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Sample records for human gh protects

  1. Immunofunctional assay of human growth hormone (hGH) in serum: A possible consensus for quantitative hGH measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Strasburger, Christian J.; Wu, Zida; Pflaum, Claus-Dieter; Dressendörfer, Regina A.

    1996-01-01

    Confirmation of the diagnosis of GH deficiency in adults and children involves provocative testing for human (h) GH. Different commercially available immunoassays yield largely discrepant results in the measurement of GH levels in human serum. These discrepancies result in doubtful relevance of cut-off levels proposed for GH provocative testing. We have developed an immunofunctional assay method that allows quantitation of only those GH forms in circulation that possess both binding sites of ...

  2. GH safety workshop position paper: A critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, t...

  3. GH receptor signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in human subjects following exposure to an intravenous GH bolus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Jessen, Niels; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates muscle and fat metabolism, which impacts on body composition and insulin sensitivity, but the underlying GH signaling pathways have not been studied in vivo in humans. We investigated GH signaling in biopsies from muscle and abdominal fat obtained 30 (n = 3) or 60 (n...... in vivo model may be used to study the mechanisms subserving the actions of GH on substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity in muscle and fat....

  4. Insulin and GH Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle In Vivo following Exogenous GH Exposure: Impact of an Oral Glucose Load

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm; Michael Madsen; Vendelbo, Mikkel H.; Pedersen, Steen B.; Christiansen, Jens S.; Niels Møller; Niels Jessen; Jørgensen, Jens O.L.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load. METHODS: Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1) after an int...

  5. Insulin and GH signaling in human skeletal muscle in vivo following exogenous GH exposure: impact of an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load. METHODS: Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1 after an intravenous GH bolus 2 after an intravenous GH bolus plus an oral glucose load (OGTT, and 3 after intravenous saline plus OGTT. Muscle biopsies were taken at t = 0, 30, 60, and 120. Blood was sampled at frequent intervals for assessment of GH, insulin, glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA. RESULTS: GH increased AUC(glucose after an OGTT (p<0.05 without significant changes in serum insulin levels. GH induced phosphorylation of STAT5 independently of the OGTT. Conversely, the OGTT induced acute phosphorylation of the insulin signaling proteins Akt (ser(473 and thr(308, and AS160.The combination of OGTT and GH suppressed Akt activation, whereas the downstream expression of AS160 was amplified by GH. WE CONCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: 1 A physiological GH bolus activates STAT5 signaling pathways in skeletal muscle irrespective of ambient glucose and insulin levels 2 Insulin resistance induced by GH occurs without a distinct suppression of insulin signaling proteins 3 The accentuation of the glucose-stimulated activation of AS 160 by GH does however indicate a potential crosstalk between insulin and GH. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00477997.

  6. GH safety workshop position paper: a critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D B; Backeljauw, P; Bidlingmaier, M; Biller, B M K; Boguszewski, M; Burman, P; Butler, G; Chihara, K; Christiansen, J; Cianfarani, S; Clayton, P; Clemmons, D; Cohen, P; Darendeliler, F; Deal, C; Dunger, D; Erfurth, E M; Fuqua, J S; Grimberg, A; Haymond, M; Higham, C; Ho, K; Hoffman, A R; Hokken-Koelega, A; Johannsson, G; Juul, A; Kopchick, J; Lee, P; Pollak, M; Radovick, S; Robison, L; Rosenfeld, R; Ross, R J; Savendahl, L; Saenger, P; Toft Sorensen, H; Stochholm, K; Strasburger, C; Swerdlow, A; Thorner, M

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, the statement highlighted a number of areas for on-going surveillance of long-term safety, including cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and use of high dose pharmacological rhGH treatment. Over the intervening years, there have been a number of publications addressing the safety of rhGH with regard to mortality, cancer and cardiovascular risk, and the need for long-term surveillance of the increasing number of adults who were treated with rhGH in childhood. Against this backdrop of interest in safety, the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE), the GRS, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) convened a meeting to reappraise the safety of rhGH. The ouput of the meeting is a concise position statement.

  7. GH safety workshop position paper: a critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D B; Backeljauw, P; Bidlingmaier, M; Biller, B M K; Boguszewski, M; Burman, P; Butler, G; Chihara, K; Christiansen, J; Cianfarani, S; Clayton, P; Clemmons, D; Cohen, P; Darendeliler, F; Deal, C; Dunger, D; Erfurth, E M; Fuqua, J S; Grimberg, A; Haymond, M; Higham, C; Ho, K; Hoffman, A R; Hokken-Koelega, A; Johannsson, G; Juul, A; Kopchick, J; Lee, P; Pollak, M; Radovick, S; Robison, L; Rosenfeld, R; Ross, R J; Savendahl, L; Saenger, P; Toft Sorensen, H; Stochholm, K; Strasburger, C; Swerdlow, A; Thorner, M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that ‘for approved indications, GH is safe’; however, the statement highlighted a number of areas for on-going surveillance of long-term safety, including cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and use of high dose pharmacological rhGH treatment. Over the intervening years, there have been a number of publications addressing the safety of rhGH with regard to mortality, cancer and cardiovascular risk, and the need for long-term surveillance of the increasing number of adults who were treated with rhGH in childhood. Against this backdrop of interest in safety, the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE), the GRS, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) convened a meeting to reappraise the safety of rhGH. The ouput of the meeting is a concise position statement. PMID:26563978

  8. Circulating levels of GH-releasing hormone and GH during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, M; Spence-Jones, C; Chard, T; Landon, J; McLean, C

    1990-04-01

    To study the potential role of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in maintaining circulating levels of GH during pregnancy, 302 maternal plasma samples were collected from non-fasted subjects at various stages of pregnancy and assayed for GHRH using a 'two-site' immunoradiometric assay. The GH and placental lactogen levels were also determined. In addition, maternal plasma samples taken during labour, amniotic fluid and cord blood were also assayed for these hormones. Maternal plasma GHRH levels were similar to non-pregnant levels throughout gestation despite fluctuations in GH values which were always higher than non-pregnant levels. There was no significant difference between GHRH levels in maternal plasma and cord blood although high GH levels were observed in the latter. These findings suggest that peripheral GHRH levels do not play an important role in maintaining circulating GH levels during pregnancy.

  9. Energy homeostasis targets chromosomal reconfiguration of the human GH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Levels of pituitary growth hormone (GH), a metabolic homeostatic factor with strong lipolytic activity, are decreased in obese individuals. GH declines prior to the onset of weight gain in response to excess caloric intake and hyperinsulinemia; however, the mechanism by which GH is reduced is not clear. We used transgenic mice expressing the human GH (hGH) gene, GH1, to assess the effect of high caloric intake on expression as well as the local chromosome structure of the intact GH1 locus. Animals exposed to 3 days of high caloric intake exhibited hyperinsulinemia without hyperglycemia and a decrease in both hGH synthesis and secretion, but no difference in endogenous production of murine GH. Efficient GH1 expression requires a long-range intrachromosomal interaction between remote enhancer sequences and the proximal promoter region through "looping" of intervening chromatin. High caloric intake disrupted this interaction and decreased both histone H3/H4 hyperacetylation and RNA polymerase II occupancy at the GH1 promoter. Incorporation of physical activity muted the effects of excess caloric intake on insulin levels, GH1 promoter hyperacetylation, chromosomal architecture, and expression. These results indicate that energy homeostasis alters postnatal hGH synthesis through dynamic changes in the 3-dimensional chromatin structure of the GH1 locus, including structures required for cell type specificity during development.

  10. El receptor de la hormona de crecimiento humana (hGH y la proteína de transporte de alta afinidad de la hGH Human Growth Hormone (GH Receptor and the High Affinity GH-Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Ballerini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La hormona de crecimiento humana (hGH circula parcialmente unida a su proteína de transporte de alta afinidad (GHBP la cual resulta del clivaje proteolítico del dominio extracelular del receptor de GH. Recientemente la enzima TACE se identificó como la metaloproteasa responsable del clivaje y liberación de GHBP a circulación. Aunque aún se desconoce la función específica de esta proteína de transporte, distintos trabajos en la literatura demuestran efectos que potencian y efectos inhibitorios sobre la acción de GH. Por otro lado, existen evidencias que demuestran una fuerte relación entre la GHBP y el nivel de receptor de GH en el hígado en situaciones fisiológicas y patológicas. Esto permitió proponer a la determinación de GHBP en suero como un marcador periférico de la abundancia del receptor de GH en los tejidos. La determinación de la concentración de GHBP sería de especial interés para evaluar pacientes con diagnóstico probable de insensibilidad a la acción de GH y orientar el posterior estudio de anormalidades en el gen del receptor de GH. En la presente revisión, también se abordan dificultades metodológicas relacionadas a la medición de GHBP sérica.Human circulating growth hormone (GH is partly bound to a high-affinity binding protein (GHBP which is derived from proteolytical cleavage of the extracellular domain of the GH receptor. Recently, the metalloproteinase TACE has been identified as an important enzyme responsive for inducing GHBP shedding. Although the specific function of GHBP is not fully known, both enhancing and inhibitory roles of this binding protein on GH action have been proposed. Many reports have demonstrated a close relationship between GHBP and the liver GH receptor status in physiological conditions and diseases. Moreover, serum GHBP measurement has been proposed as an useful peripheral index of the GH receptor abundance. Related to the latter, circulating GHBP concentration would be of

  11. THE ROLE OF CALCIUM ION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF HUMAN PITUITARY GH-SECRETING ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓洁英; 史轶蘩; 尹娟娟

    1996-01-01

    To study the role of Ca2+ in the pathogenesis of pituitary growth hormone secreting adenornas,the function of Ca2+ in 23 cases of human pituitary GH-secreting adenoma was investigated in monolayer cell culture.It was found that Ca2- channel blockers nicardipin and nifedipin inhibited hasal and growth hormone releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH secretion in 87.5% and 100.0% of the GH adenomas.respectively,demonstrating that in most human pituitary GH agonist octreotide regulated the processes of GH secretion via Ca2+ had defects in different steps including receptor.postreceptor Ca2+ channel and Ca2+-GH secreting coupling in 6(66.6%)and 5(55.5%) cases of 9 GH adenomas respectively.Among them,the defects in GRH receptor and SRIF regulated Ca2+ channel are the main causes of the dysfunction of GH adenomas.These defects may be related to GH hypersecretion in GH adenomas.Our data provides advance evidences for intrinsic defects of GH adenomas.

  12. Impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH treatment on psychiatric, neuropsychological and clinical profiles of GH deficient adults: a placebo - controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOARES CLÁUDIO DE NOVAES

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Untreated GH-deficient adults have a diversity of dysfunctions (e.g. reduced muscle strength, emotional instability during stress, depressive symptoms that may cause deleterious effects on quality of life, and may be positively influenced by recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH therapy. AIM: To evaluate the impact of a clinical intervention with rh-GH therapy on GH - deficient adults. METHOD: The physical, psychiatric and neuropsychological status of 9 GH-deficient adults was determined before and after the administration of rh-GH (0.250 IU/Kg/week in a double blind placebo-controlled trial for six months. Patients then received rh-GH for a further period of 6 months and their status was re-evaluated. RESULTS: Rh-GH was significant better than placebo at 6th month (p<0.05, producing increased serum Insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-1 levels, reduced body mass index (BMI and body fat, increased lean body mass and water, reduced waist/hip ratio and increased energy expenditure. The rh-GH therapy was also significantly better than placebo on depressive features as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale (17-items (p= 0.0431 and the Beck Depression Inventory (p= 0.0431. Neuropsychological evaluations showed significant improvements in measures of Attention: Digit Backward (p= 0.035,Verbal Fluency (FAS (p= 0.02 and Cognitive Efficiency (WAIS-R tests: Vocabulary (p= 0.027 , Picture Arrangements (p= 0.017, and Comprehension (p= 0.01 following rh-GH therapy. CONCLUSION: The clinical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological impairments of untreated GH-deficient adults can be decreased by rh-GH therapy.

  13. GH/IGF-I axis and matrix adaptation of the musculotendinous tissue to exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Mackey, Abigail; Doessing, S

    2012-01-01

    Exercise is not only associated with adaptive responses within skeletal muscle fibers but also with induction of collagen synthesis both in muscle and adjacent connective tissue. Additionally, exercise and training leads to activation of the systemic growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis...... (GH/IGF-I), as well as increased local IGF-I expression. Studies in humans with pathologically high levels of GH/IGF-I, and in healthy humans who receive either weeks of GH administration or acute injection of IGF-I into connective tissue, demonstrate increased expression and synthesis of collagen...

  14. GH receptor blocker administration and muscle-tendon collagen synthesis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Doessing, Simon; Goto, Kazushige;

    2011-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis stimulates collagen synthesis in tendon and skeletal muscle, but no studies have investigated the effect of reducing IGF-I on collagen synthesis in healthy humans.......The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis stimulates collagen synthesis in tendon and skeletal muscle, but no studies have investigated the effect of reducing IGF-I on collagen synthesis in healthy humans....

  15. Survival function Of Realization process for Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human GH in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha.T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human ghrelin in healthy volunteers. To investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide, we gave six healthy men an intravenous bolus of human ghrelin or placebo and vice versa 1–2 wk apart in a randomized fashion. Ghrelin elicited a marked increase in circulating GH. The elevation of GH lasted longer than 60 min after the bolus injection. Injection of ghrelin significantly decreased mean arterial pressure without a significant change in heart rate .In summary, human ghrelin elicited a potent, long lasting GH release and had beneficial hemodynamic effects via reducing cardiac after load and increasing cardiac output without an increase in heart rate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of intravenous ghrelin in healthy volunteers. This paper discussed the constant stress level of healthy volunteers with times to damage of stress effect and recoveries

  16. Development of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) sustained-release microspheres by a low temperature aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Wu, Fei; Cai, Yunpeng; Xu, Mingxin; He, Mu; Yuan, Weien

    2014-10-01

    A novel method has been developed to protect Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres using an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion and S/O/W multi-emulsion method. This method develops a novel rhGH sustained-release system, which is based on the combination of rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles and PLGA microspheres. The process to fabricate rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles involves an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion system formed at the reduced temperature. RhGH was first dissolved in water together with dextran and polyethylene glycol, followed by stirring at the speed of 2000 rpm for 20-30s at 0°C, and then a freezing process could enable the dextran phase to separate from the continuous PEG phase and rhGH could preferentially be loaded with dextran. The sample after freezing and phase separation was then lyophilized to powder and washed with dichloromethane to remove the PEG. Once loaded in the dextran microparticles (1-4 μm in diameter), rhGH gained resistance to interface tensions and was encapsulated into PLGA microspheres without aggregation thereafter. RhGH released from PLGA microspheres was in a sustained manner with minimal burst and maximally reduced incomplete release in vitro. Single subcutaneous injection of rhGH-loaded PLGA microspheres to rats resulted in a stable plasma concentration for 30 days avoiding the drug concentration fluctuations after multiple injections of protein solutions. In a hypophysectomized rat model, the IGF-1 and bodyweight results showed that there were higher than the levels obtained for the sustained release formulation by W/O/W for 40 days. These results suggest that the microsphere delivery system had the potential to be an injectable depot for sustained-release of the biocompatible protein of rhGH.

  17. STAT5 activation by human GH protects insulin-producing cells against interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis independent of nitric oxide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Karlsen, Allan E

    2005-01-01

    expression and in fact augmented the IL-1beta-stimulated nitric oxide production. As the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL gene has been shown to harbour a STAT5-binding element we measured the expression of Bcl-xL as well as the pro-apoptotic Bax. We found that hGH increased the Bcl-xL/Bax ratio both in the absence...

  18. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. GH response to GHRH plus arginine is impaired in lipoatrophic women with human immunodeficiency virus compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirilli, Lucia; Orlando, Gabriella; Carli, Federica; Madeo, Bruno; Cocchi, Stefania; Diazzi, Chiara; Carani, Cesare; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    GH secretion is impaired in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and inversely related to lipodystrophy-related fat redistribution in men. Less is known about the underlying mechanisms involved in reduced GH secretion in HIV-infected women. A case-control, cross-sectional study comparing GH/IGF1 status, body composition, and metabolic parameters in 92 nonobese women with HIV-related lipodystrophy and 63 healthy controls matched for age, ethnicity, sex, and body mass index (BMI). GH, IGF1, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), GH after GHRH plus arginine (GHRH+Arg), several metabolic variables, and body composition were evaluated. GH response to GHRH+Arg was lower in HIV-infected females than in controls. Using a cutoff of peak GH ≤ 7.5 μg/l, 20.6% of HIV-infected females demonstrated reduced peak GH response after GHRH+Arg. In contrast, none of the control subjects demonstrated a peak GH response ≤ 7.5 μg/l. Bone mineral density (BMD), quality of life, IGF1, and IGFBP3 were lowest in the HIV-infected females with a GH peak ≤ 7.5 μg/l. BMI was the main predictive factor of GH peak in stepwise multiregression analysis followed by age, with a less significant effect of visceral fat in the HIV-infected females. This study establishes that i) GH response to GHRH+Arg is lower in lipoatrophic HIV-infected women than in healthy matched controls, ii) BMI more than visceral adipose tissue or trunk fat influences GH peak in this population, and iii) HIV-infected women with a GH peak below or equal to 7.5 μg/l demonstrate reduced IGF1, IGFBP3, BMD, and quality of life.

  20. Hat das humane Wachtumshormon (hGH eine Relevanz in der Kontrolle der penilen Erektion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ückert St

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Allgemeines: Schon seit langem wird die Frage einer Beteiligung des Hypophysenhormons Human Growth Hormone (Wachstumshormon, hGH, GH an der Kontrolle der sexuellen Maturation und der Reproduktionsfunktion des Menschen diskutiert. Die Symptome eines GH-Defizits beim Mann sind u. a. allgemeine Antriebslosigkeit, Oligo- oder Azoospermie, eine Verminderung der Libido sowie eine Beeinträchtigung der normalen Erektionsfähigkeit. Es wird vermutet, daß die biologischen Effekte des GH eine durch das Somatomedin Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1 vermittelte Stimulation der Produktion von Stickoxid (NO durch die endotheliale und neuronale Form des Enzyms NO-Synthase einschließen. So konnte gezeigt werden, daß physiologische Konzentrationen von GH den adrenergen Tonus isolierter Streifenpräparate humaner Schwellkörpermuskulatur antagonisieren und den Gewebegehalt des Second Messengers cGMP erhöhen. Im Rahmen dieser Studie haben wir in einem Kollektiv gesunder Männer und in einer Gruppe von Patienten mit erektiler Dysfunktion (ED die systemischen und cavernösen Serumkonzentrationen von GH während verschiedener peniler Funktionszustände, d. h. verschiedener Stadien der sexuellen Erregung, untersucht. Methoden: 35 gesunden männlichen Probanden und 45 Patienten mit einer ED organogener oder psychogener Genese wurden während der penilen Flakzidität, Tumeszenz, Rigidität - dieses Stadium wurde nur von den Gesunden erreicht - und Detumeszenz zeitgleich Blutproben aus einer Cubitalvene und dem Corpus cavernosum penis entnommen. Tumeszenz und Rigidität wurden durch visuelle und taktile Stimulation ausgelöst. Die Quantifizierung von GH in Aliquots der Serumfraktionen erfolgte mit immunradiometrischen Methoden (IRMA. Ergebnisse: In der Gruppe der gesunden Männer stieg die mittlere systemische und cavernöse Serumkonzentration von GH während der Tumeszenz an, während in den Phasen der Rigidität und Detumeszenz eine Abnahme registriert wurde

  1. Development of a Transnasal Delivery System for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH): Effects of the Concentration and Molecular Weight of Poly-L-arginine on the Nasal Absorption of rhGH in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Ryo; Uchida, Masaki; Yamaki, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Kazuo; Hatanaka, Tomomi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Jun; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    A novel system for delivering recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) that is noninvasive and has a simple method of administration is strongly desired to improve the compliance of children. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for the intranasal (i.n.) co-administration of rhGH with poly-L-arginine (PLA) as a novel delivery system by evaluating the effects of the concentration and molecular weight of PLA on the nasal absorption of rhGH. The influence of the formation of insoluble aggregates and a soluble complex in the dosage formulation on nasal rhGH absorption was also evaluated by size-exclusion chromatography and ultrafiltration. PLA enhanced the nasal absorption of rhGH at each concentration and molecular weight examined. Nasal rhGH absorption increased dramatically when the PLA concentration was 1.0 % (w/v) due to the improved solubility of rhGH in the formulation. A delay in rhGH absorption was observed when the molecular weight of PLA was increased. This appeared to be because the increase in molecular weight caused the formation of a soluble complex. It seems that the PLA concentration affects the absorption-enhancing effect on rhGH, while the molecular weight of PLA affects the time when the maximum plasma rhGH concentration was reached (Tmax) of rhGH after i.n. administration, mainly because of the interactions among rhGH, PLA, and additives. Therefore, the transnasal rhGH delivery system using PLA is considered to be a promising alternative to subcutaneous (s.c.) injection if these interactions are sufficiently controlled.

  2. The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Maghsoudi, S; Fisker, S;

    2000-01-01

    (frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test) glucose tolerance test, and body composition was estimated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Treatment with rhGH induced persistent favorable changes in body composition, with a 10% increase in lean body mass (P ...The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term (30 months) metabolic effects of recombinant human GH (rhGH) given in a mean dose of 6.7 microg/kg x day (= 1.6 IU/day), in 11 patients with adult GH deficiency. Glucose metabolism was evaluated by an oral glucose tolerance test and an iv...... in glucose tolerance, beta-cell response was still inappropriate. Our conclusion is that long-term rhGH-replacement therapy in GH deficiency adults induced a significant deterioration in glucose tolerance, profound changes in kinetics of C-peptide, and insulin and prehepatic insulin secretion, despite...

  3. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real...... cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found...... that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma....

  4. Growth hormone and the kidney: the use of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in growth-retarded children with chronic renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, R N

    1991-04-01

    Hypothalamic production of growth hormone releasing hormone stimulates the anterior pituitary gland to release growth hormone (GH). The clinical manifestations of GH on tissues are either direct or are mediated by insulin-like growth factors (IGF). Both the somatic effects of GH and the renal manifestations of an increase in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow are mediated by IGF. The increase in glomerular filtration rate/renal plasma flow that occurs with either exogenous or endogenous GH is not apparent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF); therefore, it is unlikely that recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment of patients with CRF will result in glomerular hyperfiltration. Longitudinal studies are required to determine if the glomerulosclerosis and renal functional impairment occurring in GH and growth hormone releasing hormone transgenic mice occurs after rhGH treatment of growth-retarded uremic rats with GH resulted in an improvement in growth velocity. This led to preliminary studies in growth-retarded children with CRF by using rhGH. The acceleration of growth velocity was dramatic despite the fact that GH levels are elevated in uremia. The elevated IGF carrier proteins in uremic children may contribute to the growth retardation. Treatment with rhGH may be efficacious by stimulating a net increase in the free (unbound) IGF levels. Hyposecretion of GH may contribute to the failure to achieve optimal growth after successful renal transplantation. Treatment with rhGH may be efficacious in improving the growth velocity of renal allograft recipients.

  5. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M

    1997-01-01

    The onset of adult GH deficiency may be during either adulthood (AO) or childhood (CO), but potential differences have not previously been examined. In this study the baseline and GH therapy (12.5 micrograms/kg per day) data from CO (n = 74; mean age 29 yr) and AO (n = 99; mean age 44 yr) GH-defi...

  6. The precalence of the metabolic syndrome is increades in patients with GH deficiency, irrespective of long-term substition with recombinant human GH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, A.A.; Biermasz, N.R.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Bos, M.B.; Smit, J.W.; Roelfsema, F.; Corssmit, E.P.; Pijl, H.; Romijn, J.A.; Pereira, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Many reports demonstrate improvements in cardiovascular risk factors during GH replacement (rhGH) in adult GH deficiency (GHD). However, it remains to be determined to what extent these changes translate into a reduction of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of thi

  7. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) on experimental osteoporotic fracture healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of recombinant human growthhormone (r-hGH) on osteoporotic fracture healing in rats, and to provide an effective therapy for osteoporotic fracture.Methods: Thirty-six female 8-month-old SD rats were randomized into two groups: therapy group and control group. After the experimental model of osteoporotic fracture was established, the therapy group was treated with r-hGH of 2.7 mg/kg body weigh/day (1 mg=3 IU) for 10 days continuously by daily subcutaneous injection; whereas the control group was treated with equivalent saline. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I concentration was detected and bone mineral density (BMD) as well as biomechanical strength of callus were measured at 2, 4, 8 weeks.Results: Plasma insulin-like growth factor I concentration in the therapy group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.005) at 2nd week and began to decline at 4th week. At 8th week, there was no significant difference between the two groups. At 4th week, callus area and BMD in therapy group were higher than those in the control group, but at 8th week, they were lower and BMD had a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.001). Biomechanical testing of callus showed that torsional strength of the therapy group was higher than that of the control group at 4th or 8th week, meanwhile maximum torsional angle had a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.005).Conclusions: The results show that exogenous r-hGH can stimulate osteoporotic fracture healing in rats.

  8. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas J; Hernandez, Rosmel E; Noriega, Vanessa M; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-03-30

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV.

  9. 谷胱甘肽对多巴胺诱导的GH4细胞凋亡的保护作用%Glutathione protects GH4 pituitary lactotrope tumor cells from apoptosis induced by dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晗; 李书鹏; 姜玉华; 刘芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore mechanisms of dopamine(DA) inducing GH4 cell apoptosis and glutathione(GSH) protecting GH4 cells from apoptosis induced by DA. Methods ① GH4 pituitary cells were treated with DA at 0, 100, 300 and 500μmol/L for 24 h, then treated with DA at 500 μmol/L for 0,1,3,5,12 and 24 h to select the appropriate concentration and time. ② Then GH4 cells were treated with raclopride( a D2 receptor antagonist, Rac) and GSH to explore the effects of Rac and GSH on apoptosis. ③Apoptotic cells were counted by an inverted phase contrast microscope. Morphological appearance was observed by PI labeling, and expressions of Bcl-2 and PARP-1 were detected by Western blot. Results DA induced concentration-and time-dependent GH4 cell apoptosis. A selective D2 receptor antagonist could not block the cytotoxic effect. PI revealed that exposure to GSH (1 mmol/L) for lh prior to the DA treatment attenuated DA-induced apoptosis. Western blot showed up-regulation of Bcl-2 and down-regulation of PARP-1. Conclusion DA exerts cytotoxic effects on GH4 cells mainly through auto-oxidation in the intracellular space. A selective D2 receptor antagonist cannot block DA-induced apoptosis, while GSH can block it, which may be relevant to regulation of Bcl-2 and PARP-1.%目的 探讨多巴胺(DA)诱导垂体瘤GH4细胞凋亡及谷胱甘肽(GSH)对DA诱导细胞凋亡的保护作用机制.方法 本实验通过3部分探讨DA的凋亡作用及GSH的保护作用:①实验分空白对照组及DA用药组,体外观察不同浓度、时间DA对GH4细胞生长的影响;②实验分空白对照组、DA组、DA联合DA D2受体拮抗剂组,观察D2受体在细胞凋亡中的作用;③实验设空白对照组、DA组、GSH用药组,PI染色分别观察3组细胞的凋亡情况,Western blot检测Bcl-2及PARP-1的表达.结果 DA诱导的GH4细胞凋亡呈浓度-时间依赖性,选择性D2受体拮抗剂不能阻断细胞凋亡,经GSH处理GH4细胞后,PI染色显示凋

  10. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  11. GH deficiency status combined with GH receptor polymorphism affects response to GH in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsesia, Armand; Chatelain, Pierre; Stevens, Adam; Peterkova, Valentina A; Belgorosky, Alicia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Antoniazzi, Franco; Koledova, Ekaterina; Wojcik, Jerome; Farmer, Pierre; Destenaves, Benoit; Clayton, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Meta-analysis has shown a modest improvement in first-year growth response to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) for carriers of the exon 3-deleted GH receptor (GHRd3) polymorphism but with significant interstudy variability. The associations between GHRd3 and growth response to r-hGH over 3 years in relation to severity of GH deficiency (GHD) were investigated in patients from 14 countries. Treatment-naïve pre-pubertal children with GHD were enrolled from the PREDICT studies (NCT00256126 and NCT00699855), categorized by peak GH level (peak GH) during provocation test: ≤4 μg/l (severe GHD; n=45) and >4 to GH level. GH peak level (higher vs lower) and GHRd3 (fl/fl vs d3 carriers) combined status was associated with height change over 3 years (PGH had lower growth than subjects with fl/fl (median difference after 3 years -3.3 cm; -0.3 SDS). Conversely, GHRd3 carriers with higher peak GH had better growth (+2.7 cm; +0.2 SDS). Similar patterns were observed for GH-dependent biomarkers. GE profiles were significantly different between the groups, indicating that the interaction between GH status and GHRd3 carriage can be identified at a transcriptomic level. This study demonstrates that responses to r-hGH depend on the interaction between GHD severity and GHRd3 carriage.

  12. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) before and after short-term recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Jung, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jin; Jin, Hye Young; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lee, Beom Hee; Shin, Choong Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-04-01

    This study was undertaken to identify growth hormone (GH) responsive proteins and protein expression patterns by short-term recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in patients with idiopathic short stature (ISS) using proteomic analysis. Seventeen children (14 males and three females) with ISS were included. They were treated with rhGH at a dose of 0.31 ± 0.078 mg/kg/week for 3 months. Immunodepletion of six highly-abundant serum proteins followed by 2D DIGE analysis, and subsequent MALDI TOF MS, were employed to generate a panel of proteins differentially expressed after short-term rhGH therapy and verify the differences in serum levels of specific proteins by rhGH therapy. Fourteen spots were differentially expressed after rhGH treatment. Among them, apo E and apo L-1 expression were consistently enhanced, whereas serum amyloid A was reduced after rhGH therapy. The differential expressions of these proteins were subsequently verified by Western blot analysis using sera of the before and after rhGH treatment. This study suggests that rhGH therapy influences lipoprotein metabolism and enhances apo L-1 protein expression in ISS patients. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The role of ghrelin in GH secretion and GH disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Ralf; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Thorner, Michael O

    2011-06-20

    In humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from the anterior pituitary in a pulsatile pattern. The traditional view is that this secretory pattern is driven by two counter regulatory neurohormones, GHRH and somatostatin. Ghrelin, the natural ligand for the growth hormone (GH)-secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is produced in the stomach. Ghrelin is the strongest GH secretagogue known to date, but the role of endogenous ghrelin in the regulation of circulating GH levels remains controversial. The following review examines the evidence suggesting that endogenous ghrelin may be a key regulator of GH peak amplitude and discusses studies of diseases with altered GH levels, where it is found that in these states GH and ghrelin levels change in a similar way.

  15. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  16. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuytens, Kim; Tuand, Krizia; Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W M

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  17. Ghrelin drives GH secretion during fasting in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; E. Ghigo (Ezio); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: In humans, fasting leads to elevated serum GH concentrations. Traditionally, changes in hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin release are considered as the main mechanisms that induce this elevated GH secretion during fasting. Ghrelin is an

  18. Potential benefits of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael R; Baker, Julien S; Evans, Peter; Hullin, David; Thomas, Non-Eleri; Davies, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Athletes have enjoyed almost a thirty year amnesty of rhGH abuse, which they consider has contributed to the winning of medals and the breaking of world records. Such a reprieve is almost at an end, since WADA have identified a method to detect rhGH abuse. Or have they? The anecdotal word "on the street" is that rhGH is still undetectable and athletes believe that the benefits, at the dosages they administer, far outweigh the risks! Scientists are aware that in a hormone deficiency condition, replacement can halt and in certain situations reverse some of the adverse effects. Growth hormone deficiency can lead to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and an increase in abdomino-visceral obesity, which is reversed on replacement with rhGH. Since the availability of GH, athletes have been trying to extrapolate these effects from the deficiency state to the healthy corpus and increase their sporting prowess. Past confessions from athletes, such as Ben Johnson, Kelly White, Tim Montgomery, Marion Jones and currently Dwain Chambers have demonstrated that they are prepared to tread the very fine lines that separate the "men from the boys". Rewards are so great, that anonymous surveys have identified that athletes will risk ill health, if they believe they can cheat, win and not get caught. The question that still needs to be answered is, "does growth hormone enhance performance"? Recent research suggests that it could. There is also a suspicion that in "cycled" low supraphysiological doses, it is no where near as harmful as WADA claim it to be.

  19. Administration of recombinant human growth hormone normalizes GH-IGF1 axis and improves malnutrition-related disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Satoru; Komatsu, Ai; Hiramatsu, Kunihide; Mori, Jun-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Masanori; Takeda, Teiji; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Takahide; Koizumi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    High serum level of GH in the presence of low plasma level of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is one of the endocrinological features of anorexia nervosa (AN). Whether the amount of endogenous GH is not enough to increase IGF-I is not certain. We studied the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on the GH-IGF-I axis and on malnutrition-related disorders in this syndrome. Twenty patients with AN were divided into two groups; one (N = 13) was given rhGH (0.33 mg/day), and the other (N = 7) was given placebo for 6 or 12 months, respectively. During each treatment, levels of serum GH, plasma IGF-I, serum thyroid hormones, serum cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose and cardiac function were monitored. Changes in body mass index (BMI) and calorie taken were also evaluated. Plasma IGF-I level increased from 74.4 +/- 41.9 to 269.0 +/- 31.2 microg/L (Ppatients treated with placebo. Administration of rhGH is recommended as one of the methods of managing the patients with AN.

  20. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  1. The role of SOCS2 in recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) regulating lipid metabolism in high-fat-diet-induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai Li; Feng, Min; Tan, Xiao; Yan, Guo Yong; Sun, Chao

    2013-03-01

    In addition to regulate body growth and development process, growth hormone (GH) also involved in lipid metabolism, decreasing fat mass and improving lipolysis. To normal mice, GH could reduce their fat content, but events turned uncertain coming to the pattern of feeding high-fat-diet. In order to investigate the role of GH in adipogenesis of mice with high-fat-diet, the high-fat-diet feeding mice were randomly assigned into three groups and treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and the somatostatin analogue octreotide respectively. Results demonstrated that both rhGH and octreotide could reduce the body weight but the trends diminished in the end. HDL-C level was increased in octreotide treated groups but the activity of lipase was increased significantly in both two groups. RhGH remarkable increased the expression of SOCS2, FAS (P < 0.01) and SREBP-1c (P < 0.05), decreased the expression of SOCS1, SOCS3 (P < 0.05) and HSL (P < 0.01) in subcutaneous fat mass. In visceral fat tissue, all genes were increased except SOCS2 (P < 0.01), at the same time the visceral fat mass was decreased. The protein phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5 which were treated with octreotide were increased in subcutaneous fat, visceral fat and liver (P < 0.01) and were increased significant in visceral fat by rhGH treated (P < 0.01). In liver, only JAK2 protein phosphorylation was raised (P < 0.01). In conclusion, rhGH and octreotide could decrease the whole body mass before 6 days; the trend was weaken in later period with high-fat-diet. RhGH could increase the subcutaneous fat mass and reduce the visceral fat mass, and SOCS2 might be involved in regulation of the mechanism through JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

  2. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  3. Different short-term effect of protein and carbohydrate intake on TSH, growth hormone (GH), insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Andersen, B B; Jensen, B G

    1990-01-01

    hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to protein and carbohydrate was identical, with a reduction in both GH and TSH, and nadir occurring after 45-60 min and 120 min, respectively. During the next 120 min TSH returned to starting level after carbohydrate intake but was still reduced after...... protein intake (p less than 0.04). After both diets GH increased after the initial decline, the increase was greatest after protein intake and maximum was reached at 180 min (p less than 0.02). It has been reported that the 5'-deiodination of T4 is stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon......The effect of isocaloric (500 kcal) protein and carbohydrate ingestion was studied in a crossover study in nine healthy humans. Subjects were studied twice after overnight fasting, with an interval of 3 to 7 days. Blood was collected for 240 min after food ingestion. The initial reaction of growth...

  4. Protecting human subjects in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orticio, Lily P

    2009-01-01

    The quest for advancing scientific knowledge through human experimentations using vulnerable groups is traced back to ancient history, when Herophilus performed vivisections on prisoners. The violation of the rights of human subjects through the 20th century led to the formulation of the Nuremberg Code in 1947 and the Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. In the United States, the most infamous was the Tuskegee public health study that resulted in the enactment of the National Research Act that authorized the creation of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects in Biomedical and Behavioral Research in 1974. In spite of existing federal regulations, the system of protecting human subjects is still flawed. Transparency of conflict ofinterest, clarity, and strict adherence to institutional guidelines are critical in safeguarding the rights and safety of human subjects and the integrity of research. Education on ethics and emerging complex ethical issues, global awareness, and governmental cooperation and sanctions are important steps in addressing the inadequacies in protecting the most vulnerable populations in experimentations worldwide. Investigators must always remember that the primary safeguards of protecting human life rest in their hands.

  5. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  6. Implementation of a SPR immunosensor for the simultaneous detection of the 22K and 20K hGH isoforms in human serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Franco, Elena; Rodríguez-Frade, J M; Mellado, M; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-09-30

    We have implemented a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor based on a sandwich assay for the simultaneous detection of the two main hGH isoforms, of 22 kDa (22K) and 20 kDa (20K). An oriented-antibody sensor surface specific for both hormone isoforms was assembled by using the biotin-streptavidin system. The immunosensor functionality was checked for the direct detection of the 22K hGH isoform in buffer, which gave high specificity and reproducibility (intra and inter-assay mean coefficients of variation of 8.23% and 9% respectively). The selective determination of the 22K and 20K hGH isoforms in human serum samples in a single assay was possible by using two specific anti-hGH monoclonal antibodies. The detection limit for both hormone isoforms was 0.9 ng mL(-1) and the mean coefficient of variation was below 7.2%. The excellent reproducibility and sensitivity obtained indicate the high performance of this immunosensor for implementing an anti-doping test.

  7. The robustness of diagnostic tests for GH deficiency in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970s, GH treatment has been an important tool in paediatric endocrinology for the management of growth retardation. It is now accepted that adults with severe GH deficiency (GHD) demonstrate impaired physical and psychological well-being and may benefit from replacement therapy...... with recombinant human GH. There is, however, an ongoing debate on how to diagnose GHD, especially in adults. A GH response below the cut-off limit of a GH-stimulation test is required in most cases for establishing GHD in adults. No 'gold standard' GH-stimulation test exists, but some GH stimulation tests may...... be more robust to variations in patient characteristics such as age and gender, as well as to pre-test conditions like heat exposure due to a hot bath or bicycling. However, body mass index (BMI) is negatively associated with GH-responses to all available GH-stimulation tests and glucocorticoid treatment...

  8. GH receptor blocker administration and muscle-tendon collagen synthesis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Doessing, Simon; Goto, Kazushige

    2011-01-01

    Collagen is the predominant structural protein in tendons and ligaments, and can be controlled by hormonal changes. In animals, injections of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been shown to increase collagen synthesis in tendons and ligaments and to improve structural tissue healing......, but the effect of local IGF-I administration on tendon collagen synthesis in human has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to study whether local injections of IGF-I would have a stimulating effect on tendon collagen synthesis. Twelve healthy nonsmoking men [age 62 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM), BMI 27 ± 1......] participated. Two injections of either human recombinant IGF-I (0.1 mL Increlex©) or saline (control) into each patellar tendon were performed 24-h apart, respectively. Tendon collagen fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was measured by stable isotope technique in the hours after the second injection...

  9. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  10. A novel oral preparation of human growth hormone (hGH) is absorbed and increases serum IGF-I levels after 7 days administration to GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Mindeholm, Linda; Haemmerle, Sibylle;

    2007-01-01

    Growth hormone deficient (GHD) patients are currently effectively treated with daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of hGH in the evening, but alternative routes would be attractive. An oral formulationulation of hGH, using an amino-caprilic acid derivative (5-CNAC, Emisphere's eligen® technology...

  11. Long-term effect on body composition and metabolic parameters after treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in HIV-1 infected patients with lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Markus; Zangos, Stephan; Lutz, Thomas; Eisen, Johannes; Knecht, Gabi; Goebel, Frank D; Crespi, Catherine M; Jacobi, Volkmar; Staszewski, Schlomo; Klauke, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown reduction of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in HIV-1+ patients, but whether these effects are maintained after the end of treatment is unknown. In a prospective, randomized study we previously studied the effects of r-hGH 4 mg daily vs 3 times/week over 12 weeks, followed by a 2 mg daily maintenance dose for an additional 12 weeks. T1 weighted MRI flash sequences were performed of the face, abdomen and at mid-thigh level (MTF) at baseline, week 12, week 24 and at follow-up. Of 20 subjects who completed the 24-week study, follow-up is available for 16 patients (15 male, mean age 44.8 y, mean duration of HIV infection 13.5 y). After a median time of follow-up of 9 months, VAT remained overall 18% below baseline level (p =0.005). MTF was significantly reduced by 12% compared to its baseline level (p =0.03). Fasting glucose levels significantly improved by 21% compared to baseline (p =0.006). These results suggest that the achieved reduction of VAT using r-hGH in lipodystrophic HIV+ patients is in part maintained after a median follow-up of 9 months.

  12. Assessment of ghrelin, GHS-R, GH, and neurohormones in human fetal pituitary glands and central nervous system: an immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Obara-Moszynska

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was evaluation of expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a receptor in somatotrops and in neuronal cells of brain tissue in the process of human fetal ontogenesis. Relations were also looked for between GHRH and SS in the pituitary and in the CNS neurones of the studied fetuses. The study was based on 8 pituitaries and 8 brains from fetuses in different periods of intrauterine life. The immunocytochemical technique was used. The presence of ghrelin, GHS-R was shown in the glandular part of the pituitary and CNS during the whole period of intrauterine life. Neurohormones in the stalk of the pituitary were found in fetuses from the 32nd week of pregnancy whereas in the CNS neurones these hormones could be detected throughout the whole period of intrauterine life. The results obtained suggest that stimulation of GH secretion by ghrelin is independent of the feedback concentration and these two hormones act like signals of metabolic balance. GH release by ghrelin in fetal life is independent of somatostatin. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis which regulates pulsatile GH release from the pituitary matures functionally in the third trimester of pregnancy independent of the previous anatomical differentiation.

  13. Ghrelin drives GH secretion during fasting in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; E. Ghigo (Ezio); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: In humans, fasting leads to elevated serum GH concentrations. Traditionally, changes in hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin release are considered as the main mechanisms that induce this elevated GH secretion during fasting. Ghrelin is an endo

  14. Impact of growth hormone (GH deficiency and GH replacement upon thymus function in adult patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Morrhaye

    integrity of the somatotrope GH/IGF-1 axis is important for the maintenance of a normal thymus function in human adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NTC00601419.

  15. The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Maghsoudi, S; Fisker, S

    2000-01-01

    the insulin sensitivity index, calculated from the frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test, only decreased slightly. The clearance of C-peptide and insulin increased 100% and 60%, respectively, and the prehepatic insulin secretion was tripled during rhGH treatment; but related to the impairment...... an increase in lean body mass and a reduction of fat mass. Therefore, rhGH treatment may precipitate diabetes in some patients already susceptible to the disorder....

  16. Growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH): Co-localization and action in the chicken testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; López-Marín, Luz M; Carranza, Martha; Giterman, Daniel; Harvey, Steve; Arámburo, Carlos; Luna, Maricela

    2014-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) gene expression is not confined to the pituitary gland and occurs in many extrapituitary tissues, including the chicken testis. The regulation and function of GH in extrapituitary tissues is, however, largely unknown. The possibility that chicken testicular GH might be regulated by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), as in the avian pituitary gland, was investigated in the present study. GHRH co-localized with GH in the germinal epithelium and in interstitial zones within the chicken testes, particularly in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes. In testicular cell cultures, exogenous human GHRH1-44 induced (at 1, 10 and 100nM) a dose-related increase in GH release. Western blot analysis showed a heterogeneous pattern in the GH moieties released during GHRH stimulation. 26kDa monomer GH was the most abundant moiety under basal conditions, but 15 and 17kDa isoforms were more abundant after GHRH stimulation. GHRH treatment also increased the abundance of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the testes. This may have been GH-mediated, since exogenous GH similarly increased the incorporation of ((3)H)-thymidine into cultured testicular cells and increased their metabolic activity, as determined by increased MTT reduction. Furthermore, GH and GHRH immunoneutralization blocked GHRH-stimulated proliferative activity. In summary, these results indicate that GHRH stimulates testicular GH secretion in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Data also demonstrate proliferative actions of GHRH on testicular cell number and suggest that this action is mediated by local GH production.

  17. Human Longevity and Variation in GH/IGF-1/Insulin Signaling, DNA Damage Signaling and Repair and Pro/antioxidant Pathway Genes: Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Dato, Serena; Tan, Qihua; Thinggaard, Mikael; Kleindorp, Rabea; Beekman, Marian; Jacobsen, Rune; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Schreiber, Stefan; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Nebel, Almut; Vaupel, James W.; Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt; Christiansen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Here we explore association with human longevity of common genetic variation in three major candidate pathways: GH/IGF-1/insulin signaling, DNA damage signaling and repair and pro/antioxidants by investigating 1273 tagging SNPs in 148 genes composing these pathways. In a case-control study of 1089 oldest-old (age 92–93) and 736 middle-aged Danes we found 1 pro/antioxidant SNP (rs1002149 (GSR)), 5 GH/IGF-1/INS SNPs (rs1207362 (KL), rs2267723 (GHRHR), rs3842755 (INS), rs572169 (GHSR), rs9456497 (IGF2R)) and 5 DNA repair SNPs (rs11571461 (RAD52), rs13251813 (WRN), rs1805329 (RAD23B), rs2953983 (POLB), rs3211994 (NTLH1)) to be associated with longevity after correction for multiple testing. In a longitudinal study with 11 years of follow-up on survival in the oldest-old Danes we found 2 pro/antioxidant SNPs (rs10047589 (TNXRD1), rs207444 (XDH)), 1 GH/IGF-1/INS SNP (rs26802 (GHRL)) and 3 DNA repair SNPs (rs13320360 (MLH1), rs2509049 (H2AFX) and rs705649 (XRCC5)) to be associated with mortality in late life after correction for multiple testing. When examining the 11 SNPs from the case-control study in the longitudinal data, rs3842755 (INS), rs13251813 (WRN) and rs3211994 (NTHL1) demonstrated the same directions of effect (pbased association study, the largest to date applying a pathway approach, points to potential new longevity loci, but does also underline the difficulties of replicating association findings in independent study populations and thus the difficulties in identifying universal longevity polymorphisms. PMID:22406557

  18. Regulation of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and GH-binding protein mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaji, Hidesuke; Ohashi, Shin-Ichirou; Abe, Hiromi; Chihara, Kazuo [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    In fasting rats, a transient increase in growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels was observed after 1 day, in muscle, heart, and liver, but not in fat tissues. The liver GH receptor (GHR) mRNA level was significantly increased after 1 day (but not after 5 days) of bovine GH (bGH) treatment in fed rats. Both the liver GHR mRNA level and the net increment of plasma IGF-I markedly decreased after 5 days of bGH administration in fasting rats. These findings suggest that GHR and GHBP mRNAs in the liver are expressed in a different way and that the expression of GHBP mRNA is regulated differently between tissues, at least in rats. The results also suggest that refractoriness to GH in a sustained fasting state might be beneficial in preventing anabolic effects of GH. In humans, GHR mRNA in lymphocytes, from subjects with either GH-deficiency or acromegaly, could be detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. In one patient with partial GH insensitivity, a heterozygous missense mutation (P561T) was identified in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. The robustness of diagnostic tests for GH deficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Since the 1970s, GH treatment has been an important tool in paediatric endocrinology for the management of growth retardation. It is now accepted that adults with severe GH deficiency (GHD) demonstrate impaired physical and psychological well-being and may benefit from replacement therapy with recombinant human GH. There is, however, an ongoing debate on how to diagnose GHD, especially in adults. A GH response below the cut-off limit of a GH-stimulation test is required in most cases for establishing GHD in adults. No 'gold standard' GH-stimulation test exists, but some GH stimulation tests may be more robust to variations in patient characteristics such as age and gender, as well as to pre-test conditions like heat exposure due to a hot bath or bicycling. However, body mass index (BMI) is negatively associated with GH-responses to all available GH-stimulation tests and glucocorticoid treatment, including conventional substitution therapy, influences the GH-responses. Recently, the role of IGF-I measurements in the clinical decision making has been discussed. The aim of this review is to discuss the available GH-stimulation tests. In this author's opinion, tests which include growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) tend to be more potent and robust, especially the GHRH+arginine test which has been proven to be of clinical use. In contrast, the insulin tolerance test (ITT) and the glucagon test appear to have too many drawbacks.

