值均有统计学意义(P<0.05).2高压氧联合替莫唑胺组与高压氧组在HIF1-α和MRP-1上无统计学意义(P>0.05),与其他组有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 高压氧够增强替莫唑胺化疗效果,高压氧纠

  15. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs.

  16. The effect and mechanism of norepinephrine on glioblastoma invasion%去甲肾上腺素对胶质母细胞瘤侵袭迁移能力的影响及机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹俊毅; 李刚; 刘青林; 袁光; 张建; 曲迅

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and mechanism of norepinephrine (NE) on glioblastoma invasion and migration, and to evaluate the possibility of p-blocker propranolol as an anti-invasion agent. Methods RT-PCR was performed to detect expression of (3-adrenergic receptors in T98G, U251 and U87 cell lines. Transwell assay was performed to evaluate the effect of NE on glioblastoma invasion. Gelatin zymography was used to assess the effect of NE on MMP-2 activity in glioblastoma. Results Compared with the control group, NE (0.1 p,mol/L -10 ujnol/L) significantly induced glioblastoma cell invasion. The |3-receptor antagonist propranolol (1 nmol/L) could block the NE induced glioblastoma invasion. The activity of MMP-2 significantly increased after NE (0.1 (junol/L ~ 10 (jjnol/L) stimulation, which could be abrogated by propranolol (1 nmol/L). Conclusion NE can promote MMP-2 secretion in glioblastoma to facilitate its invasion, which can be inhibited by propranolol.%目的 研究应激激素去甲肾上腺素(NE)对胶质母细胞瘤侵袭迁移能力的影响及机制,并探讨β受体阻断剂普萘洛尔(propranolol)抗应激所致肿瘤侵袭转移的可行性.方法 培养胶质母细胞瘤细胞系T98G、U251及U87,采用RT-PCR检测胶质瘤细胞系β肾上腺素能受体表达,Transwell评价NE对胶质瘤细胞侵袭迁移的影响,明胶酶谱法检测NE对胶质瘤细胞系MMP-2分泌水平影响.结果 随NE浓度增加(0.1~10 μmol/L),胶质瘤细胞侵袭力逐渐增强(P>0.05),普萘洛尔(1 nmol/L)可抑制此效应;随NE浓度增加(0.1 ~ 10 μmol/L),胶质瘤细胞基质金属蛋白酶-2(MMP-2)分泌显著增多,普萘洛尔(1 nmol/L)可抑制NE诱导的MMP-2分泌.结论 应激激素去甲肾上腺素可以促进胶质母细胞瘤MMP-2分泌酶活性从而增强其迁移能力,普萘洛尔可以抑制NE诱导的胶质瘤侵袭增强.

  17. Protective Effect of Gwakhyangjeonggisan Herbal Acupuncture Solution in Glioblastoma Cells: Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression

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    Hong-Seok Lee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Neurological disorders have been one of main therapeutic targets of acupuncture. The present study investigated the protective effects of Gwakhyangjeonggisan herbal acupuncture solution (GHAS. Methods : We performed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in glioblastoma cells, and did microarray analysis with cells exposed to reactive oxigen species (ROS of hydrogen peroxide by 8.0 k Human cDNA, with cut-off level of 2-fold changes in gene expression. Results : MTT assay showed protective effect of GHAS on the glioblastoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. When glioblastoma cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, 24 genes were downregulated. When the cells were pretreated with GHAS before exposure to hydrogen peroxide, 46 genes were downregulated. Many of the genes downregulated by hydrogen peroxide stimulation were decreased in the amount of downregulation or reversed to upregulation. Conclusions : The gene expression changes observed in the present study are supposed to be related to the protective molecular mechanism of GHAS in the glioblastoma cells exposed to ROS stress.

  18. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 confers resistance to chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic treatments in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Tobias; Sahm, Felix; Blaes, Jonas; Osswald, Matthias; Rübmann, Petra; Milford, David; Urban, Severino; Jestaedt, Leonie; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Hertenstein, Anne; Pfenning, Philipp-Niclas; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Wick, Antje; Winkler, Frank; von Deimling, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Weiler, Markus

    2015-10-13

    Loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a prerequisite for tumor cell-specific expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 in glioblastoma defining a subgroup prone to develop evasive resistance towards antiangiogenic treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of human tumor tissues showed VEGFR-2 expression in glioma cells in 19% of specimens examined, mainly in the infiltration zone. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 positivity was restricted to PTEN-deficient tumor specimens. PTEN overexpression reduced VEGFR-2 expression in vitro, as well as knock-down of raptor or rictor. Genetic interference with VEGFR-2 revealed proproliferative, antiinvasive and chemoprotective functions for VEGFR-2 in glioma cells. VEGFR-2-dependent cellular effects were concomitant with activation of 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells, protein kinase B, and N-myc downstream regulated gene 1. Two-photon in vivo microscopy revealed that expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells hampers antiangiogenesis. Bevacizumab induces a proinvasive response in VEGFR-2-positive glioma cells. Patients with PTEN-negative glioblastomas had a shorter survival after initiation of bevacizumab therapy compared with PTEN-positive glioblastomas. Conclusively, expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells indicates an aggressive glioblastoma subgroup developing early resistance to temozolomide or bevacizumab. Loss of PTEN may serve as a biomarker identifying those tumors upfront by routine neuropathological methods.

  19. Classification of microvascular patterns via cluster analysis reveals their prognostic significance in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Chen, Yu-Peng; Wang, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Zong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    There are limited researches focusing on microvascular patterns (MVPs) in human glioblastoma and their prognostic impact. We evaluated MVPs of 78 glioblastomas by CD34/periodic acid-Schiff dual staining and by cluster analysis of the percentage of microvascular area for distinct microvascular formations. The distribution of 5 types of basic microvascular formations, that is, microvascular sprouting (MS), vascular cluster (VC), vascular garland (VG), glomeruloid vascular proliferation (GVP), and vasculogenic mimicry (VM), was variable. Accordingly, cluster analysis classified MVPs into 2 types: type I MVP displayed prominent MSs and VCs, whereas type II MVP had numerous VGs, GVPs, and VMs. By analyzing the proportion of microvascular area for each type of formation, we determined that glioblastomas with few MSs and VCs had many GVPs and VMs, and vice versa. VG seemed to be a transitional type of formation. In case of type I MVP, expression of Ki-67 and p53 but not MGMT was significantly higher as compared with those of type II MVP (P analysis showed that the type of MVPs presented as an independent prognostic factor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (both P < .001). Type II MVP had a more negative influence on PFS and OS than did type I MVP. We conclude that the heterogeneous MVPs in glioblastoma can be categorized properly by certain histopathologic and statistical analyses and may influence clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in glioblastoma through novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein tyrosine kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis with tightly controlled catalytic activity. Mutations in kinase-encoding genes can relieve the autoinhibitory constraints on kinase activity, can promote malignant transformation, and appear to be a major determinant of response to kinase inhibitor therapy. Missense mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, for example, have recently been identified in patients who showed clinical responses to EGFR kinase inhibitor therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Encouraged by the promising clinical activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase inhibitors in treating glioblastoma in humans, we have sequenced the complete EGFR coding sequence in glioma tumor samples and cell lines. We identified novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in 13.6% (18/132 of glioblastomas and 12.5% (1/8 of glioblastoma cell lines. These EGFR mutations were associated with increased EGFR gene dosage and conferred anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity to NIH-3T3 cells. Cells transformed by expression of these EGFR mutants were sensitive to small-molecule EGFR kinase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest extracellular missense mutations as a novel mechanism for oncogenic EGFR activation and may help identify patients who can benefit from EGFR kinase inhibitors for treatment of glioblastoma.

  1. Biological Rationale for the Use of PPARγ Agonists in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Patricia Ellis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intrinsic CNS tumour and has an extremely poor overall survival, despite advances in neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There has been interesting preliminary evidence suggesting that patients receiving the group of anti-diabetic drugs known as PPARγ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists have a lower incidence of glioma. The nuclear hormone receptor PPARγ has been found to be expressed in high grade gliomas, and its activation has been shown to have several antineoplastic effects on human and rat glioma cell lines, and in some instances an additional protective increase in antioxidant enzymes has been observed in normal astrocytes. At present, no clinical trials are underway with regards to treating glioma patients using PPARγ agonists, as Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone are only FDA-approved for use in treatment of type-2 diabetes. This review presents the case for evaluating the potential of PPARγ agonists as novel adjuvants in the treatment of high grade glioma. We introduce the PPARγ pathway, PPARγ gene and its products and examine recent research in glioblastoma.

  2. Major vault protein supports glioblastoma survival and migration by upregulating the EGFR/PI3K signalling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Daniela; Steiner, Elisabeth; Holzmann, Klaus; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Pirker, Christine; Hlavaty, Juraj; Petznek, Helga; Hegedus, Balazs; Garay, Tamas; Mohr, Thomas; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Grusch, Michael; Berger, Walter

    2013-11-01

    Despite their ubiquitous expression and high conservation during evolution, precise cellular functions of vault ribonucleoparticles, mainly built of multiple major vault protein (MVP) copies, are still enigmatic. With regard to cancer, vaults were shown to be upregulated during drug resistance development as well as malignant transformation and progression. Such in a previous study we demonstrated that human astrocytic brain tumours including glioblastoma are generally high in vault levels while MVP expression in normal brain is comparably low. However a direct contribution to the malignant phenotype in general and that of glioblastoma in particular has not been established so far. Thus we address the questions whether MVP itself has a pro-tumorigenic function in glioblastoma. Based on a large tissue collection, we re-confirm strong MVP expression in gliomas as compared to healthy brain. Further, the impact of MVP on human glioblastoma aggressiveness was analysed by using gene transfection, siRNA knock-down and dominant-negative genetic approaches. Our results demonstrate that MVP/vaults significantly support migratory and invasive competence as well as starvation resistance of glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. The enhanced aggressiveness was based on MVP-mediated stabilization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signalling axis. Consequently, MVP overexpression resulted in enhanced growth and brain invasion in human glioblastoma xenograft models. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that vaults have a tumour-promoting potential by stabilizing EGFR/PI3K-mediated migration and survival pathways in human glioblastoma.

  3. Remission of invasive, cancer stem-like glioblastoma xenografts using lentiviral vector-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Huszthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. The translation of therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma from the experimental phase into the clinic has been limited by insufficient animal models, which lack important features of human tumors. Lentiviral gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic option for human glioblastoma, which we validated in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rodent xenograft model that recapitulates the invasive and angiogenic features of human glioblastoma to analyze the transduction pattern and therapeutic efficacy of lentiviral pseudotyped vectors. Both, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV-GP and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors very efficiently transduced human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, pseudotyped gammaretroviral vectors, similar to those evaluated for clinical therapy of glioblastoma, showed inefficient gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. Both pseudotyped lentiviral vectors transduced cancer stem-like cells characterized by their CD133-, nestin- and SOX2-expression, the ability to form spheroids in neural stem cell medium and to express astrocytic and neuronal differentiation markers under serum conditions. In a therapeutic approach using the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk fused to eGFP, both lentiviral vectors mediated a complete remission of solid tumors as seen on MRI resulting in a highly significant survival benefit (p<0.001 compared to control groups. In all recurrent tumors, surviving eGFP-positive tumor cells were found, advocating prodrug application for several cycles to even enhance and prolong the therapeutic effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, lentiviral pseudotyped vectors are promising candidates for gene therapy of glioma in patients. The inefficient gene delivery

  4. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  5. Multiple glioblastomas: CT and MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafitte, F.; Morel-Precetti, S.; Martin-Duverneuil, N.; Guermazi, A.; Brunet, E.; Chiras, J. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France). Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot; Heran, F. [Service de Radiologie, Fondation Rothschild, Paris (France)

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the CT and MR features of multiple glioblastomas, and to determine the best imaging modality for the initial diagnosis. The CT (four exams) and MR imaging (eight exams) of eight patients with proven multiple glioblastomas were reviewed by two neuroradiologists. The lesions were always hypo- or isodense on CT and hyperintense on T2-weighted images (100%). They were usually hypo- or isointense on T1-weighted images (90%). Edema and mass effect were very variable. After contrast media administration, the enhancement was mostly strong (71% on CT and 70% on MR), often either heterogeneous or ring-like. The different lesions of a patient often had a different pattern on MR (75% of cases). Meningeal or ventricular enhancement, suggestive of a possible way of dissemination, was rare. In case of multiple cerebral masses, multiple glioblastomas should be considered as a possible diagnosis in addition to the better known diagnosis of brain metastases, abscesses, or multifocal lymphomas. Moderate edema and mass effect on MR associated with strong and heterogeneous enhancement are suggestive of feature of multiple glioblastomas. Magnetic resonance allows rarely the visualization of a dissemination route. (orig.)

  6. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery for glioblastoma: retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Kevin A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This retrospective study was done to better understand the conditions for which stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS for glioblastoma may be efficacious. Methods Between 2000 and 2007, 33 patients with a pathological diagnosis of glioblastoma received SRS with the Novalis® Shaped Beam Radiosurgery system. Eighteen patients (54% underwent salvage SRS for recurrence while 15 (45% patients received upfront SRS following standard fractionated RT for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Results There were no RTOG grade >2 acute side effects. The median survival after SRS was 6.7 months (range 1.4 – 74.7. There was no significant difference in overall survival (from the time of initial diagnosis with respect to the timing of SRS (p = 0.2. There was significantly better progression free survival in patients treated with SRS as consolidation versus at the time of recurrence (p = 0.04. The majority of patients failed within or at the margin of the SRS treatment volume (21/26 evaluable for recurrence. Conclusion SRS is well tolerated in the treatment of glioblastoma. As there was no difference in survival whether SRS is delivered upfront or at recurrence, the treatment for each patient should be individualized. Future studies are needed to identify patients most likely to respond to SRS.

  8. Lipoprotein-biomimetic nanostructure enables efficient targeting delivery of siRNA to Ras-activated glioblastoma cells via macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia-Lin; Jiang, Gan; Song, Qing-Xiang; Gu, Xiao; Hu, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Song, Hua-Hua; Chen, Le-Pei; Lin, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Di; Chen, Jun; Feng, Jun-Feng; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Jiang, Xin-Guo; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Gao, Xiao-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Hyperactivated Ras regulates many oncogenic pathways in several malignant human cancers including glioblastoma and it is an attractive target for cancer therapies. Ras activation in cancer cells drives protein internalization via macropinocytosis as a key nutrient-gaining process. By utilizing this unique endocytosis pathway, here we create a biologically inspired nanostructure that can induce cancer cells to `drink drugs' for targeting activating transcription factor-5 (ATF5), an overexpressed anti-apoptotic transcription factor in glioblastoma. Apolipoprotein E3-reconstituted high-density lipoprotein is used to encapsulate the siRNA-loaded calcium phosphate core and facilitate it to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, thus targeting the glioblastoma cells in a macropinocytosis-dependent manner. The nanostructure carrying ATF5 siRNA exerts remarkable RNA-interfering efficiency, increases glioblastoma cell apoptosis and inhibits tumour cell growth both in vitro and in xenograft tumour models. This strategy of targeting the macropinocytosis caused by Ras activation provides a nanoparticle-based approach for precision therapy in glioblastoma and other Ras-activated cancers.

  9. Apoptosis of Glioblastoma U251 Cells Induced by Carmustine Combined All-trans Retinoic Acid via Regulating Cyclin E and p27kip 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Bin; WEIJun; HU Guo-zhang; YANG Hong-fa; BI Chun-hua; SUN Zhi-gang; TIAN Yu

    2011-01-01

    The effect and mechanism of carmustine(BCNU) combined with all-trans retinoic acid(ATRA) on the apoptosis of human glioblastoma U251 cells were investigated by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT) assay,flow cytometry,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis.The results show that BCNU or ATRA shows time- and dose-dependent inhibition effects on human glioblastoma U251 cells and the combination of BCNU with ATRA shows an synergistic inhibition effect on human glioblastoma U251 cells,and the combined BCNU and ATRA can significantly inhibit the proliferation of human glioblastoma U251 cells,and induce the apoptosis of them,making the cells arrest in the stage of G1 phase,the stage of S and G2 phases decline,the rate of the apoptosis of human glioblastoma U251 cells increase,the corresponding mRNA expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2(CDK2) downregulated and the corresponding mRNA expression of p27kip 1 unregulated.In addition,the combined BCNU and ATRA reduced the protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-kB).Taken together,these results suggest that the treatment of human glioblastoma U251 cells with a combination application of ATRA and BCNU can exert synergistic effect,the course of this kind of combination chemotherapy may likely be associated with multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis,furthermore,the cyclin E and p27kip 1 should be considered as novel targets for controlling the growth of glioblastoma cells.