  20. China's Judicial Protection of Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN LIANG

    2007-01-01

    @@ China has devoted great efforts to improving judicial protection of human rights in the past 30 years.It has ratified the International Covenant on Economic,Social and Cultural Rights,signed but yet to ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and become a state party to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel,Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.In March 2004,the 10th National People's Congress adopted at its second plenary session the amendments to the Constitution,writing "the state respects and protects human rights" into the Constitution,declaring that China will use legal means to protect and safeguard human rights.

  1. Effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on GH and insulin-like growth factor I levels in transgenic mice overexpressing the human GHRH gene, an animal model of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, M; Kineman, R D; Schally, A V; Zarandi, M; Groot, K; Frohman, L A

    1997-11-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the human GH-releasing hormone (hGHRH) gene, an animal model of acromegaly, were used to investigate the effects of potent GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 on the excessive GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion caused by overproduction of hGHRH. Because metallothionein (MT)-GHRH mice express the hGHRH transgene in various tissues, including the pituitary and hypothalamus, initial experiments focused on the effectiveness of the GHRH antagonists in blocking basal and stimulated GH secretion from pituitary cells in vitro. Both MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 suppressed basal release of GH from superfused MT-GHRH pituitary cells, apparently by blocking the action of endogenously produced hGHRH. In addition, these antagonists effectively eliminated the response to stimulatory action of exogenous hGHRH(1-29)NH2 (30 and 100 nM). To ascertain whether MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 could antagonize the effect of hGHRH hyperstimulation in vivo, each antagonist was administered to MT-GHRH transgenic mice in a single iv dose of 10-200 microg. Both compounds decreased serum GH levels in transgenic mice by 39-72% at 1 h after injection. The inhibitory effect of 50 microg MZ-5-156 was maintained for 5 h. Twice daily ip administration of 100 microg MZ-5-156 for 3 days suppressed the highly elevated serum GH and IGF-I concentrations in transgenic mice by 56.8% and 39.0%, respectively. This treatment also reduced IGF-I messenger RNA levels in the liver by 21.8% but did not affect the level of GH messenger RNA in the pituitary. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 can inhibit elevated GH levels caused by overproduction of hGHRH. The suppression of circulating GH concentrations induced by the antagonists seems to be physiologically relevant, because both IGF-I secretion and synthesis also were reduced. Our findings, showing the suppression of GH and IGF-I secretion with GHRH antagonists, suggest that this class of analogs

  2. Human subjects protection in the African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embry Howell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research and evaluation are growing in Africa. All evaluators have an ethical responsibility to protect their research subjects from harm that could occur if sensitive data are revealed. In this article, we use a literature and document review to provide an overview of the protection of human subjects internationally and in Africa; we then use interviews with evaluators working in Africa to place human subjects protection principles and practice in an African context. We conclude that human subjects protection must be supported by improved guidelines tailored to the African context and local conditions; improved infrastructure for implementing and enforcing the guidelines; and increased training in awareness of human subjects principles and approaches. These efforts could stimulate increased research and evaluation and more confidence in results in the communities where research is conducted.

  3. Serum growth hormone (GH) profiles after nasally administered GH in normal subjects and GH deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens; Laursen, Torben; Mindeholm, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: GH-deficient patients are at present treated with daily subcutaneous GH injections. Further improvements in patient compliance and effects of treatment may occur with nasal administration. We have examined the absorption of nasally administered GH in healthy subjects and in GH...

  4. Analysis of Surface Binding Sites (SBS) within GH62, GH13, and GH77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Cockburn, Darrell; Andersen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    ) SBS containing proteins are migrating slower in native polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels cast with polysaccharide versus without polysaccharide. Amylolytic enzymes from GH13 and GH77 and xylanases from GH10 and GH11 are the best studied GH families with respect to SBS, presenting about half...... of the reported SBSs. In GH13 SBSs have been seen in 17 subfamilies including SBSs with highly diverse functions in the same enzyme. Circumstantial evidence is provided for an SBS in the GH77 MalQ from Escherichia coli, the bacterial orthologue of Arabidopsis DPE2 involved in starch metabolism. Furthermore...

  5. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  6. How China's Procuratorial Organs Protect Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING DALI

    2011-01-01

    @@ Question: The Twelfth Five-Year Program, which was approved by the 2011 session of the National People's Congress, calls for better protection of human rights and more work to promote China's human rights cause.Would you tell us about the role played by procuratorial organs in this endeavor?

  7. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  8. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  9. No Improvement of Adult Height in Non-growth Hormone (GH) Deficient Short Children with GH Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Yokoya, Susumu; Shimatsu, Akira; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Tanizawa, Takakuni; Teramoto, Akira; Nagai, Toshiro; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hanew, Kunihiko; Fujita, Keinosuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Takada, Goro

    2006-01-01

    It is still in doubt whether the standard-dose growth hormone (GH) used in Japan (0.5 IU/kg/week, 0.167 mg/kg/week) for growth hormone deficiency is effective for achieving significant adult height improvement in non-growth hormone deficient (non-GHD) short children. We compared the growth of GH-treated non-GHD short children with that of untreated short children to examine the effect of standard-dose GH treatment on non-GHD short children. GH treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (...

  10. Different short-term effect of protein and carbohydrate intake on TSH, growth hormone (GH), insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Andersen, B B; Jensen, B G

    1990-01-01

    hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to protein and carbohydrate was identical, with a reduction in both GH and TSH, and nadir occurring after 45-60 min and 120 min, respectively. During the next 120 min TSH returned to starting level after carbohydrate intake but was still reduced after...... protein intake (p less than 0.04). After both diets GH increased after the initial decline, the increase was greatest after protein intake and maximum was reached at 180 min (p less than 0.02). It has been reported that the 5'-deiodination of T4 is stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon...

  11. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  12. Reduced recruitment and survival of primordial and growing follicles in GH receptor-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, K.A.; Kastelijn, J.; Bachelot, A.; Kelly, P.A.; Binart, N.; Teerds, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    GH influences female fertility. The goal of the present study was to obtain more insight into the effect of loss of GH signalling, as observed in humans suffering from Laron syndrome, on ovarian function. Therefore, serial paraffin sections of ovaries of untreated and IGF-I-treated female GH recepto

  13. Human embryonic stem cells and patent protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of biotechnological research in modern diagnostics and therapeutics, on the one hand, and stimulative function of a patent, on the other hand, this work deals with the question of the possibility of pa-tent protection of human embryonic stem cells. Taking into account that this is a biotechnological invention, the key question that this paper highlights is the interpretation of the provisions of their patentability. Namely, thanks to the advanced methods of isolation, purification and preparation for implementation, modern patent systems do not exclude a priori living organisms from patent protection. Therefore, the analysis of representative administrative decisions or court rulings sought to define the criteria that would be applied in order to give patent protection to a certain biotechnological invention (stem cells while others do not.

  14. Update on long-acting recombinant human growth hormone(rhGH):from basic research to clinical trial%重组人生长激素长效剂型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓玲; 巩纯秀

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1985年重组人生长激素(recombinant human growth hormone,rhGH)的问世,彻底解决了尸源性人GH来源稀少和潜在脘病毒感染而致Creutzfeldt-Jakob病的问题,为生长激素缺乏症(growth hormone deficiency,GHD)患者提供了治疗途径.

  15. The protection of individuals by means of diplomatic protection: diplomatic protection as a human rights instrument

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Individuals whose international (human) rights are violated outside their state of nationality often have very limited means to address such violations. For instance, the foreign nationals detained by the United States in Guantanamo Bay have been unable to improve their situation themselves. Their state of nationality however can protect them through the exercise of diplomatic protection, thereby invoking the international responsibility of the host state for a violation of international law....

  16. Effect of GH/IGF-1 on Bone Metabolism and Osteoporsosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Locatelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 are fundamental in skeletal growth during puberty and bone health throughout life. GH increases tissue formation by acting directly and indirectly on target cells; IGF-1 is a critical mediator of bone growth. Clinical studies reporting the use of GH and IGF-1 in osteoporosis and fracture healing are outlined. Methods. A Pubmed search revealed 39 clinical studies reporting the effects of GH and IGF-1 administration on bone metabolism in osteopenic and osteoporotic human subjects and on bone healing in operated patients with normal GH secretion. Eighteen clinical studies considered the effect with GH treatment, fourteen studies reported the clinical effects with IGF-1 administration, and seven related to the GH/IGF-1 effect on bone healing. Results. Both GH and IGF-1 administration significantly increased bone resorption and bone formation in the most studies. GH/IGF-1 administration in patients with hip or tibial fractures resulted in increased bone healing, rapid clinical improvements. Some conflicting results were evidenced. Conclusions. GH and IGF-1 therapy has a significant anabolic effect. GH administration for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone fractures may greatly improve clinical outcome. GH interacts with sex steroids in the anabolic process. GH resistance process is considered.

  17. Continuous infusion versus daily injections of growth hormone (GH) for 4 weeks in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jakobsen, Grethe

    1995-01-01

    infusion by means of a portable pump for 1 month and as daily sc injections (at 1900 h) for another month. An average daily GH dosage (+/- SEM) of 3.15 +/- 0.27 IU was administered during both periods. Steady state 24-h profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), insulin, glucose, lipid......Abstract Endogenous GH secretion is pulsatile. Animal studies indicate that GH administered in a pulsatile manner induces growth and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation more effectively than continuous administration. Short term human studies, however, have reported similar metabolic.......5 +/- 50.2 (injection) and 334.6 +/- 46.6 (infusion)]. Similarly, constant GH delivery induced higher IGFBP-3 levels (P insulin levels (P

  18. Protected areas as frontiers for human migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zommers, Zinta; MacDonald, David W

    2012-06-01

    Causes of human population growth near protected areas have been much debated. We conducted 821 interviews in 16 villages around Budongo Forest Reserve, Masindi district, Uganda, to explore the causes of human migration to protected areas and to identify differences in forest use between migrant and nonmigrant communities. We asked subjects for information about birthplace, migration, household assets, household activities, and forest use. Interview subjects were categorized as nonmigrants (born in one of the interview villages), socioeconomic migrants (chose to emigrate for economic or social reasons) from within Masindi district (i.e., local migrants) and from outside the Masindi district (i.e., regional migrants), or forced migrants (i.e., refugees or internally displaced individuals who emigrated as a result of conflict, human rights abuses, or natural disaster). Only 198 respondents were born in interview villages, indicating high rates of migration between 1998 and 2008. Migrants were drawn to Budongo Forest because they thought land was available (268 individuals) or had family in the area (161 individuals). A greater number of regional migrants settled in villages near Lake Albert than did forced and local migrants. Migration category was also associated with differences in sources of livelihood. Of forced migrants 40.5% earned wages through labor, whereas 25.5% of local and 14.5% of regional migrants engaged in wage labor. Migrant groups appeared to have different effects on the environment. Of respondents that hunted, 72.7% were regional migrants. Principal component analyses indicated households of regional migrants were more likely to be associated with deforestation. Our results revealed gaps in current models of human population growth around protected areas. By highlighting the importance of social networks and livelihood choices, our results contribute to a more nuanced understanding of causes of migration and of the environmental effects of

  19. Protections for Subjects in Human Research with Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    All pesticide research using human subjects must meet our strict protective standards before we would consider using them in evaluating pesticides. EPA's regulation “Protections for Subjects in Human Research” was promulgated in 2006 and amended in 2013.

  20. Communist Party of China and Human Rights Protection for Criminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JIA; PEI JUNJIE

    2011-01-01

    Protection of criminals' human rights is an important issue that has received full attention at home and abroad.The Communlst Party of China (CPC) has always attached much importance to the protection of criminals' human rights.Since the founding of New China,the Party and the state have paid full attention to protecting the human rights of criminals.

  1. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  2. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  3. Considering GH replacement for GH-deficient adults with a previous history of cancer: a conundrum for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Heaney, Anthony P; Popovic, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that GH and IGF-I may enhance tumorigenesis, metastasis, and cell proliferation in humans and animals. Evidence supporting this notion is derived from animal model studies, epidemiological studies, experience from patients with acromegaly, molecular therapeutic manipulation of GH and IGF-I actions, and individuals with GH receptor and congenital IGF-I deficiencies. Prior exposure to radiation therapy, aging, family history of cancer, and individual susceptibility may also contribute to increase this risk. Therefore, the use of GH replacement in patients with a history of cancer raises hypothetical safety concerns for patients, caregivers, and providers. Studies of GH therapy in GH-deficient adults with hypopituitarism and childhood cancer survivors have not convincingly demonstrated an increased cancer risk. Conversely, the risk of occurrence of a second neoplasm (SN) in childhood cancer survivors may be increased, with meningiomas being the most common tumor; however, this risk appears to decline over time. In light of these findings, if GH replacement is to be considered in patients with a previous history of cancer, we propose this consideration to be based on each individual circumstance and that such therapy should only be initiated at least 2 years after cancer remission is achieved with the understanding that in some patients (particularly those with childhood cancers), GH may potentially increase the risk of SNs. In addition, close surveillance should be undertaken working closely with the patient's oncologist. More long-term data are thus needed to determine if GH replacement in GH-deficient adults with a history of cancer is associated with the development of de novo tumors and tumor recurrence.

  4. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  5. Vitamin D across growth hormone (GH) disorders: From GH deficiency to GH excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between vitamin D and the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I system is very complex and to date it is not fully understood. GH directly regulates renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity, although the action of GH in modulating vitamin D metabolism may also be IGF-I mediated. On the other hand, vitamin D increases circulating IGF-I and the vitamin D deficiency should be normalized before measurement of IGF-I concentrations to obtain reliable and unbiased IGF-I values. Indeed, linear growth after treatment of nutritional vitamin D deficiency seems to be mediated through activation of the GH/IGF-I axis and it suggests an important role of vitamin D as a link between the proliferating cartilage cells of the growth plate and GH/IGF-I secretion. Vitamin D levels are commonly lower in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) than in controls, with a variable prevalence of insufficiency or deficiency, and this condition may worsen the already known cardiovascular and metabolic risk of GHD, although this finding is not common to all studies. In addition, data on the impact of GH treatment on vitamin D levels in GHD patients are quite conflicting. Conversely, in active acromegaly, a condition characterized by a chronic GH excess, both increased and decreased vitamin D levels have been highlighted, and the interplay between vitamin D and the GH/IGF-I axis becomes even more complicated when we consider the acromegaly treatment, both medical and surgical. The current review summarizes the available data on vitamin D in the main disorders of the GH/IGF-I axis, providing an overview of the current state of the art.

  6. Thyroid function in children with growth hormone (GH deficiency during the initial phase of GH replacement therapy - clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyczynska Joanna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal thyroid hormone secretion or appropriate L-thyroxine (L-T4 substitution is necessary for the optimal effect of the growth hormone (GH administration on growth rate. The decrease of free thyroxine (FT4 levels at recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy onset has been reported in several studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of rhGH administration on thyrotropin (TSH and FT4 serum concentrations in children with GH deficiency (GHD during the 1st year of therapy, as well as to assess potential indications to thyroid hormone supplementation in them. Patients and methods The analysis involved data of 75 children (59 boys, 16 girls with disorders of GH secretion (GHD, neurosecretory dysfunction - NSD and partial GH inactivity (inactGH, who were treated with rhGH for - at least - one year. In all the children, body height and height velocity (HV were assessed before and after 1 year of therapy, while TSH, FT4, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 before treatment and after 3-6 months and 1 year of treatment. In the patients, who revealed hypothyroidism (HypoT, an appropriate L-T4 substitution was introduced immediately. The incidence of HypoT, occurring during the initial phase of rhGH therapy, was assessed, as well as its influence on the therapy effectiveness. Results Before rhGH substitution, there were no significant differences in either auxological indices or TSH and FT4 secretion, or IGF-I concentration and its bioavailability among the groups of patients. During the initial 3-6 months of rhGH administration, a significant decrease of FT4 serum concentration, together with a significant increase of IGF-I SDS and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio was observed in all the studied groups. In 17 children, HypoT was diagnosed and L-T4 substitution was administered. Despite similar IGF-I secretion increase, the improvement of HV presented significantly lower in children with HypoT than in those who remained euthyroid all the time

  7. GH signaling in human adipose and muscle tissue during 'feast and famine': amplification of exercise stimulation following fasting compared to glucose administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Christensen, Britt; Grønbæk, Solbritt B; Høgild, Morten; Madsen, Michael; Pedersen, Steen B; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Fasting and exercise stimulates, whereas glucose suppresses GH secretion, but it is uncertain how these conditions impact GH signaling in peripheral tissues. To test the original 'feast and famine hypothesis' by Rabinowitz and Zierler, according to which the metabolic effects of GH are predominant during fasting, we specifically hypothesized that fasting and exercise act in synergy to increase STAT-5b target gene expression. Eight healthy men were studied on two occasions in relation to a 1 h exercise bout: i) with a concomitant i.v. glucose infusion ('feast') and ii) after a 36 h fast ('famine'). Muscle and fat biopsy specimens were obtained before, immediately after, and 30 min after exercise. GH increased during exercise on both examination days and this effect was amplified by fasting, and free fatty acid (FFA) levels increased after fasting. STAT-5b phosphorylation increased similarly following exercise on both occasions. In adipose tissue, suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS2 were increased after exercise on the fasting day and both fasting and exercise increased cytokine inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). In muscle, SOCS2 and CISH mRNA were persistently increased after fasting. Muscle SOCS1, SOCS3, and CISH mRNA expression increased, whereas SOCS2 decreased after exercise on both examination days. This study demonstrates that fasting and exercise act in tandem to amplify STAT-5b target gene expression (SOCS and CISH) in adipose and muscle tissue in accordance with the 'feast and famine hypothesis'; the adipose tissue signaling responses, which hitherto have not been scrutinized, may play a particular role in promoting FFA mobilization. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP.

  9. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. ME

  10. GH Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HTRAMS is a travel data collection system for GH that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  11. Discordance between growth hormone (GH) responses after GH-releasing hormone and insulin hypoglycemia in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Y; Chihara, K; Kita, T; Kashio, Y; Sato, M; Kitajima, N; Abe, H; Takahashi, K; Fujita, T

    1988-11-01

    Plasma GH responses to human GHRH, arginine, L-dopa, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia were determined in seven myotonic dystrophy (MD) patients. An iv bolus injection of GHRH-(1-44)-NH2 (1 microgram/kg BW) only slightly increased plasma GH concentrations in MD patients. The mean peak plasma GH level after GHRH injection [4.2 +/- 0.8 (+/- SE) micrograms/L] was significantly lower than that in 10 age-matched normal subjects (26.7 +/- 4.3 micrograms/L) or that in 6 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (22.8 +/- 6.6 micrograms/L) whose nutritional status was similar to that of the MD patients. Even with a larger dose of GHRH (3 micrograms/kg BW), the plasma GH rises were minimal in the MD patients (mean peak, 5.9 +/- 1.8 micrograms/L). The plasma GH responses to a 30-min iv infusion of arginine (0.5 g/kg BW) and oral ingestion of L-dopa (0.5 g) were attenuated to a similar extent, whereas insulin-induced hypoglycemia caused a significant increase in plasma GH in all seven MD patients [mean peak, 17.4 +/- 4.1 (+/- SE) microgram/L]. The plasma TSH responses to TRH and plasma insulin-like growth factor I levels were similar in the MD patients and normal subjects. These findings suggest that 1) the impaired GH release after GHRH, arginine, and L-dopa administration in MD patients is not due to somatotroph deficiency, since the GH response to hypoglycemia is well preserved; and 2) insulin-induced hypoglycemia may stimulate GH release at least in part via inhibition of somatostatin release.

  12. Endurance training and GH administration in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Lorentsen, J; Isaksson, F;

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of endurance training alone and endurance training combined with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was investigated. Sixteen healthy women [age 75 +/- 2 yr (mean +/- SE)] underwent a 12-wk...... endurance training program on a cycle ergometer. rhGH was administered in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design in addition to the training program. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was estimated by means of microdialysis combined with measurements of subcutaneous abdominal...... and after completion of the training program. Similarly, no effect on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was observed when combining endurance training with rhGH administration. However, in both the placebo and the GH groups, fat oxidation was significantly increased during exercise performed...

  13. The question of the system of protection of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Revina S.; Pochuykina V.

    2016-01-01

    The Russian state is subject to the human rights activities through the system of state bodies, including the judiciary, as reflected in the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The authors consider the human rights function of the state, judicial protection as one of the ways of state protection of the rights and freedoms of man and citizen, study the elements of General system of protection of human rights in the Russian Federation and its Central element — the right to judicial protecti...

  14. United States Federal Guidance on Witness Protection in Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    UNITED STATES FEDERAL GUIDANCE ON WITNESS PROTECTION IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army...JUN 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE United States Federal Guidance on Witness Protection in Human Trafficking 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...United States needs overarching federal guidance on witness protection for human trafficking victims/witnesses in order to enhance their safety and

  15. Human physiology as the determining factor in protective clothing design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Protective clothing is designed to protect humans against risks like fire, chemicals or blunt impact. Although protect¡ve clothing diminishes the effects of external risks, it may hinder people in functioning and it may also introduce new (internal) risks. Manufacturers are often not aware of the se

  16. Effects of parenteral nutrition with and without GH on the GH/IGF-1 axis after hepatectomy in hepatocellular carcinoma with liver cirrhsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jie; LUO Shimin; LIANG Lijian; LAI Jiaming; CHEN Shanming

    2007-01-01

    Postoperative hepatic insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1)production may be severely disturbed in patients with liver cirrhosis.Complex alterations in the GH/IGF-1 axis are thought to play an important role in the protein catabolism that complicates major surgical procedures.The aim of this study was to explore the effects of parenteral nutrition (PN)with and without growth hormone(GH) on the GH/IGF-1 axis after hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)with cirrhosis and evaluate the potential roles of recombinant human GH(rhGH)therapy.Twenty-four patients with HCC with cirrhosis who underwent hepatectomy were randomly divided into two groups:a PN group (n=12)and an rhGH+PNgroup(n=12).Liver function,serum GH,IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were measured before the operation and at postoperative days(POD)1 and 6.Insulin-like growth factor-1 and IGFBP-3 mRNA in the liver tissue was detected by RT-PCR.The liver Ki67 immunohistochemistry staining was studied.At the same time,12 patients with cholelithiasis or liver hemangioma who underwent operation served as normal control group.On POD 6,serum prealbumin,GH,IGF-1,IGFBP-3,hepatic IGF-1 mRNA,IGFBP-3 mRNA and liver Ki67 LI were higher in the rhGH+PN group than in the PN group.There was no significant difference in the 6-and 12-month tumor-free survival rate and the median tumor-free survival time between the PN group and the rhGH+PN group (P>0.05).These data indicate that rhGH+PN could ameliorate the changes in the GH/IGF-1 axis after hepatectomy for HCC in the setting of cirrhosis.

  17. BIOEQUIVALENCE BETWEEN rhGH FOR RECONSTITUTION AND READY-TO-USE rhGH IN TWO LIQUID FORMULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the bioequivalence between recombinant human growth hormone ( rhGH) for reconstitution, and two dosages of liquid formulation of rhGH [ (15IU)5mg or ( 30IU) l0mg per 3ml].Methods The study drugs were tested in a randomized, single-blind and three-period crossover studies in 24 healthy male subjects. The three drugs were administered by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 0. 2IU/kg body weight. A continuous somatostatin infusion was given in order to suppress the secretion of endogenous GH. The venous blood samples were drawn at different time points to test the serum concentration of GH. The pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by statistical methods. Results 90% confidence intervals (CI) of AUC0-24h among three products were all within 80% -125% interval (103.4% -116. 5%, 105. 7% -119. 6% and 91.9% -103. 7%,respectively), and the CIs of Cmax among three products were all within 70%-143% interval ( 91.9%-114. 0%,103. 7%-127. 2% and 81.6%-97. 4%, respectively). There was no statisitical difference of tmax among all the three products. Conclusion These data demonstrate that there is bioequivalence between rhGH for reconstitution and two liquid formulations of rhGH.

  18. Histology of skeletal muscle in adults with GH deficiency: comparison with normal muscle and response to GH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, R C; Salomon, F; Wiles, C M; Round, J M; Jones, D; Hesp, R; Sönksen, P H

    1992-01-01

    The histology of needle biopsy specimens of skeletal muscle from the vastus lateralis was quantitatively assessed in a group of adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency, most of whom had hypopituitarism treated with conventional pituitary hormone replacement. The mean age of the 21 patients (16 males and 5 females) was 39 +/- 2 (SEM). Comparisons were made with age- and sex-matched controls following six months double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment with recombinant human GH (rhGH) in the GH-deficient patients. Before treatment, needle muscle biopsies from patients with GH deficiency showed mean type I and II fibre areas of 5,153 +/- 273 and 4,828 +/- 312 microns 2 respectively, which did not differ from the controls (4,482 +/- 306 and 4,699 +/- 310 microns 2). Percentages of type I fibres were similar in the two groups (47.2 +/- 2.5% in GH deficiency and 45.3 +/- 2.2% in controls). No difference in the variability of type I or II fibre areas was demonstrated between the groups. Correlations between the relative contribution to total fibre area by type I fibres (mean fibre area x percent) and maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.006), and between type II fibres and quadriceps force (p = 0.035) were noted in GH-deficient adults before treatment. Following rhGH treatment, no change was noted in mean fibre areas, variability of fibre areas, or percentage of either fibre type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Neutron effects in humans: protection considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Committee I of the International Commission on Radiological Protection has recommended that the Quality Factor for neutrons should be changed from 10 to 20. This article is an interesting recount of the tale of Q from the viewpoint of an observer which illustrates many of the problems that the selection of protection standards pose. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Clinical challenges in the management of isolated GH deficiency type IA in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteràs, Anna; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Ferrández, Angel; Zafón, Carles; Carrascosa, Antonio; Mesa, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated GH deficiency type IA (IGHDIA) is an infrequent cause of severe congenital GHD, often managed by pediatric endocrinologists, and hence few cases in adulthood have been reported. Herein, we describe the clinical status of a 56-year-old male with IGHDIA due to a 6.7 kb deletion in GH1 gene that encodes GH, located on chromosome 17. We also describe phenotypic and biochemical parameters, as well as characterization of anti-GH antibodies after a new attempt made to treat with GH. The height of the adult patient was 123 cm. He presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, osteoporosis, and low physical and psychological performance, compatible with GHD symptomatology. Anti-GH antibodies in high titers and with binding activity (>101 IU/ml) were found 50 years after exposure to exogenous GH, and their levels increased significantly (>200 U/ml) after a 3-month course of 0.2 mg/day recombinant human GH (rhGH) treatment. Higher doses of rhGH (1 mg daily) did not overcome the blockade, and no change in undetectable IGF1 levels was observed (time, as well as pituitary hormones periodically assessed.

  1. Preclinical and Clinical In Vitro In Vivo Correlation of an hGH Dextran Microsphere Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrueh, R.; Gresnigt, M. G.; Hoogerbrugge, C. M.; van Buul-Offers, S. C.; de Leede, L. G. J.; Sterkman, L. G. W.; Crommelin, D. J. A.; Hennink, W. E.; Verrijk, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the in vitro in vivo correlation of a sustained release formulation for human growth hormone (hGH) based on hydroxyethyl methacrylated dextran (dex-HEMA) microspheres in Pit-1 deficient Snell dwarf mice and in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods A hGH-loaded microsphere formulation was developed and tested in Snell dwarf mice (pharmacodynamic study) and in healthy human volunteers (pharmacokinetic study). Results Single subcutaneous administration of the microspheres in mice resulted in a good correlation between hGH released in vitro and in vivo effects for the hGH-loaded microsphere formulation similar to daily injected hGH indicating a retained bioactivity. Testing the microspheres in healthy volunteers showed an increase (over 7–8 days) in hGH serum concentrations (peak concentrations: 1–2.5 ng/ml). A good in vitro in vivo correlation was obtained between the measured and calculated (from in vitro release data) hGH serum concentrations. Moreover, an increased serum concentration of biomarkers (insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was found again indicating that bioactive hGH was released from the microspheres. Conclusions Good in vitro in vivo correlations were obtained for hGH-loaded dex-HEMA microspheres, which is an important advantage in predicting the effect of the controlled drug delivery product in a clinical situations. PMID:17929148

  2. GH-replacement therapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J S; Jørgensen, J O; Pedersen, S A

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency in adults, whether GH deficient since childhood or patients rendered GH deficient in adult life, is associated with psychosocial maladjustment, reduced muscle strength and reduced exercise capacity. Body composition is significantly altered with increased fat and de...

  3. institutional mechanisms for human rights protection in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    legal and institutional mechanisms for protecting the human rights guaranteed in .... by the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, African Charter, the .... special care administrative acts which are or appear to be contrary to any law or.

  4. Planetary Protection Considerations for Human And Robotic Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogul, R.; Stabekis, P. D.; Race, M. S.; Conley, C. A.

    2012-06-01

    Incorporating planetary protection into human missions, as supported by NASA Policy Directive NPD 8020.7G, is essential to preventing the forward contamination of Mars, ensuring astronaut health, and preventing backward contamination of Earth.

  5. GH and IGF1: Roles in Energy Metabolism of Long-Living GH Mutant Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Brown-Borg, Holly M.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Of the multiple theories to explain exceptional longevity, the most robust of these has centered on the reduction of three anabolic protein hormones, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor, and insulin. GH mutant mice live 50% longer and exhibit significant differences in several aspects of energy metabolism as compared with wild-type mice. Mitochondrial metabolism is upregulated in the absence of GH, whereas in GH transgenic mice and dwarf mice treated with GH, multiple aspects of t...

  6. Child protection from trafficking in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žegarac Nevenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in children is particularly severe form of exploitation and breach of the children rights, while security and welfare of children that are exposed to trafficking are obligations of state authorities, services and organizations of civil society. System of protection and support to children victims of trafficking should contain following: criteria for proper identification of child-victim of trafficking, mechanisms for immediate referring of a child to specialized services, procedures for appointing a guardian who will secure that procedures and decisions are in accordance with the best interest of child, measures for regulating of residential status, assistance with reparation and reintegration as well as measures for protection of children witnesses and victims of trafficking. Finally, it should include a proper access to justice. In the article, recommendations are proposed for improvement of identification system, proper evaluation of needs and planning services and protection measures as well as measures and activities which should secure long term solutions in accordance with rights of the child and her/his best interests.

  7. The GH/IGF-1 axis in obesity: pathophysiology and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Darlene E; Glad, Camilla A M; List, Edward O; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2013-06-01

    Obesity has become one of the most common medical problems in developed countries, and this disorder is associated with high incidences of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and specific cancers. Growth hormone (GH) stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor 1 in most tissues, and together GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 exert powerful collective actions on fat, protein and glucose metabolism. Clinical trials assessing the effects of GH treatment in patients with obesity have shown consistent reductions in total adipose tissue mass, in particular abdominal and visceral adipose tissue depots. Moreover, studies in patients with abdominal obesity demonstrate a marked effect of GH therapy on body composition and on lipid and glucose homeostasis. Therefore, administration of recombinant human GH or activation of endogenous GH production has great potential to influence the onset and metabolic consequences of obesity. However, the clinical use of GH is not without controversy, given conflicting results regarding its effects on glucose metabolism. This Review provides an introduction to the role of GH in obesity and summarizes clinical and preclinical data that describe how GH can influence the obese state.

  8. Genetic and protein biomarkers in blood for the improved detection of GH abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, P; Ventura, R; Pérez-Mañá, C; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2016-09-05

    Human Growth Hormone (hGH, somatotropin) is one of the relevant forbidden substances to be detected in sport drug testing. Since the appearance of recombinant hGH (rhGH) in the 80's, its expansion and availability through the black market have increased, so the detection of its abuse continues to be a challenge at present. New techniques or biomarkers that are robust, reliable, sensitive and allowing a large detection time window are welcome. rhGH produces an increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). FN1 (fibronectin 1) and RAB31 (member of RAS oncogene family) genes have been suggested as two potential biomarkers for IGF-1 abuse. Following this line, in the present study some genetic and proteomic approaches have been performed with fourteen healthy male subjects treated with rhGH (which produces increase of IGF-1 concentrations) to study FN1 gene, FN1 protein, RAB31 gene and RAB31 protein as potential biomarkers for rhGH abuse. The results showed that both, RAB31 and FN1 genes and FN1 protein could be potential biomarkers for rhGH administration. Preliminary assessments of gender, age, acute sport activities and GHRP-2 (pralmorelin, a rhGH releasing peptide) influence suggest they are not relevant confounding factors. Thus, the selected markers present high sensitivity and a larger detection window for rhGH detection than IGF-1 itself.

  9. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  10. A remote but significant sequence homology between glycoside hydrolase clan GH-H and glycoside hydrolase family GH 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janecek, S.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    , however, proposed for clan GH-H with GH31. A sequence alignment, based on the idea that residues equivalent in the primordial catalytic GH-H/GH31 (β/α)8-barrel may not be found in the present-day GH-H and GH31 structures at strictly equivalent positions, shows remote sequence homologies covering β3, β4, β...

  11. Progress in the international protection of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Keith

    2002-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the international protection of human rights since 10 December 1948 (when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights). Amidst the doom and gloom of the media's reporting of current affairs, it is easy to overlook this progress. This article provides a definition of 'human rights' and examines early human rights campaigns. It then considers the areas of progress: human rights are now part of the international political vocabulary, there is a recognition that respect for human rights can assist a country's economic and social development, there has been a growth of human rights treaties and techniques and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) see protecting human rights as a major activity. State sovereignty has been eroded as national governments are being held accountable to the international community for their human rights policies. A new challenge is to ensure respect for human rights by non-state entities, such as transnational corporations. The growing culture of international protection of human rights is here to stay. This is not a reason for complacency, but it is a sign of hope.

  12. Pioglitazone treatment increases spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and stimulated GH levels in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Støving, René Klinkby; Hagen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    and improved insulin sensitivity during pioglitazone treatment may affect GH secretion. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone on GH levels in PCOS. DESIGN: Thirty insulin-resistant PCOS patients were randomized to either 16 wk pioglitazone (30 mg/d) or placebo...... treatment. Before and after intervention, levels of fasting insulin, GH, total IGF-I, free IGF-I, IGF binding protein-1, IGF-II, free fatty acids, testosterone, and SHBG were measured. Patients underwent whole-body dual x-ray absorptiometry scans, pyridostigmine-GHRH tests, and 24-h 20-min integrated blood...... sampling for measurement of GH. RESULTS: Peak GH and area under the curve for GH in pyridostigmine-GHRH tests and 24-h mean GH concentrations and pulsatile GH secretion significantly increased after pioglitazone treatment. No significant changes were observed in GH pulse frequency, pulse duration...

  13. Preclinical and Clinical In Vitro In Vivo Correlation of an hGH Dextran Microsphere Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the in vitro in vivo correlation of a sustained release formulation for human growth hormone (hGH) based on hydroxyethyl methacrylated dextran (dex-HEMA) microspheres in Pit-1 deficient Snell dwarf mice and in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods A hGH-loaded microsphere formulation was developed and tested in Snell dwarf mice (pharmacodynamic study) and in healthy human volunteers (pharmacokinetic study). Results Single subcutaneous administration of the mic...

  14. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway.

  15. Neue Möglichkeiten in der human-embryonalen Stammzellenforschung - Anmerkung zum Urteil des EuGH Rs. C-364/13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faeh, Andrea Beata

    2015-01-01

    New possibilities in human-embryonic stem cell research - Comments to the ECJ Judgement C-364/13......New possibilities in human-embryonic stem cell research - Comments to the ECJ Judgement C-364/13...

  16. Reimagining Human Research Protections for 21st Century Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietz, Matthew; Bae, Deborah; Bigby, Barbara; Devereaux, Mary; Fowler, James; Waldo, Ann; Weibel, Nadir; Patrick, Kevin; Klemmer, Scott; Melichar, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Evolving research practices and new forms of research enabled by technological advances require a redesigned research oversight system that respects and protects human research participants. Objective Our objective was to generate creative ideas for redesigning our current human research oversight system. Methods A total of 11 researchers and institutional review board (IRB) professionals participated in a January 2015 design thinking workshop to develop ideas for redesigning the IRB system. Results Ideas in 5 major domains were generated. The areas of focus were (1) improving the consent form and process, (2) empowering researchers to protect their participants, (3) creating a system to learn from mistakes, (4) improving IRB efficiency, and (5) facilitating review of research that leverages technological advances. Conclusions We describe the impetus for and results of a design thinking workshop to reimagine a human research protections system that is responsive to 21st century science. PMID:28007687

  17. Pharmacological activation of the GABAergic system does not affect GH and PRL release in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, F; Iovino, M; Monteleone, P; Agrusta, M; Steardo, L; Lombardi, G

    1988-11-01

    An extensive hypothalamic neurotransmitter impairment has been proposed in acromegaly. However, at the moment, the hypothalamic GABAergic system has been little investigated in this disorder. Since GABA has been shown to modulate growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion in human subjects, it seemed reasonable to investigate hypothalamic GABAergic functioning through the assessment of basal GH and PRL responses to pharmacological activation of this system. 800 mg of sodium valproate (SV), a drug with GABA facilitating properties, were administered orally to 7 acromegalic patients and 9 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were collected before and after the drug administration for the measurement of plasma GH and PRL levels. SV induced a clear-cut rise in basal GH and a decrease in basal PRL in healthy subjects, but it did not induce any change in the basal levels of these hormones in acromegalics. These results suggest that the response of GH and PRL to SV in acromegaly is qualitatively different from normal controls.

  18. [Chronic renal failure and growth hormone: effects on GH-IGF axis and leptin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Josenilson C de; Machado Neto, Francisco de A; Morcillo, André Moreno; Oliveira, Laurione C de; Belangero, Vera Maria S; Geloneze Neto, Bruno; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio; Guerra-Júnior, Gil

    2005-12-01

    To analyze the changes in IGF-1, IGFBP-3, leptin and insulin after replacement doses of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in short prepubertal children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Eleven children (3F:8M), with mean age of 9.6 years, were treated with rhGH (0.23 mg/Kg weekly for 12 months). Serum leptin, insulin, glucose, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were measured before, 6 and 12 months after beginning rhGH treatment. The serum levels of leptin, insulin and glucose did not vary during the treatment; normal leptin and glucose levels and high insulin were observed. There was a significant increment of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 during the use of rhGH. The replacement doses of rhGH during 12 months in a selected group of CRF children determined an increment in IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, associated to normal serum leptin and insulin resistance.

  19. Ectoine as a promising protective agent in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bownik, Adam; Stępniewska, Zofia

    2016-12-01

    Ectoine is a compatible water molecule-binding solute (osmoprotectant) produced by several bacterial species in response to osmotic stress and unfavourable environmental conditions. This amino acid derivative can accumulate inside cells at high concentrations without interfering with natural processes and can protect the cell against radiation or osmotic stress. This brief review presents the current state of knowledge about the effects of ectoine on animals and focuses on its practical use for enzyme stabilisation, human skin protection, anti-inflammatory treatment, inhibitory effects in neurodegenerative diseases, and other therapeutic potential in human or veterinary medicine.

  20. Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions: Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret S. (Editor); Johnson, James E. (Editor); Spry, James A. (Editor); Siegel, Bette; Conley, Catharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This report on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions summarizes the presentations, deliberations and findings of a workshop at NASA Ames Research Center, March 24-26, 2015, which was attended by more than 100 participants representing a diverse mix of science, engineering, technology, and policy areas. The main objective of the three-day workshop was to identify specific knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to make incremental progress towards the development of NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for Planetary Protection during human missions to Mars.

  1. Cushing, acromegaly, GH deficiency and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome, induced by an endogenous or exogenous cortisol excess, and acromegaly, the clinical syndrome caused by growth hormone (GH) excess in adulthood, as well as the disease induced by GH deficiency (GHD), represent perfect models for the evaluation of the effects induced by chronic exposure in vivo, respectively, to cortisol and GH/IGF-1 excess or deficiency on the complex structure of the tendons as well as on the related post-traumatic repair mechanism. Although the literature...

  2. Perinatal growth and plasma GH profiles in adolescent and adult sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatford, K L; Clarke, I J; De Blasio, M J; McMillen, I C; J S Robinson; Owens, J A

    2002-04-01

    Poor prenatal growth is associated with limited evidence of GH deficiency in adult humans, which may contribute to their increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. We therefore examined the effects of placental restriction of fetal growth (PR) on size at birth, neonatal fractional growth rate (FGR) and the circulating GH profile in adolescent and young adult sheep of both sexes. Moderate or severe PR decreased birth size and increased neonatal FGR of weight, crown-rump length and abdominal circumference. In adolescent males, mean and baseline GH concentrations correlated negatively and independently with birth weight and FGR of weight, and mean GH concentrations correlated negatively with current weight. In young adult males, mean GH concentrations correlated negatively and independently with birth shoulder height and FGR of shoulder height whilst, in young adult females, these correlations were positive. This suggests that restricted fetal growth and reduced neonatal growth rate in sheep are followed by elevated circulating GH in adolescent and adult males, but GH deficiency or increased GH clearance in adult females.

  3. Downregulation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in transgenic mice overexpressing GH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Marina C; Burghi, Valeria; Miquet, Johanna G; Giani, Jorge F; Banegas, Ricardo D; Toblli, Jorge E; Fang, Yimin; Wang, Feiya; Bartke, Andrzej; Dominici, Fernando P

    2014-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a crucial role in the regulation of physiological homeostasis and diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and chronic renal failure. In this cascade, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/AT1 receptor axis induces pathological effects, such as vasoconstriction, cell proliferation, and fibrosis, while the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis is protective for end-organ damage. The altered function of the RAS could be a contributing factor to the cardiac and renal alterations induced by GH excess. To further explore this issue, we evaluated the consequences of chronic GH exposure on the in vivo levels of Ang II, Ang-(1-7), ACE, ACE2, and Mas receptor in the heart and the kidney of GH-transgenic mice (bovine GH (bGH) mice). At the age of 7-8 months, female bGH mice displayed increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), a high degree of both cardiac and renal fibrosis, as well as increased levels of markers of tubular and glomerular damage. Angiotensinogen abundance was increased in the liver and the heart of bGH mice, along with a concomitant increase in cardiac Ang II levels. Importantly, the levels of ACE2, Ang-(1-7), and Mas receptor were markedly decreased in both tissues. In addition, Ang-(1-7) administration reduced SBP to control values in GH-transgenic mice, indicating that the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis is involved in GH-mediated hypertension. The data indicate that the altered expression profile of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the heart and the kidney of bGH mice could contribute to the increased incidence of hypertension, cardiovascular, and renal alterations observed in these animals.

  4. Adherence in children with growth hormone deficiency treated with r-hGH and the easypod™ device

    OpenAIRE

    S. Loche; Salerno, M.; Garofalo, P; Cardinale, G. M.; Licenziati, MR; Citro, G.; Caruso Nicoletti, M.; Cappa, M.; Longobardi, S.; Maghnie, M; Perrone, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) therapy is associated with reduced growth velocity in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This twelve-month observational study was to assess adherence in r-hGH patients treated with the easypod™, an electronic, fully automated injection device designed to track the time, date and dose administered. Methods Ninety-seven prepubertal patients receiving r-hGH therapy were included in the study from ten Italian clinical...

  5. 77 FR 37408 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...; email address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  6. 75 FR 37813 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ..., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S...-8141; fax: 240-453-6909; e-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  7. Pulsatile characteristics of spontaneous growth hormone (GH) concentration profiles in boys evaluated by an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay: Evidence for ultradian periodicity of GH secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goji, Katsumi (Kobe Children' s Hospital (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    To investigate underlying ultradian periodicities in spontaneous circulating GH concentrations, blood samples were drawn from 15 normal short boys every 20 min over a 24-h period, and plasma GH concentrations were measured using an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay. The limit of detection for the GH assay was 0.01 [mu]g/L. The GH time series were analyzed using the Cluster program, Ultra program, cosinor analysis, and autocorrelation analysis. Plasma GH concentrations in 1,095 samples derived from 15 normal short boys were all within the detectable range of the assay and ranged from 0.07-52.2 [mu]g/L. Thirty-six percent of the GH values in the 1,095 samples from 15 normal short boys were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 82% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. Cluster analysis disclosed a total of 176 peaks in 15 normal short boys, with a mean [+-] SEM number of significant GH peaks of 12.1 [+-] 0.5/24 h. Twelve percent of the 176 peaks were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 95% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. In addition, Cluster analysis disclosed 161 interpulse intervals in total, with a mean [+-] SEM interval of 116.5 [+-] 4.3 min. The GH interpulse interval did not show a significant 24-h rhythm, whereas the GH peak height increased significantly at night. An independent discrete peak detection in program, Ultra, identified 12.6 [+-] 0.5 GH peaks/24 h. This result was in good agreement with that from analysis by the Cluster program (P = NS). Autocorrelation analysis revealed that GH time series were significantly autocorrelated in 9 of the 15 boys, with maximal autocorrelation coefficients at 115.5 min, on the average. The mean autocorrelation coefficient for a group of 15 normal short boys was significantly positive at a 100-min lag. These findings suggest that there could be a regularly occurring periodicity of approximately 100-120 min in the human GH time series. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. GH activity and markers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Frystyk, Jan; Faber, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    The GH/IGF1 axis may modulate inflammatory processes. However, the relationship seems complicated as both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects have been demonstrated.......The GH/IGF1 axis may modulate inflammatory processes. However, the relationship seems complicated as both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects have been demonstrated....

  9. The protection of individuals by means of diplomatic protection : diplomatic protection as a human rights instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer-Künzli, Anna Maria Helena

    2007-01-01

    Individuals whose international (human) rights are violated outside their state of nationality often have very limited means to address such violations. For instance, the foreign nationals detained by the United States in Guantanamo Bay have been unable to improve their situation themselves. Their

  10. To what extent can human and non-human radiation protection frameworks be integrated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, C.; Stark, Karolina [Stockholm University (Sweden); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hinton, Thomas [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France); Beresford, Nicholas A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology - CEH (United Kingdom); Brown, Justin; Dowdall, Mark; Hosseini, Ali; Liland, Astrid [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Mora, Juan Carlos; Real, Almudena; Robles, Beatriz [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); Oughton, Deborah [Norwegian University of Life Sciences - UMB (Norway); Steiner, Martin [Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS (Germany); Sweeck, Lieve; Vives I Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The first radiation protection frameworks were initiated in the early 20. century and focused on the protection of humans. Protection frameworks for non-human species were developed later, based on the human protection system as well as that used to protect the environment from adverse effects of chemicals. These two radiation protection frameworks have to some degree developed quite separately from each other over the last few decades, and it is a source of debate as to what extent the integration of the two is possible. This presentation critically reviews some of the key aspects of integrating human and non-human assessment frameworks, including both conceptual and practical issues, and focuses on five main topics: 1) the conceptual consideration of humans as part of ecosystems, rather than a separate entity; 2) the consistency and potential harmonisation of underlying data and transfer model parameters; 3) consideration of different life stages and life histories in radiation protection and the implications for exposure, dose and effects; 4) calculation of doses, including modelling approaches, spatial and temporal variability and biokinetic modelling; and 5) benchmarks and screening values. Similarities and differences between the two existing frameworks are highlighted and the feasibility of integrating the two discussed. Our recommendations on how to further integrate, where achievable and warranted, are given. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  11. Planetary protection issues linked to human missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, A.

    According to United Nations Treaties and handled presently by the Committee of Space Research COSPAR the exploration of the Solar System has to comply with planetary protection requirements The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual biocontamination carried by return samples or by space systems returning to the Earth Mars is presently one of the main target at exobiology point of view and a lot of missions are operating on travel or scheduled for its exploration Some of them include payload dedicated to the search of life or traces of life and one of the goals of these missions is also to prepare sample return missions with the ultimate objective to walk on Mars Robotic missions to Mars have to comply with planetary protection specifications well known presently and planetary protection programs are implemented with a very good reliability taking into account an experience of 40 years now For sample return missions a set of stringent requirements have been approved by the COSPAR and technical challenges have now to be won in order to preserve Earth biosphere from an eventual contamination risk Sending astronauts on Mars will gather all these constraints added with the human dimension of the mission The fact that the astronauts are huge contamination sources for Mars and that they are also potential carrier of a contamination risk back to Earth add also ethical considerations to be considered For the preparation of a such

  12. Planetary protection issues related to human missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, A.; Arnould, J.

    2008-09-01

    In accordance with the United Nations Outer Space Treaties [United Nations, Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, UN doc A/RES/34/68, resolution 38/68 of December 1979], currently maintained and promulgated by the Committee on Space Research [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], missions exploring the Solar system must meet planetary protection requirements. Planetary protection aims to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and to protect the Earth environment from potential biological contamination carried by returned samples or space systems that have been in contact with an extraterrestrial environment. From an exobiology perspective, Mars is one of the major targets, and several missions are currently in operation, in transit, or scheduled for its exploration. Some of them include payloads dedicated to the detection of life or traces of life. The next step, over the coming years, will be to return samples from Mars to Earth, with a view to increasing our knowledge in preparation for the first manned mission that is likely to take place within the next few decades. Robotic missions to Mars shall meet planetary protection specifications, currently well documented, and planetary protection programs are implemented in a very reliable manner given that experience in the field spans some 40 years. With regards to sample return missions, a set of stringent requirements has been approved by COSPAR [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], and technical challenges must now be overcome in order to preserve the Earth’s biosphere from any eventual contamination risk. In addition to the human dimension of

  13. Favorable Impacts of Growth Hormone (GH) Replacement Therapy on Atherogenic Risks in Japanese Children with GH Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuo; Seino, Yoshiki; Irie, Minoru; Takano, Kazue

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) affects body composition and atherogenic risk factors. Severe hyperlipidemia may develop in GH-deficient adults as a consequence of continuous GH deficiency. We investigated changes in lipid profiles in 158 Japanese children (103 boys and 55 girls) with GH deficiency who had been enrolled in the Pfizer International Growth Database Japan during 3 yr of GH replacement therapy to evaluate whether GH treatment has beneficial effects on atherogenic risk factors. Total choleste...

  14. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuan [Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: gideon.davies@york.ac.uk [The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  15. [Human genetic data from a data protection law perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte In den Bäumen, Tobias

    2007-02-01

    The collection and use of genetic data have caused much concern in the German population. Data protection is widely seen as the tool to address these fears. The term genetic data is not self-explanatory, as it depends on the different types of genetic diseases. The protection of genetic data as defined with regard to the different sets of diseases needs to fit into the preexisting data protection legislation. Still, the particularities of genetic data such as the multipersonal impact need to be considered. A balance between the information needs of society and the right to privacy requires a medically driven criteria. The medical term of indication which corresponds with the data protection term of purpose should serve as a tool in order to balance the rights of the patients and their relatives or between clients and third persons involved. Some countries have set up new legislative acts to address the challenges of human genetics. The current state of German data protection law leaves citizen rather unprotected as long as the data are used for medical purposes in a wider sense. A special law on the collection of genetic data has been discussed for several years, but it should be questioned whether the scope of a sector-specific law would serve citizens better. It seems to be preferable to adjust the existing Data Protection Act rather than drafting a specific law which covers the field of human genetics. This adaptation should reflect upon the different technical ways in which genetic data are collected and used.

  16. People-oriented Development and Human Rights Protection for Criminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YUQIAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ People-oriented development refers to the economic and social integrative development that regards human beings as the orientation and subject of economic and social development and considers the development of human beings the essence, objective, momentum and symbol of development.One of its important connotations is to protect human beings' rights and interests in all links and works of economic and social development.On December 10,2008, Hu Jintao, secretary general of the CPC Central Committee, clarified that "We will, as always, adhere to people-oriented principles in building a well-off society in an all-round way and accelerating the process of socialist modernization" in his letter to the China Society for Human Rights Studies.

  17. Does lycopene offer human LDL any protection against myeloperoxidase activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Poh Yeong; Riley, Lucy; Graham, Daniel L; Rahman, Khalid; Lowe, Gordon M

    2012-02-01

    Lycopene is a lipophilic antioxidant that is largely transported in human blood by Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL). One of the early events in the aetiology of atherosclerosis is thought to be the oxidation of LDL. Myeloperoxidase an enzyme secreted by neutrophils and macrophages is thought to oxidise human LDL particles. In this study, isolated human LDL was challenged with myeloperoxidase or copper, and the LDL was screened for lipoperoxidation and oxidation of apolipoprotein B100, depletion of lycopene and oxidation of cholesterol. Myeloperoxidase induced oxidation of LDL through direct interaction with apolipoprotein B100. No lipoperoxidation was observed following myeloperoxidase treatment; however, 7-ketocholesterol was detected indicating the products of myeloperoxidase interact with the surface of the LDL particles. Lycopene does react with the products of myeloperoxidase in solvent, but played no role in protecting against enzyme derived oxidation of human LDL.

  18. Discussion on Human Dignity and Human Rights Protection from the Perspective of Peacekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO XINMAN

    2012-01-01

    From an academic point of view,human dignity is the source of human fights,and has a orofound academic history.Since the end of World War Ⅱ,the issue of human fights has received great attention from the international community.So,human right theories,for which human dignity is the basic consideration,have developed continuously.In this era of advocating rights,human dignity and human fights protection are universal values and concepts,which were emphasized once again after World War Ⅱ.Moreover,human dignity was clearly identified as the basis of human rights at the system level.This paper begins by describing the relationship between human dignity and human rights.

  19. Lymphocyte GH-axis hormones in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    The production and utilization of common ligands and their receptors by cells of the immune and neuroendocrine systems constitutes a biochemical information circuit between and within the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense notifying the nervous system of the presence of foreign entities. Within this framework, it is also clear that immune cell functions can be altered by neuroendocrine hormones and that cells of the immune system have the ability to produce neuroendocrine hormones. This review summarizes a part of this knowledge with particular emphasis on growth hormone (GH). The past two decades have uncovered a lot of detail about the actions of GH, acting through its receptor, at the molecular and cellular level and its influence on the immune system. The production and action of immune cell-derived GH is less well developed although its important role in immunity is also slowly emerging. Here we discuss the production of GH, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their cognate receptors on cells of the immune system and their influence via endocrine/autocrine/paracrine and intracrine pathways on immune function. The intracellular mechanisms of action of immune cell-derived GH are still largely unexplored, and it is anticipated that further work in this particular area will establish an important role for this source of GH in normal physiology and in pathologic situations.

  20. Common exon 3 polymorphism of the GH receptor (GHR) gene and effect of GH therapy on growth in Korean children with idiopathic short stature (ISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min; Park, Jung Young; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2009-01-01

    A human GH receptor (GHR) gene exon 3 polymorphism (d3-GHR) has been reported to be associated with responsiveness to GH therapy. We assessed the frequencies of this polymorphism in Korean control and idiopathic short stature (ISS) populations, and analysed short-term growth response to GH therapy according to GHR-exon 3 genotypes in Korean children with ISS. This was a retrospective study in 158 ISS children. Auxological and endocrine parameters were measured, and the GHR-exon 3 genotype was analysed. Allelic frequencies of GHR-exon 3 genotype were compared between the ISS group and a control group. GH had been administered for 62 patients, 52 of whom remained prepubertal after the first follow-up year. Changes in height velocity (HV) and IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentrations following GH therapy were compared in patients with these genotypes. There was no difference in GHR-exon 3 genotype frequency between ISS and control groups of Koreans. However, the fl/fl genotype was more frequent in Koreans than in Caucasians. ISS children with d3-GHR showed a significantly higher increment in HV (P = 0.002) and a marginally significant increment in IGF-1 concentration (P = 0.064) at the first year of GH therapy. fl-GHR was more frequently detected in a Korean population than in Caucasians. The growth promotion efficacy of GH therapy differed significantly between ISS patients with and without the d3-GHR allele. These findings indicate that the GHR-exon 3 polymorphism can affect the growth promoting efficacy of short-term GH therapy in Korean children with ISS.

  1. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  2. Relationship between the GH-IGFs axis and the proliferation of bile duct cancer cell line QBC939 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Hua Cai; Yue-Ming Sun; Jian-Feng Bai; Yi Shi; Han-Lin Zhao; Yi Miao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:In recent years, recombined human growth hormone (rhGH) has been increasingly used in patients to help them recover from operation. But GH, as a mitogen, can promote cell renewal and increase malignant transformation. In the current study, we assessed the proliferation of a bile duct cancer cell line (QBC939) in vitro with GH and explored the possible relationship with the axis of GH-IGFs (insulin-like growth factors). METHODS:QBC939 cells in the exponential growth stage were harvested and divided into an experimental group (GH group) and a control group (NS group). The GH group was divided into four sub-groups according to the dose of GH and culture time (50μg/L for 2 hours, 50μg/L for 24 hours, 100μg/L for 2 hours, 100μg/L for 24 hours). The NS group was divided into two sub-groups (NS for 2 hours and NS for 24 hours). After 2 or 24 hours, IGF-1 and IGF-2 were detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The QBC939 cells cultured for 24 hours with two GH concentrations were made into single cell suspensions and samples underwent subsequent cell cycle evaluation. Messenger RNA of IGF-1 and IGF-2 receptor (IGF-1RmRNA and IGF-2RmRNA) were tested with the method of in situ hybridization. RESULTS:There was no statistically signiifcant difference between the GH and NS groups after 2 hours of culture (P>0.05). But after 24 hours of culture, GH stimulated cell growth in vitro and also elevated the percentage in S phase and the proliferation index (P CONCLUSION:GH can stimulate QBC939 cell growth and proliferation in vitro and the mechanism is most likely by the GH-IGF-1-IGF-1R axis.

  3. Stress rupture properties of GH4169 superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Lu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available GH4169 alloy is a nickel-based superalloy extensively used in the aircraft engine industry because of its excellent mechanical properties and good fabrication ability. The mechanical properties of the GH4169 at high temperature, rupture stress under severe condition deserves a close attention. In this paper, the creep rupture of the GH4169 alloy under constant load and different temperatures from 550 °C to 700 °C conditions is systematically evaluated and major impact factors in the stress rupture behavior are analyzed. Furthermore, an improving method for the alloy stress rupture is proposed.

  4. Does the GH/IGF-1 axis contribute to skeletal sexual dimorphism? Evidence from mouse studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongbo; Mohan, Subburaman; Yakar, Shoshana

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of the gonadotropic axis to skeletal sexual dimorphism (SSD) was clarified in recent years. Studies with animal models of estrogen receptor (ER) or androgen receptor (AR) null mice, as well as mice with bone cell-specific ablation of ER or AR, revealed that both hormones play major roles in skeletal acquisition, and that estrogen regulates skeletal accrual in both sexes. The growth hormone (GH) and its downstream effector, the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are also major determinants of peak bone mass during puberty and young adulthood, and play important roles in maintaining bone integrity during aging. A few studies in both humans and animal models suggest that in addition to the differences in sex steroid actions on bone, sex-specific effects of GH and IGF-1 play essential roles in SSD. However, the contributions of the somatotropic (GH/IGF-1) axis to SSD are controversial and data is difficult to interpret. GH/IGF-1 are pleotropic hormones that act in an endocrine and autocrine/paracrine fashion on multiple tissues, affecting body composition as well as metabolism. Thus, understanding the contribution of the somatotropic axis to SSD requires the use of mouse models that will differentiate between these two modes of action. Elucidation of the relative contribution of GH/IGF-1 axis to SSD is significant because GH is approved for the treatment of normal children with short stature and children with congenital growth disorders. Thus, if the GH/IGF-1 axis determines SSD, treatment with GH may be tailored according to sex. In the following review, we give an overview of the roles of sex steroids in determining SSD and how they may interact with the GH/IGF-1 axis in bone. We summarize several mouse models with impaired somatotropic axis and speculate on the possible contribution of that axis to SSD.

  5. Neuroregulation of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA Axis in Humans: Effects of GABA-, Mineralocorticoid-, and GH-Secretagogue-Receptor Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Giordano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis exerts a variety of effects at both the central and peripheral level. Its activity is mainly regulated by CRH, AVP, and the glucocorticoid-mediated feedback action. Moreover, many neurotransmitters and neuropeptides influence HPA axis activity by acting at the hypothalamic and/or suprahypothalamic level. Among them, GABA and Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHS/GHS-receptor systems have been shown to exert a clear inhibitory and stimulatory effect, respectively, on corticotroph secretion. Alprazolam (ALP, a GABA-A receptor agonist, shows the most marked inhibitory effect on both spontaneous and stimulated HPA axis activity, in agreement with its peculiar efficacy in panic disorders and depression where an HPA axis hyperactivation is generally present. Ghrelin and synthetic GHS possess a marked ACTH/cortisol-releasing effect in humans and the ghrelin/GHS-R system is probably involved in the modulation of the HPA response to stress and nutritional/metabolic variations. The glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback action is mediated by both glucocorticoid (GR and mineralocorticoid (MR receptors activation at the central level, mainly in the hippocampus. In agreement with animal studies, MRs seem to play a crucial role in the maintenance of the circadian ACTH and cortisol rhythm, through the modulation of CRH and AVP release. GABA agonists (mainly ALP, ghrelin, as well as MR agonists/antagonists, may represent good tools to explore the activity of the HPA axis in both physiological conditions and pathological states characterized by an impaired control of the corticotroph function.

  6. Immobilization of Glycoside Hydrolase Families GH1, GH13, and GH70: State of the Art and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália G. Graebin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycoside hydrolases (GH are enzymes capable to hydrolyze the glycosidic bond between two carbohydrates or even between a carbohydrate and a non-carbohydrate moiety. Because of the increasing interest for industrial applications of these enzymes, the immobilization of GH has become an important development in order to improve its activity, stability, as well as the possibility of its reuse in batch reactions and in continuous processes. In this review, we focus on the broad aspects of immobilization of enzymes from the specific GH families. A brief introduction on methods of enzyme immobilization is presented, discussing some advantages and drawbacks of this technology. We then review the state of the art of enzyme immobilization of families GH1, GH13, and GH70, with special attention on the enzymes β-glucosidase, α-amylase, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase, and dextransucrase. In each case, the immobilization protocols are evaluated considering their positive and negative aspects. Finally, the perspectives on new immobilization methods are briefly presented.

  7. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women

    OpenAIRE

    Maningat, Patricia D.; Sen, Partha; Rijnkels, Monique; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Bray, Molly S.; Haymond, Morey W.

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained from five normal lactating women. Following 24 h of baseline milk and blood sampling, rhGH (0.1 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 3 days. Gene expression changes were determine...

  8. On the Principle of Presumption of Innocence from the Perspective of Human Rights Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ZONGJIE

    2011-01-01

    @@ People pay more and more attention to human rights protection today.The human rights protection in the system of criminal procedure distinctly emphasizes the principle of presumptionof innocence (hereafter in this article referred to as the PPI).

  9. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  10. Correlation between GH and IGF-1 during treatment for acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Edward H; Jane, John A; Thorner, Michael O; Pledger, Carrie L; Sheehan, Jason P; Vance, Mary Lee

    2016-11-18

    OBJECTIVE The relationship between growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in patients with acromegaly as serial levels drop over time after treatment has not been examined previously. Knowledge of this relationship is important to correlate pretreatment levels that best predict response to treatment. To examine the correlation between GH and IGF-1 and IGF-1 z-scores over a wide range of GH levels, the authors examined serial GH and IGF-1 levels at intervals before and after surgery and radiosurgery for acromegaly. METHODS This retrospective analysis correlates 414 pairs of GH and IGF-1 values in 93 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS Absolute IGF-1 levels increase linearly with GH levels only up to a GH of 4 ng/ml, and with IGF-1 z-scores only to a GH level of 1 ng/ml. Between GH levels of 1 and 10 ng/ml, increases in IGF-1 z-scores relative to changes in GH diminish and then plateau at GH concentrations of about 10 ng/ml. From patient to patient there is a wide range of threshold GH levels beyond which IGF-1 increases are no longer linear, GH levels at which the IGF-1 response plateaus, IGF-1 levels at similar GH values after the IGF-1 response plateaus, and of IGF-1 levels at similar GH levels. CONCLUSIONS In acromegaly, although IGF-1 levels represent a combination of the integrated effects of GH secretion and GH action, the tumor produces GH, not IGF-1. Nonlinearity between GH and IGF-1 occurs at GH levels far below those previously recognized. To monitor tumor activity and tumor viability requires measurement of GH levels.

  11. Detection of Doping with rhGH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Mou-tian

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reviewed most articles recently pub lished in peer reviewed international scientific journals related to detection doping with rhGH. Four parts were in it: First part was the brief introduction about the background of do ping,special doping with rhGH. Second part summarized the development of "indirect method", markers approach. Third was focused on the development of "direct method", isoform approach. Finally, some potential alternatives have been discussed.

  12. GH3-Mediated Auxin Conjugation Can Result in Either Transient or Oscillatory Transcriptional Auxin Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Nathan; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2016-02-01

    The conjugation of the phytohormone auxin to amino acids via members of the gene family GH3 is an important component in the auxin-degradation pathway in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, as well as many other plant species. Since the GH3 genes are themselves up-regulated in response to auxin, providing a negative feedback on intracellular auxin levels, it is hypothesised that the GH3s have a role in auxin homoeostasis. To investigate this, we develop a mathematical model of auxin signalling and response that includes the auxin-inducible negative feedback from GH3 on the rate of auxin degradation. In addition, we include a positive feedback on the rate of auxin input via the auxin influx transporter LAX3, shown previously to be expressed in response to auxin and to have an important role during lateral root emergence. In the absence of the LAX3 positive feedback, we show that the GH3 negative feedback suffices to generate a transient transcriptional response to auxin in the shape of damped oscillations of the model system. When LAX3 positive feedback is present, sustained oscillations of the system are possible. Using steady-state analyses, we identify and discuss key parameters affecting the oscillatory behaviour of the model. The transient peak of auxin and subsequent transcriptional response caused by the up-regulation of GH3 represents a possible protective homoeostasis mechanism that may be used by plant cells in response to excess auxin.

  13. A novel soluble supramolecular system for sustained rh-GH delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Stefano; Bersani, Sara; Scomparin, Anna; Balasso, Anna; Brazzale, Chiara; Barattin, Michela; Caliceti, Paolo

    2014-11-28

    Methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)s bearing a terminal cholanic moiety (mPEG(5kDa)-cholane, mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane) were physically combined with recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH) to obtain supramolecular assemblies for sustained hormone delivery. The association constants (Ka) calculated by Scatchard analysis of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) data were in the order of 10(5)M(-1). The complete rh-GH association with mPEG(5kDa)-cholane, mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane was achieved with 7.5 ± 1.1, 3.9 ± 0.4 and 2.6 ± 0.4 w/w% rh-GH/mPEG-cholane, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) yielded association constants similar to that calculated by SEC and showed that rh-GH has 21-25 binding sites for mPEG-cholane, regardless the polymer molecular weight. Dialysis studies showed that the mPEG-cholane association strongly delays the protein release; 80-90% of the associated rh-GH was released in 200 h. However, during the first 8h the protein formulations obtained with mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane showed a burst release of 8 and 28%, respectively. Circular dichroism (CD) analyses showed that the mPEG(5kDa)-cholane association does not alter the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, mPEG(5kDa)-cholane was found to enhance both the enzymatic and physical stability of rh-GH. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were performed by subcutaneous administration of rh-GH and rh-GH/mPEG(5kDa)-cholane to normal and hypophysectomised rats. The study showed that mPEG(5kDa)-cholane decreases the maximal concentration in the blood but prolongs the body exposure of the protein, which resulted in 55% bioavailability increase. Finally, rh-GH formulated with mPEG(5kDa)-cholane yielded prolonged weight increase of hypophysectomised rats as compared to rh-GH in buffer or formulated with mPEG(5kDa)-OH. After the second administration the weight of the animals treated with rh-GH formulated with m

  14. Avian influenza biosecurity: a key for animal and human protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Charisis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosecurity methods have provided the best way of preventing the spread of a communicable disease since people realised that human and animal contact can transmit exotic diseases. The avian influenza virus is readily transmitted through animal vectors and inanimate matter and incurs heavy losses to the poultry industry. Biosecurity measures include the prevention of vaccination of flocks in an endemic area and the isolation of farms from the surrounding world (villages, other farms, fields, etc.. Veterinary services work in liaison with owners to implement national quarantine and vaccination measures for the benefit of farmers and the industry and for protection of public health.

  15. Development of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for dTMP-GH fusion protein by rational immunogen selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Shen, Mingqiang; Chen, Shilei; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Fang; Chen, Mo; Zhao, Gaomei; Ran, Xinze; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Xu, Yang; Wang, Junping

    2017-12-01

    dTMP-GH is a chimeric protein containing a tandem dimer of thrombopoietin mimetic peptide (dTMP) fused to human growth hormone (hGH) prepared previously by our team. It shows significant bioactivity in promoting thrombocytopoiesis, but detection of intact dTMP-GH in plasma is still a challenge due to the presence of endogenous hGH. In this study, a rabbit polyclonal antibody with high affinity to dTMP was obtained with a BSA-conjugated immunogen composed of 20 amino acids sequence spanning two TMP and the linker. A monoclonal antibody termed as 3B2 was screened out by using immunizing mice with whole dTMP-GH, which was proved to simultaneously interact with rhGH, TMP-GH, and dTMP-GH, respectively. In this study, we developed a specific and sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with two antibodies (one polyclonal and one HRP-conjugated monoclonal) to quantify dTMP-GH. The polyclonal antibody and HRP-conjugated monoclonal antibody 3B2 were applied as the capture antibody and detection antibody, respectively. A good correlation between ELISA and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in the quantification of diluted dTMP-GH was observed (r(2) = 0.996). Meanwhile, the standard curve of this ELISA method was found in a linear relationship between 0.2 and 10 ng/mL in the presence of rabbit plasma. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the newly developed method is effective to detect dTMP-GH in rabbits, which paves the way for further pharmacokinetic evaluation.

  16. Multifaceted pathways protect human skin from UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek T; Ganju, Parul; Ramkumar, Amrita; Grover, Ritika; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2014-07-01

    The recurrent interaction of skin with sunlight is an intrinsic constituent of human life, and exhibits both beneficial and detrimental effects. The apparent robust architectural framework of skin conceals remarkable mechanisms that operate at the interface between the surface and environment. In this Review, we discuss three distinct protective mechanisms and response pathways that safeguard skin from deleterious effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways constitutes the important defense mechanisms against UV radiation. The intricate pigmentary system and its intersection with the immune-system cytokine axis delicately balance tissue homeostasis. We discuss the relationship among these networks in the context of an unusual depigmenting disorder, vitiligo. The elaborate tunable mechanisms, elegant multilayered architecture and evolutionary selection pressures involved in skin and sunlight interaction makes this a compelling model to understand biological complexity.

  17. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengyang; Jiang, Chengyan

    2017-01-01

    GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl) gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates.

  18. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates.

  19. Dwarfism and increased adiposity in the gh1 mutant zebrafish vizzini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Sarah K; Minchin, James E N; Gordon, Tiffany N; Rawls, John F; Parichy, David M

    2013-04-01

    Somatic growth and adipogenesis are closely associated with the development of obesity in humans. In this study, we identify a zebrafish mutant, vizzini, that exhibits both a severe defect in somatic growth and increased accumulation of adipose tissue. Positional cloning of vizzini revealed a premature stop codon in gh1. Although the effects of GH are largely through igfs in mammals, we found no decrease in the expression of igf transcripts in gh1 mutants during larval development. As development progressed, however, we found overall growth to be progressively retarded and the attainment of specific developmental stages to occur at abnormally small body sizes relative to wild type. Moreover, both subcutaneous (sc) and visceral adipose tissues underwent precocious development in vizzini mutants, and at maturity, the sizes of different fat deposits were greatly expanded relative to wild type. In vivo confocal imaging of sc adipose tissue (SAT) expansion revealed that vizzini mutants exhibit extreme enlargement of adipocyte lipid droplets without a corresponding increase in lipid droplet number. These findings suggest that GH1 signaling restricts SAT hypertrophy in zebrafish. Finally, nutrient deprivation of vizzini mutants revealed that SAT mobilization was greatly diminished during caloric restriction, further implicating GH1 signaling in adipose tissue homeostasis. Overall, the zebrafish gh1 mutant, vizzini, exhibits decreased somatic growth, increased adipose tissue accumulation, and disrupted adipose plasticity after nutrient deprivation and represents a novel model to investigate the in vivo dynamics of vertebrate obesity.

  20. Differential effects of central and peripheral administration of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor on hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin gene expression in GH-deficient dwarf rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Frohman, L A

    1993-08-01

    The roles of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in the regulation of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) gene expression were investigated in the GH-deficient dwarf (dw) rat, in which endogenous feedback signals are lacking. Adult male and female dw rats were treated with GH or IGF-I by systemic (sc) administration or intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion, and hypothalamic GRH and SRIH mRNA were determined by Northern blotting and densitometric analysis. Systemic sc injection of rGH (75 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes. However, systemic sc injection of human IGF-I (150 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) did not affect GRH mRNA levels in either sex despite significant stimulation of body weight gain. The use of a continuous sc infusion, which normalized serum IGF-I levels, and prolongation of the treatment period to 7 days also failed to change GRH mRNA levels. SRIH mRNA was unaffected by systemic administration of either GH or IGF-I. Continuous icv infusion of GH (1 microgram/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes, but did not alter SRIH mRNA levels. Continuous icv infusion of IGF-I (100 ng/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA in both sexes. In contrast, SRIH mRNA levels were increased in both sexes. IGF-I decreased GRH mRNA levels at icv infusion rates of 100 and 300 ng/h and stimulated SRIH mRNA levels at infusion rates of 30 and 100 ng/h. Food intake was unaffected at these infusion rates. Changes in GRH and SRIH mRNA levels in response to systemic or central GH and IGF-I administration were similar in both sexes, except that the decrease in GRH mRNA levels produced by the icv infusion of IGF-I was greater in female than in male rats. The results provide evidence for a direct inhibitory feedback effect of GH in the central nervous system on the regulation of hypothalamic GRH gene expression that is independent of peripheral IGF-I. IGF-I feedback, in contrast, appears to

  1. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  2. GH and IGF1 levels are positively associated with musculotendinous collagen expression: experiments in acromegalic and GH deficiency patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doessing, Simon; Holm, Lars; Heinemeier, Katja M; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Schjerling, Peter; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte O; Nielsen, Rie H; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Disproportionate growth of musculoskeletal tissue is a major cause of morbidity in both acromegalic (ACRO) and GH-deficient (GHD) patients. GH/IGF1 is likely to play an important role in the regulation of tendon and muscle collagen. We hypothesized that the local production of collagen is associated with the level of GH/IGF1. As primary outcomes, collagen mRNA expression and collagen protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) were determined locally in skeletal muscle and tendon in nine ACRO and nine GHD patients. Moreover, muscle myofibrillar protein synthesis and tendon collagen morphology were determined. Muscle collagen I and III mRNA expression was higher in ACRO patients versus GHD patients (P<0.05), whereas collagen protein FSR did not differ significantly between ACRO and GHD patients in muscle (P=0.21) and tendon (P=0.15). IGF1Ea and IGF1Ec mRNA expression in muscle was higher in ACRO patients versus GHD patients (P<0.01). Muscle IGF1Ea mRNA expression correlated positively with collagen I mRNA expression (P<0.01). Tendon collagen fibrillar area tended to be higher in GHD patients relative to ACRO patients (P=0.07). Thus, we observed a higher expression for collagen and IGF1 mRNA in local musculotendinous tissue in ACRO patients relative to GHD patients. Moreover, there was a tendency towards a higher collagen protein FSR and a smaller collagen fibril diameter in ACRO patients relative to GHD patients. The results indicate a collagen-stimulating role of local IGF1 in human connective tissue and add to the understanding of musculoskeletal pathology in patients with either high or low GH/IGF1 axis activity.

  3. Impact of estradiol supplementation on dual peptidyl drive of GH secretion in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Bowers, C Y

    2002-02-01

    As an indirect probe of estrogen-regulated hypothalamic somatostatin restraint, the present study monitors the ability of short-term oral E2 supplementation to modulate GH secretion during combined continuous stimulation by recombinant human GHRH [GHRH-(1-44)-amide] and the potent and selective synthetic GH-releasing peptide, GHRP-2. According to a simplified tripeptidyl model of GH neuroregulation, the effects of estrogen in this dual secretagogue paradigm should mirror alterations in endogenous somatostatinergic signaling. To this end, seven healthy postmenopausal women underwent frequent (10-min) blood sampling for 24 h during simultaneous i.v. infusion of GHRH and GHRP-2 each at a rate of 1 microg/kg x h on d 10 of randomly ordered placebo or 17beta-estradiol (E2) (1 mg orally twice daily) replacement. Serum GH concentrations (n = 280/subject) were assayed by chemiluminescence. The resultant GH time series was evaluated by deconvolution analysis, the approximate entropy statistic, and cosine regression to quantitate pulsatile, entropic (feedback-sensitive), and 24-h rhythmic GH release, respectively. Statistical comparisons revealed that E2 repletion increased the mean (+/- SEM) serum E2 concentration to 222 +/- 26 pg/ml from 16 +/- 1.7 pg/ml during placebo (P entropic, or nyctohemeral GH secretion monitored under continuous combined drive by GHRH and GHRP-2. As E2 repletion without enforced GHRH/GHRP-2 stimulation augments each of the foregoing regulated facets of GH release, we infer that one or both of the infused peptidyl secretagogues may itself participate in E2's short-term amplification of GH secretion in postmenopausal individuals. Estrogen's disruption of the orderliness of sequential GH pulse-mass values during fixed GHRH/GHRP-2 feedforward would be consistent with a subtle reduction in the release and/or actions of hypothalamic somatostatin or an (unexpected) direct pituitary action of the sex steroid. Whether comparable dynamics mediate the effects

  4. Response to GH treatment in adult GH deficiency is predicted by gender, age, and IGF1 SDS but not by stimulated GH-peak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether the severity of GH deficiency (GHD) defined as i) GH-peak on stimulation tests (insulin tolerance test (ITT), arginine, and glucagon), ii) number of additional pituitary deficits, or iii) baseline IGF1 SDS could impact the response to GH treatment. We further explored whether i...

  5. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Niels P; Zhou, Zhigang; Oyen, Wim J G; Jaspers, Rogier; Ramakers, Bart P; Brouwer, Rene M H J; Boerman, Otto C; Steinmetz, Neil; Smits, Paul; Rongen, Gerard A

    2006-08-15

    We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. In vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury was assessed in the thenar muscle by 99mTc-annexin A5 scintigraphy. Forty-two healthy volunteers performed forearm ischemic exercise. In 24 subjects, this was preceded by a stimulus for IP. In a randomized double-blinded design, the subjects received caffeine (4 mg/kg) or saline intravenously before the experiment. At reperfusion, 99mTc-annexin A5 was administered intravenously. Targeting of annexin was quantified by region-of-interest analysis, and expressed as percentage difference between experimental and contralateral hand. In vitro, we assessed recovery of contractile function of human atrial trabeculae, harvested during heart surgery, as functional end point of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Field-stimulated contraction was quantified at baseline and after simulated ischemia-reperfusion, in a paired approach with and without 5 min of IP, in the presence (n=13) or absence (n = 17) of caffeine (10 mg/l). Ischemic preconditioning reduced annexin targeting in the absence of caffeine (from 13 +/- 3% to 7 +/- 1% at 1 h, and from 19 +/- 2% to 9 +/- 3% at 4 h after reperfusion, p = 0.006), but not after caffeine administration (targeting 11 +/- 2% and 16 +/- 3% at 1 and 4 h). In vitro, IP improved post-ischemic functional recovery in the control group, but not in the caffeine group (8 +/- 3% vs. -8 +/- 5%, p=0.003). Caffeine abolishes IP in 2 human models at a dose equivalent to the drinking of 2 to 4 cups of coffee. (The Effect of Caffeine on Ischemic Preconditioning; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00184912?order=1; NCT00184912).

  6. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  7. The influence of growth hormone (GH) deficiency and GH replacement on quality of life in GH-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deijen, J B; van der Veen, E A

    1999-01-01

    The total absence of hormones such as cortisol or thyroxine causes death within weeks. Lack of estrogen or testosterone is followed by infertility and impaired sexual functioning. Relative deficiencies of almost all classical hormones have a substantial impact on quality of life (QOL). However, in contrast to virtually all aspects of metabolism, QOL is difficult to measure. Only recently have tests been developed to assess general QOL, whereas specific tests address those aspects of QOL affected only in specific situations or disease states. For example, in rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic disabling diseases, the use of measures of QOL to assess treatment modalities is almost routine. In diseases with overt metabolic disturbances attention is generally focused on changes in metabolic parameters and the issue of QOL is neglected. Although very few practising endocrinologists will not support the idea that they specialize in improving QOL, its assessment in patients with endocrinological disorders began only recently--in patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency only 10 years ago. It became apparent that GH deficiency in adult life is unmistakably followed by changes in parameters that determine QOL. In adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency, the unemployment rate is higher and the marriage rate lower than in the general population. Another symbol of success in life, the possession of a driver's licence, is less frequently attained by these patients. Most patients with adult-onset GH deficiency score unfavourably in questionnaires such as the Nottingham Health Profile. GH substitution is now available on a scale large enough to enable studies to be made of the effects on QOL in adults. The first studies were reported in 1989. However, only in the last few years have studies appeared in which sufficient number of patients and sufficient length of treatment were reported to allow a more objective judgement of the effectiveness of GH substitution. Although

  8. Growth hormone and cancer: GH production and action in glioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Robert W; Dawson, Timothy; Martinez-Moreno, Carlos G; El-Abry, Nasra; Harvey, Steve

    2015-09-01

    The hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone (GH) is associated with an increased risk of cancer, while reducing pituitary GH signaling reduces this risk. Roles for pituitary GH in cancer are therefore well established. The expression of the GH gene is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland and it is now known to occur in many extrapituitary tissues, in which it has local autocrine or paracrine actions, rather than endocrine function. It is, for instance, expressed in cancers of the prostate, lung, skin, endometrium and colon. The oncogenicity of autocrine GH may also be greater than that induced by endocrine or exogenous GH, as higher concentrations of GHR antagonists are required to inhibit its actions. This may reflect the fact that autocrine GH is thought to act at intracellular receptors directly after synthesis, in compartments not readily accessible to endocrine (or exogenous) GH. The roles and actions of extrapituitary GH in cancer may therefore differ from those of pituitary GH. The possibility that GH may be expressed and act in glioma tumors was therefore examined by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of abundant GH- and GH receptor (GHR-) immunoreactivity in glioma, in which they were co-localized in cytoplasmic but not nuclear compartments. These results demonstrate that glioma differs from most cancers in lacking nuclear GHRs, but GH is nevertheless likely to have autocrine or paracrine actions in the induction and progression of glioma.

  9. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  10. Targeted deletion of growth hormone (GH) receptor in macrophage reveals novel osteopontin-mediated effects of GH on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunxia; Kumar, P Anil; Sun, Jinhong; Aggarwal, Anjali; Fan, Yong; Sperling, Mark A; Lumeng, Carey N; Menon, Ram K

    2013-05-31

    We investigated GH action on macrophage (MΦ) by creating a MΦ-specific GH receptor-null mouse model (MacGHR KO). On a normal diet (10% fat), MacGHR KO and littermate controls exhibited similar growth profiles and glucose excursions on intraperitoneal glucose (ipGTT) and insulin tolerance (ITT) tests. However, when challenged with high fat diet (HFD, 45% fat) for 18 weeks, MacGHR KO mice exhibited impaired ipGTT and ITT compared with controls. In MacGHR KO, adipose-tissue (AT) MΦ abundance was increased with skewing toward M1 polarization. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1β, TNF-α, IL6, and osteopontin (OPN)) were increased in MacGHR KO AT stromal vascular fraction (SVF). In MacGHR KO AT, crown-like-structures were increased with decreased insulin-dependent Akt phosphorylation. The abundance of phosphorylated NF-κB and of OPN was increased in SVF and bone-marrow-derived MΦ in MacGHR KO. GH, acting via an NF-κB site in the distal OPN promoter, inhibited the OPN promoter. Thus in diet-induced obesity (DIO), lack of GH action on the MΦ exerts an unexpected deleterious effect on glucose homeostasis by accentuating AT inflammation and NF-κB-dependent activation of OPN expression. These novel results in mice support the possibility that administration of GH could have salutary effects on DIO-associated chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in humans.

  11. Human subjects protection issues in QUERI implementation research: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie Mona

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Subjects protections approaches, specifically those relating to research review board oversight, vary throughout the world. While all are designed to protect participants involved in research, the structure and specifics of these institutional review boards (IRBs can and do differ. This variation affects all types of research, particularly implementation research. Methods In 2001, we began a series of inter-related studies on implementing evidence-based collaborative care for depression in Veterans Health Administration primary care. We have submitted more than 100 IRB applications, amendments, and renewals, and in doing so, we have interacted with 13 VA and University IRBs across the United States (U.S.. We present four overarching IRB-related themes encountered throughout the implementation of our projects, and within each theme, identify key challenges and suggest approaches that have proved useful. Where applicable, we showcase process aids developed to assist in resolving a particular IRB challenge. Results There are issues unique to implementation research, as this type of research may not fit within the traditional Human Subjects paradigm used to assess clinical trials. Risks in implementation research are generally related to breaches of confidentiality, rather than health risks associated with traditional clinical trials. The implementation-specific challenges discussed are: external validity considerations, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, risk-benefit issues, the multiple roles of researchers and subjects, and system-level unit of analysis. Discussion Specific aspects of implementation research interact with variations in knowledge, procedures, and regulatory interpretations across IRBs to affect the implementation and study of best methods to increase evidence-based practice. Through lack of unambiguous guidelines and local liability concerns, IRBs are often at risk of applying both variable and inappropriate or

  12. [Human habitats and the protection of health in Islam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrović, A

    1997-01-01

    Architecture is an expression so wide in its dimensions and meanings, that it can be compared to expression "life". Architecture is a synthesis and an expression of all rational and irrational that attributes a man, family, community in general, or mankind at all-im one hand; and rational expression of physical structure given by architects, in other hand. Thus, architecture comes down from the highest spheres of philosophy, sociology, discussions on ethics etc., to life. That is the way how architecture becomes defining frame of human life. Human habitude and health protection in islam could be elaborated through theoretical concept of architecturally defined space (ADS), that considers (treats) architecture as a complex system, consisting of four fundamental elements: man, environment, limits and perspectives. Each of these elements, when looking from the perspective of islam, has its specific characteristics, that author discusses in this paper. No doubt, in islamic sphere of life there is a wide spectrum of architectural programmes, that follows natural environment, and has a goal to confirm human and general social values.

  13. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  14. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  15. Graviton Propagators on Fuzzy G/H

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, Y; Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    We describe closed string modes by open Wilson lines in noncommutative (NC) gauge theories on compact fuzzy G/H in IIB matrix model. In this construction the world sheet cut-off is related to the spacetime cut-off since the string bit of the symmetric traced Wilson line carries the minimum momentum on G/H. We show that the two point correlation functions of graviton type Wilson lines in 4 dimensional NC gauge theories behave as 1/(momentum)^2. This result suggests that graviton is localized on D3-brane, so we can naturally interpret D3-branes as our universe. Our result is not limited to D3-brane system, and we generalize our analysis to other dimensions and even to any topology of D-brane worldvolume within fuzzy G/H.

  16. GH/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in livers of mice overexpressing GH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2015-04-01

    GH/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in the liver in adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess whether the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in the liver in these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus, but displays higher basal phosphorylation in the livers of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and the positive modulators glucocorticoid receptor and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting the activity of STAT5. The negative modulators cytokine-induced suppressor and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. The suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, indicating that they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in the liver in GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in accelerated but controlled growth.

  17. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease? Reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S.; Hudson, Peter J.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2016-01-01

    The dilution effect is the sort of idea that everyone wants to be true. If nature protects humans against infectious disease, imagine the implications: nature's value could be tallied in terms of human suffering avoided. This makes a potent argument for conservation, convincing even to those who would otherwise be disinclined to support conservation initiatives. The appeal of the dilution effect has been recognized by others: “the desire to make the case for conservation has led to broad claims regarding the benefits of nature conservation for human health” (Bauch et al. 2015). Randolph and Dobson (2012) were among the first to critique these claims, making the case that promotion of conservation to reduce Lyme disease risk, although well intentioned, was flawed. Along with Randolph and Dobson's critique, there have been several calls for a more nuanced scientific assessment of the relationship between biodiversity and disease transmission (Dunn 2010, Salkeld et al. 2013, Wood and Lafferty 2013, Young et al. 2013). In response, supporters of the dilution effect have instead increased the scope of their generalizations with review papers, press releases, and, like Levi et al. (2015), letters. These responses have been successful; it is not uncommon to read papers that repeat the assertion that biodiversity generally interferes with disease transmission and that conservation will therefore generally benefit human health. Here, we explain how Levi et al. (2015) and other, similar commentaries use selective interpretation and shifting definitions to argue for the generality of the dilution effect hypothesis.

  18. Caveolin-1 sensitizes rat pituitary adenoma GH3 cells to bromocriptine induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mu-Chiou

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactinoma is the most frequent pituitary tumor in humans. The dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine has been widely used clinically to treat human breast tumor and prolactinoma through inhibition of hyperprolactinemia and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, respectively, but the molecular mechanism of bromocriptine induction of pituitary tumor apoptosis remains unclear. Caveolin-1 is a membrane-anchored protein enriched on caveolae, inverted flask-shaped invaginations on plasma membranes where signal transduction molecules are concentrated. Currently, caveolin-1 is thought to be a negative regulator of cellular proliferation and an enhancer of apoptosis by blocking signal transduction between cell surface membrane receptors and intracellular signaling protein cascades. Rat pituitary adenoma GH3 cells, which express endogenous caveolin-1, exhibit increased apoptosis and shrinkage after exposure to bromocriptine. Hence, the GH3 cell line is an ideal model for studying the molecular action of bromocriptine on prolactinoma. Results The expression of endogenous caveolin-1 in GH3 cells was elevated after bromocriptine treatment. Transiently expressed mouse recombinant caveolin-1 induced apoptosis in GH3 cells by enhancing the activity of caspase 8. Significantly, caveolin-1 induction of GH3 cell apoptosis was sensitized by the administration of bromocriptine. Phosphorylation of caveolin-1 at tyrosine 14 was enhanced after bromocriptine treatment, suggesting that bromocriptine-induced phosphorylation of caveolin-1 may contribute to sensitization of apoptosis in GH3 cells exposed to bromocriptine. Conclusion Our results reveal that caveolin-1 increases sensitivity for apoptosis induction in pituitary adenoma GH3 cells and may contribute to tumor shrinkage after clinical bromocriptine treatment.

  19. Unaltered ratio of circulating levels of growth hormone/GH isoforms in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome after GHRH plus arginine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, A E; Grugni, G; Marazzi, N; Bini, S; Bidlingmaier, M; Sartorio, A

    2015-08-01

    Human growth hormone (GH) is a heterogeneous protein hormone consisting of several isoforms, the most abundant being 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH. The availability of analytical methods to measure these GH isoforms might represent a valuable diagnostic tool to investigate GH hyposecretory states, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), one of the most common causes of syndromic obesity. The aim of the present study was to measure circulating levels of 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH in PWS adults (n=14; M/F: 5/9; genotype DEL15/UPD15: 12/2; age: 19.0±3.7 years; BMI: 29.9±8.7 kg/m2) after combined GH releasing hormone (GHRH) plus arginine (ARG) administration. The results were analysed subdividing the study population in obese vs. nonobese (6/8) and GH deficient vs. nonGH deficient (GHD) (6/8) subjects, according to appropriate BMI-related diagnostic cut-off limits of GH peak response to the provocative test. Circulating levels of 22 kDa-GH were measured by a chemiluminescent method based on a detection monoclonal antibody targeting an epitope in the loop connecting helix 1 and 2 of GH, which is missing in 20 kDa-GH; the 20 kDa-GH was measured using a time resolved fluorescence assay based on two monoclonal antibodies with no cross-reactivity to 22-kDa GH. GHRH plus ARG significantly stimulated the secretions of 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH in nonobese (at 30, 45, 60 and 90 min and at 45, 60, 90 and 120 min vs. 0 min, pGH peaks of 15.8±10.3 ng/ml and 2.7±1.2 ng/ml, respectively) and in nonGHD PWS (at 30, 45 and 60 min and at 45, 60 and 90 min vs 0 min, pGH peaks of 12.5±9.0 ng/ml and 2.0±1.8 ng/ml, respectively). No significant GHRH plus ARG-induced changes in 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH were observed in obese or GHD PWS patients, the only exception being the increase of 22 kDa-GH (pGH peaks of 6.9±4.7 ng/ml and 0.8±0.6 ng/ml in obese subjects and 8.5±6.0 ng/ml and 1.2±1.0 ng/ml in GHD subjects for 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH, respectively). The GH responses for both isoforms were

  20. Morbidity and GH deficiency: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, K.; Laursen, T.; Green, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Design: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  1. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Berryman, Darlene E

    2014-04-05

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant's preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant's therapeutic value in selected types of cancer.

  2. Protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Suayib; Müftüoğlu, Sevda; Cetin, Eren; Sarer, Banu; Yildirim, Berna Akkuş; Zeybek, Dilara; Orhan, Bülent

    2003-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is a potent nephrotoxin, and nephrotoxicity is its most important dose-limiting toxicity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in the protection of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and compare its efficacy with the cell-protective agent amifostine. All experiments were conducted on female Wistar albino rats. Animals were randomly assigned to four groups, each including six rats. Group A received only CDDP, group B received CDDP plus rhEPO, group C received CDDP plus amifostine, and group D received only rhEPO. At the end of 7 wk, hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrite (Htc), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine (Cr) levels were determined and kidneys of the rats were removed. The weights of the kidneys were measured and sent for histopathological examination. Proximal tubules from four areas of the kidney (outer cortex, inner cortex, the medullary ray, and outer stripe of outer medulla [OSOM]) were evaluated. There were statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of tubular scores, including overall renal tubular score, cortex, inner cortex, OSOM, and medullary ray tubular scores, and Htc levels. Group A rats had the worse tubular scores in all categories when compared to group D rats. When the results of groups B and C were compared, there were no differences in terms of BUN, Cr levels, and tubular scores, but the Htc level was significantly higher in group B. Group B rats had better overall and OSOM tubular scores when compared to group A. Group C also had better overall and OSOM tubular scores compared to group A. The present study showed for the first time that rhEPO plays an important role in the prevention of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and it is as effective as amifostine.