  10. Interleukin-1-induced changes in the glioblastoma secretome suggest its role in tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarassishin, Leonid; Lim, Jihyeon; Weatherly, D Brent; Angeletti, Ruth H; Lee, Sunhee C

    2014-03-17

    The tumor microenvironment including glial cells and their inflammatory products regulates brain tumor development and progression. We have previously established that human glioma cells are exquisitely sensitive to IL-1 stimulation leading us to undertake a comparative analysis of the secretome of unstimulated and cytokine (IL-1)-stimulated glioblastoma cells. We performed label-free quantitative proteomic analysis and detected 190 proteins which included cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix (ECM) and related proteins. Measuring area under the curve (AUC) of peptides for quantitation, the IL-1-induced secretome contained 13 upregulated and 5 downregulated extracellular proteins (p<0.05) compared to controls. Of these, IL-8, CCL2, TNC, Gal-1 and PTX3 were validated as upregulated and SERPINE1, STC2, CTGF and COL4A2 were validated as downregulated factors by immunochemical methods. A major representation of the ECM and related proteins in the glioblastoma secretome and their modulation by IL-1 suggested that IL-1 induces its effect in part by altering TGFβ expression, activity and signaling. These findings enhance our understanding of IL-1-induced modulation of glioma microenvironment, with implications for increased tumor invasion, migration and angiogenesis. They further provide novel targets for the glioblastoma intervention. Present study is on an unbiased screening of the glioblastoma secretome stimulated by IL-1 which triggers neuroinflammatory cascades in the central nervous system. Network of secreted proteins were shown to be regulated revealing their possible contribution to glioma progression. Label free quantitative proteomics has provided unique novel targets for potential glioblastoma intervention. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Secondary Data Analytics of Aquaporin Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Graham, Barbara E; Pacurari, Maricica; Sims, Jennifer N; Udensi, Udensi K; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults in which recurrence has been attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. On the basis of tumor formation in vivo and growth type in vitro, two published microarray gene expression profiling studies grouped nine glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cell lines into one of two groups: full (GSf) or restricted (GSr) stem-like phenotypes. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are water transport proteins that are highly expressed in primary glial-derived tumors. However, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 have not been previously described in a panel of 92 glioma samples. Therefore, we designed secondary data analytics methods to determine the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in GS cell lines and glioblastoma neurospheres. Our investigation also included a total of 2,566 expression levels from 28 Affymetrix microarray probe sets encoding 13 human aquaporins (AQP0-AQP12); CXCR4 (the receptor for stromal cell derived factor-1 [SDF-1], a potential glioma stem cell therapeutic target]); and PROM1 (gene encoding CD133, the widely used glioma stem cell marker). Interactive visual representation designs for integrating phenotypic features and expression levels revealed that inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 correlate with distinct phenotypes in a set of cell lines grouped into full and restricted stem-like phenotypes. Discriminant function analysis further revealed that AQP1 and AQP4 expression are better predictors for tumor formation and growth types in glioblastoma stem-like cells than are CXCR4 and PROM1. Future investigations are needed to characterize the molecular mechanisms for inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in the glioblastoma stem-like neurospheres.

  12. Genetic variations in EGF and EGFR and glioblastoma outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, Sara; Andersson, Ulrika; Liu, Yanhong;

    2010-01-01

    Few prognostic factors have been associated with glioblastoma survival. We analyzed a complete tagging of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) gene polymorphisms as potential prognostic factors. Thirty tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EGF and 89 tagging SNPs...... in EGFR were analyzed for association with survival in 176 glioblastoma cases. Validation analyses were performed for 4 SNPs in a set of 638 glioblastoma patients recruited at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). Three hundred and seventy-four glioblastoma patients aged 50 years...... or older at diagnosis were subanalyzed to enrich for de novo arising glioblastoma. We found 7 SNPs in haplotype 4 in EGF that were associated with prognosis in glioblastoma patients. In EGFR, 4 of 89 SNPs were significantly associated with prognosis but judged as false positives. Four of the significantly...

  13. Association between RAD 51 rs1801320 and susceptibility to glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, S; Tomei, S; Mazzanti, C M; Lessi, F; Aretini, P; La Ferla, M; De Gregorio, V; Pasqualetti, F; Zavaglia, K; Bevilacqua, G; Naccarato, A G

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. Despite decades of research and the advent of new therapies, patients with glioblastoma continue to have a very poor prognosis. Radiation therapy has a major role as adjuvant treatment for glioblastoma following surgical resection. Many studies have shown that polymorphisms of genes involved in pathways of DNA repair may affect the sensitivity of the cells to treatment. Although the role of these polymorphisms has been investigated in relation to response to radiotherapy, their role as predisposing factors to glioblastoma has not been clarified yet. In the present study, we evaluated the association between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, namely: XRCC1 rs25487, XRCC3 rs861539 and RAD51 rs1801320, with the susceptibility to develop glioblastoma. Eighty-five glioblastoma patients and 70 matched controls were recruited for this study. Data from the 1000 Genomes Project (98 Tuscans) were also downloaded and used for the association analysis. Subjects carrying RAD51 rs1801320 GC genotype showed an increased risk of glioblastoma (GC vs GG, χ(2) = 10.75; OR 3.0087; p = 0.0010). The C allele was also significantly associated to glioblastoma (χ(2) = 8.66; OR 2.5674; p = 0.0032). Moreover, RAD51 rs1801320 C allele increased the risk to develop glioblastoma also when combined to XRCC1 rs25487 G allele and XRCC3 rs861539 C allele (χ(2) = 6.558; p = 0.0053).

  14. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echizen, Kanae [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Nakada, Mitsutoshi, E-mail: mnakada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Hayashi, Tomoatsu [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Morishita, Yasuyuki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirano, Shinji [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Okoh-cho, Nangoku-City, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Terai, Kenta [Laboratory of Function and Morphology, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  15. Clostridium novyi-NT can cause regression of orthotopically implanted glioblastomas in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Staedtke, Verena; Bai, Ren-Yuan; Sun, Weiyun; Huang, Judy; Kibler, Kathleen Kazuko; Tyler, Betty M.; Gallia, Gary L.; Kinzler, Kenneth; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor that is especially difficult to treat. The tumor's ability to withstand hypoxia leads to enhanced cancer cell survival and therapy resistance, but also yields a microenvironment that is in many aspects unique within the human body, thus offering potential therapeutic opportunities. The spore-forming anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT(C. novyi-NT) has the ability to propagate in tumor-generated hypoxia, leading to oncolysis. H...

  16. MicroRNA biomarkers in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Simon Kjær; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in initiation and progression of many cancers, including gliomas and that miRNAs hold great potential as future diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer. MiRNAs are a class of short non-coding RNA sequences (18......-24 nucleotides), which base-pair to target messenger RNA (mRNA) and thereby cause translational repression or mRNA degradation based on the level of complementarity between strands. Profiling miRNAs in clinical glioblastoma samples has shown aberrant expression of numerous miRNAs when compared to normal brain...... tissues. Understanding these alterations is key to developing new biomarkers and intelligent treatment strategies. This review presents an overview of current knowledge about miRNA alterations in glioblastoma while focusing on the clinical future of miRNAs as biomarkers and discussing the strengths...

  17. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strate...

  18. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed.

  19. Ionizing Radiation in Glioblastoma Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricruz eRivera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival of 12-15 months with treatment consisting of surgical resection followed by ionizing radiation (IR and chemotherapy. Even aggressive treatment is often palliative due to near universal recurrence. Therapeutic resistance has been linked to a subpopulation of GBM cells with stem-cell like properties termed glioblastoma initiating cells (GICs. Recent efforts have focused on elucidating resistance mechanisms activated in GICs in response to IR. Among these, GICs preferentially activate the DNA damage response (DDR to result in a faster rate of double-strand break (DSB repair induced by IR as compared to the bulk tumor cells. IR also activates NOTCH and the hepatic growth factor (HGF receptor, c-MET, signaling cascades that play critical roles in promoting proliferation, invasion, and resistance to apoptosis. These pathways are preferentially activated in GICs and represent targets for pharmacologic intervention. While IR provides the benefit of improved survival, it paradoxically promotes selection of more malignant cellular phenotypes of glioblastoma. As reviewed here, finding effective combinations of radiation and molecular inhibitors to target GICs and non-GICs is essential for the development of more effective therapies.

  20. Glioblastoma multiforme associated with klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Takashi; Mizukawa, Katsu; Sakagami, Yoshio; Mizowaki, Takashi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kohmura, Eiji

    2009-11-01

    A 54-year-old man with Klinefelter syndrome presented with glioblastoma multiforme manifesting as a 2-week history of motor weakness of the bilateral extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple heterogeneously enhanced tumors in the bilateral frontal lobes. Angiography showed no tumor stain or arteriovenous shunt. The tumor was partially removed through a right craniotomy. The histological diagnosis was glioblastoma. Immunohistochemical examination showed no O(6)-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase protein expression. Postoperative local radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) combined with temozolomide (75 mg/m(2) x 42 days) and interferon-beta (3,000,000 U, 3 times/week) was performed. The patient's clinical status rapidly deteriorated during chemoradiotherapy, and he died of tumor progression 3.5 months after the surgery. Postmortem examination revealed widespread glioblastoma infiltrating the basal ganglia and thalamus. Klinefelter syndrome is associated with increased cancer predisposition, especially for male breast cancer and germ cell tumors, but glioma is extremely rare. The abnormal genetic constitution of this patient may have been directly responsible for the poor outcome.

  1. Reduced expression of brain-enriched microRNAs in glioblastomas permits targeted regulation of a cell death gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Skalsky

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive malignant tumor involving glial cells in the human brain. We used high-throughput sequencing to comprehensively profile the small RNAs expressed in glioblastoma and non-tumor brain tissues. MicroRNAs (miRNAs made up the large majority of small RNAs, and we identified over 400 different cellular pre-miRNAs. No known viral miRNAs were detected in any of the samples analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed several miRNAs that were significantly down-regulated in glioblastomas, including miR-128, miR-124, miR-7, miR-139, miR-95, and miR-873. Post-transcriptional editing was observed for several miRNAs, including the miR-376 family, miR-411, miR-381, and miR-379. Using the deep sequencing information, we designed a lentiviral vector expressing a cell suicide gene, the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK gene, under the regulation of a miRNA, miR-128, that was found to be enriched in non-tumor brain tissue yet down-regulated in glioblastomas, Glioblastoma cells transduced with this vector were selectively killed when cultured in the presence of ganciclovir. Using an in vitro model to recapitulate expression of brain-enriched miRNAs, we demonstrated that neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells transduced with the miRNA-regulated HSV-TK vector are protected from killing by expression of endogenous miR-128. Together, these results provide an in-depth analysis of miRNA dysregulation in glioblastoma and demonstrate the potential utility of these data in the design of miRNA-regulated therapies for the treatment of brain cancers.

  2. Tumor suppressor WWOX and p53 alterations and drug resistance in glioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu eChiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1 is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate a potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death.

  3. DNA-repair gene variants are associated with glioblastoma survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara; Henriksson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    genes, in 138 glioblastoma samples from Sweden and Denmark. We confirmed our findings in an independent cohort of 121 glioblastoma patients from the UK. Our analysis revealed nine SNPs annotating MSH2, RAD51L1 and RECQL4 that were significantly (p

  4. Semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S Miller

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most malignant and lethal form of astrocytoma, with patients having a median survival time of approximately 15 months with current therapeutic modalities. It is therefore important to identify novel therapeutics. There is mounting evidence that microglia (specialized brain-resident macrophages play a significant role in the development and progression of glioblastoma tumors. In this paper we show that microglia, in addition to stimulating glioblastoma cell invasion, also promote glioblastoma cell proliferation and resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro. We found that semapimod, a drug that selectively interferes with the function of macrophages and microglia, potently inhibits microglia-stimulated GL261 invasion, without affecting serum-stimulated glioblastoma cell invasion. Semapimod also inhibits microglia-stimulated resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiation, but has no significant effect on microglia-stimulated glioblastoma cell proliferation. We also found that intracranially administered semapimod strongly increases the survival of GL261 tumor-bearing animals in combination with radiation, but has no significant benefit in the absence of radiation. In conclusion, our observations indicate that semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia and/or infiltrating macrophages.

  5. Semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ian S; Didier, Sebastien; Murray, David W; Turner, Tia H; Issaivanan, Magimairajan; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Al-Abed, Yousef; Symons, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and lethal form of astrocytoma, with patients having a median survival time of approximately 15 months with current therapeutic modalities. It is therefore important to identify novel therapeutics. There is mounting evidence that microglia (specialized brain-resident macrophages) play a significant role in the development and progression of glioblastoma tumors. In this paper we show that microglia, in addition to stimulating glioblastoma cell invasion, also promote glioblastoma cell proliferation and resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro. We found that semapimod, a drug that selectively interferes with the function of macrophages and microglia, potently inhibits microglia-stimulated GL261 invasion, without affecting serum-stimulated glioblastoma cell invasion. Semapimod also inhibits microglia-stimulated resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiation, but has no significant effect on microglia-stimulated glioblastoma cell proliferation. We also found that intracranially administered semapimod strongly increases the survival of GL261 tumor-bearing animals in combination with radiation, but has no significant benefit in the absence of radiation. In conclusion, our observations indicate that semapimod sensitizes glioblastoma tumors to ionizing radiation by targeting microglia and/or infiltrating macrophages.

  6. The vascular delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4)-Notch4 signaling correlates with angiogenesis in primary glioblastoma: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Chen, Yao; Qiu, Xian-Xin; Tang, Wen-Long; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Huang, Jian-Huang; Lin, Guo-Shi; Wang, Xing-Fu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4)-Notch signaling is known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. We had previously found that DLL4 was overexpressed, while Notch1 receptor, which binds to DLL4 during angiogenesis, was absent in the majority of human primary glioblastomas. Thus, DLL4-Notch signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis in primary glioblastoma remains unknown. Tumor tissues from 70 patients with primary glioblastoma were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of components of DLL4-Notch signaling, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvessel density (MVD). Immunohistochemistry results showed that the positive staining of DLL4 and Notch4 was primarily distributed in tumor vascular endothelial cells but rarely detected in tumor cells. However, VEGF, hairy/enhancer of split-1 (HES1; a target gene of Notch signaling), and Notch1-3 expression was seen in both tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells. Univariate analysis showed that the expression levels of VEGF and DLL4, HES1, and Notch4 in tumor endothelial cells were significantly associated with MVD in primary glioblastoma (P glioblastoma, while MVD increased with elevated VEGF expression in contrast. In addition, DLL4, Notch4, and HES1 expression were positively correlated in tumor vascular endothelial cells (P glioblastoma. Graphical abstract A, positive staining of DLL4 in human kidney; B, positive staining of VEGF in human breast cancer; C, positive staining of CD34 in human lung cancer; D, positive staining of HES1 in human breast cancer; E-H, positive staining of Notch1-4: E-F in human lung cancer; G-H in human kidney.