  3. Overall and cause-specific mortality in GH-deficient adults on GH replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaillard, Rolf C; Mattsson, Anders F; Akerblad, Ann-Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is associated with an increased mortality rate but the reasons underlying this have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mortality and associated factors within a large GH-replaced population of hypopituitary patients.......Hypopituitarism is associated with an increased mortality rate but the reasons underlying this have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mortality and associated factors within a large GH-replaced population of hypopituitary patients....

  4. Metabolomics: a tool for the diagnosis of GH deficiency and for monitoring GH replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Wahlström, Erik; Tollet-Egnell, Petra; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic value of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) for GH deficiency (GHD) in adults is not optimal. Molecular profiling could be used for biomarker discovery. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the serum metabolome between GHD patients and healthy controls, and identification of potential markers for diagnosis and/or for individual GH dosing. A total of ten patients with GHD, median age of 55 years and BMI of 27 kg/m(2), were compared with ten healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The serum metabolic profiles were generated using gas chromatography-coupled mass spectroscopy on fasting samples taken in the morning from the controls and at baseline and during 6 months of GH replacement in the patients with GHD. The difference in low-molecular weight compounds (LMC) distinguished the healthy controls from GHD patients. Among 285 measured metabolites, 13 were identified as being most important in differentiating GHD patients from controls. Of these, 11 could not be structurally annotated but many were classified as lipids. The difference in the LMC pattern persisted despite normalisation of IGF1 following GH replacement. GH replacement increased the levels of specific fatty acid compounds and decreased the levels of certain amino acids. No metabolite changed in response to GH treatment, to the same extent as IGF1. The measurement of 285 metabolites resulted in a unique pattern in GHD, but changes in the metabolite patterns during GH treatment were limited. The utility of metabolomics to find new markers in GHD and GH replacement remains to be further elucidated.

  5. Stimulation of the 150-kilodalton insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 ternary complex by continuous and pulsatile patterns of growth hormone (GH) administration in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2000-01-01

    Abstract In the circulation insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid-labile subunit (ALS) form a 150-kDa ternary complex that is of importance for the regulation of IGF-I bioactivity. GH administration is known to increase each of the single components...... of the ternary complex, and in GH-deficient rats formation of the 150-kDa complex is induced more by continuous than by pulsatile GH patterns. The aim of the present studies was to study the effects of the GH administration pattern on the formation of the 150-kDa ternary complex in humans. A fixed total GH dose...... (2 IU/m2-24 h) was administered iv randomly as 1) continuous infusion or 2) eight bolus injections to five GH-deficient patients over a period of 24 h. GH administration significantly increased serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio. IGF-I levels increased most pronouncedly after...

  6. The GH/IGF axis in the mouse kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Cingel-Ristic

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone synthesized and secreted by somatotroph cells within the anterior pituitary predominantly under regulation of hypothalamic peptides, GH releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS) (1-3) (Figure 1). Further, production of GH is modulated by vari

  7. Continuous infusion versus daily injections of growth hormone (GH) for 4 weeks in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jakobsen, Grethe;

    1995-01-01

    effects with constant and pulsatile GH delivery. This study was carried out to compare the metabolic effects of longer term continuous infusion vs. daily injections of GH. Thirteen GH-deficient patients were studied in a cross-over design. The patients were randomized to receive GH as a continuous sc...... infusion by means of a portable pump for 1 month and as daily sc injections (at 1900 h) for another month. An average daily GH dosage (+/- SEM) of 3.15 +/- 0.27 IU was administered during both periods. Steady state 24-h profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), insulin, glucose, lipid.......35 (infusion); P infusion induced higher nighttime than daytime GH levels (P = 0.01), indicating a diurnal variation in the absorption or clearance of GH. Serum IGF-I levels (micrograms per L) were slightly higher (P infusion [312...

  8. Diagnosis of growth hormone (GH deficiency: comparison of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome and transient GH deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauner Raja

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with childhood non-organic growth hormone (GH deficiency (GHD produce a normal GH peak as young adults. Our objectives were to better define this transient GHD and evaluate the factors influencing the growth response of patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS. Methods We studied 72 prepubertal patients with a GH peak Results At diagnosis, 64% of Group 1 and one Group 2 were During the first year of GH treatment, the growth rate was ≥ 2 SDS in 81% Group 1 and 37% Group 2 patients. In Group 1, it was negatively correlated with the GH peak before treatment (P The height gain SDSs between diagnosis and adult height were 1.7 ± 1.2 in Group 1 (n = 30 and 1.08 ± 0.8 in Group 2 (n = 12, P = 0.05. Conclusion The factors of the growth response to GH treatment should be analysed separately for each population: with and without PSIS or other markers.

  9. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Enhanced exercise-induced GH secretion in subjects with Pro7 substitution in the prepro-NPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, J; Pesonen, U; Karvonen, M K; Kojima, M; Hosoda, H; Kangawa, K; Koulu, M

    2001-11-01

    The leucine 7 to proline 7 (Leu7Pro) polymorphism in the signal peptide of NPY is associated with high blood lipid concentrations and accelerated rate of atherosclerosis as well as diabetic retinopathy. Also, healthy subjects with this polymorphism have increased NPY secretion during sympathetic stimulation. Because NPY may regulate GH release and ghrelin may regulate NPY formation, we studied the effects of the Leu7/Pro7 genotype on GH, ghrelin, and IGF-I secretion during standardized cycle-ergometer exercise. Furthermore, we studied the effect of the Leu7/Pro7 genotype on diurnal GH secretion in rest in a separate study. The subjects with Leu7/Pro7 genotype had 54% higher maximal increases in the plasma GH concentrations than the controls during exercise. There were no significant differences in the ghrelin or IGF-I concentrations during exercise among the groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in diurnal GH secretion between the genotypes. The results indicate that the prepro-NPY genotype has an influence on GH response during exercise in humans. The clinical significance of this finding is not known, and further studies are needed to evaluate whether the observed change in GH secretion during exercise could play a role in promoting diseases.

  11. Human migration, protected areas, and conservation outreach in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Jonathan D; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Kefauver, Shawn C

    2014-06-01

    A recent discussion debates the extent of human in-migration around protected areas (PAs) in the tropics. One proposed argument is that rural migrants move to bordering areas to access conservation outreach benefits. A counter proposal maintains that PAs have largely negative effects on local populations and that outreach initiatives even if successful present insufficient benefits to drive in-migration. Using data from Tanzania, we examined merits of statistical tests and spatial methods used previously to evaluate migration near PAs and applied hierarchical modeling with appropriate controls for demographic and geographic factors to advance the debate. Areas bordering national parks in Tanzania did not have elevated rates of in-migration. Low baseline population density and high vegetation productivity with low interannual variation rather than conservation outreach explained observed migration patterns. More generally we argue that to produce results of conservation policy significance, analyses must be conducted at appropriate scales, and we caution against use of demographic data without appropriate controls when drawing conclusions about migration dynamics. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  13. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  14. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement in men with childhood-onset GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maaten, JC; De Boer, H; Kamp, O; Stuurman, L; Van der Veen, EA

    1999-01-01

    Short term GH replacement therapy has been shown to improve body composition and exercise capacity. It is not yet known whether GH replacement remains beneficial over the long term. We assessed the effects of long term GH replacement on body composition, bone mineral density, and cardiac function. T

  15. Growth hormone (GH-releasing hormone and GH secretagogues in normal aging: Fountain of Youth or Pool of Tantalus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C Hersch

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth C Hersch, George R MerriamVA Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington School of Medicine, Tacoma and Seattle, Washington USAAbstract: Although growth hormone (GH is primarily associated with linear growth in childhood, it continues to have important metabolic functions in adult life. Adult GH deficiency (AGHD is a distinct clinical entity, and GH replacement in AGHD can improve body composition, strength, aerobic capacity, and mood, and may reduce vascular disease risk. While there are some hormone-related side effects, the balance of benefits and risks is generally favorable, and several countries have approved GH for clinical use in AGHD. GH secretion declines progressively and markedly with aging, and many age-related changes resemble those of partial AGHD. This suggests that replacing GH, or stimulating GH with GH-releasing hormone or a GH secretagogue could confer benefits in normal aging similar to those observed in AGHD – in particular, could reduce the loss of muscle mass, strength, and exercise capacity leading to frailty, thereby prolonging the ability to live independently. However, while most GH studies have shown body composition effects similar to those in AGHD, functional changes have been much less inconsistent, and older adults are more sensitive to GH side effects. Preliminary reports of improved cognition are encouraging, but the overall balance of benefits and risks of GH supplementation in normal aging remains uncertain.Keywords: growth hormone, growth hormone-releasing hormone, growth hormone secretagogues, aging, sarcopenia, frailty

  16. 10 CFR 63.321 - Individual protection standard for human intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.321 Individual protection standard for human intrusion. (a) DOE...

  17. The kidneys play a central role in the clearance of rhGH in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Thygesen, Peter; Kreilgaard, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are thought to play an important role in the clearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), but the relative importance is not clear. Obtaining knowledge of clearance pathway is an important prerequisite for the development of new long acting growth hormone analogues targeted...... at treatment of patients with growth hormone disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative importance of the kidneys in the clearance of rhGH. The study employed a newly validated nephrectomy rat model and a population based pharmacokinetic approach to assess renal clearance of rh...

  18. The Functions of Selected Human Rights Institutions and Related Role-Players in the Protection of Human Rights in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Chitimira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various violations of the human rights of ordinary people and human rights defenders have been reported in Zimbabwe since the late 1980s. It is widely acknowledged that such violations have been perpetrated mostly by the government through its different organs for political and other related reasons. Human rights violations were also easily committed against ordinary people and human rights defenders because there was no Constitution that adequately protected such people's fundamental human rights (including their civil and political rights and their socio-economic rights in Zimbabwe. Given this background, the article discusses the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe, in the light of the Zimbabwe Constitution Amendment Act 20 of 2013 (Zimbabwe Constitution 2013. This is done in order to investigate whether the promotion, protection, enforcement and respect for human rights in Zimbabwe has now improved. To this end, the functions of selected national human rights institutions and other related role-players, namely civil society, the judiciary, the law enforcement organs and the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission, are briefly discussed first. Secondly, the functions of selected regional and international institutions, namely the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the United Nations are discussed in relation to the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe. Thereafter, concluding remarks and possible recommendations that could be utilised to combat human rights violations and enhance the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe are provided.

  19. Declining human population but increasing residential development around protected areas in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Castro-Prieto; S. Martinuzzi; V.C. Radeloff; D.P. Helmers; M. Quiñones; W.A. Gould

    2017-01-01

    Increasing residential development around protected areas is a major threat for protected areas worldwide, and human population growth is often the most important cause. However, population is decreasing in many regions as a result of socio-economic changes, and it is unclear how residential development around protected areas is affected in these situations. We...

  20. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  1. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Gilfoyle, David; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Mortensen, Eva; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  2. Select human anthrax protective antigen (PA) epitope-specific antibodies provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sherry R.; Ash, Linda L.; Engler, Renata J. M.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Harley, John B.; Farris, A. Darise; James, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis remains a serious bioterrorism concern, and the currently licensed vaccine remains an incomplete solution for population protection from inhalation anthrax and has been associated with concerns regarding efficacy and safety. Thus, understanding how to generate long lasting protective immunity with reduced immunizations or providing protection through post exposure immunotherapeutics are long sought goals. Through evaluation of a large military cohort, we characterized the levels of antibodies against protective antigen and found that over half of anthrax vaccinees had low levels of in vitro toxin neutralization capacity in their sera. Using solid phase epitope mapping and confirmatory assays, we identified several neutralization-associated humoral epitopes and demonstrated that select anti-peptide responses mediated protection in vitro. Finally, passively transferred antibodies specific for select epitopes provided protection in an in vivo lethal toxin mouse model. Identification of these antigenic regions has important implications for vaccine design and the development of directed immunotherapeutics. PMID:20533877

  3. GH administration and discontinuation in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Isaksson, F; Rasmussen, M H;

    2001-01-01

    GH administration results in increased lean body mass (LBM), decreased fat mass (FM) and increased energy expenditure (EE). GH therapy may therefore have potential benefits, especially in the elderly, who are known to have decreased function of the GH/IGF-I axis. Several studies have focused...... on effects of GH administration in the elderly in the last decade. However, very limited information is available regarding changes in body composition and EE upon GH discontinuation in the elderly. The present study therefore investigated the effects of 12 weeks of GH administration and subsequent...... discontinuation on body composition, resting oxygen uptake (VO2), resting heart rate (HR) and GH related serum markers in healthy elderly men....

  4. Land use change around protected areas: management to balance human needs and ecological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFries, Ruth; Hansen, Andrew; Turner, B L; Reid, Robin; Liu, Jianguo

    2007-06-01

    Protected areas throughout the world are key for conserving biodiversity, and land use is key for providing food, fiber, and other ecosystem services essential for human sustenance. As land use change isolates protected areas from their surrounding landscapes, the challenge is to identify management opportunities that maintain ecological function while minimizing restrictions on human land use. Building on the case studies in this Invited Feature and on ecological principles, we identify opportunities for regional land management that maintain both ecological function in protected areas and human land use options, including preserving crucial habitats and migration corridors, and reducing dependence of local human populations on protected area resources. Identification of appropriate and effective management opportunities depends on clear definitions of: (1) the biodiversity attributes of concern; (2) landscape connections to delineate particular locations with strong ecological interactions between the protected area and its surrounding landscape; and (3) socioeconomic dynamics that determine current and future use of land resources in and around the protected area.

  5. 77 FR 6799 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Bioethical Issues on that group's recent report Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects... Secretary for Health on issues and topics pertaining to or associated with the protection of human research..., SACHRP, prior to the close of business February 23, 2012. Dated: February 3, 2012. Jerry Menikoff...

  6. The Environmental Right as a Human Right: Scientific Development and the Protection of Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN ZHONGLE

    2011-01-01

    @@ As environmental issues are attracting domestic and international attention,protection of environmental rights is becoming increasingly important in human rights affairs.Environmental protection involves economic development and social harmony, influences the maintenance and complete realization of people's rights to health, property and life, and is even related to the future existence of the whole human society.

  7. Glutamine and recombinant human growth hormone protect intestinal barrier function following portal hypertension surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Feng Tang; Yun-Biao Ling; Nan Lin; Zheng Hao; Rui-Yun Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment of glutamine (Gln) and recombinant human growth hormone(rhGH) on intestinal barrier function following portal hypertension surgery.METHODS: This study was designed as a prospective,randomized and controlled clinical trial. Forty two patients after portal hypertension surgery were randomly assigned into 2 groups: control group (n = 20) and supplemental group (adding Gin and rhGH, n = 22). Every patient received isocaloric and isonitrogenous standard total parenteral nutrition (TPN) starting 3 d after surgery for 7 d. Blood samples were obtained before surgery and at the 3rd and 10th day postoperatively. Host immunity was evaluated by measuring levels of CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, IgG, IgM and IgA, and the inflammatory responses were determined by assessing IL-2, TNF-α and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Intestinal permeability and integrity was evaluated by L/M test and histological examination, respectively.RESULTS: On postoperative d 10, CD4, CD4/CD8, IgG and IL-2 levels in supplemental group were significantly higher than those in control group (33.7 ± 5.5 vs 31.0± 5.4, P < 0.05, (1.17 ± 0.32 vs 1.05 ± 0.15, P < 0.05,13.94 ± 1.09 vs 12.33±1.33, P < 0.05, and 368.12± 59.25 vs 318.12 ± 45.65, P < 0.05, respectively),whereas the increase in serum TNF-α concentration was significantly reduced (41.02 ± 27.56 vs 160.09 ± 35.17,P < 0.05). The increase in L/M ratio was significantly lower in the supplemental group than in the control group (0.0166 ± 0.0017 vs 0.0339 ± 0.0028, P < 0.05).Moreover, mucosal integrity in the supplemental group was better than in the control group.CONCLUSION: Postoperative administration of TPN supplemented with Gin and rhGH in patients after portal hypertension surgery improves immune function,modulates inflammatory response, prevents the intestinal mucous membrane from atrophy and preserves intestinal integrity.

  8. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: Blood pressure (BP measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV. Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH, secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD is reversed by recombinant human (rh GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two infl ammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rh

  9. Requirement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor for selected GH-stimulated function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobie, P E; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the involvement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor in the cellular response to GH. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones expressing a receptor with tyrosine residues at position 333 and 338 of the receptor substituted for phenylalanine (...... acetyltransferase cDNA expression driven by the GH-responsive region of the SPI 2.1 gene) was not affected by Y333F,Y338F substitution. Thus we provide the first experimental evidence that specific tyrosine residues of the GH receptor are required for selected cellular responses to GH....

  10. 78 FR 10538 - Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 26 RIN 2070-AJ76 Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides... human subjects and to persons who submit the results of human research with pesticides to EPA. The amendments broaden the applicability of the rules to cover human testing with pesticides submitted to EPA...

  11. Plasma lactate, GH and GH-binding protein levels in exercise following BCAA supplementation in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palo, E F; Gatti, R; Cappellin, E; Schiraldi, C; De Palo, C B; Spinella, P

    2001-01-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) stimulate protein synthesis, and growth hormone (GH) is a mediator in this process. A pre-exercise BCAA ingestion increases muscle BCAA uptake and use. Therefore after one month of chronic BCAA treatment (0.2 gkg(-1) of body weight), the effects of a pre-exercise oral supplementation of BCAA (9.64 g) on the plasma lactate (La) were examined in triathletes, before and after 60 min of physical exercise (75% of VO2 max). The plasma levels of GH (pGH) and of growth hormone binding protein (pGHBP) were also studied. The end-exercise La of each athlete was higher than basal. Furthermore, after the chronic BCAA treatment, these end-exercise levels were lower than before this treatment (8.6+/-0.8 mmol L(-1) after vs 12.8+/-1.0 mmol L(-1) before treatment; p BCAA chronic treatment, this end-exercise pGHBP was 738+/-85 pmol L(-1) before vs 1691+/-555 pmol L(-1) after. pGH/pGHBP ratio was unchanged in each athlete and between the groups, but a tendency to increase was observed at end-exercise. The lower La at the end of an intense muscular exercise may reflect an improvement of BCAA use, due to the BCAA chronic treatment. The chronic BCAA effects on pGH and pGHBP might suggest an improvement of muscle activity through protein synthesis.

  12. Differential effects on kidney and liver growth of a non-viral hGH-expression vector in hypophysectomized mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khamaisi, M.; Søndergaard, M.; Segev, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Non-viral gene transfer was investigated as a potential modality for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) using hypophysectomized (Hx) mice as a model. Hx mice were injected with a control plasmid or a plasmid containing the human (h) GH gene driven by a ubiquitin promoter, or left......GH. Following a single hydrodynamic administration of a plasmid DNA containing the hGH gene, a sustained elevation of the circulating hGH level was observed throughout the entire observation period, with a concomitant normalization of circulating IGF-I and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3). In addition......, longitudinal growth was corrected by normalizing tibia length, tail length, and body weight gain. Interestingly, kidney weights were only partly normalized, whereas kidney glomerular volume and liver weights were fully normalized. Kidney and liver IGF-I protein content was reduced in the Hx mice...

  13. 垂体生长激素腺瘤中gsp癌基因对GHSR-1a、Ghrelin mRNA表达的影响%Effect of gsp oncogene on expression of GHSR - 1a and Ghrelin mRNA in human GH - secreting pituitary adenomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐同江; 叶飞; 田春雷; 谢蕊繁; 舒凯; 郭东生; 雷霆

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究垂体生长激素(GH)腺瘤组织中Ghrelin、生长激素释放剂受体-1a亚型(GHSR-1a)mRNA的表达,并探讨其表达与gsp癌基因的关系.方法 采用PCR-DNA直接序列分析方法,观察43例垂体GH腺瘤组织中gsp癌基因的表达;应用实时荧光定量PCR检测Ghrelin和GHSR-1a mRNA的表达水平;统计学分析Ghrelin和GHSR-1a mRNA表达与gsp癌基因的关系.结果 Ghrelin mRNA表达在gsp癌基因阳性、阴性组织间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);gsp阳性组织中GHSR-1a mRNA表达明显高于gsp阴性组织(P<0.05);gsp阳性、阴性腺瘤组织中GHSR-1amRNA与Ghrelin mRNA的表达均呈明显正相关(R=0.592或0.544,P<0.05).结论 垂体GH腺瘤中gsp癌基因上调GHSR-1a mRNA的表达;而对Ghrelin mRNA表达无明显影响.gsp阳性、阴性腺瘤中Ghrelin均可正向调控GHSR-1a mRNA表达.%Objective To investigate the relationship between the expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR- 1a) 、Ghrelin mRNA and gsp oncogene in human GH- secreting pituitary adenomas. Methods The gsp oncogene mutation in 43 cases of GH -secreting pituitary adenomas was detected by PCR - DNA direct sequencing analysis. The expression of GHSR - 1a、Ghrelin mRNA was determined by SYBR green real -time fluorescent quantitative PCR. Then the relationships between the expression of GHSR -1a、Ghrelin mRNA and gsp oncegene were studied with statistical methods. Results There was no significant difference in the expression of ghrelin mRNA between mutation - positive and mutation - negative adenomas. The expression of GHSR - 1a mRNA was significantly higher in gsp - positive adenomas than that in gsp - negative adenomas. There was significant direct correlation between the levels of ghrelin mRNA and GHSR mRNA expression in gsp - positive and gsp - negative adenomas. Conclusions Gsp oncogene may up - regulate the expression of GHSR - 1a mRNA and has no effect on the expression of ghrelin mRNA in human GH

  14. Use of the ligand immunofunctional assay for human insulin-like growth factor ((IGF) binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) to analyze IGFBP-3 proteolysis and igf-i bioavailability in healthy adults, GH-deficient and acromegalic patients, and diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassarre, C; Duron, F; Binoux, M

    2001-05-01

    The ligand immunofunctional assay for plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein (IGFBP)-3 developed in our laboratory provides for specific measurement of intact, as opposed to proteolyzed, IGFBP-3. IGFBP-bound IGFs are dissociated and separated by acid pH ultrafiltration; thereafter, intact and proteolyzed IGFBP-3 are captured by a monoclonal antibody in a solid-phase assay and incubated with (125)I-IGF-I, which detects the intact protein but not its proteolytic fragments. This assay was combined with assays for IGF-I (RIA of the ultrafiltrate) and total IGFBP-3 (immunoradiometric assay) to quantify the percentage of proteolyzed IGFBP-3 (percent proteolyzed IGFBP-3) and to calculate the IGF-I/intact IGFBP-3 ratio as an index of the fraction of exchangeable IGF-I bound to IGFBP-3. This fraction represents most of the IGF-I that is bioavailable. Because GH and insulin control the hepatic production and plasma concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, we set out to determine whether variations in the secretion of the two hormones are involved in the regulation of IGFBP-3 proteolysis. The study included adult populations of 36 healthy subjects, 23 hypopituitary patients untreated with GH, 43 acromegalics (13 untreated), 42 insulin-treated type 1 diabetics [insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)] patients, and 50 type 2 diabetics [non-IDDM (NIDDM)] patients, 22 of whom were insulin-treated and the remaining 28 treated with sulfonylurea and/or metformin). Unlike IGF-I and (to a lesser extent) total IGFBP-3 levels, which decline with age, percent proteolyzed IGFBP-3 seemed relatively stable. In healthy adults, the mean +/- SEM was 29.4 +/- 1.9 for subjects less than 45 yr old and was slightly (but not significantly) lower, 25.7 +/- 3, for those of more than 45 yr. There was no difference between male and female subjects. In GH-deficient patients, despite severely depressed IGF-I levels, percent proteolyzed IGFBP-3 and IGF-I/intact IGFBP-3 ratios were within

  15. Novel mutations in the GH gene (GH1) uncover putative splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Deepak; Mellone, Simona; Fusco, Ileana; Petri, Antonella; Walker, Gillian E; Bellone, Simonetta; Prodam, Flavia; Momigliano-Richiardi, Patricia; Bona, Gianni; Giordano, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Mutations affecting exon 3 splicing are the main cause of autosomal dominant Isolated GH Deficiency II (IGHDII) by increasing the level of exon 3-skipped mRNA encoding the functionally inactive dominant-negative 17.5-kDa isoform. The exons and introns of the gene encoding GH (GH1) were screened for the presence of mutations in 103 sporadic isolated GH deficiency cases. Four different variations within exon 3 were identified in 3 patients. One carried c.261C>T (p.Pro87Pro) and c.272A>T (p.Glu91Val), the second c.255G>A (p.Pro85Pro) and c.261 C>T, and the third c.246G>C (p.Glu82Asp). All the variants were likely generated by gene conversion from an homologous gene in the GH1 cluster. In silico analysis predicted that positions c.255 and c.272 were included within 2 putative novel exon splicing enhancers (ESEs). Their effect on splicing was confirmed in vitro. Constructs bearing these 2 variants induced consistently higher levels both of transcript and protein corresponding to the 17.5-kDa isoform. When c.255 and c.272 were combined in cis with the c.261 variant, as in our patients, their effect was weaker. In conclusion, we identified 2 variations, c.255G>A and c.272A>T, located in 2 novel putative exon splicing enhancers and affecting GH1 splicing in vitro by increasing the production of alternatively spliced isoforms. The amount of aberrant isoforms is further regulated by the presence in cis of the c.261 variant. Thus, our results evidenced novel putative splicing regulatory elements within exon 3, confirming the crucial role of this exon in mRNA processing.

  16. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  17. Combined treatment with GH and IGF-I: additive effect on cortical bone mass but not on linear bone growth in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Katja; Cedervall, Therese; Ohlsson, Claes; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Sävendahl, Lars

    2014-12-01

    The growth-promoting effect of combined therapy with GH and IGF-I in normal rats is not known. We therefore investigated the efficacy of treatment with recombinant human (rh)GH and/or rhIGF-I on longitudinal bone growth and bone mass in intact, prepubertal, female Sprague-Dawley rats. rhGH was injected twice daily sc (5 mg/kg·d) and rhIGF-I continuously infused sc (2.2 or 4.4 mg/kg·d) for 28 days. Longitudinal bone growth was monitored by weekly x-rays of tibiae and nose-anus length measurements, and tibial growth plate histomorphology was analyzed. Bone mass was evaluated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. In addition, serum levels of IGF-I, rat GH, acid labile subunit, IGF binding protein-3, 150-kDa ternary complex formation, and markers of bone formation and degradation were measured. Monotherapy with rhGH was more effective than rhIGF-I (4.4 mg/kg·d) to increase tibia and nose-anus length, whereas combined therapy did not further increase tibia, or nose-anus, lengths or growth plate height. In contrast, combined rhGH and rhIGF-I (4.4 mg/kg·d) therapy had an additive stimulatory effect on cortical bone mass vs rhGH alone. Combined treatment with rhGH and rhIGF-I resulted in markedly higher serum IGF-I concentrations vs rhGH alone but did not compromise the endogenous secretion of GH. We conclude that rhIGF-I treatment augments cortical bone mass but does not further improve bone growth in rhGH-treated young, intact, female rats.

  18. Lack of regulation of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 during short-term manipulation of GH in patients with hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurjonsdottir, Helga A; Andrew, Ruth; Stimson, Roland H; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Walker, Brian R

    2009-09-01

    Evidence from long-term clinical studies measuring urinary steroid ratios, and from in vitro studies, suggests that GH administered for longer than 2 months down-regulates 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1), thereby reducing cortisol regeneration in liver and adipose tissue. We aimed to measure acute effects of GH on 11beta-HSD1 in liver and adipose tissue in vivo, including using a stable isotope tracer. Observational studies of GH withdrawal and reintroduction in patients with hypopituitarism. Twelve men with benign pituitary disease causing GH and ACTH deficiency on stable replacement therapy for >6 months were studied after GH withdrawal for 3 weeks, and after either placebo or GH injections were reintroduced for another 3 weeks. We measured cortisol kinetics during 9,11,12,12-(2)H(4)-cortisol (d4-cortisol) infusion, urinary cortisol/cortisone metabolite ratios, liver 11beta-HSD1 by appearance of plasma cortisol after oral cortisone, and 11beta-HSD1 mRNA levels in subcutaneous adipose biopsies. GH withdrawal and reintroduction had no effect on 9,12,12-[(2)H](3)-cortisol (d3-cortisol) appearance, urinary cortisol/cortisone metabolite ratios, initial appearance of cortisol after oral cortisone, or adipose 11beta-HSD1 mRNA. GH withdrawal increased plasma cortisol 30-180 min after oral cortisone, increased d4-cortisol clearance, and decreased relative excretion of 5alpha-reduced cortisol metabolites. In this setting, GH did not regulate 11beta-HSD1 rapidly in vivo in humans. Altered cortisol metabolism with longer term changes in GH may reflect indirect effects on 11beta-HSD1. These data do not suggest that glucocorticoid replacement doses need to be increased immediately after introducing GH therapy to compensate for reduced 11beta-HSD1 activity, although dose adjustment may be required in the longer term.

  19. On the Logic Process of Human Rights Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YEZHONG; YANG RONG

    2011-01-01

    @@ The values foundation of human rights originates from people's dignity, while the formation of people's dignity was closely related to certain social system and historical conditions.From this aspect, we can say that human rights has natural attribute and social attribute, of which, social attribute plays a decisive role on the values of human rights.

  20. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Höybye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope. Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  1. The GH-IGF-SST system in hepatocellular carcinoma: biological and molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Claudia; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Negri, Mariarosaria; Cuomo, Gaia; Cariati, Federica; Izzo, Francesco; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Different signalling pathways have been identified to be implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC; among these, GH, IGF and somatostatin (SST) pathways have emerged as some of the major pathways implicated in the development of HCC. Physiologically, GH-IGF-SST system plays a crucial role in liver growth and development since GH induces IGF1 and IGF2 secretion and the expression of their receptors, involved in hepatocytes cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. On the other hand, somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are exclusively present on the biliary tract. Importantly, the GH-IGF-SST system components have been indicated as regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis. Reduction of GH binding affinity to GH receptor, decreased serum IGF1 and increased serum IGF2 production, overexpression of IGF1 receptor, loss of function of IGF2 receptor and appearance of SSTRs are frequently observed in human HCC. In particular, recently, many studies have evaluated the correlation between increased levels of IGF1 receptors and liver diseases and the oncogenic role of IGF2 and its involvement in angiogenesis, migration and, consequently, in tumour progression. SST directly or indirectly influences tumour growth and development through the inhibition of cell proliferation and secretion and induction of apoptosis, even though SST role in hepatocarcinogenesis is still opened to argument. This review addresses the present evidences suggesting a role of the GH-IGF-SST system in the development and progression of HCC, and describes the therapeutic perspectives, based on the targeting of GH-IGF-SST system, which have been hypothesised and experimented in HCC.

  2. GH62 arabinofuranosidases: Structure, function and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Dumon, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by industrial demands and ongoing scientific discoveries continuous efforts are made to identify and create improved biocatalysts dedicated to plant biomass conversion. α-1,2 and α-1,3 arabinofuranosyl specific α-l-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are debranching enzymes catalyzing...... exclusively α-l-arabinofuranosidases and these are of fungal and bacterial origin. Twenty-two GH62 enzymes out of 223 entries in the CAZy database have been characterized and very recently new knowledge was acquired with regard to crystal structures, substrate specificities, and phylogenetics, which overall...

  3. G.H. Mead's social behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G A

    1977-10-01

    This paper seeks to clarify those conceptual foundations of G.H. Mead's social behaviorism which are assumed, but not made explicit, in that writer's well-known volume Mind, Self and Society. These foundations are shown to be an outgrowth of Mead's early commitment to the organic conception of conduct underlying the psychological functionalism of the Chicago School. Further light is shed upon Mead's position by pointing out the fundamental differences between his model of conduct and that characteristic of the behaviorist tradition in American psychology.

  4. Growth and maturational changes in dense fibrous connective tissue following 14 days of rhGH supplementation in the dwarf rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Orth, Michael W.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on patella tendon (PT), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) on collagen growth and maturational changes in dwarf GH-deficient rats. Twenty male Lewis mutant dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to Dwarf + rhGH (n = 10) and Dwarf + vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt twice daily for 14 days. rhGH administration stimulated dense fibrous connective tissue growth, as demonstrated by significant increases in hydroxyproline specific activity and significant decreases in the non-reducible hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) collagen cross-link contents. The increase in the accumulation of newly accreted collagen was 114, 67, and 117% for PT, MCL, and LCL, respectively, in 72 h. These findings suggest that a short course rhGH treatment can affect the rate of new collagen production. However, the maturation of the tendon and ligament tissues decreased 18-25% during the rapid accumulation of de novo collagen. We conclude that acute rhGH administration in a dwarf rat can up-regulate new collagen accretion in dense fibrous connective tissues, while causing a reduction in collagen maturation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. PMID:25792823

  6. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood-brain barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases.

  7. LEGAL PROTECTION AGAINST CHILDREN WHO ARE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN CIANJUR DISTRICT STUDIED BY HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Nuraeny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in persons is a modern form of slavery. The eradication of human trafficking has been on the agenda in law enforcement because of its effects can interfere with social welfare. One form of trafficking in persons who lately is rampant child trafficking. The problems that can be studied is how the perspective of Human Rights in providing protection to children who are victims of trafficking and whether the implementation of legal protection for child victims of trafficking in Cianjur is in line with the concept of human rights. This study uses normative juridical approach and specification of descriptive analysis. Results from this study is the protection of child victims of trafficking in persons has been referred to the concept of human rights which the regional government make policies on prevention of trafficking, rehabilitation, counseling and empowerment of victims of human trafficking.

  8. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  9. Primary empty sella and GH deficiency: prevalence and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Poggi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary empty sella (PES is a particular anatomical condition characterized by the herniation of liquor within the sella turcica. The pathogenesis of this alteration, frequently observed in general population, is not yet completely understood. Recently reports demonstrated, in these patients, that hormonal pituitary dysfunctions, specially growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I axis ones, could be relevant. The aim of this paper is to evaluate GH/IGF-I axis in a group of adult patients affected by PES and to verify its clinical relevance. We studied a population of 28 patients with a diagnosis of PES. In each patient we performed a basal study of thyroid, adrenal and gonadal - pituitary axis and a dynamic evaluation of GH/IGF-I after GH-releasing hormone (GHRH plus arginine stimulation test. To evaluate the clinical significance of GH/IGF-I axis dysfunction we performed a metabolic and bone status evaluation in every patients. We found the presence of GH deficit in 11 patients (39.2 %. The group that displayed a GH/IGF-I axis dysfunction showed an impairment in metabolic profile and bone densitometry. This study confirms the necessity to screen the pituitary function in patients affected by PES and above all GH/IGF-I axis. Moreover the presence of GH deficiency could be clinically significant.

  10. Continuation of growth hormone (GH) therapy in GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, N; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    -controlled, parallel study. Measurements were made at baseline, where all patients were on their regular GH replacement, after 12 months of either continued GH (0.018 +/- 0.001 mg/kg day) or placebo, and finally after 12 months of open phase GH therapy (0.016 mg/kg x day). Before study entry GH deficiency...... fat and increased fat-free mass [M-value (mg/kg x min), 5.1 +/- 0.7 (placebo) vs. 3.4 +/- 1.0 (open), P = 0.09]. In the group randomized to continued GH treatment almost all hormonal and metabolic parameters remained unchanged during the study. In conclusion, 1) discontinuation of GH therapy for 1 yr...

  11. Managing Human Activities in Antarctica : Should Wilderness Protection Count?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Antarctica is often described as one of the world's last wildernesses. In harmony with this general perception, the wilderness values of Antarctica received legal status with the adoption of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Article 3(1) of the Protocol obliges each C

  12. How Should Police Respect and Protect Human Rights?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIUHONG

    2007-01-01

    @@ A11 people are equal before law and human rights must be respected and guaranteed.This is an established principle in China in bringing about a harmonious society. But how should police respect and ensure human rights in exercising their powers?

  13. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone and GH secretagogues in normal aging: Fountain of Youth or Pool of Tantalus?

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth C Hersch; Merriam, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Elizabeth C Hersch, George R MerriamVA Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington School of Medicine, Tacoma and Seattle, Washington USAAbstract: Although growth hormone (GH) is primarily associated with linear growth in childhood, it continues to have important metabolic functions in adult life. Adult GH deficiency (AGHD) is a distinct clinical entity, and GH replacement in AGHD can improve body composition, strength, aerobic capacity, and mood, and may reduce vascular disea...

  14. Patents and the obligation to protect health: examining the significance of human rights considerations in the protection of pharmaceutical patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olasupo Ayodeji

    2014-06-01

    This article discusses the human right to health in the context of patent protection and access to medicines. It considers the limitations in international human rights law, especially in relation to socioeconomic rights, that make it difficult for the right to health to be a potent justification for derogation from trade or intellectual property agreements. It concludes by taking the view that while the right to health may be somewhat unenforceable in international law, its close association with enforceable rights such as the right to life can be a legitimate basis for making maximum use of the flexibilities in the international intellectual property regime to protect public health. The article takes the view that trade and intellectual property agreements must be interpreted in a way that endeavours as much as possible to resolve any seeming inconsistency with the right to health.

  15. Protecting human and ecological health under viral threats in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, S

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbroke in 2003, and the avian influenza A (H5N1) also outbroke in 2003 and continued to 2004. These pandemic viral diseases originated in South East Asia. Many human and animal lives were lost. Economic damages due to the pandemics were also very large. The question arises of why did the pandemics originate from South East Asian areas. Human influenza A consists of many sub-types of coronaviruses including the SARS virus and the avian influenza (H5N1) that are all variants of RNA of avian coronavirus. Variants are formed during infection of a coronavirus through not only birds but also mammals, including human beings. There are hot spots where viral infection rates are accelerated among birds, mammals and human beings. Suspicious areas are in South East Asia, where living conditions of birds, mammals and human beings are so close that there are always risks of viral infection. When we see the living conditions of farmers in southern China, northern Vietnam, Laos and northern Myanmar, they commonly raise ducks/chickens with pigs sharing ponds into which they discharge household wastewater, including human excreta, and pig excreta that are significant carriers of viruses. Bird faeces are also key carriers of the viruses. In the ponds, they raise ducks and conduct fish culture. Other important players are migrating birds from North Asia, which are principal vectors of avian influenza viruses. There is an urgent necessity of improving human and ecological health in South East Asia to control viral infection among birds, mammals and human beings. We can hinder the vicious cycle of virus infection through water contamination in ponds by providing good human, pig and chicken sanitation. It is easy to provide good sanitation practices for human, pigs and chickens, introducing collection and treatment of excreta. Our modern water technology can find good solutions for the problem.

  16. Acompañamiento in Colombia: international human rights protection of IDPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Eguren

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The deployment of international observerscan effectively deter human rights violationsagainst displaced people and those workingwith them. This article discusses the role oforganisations such as Peace BrigadesInternational in providing international humanrights protection.

  17. 75 FR 7481 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Director, Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D... who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation...

  18. Multilayer Polymeric Shielding to Protect Humans from Galactic Cosmic Radiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic X4.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from the hazards of galactic cosmic...

  19. Understanding the transformative aspects of the Wilderness and Protected Lands experience upon human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Ewert; Jillisa Overholt; Alison Voight; Chun Chieh Wang

    2011-01-01

    Wilderness and Protected Landscapes (WPLs) have long been considered special areas for a variety of reasons including baseline data, impact analyses, protected zones, and other tangible and intangible values. Another salient, and some would argue, a more important value offered through WPLs is that of human transformation. Accordingly, three theories have provided the...

  20. ASPECTS OF THE EVOLUTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAE PURDĂ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human rights protection within the European Community and the European Union has developed judicially, the human rights being protected by the Community Courts as general principles of Community law. The Treaty of Maastricht and the Treaty of Amsterdam have codified the Community law within the area of human rights. The codification of European Union’s concept of human rights in a single document was realized by adopting the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, on 7 December 2000 in Nice, whose provisions acquired legally binding under the Treaty of Lisbon.

  1. Impact of exogenous growth hormone on GH/IGF/IGFBP axis in colon cancer-bearing nude mice%生长激素荷人结肠癌裸鼠GH/IGF-I/IGFBP-3轴的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张毅; 梁道明; 李思齐; 袁勇; 赵辉; 陈嘉勇

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨外源性生长激素(GH)对荷瘤裸鼠GH/胰岛素样生长因子(IGF)/胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白3(IGFBP-3)轴的影响.方法:采用人结肠癌细胞株(HCT116)建立人结肠癌细胞裸鼠移植瘤模型.取48只荷瘤裸鼠随机均分为生理盐水处理组(NS组)、氟尿嘧啶处理组(FU组)、GH处理组(GH组),FU+GH处理组(FU+GH组).每组连续给药6d,在给药结束后24,72 h分别处死每组6只动物,取血及移植瘤标本,应用ELISA法检测血清GH,IGF-I,IGFBP-3含量和RT-PCR法检测移植瘤IGF-I,IGF-I受体(IGF-IR),IGFBP-3的mRNA表达.结果:ELISA结果显示,给药结束后24 h,GH组和FU+GH组血清GH,IGF-I,IGFBP-3含量较NS组与FU组明显升高(均P<0.05);给药结束后72 h,各组GH,IGF-I的水平无统计学差异(均P>0.05),但GH组和FU+GH组IGFBP-3水平仍高于NS组和FU组(均P<0.05).RT-PCR结果显示,给药结束后24 h,GH,FU,FU+GH组移植瘤组织IGF-I mRNA与IGF-IR mRNA的表达较NS组明显降低,而IGFBP-3 mRNA表达明显增加;给药结束后72 h,IGF-I mRNA与IGF-IR mRNA表达各组间无差别,但GH组,FU组和FU+GH组IGFBP-3 mRNA表达量仍明显高于NS组.结论:短期应用外源性GH所致GH/IGF/IGFBP-3轴的变化对人结肠癌移植瘤生长无促进作用.%Objective: To observe the impact of exogenous growth hormone (GH) on the axis of GH/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/insulin-like growth factor binding protein (GFBP) in colon cancer-bearing nude mice. Methods: Nude mice xenograft models of human colon cancer were established by using human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Subsequently, 48 tumor-bearing mice were equally randomized into normal saline treatment group (NS group), fluorouracil treatment group (FU group), GH treatment group (GH group) and FU plus GH treatment group (FU+GH group), and all treatment regimens were continued for 6 days. Mice were sacrificed to collect the blood and tumor xenograft samples at 24 and 72 h after the termination of regimens with 6

  2. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, T; J. Kozik; Lussi, A.; T. S. Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing ...

  3. Space toxicology: protecting human health during space operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; James, John T; Tyl, Rochelle; Lam, Chiu-wing

    2011-02-01

    Space toxicology is a unique and targeted discipline for spaceflight, space habitation, and occupation of celestial bodies including planets, moons, and asteroids. Astronaut explorers face distinctive health challenges and limited resources for rescue and medical care during space operation. A central goal of space toxicology is to protect the health of the astronaut by assessing potential chemical exposures during spaceflight and setting safe limits that will protect the astronaut against chemical exposures while in a physiologically altered state. In order to maintain sustained occupation in space on the International Space Station (ISS), toxicological risks must be assessed and managed within the context of isolation, continuous exposures, reuse of air and water, limited rescue options, and the need to use highly toxic compounds for propulsion and other purposes. As we begin to explore other celestial bodies, in situ toxicological risks, such as inhalation of reactive mineral dusts, must also be managed.

  4. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Latif

    Full Text Available Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD. However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity.

  5. The kidneys play a central role in the clearance of rhGH in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Thygesen, Peter; Kreilgaard, Mads; Fels, Johannes Josef; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Agersø, Henrik

    2016-04-30

    The kidneys are thought to play an important role in the clearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), but the relative importance is not clear. Obtaining knowledge of clearance pathway is an important prerequisite for the development of new long acting growth hormone analogues targeted at treatment of patients with growth hormone disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative importance of the kidneys in the clearance of rhGH. The study employed a newly validated nephrectomy rat model and a population based pharmacokinetic approach to assess renal clearance of rhGH in non-anesthetized rats, anesthetized rats and in nephrectomized anesthetized rats. Clearance in non-anesthetized rats was 290 ml/h/kg. This was reduced to 185 ml/h/kg by anesthesia and further reduced to 18 ml/h/kg by nephrectomy. As nephrectomy was able to reduce clearance with 90%, we conclude that renal clearance plays a pivotal role in the elimination of rhGH in rats.

  6. Protection of asylum seekers and illegal migrants human rights: Practice of the European Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukanović Anđela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection of asylum seeker and Illegal migrants human rights, has often been difficult due to the need of states to regulate unwanted migration flows. European Court of Human Rights plays an important role in protecting the rights of these individuals, through a set of human rights. Requests for interim measures under Rule 39 of the Rules of Court also have great importance. In cases involving illegal migrants and asylum-seekers, Court was often in difficult position, given the contradictions that could arise from the protection of human rights and the legitimate aim of the Contracting States to control the entry, residence and expulsion of aliens. Recent Courts judgment in case of M. S. S. against Belgium is particularly important, because of its remarkable influence on the perception of a common asylum system in the EU, as well as the judgment in the case of Jama Hirsi and Others v. Italy.

  7. Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin in intact and hypophysectomized rats: effects of rhGH and testosterone alone or combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, A E; Locatelli, L; Cella, S G; Bonomo, S M; Giunta, M; Molinari, F; Sartorio, A; Müller, E E

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin and mechano-growth factor (MGF), an isoform of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), are two important regulators of muscle hypertrophy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and/or testosterone on muscle MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin expression in intact and hypophysectomized rats treated for 15 d with 1) saline or rhGH, 2) sesame oil or testosterone, 3) saline+sesame oil, or rhGH+testosterone (first experiment) or for 7 d with saline or rhGH (second experiment). Animals were killed by decapitation 24 h or 4 d after the last injection (first or second experiment, respectively). Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin were determined by RT-PCR. A significant increase in the weight of gastrocnemius muscle was observed only in hypophysectomized rats treated with rhGH alone or in combination with testosterone. Administration of rhGH to hypophysectomized rats caused a marked increase in both MGF and IGF-IEa muscle mRNA levels (without any change in the muscle expression of myostatin), an effect that was abolished when testosterone was combined with rhGH. Conversely, in intact rats rhGH increased myostatin muscle mRNA levels without affecting those of MGF and IGF-IEa. Testosterone, alone or combined with rhGH, induced an inhibition of myostatin expression in the muscle of intact rats, but did not change muscle paradigms of hypophysectomized rats. In conclusion, rhGH and/or testosterone anabolic effects in the muscle are mediated by a different expression of MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin, which is related to the pituitary function.

  8. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  9. Increased serum and bone matrix levels of transforming growth factor {beta}1 in patients with GH deficiency in response to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, Thor; Lekva, Tove; Otterdal, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Patients with adult onset GH deficiency (aoGHD) have secondary osteoporosis, which is reversed by long-term GH substitution. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 or TGFB1) is abundant in bone tissue and could mediate some effects of GH/IGFs on bone. We investigated its regulation by GH/IGF1 in vivo...