  7. Biodistribution and dosimetry of 18F-EF5 in cancer patients with preliminary comparison of 18F-EF5 uptake versus EF5 binding in human glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Cameron J.; Scheuermann, Joshua S.; Divgi, Chaitanya; Judy, Kevin D.; Kachur, Alexander V.; Freifelder, Richard; Reddin, Janet S.; Karp, Joel; Stubbs, James B.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Driesbaugh, Jason; Smith, Deborah; Prendergast, Susan; Evans, Sydney M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to assess the biodistribution and radiation dose resulting from administration of 18F-EF5, a lipophilic 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker in ten cancer patients. For three of these patients (with glioblastoma) unlabeled EF5 was additionally administered to allow the comparative assessment of 18F-EF5 tumor uptake with EF5 binding, the latter measured in tumor biopsies by fluorescent anti-EF5 monoclonal antibodies. Methods 18F-EF5 was synthesized by electrophilic addition of 18F2 gas, made by deuteron bombardment of a neon/fluorine mixture in a high-pressure gas target, to an allyl precursor in trifluoroacetic acid at 0° then purified and administered by intravenous bolus. Three whole-body images were collected for each of ten patients using an Allegro (Philips) scanner. Gamma counts were determined in blood, drawn during each image, and urine, pooled as a single sample. PET images were analyzed to determine radiotracer uptake in several tissues and the resulting radiation dose calculated using OLINDA software and standard phantom. For three patients, 21 mg/kg unlabeled EF5 was administered after the PET scans, and tissue samples obtained the next day at surgery to determine EF5 binding using immunohistochemistry techniques (IHC). Results EF5 distributes evenly throughout soft tissue within minutes of injection. Its concentration in blood over the typical time frame of the study (~3.5 h) was nearly constant, consistent with a previously determined EF5 plasma half-life of ~13 h. Elimination was primarily via urine and bile. Radiation exposure from labeled EF5 is similar to other 18F-labeled imaging agents (e.g., FDG and FMISO). In a de novo glioblastoma multiforme patient, focal uptake of 18F-EF5 was confirmed by IHC. Conclusion These results confirm predictions of biodistribution and safety based on EF5's characteristics (high biological stability, high lipophilicity). EF5 is a novel hypoxia marker with unique

  8. NHERF-1: Modulator of Glioblastoma Cell Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri L. Kislin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The invasive nature of malignant gliomas is a clinical problem rendering tumors incurable by conventional treatment modalities such as surgery, ionizing radiation, and temozolomide. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein, recruiting cytoplasmic signaling proteins and membrane receptors/transporters into functional complexes. This study revealed that NHERF-1 expression is increased in highly invasive cells that reside in the rim of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM tumors and that NHERF-1 sustains glioma migration and invasion. Gene expression profiles were evaluated from laser capture-microdissected human GBM cells isolated from patient tumor cores and corresponding invaded white matter regions. The role of NHERF-1 in the migration and dispersion of GBM cell lines was examined by reducing its expression with small-interfering RNA followed by radial migration, three-dimensional collagen dispersion, immunofluorescence, and survival assays. The in situ expression of NHERF-1 protein was restricted to glioma cells and the vascular endothelium, with minimal to no detection in adjacent normal brain tissue. Depletion of NHERF-1 arrested migration and dispersion of glioma cell lines and caused an increase in cell-cell cohesiveness. Glioblastoma multiforme cells with depleted NHERF-1 evidenced a marked decrease in stress fibers, a larger cell size, and a more rounded shape with fewer cellular processes. When NHERF-1 expression was reduced, glioma cells became sensitized to temozolomide treatment resulting in increased apoptosis. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for NHERF-1 as a participant in the highly invasive phenotype of malignant gliomas and implicate NHERF-1 as a possible therapeutic target for treatment of GBM.

  9. Near-infrared optical imaging in glioblastoma xenograft with ligand-targeting {alpha}3 integrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Wenwu; Yao, Nianhuan; Peng, Li; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S. [University of California Davis, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Patients with glioblastoma usually have a very poor prognosis. Even with a combination of radiotherapy plus temozolomide, the median survival of these patients is only 14.6 months. New treatment approaches to this cancer are needed. Our purpose is to develop new cell surface-binding ligands for glioblastoma cells and use them as targeted imaging and therapeutic agents for this deadly disease. One-bead one-compound combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries were screened with live human glioblastoma U-87MG cells. The binding affinity and targeting specificity of peptides identified were tested with in vitro experiments on cells and in vivo and ex vivo experiments on U-87MG xenograft mouse model. A cyclic peptide, LXY1, was identified and shown to be binding to the {alpha}3 integrin of U-87MG cells with moderately high affinity (K{sub d} = 0.5 {+-} 0.1 {mu}M) and high specificity. Biotinylated LXY1, when complexed with streptavidin-Cy5.5 (SA-Cy5.5) conjugate, targeted both subcutaneous and orthotopic U-87MG xenograft implants in nude mice. The in vivo targeting specificity was further verified by strong inhibition of tumor uptake of LXY1-biotin-SA-Cy5.5 complex when intravenously injecting the animals with anti-{alpha}3 integrin antibody or excess unlabeled LXY1 prior to administrating the imaging probe. The smaller univalent LXY1-Cy5.5 conjugate (2,279 Da) was found to have a faster accumulation in the U-87MG tumor and shorter retention time compared with the larger tetravalent LXY1-biotin-SA-Cy5.5 complex (approximately 64 kDa). Collectively, the data reveals that LXY1 has the potential to be developed into an effective imaging and therapeutic targeting agent for human glioblastoma. (orig.)

  10. Three-Times Daily Ultrafractionated Radiation Therapy, A Novel and Promising Regimen for Glioblastoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchesne, Patrick [Neuro-Oncology Department, CHU de Nancy, Hospital Central, Nancy 54035 (France)

    2013-09-25

    Glioblastomas are considered to be one of the most radio resistant tumors. Despite new therapies, the prognosis of this disease remains dismal. Also, the mechanisms of radiation resistance in mammalian cells are more complex than once believed. Experimental studies have indicated that some human cell lines are sensitive to low radiation doses of <1 Gy. This phenomenon has been termed low-dose hyper-radio-sensitivity (HRS), and is more apparent in radio resistant cell lines, such as glioblastoma cells. Sensitivity may result from the inability of low dose radiation to efficiently induce repair mechanisms, whereas higher doses cause enough damage to trigger repair responses for radio resistance. In vitro studies have demonstrated this phenomenon using various human malignant glioma cell lines: (1) daily repeated irradiation of cells with low doses compared to irradiation using a single biologically equivalent dose resulted in significantly higher cell killing; (2) experiments conducted on glioma xenografts demonstrated that repeated irradiation with low doses was more effective for inhibiting tumor growth than a single dose. In order to confirm and validate these promising studies on HRS, a few phase II trials were developed. For translating the experimental observations into the clinic, ultra fractionation protocols (with three daily doses) were tested in glioblastoma patients. Tolerance and toxicity were the primary endpoints, with overall survival as a secondary endpoint. These protocols were initiated before concomitant radio chemotherapy became the standard of care. For these trials, patients with an unfavorable clinical prognostic factor of newly unresectable GBM were included. When comparing the results of these trials with international literature using multivariate analysis for both progression free survival and overall survival, ultra fractionated irradiation showed superiority over radiotherapy alone. In addition, it was found to be equivalent to treatment

  11. 18F-FET microPET and microMRI for anti-VEGF and anti-PlGF response assessment in an orthotopic murine model of human glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette Kjoelhede; Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Urup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist for anti-cancer effects of anti-placental growth factor (anti-PlGF) in combination with anti-VEGF. Still, this treatment combination has not been evaluated in intracranial glioblastoma (GBM) xenografts. In clinical studies, position emission tomography (PET) using......-FET MicroPET and MicroMRI for evaluation of anti-VEGF and anti-PlGF treatment response in GBM xenografts. METHODS: Mice with intracranial GBM were treated with anti-VEGF, anti-PlGF + anti-VEGF or saline. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI), 18F-FET MicroPET and T2-weighted (T2w)-MRI were used to follow tumour...... development. Primary end-point was survival, and tumours were subsequently analysed for Ki67 proliferation index and micro-vessel density (MVD). Further, PlGF and VEGFR-1 expression were examined in a subset of the xenograft tumours and in 13 GBM patient tumours. RESULTS: Anti-VEGF monotherapy increased...

  12. Is There Pseudoprogression in Secondary Glioblastomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juratli, Tareq A., E-mail: Tareq.Juratli@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Engellandt, Kay [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lautenschlaeger, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center/Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University College of Medicine Columbus, Ohio (United States); Geiger, Kathrin D. [Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Kummer, Rüdiger von; Cerhova, Jana [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Chakravarti, Arnab [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center/Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University College of Medicine Columbus, Ohio (United States); Krex, Dietmar; Schackert, Gabriele [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Pseudoprogression (PP) during adjuvant treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is frequent and is a clinically and radiologically challenging problem. While there are several reports of the frequency of PP in GBM cohorts including mainly patients with primary GBM, there are few data on the incidence of PP in patients with secondary glioblastomas (sGBM). Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the frequency of PP in sGBM. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of PP in adult patients with sGBM treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRTx) using temozolomide (TMZ) and sought to assess if there was an association between PP and MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH mutations status, or 1p/19q codeletion. The definition of PP according to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Working Group was used. Results: None of the evaluable 15 sGBM patients in our series demonstrated a PP. Of the 9 sGBM patients who received concomitant CRTx with TMZ, 6 patients had the methylated MGMT promoter, and 6 patients had IDH mutations. There also was no PP identified in sGBM patients who received sequential CRTx, irrespective of MGMT or IDH status. The median time of follow-up was 3.4 years after diagnosis of an sGBM, and the median overall survival was 18.2 months (range, 14.3-45.2 months). Three of 15 patients had previously received radiation therapy for their World Health Organization low-grade 2 glioma, while none of them had received chemotherapy at that stage. Conclusions: Based on this small series of sGBM patients treated with CRTx (concomitantly or sequentially) the frequency of PP appears to be very low in sGBM, even in those patients with methylated MGMT promoter or IDH mutations. Our results highlight the differences between primary glioblastomas and sGBM in particular as they relate to PP.

  13. Network modeling of the transcriptional effects of copy number aberrations in glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnsten, Rebecka; Abenius, Tobias; Kling, Teresia; Schmidt, Linnéa; Johansson, Erik; Nordling, Torbjörn E M; Nordlander, Bodil; Sander, Chris; Gennemark, Peter; Funa, Keiko; Nilsson, Björn; Lindahl, Linda; Nelander, Sven

    2011-01-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are a hallmark of cancer genomes. However, little is known about how such changes affect global gene expression. We develop a modeling framework, EPoC (Endogenous Perturbation analysis of Cancer), to (1) detect disease-driving CNAs and their effect on target mRNA expression, and to (2) stratify cancer patients into long- and short-term survivors. Our method constructs causal network models of gene expression by combining genome-wide DNA- and RNA-level data. Prognostic scores are obtained from a singular value decomposition of the networks. By applying EPoC to glioblastoma data from The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the resulting network models contain known disease-relevant hub genes, reveal interesting candidate hubs, and uncover predictors of patient survival. Targeted validations in four glioblastoma cell lines support selected predictions, and implicate the p53-interacting protein Necdin in suppressing glioblastoma cell growth. We conclude that large-scale network modeling of the effects of CNAs on gene expression may provide insights into the biology of human cancer. Free software in MATLAB and R is provided. PMID:21525872

  14. Antitumorigenic effect of interferon-β by inhibition of undifferentiated glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMAMURO, SHUN; SANO, EMIKO; OKAMOTO, YUTAKA; OCHIAI, YUSHI; OHTA, TAKASHI; OGINO, AKIYOSHI; NATSUME, ATSUSHI; WAKABAYASHI, TOSHIHIKO; UEDA, TAKUYA; HARA, HIROYUKI; NAKAYAMA, TOMOHIRO; YOSHINO, ATSUO; KATAYAMA, YOICHI

    2015-01-01

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are undifferentiated cells that are considered to be an origin of glioblastomas. Furthermore, they may contribute to treatment resistance and recurrence in glioblastomas. GSCs differentiate into differentiated glioma cells (non-glioma stem-like cells: non-GSCs), and interconversion might occur between GSCs and non-GSCs. We investigated whether interferon-beta (IFN-β) could exert any efficacy towards GSCs or such interconversion processes. The neural stem cell marker CD133 and pluripotency marker Nanog in GSCs were analyzed to evaluate their differentiation levels. GSCs were considered to undergo differentiation into non-GSCs upon serum exposure, since the expression of CD133 and Nanog in the GSCs was negatively affected. Furthermore, the cells regained their undifferentiated features upon removal of the serum. However, we verified that IFN-β reduced cell proliferation and tumor sphere formation in GSCs, and induced suppression of the restoration of such undifferentiated features. In addition, we also confirmed that IFN-β suppressed the acquisition process of undifferentiated features in human malignant glioma cell lines. Our data thus suggest that IFN-β could be an effective agent not only through its cell growth inhibitory effect on GSCs but also as a means of targeting the interconversion between GSCs and non-GSCs, indicating the possibility of IFN-β being used to prevent treatment resistance and recurrence in glioblastomas, via the inhibition of undifferentiated features. PMID:26397698

  15. Antitumorigenic effect of interferon-β by inhibition of undifferentiated glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Shun; Sano, Emiko; Okamoto, Yutaka; Ochiai, Yushi; Ohta, Takashi; Ogino, Akiyoshi; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Ueda, Takuya; Hara, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2015-11-01

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are undifferentiated cells that are considered to be an origin of glioblastomas. Furthermore, they may contribute to treatment resistance and recurrence in glioblastomas. GSCs differentiate into differentiated glioma cells (non-glioma stem-like cells: non‑GSCs), and interconversion might occur between GSCs and non-GSCs. We investigated whether interferon-beta (IFN-β) could exert any efficacy towards GSCs or such interconversion processes. The neural stem cell marker CD133 and pluripotency marker Nanog in GSCs were analyzed to evaluate their differentiation levels. GSCs were considered to undergo differentiation into non-GSCs upon serum exposure, since the expression of CD133 and Nanog in the GSCs was negatively affected. Furthermore, the cells regained their undifferentiated features upon removal of the serum. However, we verified that IFN-β reduced cell proliferation and tumor sphere formation in GSCs, and induced suppression of the restoration of such undifferentiated features. In addition, we also confirmed that IFN-β suppressed the acquisition process of undifferentiated features in human malignant glioma cell lines. Our data thus suggest that IFN-β could be an effective agent not only through its cell growth inhibitory effect on GSCs but also as a means of targeting the interconversion between GSCs and non-GSCs, indicating the possibility of IFN-β being used to prevent treatment resistance and recurrence in glioblastomas, via the inhibition of undifferentiated features.

  16. Polysome Profiling Links Translational Control to the Radioresponse of Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Amy; Rath, Barbara H; Bisht, Kheem; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Changes in polysome-bound mRNA (translatome) are correlated closely with changes in the proteome in cells. Therefore, to better understand the processes mediating the response of glioblastoma to ionizing radiation (IR), we used polysome profiling to define the IR-induced translatomes of a set of human glioblastoma stem-like cell (GSC) lines. Although cell line specificity accounted for the largest proportion of genes within each translatome, there were also genes that were common to the GSC lines. In particular, analyses of the IR-induced common translatome identified components of the DNA damage response, consistent with a role for the translational control of gene expression in cellular radioresponse. Moreover, translatome analyses suggested that IR enhanced cap-dependent translation processes, an effect corroborated by the finding of increased eIF4F-cap complex formation detected after irradiation in all GSC lines. Translatome analyses also predicted that Golgi function was affected by IR. Accordingly, Golgi dispersal was detected after irradiation of each of the GSC lines. In addition to the common responses seen, translatome analyses predicted cell line-specific changes in mitochondria, as substantiated by changes in mitochondrial mass and DNA content. Together, these results suggest that analysis of radiation-induced translatomes can provide new molecular insights concerning the radiation response of cancer cells. More specifically, they suggest that the translational control of gene expression may provide a source of molecular targets for glioblastoma radiosensitization. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3078-87. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Tetanus toxoid and CCL3 improve dendritic cell vaccines in mice and glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Duane A; Batich, Kristen A; Gunn, Michael D; Huang, Min-Nung; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Nair, Smita K; Congdon, Kendra L; Reap, Elizabeth A; Archer, Gary E; Desjardins, Annick; Friedman, Allan H; Friedman, Henry S; Herndon, James E; Coan, April; McLendon, Roger E; Reardon, David A; Vredenburgh, James J; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2015-03-19

    After stimulation, dendritic cells (DCs) mature and migrate to draining lymph nodes to induce immune responses. As such, autologous DCs generated ex vivo have been pulsed with tumour antigens and injected back into patients as immunotherapy. While DC vaccines have shown limited promise in the treatment of patients with advanced cancers including glioblastoma, the factors dictating DC vaccine efficacy remain poorly understood. Here we show that pre-conditioning the vaccine site with a potent recall antigen such as tetanus/diphtheria (Td) toxoid can significantly improve the lymph node homing and efficacy of tumour-antigen-specific DCs. To assess the effect of vaccine site pre-conditioning in humans, we randomized patients with glioblastoma to pre-conditioning with either mature DCs or Td unilaterally before bilateral vaccination with DCs pulsed with Cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) RNA. We and other laboratories have shown that pp65 is expressed in more than 90% of glioblastoma specimens but not in surrounding normal brain, providing an unparalleled opportunity to subvert this viral protein as a tumour-specific target. Patients given Td had enhanced DC migration bilaterally and significantly improved survival. In mice, Td pre-conditioning also enhanced bilateral DC migration and suppressed tumour growth in a manner dependent on the chemokine CCL3. Our clinical studies and corroborating investigations in mice suggest that pre-conditioning with a potent recall antigen may represent a viable strategy to improve anti-tumour immunotherapy.