  10. Longitudinal study of serum placental GH in 455 normal pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, Marla; Skibsted, Lillian; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Placental GH is thought to be responsible for the rise in maternal IGF-I during pregnancy and is considered to be important for fetal growth. In this prospective longitudinal study of healthy pregnant women, we investigated determinants of placental GH in maternal serum. Serum was obtained from 4...

  11. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  12. The Protection of Human Rights in Saudi Counter-terrorism Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faleh Salem Alkahtani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human rights constitute a significant aspect of the law. Human rights are protected by national and international legal and judicial apparatuses. In addition, promoting respect for human rights is a key purpose of the United Nations (UN and its international bodies, such as the UN Human Rights Council, established in 2006, and the International Criminal Court, created in 1998. The UN has also issued a variety of protocols, declarations and agreements regarding human rights and their protection, specifically the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights in 1966. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Saudi legislation has initiated and allowed various Saudi human rights institutions, namely the Saudi Human Rights Commission and Saudi National Society for Human Rights. In particular, Saudi legislation has focused on Sharia principles when it comes to the interpretation and implementation of secular international human rights laws. Saudi legislation has enacted a variety of contemporary human rights laws, including the Child Protection Law and the Law of Protection from Abuse. The human cost of terrorism has been felt virtually in every part of the globe. Terrorism has disrupted peace, security, liberty and physical integrity of individuals at every level. Protection and security of its individuals is a fundamental obligation of the state. Accordingly, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has taken several legal measures, allowed under Islamic Sharia and International laws, to ensure the protection of human rights of its citizens and residents and safeguard the society against possible threats of terrorism and bring the criminals to justice. Saudi legislation has ensured human rights applications in other Saudi criminal laws, such as the Saudi Criminal Procedure Law of 2002, amended in 2014 (hereinafter SCPL, and the Saudi Law of Terrorist Crimes of 2014 (hereinafter SLTC. This short commentary

  13. Both pituitary and placental growth hormone transcripts are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melen, L; Hennen, G; Dullaart, RPF; Igout, A

    1997-01-01

    The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at t

  14. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation.

  15. Coffee polyphenols protect human plasma from postprandial carbonyl modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Roman; Gorelik, Shlomit; Harris, Raviv; Kohen, Ron; Kanner, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The antioxidant capability of coffee polyphenols to inhibit red-meat lipid peroxidation in stomach medium and absorption into blood of malondialdehyde (MDA) in humans was studied. Roasted-ground coffee polyphenols that were found to inhibit lipid peroxidation in stomach medium are 2- to 5-fold more efficient antioxidant than those found in instant coffee. Human plasma from ten volunteers analyzed after a meal of red-meat cutlets (250 g) revealed a rapid accumulation of MDA. The accumulation of MDA in human plasma modified low-density lipoprotein is known to trigger atherogenesis. Consumption of 200 mL roasted coffee by ten volunteers during a meal of red-meat cutlets, resulted after 2 and 4 h in the inhibition by 80 and 50%, respectively, of postprandial plasma MDA absorption. The results obtained in vitro simulated stomach model on MDA accumulation were predictive for the amount of MDA absorbed into circulating human plasma, in vivo. Timing the consumption of coffee during the meals may make it a very active functional food.

  16. 77 FR 58383 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1101...: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a, Section 222 of.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  17. 75 FR 59264 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a, Section.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  18. HEW Proposed Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects: Experimentation and the Institutionalized Mentally Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington University Law Quarterly, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Underlying bases for federal interest in experimentation on human subjects, including abuses of investigative processes and efforts at regulation, are explored. Focus is on recent HEW rules on the protection of human subjects, which will have a significant impact on many research institutions. (LBH)

  19. The GH-IGF1 axis and longevity. The paradigm of IGF1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Primary or secondary IGF1 deficiency has been implicated in shortening of lifespan. This paper reviews available data on the influence of IGF1 deficiency on lifespan and longevity in animals and man. It has been shown that inactivation of the IGF1 gene or of the GH receptor in both invertebrates (C-elegans, flies-Drosphila) and rodents (mice and rats), leading to IGF1 deficiency, prolong life, particularly in females. In man, evaluation of the 2 largest cohorts of patients with Laron syndrome (inactive GH receptor resulting in IGF1 deficiency) in Israel and Ecuador revealed that despite their dwarfism and marked obesity, patients are alive at the ages of 75-78 years, with some having reached even more advanced ages. It is assumed that a major contributing factor is their protection from cancer, a major cause of death in the general population.

  20. TOWARDS THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS: DO THE NEW ZIMBABWEAN CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS ON JUDICIAL INDEPENDENCE SUFFICE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovemore Chiduza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available If human rights are to be effectively protected in any country, the judiciary has to recognise that it also has a role to play in this regard. The rationale for this is that the judiciary has a duty to enhance and protect human rights. Across Africa and most notably in Zimbabwe political interference has been noted as a factor that limits judicial independence. In Zimbabwe the weak protection of judicial independence has contributed to gross human rights violations. Constitutional reforms have been conducted in order to improve the independence of the judiciary and consequently the judicial protection of human rights. These efforts have resulted in the adoption of a new Constitution in Zimbabwe which has replaced the Lancaster House Constitution. The Constitutional reforms have captured legal principles which will ensure an improvement in the human rights situation. Key to the reforms has been the independence of the judiciary. The Constitution guarantees the independence of the judiciary. Despite such guarantees there are a number of challenges with regards to this independence. The aim of this paper is therefore to analyse the judicial reforms introduced by the Constitution of Zimbabwe with a view to establishing whether or not such reforms are likely to improve judicial independence and in turn the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe.

  1. Effect of cessation of GH treatment on cognition during transition phase in Prader-Willi syndrome: results of a 2-year crossover GH trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppens, R. J.; Mahabier, E. F.; Bakker, N. E.; Siemensma, E. P. C.; Donze, S.H.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have a cognitive impairment. Growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood improves cognitive functioning, while cognition deteriorates in GH-untreated children with PWS. Cessation of GH treatment at attainment of adult height (AH) might deteriorate their GH-induced improved cognition, while continuation might benefit them. We, therefore, investigated the effects of placebo versus GH administration on cognition in young adults with PWS who...

  2. Dimerization of Human Growth Hormone by Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian C.; Mulkerrin, Michael G.; Wells, James A.

    1991-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium studies demonstrated that zinc ion (Zn2+) induced the dimerization of human growth hormone (hGH). Scatchard analysis of 65Zn2+ binding to hGH showed that two Zn2+ ions associate per dimer of hGH in a cooperative fashion. Cobalt (II) can substitute for Zn2+ in the hormone dimer and gives a visible spectrum characteristic of cobalt coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by oxygen- and nitrogen-containing ligands. Replacement of potential Zn2+ ligands (His18, His21, and Glu174) in hGH with alanine weakened both Zn2+ binding and hGH dimer formation. The Zn2+-hGH dimer was more stable than monomeric hGH to denaturation in guanidine-HCl. Formation of a Zn2+-hGH dimeric complex may be important for storage of hGH in secretory granules.

  3. A pharmacogenomic approach to the treatment of children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, P; Chatelain, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Ambler, G R; Belgorosky, A; Quinteiro, S; Deal, C; Stevens, A; Raelson, J; Croteau, P; Destenaves, B; Olivier, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective Individual sensitivity to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) is variable. Identification of genetic factors contributing to this variability has potential use for individualization of treatment. The objective of this study was to identify genetic markers and gene expression profiles associated with growth response on r-hGH therapy in treatment-naïve, prepubertal children with GH deficiency (GHD) or Turner syndrome (TS). Design A prospective, multicenter, international, open-label pharmacogenomic study. Methods The associations of genotypes in 103 growth- and metabolism-related genes and baseline gene expression profiles with growth response to r-hGH (cm/year) over the first year were evaluated. Genotype associations were assessed with growth response as a continuous variable and as a categorical variable divided into quartiles. Results Eleven genes in GHD and ten in TS, with two overlapping between conditions, were significantly associated with growth response either as a continuous variable (seven in GHD, two in TS) or as a categorical variable (four more in GHD, eight more in TS). For example, in GHD, GRB10 was associated with high response (≥Q3; P=0.0012), while SOS2 was associated with low response (≤Q1; P=0.006), while in TS, LHX4 was associated with high response (P=0.0003) and PTPN1 with low response (P=0.0037). Differences in expression were identified for one of the growth response-associated genes in GHD (AKT1) and for two in TS (KRAS and MYOD1). Conclusions Carriage of specific growth-related genetic markers is associated with growth response in GHD and TS. These findings indicate that pharmacogenomics could have a role in individualized management of childhood growth disorders. PMID:23761422

  4. Blockade of the growth hormone (GH) receptor unmasks rapid GH-releasing peptide-6-mediated tissue-specific insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); L.J. Hofland (Leo); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe roles of GH and its receptor (GHR) in metabolic control are not yet fully understood. We studied the roles of GH and the GHR using the GHR antagonist pegvisomant for metabolic control of healthy nonobese men in fasting and nonfasting conditions. Ten heal

  5. Clinical features of GH deficiency and effects of 3 years of GH replacement in adults with controlled Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Jönsson, Peter J;

    2010-01-01

    Patients in remission from Cushing's disease (CD) have many clinical features that are difficult to distinguish from those of concomitant GH deficiency (GHD). In this study, we evaluated the features of GHD in a large cohort of controlled CD patients, and assessed the effect of GH treatment....

  6. Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-08-23

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt(1)), which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness(2, 3)), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference(4-9)) to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model(10)) was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls.

  7. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p < 0.0001). Different components of saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle. PMID:27703230

  8. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle.

  9. A Path to Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Exploration: A Literature Review and Systems Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Conley, Cassie; Siegel, Bette

    2015-01-01

    As systems, technologies, and plans for the human exploration of Mars and other destinations beyond low Earth orbit begin to coalesce, it is imperative that frequent and early consideration is given to how planetary protection practices and policy will be upheld. While the development of formal planetary protection requirements for future human space systems and operations may still be a few years from fruition, guidance to appropriately influence mission and system design will be needed soon to avoid costly design and operational changes. The path to constructing such requirements is a journey that espouses key systems engineering practices of understanding shared goals, objectives and concerns, identifying key stakeholders, and iterating a draft requirement set to gain community consensus. This paper traces through each of these practices, beginning with a literature review of nearly three decades of publications addressing planetary protection concerns with respect to human exploration. Key goals, objectives and concerns, particularly with respect to notional requirements, required studies and research, and technology development needs have been compiled and categorized to provide a current 'state of knowledge'. This information, combined with the identification of key stakeholders in upholding planetary protection concerns for human missions, has yielded a draft requirement set that might feed future iteration among space system designers, exploration scientists, and the mission operations community. Combining the information collected with a proposed forward path will hopefully yield a mutually agreeable set of timely, verifiable, and practical requirements for human space exploration that will uphold international commitment to planetary protection.

  10. Advances on human milk hormones and protection against obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, F; Benetti, S; Liguori, S A; Sorrenti, M; Cordero Di Montezemolo, L

    2013-11-03

    Extensive research shows that breast milk could have positive health effects not limited to infancy, but extend into childhood and adulthood. Recently many studies have provided new evidence on the long—term positive effects of breastfeeding, in particular protection against obesity and type 2 diabetes, suggesting that breast milk may have a role in the programming of later metabolic diseases. The mechanism throughout breastfeeding that exerts these effects has been a major focus of interest for researchers and it is still not completely known. There are some hints for biological plausibility of beneficial effects of breastfeeding including macronutrient intake, hormonal and behavioural mechanisms related to breast milk composition. Breast milk biochemical components, such as protein quantity and quality, polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, cytokines and hormones, in particular leptin, adiponectin and resistin together with the breastfeeding practice itself can influence infants feeding behaviour and regulation of growth and appetite control later in life. Further research is needed to confirm the possibility that hormones present in breast milk exert a metabolic and beneficial effects.

  11. Characterization of the homeobox-containing gene GH6 identifies novel regions of homeobox gene expression in the developing chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Solursh, M

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a major group of genes involved in regulating, embryogenesis. Here we describe the identification of GH6, a novel chicken homeobox-containing gene and its spatial and temporal expression pattern in the developing chick embryo. Identity comparisons of the GH6 homeodomain suggest that it is closely related to the human homeobox gene H6, with 93% amino acid conservation. Temporally, GH6 expression is highest between embryonic stages 23 and 26; however, some expression is also detectable as early as stage 13. In situ hybridization of stage 23 embryos indicates that GH6 expression occurs at high levels in discrete craniofacial regions including the second branchial arch, the neural retina, the lens epithelium, the optic nerve, and the infundibulum. GH6 expression was also seen in the developing ventricular myocardium, representing the first report of homeobox gene expression in the developing ventricle. GH6 is also expressed in sensory spinal and cranial ganglia, suggesting that GH6 plays several roles not only in the development of craniofacial structures such as the eye and ear, but also in formation of functionally defined ganglia and myocardial structures.

  12. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves' Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-04-12

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves' turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle's GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves' turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression.

  13. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves’ Turtle (Chinemys reevesii Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Sheng Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves’ turtle (Chinemys reevesii have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp, comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS of the turtle’s GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves’ turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression.

  14. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  15. Angelica Sinensis May Provide Protection Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad Zarenezhad

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress and disturbed glutathione redox system play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Depletion in intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH contributes to an increment in tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α-stimulated-HIV-1-transcription, activation of HIV-1-replication, sensitivity to TNF-α-induced cell death, and impairment of CD4+ cell function and survival. Therefore, several studies have investigated the effect of GSH-enhancer agents such as N-acetyl cystein in the treatment of patients with HIV infection. With regard to the beneficial effects of Angelica sinensis, a Chinese medicinal herb, on GSH redox system and the pathogenic role of GSH depletion in HIV infection and the immunomodulator effects of active ingredients of this herb, we postulated that Angelica sinensis may be of value in the treatment of HIV-infected patients.

  16. Recombinant Human Prolactin Protects against Irradiation Induced Myelosuppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weici Zhang; Rui Sun; Jianhua Zhang; Jian Zhang; Zhigang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Prolactin is a multifunctional hormone that exerts many separate functions and acts as an important connection between the endocrine and immune systems. There are increasing researches implicating the role of prolactin in hematopoiesis. Enhanced erythropoiesis in pregnant women and direct erythropoietic effects in vitro of plasma either from pregnant or lactating mice have been reported. Furthermore, regression of erythroblastic leukemia has been observed in a significant number of rats after hypophysectomy. In this study, the effects of recombinant human prolactin (rhPRL) on hematopoiesis were assessed in irradiated mice. Mice were treated with rhPRL for five consecutive days after exposure to a lethal dose or a sub-dose irradiation. Prolonged survival rate and increased erythropoiesis were observed in the irradiation-induced myelosuppressive mice. It was concluded that rhPRL might act on erythropoiesis and could be a potential candidate for the treatment of irradiation-induced myelosuppresion in clinic. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  17. Expression of endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) messenger (m) RNA in a GH-transgenic tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caelers, Antje; Maclean, Norman; Hwang, Gyulin; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    We have previously produced transgenic fish from crosses between a wild-type female tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and a G transgenic male. This line of growth-enhanced tilapia carries a single copy of a chinook salmon (s) growth hormone (GH) gene spliced to an ocean pout antifreeze promoter (OPA-FPcsGH) co-ligated to a carp beta-actin/lacZ reporter gene construct, integrated into the tilapia genome. Because little is known about the expression sites of transgenes, we have characterised the gene expression patterns of sGH and tilapia (t)GH in transgenic tilapia using a newly established real-time PCR to measure the absolute mRNA amounts of both hormones. The sGH gene, which was expected to be expressed mainly in liver, was also found to be expressed in other organs, such as gills, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, intestine and testes. However, in pituitary no sGH mRNA but only tGH mRNA was found. Tilapia GH mRNA in wild-type pituitary amounted to 226 +/- 30 pg/microg total RNA but in transgenics only to 187 +/- 43 pg/microg total RNA. Liver exhibited the highest level of sGH mRNA (8.3 +/- 2.5 pg/microg total RNA) but the extrahepatic sites expressed considerable amounts of sGH mRNA ranging from 4.1 +/- 2.0 pg/microg total RNA in gills to 0.2 +/- 0.08 pg/microg total RNA in kidney. The widespread expression of the sGH gene is assumed to be due to the tissue specificity of the type III AFP gene promoter. It is assumed that our transgenic experiments, which in contrast to some other approaches caused no obvious organ abnormalities, mimick the GH expression during ontogeny. Because sGH mRNA is expressed both in liver and in extrahepatic sites it may not only promote secretion and release of liver-derived (endocrine) IGF-I leading to an overall growth enhancement but also stimulate IGF-I expression within the different organs in a paracrine/autocrine manner and, thus, further promote organ growth.

  18. Support of protective work of human error in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Yuriko [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    The nuclear power plant human factor group of the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. supports various protective work of human error conducted at the nuclear power plant. Its main researching theme are studies on human factor on operation of a nuclear power plant, and on recovery and common basic study on human factor. In addition, on a base of the obtained informations, assistance to protective work of human error conducted at the nuclear power plant as well as development for its actual use was also promoted. Especially, for actions sharing some dangerous informations, various assistances such as a proposal on actual example analytical method to effectively understand a dangerous information not facially but faithfully, construction of a data base to conveniently share such dangerous information, and practice on non-accident business survey for a hint of effective promotion of the protection work, were promoted. Here were introduced on assistance and investigation for effective sharing of the dangerous informations for various actions on protection of human error mainly conducted in nuclear power plant. (G.K.)

  19. Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions Workshop Booklet - 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Although NASA's preparations for the Apollo lunar missions had only a limited time to consider issues associated with the protection of the Moon from biological contamination and the quarantine of the astronauts returning to Earth, they learned many valuable lessons (both positive and negative) in the process. As such, those efforts represent the baseline of planetary protection preparations for sending humans to Mars. Neither the post-Apollo experience or the Shuttle and other follow-on missions of either the US or Russian human spaceflight programs could add many additional insights to that baseline. Current mission designers have had the intervening four decades for their consideration, and in that time there has been much learned about human-associated microbes, about Mars, and about humans in space that has helped prepare us for a broad spectrum of considerations regarding potential biological contamination in human Mars missions and how to control it. This paper will review the approaches used in getting this far, and highlight some implications of this history for the future development of planetary protection provisions for human missions to Mars. The role of NASA and ESA's planetary protection offices, and the aegis of COSPAR have been particularly important in the ongoing process.

  20. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH.

  1. Epitope-focused peptide immunogens in human use adjuvants protect rabbits from experimental inhalation anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Feldman, Daniel; Yu, Fen; Cease, Kemp B

    2015-01-09

    Anthrax represents a formidable bioterrorism threat for which new, optimized vaccines are required. We previously demonstrated that epitope-focused multiple antigenic peptides or a recombinant protein in Freund's adjuvant can elicit Ab against the loop neutralizing determinant (LND), a cryptic linear neutralizing epitope in the 2ß2-2ß3 loop of protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis, which mediated protection of rabbits from inhalation challenge with B. anthracis Ames strain. However, demonstration of efficacy using human-use adjuvants is required before proceeding with further development of an LND vaccine for testing in non-human primates and humans. To optimize the LND immunogen, we first evaluated the protective efficacy and immune correlates associated with immunization of rabbits with mixtures containing two molecular variants of multiple antigenic peptides in Freunds adjuvant, termed BT-LND(2) and TB-LND(2). TB-LND(2) was then further evaluated for protective efficacy in rabbits employing human-use adjuvants. Immunization of rabbits with TB-LND(2) in human-use adjuvants elicited protection from Ames strain spore challenge which was statistically indistinguishable from that elicited through immunization with protective antigen. All TB-LND(2) rabbits with any detectable serum neutralization prior to challenge were protected from aerosolized spore exposure. Remarkably, rabbits immunized with TB-LND(2) in Alhydrogel/CpG had significant anamnestic increases in post-challenge LND-specific Ab and neutralization titers despite little evidence of spore germination in these rabbits. An LND-specific epitope-focused vaccine may complement PA-based vaccines and may represent a complementary stand-alone vaccine for anthrax. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru Nishida

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH, prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs. Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  3. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  4. Longitudinal study of serum placental GH in 455 normal pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, Marla; Skibsted, Lillian; Skouby, Sven O

    2002-01-01

    women with normal singleton pregnancies at approximately 19 and 28 wk gestation. Serum placental GH concentrations were measured by a highly specific immunoradiometric assay, and fetal size was measured by ultrasound. Data on birth weight, gender, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), parity, and smoking.......002). Placental GH at second examination was positively correlated with gestational age (P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with prepregnancy BMI (P = 0.039). Placental GH correlated with fetal weight at approximately 28 wk gestation (P = 0.002) but did not predict birth weight at term. Our study supports...

  5. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  6. Effect of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) on plasma GH in relation to magnitude and duration of GH deficiency in 26 children and adults with isolated GH deficiency or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: evidence for hypothalamic GRH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriock, E A; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, S M; Kaplan, S L; Grumbach, M M

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic, amidated, 44 amino acid GH-releasing hormone ( GRH -44) was administered iv at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg to 20 patients with severe GH deficiency (GHD), 6 children and adolescents with partial GHD, and 6 non-GH deficient ( NGHD ) children and adolescents. The 17 patients with severe GHD that responded to GRH -44 had lower peak concentrations of plasma GH than the NGHD individuals (5.0 +/- 1.2 (SEM) vs. 27.2 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P less than 0.0001). The children and adolescents with severe GHD tended to have higher peak GH responses to GRH -44 than the GHD adults (6.9 +/- 1.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) although the difference was not significant. The peak GH concentration was attained earlier in the GHD children and adolescents than in the GHD adults (28 +/- 4.7 vs. 69.3 +/- 13 min, P less than 0.004). There was a negative correlation between chronological age and peak plasma GH response to GRH in the children and adolescents with severe GHD (r = -0.758, P less than 0.02). Children and adolescents with partial GHD had a higher mean peak concentration of plasma GH (13. 1 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) than the children, adolescents, and adults with severe GHD (P less than 0.04), but one lower than the NGHD children and adolescents (P less than 0.05). In both severe and partial GHD the GH response to GRH was greater than that elicited by standard pharmacological tests. Serum somatomedin-C did not increase after a single pulse of GRH -44 in the 12 GHD patients studied. PRL increased minimally 30 min after 5 micrograms/kg iv GRH -44 in patients with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies but not in patients with isolated GHD or in NGHD individuals. The GH responses to GRH suggest that the majority of patients with isolated GHD as well as those with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies have deficiency of hypothalamic GRH . Lack of a GH response to a single pulse of GRH does not exclude GRH deficiency as priming of the somatotrope with multiple pulses of

  7. The Cancer Cow: A study of the risks associated with milk from rbGH treated cows

    OpenAIRE

    Malawa, Zea

    2002-01-01

    In 1993 the FDA approved the commercial sale of milk from rbGH treated cows. Despite this approval, there are a number of public health concerns that have arisen about the safety of this milk. Specifically, there is concern that this milk may increase the risk and rate of cancer. Milk from rbGH treated cows has elevated levels of IGF-1. Furthermore, some amount of IGF-1 from the milk is orally active in humans. IGF-1 has a strong association with a number of cancers including breast, prostate...

  8. Protection of Human Beings Trafficked for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalev, Assya; Van Assche, Kristof; Sándor, Judit; Codreanu, Natalia; Naqvi, Anwar; Gunnarson, Martin; Frunza, Mihaela; Yankov, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    This report presents a comprehensive set of recommendations for protection of human beings who are trafficked for the purpose of organ removal or are targeted for such trafficking. Developed by an interdisciplinary group of international experts under the auspices of the project Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal (also known as the HOTT project), these recommendations are grounded in the view that an individual who parts with an organ for money within an illegal scheme is ipso facto a victim and that the crime of trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal (THBOR) intersects with the crime of trafficking in organs. Consequently, the protection of victims should be a priority for all actors involved in antitrafficking activities: those combating organ-related crimes, such as health organizations and survivor support services, and those combating trafficking in human beings, such as the criminal justice sectors. Taking into account the special characteristics of THBOR, the authors identify 5 key stakeholders in the protection of human beings trafficked for organ removal or targeted for such trafficking: states, law enforcement agencies and judiciary, nongovernmental organizations working in the areas of human rights and antitrafficking, transplant centers and health professionals involved in transplant medicine, and oversight bodies. For each stakeholder, the authors identify key areas of concern and concrete measures to identify and protect the victims of THBOR. The aim of the recommendations is to contribute to the development of a nonlegislative response to THBOR, to promote the exchange of knowledge and best practices in the area of victim protection, and to facilitate the development of a policy-driven action plan for the protection of THBOR victims in the European Union and worldwide.

  9. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far.

  10. Usefulness of growth hormone (GH) stimulation tests and IGF-I concentration measurement in GH deficiency diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Kedzia, Andrzej; Korman, Eugeniusz; Niedziela, Marek

    2008-06-01

    The diagnosis of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is still problematic for the clinician. There is no gold standard for estimating GH secretion. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic usefulness of spontaneous GH secretion test, pharmacological tests with insulin, clonidine, L-dopa, and glucagon, and IGF-I measurement in GHD. We studied 180 prepubertal, short children. Predictive values were calculated for different GH cutoff levels for each diagnostic test. ROC curves were used to estimate the diagnostic usefulness of the tests. The results show that sleep is the strongest stimulatory agent for GH secretion. The estimation of GH secretion after onset of sleep can be used as a screening test in GHD diagnosis. The insulin test has the highest discrimination. A combination of insulin test with another provocative test allows high discrimination and accuracy for standard cut-off GH level. Measurement of IGF-I is characterized by low predictive values. IGF-I level below the mean according to age indicates high probability of GHD. Auxological parameters should be the most important factor in diagnosing GHD.

  11. GH responsiveness in a large multinational cohort of SGA children with short stature (NESTEGG) is related to the exon 3 GHR polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, M; Ester, W; Auriol, F; Molinas, C; Fauvel, J; Caliebe, J; Nugent, T; Fryklund, L; Ranke, M B; Savage, M O; Clark, A J L; Johnston, L B; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2007-09-01

    The polymorphic deletion of exon 3 of the GH receptor (d3-GHR) has recently been linked to the magnitude of growth response to recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in short children with or without GH deficiency. We investigated this association in a large multinational cohort from the Network of European Studies of Genes in Growth (NESTEGG), comprising short children born small for gestational age (SGA). The study included short prepubertal SGA children treated with rhGH for 1 or 2 years. Two hundred and forty white Caucasian SGA children (138 male, 102 female) aged 6.6 +/- 2.3 years with a height at -3.0 +/- 0.7 SDS at start of rhGH treatment; 193 ethnically matched controls. The GHR polymorphism (fl/fl, fl/d3 or d3/d3) was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) multiplex assay. Growth velocity (G/V) in cm/year and changes in GV during the first and second year of rhGH treatment were evaluated. The change in GV was significantly greater in SGA children carrying one or two copies of the d3-GHR allele (P = 0.038 for the first year and P = 0.041 for the second year of GH treatment), but the change in height was not significantly different. Birthweight was significantly lower in SGA children with the d3/d3 genotype than in SGA children with the fl/fl genotype (P = 0.034) and in those with the fl/d3 genotype (P = 0.016). Our data, based on a large cohort, showed that the exon 3 GHR polymorphism is associated with responsiveness to rhGH treatment in SGA children with short stature.

  12. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Velappan, Nileena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  13. Radiation Protection Challenges for a Human Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    A human mission to Mars presents many challenges, not least of which is the radiation exposure that crew members will certainly receive in all phases of the journey, but most critically during the transits to and from Mars. Measurements from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) aboard the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, made both in flight and on the surface of Mars, confirm previous estimates that crew members under reasonable shielding would receive a dose equivalent of about 1 Sievert on a 1000-day mission. In standard radiation biology, an acute exposure to 1 Sievert would be expected to increase lifetime fatal cancer risk by about 5%. This is well beyond the currently allowed 3% risk increase limit used by NASA and JAXA. Perhaps more significantly, the nature of exposure in space differs greatly from the terrestrial exposures that lead to the 5% estimate -- in space, the exposure is received at a very low dose rate, and includes a significant component from heavy ions in the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). Acute exposures to Solar Energetic Particles are also possible, but the generally lower energies of SEPs (kinetic energies typically below 100 MeV/nuc) mean that modest amounts of shielding are effective against them. Thus the greater concern for long-duration deep-space missions is the GCR exposure. In this presentation, I will briefly review the MSL-RAD data and discuss current approaches to radiation risk estimation, including the NASA limit of 3% at the 95% confidence level. Recent results from the NASA radiation biology program indicate that cancer may not be the only risk that needs to be considered, with emerging concerns about cardiovascular and central nervous system health. These health effects are not accounted for in the current methodology and could potentially be threatening to mission success if they manifest in the course of the mission, rather than appearing many years after the exposure as radiation-induced cancer typically does.

  14. Protection of the right to privacy in the practice of the European Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenov Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The right to privacy is a fundamental human right and an essential component of the protection of human autonomy and freedom. The development of science and information systems creates various opportunities for interferences with physical and moral integrity of a person. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the precise content of the right to privacy. The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms guarantees this right under Article 8. The European Court of Human Rights did not precisely define the content of the right to privacy and thereby the applicants could bring different aspects of life into the scope of respect for private life. According to the Court, the concept of privacy and private life includes the following areas of human life: the right to establish and maintain relationships with other human beings, protection of the physical and moral integrity of persons, protection of personal data, change of personal name, various issues related to sexual orientation and transgender. The subject of this paper is referring to previously mentioned spheres of human life in the light of interpretation of Article 8 of the Convention.

  15. Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced Anti-Müllerian Hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, M; Frystyk, Jan; Faber, J;

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers...... (mean age 35, range 29-46 years) were treated with GH for 3 weeks (1st week 0.01, 2nd week 0.02, 3rd week 0.03 mg/day/kg) or a GH receptor antagonist (Pegvisomant) (1st week 10, last 2 weeks 15 mg/day), separated by 8 weeks of washout. Before and after the two treatment periods, concentrations...... of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) μg/L, p

  16. The protection of the accused in international criminal law according to the Human Rights Law Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kremens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper discusses the influence of international human rights law on international criminal law. It tries to give an answer to the question of whether rules protecting the accused in international criminal proceedings meet the human rights law standard provided by international declarations and covenants. Meaning, if the proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia (ICTY, International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR and International Criminal Court (ICC meet the standard provided by international human rights law, in particular the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The paper proves that international human rights law has affected international criminal law tremendously. Moreover, it is argued that the protection of the accused in the law of the international courts and tribunals with regard to his rights has improved when compared to the international human rights law standard. In particular the Rome Statute of the ICC provides the accused with the most comprehensive protection. This is especially visible in the case of such rights as the presumption of innocence, right to an interpreter and right to remain silent. Nevertheless, some shortcomings in the law of the ad hoc tribunals and ICC can be observed, in particular when it comes to identifying the commencement of protection of the accused.

  17. Continuation of growth hormone (GH) therapy in GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, N; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    fat and increased fat-free mass [M-value (mg/kg x min), 5.1 +/- 0.7 (placebo) vs. 3.4 +/- 1.0 (open), P = 0.09]. In the group randomized to continued GH treatment almost all hormonal and metabolic parameters remained unchanged during the study. In conclusion, 1) discontinuation of GH therapy for 1 yr...... in adolescent patients induces fat accumulation without compromising insulin sensitivity; and 2) the beneficial effects of continued GH treatment on body composition in terms of decrease in fat mass and increase in fat-free mass does not fully balance the direct insulin antagonistic effects....

  18. Demographic factors influencing the GH system: Implications for the detection of GH doping in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anne E; Ho, Ken K Y

    2009-08-01

    Application of methods for detecting GH doping depend on being able to discriminate between abnormal levels due to doping and normal physiological levels of circulating proteins that change in response to exogenous administration. Constituents of the IGF and collagen systems have been shown to be promising markers of GH abuse. Their ultimate utility, however, depends on identification of the factors that regulate their concentrations in blood. Among these are demographic factors that are known to influence these markers in the general population. In a large cross-sectional study of the GH-responsive markers in over 1000 elite athletes from 12 countries representing 4 major ethnic groups and 10 sport types, we have shown that there is a significant negative correlation between age and all the IGF and collagen markers we studied, with a rapid decrease in early adolescence. Age was the major contribution to the variability, equivalent to >80% of the attributable variation in IGF-I and the collagen markers. The IGF axis markers were all significantly higher in women, and the collagen markers significantly higher in men, however, the contribution of gender was smaller than that of age, except for IGFBP-3 and ALS. BMI had a minor contribution to variability of the GH-responsive markers. After adjustment for the confounding influences of age, gender and BMI, the effect of ethnicity in elite athletes was trivial except for IGFBP-3 and ALS, which were both lower in Africans and higher in Caucasians. Compared to age and gender, the contribution of sport type was also modest. Our findings on the influence of age, gender, BMI and sport type have also been confirmed in a study of mostly Caucasian elite athletes in the post-competition setting. In conclusion, age and gender are the major determinants of variability for IGF-I and the collagen markers, whereas ethnicity and sport type have a minor influence. Therefore, a test based on IGF-I and the collagen markers must take age

  19. GH-producing mammary tumors in two dogs with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsuko; Nishii, Naohito; Morita, Takehito; Yuki, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Two intact female dogs were admitted for growing mammary tumors. They had symptoms of acromegaly including weight gain, enlargement of the head, excessive skin folds, and inspiratory stridor. Serum concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin were elevated in the two cases. From these findings, both dogs were diagnosed with acromegaly. In case 1, the GH, IGF-I, and insulin levels subsided after removal of the focal benign mammary tumors and ovariohysterectomy. In case 2, those levels subsided after removal of only focal mammary carcinoma. In both cases, immunohistochemical investigations for GH were positive in the mammary tumor cells but not in the normal mammary glands. We concluded that GH-producing mammary tumors caused the present acromegaly.

  20. 生长激素、肝细胞生长因子和烟酰胺对人胎胰岛细胞的增殖作用%Effect of GH, HGF and NIC on proliferation of human fetal pancreatic islets pancreatic islets in tissue culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永兵; 严律南; 吴泽建; 张阳德

    2004-01-01

    目的研究生长激素(GH),肝细胞生长因子(HGF)和烟酰胺(NIC)对体外培养的人胎胰岛细胞的增殖作用及其交互作用.方法采用L8(27)正交设计法在体外培养的人胎胰岛细胞的各组中分别加入不同浓度及组合的GH,HGF和NIC,培养48 h后,收集各孔细胞,DTZ染色,计数.结果GH,HGF和NIC均起主要作用,HGF和NIC的交互作用不可忽视,最佳的生长因子组合及适配浓度为GH(100ng/ml)HGF(25ng/ml)NIC(100mmol/L).结论GH,HGF和NIC均能促进体外培养的胰岛细胞的增殖,且组合GH(100ng/ml)HGF(25 ng/ml)NIC(100mmpol/L)的作用最大.

  1. Human Herpesvirus 7 Glycoprotein B (gB) , gH, gL, gO Can Mediate Cell Fusion%人类疱疹病毒7型糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO介导细胞融合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建; 姚堃; 窦洁; 秦健; 许文嵘; 陈云; 尹全章; 周锋

    2007-01-01

    人类疱疹病毒7型(HHV-7)的感染依赖于包膜糖蛋白在病毒生命周期的多个阶段发挥功能.这些蛋白质可以介导病毒吸附,病毒包膜和宿主细胞膜融合以及病毒在细胞间的接触传播.将表达HHV-7糖蛋白的293T细胞与HHV-7易感的SupT1细胞共培养,检测虫荧光素酶报告基因的表达,以鉴定介导膜融合的HHV-7糖蛋白.研究发现,HHV-7糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO能介导293T细胞与SupT1细胞的融合,且融合可被抗CD4单抗所抑制.结果表明,糖蛋白gB、gH、gL、gO对于HHV-7引发的膜融合是必需的,其中某个蛋白质或所形成的蛋白质复合物可能是CD4的配体.%Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) infection is dependent on the functions of structural glycoproteins at multiple stages of the viral life cycle. These proteins mediate the initial attachment and fusion events that occur between the viral envelope and a host cell membrane, as well as cell to cell spread of the virus. To characterize the HHV-7 glycoproteins that can mediate cell fusion, a cell-based fusion assay was used. 293T cells expressing the HHV-7 glycoproteins of interest along with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the T7 promoter were cocultivated with SupT1 cells transfected with T7 RNA polymerase. HHV-7 glycoproteins gB, gH, gL and gO can mediate the fusion of 293T cells with SupT1 cells, and the fusion can be inhibited by anti-CD4 mAbs. Thus, the coexpression of HHV-7 gB, gO, gH and gL is sufficient and necessary for HHV-7 induced membrane fusion, and one of these glycoproteins or protein complex formed by these glycoproteins might be the ligand(s) of CD4 molecule.

  2. A sensitive RNase protection assay to detect transcripts from potentially functional human endogenous L1 retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, D M; Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    A high background of read-through transcripts from degenerate human L1 retrotransposons is present in almost all human cell types. This prevents the detection of RNA transcripts from potentially functional elements. To overcome this, we have developed an RNase protection assay based on the recons...... transcripts from divergent L1 families but are either discrete shorter transcripts or specifically processed products from longer initial transcripts....

  3. Aerosol Observing System Greenhouse Gas (AOS GhG) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reichl, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Greenhouse Gas (GhG) Measurement system is a combination of two systems in series: (1) the Tower Gas Processing (TGP) System, an instrument rack which pulls, pressurizes, and dries air streams from an atmospheric sampling tower through a series of control and monitoring components, and (2) the Picarro model G2301 cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS), which measures CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor; the primary measurements of the GhG system.

  4. Mx1 gene protects mice against the highly lethal human H5N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Rachelle; Staeheli, Peter; Kochs, Georg; Yen, Hui-Ling; Franks, John; Rehg, Jerold E; Webster, Robert G; Hoffmann, Erich

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the importance of the host Mx1 gene in protection against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Mice expressing the Mx1 gene survived infection with the lethal human H5N1 isolate A/Vietnam/1203/04 and with reassortants combining its genes with those of the non-lethal virus A/chicken/Vietnam/C58/04, while all Mx1-/- mice succumbed. Mx1-expressing mice showed lower organ virus titers, fewer lesions, and less pulmonary inflammation. Our data support the hypothesis that Mx1 expression protects mice against the high pathogenicity of H5N1 virus through inhibition of viral polymerase activity ultimately resulting in reduced viral growth and spread. Drugs that mimic this mechanism may be protective in humans.

  5. Protecting the Home and Adequate Housing - Living in a Caravan or Trailer as a Human Right

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Many Roma, gypsies and travellers live in caravans or trailers, sometimes in together trailer parks or camps. This article analyses how this specific lifestyle connected to their housing is protected under the various regimes and provisions of international human rights law. Home and adequate housin

  6. 76 FR 11248 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ...: Jerry Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Director, Office for Human Research Protections, or Julia Gorey, J.D..., Rockville, Maryland 20852; 240-453-6900, fax: 240-453-6909; e-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  7. 76 FR 58006 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation...

  8. 76 FR 37354 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a... sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the designated...

  9. 78 FR 12061 - Meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S. Department of Health and Human...; email address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 217a.... Individuals who plan to attend the meeting and need special assistance, such as sign language...

  10. Vaccines against human papillomavirus infections: protection against cancer, genital warts or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joura, E A; Pils, S

    2016-12-01

    Since 2006, three vaccines against infections and disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) became available in Europe-in 2006 a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine, in 2007 a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine and in 2015 a nonavalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. HPV 16 and 18 are the most oncogenic HPV strains, causing about 70% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers, HPV 6 and 11 cause 85% of all genital warts. The additional types of the polyvalent vaccine account for about 20% of invasive cervical cancer and >35% of pre-cancer. The potential differences between these vaccines caused some debate. All three vaccines give a robust and long-lasting protection against the strains in the various vaccines. The promise of cross-protection against other types (i.e. HPV 31/33/45) and hence a broader cancer protection was not fulfilled because these observations were confounded by the vaccine efficacy against the vaccine types. Furthermore, cross-protection was not consistent over various studies, not durable and not consistently seen in the real world experience. The protection against disease caused by oncogenic HPV strains was not compromised by the protection against low-risk types causing genital warts. The most effective cancer protection to date can be expected by the nonavalent vaccine, data indicate a 97% efficacy against cervical and vulvovaginal pre-cancer caused by these nine HPV types.

  11. GH4169合金研制进展%Progress in GH4169 Alloy Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜金辉; 吕旭东; 邓群; 庄景云

    2012-01-01

    As a result of higher high temperature strength, excellent rupture stress, creep and fatigue properties, as well as good processing and welding performance, GH4169 alloy has been widely used in aerospace, petrochemical and other fields. With continuous improvement on performance of aeronautical and astronautical engines, some higher requirements were put forward to the key material GH4169 Such as temperature bearing capability, rupture stress and creep properties as well as fatigue resistant performance were improved to meet the demands of high performance, high reliability and long service life of the advanced aeroengines. The achievement of basic research and development of industrial manufacture technologies were systematically expounded from aspects of alloy modification, optimization of melting process, improvement of hot deformation technology for the past fifty years in this paper. Expounded contents include: development of alloying principle of modified alloy with higher temperature bearing capability for improving the thermal stability; triple melting technology for the preparation of large sizd clean ingot without segregation, promotion of hot processing technology of press forging and radial forging combination for the preparation of fine grained bar; new progress of hot die forging and isothermal forging for the realization of near net forming.%GH4169合金具有较高的高温强度,优异的持久、蠕变和疲劳性能,同时具备良好的加工和焊接性能,广泛用于航空、航天、石化等领域。随着航空、航天发动机性能的不断提高,对发动机关键用材GH4169在承温能力、持久蠕变性能和抗疲劳性能提出了更高要求,以满足先进航空发动机高性能、高可靠性、长寿命的需求。从合金改型、冶炼工艺优化、热加工技术提升等方面,系统论述了GH4169合金近50年基础研究成果及工程制备技术的进展。内容包括基于提高热稳定性

  12. Spotted hyaena space use in relation to human infrastructure inside a protected area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Lydia E.; Cameron, Elissa Z.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing human population growth has led to elevated levels of human-carnivore conflict. However, some carnivore populations have adapted to urban environments and the resources they supply. Such associations may influence carnivore ecology, behaviour and life-history. Pockets of urbanisation sometimes occur within protected areas, so that anthropogenic influences on carnivore biology are not necessarily confined to unprotected areas. In this study we evaluated associations between human infrastructure and related activity and space use of spotted hyaenas within one of the largest protected areas in South Africa, the Kruger National Park. Home range size was smaller for the dominant female of a clan living in close proximity to humans than that of the dominant female of a clan without direct access to human infrastructure. The home range including human infrastructure was also used less evenly during the night, presumably when the animals were active. Within this home range, a village area was preferred during the night, when the least modified areas within the village were preferred and administration and highly modified areas were avoided. During the day, however, there were no preference or avoidance of the village area, but all habitats except unmodified habitats within the village area were avoided. We suggest that human infrastructure and associated activity influenced hyaena space use, primarily through alterations in the spatial distribution of food. However, these effects may have been indirectly caused by habitat modification that generated favourable hunting habitat rather than a direct effect caused by access to human food such as garbage. Because of the often pivotal effects of apex predators in terrestrial ecosystems, we encourage further work aimed to quantify how human presence influences large carnivores and associated ecosystem processes within protected areas. PMID:27781175

  13. Protection of rabbits and immunodeficient mice against lethal poxvirus infections by human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Crickard

    Full Text Available Smallpox (variola virus is a bioweapon concern. Monkeypox is a growing zoonotic poxvirus threat. These problems have resulted in extensive efforts to develop potential therapeutics that can prevent or treat potentially lethal poxvirus infections in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against smallpox are a conservative approach to this problem, as the licensed human smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus, VACV primarily works on the basis of protective antibody responses against smallpox. Fully human mAbs (hmAbs against vaccinia H3 (H3L and B5 (B5R, targeting both the mature virion (MV and extracellular enveloped virion (EV forms, have been developed as potential therapeutics for use in humans. Post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed in both murine and rabbit animal models. Therapeutic efficacy of the mAbs was assessed in three good laboratory practices (GLP studies examining severe combined immunodeficiency mice (SCID given a lethal VACV infection. Pre-exposure combination hmAb therapy provided significantly better protection against disease and death than either single hmAb or vaccinia immune globulin (VIG. Post-exposure combination mAb therapy provided significant protection against disease and death, and appeared to fully cure the VACV infection in ≥50% of SCID mice. Therapeutic efficacy was then assessed in two rabbit studies examining post-exposure hmAb prophylaxis against rabbitpox (RPXV. In the first study, rabbits were infected with RPVX and then provided hmAbs at 48 hrs post-infection, or 1 hr and 72 hrs post-infection. Rabbits in both groups receiving hmAbs were 100% protected from death. In the second rabbitpox study, 100% of animal treated with combination hmAb therapy and 100% of animals treated with anti-B5 hmAb were protected. These findings suggest that combination hmAb treatment may be effective at controlling smallpox disease in immunocompetent or immunodeficient humans.

  14. Recruiting of somatotroph cells after combined somatostatin, GHRH and growth hormone (GH) secretagogue stimulation in a study of pituitary GH reserve in prepuberal female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Reina, L.; García-Martínez, E.; Rojas, J.P.; Cañete, M.D.; G. Bernal; Cañete, R.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic confirmation of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in children and adults is based on stimulation tests designed to assess the pituitary reserve by measuring the amount of GH released into the bloodstream; however, the results obtained by this means cannot provide any direct indication of the amount of GH actually produced by pituitary somatotroph cells. The present paper sought to test the hypothesis that release of GH following administration of sp...

  15. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  16. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Review (laws for compliance and human rights multi-level protection in Inter-American Human Rights System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Torres Zúñiga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses diverse perspectives concerning relationship between reviewing (laws for compliance and the process of putting international law of human rights on a constitutional footing. Therefore, a parallel is established between reviewing (laws for compliance and constitutional review (laws in order to outline features and application impact of this research. The design of a multi-level protection system for fundamental rights in Latin America is also discussed in this article.

  18. IGF-I bioactivity might reflect different aspects of quality of life than total IGF-I in gh-deficient patients during GH treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Varewijck (Aimee); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); S.J.C.M.M. Neggers (Bas); L.J. Hofland (Leo); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: No relationship has been found between improvement in quality of life (QOL) and total IGF-I during GH therapy. Aim: Our aim was to investigate the relationship between IGF-I bioactivity and QOL in GH-deficient (GHD) patients receiving GH for 12 months. Methods: Of 106 GHD patien

  19. Human telomere biology: A contributory and interactive factor in aging, disease risks, and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue

    2015-12-04

    Telomeres are the protective end-complexes at the termini of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere attrition can lead to potentially maladaptive cellular changes, block cell division, and interfere with tissue replenishment. Recent advances in the understanding of human disease processes have clarified the roles of telomere biology, especially in diseases of human aging and in some aging-related processes. Greater overall telomere attrition predicts mortality and aging-related diseases in inherited telomere syndrome patients, and also in general human cohorts. However, genetically caused variations in telomere maintenance either raise or lower risks and progression of cancers, in a highly cancer type-specific fashion. Telomere maintenance is determined by genetic factors and is also cumulatively shaped by nongenetic influences throughout human life; both can interact. These and other recent findings highlight both causal and potentiating roles for telomere attrition in human diseases.