  18. A unique four-hub protein cluster associates to glioblastoma progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Simeone

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most frequent brain tumors. Among them, glioblastomas are malignant and largely resistant to available treatments. Histopathology is the gold standard for classification and grading of brain tumors. However, brain tumor heterogeneity is remarkable and histopathology procedures for glioma classification remain unsatisfactory for predicting disease course as well as response to treatment. Proteins that tightly associate with cancer differentiation and progression, can bear important prognostic information. Here, we describe the identification of protein clusters differentially expressed in high-grade versus low-grade gliomas. Tissue samples from 25 high-grade tumors, 10 low-grade tumors and 5 normal brain cortices were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and proteomic profiling by mass spectrometry. This led to identify 48 differentially expressed protein markers between tumors and normal samples. Protein clustering by multivariate analyses (PCA and PLS-DA provided discrimination between pathological samples to an unprecedented extent, and revealed a unique network of deranged proteins. We discovered a novel glioblastoma control module centered on four major network hubs: Huntingtin, HNF4α, c-Myc and 14-3-3ζ. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and unbiased proteome-wide meta-analysis revealed altered expression of this glioblastoma control module in human glioma samples as compared with normal controls. Moreover, the four-hub network was found to cross-talk with both p53 and EGFR pathways. In summary, the findings of this study indicate the existence of a unifying signaling module controlling glioblastoma pathogenesis and malignant progression, and suggest novel targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  19. Efficient chemotherapy of rat glioblastoma using doxorubicin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with different stabilizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wohlfart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy of glioblastoma is largely ineffective as the blood-brain barrier (BBB prevents entry of most anticancer agents into the brain. For an efficient treatment of glioblastomas it is necessary to deliver anti-cancer drugs across the intact BBB. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles coated with poloxamer 188 hold great promise as drug carriers for brain delivery after their intravenous injection. In the present study the anti-tumour efficacy of the surfactant-coated doxorubicin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles against rat glioblastoma 101/8 was investigated using histological and immunohistochemical methods. METHODOLOGY: The particles were prepared by a high-pressure solvent evaporation technique using 1% polyvinylalcohol (PLGA/PVA or human serum albumin (PLGA/HSA as stabilizers. Additionally, lecithin-containing PLGA/HSA particles (Dox-Lecithin-PLGA/HSA were prepared. For evaluation of the antitumour efficacy the glioblastoma-bearing rats were treated intravenously with the doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles coated with poloxamer 188 using the following treatment regimen: 3 × 2.5 mg/kg on day 2, 5 and 8 after tumour implantation; doxorubicin and poloxamer 188 solutions were used as controls. On day 18, the rats were sacrificed and the antitumour effect was determined by measurement of tumour size, necrotic areas, proliferation index, and expression of GFAP and VEGF as well as Isolectin B4, a marker for the vessel density. CONCLUSION: The results reveal a considerable anti-tumour effect of the doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles. The overall best results were observed for Dox-Lecithin-PLGA/HSA. These data demonstrate that the poloxamer 188-coated PLGA nanoparticles enable delivery of doxorubicin across the blood-brain barrier in the therapeutically effective concentrations.

  20. BIS-mediated STAT3 stabilization regulates glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chang-Nim; Yun, Hye Hyeon; Song, Byunghoo; Youn, Dong-Ye; Cui, Mei Nu; Kim, Hong Sug; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic and stem-like cells that are responsible for resistance to conventional therapy. Bcl-2-intreacting cell death suppressor (BIS; also known as BAG3) is an anti-apoptotic protein that is highly expressed in human cancers with various origins, including glioblastoma. In the present study, to investigate the role of BIS in GSC subpopulation, we examined the expression profile of BIS in A172 and U87-MG glioblastoma cell lines under specific in vitro culture conditions that enrich GSC-like cells in spheres. Both BIS mRNA and protein levels significantly increased under the sphere-forming condition as compared with standard culture conditions. BIS depletion resulted in notable decreases in sphere-forming activity and was accompanied with decreases in SOX-2 expression. The expression of STAT3, a master regulator of stemness, also decreased following BIS depletion concomitant with decreases in the nuclear levels of active phosphorylated STAT3, while ectopic STAT3 overexpression resulted in recovery of sphere-forming activity in BIS-knockdown glioblastoma cells. Additionally, immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy revealed that BIS physically interacts with STAT3. Furthermore, BIS depletion increased STAT3 ubiquitination, suggesting that BIS is necessary for STAT3 stabilization in GSC-like cells. BIS depletion also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes as evidenced by decrease in SNAIL and MMP-2 expression and increase in E-cadherin expression in GSC-like cells. Our findings suggest that high levels of BIS expression might confer stem-cell-like properties on cancer cells through STAT3 stabilization, indicating that BIS is a potential target in cancer therapy. PMID:27145367

  1. MicroRNA-7 regulates glioblastoma cell invasion via targeting focal adhesion kinase expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU De-gang; WANG Xi-rui; YOU Yong-ping; LIU Ning; WANG Ying-yi; FAN Li-gang; LUO Hui; HAN Bin; SUN Li-hua; WANG Xie-feng; ZHANG Jun-xia; CAO Lei

    2011-01-01

    Background Invasion growth is the most characteristic biological phenotype of glioblastoma,but the molecular mechanism in glioma cell invasion is poorly understood.Recent data have showed that microRNA plays an essential role in tumor invasion.Our study aimed to explore the mechanism of miR-7 involved in the control of glioblastoma cell invasion.Methods Glioma cell invasion was evaluated by transwell and scratch assays after up-regulation of miR-7 using miR-7 mimics in U87 and U251 cells.Luciferase reporter assay was used to determine focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as a target of miR-7.The levels of miR-7,matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were detected by PCR assay,and the levels of FAK,MMP-2,MMP-9,total and phosphorylation serine/threonine kinase (AKT),and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were measured by Western blotting analysis.Results Over-expression of miR-7 inhibited the invasion and migration activity of U87 and U251 cells.And up-regulation of miR-7 reduced FAK protein expression,Further,luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-7 modulated FAK expression directly by binding 3'UTR of FAK mRNA.In addition,miR-7 repressed p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT level,MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression.Finally,the inverse relationship between FAK and miR-7 expression was certificated in human glioma tissues.Conclusion To our knowledge,these data indicate for the first time that miR-7 directly regulates cell invasion by targeting FAK in glioblastoma and that miR-7 could be a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma intervention.

  2. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma;Controle par IRM bas champ in vivo de l'efficacite d'une therapie genique par gene suicide dans un modele murin de glioblastome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph. [Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, hopital de Hautepierre, CHRU de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Institut de mecanique des fluides et des solides, CNRS, universite de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R. [Transgene SA, parc d' innovation, 67 - Illkirch Graffenstaden (France)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Automatic Volume Determination of Glioblastomas Based on Several Manual Expert Segmentations

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is one of the highest malignant human neoplasms. During the course of disease, the evaluation of tumor volume is an essential part of the clinical follow-up. However, manual segmentation for acquisition of tumor volume is a time-consuming process. In this paper, a new approach for the automatic segmentation and volume determination of glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme) is presented and evaluated. The approach uses a user-defined seed point inside the glioma to set up a directed 3D graph. The nodes of the graph are obtained by sampling along rays that are sent through the surface points of a polyhedron. After the graph has been constructed, the minimal s-t cut is calculated to separate the glioblastoma from the background. For evaluation, 12 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data sets were manually segmented slice by slice, by neurosurgeons with several years of experience in the resection of gliomas. Afterwards, the manual se...

  4. Irinotecan and Bevacizumab in Glioblastoma-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1M. T. Shahid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a common brain tumor having comparatively poor prognosis. Bevacizumab and irinotecan are found to be effective in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. The present review covers investigations made on the mentioned drugs in the past decade. As compared to other chemotherapeutic agents, the drugs have shown greater activity and overall survival when used as monotherapeutic agents or in combination with other drugs. Still some work needs to be done in establishing clear role of both the drugs in newly diagnosed glioblastoma, especially, role of irinotecan needs clarity.

  5. [A case of glioblastoma manifesting 49 years after lobotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, H; Yamaguchi, T; Arai, T; Nakagawa, S; Tsuchiya, K; Torii, N; Shirai, M

    1998-08-01

    We report a case of glioblastoma manifesting 49 years after a lobotomy. He was diagnosed as having schizophrenia at age 20 and was operated on with a standard lobotomy when he was 27 years old. He had led a useful life after 40 years old without medication. Because of hallucination and delusion, he was hospitalized at the end of 1996. CT showed a well enhanced tumor adjacent to the cavity made by the lobotomy in the left frontal lobe. This is the second case report of glioblastoma just beside the cavity formed by lobotomy. The relationship between glioblastoma and old lobotomy is discussed, especially in regard to morphology and CT findings.

  6. Differentiation of radiation necrosis from glioblastoma recurrence after radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chrissa Sioka; Anastasia Zikou; Anna Goussia; Spyridon Tsiouris; Loucas G Astrakas; Athanassios P Kyritsis

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment of glioblastoma, the most common type of primary-brain-tumor, involves radiotherapy with concomitant temozolomide chemotherapy. A patient with glioblastoma, post radiotherapy developed magnatic resonance imaging (MRI) changes consistent with either radiation-induced tumor necrosis or tumor recurrence. Perfusion MRI was suggestive of radiation necrosis, but magnetic resonance spectroscopy and99mTc-Tetrofosmin single photon emission computed tomography was indicative of tumor recurrence. Positron emission tomography scan was not available. Tumor recurrence was documented by biopsy. Several advanced imaging methods are available to differentiate tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis in glioblastoma patients. However, in inconclusive cases, brain biopsy should be performed for deifnite diagnosis.

  7. Genetic variations in VEGF and VEGFR2 and glioblastoma outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, S; Wibom, C; Andersson, U

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR) are central components in the development and progression of glioblastoma. To investigate if genetic variation in VEGF and VEGFR2 is associated with glioblastoma prognosis, we examined blood samples from 154 glioblastoma cases...... collected in Sweden and Denmark between 2000 and 2004. Seventeen tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGF and 27 in VEGFR2 were genotyped and analysed, covering 90% of the genetic variability within the genes. In VEGF, we found no SNPs associated with survival. In VEGFR2, we found two SNPs...

  8. Genetic variations in VEGF and VEGFR2 and glioblastoma outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, S; Wibom, C; Andersson, U

    2011-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR) are central components in the development and progression of glioblastoma. To investigate if genetic variation in VEGF and VEGFR2 is associated with glioblastoma prognosis, we examined blood samples from 154 glioblastoma cases...... collected in Sweden and Denmark between 2000 and 2004. Seventeen tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGF and 27 in VEGFR2 were genotyped and analysed, covering 90% of the genetic variability within the genes. In VEGF, we found no SNPs associated with survival. In VEGFR2, we found two SNPs...

  9. Strategies of temozolomide in future glioblastoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee CY

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chooi Yeng Lee School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM may be one of the most challenging brain tumors to treat, as patients generally do not live more than 2 years. This review aimed to give a timely review of potential future treatments for GBM by looking at the latest strategies, involving mainly the use of temozolomide (TMZ. Although these studies were carried out either in vitro or in rodents, the findings collectively suggested that we are moving toward developing a more efficacious therapy for GBM patients. Nanoparticles preparation was, by far, the most extensively studied strategy for targeted brain delivery. Therefore, the first section of this review presents a treatment strategy using TMZ-loaded nanocarriers, which encompassed nanoparticles, nanoliposomes, and nanosponges. Besides nanocarriers, new complexes that were formed between TMZ and another chemical agent or molecule have shown increased cytotoxicity and antitumor activity. Another approach was by reducing GBM cell resistance to TMZ, and this was achieved either through the suppression of metabolic change occurring in the cells, inhibition of the DNA repair protein, or up-regulation of the protein that mediates autophagy. Finally, the review collates a list of substances that have demonstrated the ability to suppress tumor cell growth. Keywords: cellular resistance, glioblastoma multiforme, nanoparticles, targeted delivery, temozolomide

  10. Glioblastoma Circulating Cells: Reality, Trap or Illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lombard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases are the hallmark of cancer. This event is in direct relationship with the ability of cancer cells to leave the tumor mass and travel long distances within the bloodstream and/or lymphatic vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most frequent primary brain neoplasm, is mainly characterized by a dismal prognosis. The usual fatal issue for GBM patients is a consequence of local recurrence that is observed most of the time without any distant metastases. However, it has recently been documented that GBM cells could be isolated from the bloodstream in several studies. This observation raises the question of the possible involvement of glioblastoma-circulating cells in GBM deadly recurrence by a “homing metastasis” process. Therefore, we think it is important to review the already known molecular mechanisms underlying circulating tumor cells (CTC specific properties, emphasizing their epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT abilities and their possible involvement in tumor initiation. The idea is here to review these mechanisms and speculate on how relevant they could be applied in the forthcoming battles against GBM.

  11. 5-ALA based photodynamic management of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, Adrian; Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hennig, Georg; Pongratz, Thomas; Sroka, Ronald; Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-03-01

    Objective: Improvement of the clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) patients by employment of fluorescence and photosensitization on the basis of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Methods: In this report the focus is laid on the use of tumor selective PpIX fluorescence for stereotactic biopsy sampling and intra-operative treatment monitoring. In addition, our current concept for treatment planning is presented. For stereotactic interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT), radial diffusers were implanted into the contrast enhancing tumor volume. Spectroscopic measurements of laser light transmission and fluorescence between adjacent fibers were performed prior, during and post PDT. Results: PpIX concentrations in primary glioblastoma tissue show high intra- and inter-patient variability, but are usually sufficient for an effective PDT. During individual treatment attempts with 5-ALA based GBM-iPDT, transmission and fluorescence measurements between radial diffusers gave the following results: 1. In some cases, transmission after PDT is considerably reduced compared to the value before PDT, which may be attributable to a depletion of oxygenated hemoglobin and/or diffuse bleeding. 2. PpIX fluorescence is efficiently photobleached during PDT in all cases. Conclusion: iPDT with assessment of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching is a promising treatment option. Individualization of treatment parameters appears to bear a potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

  12. Rhabdoid glioblastoma is distinguishable from classical glioblastoma by cytogenetics and molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Sun-Ju; Cho, Hwa Jin; Baek, Hae Woon; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hong; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Park, Sung-Hye

    2014-03-01

    The clinicopathologic and molecular genetic features of 5 cases of rhabdoid glioblastoma, an extremely rare variant of glioblastoma that tends to affect patients at a young age, were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis and focused molecular genetic studies including array-based comparative genomic hybridization. All 5 cases had supratentorial tumors that immunohistochemical analysis revealed to be robustly positive for epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, p53, and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) but only focally positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Although complete retention of SMARCB1 (INI1) was observed in all 5 cases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) loss, homozygous deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, 1p/19q codeletion, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132/IDH2 R172 mutation were not observed in any case, although a high level of EGFR polysomy was detected in 1 recurrent tumor. Although c-MET (MET protein) expression was focal but robustly positive in 3 cases, met proto-oncogene (MET) fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed low polysomy but not MET amplification. MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-40 transferase) methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed MGMT methylation in only 1 case. Furthermore, array-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed gain of chromosome 7 and loss of 1p, 6, 8p, 11, 13q, and 18q but no deletion of chromosome 22. In contrast to the classical subtype of primary glioblastoma, the cases studied here were characterized by the absence of EGFR amplification, PTEN loss, and 9p homozygous deletion and overexpression of p53, PDGFRα, and c-MET, suggesting that they can be classified as the proneural or mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma and benefit from intensive therapy that includes temozolomide.

  13. Knockdown of Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing 1 (CTHRC1) Inhibits Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Cellular Migration in Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shunshun; Zheng, Xu; Shi, Lin; Zhang, Weitao; Yang, Hongfa

    2017-01-26

    Collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1), an extracellular matrix-related protein, has been found to be upregulated in many solid tumors and contributes to tumorigenesis. We found that CTHRC1 is overexpressed in glioblastoma tissues and cells. By using the technique of RNA interference, the expression of CTHRC1 in the human glioblastoma U-87MG cell line was downregulated, and the proliferation and migration of U-87MG cells were examined. The results showed that the knockdown of CTHRC1 exerts inhibitory effects on the proliferation and migration ability of U-87MG cells. Knockdown of CTHRC1 expression in U-87MG cells resulted in upregulation in the expression of E-cadherin and downregulation in the expression of N-cadherin, SNAIL, and Slug, suggesting that CTHRC1 inhibits glioblastoma cell migration by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Knockdown of CTHRC1 led to remarkably decreased β-catenin protein levels in the nucleus. These results indicate that CTHRC1 might play an important role in the development of glioblastoma and offer a candidate molecular target for glioblastoma prevention and therapy.