  20. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  1. Protective effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on metal-induced lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay Kumar; Rather, Irfan Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    The protective potential of Emblica officinalis (amla) was investigated on metal-induced lipid per oxidation in human erythrocytes. Increases in the levels of MDA and catalase activity were assessed as lipid per oxidation. In addition, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), and ascorbic acid levels were assessed as antioxidant indices. Preliminary investigation of the extract exhibited a significant reduction in lipid per oxidation and an increase in antioxidant abilities, such as a decrease in MDA, GPx and GSH (Pamla extract (Pamla extract has significant protective potential against lipid per oxidation.

  2. Protecting Children Victims of Crimes of Human Trafficking in the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora-Ioana Balan-Rusu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the paper there were examined the main provisions of the European legislative act framework in the domain of protecting children victims of human trafficking offenses, with some critical remarks. The paper can be useful to the European and Romanian legislator, practitioners and academics in the field. The novelty consists of analyzing the provisions of the European legislative act, focusing on the practical ways provided for the protection of children victims of this kind of crime, and the formulated critical remarks.

  3. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiante S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Valiante,1,* Annarita Falanga,2,3,* Luisa Cigliano,1 Giuseppina Iachetta,1 Rosa Anna Busiello,1 Valeria La Marca,1 Massimiliano Galdiero,4 Assunta Lombardi,1 Stefania Galdiero1,2 1Department of Biology, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3DFM Scarl, University of Naples Federico II, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this paper and are considered joint first authors Abstract: Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. Keywords: drug delivery, neurons, astrocytes, blood–brain barrier, peptide

  4. Strengthening the human rights framework to protect breastfeeding: a focus on CEDAW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtry, Judith

    2015-01-01

    There have been recent calls for increased recognition of breastfeeding as a human right. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 (CEDAW) is the core human rights treaty on women. CEDAW's approach to breastfeeding is considered from an historical perspective. A comparison is drawn with breastfeeding protection previously outlined in the International Labour Organization's Maternity Protection Convention, 1919 (ILO C3), and its 1952 revision (ILO C103), and subsequently, in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989 (CRC). Despite breastfeeding's sex-specific significance to an international human rights treaty on women and CEDAW's emphasis on facilitating women's employment, CEDAW is, in reality, a relatively weak instrument for breastfeeding protection. In both its text and subsequent interpretations explicit recognition of breastfeeding is minimal or nonexistent. Explanations for this are proposed and contextualised in relation to various political, social and economic forces, especially those influencing notions of gender equality. During the mid to late 1970s -when CEDAW was formulated - breastfeeding posed a strategic challenge for key feminist goals, particularly those of equal employment opportunity, gender neutral childrearing policy and reproductive rights. Protective legislation aimed at working women had been rejected as outdated and oppressive. Moreover, the right of women to breastfeed was generally assumed, with choice over infant feeding practices often perceived as the right NOT to breastfeed. There was also little awareness or analysis of the various structural obstacles to breastfeeding's practice, such as lack of workplace support, that undermine 'choice'. Subsequent interpretations of CEDAW show that despite significant advances in scientific and epidemiological knowledge about breastfeeding's importance for short-term and long-term maternal health, breastfeeding

  5. Proactive Integration of Planetary Protection Needs Into Early Design Phases of Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret; Conley, Catharine

    Planetary protection (PP) policies established by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council for Science have been in force effectively for five decades, ensuring responsible exploration and the integrity of science activities, for both human and robotic missions in the Solar System beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). At present, operations on most bodies in the solar system are not constrained by planetary protection considerations because they cannot be contaminated by Earth life in ways that impact future space exploration. However, operations on Mars, Europa, and Enceladus, which represent locations with biological potential, are subject to strict planetary protection constraints for missions of all types because they can potentially be contaminated by organisms brought from Earth. Forward contamination control for robotic missions is generally accomplished through a combination of activities that reduce the bioload of microbial hitchhikers on outbound spacecraft prior to launch. Back contamination control for recent robotic missions has chiefly been accomplished by selecting sample-return targets that have little or no potential for extant life (e.g., cometary particles returned by Stardust mission). In the post-Apollo era, no human missions have had to deal with planetary protection constraints because they have never left Earth orbit. Future human missions to Mars, for example, will experience many of the challenges faced by the Apollo lunar missions, with the added possibility that astronauts on Mars may encounter habitable environments in their exploration or activities. Current COSPAR PP Principles indicate that safeguarding the Earth from potential back contamination is the highest planetary protection priority in Mars exploration. While guidelines for planetary protection controls on human missions to Mars have been established by COSPAR, detailed engineering constraints and processes for implementation of these guidelines have not

  6. Partial biochemical and biological characterization of purified chicken growth hormone (cGH). Isolation of cGH charge variants and evidence that cGH is phosphorylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámburo, C; Carranza, M; Sanchez, R; Perera, G

    1989-11-01

    Chicken growth hormone (cGH) was purified from frozen pituitary glands obtained from recently sacrificed broilers. Glands were homogenized in a protease inhibitor solution (0.5 mM PMSF, 50 KIU/ml aprotinin, pH 7.2); extract was taken to pH 9.0 with calcium hydroxide and the supernatant was differentially precipitated with 20% (fraction A) and 50% (fraction B) ammonium sulfate. cGH (fraction B-DE-1) was obtained in pure form from fraction B after DEAE-cellulose chromatography at pH 8.6, with a yield of 2.9 mg/g tissue. Three charge variants of cGH (Rf = 0.23, 0.30, and 0.35) could be isolated by electroelution after semipreparative nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of fraction B-DE-1. These charge variants showed the same apparent molecular weight (26,300 Da) by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. Isoelectric focusing of fraction B-DE-1 revealed two major components (pI = 7.2 and 7.4) and four minor bands (pI = 6.2, 6.7, 7.1, and 7.5). It was found that fraction B-DE-1 contained a significant amount of esterified phosphate (1 nmol PO4/3.5 nmol protein) similar to that reported previously for ovine GH. The functional integrity of the cGH obtained here was characterized by two heterologous and one homologous bioassays. High activity was shown by fraction B-DE-1 in the tibia assay (1.76 UI/mg) and in the liver ornithine decarboxylase assay (sixfold over control), both made in hypophysectomized rats; and it also stimulated lipolysis (138 and 215% at 10 and 100 ng/ml, respectively) on chicken abdominal adipose tissue explants.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the first GH10 and GH11 xylanases from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhizhuang; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Lau, Peter C K

    2014-10-01

    The only available genome sequence for Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 was annotated to not encode any β-1,4-endoxylanase encoding genes of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 or 11. Here, we report the identification and cloning of two such members in R. oryzae strain NRRL 29086. Strain 29086 was one of several selected fungi grown on wheat or triticale bran and screened for xylanase activity among other hydrolytic actions. Its high activity (138 U/ml) in the culture supernatant led to the identification of two activity-stained proteins, designated Xyn-1 and Xyn-2 of respective molecular masses 32,000 and 22,000. These proteins were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. The specific activities of Xyn-1 and Xyn-2 towards birchwood xylan were 605 and 7,710 U/mg, respectively. Kinetic data showed that the lower molecular weight Xyn-2 had a higher affinity (K m=3.2 ± 0.2 g/l) towards birchwood xylan than Xyn-1 by about 4-fold. The melting temperature (T m) of the two proteins, estimated to be in the range of 49.5-53.7 °C indicated that they are rather thermostable proteins. N-terminal and internal peptide sequences were obtained by chemical digestion of the purified xylanases to facilitate cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, and sequencing of the respective gene. The cloned Rhizopus xylanases were used to demonstrate release of xylose from flax shives-derived hemicellulose as model feedstock. Overall, this study expands the catalytic toolbox of GH10 and 11 family proteins that have applications in various industrial and bioproducts settings.

  8. Growth hormone dose regimens in adult GH deficiency: effects on biochemical growth markers and metabolic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Laursen, Torben;

    1993-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: We examined the effects of different doses of GH on insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), body composition, energy expenditure, and various metabolites in GH deficient adults, in order to approach a metabolically appropriate GH dosage in young GH...... deficient adults. DESIGN: Ten GH deficient patients (age 21-43) were studied after 4 weeks without GH followed by three consecutive 4-week periods, where the patients received in a fixed order GH 1, 2 and 4 IU/m2 s.c. per day. At the end of each period the patients were hospitalized for a 24-hour...... examination. RESULTS: Mean 24-hour levels of GH (mIU/l) were 2.7 +/- 0.3 (0 GH), 7.2 +/- 0.9 (1), 10.8 +/- 1.5 (2) and 18.9 +/- 2.7 (4 IU/m2) (mean +/- SEM) (P

  9. [Suppression by dopamine of GH release induced by GRF in a case of acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, M; Odagaki, E; Morioka, T

    1987-03-20

    Inhibition of plasma GH by dopaminergic agonists is one of the characteristics of the GH secretion in acromegaly. GRF is known to stimulate GH secretion in most patients with acromegaly. In order to elucidate the relationship between GRF and dopamine in regulating the secretion of GH in this disease, we examined plasma GH responses to dopamine (DA) infusion (4 micrograms/kg/min), GRF injection (100 micrograms i.v.), sulpiride (SP) injection (200 mg i.v.), a DA blocker, DA plus GRF and SP plus GRF in a 51-year-old male patient with acromegaly. Plasma GH was reduced to 14% of the initial level by iv infusion of DA, and was elevated to 158% by iv injection of GRF. No considerable change was observed in plasma GH by iv infusion of SP (114% of the initial level). GH release induced by GRF was remarkably reduced by simultaneous administration of DA (28% of the initial level), whereas SP administration did not affect GRF-induced GH release (154%). The marked reduction of GH release after DA plus GRF seems to suggest that the effect of DA on the GH regulation is stronger than that of GRF in this acromegalic patient. It is suggested also that endogenous DA may not play an inhibitory role in GH secretion in this case since DA blockade by SP did not raise basal GH levels and the GH response to GRF.

  10. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schnell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenylsemicarbazone (EGA has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT. Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria.

  11. Protection of human upper respiratory tract cell lines against sulphur mustard toxicity by hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, D J; Lindsay, C D

    1998-07-01

    1. Sulphur mustard ('mustard gas', HD) is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent which affects the skin and respiratory tract. The primary targets of inhaled HD are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) has been shown to protect human lung cells against HD toxicity and has also been shown to be effective in vivo against the chemical warfare agent phosgene. The ability of HMT to protect against the toxicity of HD was investigated in the human upper respiratory tract cell lines BEAS-2B and RPMI 2650. 2. HD was highly toxic to both cell lines, with LC50 values of 15-30 microM. HMT, at a concentration of 10 mM, was shown to protect the cell lines against the toxic effects of 20 microM and 40 microM HD. Results demonstrated that it was necessary for HMT to be in situ at the time of exposure to HD for effective cytoprotection. No protection was seen when cells were treated with HMT following exposure to HD, or where HMT was removed prior to HD exposure. 3. Results suggest that HMT may be effective prophylaxis for exposure to HD by inhalation.

  12. Dissociation of HSV gL from gH by αvβ6- or αvβ8-integrin promotes gH activation and virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Tatiana; Massaro, Raffaele; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2015-07-21

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important human pathogen. It enters cells through an orchestrated process that requires four essential glycoproteins, gD, gH/gL, and gB, activated in cascade fashion by receptor-binding and signaling. gH/gL heterodimer is conserved across the Herpesviridae family. HSV entry is enabled by gH/gL interaction with αvβ6- or αvβ8-integrin receptors. We report that the interaction of virion gH/gL with integrins resulted in gL dissociation and its release in the medium. gL dissociation occurred if all components of the entry apparatus-receptor-bound gD and gB-were present and was prevented if entry was blocked by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to gH or by a mutation in gH. We propose that (i) gL dissociation from gH/gL is part of the activation of HSV glycoproteins, critical for HSV entry; and (ii) gL is a functional inhibitor of gH and maintains gH in an inhibited form until receptor-bound gD and integrins signal to gH/gL.

  13. The evolution of the Constitutional Protection of Women’s Human Rights in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra MORENO FLÓREZ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human rights were first acknowledged in Colombia in the 1991 Constitution, bringing up a catalogue of specific rights in favour of the female population whose implementation has been possible thanks to the Constitutional Court’s decisive compromise on the struggle against gender discrimination. This way, since the incorporation of the gender perspective in the Colombian Law, great progress has been obtained in the effectiveness of the constitutional normative framework and in the consequent effective protection of women’s human rights in legally relevant different ambits of life.

  14. A new prenylated flavanonol from Seseli annuum roots showing protective effect on human lymphocytes DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucković, Ivan; Vajs, Vlatka; Stanković, Miroslava; Tesević, Vele; Milosavljević, Slobodan

    2010-03-01

    A new prenylated flavanonol named seselinonol (1) was isolated from the roots of Seseli annuum, together with the well-known biologically active polyacetylenes falcarinol (2) and falcarindiol (3), and the prenylated furanocoumarin phellopterin (4). Its structure was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HR-ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. Seselinonol and phellopterin were tested for in vitro protective effect on chromosome aberrations in peripheral human lymphocytes using cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The new compound exerted a beneficial effect by decreasing DNA damage of human lymphocytes.

  15. The environmental protection in the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio de Oliveira Mazzuoli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the interconnections between environmental issues and the protection of human rights, in a process that began in the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm, 1972 and has been developed by the greening of the regional human rights systems. In the Inter-American system the article 11 of the Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of 1988 — the Protocol of San Salvador — guarantees the right to a healthy environment. However the American Convention (on its arts. 3-25, 44-51 and 61-69 and its Additional Protocol (on its arts. 8, 13 and 19.6 only allow the submission of individual petitions to the Inter-American Commission and the possible acting of the Inter-American Court, in complaints containing alleged violations of civil and political rights, trade union rights and the right to education. Despite the lack of devices that are capable to ensure an effective protection to the right to a healthy environment, by itself, the Inter-American Court has demonstrated the greening of the human rights, which means, in other words, that it is quite possible to protect environmental issues by the demonstration of its interconnections with civil and political rights that are directly protected by the inter-American system. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the contributions of the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court in the strengthening of the civil and political rights in cases related to environmental issues.

  16. Ultraviolet-B Protective Effect of Flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata on Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Juilee; Bhatt, Purvi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The exposure of skin to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiations leads to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and can induce production of free radicals which imbalance the redox status of the cell and lead to increased oxidative stress. Clove has been traditionally used for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-viral, and antiseptic effects. Objective: To evaluate the UV-B protective activity of flavonoids from Eugenia caryophylata (clove) buds on human dermal fibroblast c...

  17. A decision model for the sustainable protection of human rights in Italian Prison System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maturo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work starts from an analysis of the critical problems of the prison system in Italy. It aims to develop a decision-making model to address the issue of sustainable protection of human rights in prisons. It shows how, using the Saaty AHP procedure, it is possible to have an analytical reasoning guideline for the understanding of the validity of the various alternative choices, in order to facilitate the situation of the prisoners and their reintegration into society.

  18. Increased Secretion of Endogenous GH after Treatment with an Intranasal GH-releasing Peptide-2 Spray Does Not Promote Growth in Short Children with GH Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Yokoya, Susumu; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    We investigated whether treatment with an intranasal GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-2 spray, which acts as a potent GH secretagogue that stimulates endogenous GH secretion, promotes growth in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study involved 126 prepubertal short children (81 males, 45 females) with a height SD score of -2 SD or less, who had been diagnosed as having GHD based on GH stimulation tests, and in whom the serum GH concentrations increased up to 9 ng/ml after preliminary administration of an intranasal GHRP-2 spray. The subjects included in this study were divided into 3 groups by use of a double-blind method; that is 44 were placed into the placebo group (P group: 30 males, 14 females), 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 low dose group (L group: 25 males, 16 females), and 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 high dose group (H group: 26 males, 15 females). Those with a body wt of less than 20 kg were administered a placebo (P group), 50 μg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 100 μg of GHRP-2 (H group), and those with a body wt of 20 kg or more were administered a placebo (P group), 100 µg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 200 µg of GHRP-2 (H group) twice daily (morning and evening) for 48 continuous wk. Age and height SD scores at baseline were not significantly different among the three groups: 7.5 yr old and -2.26 SD in the P group, 7.3 yr old and -2.38 SD in the L group, and 7.5 yr old and -2.27 SD in the H group. Of the 126 subjects, 44, 40 and 40 subjects in the P, L and H groups, respectively, completed the 48 continuous wk of treatment. The changes in the mean height SD scores (mean growth rate) after 48 wk of treatment in the P, L and H groups were 0.07 SD, 0.03 SD, and 0.02 SD, respectively, and thus no significant differences was observed among the 3 groups. Also no significant changes in blood IGF-I levels at baseline or after 48 wk of treatment were observed among the 3 groups. This study revealed that in patients with GHD, an increase in endogenous GH secretion as a

  19. Protective function of tocilizumab in human cardiac myocytes ischemia reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Cheng; Yan Feng; Da-Ming Jiang; Kai-Yu Tao; Min-Jian Kong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective function of tocilizumab in human cardiac myocytes ischemia-reperfusion injury.Methods:The human cardiac myocytes were treated by tocilizumab with different concentrations(1.0 mg/mL, 3.0 mg/mL, 5.0 mg/mL) for 24 h,then cells were cultured in ischemia environment for 24 h and reperfusion environment for 1 h. The MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation and apoptosis of human cardiac myocytes, respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured by qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively.Results:Compared to the negative group, pretreated by tocilizumab could significantly enhance the proliferation viability and suppress apoptosis of human cardiac myocytes after suffering ischemia reperfusion injury(P<0.05).The expression of Bcl-2 in tocilizumab treated group were higher thanNC group(P<0.05), while theBax expression were lower(P<0.05).Conclusions:Tocilizumab could significantly inhibit apoptosis and keep the proliferation viability of human cardiac myocytes after suffering ischemia reperfusion injury. Tocilizumab may obtain a widely application in the protection of ischemia reperfusion injury.

  20. Report on the COSPAR Workshop on Refining Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, James Andrew; Rummel, John; Conley, Catharine; Race, Margaret; Kminek, Gerhard; Siegel, Bette

    2016-07-01

    A human mission to Mars has been the driving long-term goal for the development of the Global Exploration Roadmap by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group. Additionally, multiple national space agencies and commercial organizations have published similar plans and aspirations for human missions beyond LEO. The current COSPAR planetary protection "Guidelines for Human Missions to Mars" were developed in a series of workshops in the early 2000s and adopted into COSPAR policy at the Montreal Assembly in 2008. With changes and maturation in mission architecture concepts and hardware capabilities, the holding of a workshop provided an opportunity for timely review of these guidelines and their interpretation within current frameworks provided by ISECG and others. The COSPAR Workshop on Refining Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Missions was held in the US in spring 2016 to evaluate recent efforts and activities in the context of current COSPAR policy, as well as collect inputs from the various organizations considering crewed exploration missions to Mars and precursor robotic missions focused on surface material properties and environmental challenges. The workshop also considered potential updates to the COSPAR policy for human missions across a range of planetary destinations. This paper will report on those deliberations.

  1. Bridging non-human primate correlates of protection to reassess the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed booster schedule in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Jarad M; Chen, Ligong; Dalton, Shannon; Niemuth, Nancy A; Sabourin, Carol L; Quinn, Conrad P

    2015-07-17

    Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax) is approved for use in humans as a priming series of 3 intramuscular (i.m.) injections (0, 1, 6 months; 3-IM) with boosters at 12 and 18 months, and annually thereafter for those at continued risk of infection. A reduction in AVA booster frequency would lessen the burden of vaccination, reduce the cumulative frequency of vaccine associated adverse events and potentially expand vaccine coverage by requiring fewer doses per schedule. Because human inhalation anthrax studies are neither feasible nor ethical, AVA efficacy estimates are determined using cross-species bridging of immune correlates of protection (COP) identified in animal models. We have previously reported that the AVA 3-IM priming series provided high levels of protection in non-human primates (NHP) against inhalation anthrax for up to 4 years after the first vaccination. Penalized logistic regressions of those NHP immunological data identified that anti-protective antigen (anti-PA) IgG concentration measured just prior to infectious challenge was the most accurate single COP. In the present analysis, cross-species logistic regression models of this COP were used to predict probability of survival during a 43 month study in humans receiving the current 3-dose priming and 4 boosters (12, 18, 30 and 42 months; 7-IM) and reduced schedules with boosters at months 18 and 42 only (5-IM), or at month 42 only (4-IM). All models predicted high survival probabilities for the reduced schedules from 7 to 43 months. The predicted survival probabilities for the reduced schedules were 86.8% (4-IM) and 95.8% (5-IM) at month 42 when antibody levels were lowest. The data indicated that 4-IM and 5-IM are both viable alternatives to the current AVA pre-exposure prophylaxis schedule. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The Impacts of Macroergonomics on Environmental Protection and Human Performance in Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Azadeh, J Nouri, I Mohammad Fam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and his performance is a vital factor in protection of asset including environmental properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of total system design factors (TSD on human performance in a power plant. The TSD factors are defined as design factors, which have impact on overall performance of the power plants in context of total human engineering or macroergonomics. The systems being studied are the control rooms and maintenance departments of a 2000 MW thermal power plant. To achieve the above objective, the TSD factors were addressed and assessed through a detailed questionnaire. The relationships between TSD factors and human performance were then examined through non-parametric correlation analysis (Kramer’s Phi and Kruskal-Wallis test of means. The results of this study show that the macroergonomic factors such as organizational and safety procedures, teamwork, self-organization, job design and information exchange, influence human performance in the power plant. The findings also suggest that the selected macroergonomic factors are correlated to human performance and must be considered, designed and tested concurrently with the engineering factors at the design phase of the system developmental cycle. Consequently, total system’s faults and organizational errors are reduced to an acceptable level and human performance is significantly increased. The main goal in such program is customer's satisfaction (Internal customers. However, more elaboration on the scientific tools for implementation of TDS factors in context of human performance is also under investigation.

  3. Broaching Performance of Superalloy GH4169 Based on FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangwei Kong; Bin Li; Zhibo Jin; Wenran Geng

    2011-01-01

    The nickel-based superalloy GH4169 is an important material for high temperature applications in the aerospace industry. However, due to its poor machinability, GH4169 is hard to be cut and generates saw-tooth chips during high speed machining, which could significantly affect the dynamic cutting force, cutting temperature fluctuation, tool life, and the surface integrity of the parts. In this paper, the saw-tooth chip formation mechanism of superalloy GH4169 was investigated by the elasto-viscoplastic finite element method (FEM). Using the finite element software of ABAQUS/Explicit, the deformation of the part during high speed machining was simulated. The effective plastic strain, the temperature field, the stress distribution, and the cutting force were analyzed to determine the influence of the cutting parameters on the saw-tooth chip formation. The study on broaching performance has great effect on selecting suitable machining parameters and improving tool life.

  4. Bioavailability and bioactivity of three different doses of nasal growth hormone (GH) administered to GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Grandjean, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde;

    1996-01-01

    Abstract The current mode of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy is daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections given in the evening. This schedule is unable to mimic the endogenous pulsatile pattern of GH secretion, which might be of importance for the induction of growth and other GH actions....... Intravenous administration produced a short-lived serum GH peak value of 128.12 +/- 6.71 micrograms/l. Peak levels were 13.98 +/- 1.63 micrograms/l after s.c. injection and 3.26 +/- 0.38, 7.07 +/- 0.80 and 8.37 +/- 1.31 micrograms/l, respectively, after the three nasal doses. The peak values of the 0....... The absolute bioavailability of GH following s.c. relative to i.v. administration was 49.5%. The bioavailabilities of the nasal doses were: 7.8% (0.05 IU). 8.9% (0.10 IU) and 3.8% (0.20 IU). Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels increased significantly after s.c. administration only. Mean levels...

  5. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R;

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...... proliferation after interleukin 3 withdrawal at a rate equal to maximally stimulated wild type GHR-expressing cells. Activation of STAT 5b was also observed in Fos-Jun-GHR-expressing cells at a level equal to that in chronically GH-treated GHR-expressing cells. Thus, forced dimerization of the transmembrane...... and cytoplasmic domains of the GHR in the absence of the extracellular domain can lead to the constitutive activation of known GH signaling end points, supporting the view that proximity of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinases is the essential element in signaling. Such constitutively active GH receptors may have...

  6. Identification and Characterization of GH Receptor and Serum GH-binding Protein in Chinese Sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong LIAO; Shang-Quan ZHU

    2004-01-01

    Chinese sturgeon, a kind of cartilage ganoid, has a history of over one billion years and it is called the living fossil of aquatic biology since it keeps some evolutionary trace. Here, we characterized the growth hormone receptor (GHR) and serum growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) of Chinese sturgeon. It was shown that GHR was expressed in various tissues, mainly in hepatic, kidney and intestine tissues. GHR on the hepatic membrane has high and specific affinity for bream GH (brGH) and Scatchard analysis of the binding data showed a single class of high affinity binding site with an association constant Ka of 3.1×109 M-1. A specific band around 94 kD was detected by SDS-PAGE in cross-linking studies of membrane receptors. After incubation of Chinese sturgeon serum with 125I-brGH, a 125I-brGH-GHBP complex was identified by Sephadex G-75, indicating that in the serum exists GHBP specially binding to brGH.

  7. Auxological criteria for the diagnosis of GH-dependent short stature and prescription of rGH: problems and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gilli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant growth hormone (rGH administration is a cornerstone in the treatment of short stature secondary to GH deficit. Since its introduction in the 80s, the population of short patients with an indication to rGH therapy has clearly broadened, probably because of increased awareness by patients and physicians. Since rGH therapy is demanding for patients and expensive, the Italian National Health Service, like other third payers and regulatory authorities, regulates its prescription according to criteria listed in the Nota AIFA 39. This paper illustrates pitfalls and difficulties paediatricians may encounter when assessing short stature patients in order to decide upon the opportunity and possibility to initiate rGH therapy through the exposition of four emblematic, though hypothetical, clinical histories. In the discussion, the Authors highlight some of the most critical points in the formulation of the Nota 39, among which are the lack of clear reference values, neglecting of parental height targets and therapeutic responses, as well as some omissions in methodology specifications.

  8. GH/IGF1 axis disturbances in the fibromyalgia syndrome: is there a rationale for GH treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuatrecasas, G; Alegre, C; Casanueva, F F

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a frequent idiopathic condition in which patients experience intense pain in specific tender points, profound fatigue and sleep disturbances. Although pain had not account so far in growth hormone deficiency syndrome (GHD) description, symptoms of FMS are very similar; and there is strong evidence of decreased GH secretion at least in a subset of FMS patients. Is there an overlap of the two diseases? A systematic Medline/Embase search for preliminary proof-of-concept trials, but also larger placebo-controlled studies, have shown that GH replacement in low-IGF1 patients can significantly improve some symptoms of FMS and quality of life, suggesting a direct causal effect of GH deficiency. Despite the use of relatively high doses of GH in these patients, treatment seems to be well tolerated. Several mechanisms of action for GH in FMS relief have been suggested, including both central modulation of pain and peripheral musculo-tendinous effects, as already described in classic GHD.

  9. Integrating habitat status, human population pressure, and protection status into biodiversity conservation priority setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H.; Singh, A.; Kant, S.; Zhu, Z.; Waller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Priority setting is an essential component of biodiversity conservation. Existing methods to identify priority areas for conservation have focused almost entirely on biological factors. We suggest a new relative ranking method for identifying priority conservation areas that integrates both biological and social aspects. It is based on the following criteria: the habitat's status, human population pressure, human efforts to protect habitat, and number of endemic plant and vertebrate species. We used this method to rank 25 hotspots, 17 megadiverse countries, and the hotspots within each megadiverse country. We used consistent, comprehensive, georeferenced, and multiband data sets and analytical remote sensing and geographic information system tools to quantify habitat status, human population pressure, and protection status. The ranking suggests that the Philippines, Atlantic Forest, Mediterranean Basin, Caribbean Islands, Caucasus, and Indo-Burma are the hottest hotspots and that China, the Philippines, and India are the hottest megadiverse countries. The great variation in terms of habitat, protected areas, and population pressure among the hotspots, the megadiverse countries, and the hotspots within the same country suggests the need for hotspot- and country-specific conservation policies.

  10. The effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on GH and insulin/IGF-1 signaling in long-lived Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masternak, Michal M; Panici, Jacob A; Wang, Feiya; Wang, Zhihui; Spong, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The disruption of the growth hormone (GH) axis in mice promotes insulin sensitivity and is strongly correlated with extended longevity. Ames dwarf (Prop1(df), df/df) mice are GH, prolactin (PRL), and thyrotropin (TSH) deficient and live approximately 50% longer than their normal siblings. To investigate the effects of GH on insulin and GH signaling pathways, we subjected these dwarf mice to twice-daily GH injections (6 microg/g/d) starting at the age of 2 weeks and continuing for 6 weeks. This produced the expected activation of the GH signaling pathway and stimulated somatic growth of the Ames dwarf mice. However, concomitantly with increased growth and increased production of insulinlike growth factor-1, the GH treatment strongly inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by decreasing insulin sensitivity of the dwarf mice. This suggests that improving growth of these animals may negatively affect both their healthspan and longevity by causing insulin resistance.

  11. Dynamic evaluation of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (hPRL) secretion in active acromegaly with high and low GH output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolis, G; Kovacs, L; Friesen, H; Martin, J B

    1975-02-01

    Ten patients with active acromegaly were studied. In 9 plasma GH levels failed to suppress after glucose (OGTT), in 8 an increase in serum GH occurred after thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). After L-Dopa, 4 patients showed no change in serum GH, 3 exhibited a decrease and in 3 an increase in serum hGH occurred. With a combined insulin (ITT) and arginine (ATT) test, 2 patients exhibited an increase in hGH, and in 6 no change occurred. Fasting serum GH concentration was less than 11 ng/ml in 5 patients. Basal prolactin (hPRL) levels were normal in all patients including two with galactorrhea. L-Dopa suppressed and TRH stimulated hPRL secretion in all, but the responses which were seen were subnormal. Hydrocortisone infusion in two acromegalics did not affect the prolactin induced increase after TRH but blunted the GH increase after TRH.

  12. Crystal Structure of a 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Supports Diet-Driven Evolution of GH70 Enzymes from α-Amylases in Oral Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Bai, Yuxiang; Gangoiti Muñecas, Joana; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    The human diet has been subject to dramatic changes due to food processing and refining. However, whether this affected the evolution of enzymes in human microbiota is largely unknown. It was proposed that glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) glucansucrases (GS) from Lactobacilli, which synthesize α

  13. Crystal Structure of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Supports Diet-Driven Evolution of GH70 Enzymes from α-Amylases in Oral Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Yuxiang; Gangoiti, Joana; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Pijning, Tjaard

    2017-01-01

    Food processing and refining has dramatically changed the human diet, but little is known about whether this affected the evolution of enzymes in human microbiota. We present evidence that glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) glucansucrases from lactobacilli, synthesizing α-glucan-type extracellular

  14. Characterization of transgene integration pattern in F4 hGH-transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo WU; Yong Hua SUN; Yan Wu WANG; Ya Ping WANG; Zuo Yan ZHU

    2005-01-01

    The integration pattern and adjacent host sequences of the inserted pMThGH-transgene in the F4 hGH-transgenic common carp were extensively studied. Here we show that each F4 transgenic fish contained about 200 copies of the pMThGH-transgene and the transgenes were integrated into the host genome generally with concatemers in a head-totail arrangement at 4-5 insertion sites. By using a method of plasmid rescue, four hundred copies of transgenes from two individuals of F4 transgenic fish, A and B, were recovered and clarified into 6 classes. All classes of recovered transgenes contained either complete or partial pMThGH sequences. The class Ⅰ, which comprised 83% and 84.5% respectively of the recovered transgene copies from fish A and B, had maintained the original configuration, indicating that most transgenes were faithfully inherited during the four generations of reproduction. The other five classes were different from the original configuration in both molecular weight and restriction map, indicating that a few transgenes had undergone mutation, rearrangement or deletion during integration and germline transmission. In the five types of aberrant transgenes, three flanking sequences of the host genome were analyzed. These sequences were common carp β-actin gene, common carp DNA sequences homologous to mouse phosphoglycerate kinase-1 and human epidermal keratin 14, respectively.

  15. Evaluation of fibronectin 1 in one dried blood spot and in urine after rhGH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, P; Ventura, R; Pérez-Mañá, C; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2016-10-07

    Since the appearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the 1980s, its expansion and acquisition through the black market has increased, so the detection of its abuse continues to be a challenge. New biomarkers that are more reliable and sensitive, allowing a larger detection window, are still needed. In this line, Fibronectin 1 (FN1) has been proposed as a potential genetic and protein biomarker of rhGH abuse in peripheral blood lymphocytes, serum, and plasma. However, logistic problems associated with current blood collection in sports drug testing point towards potential new alternative matrices that could be good candidates to be evaluated. Results obtained in this study showed high ELISA FN1 levels in one dried blood spot and in urine samples in ten healthy male volunteers treated with rhGH. Results showed that especially dried blood spots appear as a potential good matrix to detect rhGH abuse by means of FN1 biomarker. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Endurance training and GH administration in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Lorentsen, J; Isaksson, F

    2001-01-01

    adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; (133)Xe washout). Whole body fat oxidation was estimated simultaneously by indirect calorimetry. Before and after completion of the training program, measurements were performed both at rest and during 60 min of continuous cycling at a workload corresponding to 60...... and after completion of the training program. Similarly, no effect on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was observed when combining endurance training with rhGH administration. However, in both the placebo and the GH groups, fat oxidation was significantly increased during exercise performed...

  17. Principles of human rights protection in foreign and home legal policy of the Russian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anokhin Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The principles of state protection of human rights are stated to be important. The principles of human rights policy being a system are conditional on main state goals and objectives, that is ensuring legal safety and unhindered development of an individual and society. This system is argued to be two-component and to include the principles of government mechanism’s construction and activity and general human rights principles. The principles which are not fixed in the legislation are also of great importance. The legislative fixing of principles of civil servants’ activity concerning the human rights is positively estimated by the authors, notably the priority of rights and freedoms of man and citizen; professionalism and competence of civil servants; availability of information on civil service; cooperation with public associations and citizens; security of civil servants against illegal intrusion into their activity. The facts of departure from impartial justice and disrespectful attitude of law enforcement officers to citizens are stated to be wide-spread. The authors prove the necessity to intensify the control of public authorities’ and officials’ activity, to create conditions of its full transparency for the public. The principles of state protection of human rights are ruling principles of public authority’s organization and activity, stating its essence, social function and orientation on setting high level of legal security of man and citizen, fixed in the international agreements and national legislation. It is proposed to reconsider the principles of Russia’s functioning in the sphere of protecting the rights of citizens and proprietors residing abroad.

  18. Disruption of the GH Receptor Gene in Adult Mice Increases Maximal Lifespan in Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junnila, Riia K.; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Suer, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    carry germline mutations. Importantly, the effect of a long-term suppression of the GH/IGF-1 axis during adulthood, as would be considered for human therapeutic purposes, has not been tested. The goal of this study was to determine whether temporally controlled Ghr gene deletion in adult mice would...... affect metabolism and longevity. Thus, we produced adult-onset GHRKO (aGHRKO) mice by disrupting the Ghr gene at 6 weeks of age. We found that aGHRKO mice replicate many of the beneficial effects observed in long-lived GHRKO mice. For example, aGHRKO mice, like GHRKO animals, displayed retarded growth...

  19. The importance of human FcgammaRI in mediating protection to malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S McIntosh

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of passive immunization suggests that antibody-based therapies will be effective at controlling malaria. We describe the development of fully human antibodies specific for Plasmodium falciparum by antibody repertoire cloning from phage display libraries generated from immune Gambian adults. Although these novel reagents bind with strong affinity to malaria parasites, it remains unclear if in vitro assays are predictive of functional immunity in humans, due to the lack of suitable animal models permissive for P. falciparum. A potentially useful solution described herein allows the antimalarial efficacy of human antibodies to be determined using rodent malaria parasites transgenic for P. falciparum antigens in mice also transgenic for human Fc-receptors. These human IgG1s cured animals of an otherwise lethal malaria infection, and protection was crucially dependent on human FcgammaRI. This important finding documents the capacity of FcgammaRI to mediate potent antimalaria immunity and supports the development of FcgammaRI-directed therapy for human malaria.

  20. Expression of lymphocyte-derived growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone receptors in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we show that higher levels of lymphocyte GH are expressed in spleen cells from aging animals compared to young animals. Further, leukocytes from primary and secondary immune tissues and splenic T and B cells from aging rats all express higher levels of GHRH receptors compared to younger animals. Bone marrow and splenic T cells express the highest levels of GHRH receptor in aging animals. Spleen cells from aging animals showed no significant change in proliferation or GH induction after treatment with GHRH. Taken together, the data for the first time show alterations in GH synthesis and expression of the GHRH receptor on cells of the immune system that may play a role in the immune response in aging.

  1. Protective effects of exogenous gangliosides on ROS-induced changes in human spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjana Gavella; Vaskresenija Lipovac

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the available evidence on the efficacy of gangliosides to reduce the degree of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated damage.The antioxidative efficacy of exogenous gangliosides in protecting different cells encouraged us to examine their ability to protect human spermatozoa.Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids with strong amphiphilic character due to the bulky headgroup made of several sugar rings with sialic acid residues and the double-tailed hydrophobic lipid moiety.The amphiphilicity of gangliosides allows them to exist as micelles in aqueous media when they are present at a concentration above their critical micellar concentration.The protective effect of ganglioside micelles on spermatozoa is believed to stem from their ability to scavenge free radicals and prevent their damaging effects.In our study,we particularly focused our attention on the protective effect of ganglioside micelles on DNA in human spermatozoa exposed to cryopreservation.The results indicate that ganglioside micelles can modulate the hydrophobic properties of the sperm membrane to increase tolerance to DNA fragmentation,thus protecting the DNA from cryopreservation-induced damage.Further actions of ganglioside micelles,which were documented by biochemical and biophysical studies,included (i) the modulation of superoxide anion generation by increasing the diffusion barrier for membrane events responsible for signal translocation to the interior of the cell; (ii) the inhibition of iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation due to the iron chelation potential of gangliosides; and (iii) inhibition of hydrogen peroxide diffusion across the sperm membrane.

  2. Internalization and synaptogenic effect of GH in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Thomas; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Mora, Janeth; Aizouki, Miray; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    In the chicken embryo, GH gene expression occurs in the neural retina and retinal GH promotes cell survival and induces axonal growth of retinal ganglion cells. Neuroretinal GH is therefore of functional importance before the appearance of somatotrophs and the onset of pituitary GH secretion to the peripheral plasma (at ED15-17). Endocrine actions of pituitary GH in the development and function of the chicken embryo eye are, however, unknown. This possibility has therefore been investigated in ED15 embryos and using the quail neuroretinal derived cell line (QNR/D). During this research, we studied for the first time, the coexistence of exogenous (endocrine) and local GH (autocrine/paracrine) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In ovo systemic injections of Cy3-labeled GH demonstrated that GH in the embryo bloodstream was translocated into the neural retina and internalized into RGC's. Pituitary GH may therefore be functionally involved in retinal development during late embryogenesis. Cy3-labelled GH was similarly internalized into QNR/D cells after its addition into incubation media. The uptake of exogenous GH was by a receptor-mediated mechanism and maximal after 30-60min. The exogenous (endocrine) GH induced STAT5 phosphorylation and increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity. Ex ovo intravitreal injections of Cy3-GH in ED12 embryos resulted in GH internalization and STAT5 activation. Interestingly, the CY3-labeled GH accumulated in perinuclear regions of the QNR/D cells, but was not found in the cytoplasm of neurite outgrowths, in which endogenous retinal GH is located. This suggests that exogenous (endocrine) and local (autocrine/paracrine) GH are both involved in retinal function in late embryogenesis but they co-exist in separate intracellular compartments within retinal ganglion cells.

  3. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  4. Electrochemical Methods for Human Growth Hormone Doping Detection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Human Growth Hormone (GH) is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and promotes growth of tissue through direct uptake at target tissue sites, or alternatively, by regulating production of insulin-like growth factor-1. The World Anti-Doping Agency considers GH a performance enhancing substance, so the use of GH by athletes is prohibited in most sports. The current immunoassay for GH detection is suboptimal for routine screening of blood samples because of the large resources required for c...

  5. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  6. The impact of growth hormone on proteomic profiles: a review of mouse and adult human studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvana Duran-Ortiz; Alison L Brittain; John J Kopchick

    2017-01-01

    .... For instance, GH increases skeletal muscle and decreases adipose tissue mass. Our laboratory has spent the past two decades studying these effects, including the effects of GH excess and depletion, on the proteome of several mouse and human tissues...

  7. Email: pattuquayefio@ug.edu.gh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apusigah

    security into the mainstream of the security dialogue and policy-making, and juxtaposes it against .... This approach seeks to limit the practice of human ..... concept in their analysis of collective security threats and in devising solutions to them.

  8. Deliberate Microbial Infection Research Reveals Limitations to Current Safety Protections of Healthy Human Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, David L; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T; Mimnall, Rebecca K

    2015-08-01

    Here we identify approximately 40,000 healthy human volunteers who were intentionally exposed to infectious pathogens in clinical research studies dating from late World War II to the early 2000s. Microbial challenge experiments continue today under contemporary human subject research requirements. In fact, we estimated 4,000 additional volunteers who were experimentally infected between 2010 and the present day. We examine the risks and benefits of these experiments and present areas for improvement in protections of participants with respect to safety. These are the absence of maximum limits to risk and the potential for institutional review boards to include questionable benefits to subjects and society when weighing the risks and benefits of research protocols. The lack of a duty of medical care by physician-investigators to research subjects is likewise of concern. The transparency of microbial challenge experiments and the safety concerns raised in this work may stimulate further dialogue on the risks to participants of human experimentation.

  9. Induction of pluripotent protective immunity following immunisation with a chimeric vaccine against human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhong

    Full Text Available Based on the life-time cost to the health care system, the Institute of Medicine has assigned the highest priority for a vaccine to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV disease in transplant patients and new born babies. In spite of numerous attempts successful licensure of a HCMV vaccine formulation remains elusive. Here we have developed a novel chimeric vaccine strategy based on a replication-deficient adenovirus which encodes the extracellular domain of gB protein and multiple HLA class I & II-restricted CTL epitopes from HCMV as a contiguous polypeptide. Immunisation with this chimeric vaccine consistently generated strong HCMV-specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells which co-expressed IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, while the humoral response induced by this vaccine showed strong virus neutralizing capacity. More importantly, immunization with adenoviral chimeric vaccine also afforded protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding HCMV antigens and this protection was associated with the induction of a pluripotent antigen-specific cellular and antibody response. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with this adenoviral chimeric vaccine rapidly expanded multiple antigen-specific human CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells from healthy virus carriers. These studies demonstrate that the adenovirus chimeric HCMV vaccine provides an excellent platform for reconstituting protective immunity to prevent HCMV diseases in different clinical settings.

  10. Scutellaria radix Extract as a Natural UV Protectant for Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Choi, Go Woon; An, Sang Mi; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Hyeong-Ho; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces oxidative injury and inflammation in human skin. Scutellaria radix (SR, the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) contains flavonoids with high UV absorptivity and antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential use of SR extract as an additive in cosmetic products for UV protection. SR extract and its butanol (BuOH) fraction strongly absorbed UV radiation and displayed free radical scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radials and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. They also attenuated the UV-induced death of HaCaT cells. Sunscreen creams, with or without supplementation of SR extract BuOH fraction, were tested in vivo in human trials to evaluate potential skin irritation and determine the sun protection factor (SPF). Both sunscreen creams induced no skin irritation. A sunscreen cream containing 24% ZnO showed an SPF value of 17.8, and it increased to 22.7 when supplemented with 5% SR extract BuOH fraction. This study suggests that SR-derived materials are useful as safe cosmetic additives that provide UV protection.

  11. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides protected human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stressinduced apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian; Liu; Wei; Lao; Qing-Shan; Ji; Zhi-Hao; Yang; Guo-Cheng; Yu; Jing-Xiang; Zhong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect and its mechanism of lycium barbarum polysaccharides(LBP)against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.METHODS: ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines, were exposed to different concentrations of H2O2 for 24h, then cell viability was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8(CCK-8) assay to get the properly concentration of H2O2 which can induce half apoptosis of APRE-19. With different concentrations of LBP pretreatment, the ARPE-19 cells were then exposed to appropriate concentration of H2O2, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis. Expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) technique.RSULTS: LBP significantly reduced the H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cells’ apoptosis. LBP inhibited the H2O2-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax.CONCLUSION: LBP could protect ARPE-19 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The Bcl-2 family had relationship with the protective effects of LBP.

  12. Proteomic analysis of pure human airway gland mucus reveals a large component of protective proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Soo Joo

    Full Text Available Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269-319 proteins per subject. We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38% had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican. A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment.

  13. The role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J A; Hansen, L H; Wang, X;

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of GH receptors leads to rapid activation of Jak2 kinase and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the GH receptor. Three specific tyrosines located in the C-terminal domain of the GH receptor have been identified as being involved in GH-stimulated transcription of the Spi 2.1 promoter....... Mutated GH receptors lacking all but one of these three tyrosines are able to mediate a transcriptional response when transiently transfected into CHO cells together with a Spi 2.1 promoter/luciferase construct. Similarly, these GH receptors were found to be able to mediate activation of Stat5 DNA......-binding activity, whereas the GH receptor mutant lacking all intracellular tyrosines was not. Synthetic tyrosine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the GH receptor sequence around the three tyrosines inhibited Stat5 DNA-binding activity while their non-phosphorylated counterparts were ineffective. Tyrosine...

  14. (SNP) of GH gene in camel breeds reared in Egypt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hend

    2015-03-04

    Mar 4, 2015 ... Full Length Research Paper. Detection of ... The aim of this study was to detect the genetic polymorphism of ... are Maghrabi (a dual purpose animal; (meat and milk) .... products of camel GH gene with MspI; TT: homozygous.

  15. Management of endocrine disease: GH excess: diagnosis and medical therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    for acromegaly. Papers published on pasireotide have reported an increased risk of diabetes mellitus due to a reduction in insulin levels.Pegvisomant, the GH receptor antagonist, is indicated - alone or in combination with a somatostatin analogue - in most patients who fail to enter remission on a somatostatin...

  16. Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, John; Gilman, Morgan S A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Gui, Miao; Cagigi, Alberto; Mulangu, Sabue; Corti, Davide; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Cunningham, James; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean Jacques; Baxa, Ulrich; Graham, Barney S; Xiang, Ye; Sullivan, Nancy J; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus causes hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate for which there is no approved therapy. Two human monoclonal antibodies, mAb100 and mAb114, in combination, protect nonhuman primates against all signs of Ebola virus disease, including viremia. Here, we demonstrate that mAb100 recognizes the base of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) trimer, occludes access to the cathepsin-cleavage loop, and prevents the proteolytic cleavage of GP that is required for virus entry. We show that mAb114 interacts with the glycan cap and inner chalice of GP, remains associated after proteolytic removal of the glycan cap, and inhibits binding of cleaved GP to its receptor. These results define the basis of neutralization for two protective antibodies and may facilitate development of therapies and vaccines.

  17. Effect of GH/IGF-1 on Bone Metabolism and Osteoporsosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vittorio Locatelli; Vittorio E. Bianchi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are fundamental in skeletal growth during puberty and bone health throughout life. GH increases tissue formation by acting directly and indirectly on target cells; IGF-1 is a critical mediator of bone growth. Clinical studies reporting the use of GH and IGF-1 in osteoporosis and fracture healing are outlined. Methods. A Pubmed search revealed 39 clinical studies reporting the effects of GH and IGF-1 administration on bone ...

  18. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P growth.