  14. 18F-FET microPET and microMRI for anti-VEGF and anti-PlGF response assessment in an orthotopic murine model of human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Kjoelhede Nedergaard

    Full Text Available Conflicting data exist for anti-cancer effects of anti-placental growth factor (anti-PlGF in combination with anti-VEGF. Still, this treatment combination has not been evaluated in intracranial glioblastoma (GBM xenografts. In clinical studies, position emission tomography (PET using the radiolabeled amino acid O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (18F-FET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI add complementary but distinct information about glioma growth; however, the value of 18F-FET MicroPET combined with MicroMRI has not been investigated preclinically. Here we examined the use of 18F-FET MicroPET and MicroMRI for evaluation of anti-VEGF and anti-PlGF treatment response in GBM xenografts.Mice with intracranial GBM were treated with anti-VEGF, anti-PlGF + anti-VEGF or saline. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI, 18F-FET MicroPET and T2-weighted (T2w-MRI were used to follow tumour development. Primary end-point was survival, and tumours were subsequently analysed for Ki67 proliferation index and micro-vessel density (MVD. Further, PlGF and VEGFR-1 expression were examined in a subset of the xenograft tumours and in 13 GBM patient tumours.Anti-VEGF monotherapy increased survival and decreased 18F-FET uptake, BLI and MVD, while no additive effect of anti-PlGF was observed. 18F-FET SUV max tumour-to-brain (T/B ratio was significantly lower after one week (114 ± 6%, n = 11 vs. 143 ± 8%, n = 13; p = 0.02 and two weeks of treatment (116 ± 12%, n = 8 vs. 190 ± 24%, n = 5; p = 0.02 in the anti-VEGF group as compared with the control group. In contrast, T2w-MRI volume was unaffected by anti-VEGF. Gene expression of PlGF and VEGFR-1 in xenografts was significantly lower than in patient tumours.18F-FET PET was feasible for anti-angiogenic response evaluation and superior to T2w-MRI; however, no additive anti-cancer effect of anti-PlGF and anti-VEGF was observed. Thus, this study supports use of 18F-FET PET for response evaluation in future studies.

  15. Glioblastoma multiforme no cerebelo: registro de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Aidar Aun

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available O glioblastoma multiforme no cerebelo é raro. Foram publicados cêrca de 38 casos na literatura. Os autores relatam um caso, parecendo tratar-se da primeira referência na literatura brasileira.

  16. Prognostic relevance of epilepsy at presentation in glioblastoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Sharon; Varkila, Meri; Kroonen, Jérôme; Seute, Tatjana; Snijders, Tom J; Kauw, Frans; Spliet, Wim G M; Willems, Marie; Poulet, Christophe; Broekman, Marike L; Bours, Vincent; Robe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epileptogenic glioblastomas are thought to convey a favorable prognosis, either due to early diagnosis or potential antitumor effects of antiepileptic drugs. We investigated the relationship between survival and epilepsy at presentation, early diagnosis, and antiepileptic drug therapy in

  17. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli, Aglaia; Lesma, Elena; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Peron, Angela; Scornavacca, Giulia Federica; Massimino, Maura; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Ancona, Silvia; Cerati, Michele; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Gorio, Alfredo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2015-10-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is characterized by the presence of benign tumors in the brain, kidneys, heart, eyes, lungs, and skin. The typical brain lesions are cortical tubers, subependimal nodules and subependymal giant-cell astrocytomas. The occurrence of malignant astrocytomas such as glioblastoma is rare. We report on a child with a clinical diagnosis of TSC and a rapidly evolving glioblastoma multiforme. Genetic analysis identified a de novo mutation in TSC2. Molecular characterization of the tumor was performed and discussed, as well as a review of the literature where cases of TSC and glioblastoma multiforme are described. Although the co-occurrence of TSC and glioblastoma multiforme seems to be rare, this possible association should be kept in mind, and proper clinical and radiological follow up should be recommended in these patients.

  18. MicroRNA as potential biomarkers in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeb, Zammam; Stylli, Stanley S; Koldej, Rachel; Ritchie, David S; Siegal, Tali; Morokoff, Andrew P; Kaye, Andrew H; Luwor, Rodney B

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and lethal tumour of the central nervous system and as such the identification of reliable prognostic and predictive biomarkers for patient survival and tumour recurrence is paramount. MicroRNA detection has rapidly emerged as potential biomarkers, in patients with glioblastoma. Over the last decade, analysis of miRNA in laboratory based studies have yielded several candidates as potential biomarkers however, the accepted use of these candidates in the clinic is yet to be validated. Here we will examine the use of miRNA signatures to improve glioblastoma stratification into subgroups and summarise recent advances made in miRNA examination as potential biomarkers for glioblastoma progression and recurrence.

  19. A prospective PET study of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Blinkenberg, M; Lassen, U;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the post-surgical metabolic and structural cerebral changes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ten patients prospectively with newly diagnosed GBM. All patients were primarily treated with surgery, followed by chemotherapy...

  20. Down-regulation of MicroRNA-126 in Glioblastoma and its Correlation with Patient Prognosis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In Bo; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Soo Hong; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Teng, Yang D

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the adult human brain. Although microRNA-126 (miR-126) has been reported to exhibit expression abnormalities in various types of cancer, to date very few studies have examined changes in miR-126 level in glioblastoma. In this pilot study, we investigated the changes in miR-126 expression in newly-dissected primary glioblastoma to explore possible roles of miR-126 in patient prognosis. Total RNA was extracted from tumoral and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from 14 patients' paired frozen specimens. Using an established quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR protocol, the levels of miR-126 in glioblastoma and adjacent non-tumor brain tissues were compared against small nucleolar RNA U48 (RNU48) as a reference gene. The expression of miR-126 in glioblastoma samples was significantly lower than in paired non-tumoral controls (pglioblastoma patients with higher relative intratumoral miR-126 expression (i.e. 53-79% relative to that of the control tissue; n=7) had significantly improved survival duration than patients whose miR-126 levels were lower (i.e. 12-48%, n=7; stratified log-rank analysis p=0.011 when the dividing threshold was set at ≥51%; total: n=14, male: 8; female: 6). Thus, intraglioblastoma miR-126 may be down-regulated relative to normal tissue and patients with less down-regulation of intratumoral miR-126 expression could have improved postsurgical prognosis. Future clinical studies with larger sample sizes should be performed to validate this observation.

  1. Dynamics of chemosensitivity and chromosomal instability in recurrent glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegl-Kreinecker, S.; Pirker, C; Marosi, C; Buchroithner, J; Pichler, J; Silye, R; Fischer, J.; Micksche, M.; Berger, W

    2007-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterised by invasive growth and frequent recurrence. Here, we have analysed chromosomal changes in comparison to tumour cell aggressiveness and chemosensitivity of three cell lines established from a primary tumour and consecutive recurrences (BTL1 to BTL3) of a long-term surviving glioblastoma patient together with paraffin-embedded materials of five further cases with recurrent disease. Following surgery, the BTL patient progressed under irradiation/ lomustin...

  2. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zhang

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo.

  3. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Suzana A.; Azad, Tej D.; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y.; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S.; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N.; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Cheshier, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo. PMID:27092773

  4. The somatic genomic landscape of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Cameron W; Verhaak, Roel G W; McKenna, Aaron; Campos, Benito; Noushmehr, Houtan; Salama, Sofie R; Zheng, Siyuan; Chakravarty, Debyani; Sanborn, J Zachary; Berman, Samuel H; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bernard, Brady; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Genovese, Giannicola; Shmulevich, Ilya; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Zou, Lihua; Vegesna, Rahulsimham; Shukla, Sachet A; Ciriello, Giovanni; Yung, W K; Zhang, Wei; Sougnez, Carrie; Mikkelsen, Tom; Aldape, Kenneth; Bigner, Darell D; Van Meir, Erwin G; Prados, Michael; Sloan, Andrew; Black, Keith L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Andrews, David W; Guha, Abhijit; Iacocca, Mary; O'Neill, Brian P; Foltz, Greg; Myers, Jerome; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Penny, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Gibbs, Richard; Marra, Marco; Mills, Gordon B; Lander, Eric; Spellman, Paul; Wilson, Richard; Sander, Chris; Weinstein, John; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey; Laird, Peter W; Haussler, David; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-10

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors, including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer.

  5. Glioblastoma Multiforme Therapy and Mechanisms of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulian P. Ramirez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV brain tumor characterized by a heterogeneous population of cells that are highly infiltrative, angiogenic and resistant to chemotherapy. The current standard of care, comprised of surgical resection followed by radiation and the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide, only provides patients with a 12–14 month survival period post-diagnosis. Long-term survival for GBM patients remains uncommon as cells with intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment repopulate the tumor. In this review we will describe the mechanisms of resistance, and how they may be overcome to improve the survival of GBM patients by implementing novel chemotherapy drugs, new drug combinations and new approaches relating to DNA damage, angiogenesis and autophagy.

  6. Current status of intratumoral therapy for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ankit I; Linninger, Andreas; Lesniak, Maciej S; Engelhard, Herbert H

    2015-10-01

    With emerging drug delivery technologies becoming accessible, more options are expected to become available to patients with glioblastoma (GBM) in the near future. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with the underlying mechanisms and limitations of intratumoral drug delivery, and direction of recent research efforts. Tumor-adjacent brain is an extremely complex living matrix that creates challenges with normal tissue intertwining with tumor cells. For convection-enhanced delivery (CED), the role of tissue anisotropy for better predicting the biodistribution of the infusate has recently been studied. Computational predictive methods are now available to better plan CED therapy. Catheter design and placement—in addition to the agent being used—are critical components of any protocol. This paper overviews intratumoral therapies for GBM, highlighting key anatomic and physiologic perspectives, selected agents (especially immunotoxins), and some new developments such as the description of the glymphatic system.

  7. AQP9 expression in glioblastoma multiforme tumors is limited to a small population of astrocytic cells and CD15(+)/CalB(+) leukocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelen, S.K.; Parm Ulhoi, B.; Larsen, A.; Frokiaer, J.; Nielsen, S.; Rutzler, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-9 (AQP9) is a membrane protein channel that is permeable to a range of small solutes, including glycerol, urea and nucleobases. Expression of AQP9 in normal brain is limited, while widespread AQP9 expression has previously been reported in human glioblastoma. However, the specific cellular

  8. Unsupervised deep learning reveals prognostically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jonathan D; Cai, Chunhui; Lu, Xinghua

    2017-10-03

    One approach to improving the personalized treatment of cancer is to understand the cellular signaling transduction pathways that cause cancer at the level of the individual patient. In this study, we used unsupervised deep learning to learn the hierarchical structure within cancer gene expression data. Deep learning is a group of machine learning algorithms that use multiple layers of hidden units to capture hierarchically related, alternative representations of the input data. We hypothesize that this hierarchical structure learned by deep learning will be related to the cellular signaling system. Robust deep learning model selection identified a network architecture that is biologically plausible. Our model selection results indicated that the 1st hidden layer of our deep learning model should contain about 1300 hidden units to most effectively capture the covariance structure of the input data. This agrees with the estimated number of human transcription factors, which is approximately 1400. This result lends support to our hypothesis that the 1st hidden layer of a deep learning model trained on gene expression data may represent signals related to transcription factor activation. Using the 3rd hidden layer representation of each tumor as learned by our unsupervised deep learning model, we performed consensus clustering on all tumor samples-leading to the discovery of clusters of glioblastoma multiforme with differential survival. One of these clusters contained all of the glioblastoma samples with G-CIMP, a known methylation phenotype driven by the IDH1 mutation and associated with favorable prognosis, suggesting that the hidden units in the 3rd hidden layer representations captured a methylation signal without explicitly using methylation data as input. We also found differentially expressed genes and well-known mutations (NF1, IDH1, EGFR) that were uniquely correlated with each of these clusters. Exploring these unique genes and mutations will allow us to

  9. Major vault protein supports glioblastoma survival and migration by upregulating the EGFR/PI3K signalling axis

    OpenAIRE

    Lötsch, Daniela; Steiner, Elisabeth; Holzmann, Klaus; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Pirker, Christine; Hlavaty, Juraj; Petznek, Helga; Hegedus, Balazs; Garay, Tamas; Mohr, Thomas; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Grusch, Michael; Berger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Despite their ubiquitous expression and high conservation during evolution, precise cellular functions of vault ribonucleoparticles, mainly built of multiple major vault protein (MVP) copies, are still enigmatic. With regard to cancer, vaults were shown to be upregulated during drug resistance development as well as malignant transformation and progression. Such in a previous study we demonstrated that human astrocytic brain tumours including glioblastoma are generally high in vault levels wh...

  10. Uncovering MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Networks in Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jingchun Sun; Xue Gong; Benjamin Purow; Zhongming Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain tumor in humans. Recent studies revealed that patterns of microRNA (miRNA) expression in GBM tissue samples are different from those in normal brain tissues, suggesting that a number of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathogenesis of GBM. However, little is yet known about which miRNAs play central roles in the pathology of GBM and their regulatory mechanisms of action. To address this issue, in this study, we systematically ...

  11. Locomotion and proliferation of glioblastoma cells in vitro statistical evaluation of videomicroscopic observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hegedus, B; Fazekas, I; Babel, T; Madarasz, E; Vicsek, T

    1999-01-01

    Long-term videomicroscopy and computer-aided statistical analysis were used to determine some characteristic parameters of in vitro cell motility and proliferation in three established cell lines derived from human glioblastoma tumors. Migration and proliferation activities were compared among the three cell lines since these are two features of tumor cells that strongly influence the progression of cancer. The results on these dynamical parameters of cell locomotion were compared to pathological data obtained by traditional methods. The data indicate that the analysis of cell motility provides more specific information and is potentially useful in diagnosis.

  12. Characterizing mutational heterogeneity in a glioblastoma patient with double recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Nickel

    Full Text Available Human cancers are driven by the acquisition of somatic mutations. Separating the driving mutations from those that are random consequences of general genomic instability remains a challenge. New sequencing technology makes it possible to detect mutations that are present in only a minority of cells in a heterogeneous tumor population. We sought to leverage the power of ultra-deep sequencing to study various levels of tumor heterogeneity in the serial recurrences of a single glioblastoma multiforme patient. Our goal was to gain insight into the temporal succession of DNA base-level lesions by querying intra- and inter-tumoral cell populations in the same patient over time. We performed targeted "next-generation" sequencing on seven samples from the same patient: two foci within the primary tumor, two foci within an initial recurrence, two foci within a second recurrence, and normal blood. Our study reveals multiple levels of mutational heterogeneity. We found variable frequencies of specific EGFR, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TP53 base substitutions within individual tumor regions and across distinct regions within the same tumor. In addition, specific mutations emerge and disappear along the temporal spectrum from tumor at the time of diagnosis to second recurrence, demonstrating evolution during tumor progression. Our results shed light on the spatial and temporal complexity of brain tumors. As sequencing costs continue to decline and deep sequencing technology eventually moves into the clinic, this approach may provide guidance for treatment choices as we embark on the path to personalized cancer medicine.

  13. Glioblastoma multiforme: State of the art and future therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and lethal primary malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS. Despite the proven benefit of surgical resection and aggressive treatment with chemo- and radiotherapy, the prognosis remains very poor. Recent advances of our understanding of the biology and pathophysiology of GBM have allowed the development of a wide array of novel therapeutic approaches, which have been developed. These novel approaches include molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and gene therapy. Methods: We offer a brief review of the current standard of care, and a survey of novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of GBM. Results: Despite promising results in preclinical trials, many of these therapies have demonstrated limited therapeutic efficacy in human clinical trials. Thus, although survival of patients with GBM continues to slowly improve, treatment of GBM remains extremely challenging. Conclusion: Continued research and development of targeted therapies, based on a detailed understanding of molecular pathogenesis can reasonably be expected to yield improved outcomes for patients with GBM.

  14. Therapeutic targeting of EGFR-activated metabolic pathways in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qinglei; Lei, Ting; Ye, Fei

    2013-08-01

    The highly divergent histological heterogeneities, aggressive invasion and extremely poor response to treatment make glioblastoma (GBM) one of the most lethal and difficult cancers in humans. Among key elements driving its behavior is epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), however, neither traditional therapy including neurosurgery, radiation, temozolomide, nor targeted EGFR therapeutics in clinic has generated promising results to date. Strategies are now focusing on blocking the downstream EGFR-activated metabolic pathways and the key phosphorylated kinases. Here, we review two major EGFR-activated downstream metabolic pathways including the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MAPK pathways and their key phosphorylated kinase alterations in GBMs. This review also discusses potential pharmacological progress from bench work to clinical trials in order to evaluate specific inhibitors as well as therapeutics targeting PI3K and RAS signaling pathways. Several factors impede clinical progress in targeting GBM, including the high rates of acquired resistance, heterogeneity within and across the tumors, complexity of signaling pathways and difficulty in traversing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Substantial insight into genetic and molecular pathways and strategies to better tap the potential of these agents include rational combinatorial regimens and molecular phenotype-based patient enrichment, each of which will undoubtedly generate new therapeutic approaches to combat these devastating disabilities in the near future.

  15. Puerarin Synergizes with Arsenic Trioxide for the Apoptosis of Human Glioblastoma Cells through the Protein Kinase/p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Pathway%葛根素与三氧化二砷协同作用通过Akt/p38途径促进人胶质瘤细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    羊轶驹; 孙振球

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究葛根素(PRN)是否通过Akt/p38途径协同三氧化二砷(As2O3)促进人胶质瘤细胞的凋亡.方法:MTT检测细胞的存活率,流式细胞仪(FCM)技术检测细胞的凋亡状态,蛋白免疫印迹(Immunoblotting)检测细胞phosphorylated Akt和p38-MAPK,Cleaved Caspase-3蛋白的表达,PCR检测Caspase-3的mRNA的表达.结果:PRN协同As2O3降低人胶质瘤细胞U87的存活.与对照组相比,PRN(16μM)组,As2O3(2μM)组显著增加细胞内钙水平(1.13±0.015),(1.18±0.33).此外,PRN能够协同As2O3增加细胞内钙(1.34±0.72),下调蛋白phosphorylated Akt,上调phosphorylated p38-MAPK和Cleaved Caspase-3蛋白及Cleaved Caspase-3 mRNA表达水平.结论:PRN协同As2O3增加胶质瘤细胞内钙水平,抑制细胞存活.此外,PRN联合As2O3下调phosphorylated Akt,增强phosphorylated p38-MAPK和Cleaved Caspase-3的表达,进而促进肿瘤细胞凋亡.PRN可能成为临床上辅助As2O3治疗肿瘤中的潜在的辅助治疗药物.%Objective: To investigate whether puerarin (PRN) synergizes with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in facilitating the apoptosis of human glioblastoma cell line U87 through the protein kinase (Akt)/p 38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38-MAPK) pathway. Methods: The 3-(4,5-deimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide technique was performed to detect cell survival. Flow cytometry was applied to calculate cell apoptosis, and immunoblot technique was used to verify the protein expressions of phosphorylated Akt, p38-MAPK, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition, caspase-3 mRNA levels were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: PRN synergized with As2O3 to decrease the survival of human glioblastoma cell line U87. A single dosage each of PRN (16 μM; 1.13±0.015) and As2O3 (2 μM; 1.18±0.33) significantly increased the intracellular calcium concentration. Moreover, PRN synergized with As2O3 to increase the in-tracellular calcium concentration (1.34±0.72) compared with the findings in

  16. Efficacy of systemic adoptive transfer immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1 for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Richard G; Antonios, Joseph P; Lisiero, Dominique N; Soto, Horacio; Scharnweber, Rudi; Garrett, Matthew C; Yong, William H; Li, Ning; Li, Gang; Kruse, Carol A; Liau, Linda M; Prins, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy is an ideal treatment modality to specifically target the diffusely infiltrative tumor cells of malignant gliomas while sparing the normal brain parenchyma. However, progress in the development of these therapies for glioblastoma has been slow due to the lack of immunogenic antigen targets that are expressed uniformly and selectively by gliomas. We utilized human glioblastoma cell cultures to induce expression of New York-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (NY-ESO-1) following in vitro treatment with the demethylating agent decitabine. We then investigated the phenotype of lymphocytes specific for NY-ESO-1 using flow cytometry analysis and cytotoxicity against cells treated with decitabine using the xCelligence real-time cytotoxicity assay. Finally, we examined the in vivo application of this immune therapy using an intracranially implanted xenograft model for in situ T cell trafficking, survival, and tissue studies. Our studies showed that treatment of intracranial glioma-bearing mice with decitabine reliably and consistently induced the expression of an immunogenic tumor-rejection antigen, NY-ESO-1, specifically in glioma cells and not in normal brain tissue. The upregulation of NY-ESO-1 by intracranial gliomas was associated with the migration of adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific lymphocytes along white matter tracts to these tumors in the brain. Similarly, NY-ESO-1-specific adoptive T cell therapy demonstrated antitumor activity after decitabine treatment and conferred a highly significant survival benefit to mice bearing established intracranial human glioma xenografts. Transfer of NY-ESO-1-specific T cells systemically was superior to intracranial administration and resulted in significantly extended and long-term survival of animals. These results reveal an innovative, clinically feasible strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro

  17. Effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine on glioblastoma cell invasion and migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-hui MENG; Li-xin ZHOU; Jia-lin LUO; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, on cell growth, migration, and invasion in inva sive human glioblastoma U-87MG cells. Methods: PKC activity was determined based on the PKC-catalyzed transfer of the 32p-phosphate group from [g-32p]ATP into a PKC-specific peptide substrate. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay.Cell invasion and migration were evaluated by a Boyden chamber assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. Protein expression was analyzed using Western blot assay. The formation of 3-dimensional cellular aggregates was examined by a cell-cell aggregation assay. Results: UCN-01 treatment resulted in concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of U-87MG cell growth at higher doses (> 100 nmol/L), and reduced cell invasion and migration capability at less cytotoxic doses (<100 nmol/L). UCN-01 significantly repressed PKC activity. Consistent with this result, UCN-01 blocked cell invasion stimulated by phorbel 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) and ethanol (EtOH), 2 PKC activators. Enforced expression of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and PTEN increased the anti-invasion potential of UCN-01. Exposure to UCN-01 caused a dose-dependent increase in cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The effect of UCN-01 on the formation of cell-cell aggregation was significantly reduced by the addition of an anti-E-cadherin antibody. Conclusion: UCN-01 inhibits the invasion and migration of human glioma cells. Accordingly, UCN-01 can have potential clinical applications for the treatment of human glioma metastasis.

  18. NETRIN-4 protects glioblastoma cells FROM temozolomide induced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4 and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4, which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via activating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. In the current work we have explored the effect of NTN4/ITGB4 interaction on TMZ induced glioblastoma cell senescence. We report here that the suppression of either ITGB4 or NTN4 in glioblastoma cell lines significantly enhances cellular senescence. The sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ was primarily determined by the expression of MGMT. To omit the effect of MGMT, we concentrated on the cell lines devoid of expression of MGMT. NTN4 partially inhibited TMZ induced cell senescence and rescued AKT from dephosphorylation in U251MG cells, a cell line bearing decent levels of ITGB4. However, addition of exogenous NTN4 displayed no significant effect on TMZ induced senescence rescue or AKT activation in U87MG cells, which expressed ITGB4 at low levels. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB4 combined with exogenous NTN4 significantly attenuated U87MG cell senescence induced by TMZ. These data suggest that NTN4 protects glioblastoma cells from TMZ induced senescence, probably via rescuing TMZ triggered ITGB4 dependent AKT dephosphorylation. This suggests that interfering the interaction between NTN4 and ITGB4 or concomitant use of the inhibitors of the AKT pathway may improve the therapeutic efficiency of TMZ.

  19. NETRIN-4 protects glioblastoma cells FROM temozolomide induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hu, Yizhou; Ylivinkka, Irene; Li, Huini; Chen, Ping; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Hyytiäinen, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ) prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4) and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4), which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via activating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. In the current work we have explored the effect of NTN4/ITGB4 interaction on TMZ induced glioblastoma cell senescence. We report here that the suppression of either ITGB4 or NTN4 in glioblastoma cell lines significantly enhances cellular senescence. The sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ was primarily determined by the expression of MGMT. To omit the effect of MGMT, we concentrated on the cell lines devoid of expression of MGMT. NTN4 partially inhibited TMZ induced cell senescence and rescued AKT from dephosphorylation in U251MG cells, a cell line bearing decent levels of ITGB4. However, addition of exogenous NTN4 displayed no significant effect on TMZ induced senescence rescue or AKT activation in U87MG cells, which expressed ITGB4 at low levels. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB4 combined with exogenous NTN4 significantly attenuated U87MG cell senescence induced by TMZ. These data suggest that NTN4 protects glioblastoma cells from TMZ induced senescence, probably via rescuing TMZ triggered ITGB4 dependent AKT dephosphorylation. This suggests that interfering the interaction between NTN4 and ITGB4 or concomitant use of the inhibitors of the AKT pathway may improve the therapeutic efficiency of TMZ.

  20. Molecular markers of extracellular matrix remodeling in glioblastoma vessels: microarray study of laser-captured glioblastoma vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Ally; Moreno, Maria J; Martin, Joel; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2007-04-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most malignant and vascularized brain tumors. The aberrant vascular phenotype of GBM could be exploited for diagnosis or therapeutic targeting. This study identified new molecular markers of GBM vessels, using a combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) microscopy, RNA amplification, and microarray analyses to compare vessels from nonmalignant human brain and GBM tumors. Forty-two genes were differentially expressed in GBM vessels compared to nonmalignant brain vessels. Validation of differentially expressed genes was performed by literature mining, Q-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Among the differentially expressed genes, only 64% were previously associated with vessels, angiogenesis, gliomas, and/or cancer. The upregulation of genes encoding secreted extracellular proteins IGFBP7 and SPARC was confirmed by Q-PCR in LCM-captured vessels. Whereas SPARC and IGFBP7 protein were absent in nonmalignant brain vessels, a distinct immunoreactivity patterns were observed in GBM sections whereby SPARC was strongly expressed in perivascular cells adjacent to GBM vessels while GBM endothelial cells were immunostained for IGFBP7. IGFBP7 immunoreactivity was also detected on the abluminal side of GBM vessels deposited between strands of vascular basal lamina. The study discerns unique molecular characteristics of GBM vessels compared with nonmalignant brain vessels that could potentially be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Glioblastoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Glioblastoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Glioblastoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Glioblastoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/AKT Pathway Inhibition by Doxazosin Promotes Glioblastoma Cells Death, Upregulation of p53 and Triggers Low Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Maier Gaelzer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Treatment includes chemotherapy with temozolomide concomitant with surgical resection and/or irradiation. However, a number of cases are resistant to temozolomide, as well as the human glioblastoma cell line U138-MG. We investigated doxazosin's (an antihypertensive drug activity against glioblastoma cells (C6 and U138-MG and its neurotoxicity on primary astrocytes and organoptypic hippocampal cultures. For this study, the following methods were used: citotoxicity assays, flow cytometry, western-blotting and confocal microscopy. We showed that doxazosin induces cell death on C6 and U138-MG cells. We observed that doxazosin's effects on the PI3K/Akt pathway were similar as LY294002 (PI3K specific inhibitor. In glioblastoma cells treated with doxasozin, Akt levels were greatly reduced. Upon examination of activities of proteins downstream of Akt we observed upregulation of GSK-3β and p53. This led to cell proliferation inhibition, cell death induction via caspase-3 activation and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in glioblastoma cells. We used in this study Lapatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a comparison with doxazosin because they present similar chemical structure. We also tested the neurocitotoxicity of doxazosin in primary astrocytes and organotypic cultures and observed that doxazosin induced cell death on a small percentage of non-tumor cells. Aggressiveness of glioblastoma tumors and dismal prognosis require development of new treatment agents. This includes less toxic drugs, more selective towards tumor cells, causing less damage to the patient. Therefore, our results confirm the potential of doxazosin as an attractive therapeutic antiglioma agent.

  13. Glioblastoma stem cells resistant to temozolomide-induced autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jun; LIU Zhi-gang; LIU Xiao-mei; CHEN Fu-rong; SHI Hong-liu; PANG Jesse Chung-sean; NG Ho-keung; CHEN Zhong-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of cells with features of primitive neural progenitor cells and tumor-initiating function in brain tumors. These cells might represent primary therapeutic target for complete eradication of the tumors. This study aimed to determine the resistant phenotype of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) to temozolomide (TMZ) and to explore the possible molecular mechanisms underlying TMZ resistance.Methods Freshly resected glioblastoma specimen was collected and magnetic isolation of GSCs was carded out using the Miltenyi Biotec CD133 Celt isolation kit. The cytotoxic effect of TMZ on CD133+ and CD133- glioblastoma cells was determined by using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Autophagy-related proteins (Beclin-1, LC3 and Atg5) and cleaved caspase-3 (p17) were analyzed by Westem blotting. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect Atg5, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD133 expression in glioblastoma cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 10.0 software. For all tests, the level of statistical significance was set at P <0.05.Results CD133+ glioblastoma cells exhibited neurosphere-like growth in vitro and high expression of CD133 stem cell marker. The growth-inhibiting rate in CD133- glioblastoma cells treated with 5 or 50 pmol/L TMZ was significantly higher than that in CD133+ glioblastoma cells ((14.36±3.75)% vs (2.54±1.36)% or (25.95±5.25)% vs (2.72±1.84)%, respectively, P <0.05). Atg5, LC3-ll and Beclin-1 levels were significantly lower in CD133+ glioblastoma cells than those in autologous CD133- cells after TMZ treatment (P <0.05). Caspase-3 was mildly activated only in CD133- glioblastoma cells after exposure to TMZ (P <0.05). Immunofluorescent staining revealed elevated expression of Atg5 in GFAP* cells following TMZ treatment.Conclusions The GSCs display strong capability of tumor's resistance to TMZ. This resistance is

  14. Kruppel-like factor-9 (KLF9) inhibits glioblastoma stemness through global transcription repression and integrin α6 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Mingyao; Tilghman, Jessica; Wei, Yingying; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Ji, Hongkai; Laterra, John

    2014-11-21

    It is increasingly important to understand the molecular basis for the plasticity of neoplastic cells and their capacity to transition between differentiated and stemlike phenotypes. Kruppel-like factor-9 (KLF9), a member of the large KLF transcription factor family, has emerged as a regulator of oncogenesis, cell differentiation, and neural development; however, the molecular basis for the diverse contextual functions of KLF9 remains unclear. This study focused on the functions of KLF9 in human glioblastoma stemlike cells. We established for the first time a genome-wide map of KLF9-regulated targets in human glioblastoma stemlike cells and show that KLF9 functions as a transcriptional repressor and thereby regulates multiple signaling pathways involved in oncogenesis and stem cell regulation. A detailed analysis of one such pathway, integrin signaling, showed that the capacity of KLF9 to inhibit glioblastoma cell stemness and tumorigenicity requires ITGA6 repression. These findings enhance our understanding of the transcriptional networks underlying cancer cell stemness and differentiation and identify KLF9-regulated molecular targets applicable to cancer therapeutics.

  15. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells.

  16. Dynamics of chemosensitivity and chromosomal instability in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl-Kreinecker, S; Pirker, C; Marosi, C; Buchroithner, J; Pichler, J; Silye, R; Fischer, J; Micksche, M; Berger, W

    2007-03-26

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterised by invasive growth and frequent recurrence. Here, we have analysed chromosomal changes in comparison to tumour cell aggressiveness and chemosensitivity of three cell lines established from a primary tumour and consecutive recurrences (BTL1 to BTL3) of a long-term surviving glioblastoma patient together with paraffin-embedded materials of five further cases with recurrent disease. Following surgery, the BTL patient progressed under irradiation/ lomustine but responded to temozolomide after re-operation to temozolomide. The primary tumour -derived BTL1 cells showed chromosomal imbalances typical of highly aggressive glioblastomas. Interestingly, BTL2 cells established from the first recurrence developed under therapy showed signs of enhanced chromosomal instability. In contrast, BTL3 cells from the second recurrence resembled a less aggressive subclone of the primary tumour. Although BTL2 cells exhibited a highly aggressive phenotype, BTL3 cells were characterised by reduced proliferative and migratory potential. Despite persistent methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter, BTL3 cells exhibited the highest temozolomide sensitivity. A comparable situation was found in two out of five glioblastoma patients, both characterised by enhanced survival time, who also relapsed after surgery/chemotherapy with less aggressive recurrences. Taken together, our data suggest that pretreated glioblastoma patients may relapse with highly chemosensitive tumours confirming the feasibility of temozolomide treatment even in case of repeated recurrence.

  17. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and Their Ligands in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Carrasco-García

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent, aggressive and fatal type of brain tumor. Glioblastomas are characterized by their infiltrating nature, high proliferation rate and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Recently, oncologic therapy experienced a rapid evolution towards “targeted therapy,” which is the employment of drugs directed against particular targets that play essential roles in proliferation, survival and invasiveness of cancer cells. A number of molecules involved in signal transduction pathways are used as molecular targets for the treatment of various tumors. In fact, inhibitors of these molecules have already entered the clinic or are undergoing clinical trials. Cellular receptors are clear examples of such targets and in the case of glioblastoma multiforme, some of these receptors and their ligands have become relevant. In this review, the importance of glioblastoma multiforme in signaling pathways initiated by extracellular tyrosine kinase receptors such as EGFR, PDGFR and IGF-1R will be discussed. We will describe their ligands, family members, structure, activation mechanism, downstream molecules, as well as the interaction among these pathways. Lastly, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in cancer, in particular glioblastoma that employ inhibitors of these pathways and their benefits.