  19. Possible Role of DNA Polymerase beta in Protecting Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Against Cytotoxicity of Hydroquinone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-LIN HU; JIAN-PING YANG; DAO-KUI FANG; YAN SHA; XIAO-ZHI TU; ZHI-XIONG ZHUANG; HUAN-WEN TANG; HAI-RONG LIANG; DONG-SHENG TANG; YI-MING LIU; WEI-DONG JI; JIAN-HUI YUAN; YUN HE; ZHENG-YU ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxicological mechanism of hydroquinone in human bronchial epithelial cells and to investigate whether DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone. Methods DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line was established via RNA interference as an experimental group. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and cells transfected with the empty vector of pEGFP-Cl were used as controls. Cells were treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone (ranged from 10 μmol/L to 120 μmol/L) for 4 hours. MTT assay and Comet assay [single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] were performed respectively to detect the toxicity of hydroquinone. Results MTT assay showed that DNA polymerase beta knock-down cells treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone had a lower absorbance value at 490 nm than the control cells in a dose-dependant manner. Comet assay revealed that different concentrations of hydroquinone caused more severe DNA damage in DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line than in control cells and there was no significant difference in the two control groups. Conclusions Hydroquinone has significant toxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells and causes DNA damage. DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line appears more sensitive to hydroquinone than the control cells. The results suggest that DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone.

  20. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  1. Contribution of the police negotiating team to the protection of human rights in specific security situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subošić Dane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal right of police to use force, especially firearms, makes modern police mission seem inconsistent: in order to protect the rights of one, the police must limit the rights of others, which raises the question of optimal measures between these opposites. The most dangerous is the police action which encroaches on the right to life, thus indirectly interfering in other human rights. This applies equally to both citizens and the offenders. In an effort to minimize the possibility of eroding the right to life, the modern police forces have developed mechanisms of so-called police negotiating. Respecting the principles of legality, humanity and expertise, members of the of specialized police units engage in negotiations with the most dangerous criminals in order to prevent them in further criminal intent on one hand and in order to solve the crisis without the use of police force, on the other. In addition a notable involvement of police negotiators in prevention of suicide attempts has been observed. In this regard, the paper explores the contribution of the negotiating team of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Serbia to the protection of human rights in Serbia in the period 2005. - 2010.

  2. Reporting of ethical protection in recent oral and maxillofacial surgery research involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, P; Sader, R; Hervé, C; Dhanuthai, K; Bertrand, J-Ch; Hemprich, A

    2009-07-01

    This retrospective observational study investigated the frequency of reporting ethical approval and informed consent in recently published oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) research involving human subjects. All research involving human subjects published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery during January to June 2005-2007 were analysed for disclosure of ethical approval by a local ethical committee and obtaining informed consent from the subjects. 534 articles were identified; ethical approval was documented in 118 (22%) and individual patient consent in 135 (25%). 355 reports (67%) did not include a statement on ethical approval or informed consent and only 74 reports (14%) disclosed statements of both. Ethical documentation in retrospective and observational studies was scant; 12% of randomised controlled trials and 38% of non-random trials did not report both of ethical protections. Most recent OMS publications involving humans failed to mention ethical review or subjects' consent. Authors must adhere to the international research ethics guidelines and journal instructions, while editors should play a gatekeeper role to protect research participants, uphold scientific integrity and maintain public trust in the experimental process and OMS profession.

  3. [Legislative and legal security of supervisory activities in the sphere of protection of consumers' rights and human well-being].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantsev, G I; Kutsenko, G I; Polesskiĭ, V A

    2007-01-01

    Sanitary legislation plays an important role in supervisory activities ensuring the protection of consumers' rights and human well-being. The paper considers the basic laws and standard acts allowing for legal regulation in this sphere of activities.

  4. Are research subjects adequately protected? A review and discussion of studies conducted by the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Nancy E; Sugarman, Jeremy

    1996-09-01

    In light of information uncovered about human radiation experiments conducted during the Cold War, an important charge for the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was to assess the current state of protections for human research subjects. This assessment was designed to enhance the Committee's ability to make informed recommendations for the improvement of future policies and practices for the protection of research subjects. The Committee's examination of current protections revealed great improvement over those from the past, yet some problems remain. Although the data collected by the Committee highlight specific areas in need of attention, the Committee's work should be viewed in part as the beginning of a series of ongoing assessments of the adequacy and effectiveness of the protections afforded to human subjects.

  5. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi, E-mail: mnavid@iust.ac.ir; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-09-01

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load. - Highlights: • The ability of PVA sponge to control the injury to the human mandible is computed. • A hexahedral FE model for gunshot wounds to the human mandible is established. • The kinetic energy and injury severity of the mandible is minimized by the sponge. • The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. • PVA suggests as an alternative

  6. Privacy as human flourishing: could a shift towards virtue ethics strengthen privacy protection in the age of Big Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, B.

    2014-01-01

    Privacy is commonly seen as an instrumental value in relation to negative freedom, human dignity and personal autonomy. Article 8 ECHR, protecting the right to privacy, was originally coined as a doctrine protecting the negative freedom of citizens in vertical relations, that is between citizen and

  7. A Novel Tool for Peptide Pattern Recognition Identifies 13 Subgroups of the GH61 Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Lange, Lene

    2011-01-01

    Proteins of the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (gh61) are important proteins for fungal degradation of biomass. There are 132 entries for gh61 in the CAZY database, no subfamilies have been defined and each fungus may have several gh61s with very different sequences. Alignment of highly divergent s...

  8. Special procedural measures and the protection of human rights
    General report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A.E. Vervaele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the general report is to conduct a comparative analysis of the national reports in order to trace transformation processes in domestic criminal justice systems, in particular criminal process, as special procedural measures are introduced to deal with terrorism and organised crime, and to map whether this has led countries to depart from their own fundamental rules, procedures, principles and applicable human rights standards. Starting from the premise that the integrated system of criminal law has three dimensions – the protection of individuals (the shield dimension, the provision of instruments of law enforcement (the sword dimension, and of checks and balances/trias politica (the constitutional dimension – the report provides a comprehensive overview of interrelated transformations, mostly in the pre-trial setting, that have affected all three in three waves of ‘war’ (on drugs, organised crime and terrorism. In many countries, procedural guarantees and principles that protect against the infringement of fair trial rights are considered a burden to the efficiency of serious crime enforcement. These reforms have resulted in a clear expansion of the punitive state and a blurring of classic distinctions, and do not favour the rule of law. The focus on public security and preventive coercive investigation undermines the criminal justice system. With the criminal justice system increasingly used as an instrument to regulate the present and/or the future rather than to punish past behaviour, and a criminal process in which pre-trial investigation is not about truth-finding related to committed crime, but about the construction and de-construction of social dangerousness, the interests of national security may be said to be prevailing over justice and to be threatening due process and the protection of human rights – notwithstanding that general principles of criminal procedure seem to have become more important in the reporting

  9. Special procedural measures and the protection of human rights General report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A.E. Vervaele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the general report is to conduct a comparative analysis of the national reports in order to trace transformation processes in domestic criminal justice systems, in particular criminal process, as special procedural measures are introduced to deal with terrorism and organised crime, and to map whether this has led countries to depart from their own fundamental rules, procedures, principles and applicable human rights standards. Starting from the premise that the integrated system of criminal law has three dimensions – the protection of individuals (the shield dimension, the provision of instruments of law enforcement (the sword dimension, and of checks and balances/trias politica (the constitutional dimension – the report provides a comprehensive overview of interrelated transformations, mostly in the pre-trial setting, that have affected all three in three waves of ‘war’ (on drugs, organised crime and terrorism. In many countries, procedural guarantees and principles that protect against the infringement of fair trial rights are considered a burden to the efficiency of serious crime enforcement. These reforms have resulted in a clear expansion of the punitive state and a blurring of classic distinctions, and do not favour the rule of law. The focus on public security and preventive coercive investigation undermines the criminal justice system. With the criminal justice system increasingly used as an instrument to regulate the present and/or the future rather than to punish past behaviour, and a criminal process in which pre-trial investigation is not about truth-finding related to committed crime, but about the construction and de-construction of social dangerousness, the interests of national security may be said to be prevailing over justice and to be threatening due process and the protection of human rights – notwithstanding that general principles of criminal procedure seem to have become more important in the reporting

  10. Towards modelling flood protection investment as a coupled human and natural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, P. E.; O'Donnell, G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to a number of recent high-profile flood events and the apparent threat from global warming, governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains. However, adopting a proactive approach as a universal strategy is not affordable. It has been argued that delaying expensive and essentially irreversible capital decisions could be a prudent strategy in situations with high future uncertainty. This paper firstly uses Monte Carlo simulation to explore the performance of proactive and reactive investment strategies using a rational cost-benefit approach in a natural system with varying levels of persistence/interannual variability in annual maximum floods. It is found that, as persistence increases, there is a change in investment strategy optimality from proactive to reactive. This could have implications for investment strategies under the increasingly variable climate that is expected with global warming. As part of the emerging holistic approaches to flood risk management, there is increasing emphasis on stakeholder participation in determining where and when flood protection investments are made, and so flood risk management is becoming more people-centred. As a consequence, multiple actors are involved in the decision-making process, and the social sciences are assuming an increasingly important role in flood risk management. There is a need for modelling approaches which can couple the natural and human system elements. It is proposed that coupled human and natural system (CHANS) modelling could play an important role in understanding the motivations, actions and influence of citizens and institutions and how these impact on the effective delivery of flood protection investment. A framework for using agent-based modelling of human activities leading to flood investments is outlined, and some of the challenges associated with implementation are discussed.

  11. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    -independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period...

  12. Changes in bone mineral density, body composition, and lipid metabolism during growth hormone (GH) treatment in children with GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); M.A. Engels (Melanie); G.J.M. Boerma (Geert); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAdults with childhood onset GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mass, increased fat mass, and disorders of lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism, body composition, and lipid metabolism in

  13. How Does Iranian's Legal System Protect Human Vulnerability and Personal Integrity in Medical Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoubi, Mohammad Taghi; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    The astonishing advance of medical science in recent decades has had endless advantages for humans, including improved level of health, prevention of disease and advances in treatment. These advances depend to a great extent on conducting continuous research. However, besides its enormous advantages, the sole interest of medical science undermines the principles of respect for human vulnerability and personal integrity, in both positive and negative approaches. The positive approach refers to the people who participate in research and practice, while the negative approach refers to people who are deprived of research and practice. The authors of this work, based on legal or moral grounds try to analyse the tension between the principle of respect for human vulnerability and personal integrity and the interest of medical science. Undoubtedly, in applying scientific knowledge and medical practice human vulnerability should be taken into account. In this regard, especially vulnerable individuals and groups should be protected and the personal integrity of such individuals respected. In the light of the merits of Islamic law, this paper is designed to examine the significance of the principles of human vulnerability and personal integrity in medical research by studying the international documents as formalised by UNESCO in order to explore the place of these principles in the Iranian legal system. PMID:23408269

  14. Protective effects of b-carotene and silymarin on human lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Beta-carotene and silymarin have antioxidant properties against oxidative damage and are used as dietary supplements. The aim of this study was to assess the protective effects of b-carotene and silymarin on healthy human lymphocytes exposed to L-arginine-induced oxidative damage. Study samples were lymphocyte cultures set up from venous blood obtained from 6 healthy individuals (3 males and 3 females). Oxidative DNA damage was induced by L-arginine. b-Carotene and silymarin were added to the...

  15. Effects of growth hormone (GH therapy withdrawal on glucose metabolism in not confirmed GH deficient adolescents at final height.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Prodam

    Full Text Available CONTEXT OBJECTIVE: Growth hormone deficiency (GHD is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, in particular after treatment in children and adults with pre-existing metabolic risk factors. Our aims were. i to evaluate the effect on glucose metabolism of rhGH treatment and withdrawal in not confirmed GHD adolescents at the achievement of adult height; ii to investigate the impact of GH receptor gene genomic deletion of exon 3 (d3GHR. DESIGN SETTING: We performed a longitudinal study (1 year in a tertiary care center. METHODS: 23 GHD adolescent were followed in the last year of rhGH treatment (T0, 6 (T6 and 12 (T12 months after rhGH withdrawal with fasting and post-OGTT evaluations. 40 healthy adolescents were used as controls. HOMA-IR, HOMA%β, insulinogenic (INS and disposition (DI indexes were calculated. GHR genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. RESULTS: In the group as a whole, fasting insulin (p<0.05, HOMA-IR (p<0.05, insulin and glucose levels during OGTT (p<0.01 progressively decreased from T0 to T12 becoming similar to controls. During rhGH, a compensatory insulin secretion with a stable DI was recorded, and, then, HOMAβ and INS decreased at T6 and T12 (p<0.05. By evaluating the GHR genotype, nDel GHD showed a decrease from T0 to T12 in HOMA-IR, HOMAβ, INS (p<0.05 and DI. Del GHD showed a gradual increase in DI (p<0.05 and INS with a stable HOMA-IR and higher HDL-cholesterol (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: In not confirmed GHD adolescents the fasting deterioration in glucose homeostasis during rhGH is efficaciously coupled with a compensatory insulin secretion and activity at OGTT. The presence of at least one d3GHR allele is associated with lower glucose levels and higher HOMA-β and DI after rhGH withdrawal. Screening for the d3GHR in the pediatric age may help physicians to follow and phenotype GHD patients also by a metabolic point of view.

  16. The role of GH and IGF-I in mediating anabolic effects of testosterone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Carlo; Bhasin, Shalender; Tangherlini, Frances; Barton, Elisabeth R; Ganno, Michelle; Zhang, Anqi; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Travison, Thomas G; Jasuja, Ravi; Morris, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone (T) supplementation increases skeletal muscle mass, circulating GH, IGF-I, and im IGF-I expression, but the role of GH and IGF-I in mediating T's effects on the skeletal muscle remains poorly understood. Here, we show that T administration increased body weight and the mass of the androgen-dependent levator ani muscle in hypophysectomized as well as castrated plus hypophysectomized adult male rats. T stimulated the proliferation of primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSKMCs) in vitro, an effect blocked by transfecting hSKMCs with small interference RNA targeting human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). In differentiation conditions, T promoted the fusion of hSKMCs into larger myotubes, an effect attenuated by small interference RNA targeting human IGF-IR. Notably, MKR mice, which express a dominant negative form of the IGF-IR in skeletal muscle fibers, treated with a GnRH antagonist (acyline) to suppress endogenous T, responded to T administration by an attenuated increase in the levator ani muscle mass. In conclusion, circulating GH and IGF-I are not essential for mediating T's effects on an androgen-responsive skeletal muscle. IGF-I signaling plays an important role in mediating T's effects on skeletal muscle progenitor cell growth and differentiation in vitro. However, IGF-IR signaling in skeletal muscle fibers does not appear to be obligatory for mediating the anabolic effects of T on the mass of androgen-responsive skeletal muscles in mice.

  17. Effects of GH,HGF and NIC on proliferation and function of human fetal pancreatic islets in culture%生长激素、肝细胞生长因子和烟酰胺对人胎胰岛细胞体外增殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永兵; 严律南; 彭珂; 刘立新; 周祥

    2003-01-01

    目的:探讨生长激素(GH),肝细胞生长因子(HGF)和烟酰胺(NIC)对体外培养人胎胰岛细胞增殖的影响.方法:胶原酶消化法制胰岛样细胞团(ICCs),接种于24孔培养板培养,在实验组中分别加入GH(100 μg/L),HGF(25 μg/L)和NIC(10 mmol/L)及其组合,同时设空白组为对照,间日调换培养液并测定胰岛素分泌量,于培养6 d末测定胰岛细胞内胰岛素含量,收集细胞计数,观察细胞有丝分裂相及胰岛细胞分布情况.结果:①在人胎胰岛细胞体外培养第2 d、第4 d、第6 d胰岛素分泌量各实验组均高于空白组(P<0.01),以GH+HGF+NIC组最高, GH+HGF+NIC组与GH+NIC组、GH+HGF组、HGF+NIC组相比,差异无统计学意义,但与GH组、HGF组、NIC组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).②各组胰岛细胞内胰岛素含量与胰岛样细胞团数均呈正相关,r均大于0.80(P<0.05).结论:GH、HGF、NIC均能显著促进体外培养的人胎胰岛细胞的增殖,胰岛素含量及分泌量增加,3者有协同作用.

  18. Effects of theophylline infusion on the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin response to GH-releasing hormone administration in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, M; Alba-Lopez, J; Schopohl, J; Sobiesczcyk, S; Chiodini, P G; Müller, O A; von Werder, K

    1988-10-01

    Since theophylline has been shown to blunt the GH response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in normal subjects, we investigated whether the same effect of theophylline administration could be reproduced in patients with active acromegaly. Ten acromegalic patients received on two different days 100 micrograms GHRH iv alone and the same GHRH dose during a constant infusion of theophylline (3.56 mg/min), beginning 2 h before GHRH administration. In the whole group theophylline did not affect basal GH secretion significantly (from a mean of 44.6 +/- 14.4 at 0 min to 41.8 +/- 13.5 ng/ml at 120 min). However, the amount of GH released after GHRH stimulation was lower when theophylline was concomitantly infused (7525 +/- 3709 ng min/ml vs. 12038 +/- 6337 ng min/ml; p less than 0.05). The inhibitory effect of theophylline was not homogeneous, since either marked or minimal reductions of the GHRH-stimulated GH secretion occurred. Serum PRL levels increased after GHRH administration in 6 patients and theophylline infusion had no influence upon this response. Peak GHRH levels were not different in both studies (14.9 +/- 1.7 and 17.1 +/- 4.0 ng/ml, respectively). Free fatty acid levels rose progressively during theophylline administration (from 0.66 +/- 0.10 at 0 min to 1.04 +/- 0.10 mEq/l at 240 min) and were significantly higher than after GHRH stimulation alone from 180 min up to the end of the test. Our results demonstrate that in active acromegaly theophylline blunts the GH response to GHRH, though this effect is not uniformly seen in all patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansruedi Voelkle [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Environmental Radioactivity Section, c/o Physics Department, University of Fribourg Chemin du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  20. Protective Effect of Strawberry Extract against Inflammatory Stress Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Gasparrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A protracted pro-inflammatory state is a major contributing factor in the development, progression and complication of the most common chronic pathologies. Fruit and vegetables represent the main sources of dietary antioxidants and their consumption can be considered an efficient tool to counteract inflammatory states. In this context an evaluation of the protective effects of strawberry extracts on inflammatory stress induced by E. coli LPS on human dermal fibroblast cells was performed in terms of viability assays, ROS and nitrite production and biomarkers of oxidative damage of the main biological macromolecules. The results demonstrated that strawberry extracts exerted an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-treated cells, through an increase in cell viability, and the reduction of ROS and nitrite levels, and lipid, protein and DNA damage. This work showed for the first time the potential health benefits of strawberry extract against inflammatory and oxidative stress in LPS-treated human dermal fibroblast cells.

  1. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-07-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death.

  2. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  3. Proliferative and anti-proliferative effects of dietary levels of phytoestrogens in rat pituitary GH3/B6/F10 cells - the involvement of rapidly activated kinases and caspases

    OpenAIRE

    Watson Cheryl S; Jeng Yow-Jiun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Phytoestogens are a group of lipophillic plant compounds that can have estrogenic effects in animals; both tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic effects have been reported. Prolactin-secreting adenomas are the most prevalent form of pituitary tumors in humans and have been linked to estrogen exposures. We examined the proliferative effects of phytoestrogens on a rat pituitary tumor cell line, GH3/B6/F10, originally subcloned from GH3 cells based on its ability to express high l...

  4. Mecasermin (recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exercises its growth effects by stimulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) synthesis in the liver (endocrine IGF-I) and by inducing chondrocyte differentiation/replication and local production of IGF-I (paracrine/autocrine IGF-I). Injectable recombinant human (rh)IGF-I (mecasermin) has been available for nearly 20 years for treatment of the rare instances of GH insensitivity caused by GH receptor defects or GH-inhibiting antibodies. Full restoration of normal growth, as occurs with rhGH replacement of GH deficiency, is not seen, presumably because only the endocrine deficiency is addressed. RhIGF-I has also been effective as an insulin-sensitizing agent in severe insulin-resistant conditions. Although the insulin-sensitizing effect may benefit both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, there are no ongoing clinical trials because of concern about risk of retinopathy and other complications. Promotion of rhIGF-I for treatment of idiopathic short stature has been intensive, with neither data nor rationale suggesting that there might be a better response than has been documented with rhGH. Other applications that have either been considered or are undergoing clinical trial are based on the ubiquitous tissue-building properties of IGF-I and include chronic liver disease, cystic fibrosis, wound healing, AIDS muscle wasting, burns, osteoporosis, Crohn's disease, anorexia nervosa, Werner syndrome, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hearing loss prevention, spinal cord injury, cardiovascular protection, and prevention of retinopathy of prematurity. The most frequent side effect is hypoglycemia, which is readily controlled by administration with meals. Other common adverse effects involve hyperplasia of lymphoid tissue, which may require tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, accumulation of body fat, and coarsening of facies. The anti-apoptotic properties of IGF-I are implicated in cancer

  5. Contraction of human airways by oxidative stress protection by N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, J; Martí-Cabrera, M; de la Asuncíon, J G; Pallardó, F V; Esteras, A; Bruseghini, L; Viña, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    We examined the in vitro effects of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBu-OOH) in human bronchial muscle. tert-Butylhydroperoxide produced concentration-dependent contractions of bronchial rings (maximum effect was 56.5 +/- 9.6% of contraction by 1 mM acetylcholine; effective concentration 50% was approximately 100 microM). tert-Butylhydroperoxide (0.5 mM)-induced contraction was enhanced by epithelial removal but abolished by indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and zileuton (lipoxygenase inhibitor). tert-Butylhydroperoxide produced a transient rise in intracellular calcium in human cultured airway smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). The bronchial reactivity to acetylcholine and histamine was not altered by tBu-OOH. In HCASMC, tBu-OOH (0.5 mM, 30 min) increased malondialdehyde levels (MDA; from 7.80 +/- 0.83 to 26.82 +/- 1.49 nmol mg(-1) protein), accompanied by a decrease of reduced glutathione (GSH; from 16.7 +/- 2.6 to 6.9 +/- 1.9 nmol mg(-1) protein) and an increase of oxidized glutathione (from 0.09 +/- 0.03 to 0.18 +/- 0.03 nmol mg(-1) protein). N-acetylcysteine (0.3 mM) inhibited by approximately 60% the bronchial contraction resulting from tBu-OOH (0.5 mM) and protected cultured cells exposed to tBu-OOH (MDA was lowered to 19.51 +/- 1.19 nmol mg(-1) protein, and GSH content was replenished). In summary, tBu-OOH caused contraction of human bronchial muscle mediated by release of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products without producing airways hyperreactivity. N-acetylcysteine decreases tBu-OOH-induced contraction and protects human cultured airway smooth muscle cells exposed to tBu-OOH.

  6. Today's ``safe" radiofrequency (RF) exposure limits DON'T protect human health near transmitters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2005-03-01

    Maxwell's theory implies that electromagnetic (EM) radiation carries both energy and momentum. ``The momentum may have both linear and angular contributions; angular momentum [AM] has a spin part associated with polarization and an orbital part associated with spatial distribution. Any interaction between radiation and matter is inevitably accompanied by an exchange of momentum. This often has mechanical consequences ..."^2 Voluntary consensus standards [ANSI C95; NCRP; INCIRP] protect human health from most thermal [energy transfer] effects, but no standards yet exist to protect health against athermal [momentum transfer] effects, though laboratory transfer of spin AM was reported by 1935^3 and of orbital AM by 1992^2 for an optical vortex [tip of Poynting vector (PV) traces a helix about the beam axis]. In the far field of a dipole RF transmitter, radiation is linearly polarized (minimal spin AM) and locally approximated by a plane wave (zero orbital AM), but in the near field the orbital AM is non-zero [tip of PV traces an ellipse^4 in air] implying an athermal hazard [e.g., brain tumors in cellular phone users] against which no standard now in use anywhere in the world protects! ^2 L. Allen et al. Phys. Rev. A 45:8185-9(1992). ^3 R.A. Beth, Phys. Rev. 48:471(1935); 50:115-25 (1936). ^4 F. Landstorfer, Archiv für Elektronik und übertragungstechnik 26:189-96(1972) [in German].

  7. Pentavalent HIV-1 vaccine protects against simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Todd; Pollara, Justin; Santra, Sampa; Vandergrift, Nathan; Pittala, Srivamshi; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Shen, Xiaoying; Parks, Robert; Goodman, Derrick; Eaton, Amanda; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Saunders, Kevin O.; Weiner, Joshua A.; Scearce, Richard; Sutherland, Laura L.; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Reed, Steven G.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Theis, James F.; Pinter, Abraham; Montefiori, David C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Peachman, Kristina K.; Rao, Mangala; Michael, Nelson L.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia; Ferrari, Guido; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2017-01-01

    The RV144 Thai trial HIV-1 vaccine of recombinant poxvirus (ALVAC) and recombinant HIV-1 gp120 subtype B/subtype E (B/E) proteins demonstrated 31% vaccine efficacy. Here we design an ALVAC/Pentavalent B/E/E/E/E vaccine to increase the diversity of gp120 motifs in the immunogen to elicit a broader antibody response and enhance protection. We find that immunization of rhesus macaques with the pentavalent vaccine results in protection of 55% of pentavalent-vaccine-immunized macaques from simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. Systems serology of the antibody responses identifies plasma antibody binding to HIV-infected cells, peak ADCC antibody titres, NK cell-mediated ADCC and antibody-mediated activation of MIP-1β in NK cells as the four immunological parameters that best predict decreased infection risk that are improved by the pentavalent vaccine. Thus inclusion of additional gp120 immunogens to a pox-prime/protein boost regimen can augment antibody responses and enhance protection from a SHIV challenge in rhesus macaques. PMID:28593989

  8. Protection of human HepG2 cells against oxidative stress by cocoa phenolic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Granado Serrano, Ana Belén; Izquierdo-Pulido, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2008-09-10

    Cocoa is a rich source of flavanols and procyanidin oligomers with antioxidative properties, providing protection against oxidation and nitration. The present study investigated the potential protective effect of a polyphenolic extract from cocoa on cell viability and antioxidant defenses of cultured human HepG2 cells submitted to oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH). Pretreatment of cells with 0.05-50 microg/mL of cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) for 2 or 20 h completely prevented cell damage and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes induced by a treatment with t-BOOH. Moreover, lower levels of GSH caused by t-BOOH in HepG2 cells were partly recovered by a pretreatment with CPE. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by t-BOOH was dose-dependently prevented when cells were pretreated for 2 or 20 h with CPE. These results show that treatment of HepG2 in culture with CPE (within the physiological range of concentrations) confers a significant protection against oxidation to the cells.

  9. A mint purified extract protects human keratinocytes from short-term, chemically induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berselli, Patrizia Valeria Rita; Zava, Stefania; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Krzyzanowska, Justyna; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Berra, Bruno; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2010-11-10

    Oxidative stress is strictly correlated to the pathogenesis of many diseases, and a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or adequately integrated, is currently considered to be a protective and preventive factor. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a 1 h preincubation with the highest nontoxic dose of a characterized Mentha longifolia extract (80 μg/mL) in protecting human keratinocytes (NCTC2544) from chemically induced oxidative stress (500 μM H2O2 for 2, 16, and 24 h). As reference synthetic pure compounds rosmarinic acid (360.31 μg/mL), a major mint phenolic constituent, and resveratrol (31.95 mg/mL), a well-known antioxidant, were used. Cellular viability was significantly protected by mint, which limited protein and DNA damage, decreased lipid peroxidation, and preserved glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in the shorter phases of oxidative stress induction, in extents comparable to or better than those of pure compounds. These data suggest that mint use as only a flavoring has to be revised, taking into consideration its enrichment in foodstuff and cosmetics.

  10. Gender differences in serum GH and IGF-I levels and the GH response to dynamic tests in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Fukuda, Izumi; Hizuka, Naomi; Takano, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    Gender affects the GH secretory pattern both in normal subjects and in patients with acromegaly by an uncertain mechanism. Here, we report the influence of gender on the relationship between serum GH and IGF-I levels and the GH response to dynamic tests in patients with acromegaly. Seventy-four patients with untreated acromegaly (M/F 27/47, age range 22-86 yr.) were studied. The serum GH levels did not differ between male and female (6.1 vs. 8.7 ng/ml; p=0.26), while serum IGF-I levels, IGF-I SDS and the IGF-I/GH ratio were lower in female than those in male (679 vs. 769 ng/ml; p50 yr, serum IGF-I levels and IGF-I/GH ratios were lower in female than those in male in patients 50 yrs (684 vs. 680 ng/ml; p=0.39 and 98.7 vs. 118.4; p=0.40). The GH responses to OGTT, TRH, octreotide, and bromocriptine tests were similar in male and female. In conclusion, IGF-I/GH ratio was significantly lower in female than that in male particularly in younger patients with acromegaly. These data suggest that gender, presumably sex steroids in female, may partially modulate the relationship between circulating IGF-I and GH levels in patients with acromegaly.

  11. Sequential exercise in triathletes: variations in GH and water loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Galy

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH may stimulate water loss during exercise by activating sweating. This study investigated GH secretion and water loss during sequential cycling and running, taking postural changes into account. The two exercise segments had similar durations and were performed at the same relative intensity to determine their respective contributions to water loss and the plasma volume variation noted in such trials. Eight elite triathletes first performed an incremental cycle test to assess maximal oxygen consumption. Then, the triathletes performed one of two trials in randomized order: constant submaximal cycling followed by treadmill running (C1-R2 or an inversed succession of running followed by cycling (R1-C2. Each segment of both trials was performed for 20 minutes at ∼75% of maximal oxygen consumption. The second trial, reversing the segment order of the first trial, took place two weeks later. During cycling, the triathletes used their own bicycles equipped with a profiled handlebar. Blood sampling (for GH concentrations, plasma viscosity and plasma volume variation was conducted at rest and after each segment while water loss was estimated from the post- and pre-measures. GH increases were significantly lower in R2 than C2 (72.2±50.1 vs. 164.0±157 ng x ml(-1 x min(-1, respectively; P<0.05. Water loss was significantly lower after C1-R2 than R1-C2 (1105±163 and 1235±153 ml, respectively; P<0.05. Plasma volume variation was significantly negative in C1 and R1 (-6.15±2.0 and -3.16±5.0%, respectively; P<0.05, not significant in C2, and significantly positive for seven subjects in R2 (4.05±3.1%. We concluded that the lower GH increases in R2 may have contributed to the smaller reduction in plasma volume by reducing sweating. Moreover, this lower GH response could be explained by the postural change during the transition from cycling to running. We recommend to pay particular attention to their hydration status during R1 which

  12. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  13. The role of lactoferrin binding protein B in mediating protection against human lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Livingstone, Margaret; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts of mammals encounter an iron-deficient environment because of iron sequestration by the host iron-binding proteins transferrin and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin is also present in high concentrations at sites of inflammation where the cationic, antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin is produced by proteolysis of lactoferrin. Several Gram-negative pathogens express a lactoferrin receptor that enables the bacteria to use lactoferrin as an iron source. The receptor is composed of an integral membrane protein, lactoferrin binding protein A (LbpA), and a membrane-bound lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB). LbpA is essential for growth with lactoferrin as the sole iron source, whereas the role of LbpB in iron acquisition is not yet known. In this study, we demonstrate that LbpB from 2 different species is capable of providing protection against the killing activity of a human lactoferrin-derived peptide. We investigated the prevalence of lactoferrin receptors in bacteria and examined their sequence diversity. We propose that the protection against the cationic antimicrobial human lactoferrin-derived peptide is associated with clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the C-terminal lobe of LbpB that is a common feature of this protein.

  14. Investigating the role of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in protecting Human Adenovirus from water disinfection treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Marco; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Tammaro, Carmine; Carducci, Annalaura

    2016-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical infections and are present in aquatic environments, including river, seawater, drinking-water and sewage. Free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba) in the same environments may internalize them and other microorganisms can act as a reservoir for the internalized viruses. In this study, we studied the interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Human Adenovirus type 5 (HAdV 5) to determine whether the amoeba played a role in protecting the internalized viruses from chemical disinfection. The efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfection against A. polyphaga and HAdV 5 either singly or in combination was assessed at three different concentrations. Individually, the amoeba were more resistant to chemical disinfection than HAdV 5 and remained alive after exposure to 5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. In contrast, HAdV 5 lost infectivity following exposure to 2.5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. When the amoeba and HAdV 5 were co-cultured, infectious virus was found in the cytoplasm of the amoeba at 5mg/l disinfectant concentration. These findings suggest that the A. polyphaga is providing protection for the HAdV 5.

  15. Human milk oligosaccharides protect bladder epithelial cells against uropathogenic Escherichia coli invasion and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Espanola, Sophia D; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants.

  16. Protection of Mice from Lethal Endotoxemia by Chimeric Human BPI-Fcγ1 Gene Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Jing Li; Zhe Lv; Xinghua Guo; Qinghua Chen; Qingli Kong; Yunqing An

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the potentiality of applying gene therapy to endotoxemia in high-risk patients, we investigated the effects of transferring an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2)-mediated BPI-Fcγ1 gene on protecting mice from challenge of lethal endotoxin. The chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene consists of two parts, one encods functional N-terminus (1 to 199 amino acidic residues) of human BPI, which is a bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein,and the other encodes Fc segment of human immunoglobulin G1 (Fcγ1). Our results indicated that the target protein could be expressed and secreted into the serum of the gene-transferred mice. After lethal endotoxin challenge, the levels of endotoxin and TNF-α in the gene-transferred mice were decreased. The survival rate of the BPI-Fcγ1 gene-transferred mice was markedly increased. Our data suggest that AAV2-mediated chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene delivery can potentially be used clinically for the protection and treatment of endotoxemia and endotoxic shock in high-risk individuals.

  17. Research monitoring by US medical institutions to protect human subjects: compliance or quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Jean Philippe; van Zwieten, Myra C B; Willems, Dick L

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, institutions in the USA have begun to set up programmes to monitor ongoing medical research. These programmes provide routine, onsite oversight, and thus go beyond existing oversight such as investigating suspected misconduct or reviewing paperwork provided by investigators. However, because of a lack of guidelines and evidence, institutions have had little guidance in setting up their programmes. To help institutions make the right choices, we used interviews and document analysis to study how and why 11 US institutions have set up their monitoring programmes. Although these programmes varied considerably, we were able to distinguish two general types. 'Compliance' programmes on the one hand were part of the institutional review board office and set up to ensure compliance with regulations. Investigators' participation was mandatory. Monitors focused on documentation. Investigators could be disciplined, and could be obliged to take corrective actions. 'Quality-improvement' programmes on the other hand were part of a separate office. Investigators requested to be monitored. Monitors focused more on actual research conduct. Investigators and other parties received feedback on how to improve the research process. Although both types of programmes have their drawbacks and advantages, we argue that if institutions want to set up monitoring programmes, quality improvement is the better choice: it can help foster an atmosphere of trust between investigators and the institutional review board, and can help raise the standards for the protection of human subjects.

  18. Protective effect of quercetin against oxidative stress caused by dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassoued Saloua

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of quercetin in alleviating the cytotoxic effects of Dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods Lymphocytes were divided into too groups. The first group, lymphocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37°C with different concentrations (0, 40, 60 and 100 mM of Dimethoate. The second group was preincubated with quercetin for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37°C. Results Following in vitro incubation, Dimethoate caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde levels, a significant decrease in thiol levels, as well as a significant increase in superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in lymphocytes at different concentrations. Quercetin pretreated lymphocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dimethoate on the studied parameters. Conclusion In conclusion, antioxidant quercetin could protect against Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in human lymphocytes.

  19. Protection of human HepG2 cells against oxidative stress by the flavonoid epicatechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Izquierdo-Pulido, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2010-04-01

    Flavanols, such as epicatechin (EC), constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in green tea, grapes and cocoa and possess different biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic. This study investigated the potential chemo-protective effect of EC against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on human HepG2 cells. Cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase assay and markers of oxidative status: reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were evaluated. Pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h prevented the enhanced cell damage and GPx and GR activities as well as the decrease in GSH induced by t-BOOH. The increased ROS generation induced by t-BOOH was also partly prevented by a pretreatment for 20 h with EC. In addition, pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h recovered the t-BOOH-induced MDA concentration to control values. A pretreatment for 2 h with EC did not reduce cell damage but partly recovered GSH, reduced ROS levels and muffled the increase of GPx and GR after exposure to t-BOOH. Treatment of HepG2 cells with concentrations of EC in the micromolar range confers a significant protection against oxidative stress.

  20. Protection of Salvianolic Acid B for Human Endothelial Cells Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jungang; ZHAO Guangrong; LIU Jinling; JI Xiangwu

    2009-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B(Sal B) is an active component of traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza and is used to treat vascular diseases. To better understand its mechanism, the antioxidant capacities of Sal B was evaluated with human endothelial cells under oxidative stress. Human endothelial cells were pretreated with Sal B for 12 h followed by hydrogen peroxide for another 12 h. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and concentration of glu-tathione were measured: Protective effect of Sal B on the endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced damage ' was observed, and ROS production in the cells was found significantly inhibited. Sal B remarkably enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and GPX. Furthermore, Sal B up-regulated the intracellular glutathione concentration. The results indicate that Sal B protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress by improving the redox status of the cells through enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities and increasing the reductive glutathione concentration after the oxidative challenge.

  1. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway....... Furthermore, using Northern blot analysis it was shown that SOCS-3 can completely inhibit GH-induced insulin production in these cells. Finally, 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that SOCS-3 inhibits GH-induced proliferation of INS-1 cells...

  2. The protective effect of resveratrol on human lens epithelial cells against ultraviolet-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue - Fang Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the protective effect of resveratrol on human lens epithelial cells against ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. METHODS:Subcultured human lens epithelial cell line, ultraviolet induced cell apoptosis, 20μmol/L resveratrol pretreated cell, the indicators change was observed: rate of apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and apoptosis-related factors of caspses-3 and caspase-9 were detected by colorimetric detection, ultrastructure changes were observed under transmission electron microscope. RESULTS: Flow cytometry instrument testing found that resveratrol can suppress the apoptosis induced by ultraviolet irradiation, caspses-3 and caspase-9 content in positive control group were significantly higher than that of the negative control group at the same time period, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05; caspses-3 and caspase-9 content in experimental group were lower than that in the positive control group at the same time, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. In addition, the damage of human lens epithelial cells was alleviated with the incubation time of resveratrol elongated. CONCLUSION:Resveratrol may inhibit ultraviolet-induced apoptosis of human lens epithelial cells, it has preventive function against radioactive cataract, and it can provide reliable evidence for pursuing effective medicine to prevent and treat cataract.

  3. Potent protection of gallic acid against DNA oxidation: Results of human and animal experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferk, Franziska; Chakraborty, Asima [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Jaeger, Walter [Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Diagnostic, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kundi, Michael [Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bichler, Julia; Misik, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Wagner, Karl-Heinz [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Sagmeister, Sandra [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haidinger, Gerald [Department of Epidemiology, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hoelzl, Christine; Nersesyan, Armen [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Dusinska, Maria [Health Effect Laboratory, Center for Ecological Economics, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Simic, Tatjana [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is a constituent of plant derived foods, beverages and herbal remedies. We investigated its DNA protective properties in a placebo controlled human intervention trial in single cell gel electrophoresis experiments. Supplementation of drinking water with GA (12.8 mg/person/d) for three days led to a significant reduction of DNA migration attributable to oxidised pyrimidines (endonuclease III sensitive sites) and oxidised purines (formamidopyrimidine glycosylase sensitive sites) in lymphocytes of healthy individuals by 75% and 64% respectively. Also DNA damage caused by treatment of the cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced after GA consumption (by 41%). These effects were paralleled by an increase of the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathion-S-transferase-{pi}) and a decrease of intracellular ROS concentrations in lymphocytes, while no alterations of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), of malondialdehyde levels in serum and of the urinary excretion of isoprostanes were found. Experiments with rats showed that GA reduces oxidatively damaged DNA in lymphocytes, liver, colon and lungs and protects these organs against {gamma}-irradiation-induced strand breaks and formation of oxidatively damaged DNA-bases. Furthermore, the number of radiation-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci was decreased by 43% after oral administration of the phenolic. Since we did not find alterations of the TAC in plasma and lipid peroxidation of cell membranes but intracellular effects it is likely that the antioxidant properties of GA seen in vivo are not due to direct scavenging of radicals but rather to indirect mechanisms (e.g. protection against ROS via activation of transcription factors). As the amount of GA used in the intervention trial is similar to the daily intake in Middle Europe (18 mg/person/day), our findings indicate that it may contribute to prevention of

  4. The Australian joint inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2003-04-01

    The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) and the Australian Health Ethics Committee are currently engaged in an inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information. In particular, the Attorney-General and the Minister for Health and Ageing have asked us to focus, in relation to human genetic information and tissue samples, on how best to ensure world's best practice in relation to: privacy protection; protection against unlawful discrimination; and the maintenance of high ethical standards in medical research and clinical practice. While initial concerns and controversies have related mainly to aspects of medical research (e.g. consent; re-use of samples) and access to private insurance coverage, relevant issues arise in a wide variety of contexts, including: employment; medical practice; tissue banks and genetic databases; health administration; superannuation; access to government services (e.g. schools, nursing homes); law enforcement; and use by government authorities (e.g. for immigration purposes) or other bodies (e.g. by sports associations). Under the Australian federal system, it is also the case that laws and practices may vary across states and territories. For example, neonatal genetic testing is standard, but storage and retention policies for the resulting 'Guthrie cards' differ markedly. Similarly, some states have developed highly linked health information systems (e.g. incorporating hospitals, doctors' offices and public records), while others discourage such linkages owing to concerns about privacy. The challenge for Australia is to develop policies, standards and practices that promote the intelligent use of genetic information, while providing a level of security with which the community feels comfortable. The inquiry is presently reviewing the adequacy of existing laws and regulatory mechanisms, but recognizes that it will be even more important to develop a broad mix of strategies, such as community and professional education, and the

  5. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathy-Hartert

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−. In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M, this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC. Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2− generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2 was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon. So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis.

  6. [Animal protection without limits? Human-animal relations in between anthropomorphism and objectification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Herwig; Hartnack, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    In view of recent developments in human-animal relations, vets and ethicists face a new problem: On the one hand, animals such as mammals and birds are used extensively and are in danger to be reduced to mere production units e. g. in the agricultural production, measuring devices in laboratories, sports equipment etc. On the other hand, biologically similar animals are perceived as family members or partners and are almost treated like humans. The article summarizes the results of a workshop that dealt with reductionism and anthropomorphism in human-animal relations. Vets and ethicists tackled the question how the unequal treatment of biologically similar animals can be better understood and whether it can be ethically justified. In the first section, the problem of inconsistency in human-animals relations is briefly sketched. The second part of the article addresses the ethics of unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts. The following section inquires possible solutions and the advantages and disadvantages of biological criteria versus social criteria in animal protection. Finally, the background and reasons for our moral intuitions of injustice associated with the inconsistencies in human-animal relations are outlined. This fourth section refers to the presentation of Peter Kunzmann during the workshop on the unequal treatment of equals.The article closes with some general remarks on the issue. One main result of the workshop can be stated as follows: Due to the fact that the various human-animal relations gain their ethical justification from different ethical reasons, the unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts is not ethically wrong per se. However, every intrusive dealing or interaction with animals is in itself in need of ethical justification.

  7. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing FENG; Lai-ji MA; Jin-jing YAO; Yun FANG; Yan-ai MEI; Shao-min WEI

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties;no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level.Therefore,the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide(H2O2).Kjeldahl determination,phenol-sulfuric acid method,and high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%,of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da.Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH)radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide(MTT)colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling(TUNEL)assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis.Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2,but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not.Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and the inhibition of malondialdehyde(MDA).The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level.Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury.

  8. Mutation of the SHP-2 binding site in growth hormone (GH) receptor prolongs GH-promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of GH receptor, JAK2, and STAT5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stofega, M R; Herrington, J; Billestrup, Nils;

    2000-01-01

    that the SH2 domains of SHP-2 bind directly to tyrosyl phosphorylated GHR from GH-treated cells. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 595 of rat GHR greatly diminishes association of the SH2 domains of SHP-2 with GHR, and tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 487 partially reduces...... phosphorylation. Consistent with the effects on STAT5B phosphorylation, tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 595 prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR and JAK2. These data suggest that tyrosine 595 is a major site of interaction of GHR with SHP-2, and that GHR-bound SHP-2 negatively...

  9. Bringing radiation protection into harmony with human life and the ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwell, T. [Radiation, Science and Health, Inc., Chevy Chase, MD (United States)

    2000-05-01

    A radiation protection policy that is truly in harmony with human life and the ecosystem cannot insist that radiation doses be reduced to as low as achievable regardless of the impact of such a policy on other aspects of human life and the ecosystem. This potential conflict of purposes can be approached from several directions, some of which are explored here. First, we must consider the presence of a large and variable background of natural radiation, whose health and ecological effects are virtually identical to those from human-generated radiation. To attempt to measure, account for, and reduce additional radiation sources that are far smaller than this background-indeed, far smaller than the natural variations in the background, affronts both science and common sense. Second, to base policy on extrapolation of several orders of magnitude from health effects resulting from high-level, high-dose rate, radiation is another serious departure from proper scientific practice. Third, to justify current policy as being conservative in the face of uncertainty is wrong on both counts. The uncertainty claimed by the policy makers is based on their unwillingness to consider and apply the enormous body of available evidence. The presumption of conservatism is based on the issue in question: that any level of radiation is deemed potentially harmful. Fourth, by not fully considering the cost of implementing current radiation policy, limited societal resources are diverted from critical needs, for little or no societal benefit. There are good data showing that health of the people and the environment are directly impacted by the amount of money available in the society to benefit real needs. In addition, the fear generated by the presumption that all radiation is harmful, leads to avoidance of life-saving medical techniques such as mammograms, irradiation of food, applications of radiation such as smoke detectors and medical research, reduction of air and ground pollution

  10. Proteomic pleiotropy of OpgGH, an operon necessary for efficient growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under low-osmotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica, a bacterial, food-borne pathogen of humans, can contaminate raw fruits and vegetables. Causing much public concern, the bacteria can survive in water used to wash produce. The ability to survive the low-osmolarity of the wash waters is attributed to the OpgGH operon that leads...

  11. Translational neuroendocrinology: control of human growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, P E; Gill, M S; Tillmann, V; Westwood, M

    2014-06-01

    Human growth is driven by both basic cell processes as well as hormones, in particular the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis. Understanding how these mechanisms are coordinated is not only critical to achieving a normal growth rate, but also to recognising potential new causes of disordered growth and how they might be treated. We have demonstrated in healthy children that height is gained by periods of rapid growth interspersed by periods of very slow growth or even stasis. We have also shown that a lower order organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, grows in a similar manner. By contrast, secretion of GH from somatotrophs occurs on a daily basis in discrete pulses over a 24-h period. We have used the measurement of GH in urine as a surrogate marker of GH secretion to show that there are rhythms of GH output with frequencies of several days. We then assessed which attributes of these GH profiles were related to growth and found that disorderliness in the GH profile (as measured by approximate entropy) was related to better growth rate. This feature was then tested in the dwarf rat using different GH regimens to introduce variation into the administration of daily GH injections. Better long bone growth was associated with week-to-week or even random dose variation compared to the same amount of GH delivered as a standard daily dose. Understanding the control of growth has implications in clinical practice for modelling GH treatment regimens based on physiological principles.

  12. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans.