  18. Bioactive form of resveratrol in glioblastoma cells and its safety for normal brain cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Shu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol existing in grapes and many other natural foods, possesses a wide range of biological activities including cancer prevention. It has been recognized that resveratrol is intracellularly biotransformed to different metabolites, but no direct evidence has been available to ascertain its bioactive form because of the difficulty to maintain resveratrol unmetabolized in vivo or in vitro. It would be therefore worthwhile to elucidate the potential therapeutic implications of resveratrol metabolism using a reliable resveratrol-sensitive cancer cells.Objective: To identify the real biological form of trans-resveratrol and to evaluate the safety of the effective anticancer dose of resveratrol for the normal brain cells.Methods: The samples were prepared from the condition media and cell lysates of human glioblastoma U251 cells, and were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE. The samples were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis. According to the metabolite(s, trans-resveratrol was biotransformed in vitro by the method described elsewhere, and the resulting solution was used to treat U251 cells. Meanwhile, the responses of U251 and primarily cultured rat normal brain cells (glial cells and neurons to 100μM trans-resveratrol were evaluated by multiple experimental methods.Results: The results revealed that resveratrol monosulfate was the major metabolite in U251 cells. About half fraction of resveratrol monosulfate was prepared in vitro and this trans-resveratrol and resveratrol monosulfate mixture showed little inhibitory effect on U251 cells. It is also found that rat primary brain cells (PBCs not only resist 100μM but also tolerate as high as 200μM resveratrol treatment.Conclusions: Our study thus demonstrated that trans-resveratrol was the bioactive form in glioblastoma cells and, therefore, the biotransforming

  19. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier-stealth nanocomposites for in situ glioblastoma theranostics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Fong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00280c

  20. Neuropeptides of the VIP family inhibit glioblastoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochaud, Stéphanie; Meunier, Annie-Claire; Monvoisin, Arnaud; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are neuropeptides acting through VPAC1, VPAC2 and PAC1 receptors (referred here as the VIP-receptor system). In the central nervous system, VIP and PACAP are involved in neurogenesis, cell differentiation and migration, suggesting that they could be implicated in the development of glioblastoma (GBM). The infiltrative nature of GBM remains a major problem for the therapy of these tumors. We previously demonstrated that the VIP-receptor system regulated cell migration of the human cell lines M059J and M059K, derived from a single human GBM. Here, we evaluated the involvement of the VIP-receptor system in GBM cell invasion. In Matrigel invasion assays, M059K cells that express more the VIP-receptor system than M059J cells were less invasive. Invasion assays performed in the presence of agonists, antagonists or anti-PACAP antibodies as well as experiments with transfected M059J cells overexpressing the VPAC1 receptor indicated that the more the VIP-receptor system was expressed and activated, the less the cells were able to invade. Western immunoblotting experiments revealed that the VIP-receptor system inactivated the signaling protein AKT. Invasion assays carried out in the presence of an AKT inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of this signaling kinase in the regulation of cell invasion by the VIP-receptor system in M059K cells. The inhibition by VIP of invasion and AKT was also observed in U87 cells. In conclusion, VIP and PACAP act as anti-invasive factors in different GBM cell lines, a function mediated by VPAC1 inhibition of AKT signaling in M059K cells.

  1. Inhibition of Nucleotide Synthesis Targets Brain Tumor Stem Cells in a Subset of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laks, Dan R; Ta, Lisa; Crisman, Thomas J; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Radu, Caius G; Nathanson, David A; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of both the de novo (DNP) and salvage (NSP) pathways of nucleoside synthesis has been demonstrated to impair leukemia cells. We endeavored to determine whether this approach would be efficacious in glioblastoma. To diminish nucleoside biosynthesis, we utilized compound DI-39, which selectively targets NSP, in combination with thymidine (dT), which selectively targets DNP. We employed in vitro and ex vivo models to determine the effects of pretreatment with dT + DI-39 on brain tumor stem cells (BTSC). Here, we demonstrate that this combinatorial therapy elicits a differential response across a spectrum of human patient-derived glioblastoma cultures. As determined by apoptotic markers, most cultures were relatively resistant to treatment, although a subset was highly sensitive. Sensitivity was unrelated to S-phase delay and to DNA damage induced by treatment. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that response across cultures was associated with the transcription factor PAX3 (associated with resistance) and with canonical pathways, including the nucleotide excision repair pathway, PTEN (associated with resistance), PI3K/AKT (associated with sensitivity), and ErbB2-ErbB3. Our in vitro assays demonstrated that, in sensitive cultures, clonal sphere formation was reduced upon removal from pretreatment. In contrast, in a resistant culture, clonal sphere formation was slightly increased upon removal from pretreatment. Moreover, in an intracranial xenograft model, pretreatment of a sensitive culture caused significantly smaller and fewer tumors. In a resistant culture, tumors were equivalent irrespective of pretreatment. These results indicate that, in the subset of sensitive glioblastoma, BTSCs are targeted by inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1271-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Desert Hedgehog/Patch2 Axis Contributes to Vascular Permeability and Angiogenesis in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Sandy; Treps, Lucas; Leclair, Héloïse M; Ngo, Hai-Mi; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Gavard, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) constitutes the most common and the most aggressive type of human tumors affecting the central nervous system. Prognosis remains dark due to the inefficiency of current treatments and the rapid relapse. Paralleling other human tumors, GBM contains a fraction of tumor initiating cells with the capacity to self-renew, initiate and maintain the tumor mass. These cells were found in close proximity to brain vasculature, suggesting functional interactions between brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) and endothelial cells within the so-called vascular niche. However, the mechanisms by which these cells impact on the endothelium plasticity and function remain unclear. Using culture of BTICs isolated from a cohort of 14 GBM patients, we show that BTICs secretome promotes brain endothelial cell remodeling in a VEGF-independent manner. Gene array analysis unmasked that BTICs-released factors drove the expression of Ptch2 in endothelial cells. Interestingly, BTICs produce desert hedgehog (DHH) ligand, enabling a paracrine DHH/Ptch2 signaling cascade that conveys elevated permeability and angiogenesis. Finally, DHH silencing in BTICs dramatically reduced tumor growth, as well as vascularization and intra-tumor permeability. Collectively, our data unveil a role for DHH in exacerbated tumor angiogenesis and permeability, which may ultimately favor glioblastoma growth, and thus place the DHH/Ptch2 nexus as a molecular target for novel therapies.

  3. Desert Hedgehog/Patch2 axis contributes to vascular permeability and angiogenesis in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy eAzzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM constitutes the most common and the most aggressive type of human tumors affecting the central nervous system. Prognosis remains dark due to the inefficiency of current treatments and the rapid relapse. Paralleling other human tumors, GBM contains a fraction of tumor initiating cells with the capacity to self-renew, initiate and maintain the tumor mass. These cells were found in close proximity to brain vasculature, suggesting functional interactions between brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs and endothelial cells within the so-called vascular niche. However, the mechanisms by which these cells impact on the endothelium plasticity and function remain unclear. Using culture of BTICs isolated from a cohort of 14 GBM patients, we show that BTIC secretome promotes brain endothelial cell remodeling in a VEGF-independent manner. Gene array analysis unmasked that BTIC-released factors drove the expression of Ptch2 in endothelial cells. Interestingly, BTICs produce Desert Hedgehog (DHH ligand, enabling a paracrine DHH/Ptch2 signaling cascade that conveys elevated permeability and angiogenesis. Finally, DHH silencing in BTICs dramatically reduced tumor growth, as well as vascularization and intra-tumor permeability. Collectively, our data unveil a role for DHH in exacerbated tumor angiogenesis and permeability, which may ultimately favor glioblastoma growth, and thus place the DHH/Ptch2 nexus as a molecular target for novel therapies.

  4. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

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    Mariano S. Viapiano

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  5. Vascular Distribution of Glioblastoma Multiforme at Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohay, K.; Wolf, D.S.; Aronson, L.J.; Duus, M.; Melhem, E.R.; Cohen, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Treatment of high-grade gliomas with selective intra-arterial (IA) administration of chemotherapies has been proposed, and utilized as a therapeutic modality. This approach offers the conceptual benefit of providing maximal delivery of the agent to the tumor bed, while potentially reducing systemic exposure to the agent. This retrospective study was designed to determine the vascular distribution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at the time of diagnosis in an effort to determine what proportion of patients would likely be candidates for this approach. The preoperative MRI scans of 50 patients with GBM were analyzed and compared to published normative data of intracranial vascular distribution. Vascular distribution was determined by analyzing post-gadolinium axial and coronal T1 images, axial T2 images, and axial T2 images with an additional 1 cm margin (T2 + 1 cm) added in all dimensions. T1 analysis demonstrated 60% of tumors in a single vascular distribution. T2 analysis of these tumors reduced that number to 34%. When the T2 + 1 cm margin was utilized, only 6% of tumors were in a single vascular distribution. 66% of tumors were limited to the anterior circulation on T1 imaging but only 34% on T2 + 1 cm imaging. 30% of tumors were also within the distribution of the anterior choroidal artery. These findings suggest that the use of selective IA administration of agents is necessarily limited to a fraction of presenting patients or will require administration via multiple cerebral arteries. PMID:23472735

  6. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  7. Glioblastoma in the setting of tuberous sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Dennys; Prayson, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant condition commonly manifesting with seizures, mental retardation, cortical tubers and hamartomas. Neoplasms may occasionally arise in this setting with the majority of these tumors being subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (World Health Organization [WHO] grade I). Reports of high grade astrocytic neoplasms arising in patients with tuberous sclerosis are rare. We report a left fronto-parietal mass presenting in a 33-year-old woman with altered mental status and slurred speech. The tumor demonstrated areas of enhancement and was associated with mass effect on CT imaging. The tumor was marked by prominent cellularity, easily identifiable mitotic figures, vascular proliferative changes, necrosis and multinucleated giant cells. A Ki-67 labeling index of greater than 30% was noted. The findings were interpreted as being consistent with a glioblastoma (WHO grade IV). The limited literature on similar cases of malignant gliomas arising in the setting of tuberous sclerosis are reviewed. Few reports of similar tumors have been described in the literature. Presentation appears to depend on where the tumor is situated; locations have been variable in previous reports. For those cases in which survival data were included, the prognosis is poor.

  8. Somatic retrotransposition is infrequent in glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanta, Pragathi; Steranka, Jared P; Tang, Zuojian; Rodić, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Yang, Wan Rou; Ma, Sisi; Grivainis, Mark; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Schneider, Anna M; Gallia, Gary L; Riggins, Gregory J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Fenyö, David; Boeke, Jef D; Burns, Kathleen H

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults. We sought to understand the roles of endogenous transposable elements in these malignancies by identifying evidence of somatic retrotransposition in glioblastomas (GBM). We performed transposon insertion profiling of the active subfamily of Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) elements by deep sequencing (TIPseq) on genomic DNA of low passage oncosphere cell lines derived from 7 primary GBM biopsies, 3 secondary GBM tissue samples, and matched normal intravenous blood samples from the same individuals. We found and PCR validated one somatically acquired tumor-specific insertion in a case of secondary GBM. No LINE-1 insertions present in primary GBM oncosphere cultures were missing from corresponding blood samples. However, several copies of the element (11) were found in genomic DNA from blood and not in the oncosphere cultures. SNP 6.0 microarray analysis revealed deletions or loss of heterozygosity in the tumor genomes over the intervals corresponding to these LINE-1 insertions. These findings indicate that LINE-1 retrotransposon can act as an infrequent insertional mutagen in secondary GBM, but that retrotransposition is uncommon in these central nervous system tumors as compared to other neoplasias.

  9. Strategies of temozolomide in future glioblastoma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chooi Yeng

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) may be one of the most challenging brain tumors to treat, as patients generally do not live more than 2 years. This review aimed to give a timely review of potential future treatments for GBM by looking at the latest strategies, involving mainly the use of temozolomide (TMZ). Although these studies were carried out either in vitro or in rodents, the findings collectively suggested that we are moving toward developing a more efficacious therapy for GBM patients. Nanoparticles preparation was, by far, the most extensively studied strategy for targeted brain delivery. Therefore, the first section of this review presents a treatment strategy using TMZ-loaded nanocarriers, which encompassed nanoparticles, nanoliposomes, and nanosponges. Besides nanocarriers, new complexes that were formed between TMZ and another chemical agent or molecule have shown increased cytotoxicity and antitumor activity. Another approach was by reducing GBM cell resistance to TMZ, and this was achieved either through the suppression of metabolic change occurring in the cells, inhibition of the DNA repair protein, or up-regulation of the protein that mediates autophagy. Finally, the review collates a list of substances that have demonstrated the ability to suppress tumor cell growth. PMID:28123308

  10. Imaging modalities to assess oxygen status in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien eCorroyer-Dulmont

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia, the result of an inadequacy between a disorganized and functionally impaired vasculature and the metabolic demand of tumor cells is a feature of glioblastoma. Hypoxia promotes the aggressiveness of these tumors and, equally, negatively correlates with a decrease in outcome. Tools to characterize oxygen status are essential for the therapeutic management of patients with glioblastoma: i to refine prognosis; ii to adapt the treatment regimen; iii and to assess the therapeutic efficacy. While methods that are focal and invasive in nature are of limited use, non-invasive imaging technologies have been developed. Each of these technologies is characterized by its singular advantages and limitations in terms of oxygenation status in glioblastoma. The aim of this short review is, first, to focus on the interest to characterize hypoxia for a better therapeutic management of patients and, second, to discuss recent and pertinent approaches for the assessment of oxygenation/hypoxia and their direct implication for patient care.

  11. Glioblastoma and the significance of MGMT gene methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Izadpanahi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research Glioblastoma has been studied as one of the most common brain tumors and a short review of the available therapeutic methods have presented including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and particularly adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide, as the most effective developed treatment. Moreover, MGMT gene promoter methylation has been introduced as an important predictive factor of treatment response to temozolamide. The different mechanisms of methylation and the availableliterature on its association with patient survival and disease recurrence have been summarized. Taken together, Glioblastoma is a tumor in which the MGMT gene expression can potentially deliver the highest amount of data in comparison to other tumors; as almost every related study has emphasized on the direct association between MGMT methylation and patient survival. Regarding this debate, the pseudoprogression pattern in Glioblastoma patients and the laboratory methods studying MGMT gene methylation have been examined. At the end of this review, the obstacles to its development have been briefly mentioned.

  12. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Is Frequently Expressed in a Multicentric Study on Glioblastoma and May Be Induced in Vitro by Combined 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and Interferon-γ Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastowski, Isabela J; Simões, Renata T; Yaghi, Layale

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule involved in immune tolerance processes, playing an important role in the maintenance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. Although HLA-G expression is restricted in normal tissues, it is broadly e...

  14. Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amelio, Dante; Amichetti, Maurizio, E-mail: amelio@atrep.it [ATreP-Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Via F.lli Perini 181, Trento 38122 (Italy)

    2012-03-07

    Despite the therapeutic advances in neuro-oncology, most patients with glioblastoma ultimately experience local progression/relapse. Re-irradiation has been poorly viewed in the past, mainly due to the overestimated risk of side effects using conventional radiotherapy. To date, thanks to the improvement of several delivery techniques, together with improved imaging capabilities, re-irradiation is a viable salvage treatment option to manage such clinical scenario. A literature overview on the feasibility and efficacy of the different irradiation modalities for recurrent glioblastoma along with considerations on areas of improvement are provided.

  15. A stapled peptide antagonist of MDM2 carried by polymeric micelles sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide treatment through p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xishan; Tai, Lingyu; Gao, Jie; Qian, Jianchang; Zhang, Mingfei; Li, Beibei; Xie, Cao; Lu, Linwei; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-11-28

    Antagonizing MDM2 and MDMX to activate the tumor suppressor protein p53 is an attractive therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, challenges remain with respect to the poor ability of p53 activators to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-brain tumor barrier and to specifically target tumor cells. To circumvent these problems, we developed a cyclic RGD peptide-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(lactic acid) polymeric micelle (RGD-M) that carried a stapled peptide antagonist of both MDM2 and MDMX (sPMI). The peptide-carrying micelle RGD-M/sPMI was prepared via film-hydration method with high encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity as well as ideal size distribution. Micelle encapsulation dramatically increased the solubility of sPMI, thus alleviating its serum sequestration. In vitro studies showed that RGD-M/sPMI efficiently inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells in the presence of serum by activating the p53 signaling pathway. Further, RGD-M/sPMI exerted potent tumor growth inhibitory activity against human glioblastoma in nude mouse xenograft models. Importantly, the combination of RGD-M/sPMI and temozolomide--a standard chemotherapy drug for GBM increased antitumor efficacy against glioblastoma in experimental animals. Our results validate a combination therapy using p53 activators with temozolomide as a more effective treatment for GBM.

  16. The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brittany C.; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Sun, Yan; Ji, Ping; Li, Xia; Gumin, Joy; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Yli-Harja, Olli; Haapasalo, Hannu; Visakorpi, Tapio; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Chen, Kexin; Lang, Frederick F.; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:23298836

  17. Nrf2-driven TERT regulates pentose phosphate pathway in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, F; Dixit, D; Sharma, V; Kumar, A; Joshi, S D; Sarkar, C; Sen, E

    2016-05-05

    Given the involvement of telomerase activation and dysregulated metabolism in glioma progression, the connection between these two critical players was investigated. Pharmacological inhibition of human Telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by Costunolide induced glioma cell apoptosis in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. Costunolide induced an ROS-dependent increase in p53 abrogated telomerase activity. Costunolide decreased Nrf2 level; and ectopic Nrf2 expression decreased Costunolide-induced ROS generation. While TERT knock-down abrogated Nrf2 levels, overexpression of Nrf2 increased TERT expression. Inhibition of hTERT either by Costunolide, or by siRNA or dominant-negative hTERT (DN-hTERT) abrogated (i) expression of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and Transketolase (TKT) - two major nodes in the pentose phosphate (PPP) pathway; and (ii) phosphorylation of glycogen synthase (GS). hTERT knock-down decreased TKT activity and increased glycogen accumulation. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knock-down of TKT elevated glycogen accumulation. Coherent with the in vitro findings, Costunolide reduced tumor burden in heterotypic xenograft glioma mouse model. Costunolide-treated tumors exhibited diminished TKT activity, heightened glycogen accumulation, and increased senescence. Importantly, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patient tumors bearing TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) known to be associated with increased telomerase activity; exhibited elevated Nrf2 and TKT expression and decreased glycogen accumulation. Taken together, our findings highlight the previously unknown (i) role of telomerase in the regulation of PPP and glycogen accumulation and (ii) the involvement of Nrf2-TERT loop in maintaining oxidative defense responses in glioma cells.

  18. PARP Inhibition Restores Extrinsic Apoptotic Sensitivity in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Pareja, Fresia; Aimé, Pascaline; Shu, Chang; Chau, Lily; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Crary, John F.; Canoll, Peter; Siegelin, Markus D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a paramount issue in the treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM). We show that targeting PARP by the small molecule inhibitors, Olaparib (AZD-2281) or PJ34, reduces proliferation and lowers the apoptotic threshold of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods The sensitizing effects of PARP inhibition on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and potential toxicity were analyzed using viability assays and flow cytometry in established GBM cell lines, low-passage neurospheres and astrocytes in vitro. Molecular analyses included western blots and gene silencing. In vivo, effects on tumor growth were examined in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model. Results The combination treatment of PARP inhibitors and TRAIL led to an increased cell death with activation of caspases and inhibition of formation of neurospheres when compared to single-agent treatment. Mechanistically, pharmacological PARP inhibition elicited a nuclear stress response with up-regulation of down-stream DNA-stress response proteins, e.g., CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homology protein (CHOP). Furthermore, Olaparib and PJ34 increased protein levels of DR5 in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In turn, siRNA-mediated suppression of DR5 mitigated the effects of TRAIL/PARP inhibitor-mediated apoptosis. In addition, suppression of PARP-1 levels enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Treatment of human astrocytes with the combination of TRAIL/PARP inhibitors did not cause toxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of TRAIL and PJ34 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo when compared to treatment with each agent alone. Conclusions PARP inhibition represents a promising avenue to overcome apoptotic resistance in GBM. PMID:25531448

  19. Genome-wide methylation analyses in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose K Lai

    Full Text Available Few studies had investigated genome-wide methylation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Our goals were to study differential methylation across the genome in gene promoters using an array-based method, as well as repetitive elements using surrogate global methylation markers. The discovery sample set for this study consisted of 54 GBM from Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University, and 24 brain controls from the New York Brain Bank. We assembled a validation dataset using methylation data of 162 TCGA GBM and 140 brain controls from dbGAP. HumanMethylation27 Analysis Bead-Chips (Illumina were used to interrogate 26,486 informative CpG sites in both the discovery and validation datasets. Global methylation levels were assessed by analysis of L1 retrotransposon (LINE1, 5 methyl-deoxycytidine (5m-dC and 5 hydroxylmethyl-deoxycytidine (5hm-dC in the discovery dataset. We validated a total of 1548 CpG sites (1307 genes that were differentially methylated in GBM compared to controls. There were more than twice as many hypomethylated genes as hypermethylated ones. Both the discovery and validation datasets found 5 tumor methylation classes. Pathway analyses showed that the top ten pathways in hypomethylated genes were all related to functions of innate and acquired immunities. Among hypermethylated pathways, transcriptional regulatory network in embryonic stem cells was the most significant. In the study of global methylation markers, 5m-dC level was the best discriminant among methylation classes, whereas in survival analyses, high level of LINE1 methylation was an independent, favorable prognostic factor in the discovery dataset. Based on a pathway approach, hypermethylation in genes that control stem cell differentiation were significant, poor prognostic factors of overall survival in both the discovery and validation datasets. Approaches that targeted these methylated genes may be a future therapeutic goal.

  20. Distinct phenotypic differences associated with differential amplification of receptor tyrosine kinase genes at 4q12 in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Burford

    Full Text Available Gene amplification at chromosome 4q12 is a common alteration in human high grade gliomas including glioblastoma, a CNS tumour with consistently poor prognosis. This locus harbours the known oncogenes encoding the receptor tyrosine kinases PDGFRA, KIT, and VEGFR2. These receptors are potential targets for novel therapeutic intervention in these diseases, with expression noted in tumour cells and/or associated vasculature. Despite this, a detailed assessment of their relative contributions to different high grade glioma histologies and the underlying heterogeneity within glioblastoma has been lacking. We studied 342 primary high grade gliomas for individual gene amplification using specific FISH probes, as well as receptor expression in the tumour and endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry, and correlated our findings with specific tumour cell morphological types and patterns of vasculature. We identified amplicons which encompassed PDGFRA only, PDGFRA/KIT, and PDGFRA/KIT/VEGFR2, with distinct phenotypic correlates. Within glioblastoma specimens, PDGFRA amplification alone was linked to oligodendroglial, small cell and sarcomatous tumour cell morphologies, and rare MGMT promoter methylation. A younger age at diagnosis and better clinical outcome in glioblastoma patients is only seen when PDGFRA and KIT are co-amplified. IDH1 mutation was only found when all three genes are amplified; this is a subgroup which also harbours extensive MGMT promoter methylation. Whilst PDGFRA amplification was tightly linked to tumour expression of the receptor, this was not the case for KIT or VEGFR2. Thus we have identified differential patterns of gene amplification and expression of RTKs at the 4q12 locus to be associated with specific phenotypes which may reflect their distinct underlying mechanisms.

  1. Alkylphospholipids deregulate cholesterol metabolism and induce cell-cycle arrest and autophagy in U-87 MG glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Martín-Fernández, Mario; Soria-Bretones, Isabel; Ríos, Antonio; Carrasco, María P; Marco, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumour in adults and one of the most lethal of all cancers. Growing evidence suggests that human tumours undergo abnormal lipid metabolism, characterised by an alteration in the mechanisms that regulate cholesterol homeostasis. We have investigated the effect that different antitumoural alkylphospholipids (APLs) exert upon cholesterol metabolism in the U-87 MG glioblastoma cell line. APLs altered cholesterol homeostasis by interfering with its transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus hindering its esterification. At the same time they stimulated the synthesis of cholesterol from radiolabelled acetate and its internalisation from low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), inducing both 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and LDL receptor (LDLR) genes. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that these effects promoted the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol. Filipin staining demonstrated that this accumulation was not confined to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/LY) compartment since it did not colocalise with LAMP2 lysosomal marker. Furthermore, APLs inhibited cell growth, producing arrest at the G2/M phase. We also used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate ultrastructural alterations induced by APLs and found an abundant presence of autophagic vesicles and autolysosomes in treated cells, indicating the induction of autophagy. Thus our findings clearly demonstrate that antitumoural APLs interfere with the proliferation of the glioblastoma cell line via a complex mechanism involving cholesterol metabolism, cell-cycle arrest or autophagy. Knowledge of the interrelationship between these processes is fundamental to our understanding of tumoural response and may facilitate the development of novel therapeutics to improve treatment of glioblastoma and other types of cancer.

  2. Morphometic analysis of TCGA glioblastoma multiforme

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    Chang Hang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goals are to develop a computational histopathology pipeline for characterizing tumor types that are being generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA for genomic association. TCGA is a national collaborative program where different tumor types are being collected, and each tumor is being characterized using a variety of genome-wide platforms. Here, we have developed a tumor-centric analytical pipeline to process tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E for visualization and cell-by-cell quantitative analysis. Thus far, analysis is limited to Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma tissue sections. The final results are being distributed for subtyping and linking the histology sections to the genomic data. Results A computational pipeline has been designed to continuously update a local image database, with limited clinical information, from an NIH repository. Each image is partitioned into blocks, where each cell in the block is characterized through a multidimensional representation (e.g., nuclear size, cellularity. A subset of morphometric indices, representing potential underlying biological processes, can then be selected for subtyping and genomic association. Simultaneously, these subtypes can also be predictive of the outcome as a result of clinical treatments. Using the cellularity index and nuclear size, the computational pipeline has revealed five subtypes, and one subtype, corresponding to the extreme high cellularity, has shown to be a predictor of survival as a result of a more aggressive therapeutic regime. Further association of this subtype with the corresponding gene expression data has identified enrichment of (i the immune response and AP-1 signaling pathways, and (ii IFNG, TGFB1, PKC, Cytokine, and MAPK14 hubs. Conclusion While subtyping is often performed with genome-wide molecular data, we have shown that it can also be applied to categorizing histology

  3. Telomere profiling: toward glioblastoma personalized medicine.

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    Ferrandon, Sylvain; Saultier, Paul; Carras, Julien; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Alphonse, Gersende; Beuve, Michael; Malleval, Céline; Honnorat, Jérôme; Slatter, Tania; Hung, Noelyn; Royds, Janice; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2013-02-01

    Despite a standard of care combining surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and temozolomide chemotherapy, the average overall survival (OS) of glioblastoma patients is only 15 months, and even far lower when the patient cannot benefit from this combination. Therefore, there is a strong need for new treatments, such as new irradiation techniques. Against this background, carbon ion hadrontherapy, a new kind of irradiation, leads to a greater biological response of the tumor, while minimizing adverse effects on healthy tissues in comparison with RT. As carbon ion hadrontherapy is restricted to RT-resistant patients, photon irradiation resistance biomarkers are needed. Long telomeres and high telomerase activity have been widely associated with photon radioresistance in other cancers. Moreover, telomere protection, telomere function, and telomere length (TL) also depend on the shelterin protein complex (TRF1, TRF2, TPP1, POT1, TIN2, and hRAP1). We thus decided to evaluate an enlarged telomeric status (TL, telomerase catalytic subunit, and the shelterin component expression level) as a potential radioresistance biomarker in vitro using cellular models and ex vivo using patient tumor biopsies. In addition, nothing was known about the role of telomeres in carbon ion response. We thus evaluated telomeric status after both types of irradiation. We report here a significant correlation between TL and the basal POT1 expression level and photon radioresistance, in vitro, and a significant increase in the OS of patients with long telomeres or a high POT1 level, in vivo. POT1 expression was predictive of patient response irrespective of the TL. Strikingly, these correlations were lost, in vitro, when considering carbon irradiation. We thus propose (1) a model of the implications of telomeric damage in the cell response to both types of irradiation and (2) assessment of the POT1 expression level and TL using patient tumor biopsies to identify radioresistant patients who could benefit from

  4. A Positive Feed-forward Loop Associating EGR1 and PDGFA Promotes Proliferation and Self-renewal in Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

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    Sakakini, Nathalie; Turchi, Laurent; Bergon, Aurélie; Holota, Hélène; Rekima, Samah; Lopez, Fabrice; Paquis, Philipe; Almairac, Fabien; Fontaine, Denys; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Imbert, Jean; Virolle, Thierry

    2016-05-13

    Glioblastomas are the most common primary brain tumors, highly vascularized, infiltrating, and resistant to current therapies. This cancer leads to a fatal outcome in less than 18 months. The aggressive behavior of glioblastomas, including resistance to current treatments and tumor recurrence, has been attributed to glioma stemlike/progenitor cells. The transcription factor EGR1 (early growth response 1), a member of a zinc finger transcription factor family, has been described as tumor suppressor in gliomas when ectopically overexpressed. Although EGR1 expression in human glioblastomas has been associated with patient survival, its precise location in tumor territories as well as its contribution to glioblastoma progression remain elusive. In the present study, we show that EGR1-expressing cells are more frequent in high grade gliomas where the nuclear expression of EGR1 is restricted to proliferating/progenitor cells. We show in primary cultures of glioma stemlike cells that EGR1 contributes to stemness marker expression and proliferation by orchestrating a PDGFA-dependent growth-stimulatory loop. In addition, we demonstrate that EGR1 acts as a positive regulator of several important genes, including SHH, GLI1, GLI2, and PDGFA, previously linked to the maintenance and proliferation of glioma stemlike cells.

  5. Cathepsin S expression: An independent prognostic factor in glioblastoma tumours--A pilot study.

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    Flannery, Thomas; McQuaid, Stephen; McGoohan, Caroline; McConnell, Robert S; McGregor, Gordon; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Hamilton, Peter; Diamond, James; Cran, Gordon; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher; Martin, Lorraine; Ellison, David; Patel, Chirag; Nicholson, Clare; Mendelow, David; McCormick, Derek; Johnston, Patrick G

    2006-08-15

    Cysteine proteinases have been implicated in astrocytoma invasion. We recently demonstrated that cathepsin S (CatS) expression is up-regulated in astrocytomas and provided evidence for a potential role in astrocytoma invasion (Flannery et al., Am J Path 2003;163(1):175-82). We aimed to evaluate the significance of CatS in human astrocytoma progression and as a prognostic marker. Frozen tissue homogenates from 71 patients with astrocytomas and 3 normal brain specimens were subjected to ELISA analyses. Immunohistochemical analysis of CatS expression was performed on 126 paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Fifty-one astrocytoma cases were suitable for both frozen tissue and paraffin tissue analysis. ELISA revealed minimal expression of CatS in normal brain homogenates. CatS expression was increased in grade IV tumours whereas astrocytoma grades I-III exhibited lower values. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a similar pattern of expression. Moreover, high-CatS immunohistochemical scores in glioblastomas were associated with significantly shorter survival (10 vs. 5 months, p = 0.014). With forced inclusion of patient age, radiation dose and Karnofsky score in the Cox multivariate model, CatS score was found to be an independent predictor of survival. CatS expression in astrocytomas is associated with tumour progression and poor outcome in glioblastomas. CatS may serve as a useful prognostic indicator and potential target for anti-invasive therapy.

  6. Salinomycin potentiates the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL on glioblastoma cell lines.

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    Alessia Calzolari

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has been reported to exhibit therapeutic activity in cancer. However, many tumors remain resistant to treatment with TRAIL. Therefore, small molecules that potentiate the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL could be used for combinatorial therapy. Here we found that the ionophore antibiotic salinomycin acts in synergism with TRAIL, enhancing TRAIL-induced apoptosis in glioma cells. Treatment with low doses of salinomycin in combination with TRAIL augmented the activation of caspase-3 and increased TRAIL-R2 cell surface expression. TRAIL-R2 upmodulation was required for mediating the stimulatory effect of salinomycin on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, since it was abrogated by siRNA-mediated TRAIL-R2 knockdown. Salinomycin in synergism with TRAIL exerts a marked anti-tumor effect in nude mice xenografted with human glioblastoma cells. Our results suggest that the combination of TRAIL and salinomycin may be a useful tool to overcome TRAIL resistance in glioma cells and may represent a potential drug for treatment of these tumors. Importantly, salinomycin+TRAIL were able to induce cell death of well-defined glioblastoma stem-like lines.

  7. Salinomycin potentiates the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL on glioblastoma cell lines.

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    Calzolari, Alessia; Saulle, Ernestina; De Angelis, Maria Laura; Pasquini, Luca; Boe, Alessandra; Pelacchi, Federica; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Baiocchi, Marta; Testa, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been reported to exhibit therapeutic ac