  13. Muscle and skeletal health in children and adolescents with GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improda, Nicola; Capalbo, Donatella; Esposito, Andrea; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2016-12-01

    In addition to promoting linear growth, GH plays a key role in the regulation of bone and muscle development and metabolism. Although GH deficiency is frequently listed among the causes of secondary osteoporosis in children, its impact on bone and muscle health and on fracture risk is still not completely established. Current data suggest that childhood-onset GH deficiency can affect bone and muscle mass and strength, with GH replacement therapy exerting beneficial effects. Moreover, GH withdrawal at final height can result in reduced peak bone and muscle mass, potentially leading to increased fracture risk in adulthood. Thus, the muscle-bone unit in GH deficient subjects should be monitored during childhood and adolescence in order to prevent osteoporosis and increased fracture risk and GH replacement should be tailored to ensure an optimal bone and muscle health.

  14. TALEN-Mediated Knockout of CCR5 Confers Protection Against Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingjie; Li, Juan; Shi, Xuanling; Jia, Wenxu; Wen, Yi; Hu, Xiongbing; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Zhang, Linqi

    2017-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) represents a valuable tool for genomic engineering due to its single-nucleotide precision, high nuclease activity, and low cytotoxicity. We report here systematic design and characterization of 28 novel TALENs targeting multiple regions of CCR5 gene (CCR5-TALEN) which encodes the co-receptor critical for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). By systemic characterization of these CCR5-TALENs, we have identified one (CCR5-TALEN-515) with higher nuclease activity, specificity, and lower cytotoxicity compared with zinc-finger nuclease (CCR5-ZFN) currently undergoing clinical trials. Sequence analysis of target cell line GHOST-CCR5-CXCR4 and human primary CD4 T cells showed that the double-strand breaks at the TALEN targeted sites resulted in truncated or nonfunctional CCR5 proteins thereby conferring protection against HIV-1 infection in vitro. None of the CCR5-TALENs had detectable levels of off-target nuclease activity against the homologous region in CCR2 although substantial level was identified for CCR5-ZFN in the primary CD4 T cells. Our results suggest that the CCR5-TALENs identified here are highly functional nucleases that produce protective genetic alterations to human CCR5. Application of these TALENs directly to the primary CD4 T cells and CD34 hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) of infected individuals could help to create an immune system resistant to HIV-1 infection, recapitulating the success of "Berlin patient" and serving as an essential first step towards a "functional" cure of AIDS.

  15. MALDI-TOF characterization of hGH1 produced by hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica grown in an airlift with mesh bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Edgar García; Ramírez, Emma Gloria Ramos; Gúzman, Octavio Gómez; Calva, Graciano Calva; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Pérez-Vargas, Josefina; Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Expression systems based on plant cells, tissue, and organ cultures have been investigated as an alternative for production of human therapeutic proteins in bioreactors. In this work, hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli) were established in an airlift with mesh bioreactor to produce isoform 1 of the human growth hormone (hGH1) as a model therapeutic protein. The hGH1 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA1105.1 binary vector to induce hairy roots in hypocotyls of broccoli plantlets via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Most of the infected plantlets (90%) developed hairy roots when inoculated before the appearance of true leaves, and keeping the emerging roots attached to hypocotyl explants during transfer to solid Schenk and Hildebrandt medium. The incorporation of the cDNA into the hairy root genome was confirmed by PCR amplification from genomic DNA. The expression and structure of the transgenic hGH1 was assessed by ELISA, western blot, and MALDITOF-MS analysis of the purified protein extracted from the biomass of hairy roots cultivated in bioreactor for 24 days. Production of hGH1 was 5.1 ± 0.42 µg/g dry weight (DW) for flask cultures, and 7.8 ± 0.3 µg/g DW for bioreactor, with productivity of 0.68 ± 0.05 and 1.5 ± 0.06 µg/g DW*days, respectively, indicating that the production of hGH1 was not affected by the growth rate, but might be affected by the culture system. These results demonstrate that hairy root cultures of broccoli have potential as an alternative expression system for production of hGH1, and might also be useful for production of other therapeutic proteins.

  16. Mode of GH administration and gene expression in the female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Marion; Schiöler, Linus; Oscarsson, Jan; Åberg, Maria A I; Wickelgren, Ruth; Svensson, Johan; Isgaard, Jörgen; Aberg, N David

    2017-03-08

    The endogenous secretion of growth hormone (GH) is sexually dimorphic in rats with females having a more even and males a more pulsatile secretion and low trough levels. The mode of GH administration, mimicking the sexually dimorphic secretion, has different systemic effects. In the brains of male rats, we have previously found that the mode of GH administration differently affects neuron haemoglobin beta (Hbb) expression whereas effects on other transcripts were moderate. The different modes of GH administration could have different effects on brain transcripts in female rats. Hypophysectomised female rats were given GH either as injections twice daily or as continuous infusion and GH-responsive transcripts were assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the hippocampus and parietal cortex (cortex). The different modes of GH-administration markedly increased Hbb and 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (Alas2) in both brain regions. As other effects were relatively moderate, a mixed model analysis (MMA) was used to investigate general effects of the treatments. In the hippocampus, MMA showed that GH-infusion suppressed glia- and neuron-related transcript expression whereas GH-injections increased expression. In the cortex, GH-infusion instead increased neuron-related transcripts, whereas GH-injections had no significant effect. Interestingly, this contrasts to previous results from male rat cortex where GH-infusion generally decreased expression levels. In conclusion, the results indicate that there is a small but significant difference in response to mode of GH administration, in the hippocampus as compared to the cortex. For both modes of GH administration, there was a robust effect on Hbb and Alas2.

  17. Impacts of Community Forest Management and Strictly Protected Areas on Deforestation and Human Well-Being in Madagascar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasolofoson, Ranaivo Andriarilala

    -dimensional nature of human well-being. In this thesis, I aim to investigate the impacts of different conservation interventions on environmental and human well-being outcomes while addressing the challenges to conservation impact evaluation discussed above. My case studies are CFM and strict protection......Protected areas and Community Forest Management (CFM) are among the most widespread interventions to conserve forests in tropical countries. In addition to their impacts on forests and the biodiversity they contain, these interventions also affect human well-being, particularly that of the local...... they contain) and human well-being. However, while scientifically rigorous impact evaluation of programs is well advanced in fields such as development, health and education, it is rare in nature conservation. The rare existing studies focus mostly on protected areas and other interventions, such as CFM...

  18. Stereotactic Irradiation of GH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Minniti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT is often employed in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions in order to prevent tumour regrowth and normalize elevated GH and IGF-I levels. It achieves tumour control and hormone normalization up to 90% and 70% of patients at 10–15 years. Despite the excellent tumour control, conventional RT is associated with a potential risk of developing late toxicity, especially hypopituitarism, and its role in the management of patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas remains a matter of debate. Stereotactic techniques have been developed with the aim to deliver more localized irradiation and minimize the long-term consequences of treatment, while improving its efficacy. Stereotactic irradiation can be given in a single dose as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS or in multiple doses as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT. We have reviewed the recent published literature on stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques.

  19. Remifentanil protects human keratinocytes against hypoxia-reoxygenation injury through activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, Yong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Deok; Kim, Cheul-Hong; Yoon, Ji-Young; Yoon, Ji-Uk

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation, differentiation, and migration of keratinocytes are essential in the early stages of wound healing. Hypoxia-Reoxygenation (H/R) injury to keratinocytes can occur in various stressful environments such as surgery, trauma, and various forms of ulcers. The effects of remifentanil on human keratinocytes under hypoxia-reoxygenation have not been fully studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of remifentanil on the proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagic activation of human keratinocytes during hypoxic-reoxygenation. Human keratinocytes were cultured under 1% oxygen tension for 24 h. The cells were then treated with various concentrations of remifentanil (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng/mL) for 2 h. Thereafter, the cells were reoxygenated for 12 h at 37°C. We measured cell viability via MTT assay. Using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis, we measured the expression levels of proteins associated with apoptosis and autophagy. Quantification of apoptotic cells was performed using flow cytometer analysis and autophagic vacuoles were observed under a fluorescence microscope. Remifentanil treatment brought about an increase in the proliferation of human keratinocytes damaged by hypoxia-reoxygenation and decreased the apoptotic cell death, enhancing autophagic activity. However, the autophagy pathway inhibitor 3-MA inhibited the protective effect of remifentanil in hypoxia-reoxygenation injury. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that remifentanil treatment stimulated autophagy and reduced apoptotic cell death in a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of human keratinocytes. Our results provide additional insights into the relationship between apoptosis and autophagy.

  20. Remifentanil protects human keratinocytes against hypoxia-reoxygenation injury through activation of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kwon

    Full Text Available The proliferation, differentiation, and migration of keratinocytes are essential in the early stages of wound healing. Hypoxia-Reoxygenation (H/R injury to keratinocytes can occur in various stressful environments such as surgery, trauma, and various forms of ulcers. The effects of remifentanil on human keratinocytes under hypoxia-reoxygenation have not been fully studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of remifentanil on the proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagic activation of human keratinocytes during hypoxic-reoxygenation. Human keratinocytes were cultured under 1% oxygen tension for 24 h. The cells were then treated with various concentrations of remifentanil (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng/mL for 2 h. Thereafter, the cells were reoxygenated for 12 h at 37°C. We measured cell viability via MTT assay. Using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis, we measured the expression levels of proteins associated with apoptosis and autophagy. Quantification of apoptotic cells was performed using flow cytometer analysis and autophagic vacuoles were observed under a fluorescence microscope. Remifentanil treatment brought about an increase in the proliferation of human keratinocytes damaged by hypoxia-reoxygenation and decreased the apoptotic cell death, enhancing autophagic activity. However, the autophagy pathway inhibitor 3-MA inhibited the protective effect of remifentanil in hypoxia-reoxygenation injury. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that remifentanil treatment stimulated autophagy and reduced apoptotic cell death in a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of human keratinocytes. Our results provide additional insights into the relationship between apoptosis and autophagy.

  1. The Role of GH/IGF-I Axis in Muscle Homeostasis During Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to reduced gravity during space travel profoundly alters the loads placed on bone and muscle. Astronauts suffer significant losses of muscle and bone strength during weightlessness. Exercise as a countermeasure is only partially effective in remedying severe muscle atrophy and bone demineralization. Similar wasting of muscles and bones affects people on Earth during prolonged bed rest or immobilization due to injury. In the absence of weight bearing activity, atrophy occurs primarily in the muscles that act in low power, routine movements and in maintaining posture. Hormonal disfunction could contribute in part to the loss of muscle and bone during spaceflight. Reduced levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH) were found in astronauts during space flight, as well as reduced GH secretory activity was observed from the anterior pituitary in 7-day space flight rats. Growth hormone has been shown to be required for maintenance of muscle mass and bone mineralization, in part by mediating the biosynthesis IGF-I, a small polypeptide growth factor. IGF biosynthesis and secretion plays an important role in potentiating muscle cell differentiation and has been shown to drive the expression of myogenin, a myogenic specific basic helix-loop-helix factor. IGF-I has also been shown to have an important role in potentiating muscle regeneration, repair and adult muscle hypertrophy.

  2. 论我国同性恋者的人权保障%On the Protection of Human Rights of Homosexuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何东平

    2011-01-01

    同性恋是客观存在的,在我国的人数也不算少;同性恋者人权保障的必要性是对同性恋者权利呼声的回应,是包容发展的国家发展趋势、紧跟世界保障同性恋者人权发展趋势之必然。在进行人权保障的时候,我们应该注重构建保障同性恋者的自由权、平等权、生存权、发展权的理念。具体的保障措施是:立法保障、司法和执法保障以及社会保障。%Homosexuality is an objective existence,and the number of homosexuals in our country is not too small.Protecting the human rights of homosexuals is the response to the calls of gay rights,a developmental trend for countries adopting inclusive development policy,and a necessity to keeping pace with the worldwide trend of protecting the human rights of homosexuals.When protecting homosexuals' human rights,we should focus on building the concepts of protecting their rights of freedom,equality,survival and development.The specific supporting measures include legislative protection,judicial protection,law enforcement protection and social security.

  3. N-glycosylation increases the circulatory half-life of human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flintegaard, Thomas V; Thygesen, Peter; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic use of recombinant GH typically involves daily sc injections. We examined the possibilities for prolonging the in vivo circulation of GH by introducing N-glycans. Human GH variants with a single potential N-glycosylation site (N-X-S/T) introduced by site-directed mutagenesis were...

  4. Effects of growth hormone on glucose and fat metabolism in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Louise; Krag, Morten Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo data from tests performed in normal subjects and in patients who had abnormal growth hormone (GH) status. Experimental data in human subjects demonstrate that GH acutely inhibits glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. At the same time GH stimulates the turnover...

  5. The absence of GH signaling affects the susceptibility to high-fat diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation in male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baquedano, Eva; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Sustarsic, Elahu G

    2014-01-01

    GH is important in metabolic control, and mice with disruption of the gene encoding the GH receptor (GHR) and GH binding protein (GHR-/- mice) are dwarf with low serum IGF-1 and insulin levels, high GH levels, and increased longevity, despite their obesity and altered lipid and metabolic profiles...

  6. Are protected areas required to maintain functional diversity in human-modified landscapes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Eden W Cottee-Jones

    Full Text Available The conversion of forest to agriculture across the world's tropics, and the limited space for protected areas, has increased the need to identify effective conservation strategies in human-modified landscapes. Isolated trees are believed to conserve elements of ecological structure, providing micro-sites for conservation in matrix landscapes, and facilitating seed dispersal and forest restoration. Here we investigate the role of isolated Ficus trees, which are of critical importance to tropical forest ecosystems, in conserving frugivore composition and function in a human-modified landscape in Assam, India. We surveyed the frugivorous birds feeding at 122 isolated Ficus trees, 33 fruit trees, and 31 other large trees across a range of 32 km from the nearest intact forest. We found that Ficus trees attracted richer and more abundant assemblages of frugivores than the other tree categories. However, incidence function estimates revealed that forest specialist species decreased dramatically within the first kilometre of the forest edge. Despite this, species richness and functional diversity remained consistent across the human-modified landscape, as habitat generalists replaced forest-dependent frugivores, and accounted for most of the ecological function found in Ficus trees near the forest edge. We recommend that isolated Ficus trees are awarded greater conservation status, and suggest that their conservation can support ecologically functional networks of frugivorous bird communities.

  7. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  8. The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on muscle strength in patients with GH-deficiency: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    CONTEXT\\/OBJECTIVES: GH replacement increases muscle mass and reduces body fat in growth hormone deficiency (GHD) adults. A recent meta-analysis has demonstrated that this improvement in body composition is associated with improved exercise performance. The current meta-analysis was carried out to determine whether high-quality evidence exists to support a beneficial effect of GH replacement on strength. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An extensive Medline search\\/literature review identified eight studies with utilizable, robust data, involving 231 patients in nine cohorts. Previously unpublished data were sought from authors and obtained in two cases. All studies included were randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, of parallel or cross-over design and of an average 6.7 months duration. Information was retrieved in uniform format, with data pertaining to patient numbers, study-design, GH-dose, mean age, IGF-I levels and muscle strength measurements (isometric or isokinetic quadriceps strength) recorded. Data were analysed using a fixed-effects model, utilizing continuous data measured on different scales. A summary effect measure (d(s)) was derived for individual strength variables, whereas an overall summary effect was derived from the sum of all studies incorporating different variables; 95% CIs were calculated from the weighted variances of individual study effects. RESULTS: Analysis revealed no significant improvement, neither when all studies were combined (d(s) = +0.01 +\\/- 0.26) nor when measured individually (isometric quadriceps strength, d(s) = +0.02 +\\/- 0.32 and isokinetic quadriceps strength, d(s) = 0.00 +\\/- 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from short-term controlled studies fails to support a benefit on muscle strength of GH replacement in GHD patients, which is likely to occur over a longer time-course, as seen in open-label studies.

  9. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH) replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD) children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Begoña; Casteleiro, Nerea; Couto, Paula; Castañón, Beatriz; Zas, Eva; Reimunde, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years) with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH) and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST) was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P < 0.01), and in fine motor skills and expressive communication (P < 0.02) were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.

  10. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  14. Ethics and data protection in human biomarker studies in environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleyn, Ludwine; Dumez, Birgit; Van Damme, Karel; Anwar, Wagida A

    2013-08-01

    Human biomarker studies in environmental health are essential tools to study the relationship between health and environment. They should ultimately contribute to a better understanding of environmentally induced adverse health effects and to appropriate preventive actions. To ensure the protection of the rights and dignity of study participants a complex legal and ethical framework is applied, consisting of several international directives, conventions, and guidelines, whether or not translated in domestic laws. Main characteristics of ethics and data protection in studies using biomarkers in the field of environmental health are summarized and current discussions on related questions and bottlenecks highlighted. In the current regulatory context, dominated by the protection of the individual study participant, difficulties are reported due to the different interpretation and implementation of the regulations of concern within and across borders. Advancement of consistency and compatibility is recommended and efforts are ongoing. An increasing demand for secondary use of data and samples poses additional challenges in finding a right balance between the individual rights of the study participants on the one hand and the common interest of, and potential benefit for the public or community at large on the other. Ethics committees could play a key role in assessing problems originating from the sometimes competing needs at individual and societal level. Building trust in science amongst (potential) study participants and within the community allows the inclusion of arguments from the societal perspective. This requires increased attention for respectful communication efforts. Striving for public participation in decision making processes may promote policy relevant research and the related translation of study results into action.

  15. NOVEL NON-CALCEMIC SECOSTEROIDS THAT ARE PRODUCED BY HUMAN EPIDERMAL KERATINOCYTES PROTECT AGAINST SOLAR RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Janjetovic, Zorica; Kim, Tae-Kang; Wasilewski, Piotr; Rosas, Sofia; Hanna, Sherie; Sayre, Robert M.; Dowdy, John C.; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    CYP11A1 hydroxylates the side chain of vitamin D3 (D3) in a sequential fashion [D3→20S(OH)D3→20,23(OH)2D3→ 17,20,23(OH)3D3], in an alternative to the classical pathway of activation [D3→25(OH)D3→1,25(OH)2D3]. The products/intermediates of the pathway can be further modified by the action of CYP27B1. The CYP11A1-derived products are biologically active with functions determined by the lineage of the target cells. This pathway can operate in epidermal keratinocytes. To further define the role of these novel secosteroids we tested them for protective effects against UVB-induced damage in human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and HaCaT keratinocytes, cultured in vitro. The secosteroids attenuated ROS, H2O2 and NO production by UVB-irradiated keratinocytes and melanocytes, with an efficacy similar to 1,25(OH)2D3, while 25(OH)D3 had lower efficacy. These attenuations were also seen to some extent for the 20(OH)D3 precursor, 20S-hydroxy-7-dehydrocholesterol. These effects were accompanied by upregulation of genes encoding enzymes responsible for defence against oxidative stress. Using immunofluorescent staining we observed that the secosteroids reduced the generation cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in response to UVB and enhanced expression of p53 phosphorylated at Ser-15, but not at Ser-46. Additional evidence for protection against DNA damage in cells exposed to UVB and treated with secosteroids was provided by the Comet assay where DNA fragmentation was markedly reduced by 20(OH)D3 and 20,23(OH)2D3. In conclusion, novel secosteroids that can be produced by the action of CYP11A1 in epidermal keratinocytes have protective effects against UVB radiation. PMID:25617667

  16. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, B. (Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Unites States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  17. Schisandrin B protects against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury in BJ human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Po Yee; Lam, Philip Y; Yan, Chung Wai; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-06-01

    The effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) and its analogs on solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury were examined in BJ human fibroblasts. Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C) increased cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and protected against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury. The photoprotection was paralleled by decreases in the elastases-type protease activity and matrix-metalloproteinases-1 expression in solar-irradiated fibroblasts. The cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of Sch B or Sch C caused ROS production. The results suggest that by virtue of its pro-oxidant action and the subsequent glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B or Sch C may offer the prospect of preventing skin photo-aging.

  18. Geniposide protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Chen; Fawei Wang; Miao Geng; Hongyan Chen; Dongmei Duan

    2011-01-01

    In vitro cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with 50 or 5 μg/mL geniposide for 12 hours and exposed to 400 μmol/L corticosterone. Corticosterone exposure in cultures not pretreated with geniposide resulted in inhibited cell growth, reduced cell survival, and increased P53 and P21 protein expression. However, in geniposide pretreated SH-SY5Y cells, cell viability and the number of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle were significantly increased, P21 and P53 protein expression was reduced, and cell apoptosis was inhibited following corticosterone exposure. These results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against high-dose corticosterone-induced injury.

  19. Oral nicotinamide protects against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemides, Eleni; Sivapirabu, Geetha; Halliday, Gary M; Park, Joohong; Damian, Diona L

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous immunity, which is a key defence against the development of skin cancers, is suppressed by even small doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Preventing this UV-induced immunosuppression may therefore reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has immune-protective and cancer-preventive effects against UV radiation in mice, and we have shown previously that topical nicotinamide is immune protective in humans. Using the Mantoux model of skin immunity in healthy volunteers, we compared oral nicotinamide to placebo (both administered for 1 week) in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design against the effects of solar-simulated ultraviolet (ssUV) radiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin purified protein derivative. Discrete areas of the back were irradiated with low doses of ssUV daily for three consecutive days. Immunosuppression, calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema of irradiated sites compared with unirradiated control sites, was determined in volunteers taking oral nicotinamide and placebo. Significant immunosuppression occurred in an UV dose-dependent manner in the presence of placebo. Oral nicotinamide, at doses of either 1500 or 500 mg daily, was well tolerated and significantly reduced UV immunosuppression with no immune effects in unirradiated skin. Oral nicotinamide is safe and inexpensive and looks promising as a chemopreventive supplement for reducing the immunosuppressive effects of sunlight.

  20. Cordyceps militaris Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Myoung Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease. In this study, we investigated whether Cordyceps militaris extract (CME has in vitro protective effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs. Our results showed that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of CME was increased in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hydrogen peroxide treatment in HDFs increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, CME improved the survival of HDFs against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. CME treatment inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death and apoptotic nuclear condensation in HDFs. In addition, CME prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced SA-β-gal-positive cells suggesting CME could inhibit oxidative stress-induced premature senescence. Therefore, these results suggest that CME might have protective effects against oxidative stress-induced premature senescence via scavenging ROS.

  1. Cordyceps militaris Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Myoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ki Rim; Ha, Suk-Jin; Hong, Eock Kee

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease. In this study, we investigated whether Cordyceps militaris extract (CME) has in vitro protective effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Our results showed that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of CME was increased in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hydrogen peroxide treatment in HDFs increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, CME improved the survival of HDFs against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. CME treatment inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death and apoptotic nuclear condensation in HDFs. In addition, CME prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced SA-β-gal-positive cells suggesting CME could inhibit oxidative stress-induced premature senescence. Therefore, these results suggest that CME might have protective effects against oxidative stress-induced premature senescence via scavenging ROS. PMID:25230212

  2. Protective role of a novel human erythrocyte-derived depressing factor on blood vessels in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The protective role of a human erythrocyte-derived depressing factor (EDDF) on blood vessels was evaluated. The experiments were carried out on 25male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks, which were divided into control (n = 8), calcium overload (n = 8) and NG-L-nitro-arginine hypertensive model groups (L-NNA,n = 9), respectively. The isolated vascular ring perfusion assay, two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (TPM) and transmitted electron microscope were used to examine the effect of EDDF on vascular function and ultrastructure. Results showed that the contractile response of calcium overload rats and L-NNA rats to phenylephrine (PE) was significantly enhanced compared with that of the control (P < 0.05), and EDDF (10-3 g @mL-1) remarkably decreased the vascular contractile response of control's and calcium overload rats (P < 0.05),while EDDF had no effect on that of L-NNA rats. EDDF also alleviated the ultrastructural lesion of aorta VSMC in calcium overload rats by easing the abnormal in the nucleus, mitochondrion and other organell. It is concluded that EDDF could efficiently protect blood vessels against injury by influencing Ca2+ transport and ameliorating the lesion of VSMC, and further supported the hypothesis that the NO-cGMP pathway might contribute to the vasodilation and partially antihypertensive mechanism of EDDF.``

  3. Intravitreal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells protects rats from traumatic optic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Jiang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To treat traumatic optic neuropathy (TON with transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSC and explore how transplanted stem cells participate in the neuron repairing process. METHODS: A total of 195 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-surgery, optic nerve injury, and stem cell transplant group. Optic nerve injury was established in rats by directly clamping the optic nerve for 30 seconds. hUCBSC was microinjected into the vitreous cavity of injured rats. Optic nerve function was evaluated by flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEP. Apoptosis in retina tissues was detected by TUNEL staining. GRP78 and CHOP gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: After injury, transplantation of hUCBSC significantly blunted a reduction in optic nerve function indicated by smaller decreases in amplitude and smaller increases in peak latency of F-VEP waveform compared to the injury alone group. Also, significant more in retinal ganglion cell (RGC count and less in RGC apoptosis were detected after transplantation compared to injured rats. The protective effect correlated with upregulated GRP78 and downregulated CHOP mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Intravitreal transplantation of hUCBSCs significantly blunted a reduction in optic nerve function through increasing RGC survival and decreasing retinal cell apoptosis. The protective role of transplantation was associated with upregulation of GRP78 expression and downregulation of CHOP expression in retinal cells.

  4. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  5. Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum extracts in the protection of human plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Moniuszko-Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Clovers (genus: Trifolium) have been used in traditional medicine by many cultures, but the biological activity of the most of these plants still remains unknown. The aim of our in vitro study was to assess the antioxidative action of phenolic extracts from aerial parts of Trifolium scabrum and Trifolium pallidum in human blood plasma, exposed to oxidative stress. In the present study we also demonstrate, for the first time the effects of the tested extracts on coagulative properties and fibrinolytic activity of blood plasma. The protective properties of the examined extracts (0.5-50 μg/ml) against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative stress were estimated by the measurements of 3-nitrotyrosine, thiol groups and the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels. The extracts considerably prevented the oxidative and nitrative damage to plasma proteins. Even the lowest doses of the Trifolium extracts (0.5 μg/ml) were able to markedly reduce 3-nitrotyrosine formation (by about 50%) and to increase the level of -SH groups (by about 30%), in comparison to the plasma exposed to ONOO(-) in the absence of the extracts. The protective action of all the used concentrations of the Trifolium extracts in the prevention of lipid peroxidation was also found. The tested extracts influenced neither the coagulative properties nor fibrinolytic activity of plasma. Moreover, the extracts were able to significantly reduce the inhibitory effect of ONOO(-) on fibrinolytic activity of plasma (assessed with the use of a chromogenic substrate for plasmin).

  6. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016.

  7. MDR1 transporter protects against paraquat-induced toxicity in human and mouse proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xia; Gibson, Christopher J; Yang, Ill; Buckley, Brian; Goedken, Michael J; Richardson, Jason R; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2014-10-01

    Paraquat is a herbicide that is highly toxic to the lungs and kidneys following acute exposures. Prior studies have demonstrated that the organic cation transporter 2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 contribute to the urinary secretion of paraquat in the kidneys. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/Mdr1, ABCB1, or P-glycoprotein) also participates in the removal of paraquat from the kidneys and protects against renal injury. Paraquat transport and toxicity were quantified in human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) that endogenously express MDR1, HEK293 cells overexpressing MDR1, and Mdr1a/1b knockout mice. In RPTEC cells, reduction of MDR1 activity using the antagonist PSC833 or siRNA transfection increased the cellular accumulation of paraquat by 50%. Reduced efflux of paraquat corresponded with enhanced cytotoxicity in PSC833-treated cells. Likewise, stable overexpression of the human MDR1 gene in HEK293 cells reduced intracellular levels of paraquat by 50%. In vivo studies assessed the renal accumulation and subsequent nephrotoxicity of paraquat (10 or 30 mg/kg ip) in wild-type and Mdr1a/1b knockout mice. At 4 h after paraquat treatment, renal concentrations of paraquat in the kidneys of Mdr1a/1b knockout mice were 750% higher than wild-type mice. By 72 h, paraquat-treated Mdr1a/1b knockout mice had more extensive tubular degeneration and significantly greater mRNA expression of kidney injury-responsive genes, including kidney injury molecule-1, lipocalin-2, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1, compared with wild-type mice. In conclusion, MDR1/Mdr1 participates in the elimination of paraquat from the kidneys and protects against subsequent toxicity.

  8. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

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    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  9. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2015-07-07

    Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  10. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness

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    Dani-Louise Dixon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  11. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (PGH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (PGH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation.

  12. Does the KIR2DS5 gene protect from some human diseases?

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    Izabela Nowak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KIR2DS5 gene encodes an activating natural killer cell receptor whose ligand is not known. It was recently reported to affect the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our studies on KIR2DS5 gene associations with human diseases, we compared the frequencies of this gene in patients and relevant controls. Typing for KIR2DS5 gene was performed by either individual or multiplex polymerase chain reactions which, when compared in the same samples, gave concordant results. We noted an apparently protective effect of KIR2DS5 gene presence in several clinical conditions, but not in others. Namely, this effect was observed in ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.003, odds ratio [OR]=0.47, confidence interval [CI]=0.28-0.79, endometriosis (p=0.03, OR=0.25, CI = 0.07-0.82 and acute rejection of kidney graft (p=0.0056, OR=0.44, CI=0.24-0.80, but not in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis, spontaneous abortion, or leukemia (all p>0.05. In addition, the simultaneous presence of KIR2DS5 gene and HLA-C C1 allotype exhibited an even stronger protective effect on ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0003, OR=0.35, CI=0.19-0.65, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and the presence of the HLA-C C2 allotype was associated with ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0017, OR=1.92, CI=1.28-2.89, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C1 allotype was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p=0.005, OR=1.47, CI=1.13-1.92. The presence of both KIR2DS5 and C1 seemed to protect from acute kidney graft rejection (p=0.017, OR=0.47, CI=0.25-0.89, whereas lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C2 seemed to favor rejection (p=0.0015, OR=2.13, CI=1.34-3.37. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that KIR2DS5 may protect from endometriosis, ankylosing spondylitis, and acute rejection of kidney graft.

  13. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV☆

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    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  14. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV

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    Shasha Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I, dihydrotanshinone (DHT, tanshinone IIA (T-II-A and cryptotanshinone (CT] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1 with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA. The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities was significantly attenuated in DHT

  15. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm(2) UVB; 1.53 J/cm(2) UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  16. The European Convention on Human Rights and the Protection of the Roma as Controversial Case of Cultural Diversity

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    Kristin Henrard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Roma are often the victims of systemic discrimination which is closely related to the prejudices against them and their particular way of life, their own minority identity. When studying to what extent the Roma and their own way of life are protected on the basis of individual human rights in the European Convention on Human Rights, it becomes clear that slowly but surely the European Court of Human Rights acknowledges the vulnerable position of the Roma and their concomitant need of special protection. While significant developments have taken place concerning the preliminary issues of non-discrimination and the protection of physical integrity, the actual protection concerning language rights or educational rights is still rather meagre. Nevertheless, the gradual emergence of a right to an own way of life for Roma and the ensuing positive state obligations might very well enhance the latter incipient protection. The overall tendency of the latest judgements of the Court is to increasingly restrict the margin of appreciation of states, also in the sensitive domain of minority protection.

  17. Endothelial function and vascular oxidative stress in long-lived GH/IGF-deficient Ames dwarf mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Perez, Viviana; Recchia, Fabio A.; Podlutsky, Andrej; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pacher, Pal; Austad, Steven N.; Bartke, Andrzej; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice have low circulating growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I levels, and they have extended longevity and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. To elucidate the vascular consequences of Ames dwarfism we compared endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide (NO) production in aortas of Ames dwarf and wild-type control mice. In Ames dwarf aortas endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria were enhanced compared with those in vessels of wild-type mice. In Ames dwarf aortas there was a less abundant expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). NO production and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were also decreased in aortas of Ames dwarf mice. In cultured wild-type mouse aortas and in human coronary arterial endothelial cells treatment with GH and IGF significantly reduced cellular O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria and upregulated expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx-1, and eNOS. Thus GH and IGF-I promote antioxidant phenotypic changes in the endothelial cells, whereas Ames dwarfism leads to vascular oxidative stress. PMID:18757483

  18. Constitutional protection of the economic, social and cultural rights of article 26 of the American Convention on Human Rights

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    Victor Abramovich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to suggest an interpretation of article 26 of the American Convention of Human Rights which allows the protection of certain economic, social and cultural rights within the Inter-American System. This interpretation seeks to mediate between those positions which consider article 26 as a non operative rule, and those which regard it as the key to the full protection of those rights. Finally, authors try to establish the list of the rights that article 26 protects.

  19. Human Subjects Protection and Technology in Prevention Science: Selected Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; Wyman, Peter A; Mohr, David C; Perrino, Tatiana; Gallo, Carlos; Villamar, Juan; Kendziora, Kimberly; Howe, George W; Sloboda, Zili; Brown, C Hendricks

    2016-08-01

    Internet-connected devices are changing the way people live, work, and relate to one another. For prevention scientists, technological advances create opportunities to promote the welfare of human subjects and society. The challenge is to obtain the benefits while minimizing risks. In this article, we use the guiding principles for ethical human subjects research and proposed changes to the Common Rule regulations, as a basis for discussing selected opportunities and challenges that new technologies present for prevention science. The benefits of conducting research with new populations, and at new levels of integration into participants' daily lives, are presented along with five challenges along with technological and other solutions to strengthen the protections that we provide: (1) achieving adequate informed consent with procedures that are acceptable to participants in a digital age; (2) balancing opportunities for rapid development and broad reach, with gaining adequate understanding of population needs; (3) integrating data collection and intervention into participants' lives while minimizing intrusiveness and fatigue; (4) setting appropriate expectations for responding to safety and suicide concerns; and (5) safeguarding newly available streams of sensitive data. Our goal is to promote collaboration between prevention scientists, institutional review boards, and community members to safely and ethically harness advancing technologies to strengthen impact of prevention science.

  20. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

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    Yoon Hee Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM, a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL, the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  1. A multivalent and cross-protective vaccine strategy against arenaviruses associated with human disease.

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    Maya F Kotturi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses are the causative pathogens of severe hemorrhagic fever and aseptic meningitis in humans, for which no licensed vaccines are currently available. Pathogen heterogeneity within the Arenaviridae family poses a significant challenge for vaccine development. The main hypothesis we tested in the present study was whether it is possible to design a universal vaccine strategy capable of inducing simultaneous HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against 7 pathogenic arenaviruses (including the lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Lassa, Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Whitewater Arroyo viruses, either through the identification of widely conserved epitopes, or by the identification of a collection of epitopes derived from multiple arenavirus species. By inoculating HLA transgenic mice with a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs expressing the different arenavirus proteins, we identified 10 HLA-A02 and 10 HLA-A03-restricted epitopes that are naturally processed in human antigen-presenting cells. For some of these epitopes we were able to demonstrate cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses, further increasing the coverage afforded by the epitope set against each different arenavirus species. Importantly, we showed that immunization of HLA transgenic mice with an epitope cocktail generated simultaneous CD8+ T cell responses against all 7 arenaviruses, and protected mice against challenge with rVACVs expressing either Old or New World arenavirus glycoproteins. In conclusion, the set of identified epitopes allows broad, non-ethnically biased coverage of all 7 viral species targeted by our studies.

  2. Morroniside protects SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Xing; Wang, Rui; Xi, Jin; Shen, Lin; Zhu, An-You; Qi, Qi; Wang, Qi-Yi; Zhang, Lun-Jun; Wang, Feng-Chao; Lü, He-Zuo; Hu, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cell injury has been linked to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. Morroniside is an antioxidant derived from the Chinese herb Shan-Zhu-Yu. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effect of morroniside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell death in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells. H2O2 increased cell apoptosis, as determined by flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 staining. This effect was reversed by pretreatment with morroniside at concentrations of 1-100 µM. The increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 was also abrogated by morroniside. H2O2 induced a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased caspase-3 activity, and caused downregulation of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) expression. These effects were blocked by morroniside pretreatment. Thus, morroniside protects human neuroblastoma cells against oxidative damage by inhibiting ROS production while suppressing Bax and stimulating Bcl-2 expression, thereby blocking mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. These results indicate that morroniside has therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Protective effects of tea, red wine and cocoa in diabetes. Evidences from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Angeles; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2017-09-08

    Prevention of diabetes through the diet has recently received an increasing interest, and polyphenolic compounds, such as flavanols, have become important potential chemopreventive natural agents due to their proved benefits on health, with low toxicity and cost. Tea, red wine and cocoa are good sources of flavanols and these highly consumed foods might contribute to prevent diabetes. In this regard, there is increasing evidence for a protective effect of tea, red wine and cocoa consumption against this disorder. This review summarizes the available epidemiological and interventional human studies providing evidence for and against this effect. Overall observational data suggest a benefit, but results are still equivocal and likely confounded by lifestyle and background dietary factors. The weight of data indicate favourable effects on diabetes risk factors for tea, red wine and cocoa intake, and a number of plausible mechanisms have been elucidated in human studies. However, despite the growing evidence it remains uncertain whether tea, red wine and cocoa consumption should be recommended to the general population or to patients as a strategy to reduce the risk of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In Vitro Protective Effect and Antioxidant Mechanism of Resveratrol Induced by Dapsone Hydroxylamine in Human Cells.

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    Rosyana V Albuquerque

    Full Text Available Dapsone (DDS hydroxylamine metabolites cause oxidative stress- linked adverse effects in patients, such as methemoglobin formation and DNA damage. This study evaluated the ameliorating effect of the antioxidant resveratrol (RSV on DDS hydroxylamine (DDS-NHOH mediated toxicity in vitro using human erythrocytes and lymphocytes. The antioxidant mechanism was also studied using in-silico methods. In addition, RSV provided intracellular protection by inhibiting DNA damage in human lymphocytes induced by DDS-NHOH. However, whilst pretreatment with RSV (10-1000 μM significantly attenuated DDS-NHOH-induced methemoglobinemia, but it was not only significantly less effective than methylene blue (MET, but also post-treatment with RSV did not reverse methemoglobin formation, contrarily to that observed with MET. DDS-NHOH inhibited catalase (CAT activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, but did not alter superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in erythrocytes. Pretreatment with RSV did not alter these antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes treated with DDS-NHOH. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory methods showed that DDS-NHOH has a pro-oxidant effect, whereas RSV and MET have antioxidant effect on ROS. The effect on methemoglobinemia reversion for MET was significantly higher than that of RSV. These data suggest that the pretreatment with resveratrol may decrease heme-iron oxidation and DNA damage through reduction of ROS generated in cells during DDS therapy.

  5. Protection of non-human primates against glanders with a gold nanoparticle glycoconjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Alfredo G; Gregory, Anthony E; Hatcher, Christopher L; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Morici, Lisa A; Titball, Richard W; Roy, Chad J

    2015-01-29

    The Gram-negative Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of glanders disease. Because the bacteria maintain the potential to be used as a biothreat agent, vaccine strategies are required for human glanders prophylaxis. A rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model of pneumonic (inhalational) glanders was established and the protective properties of a nanoparticle glycoconjugate vaccine composed of Burkholderia thailandensis LPS conjugated to FliC was evaluated. An aerosol challenge dose of ∼1×10(4) CFU B. mallei produced mortality in 50% of naïve animals (n=2/4), 2-3 days post-exposure. Although survival benefit was not observed by vaccination with a glycoconjugate glanders vaccine (p=0.42), serum LPS-specific IgG titers were significantly higher on day 80 in 3 vaccinated animals who survived compared with 3 vaccinated animals who died. Furthermore, B. mallei was isolated from multiple organs of both non-vaccinated survivors, but not from any organs of 3 vaccinated survivors at 30 days post-challenge. Taken together, this is the first time a candidate vaccine has been evaluated in a non-human primate aerosol model of glanders and represents the initial step for consideration in pre-clinical studies.

  6. Protective Effect of Prolactin against Methylmercury-Induced Mutagenicity and Cytotoxicity on Human Lymphocytes

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    Liz Carmem Silva-Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exhibits cytotoxic and mutagenic properties as a result of its effect on tubulin. This toxicity mechanism is related to the production of free radicals that can cause DNA damage. Methylmercury (MeHg is one of the most toxic of the mercury compounds. It accumulates in the aquatic food chain, eventually reaching the human diet. Several studies have demonstrated that prolactin (PRL may be differently affected by inorganic and organic mercury based on interference with various neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of PRL secretion. This study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of PRL on human lymphocytes exposed to MeHg in vitro, including observation of the kinetics of HL-60 cells (an acute myeloid leukemia lineage treated with MeHg and PRL at different concentrations, with both treatments with the individual compounds and combined treatments. All treatments with MeHg produced a significant increase in the frequency of chromatid gaps, however, no significant difference was observed in the chromosomal breaks with any treatment. A dose-dependent increase in the mitotic index was observed for treatments with PRL, which also acts as a co-mitogenic factor, regulating proliferation by modulating the expression of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton organization. These properties contribute to the protective action of PRL against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of MeHg.

  7. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Conserving biodiversity in a human-dominated world: degradation of marine sessile communities within a protected area with conflicting human uses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriano Parravicini

    Full Text Available Conservation research aims at understanding whether present protection schemes are adequate for the maintenance of ecosystems structure and function across time. We evaluated long-term variation in rocky reef communities by comparing sites surveyed in 1993 and again in 2008. This research took place in Tigullio Gulf, an emblematic case study where various conservation measures, including a marine protected area, have been implemented to manage multiple human uses. Contrary to our prediction that protection should have favored ecosystem stability, we found that communities subjected to conservation measures (especially within the marine protected area exhibited the greatest variation toward architectural complexity loss. Between 1993 and 2008, chronic anthropogenic pressures (especially organic load that had already altered unprotected sites in 1993 expanded their influence into protected areas. This expansion of human pressure likely explains our observed changes in the benthic communities. Our results suggest that adaptive ecosystem-based management (EBM, that is management taking into account human interactions, informed by continuous monitoring, is needed in order to attempt reversing the current trend towards less architecturally complex communities. Protected areas are not sufficient to stop ecosystem alteration by pressures coming from outside. Monitoring, and consequent management actions, should therefore extend to cover the relevant scales of those pressures.

  9. Characteristics of a foot-and-mouth disease virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion in experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Veronica; Bashiruddin, John B.; Belsham, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in cattle illustrated the protective efficacy and negative marker potential of a A serotype foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine prepared from a virus lacking a significant portion of the VP1 G-H loop (termed A(−)). Since this deletion also includes the arginine-glycine-aspar......Previous work in cattle illustrated the protective efficacy and negative marker potential of a A serotype foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine prepared from a virus lacking a significant portion of the VP1 G-H loop (termed A(−)). Since this deletion also includes the arginine......-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif required for virus attachment to the host cell in vivo, it was hypothesised that this virus would be attentuated in naturally susceptible animals. The A(−) virus was passaged three times in cattle via needle inoculation of virus suspension delivered into the intradermal space of the tongue...

  10. Protective Potential of Antioxidant Enzymes as Vaccines for Schistosomiasis in a Non-Human Primate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Queiroz, Claudia; Nyakundi, Ruth; Ogongo, Paul; Rikoi, Hitler; Egilmez, Nejat K.; Farah, Idle O.; Kariuki, Thomas M.; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a major cause of morbidity in the world. The challenge today is not so much in the clinical management of individual patients, but rather in population-based control of transmission in endemic areas. Despite recent large-scale efforts, such as integrated control programs aimed at limiting schistosomiasis by improving education and sanitation, molluscicide treatment programs and chemotherapy with praziquantel, there has only been limited success. There is an urgent need for complementary approaches, such as vaccines. We demonstrated previously that anti-oxidant enzymes, such as Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S peroxidase (GPX), when administered as DNA-based vaccines induced significant levels of protection in inbred mice, greater than the target 40% reduction in worm burden compared to controls set as a minimum by the WHO. These results led us to investigate if immunization of non-human primates with antioxidants would stimulate an immune response that could confer protection as a prelude study for human trials. Issues of vaccine toxicity and safety that were difficult to address in mice were also investigated. All baboons in the study were examined clinically throughout the study and no adverse reactions occurred to the immunization. When our outbred baboons were vaccinated with two different formulations of SOD (SmCT-SOD and SmEC-SOD) or one of GPX (SmGPX), they showed a reduction in worm number to varying degrees, when compared with the control group. More pronounced, vaccinated animals showed decreased bloody diarrhea, days of diarrhea, and egg excretion (transmission), as well as reduction of eggs in the liver tissue and in the large intestine (pathology) compared to controls. Specific IgG antibodies were present in sera after immunizations and 10 weeks after challenge infection compared to controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mesenteric, and inguinal node cells from vaccinated animals proliferated and

  11. Construction and Expression of Eukaryotic Expression Vector and Plasmid Expressing siRNA of Human Protection of Telomeres 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe POT1 (protection of telomeres 1) protein binds the single-stranded overhang at the ends of chromosomes in diverse eukaryocytes. It is essential for chromosome end-protection in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and it is involved in regulation of telomere length in human cells. Human POT1 had been identified in 2001 year. Its amino terminal is highly conservative in eukaryocytes. Since Pot1 can bind internal loops and directly adjacent DNA-binding sites, it is likely to fully co...

  12. [Search problems of human radiation protection in the world of genetics of aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the urgency for protection from negative effects of radiation in the range of low and medium dose where classic radioprotectors are ineffective is increased. In this respect it seems promising to study the molecular pathways that increase, on the one hand, the stability of the genome against radiation damage (inducers of carcinogenesis), and, on the other hand, elevate the radiation sensitivity of cell populations in order to eliminate potentially carcinogenic cells. This approach requires modification of cascade mechanisms of signal transduction to apoptosis and responses to DNA damage. Research plan is similar to the Genetics of Aging, where a number of hypotheses about the mechanism of aging have been proposed, including a decrease in the stability of the genome to external influences. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference "The genetics of aging and longevity" (Moscow, April 2012) demonstrated, however, that patterns of aging mechanisms identified in model animals (nematodes, drosophila and mice) are far from the possibility of their practical application. Discovered genes that may be responsible for life expectancy (stress-inducible protein and other components of the signal transduction cascade, as well as suppressors and inducers) rarely find significance in the study of the genomes of centenarian cohorts. This may be due to the difficulty in transferring molecular genetic patterns from model objects to large mammals, including humans, with respect to systems of signal transduction. This point must be taken into account during the search for a new generation of radioprotective agents that promote anti-carcinogenic potential of human cells exposed to radiation at low and moderate doses. It may be necessary to search for such tools in large laboratory animals and in human tissue cultures obtained through genetic engineering or cloning.

  13. Evaluation of protective ensemble thermal characteristics through sweating hot plate, sweating thermal manikin, and human tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Powell, Jeffery B; Roberge, Raymond J; Shepherd, Angie; Coca, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive capability of fabric Total Heat Loss (THL) values on thermal stress that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ensemble wearers may encounter while performing work. A series of three tests, consisting of the Sweating Hot Plate (SHP) test on two sample fabrics and the Sweating Thermal Manikin (STM) and human performance tests on two single-layer encapsulating ensembles (fabric/ensemble A = low THL and B = high THL), was conducted to compare THL values between SHP and STM methods along with human thermophysiological responses to wearing the ensembles. In human testing, ten male subjects performed a treadmill exercise at 4.8 km and 3% incline for 60 min in two environmental conditions (mild = 22°C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and hot/humid = 35°C, 65% RH). The thermal and evaporative resistances were significantly higher on a fabric level as measured in the SHP test than on the ensemble level as measured in the STM test. Consequently the THL values were also significantly different for both fabric types (SHP vs. STM: 191.3 vs. 81.5 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble A, and 909.3 vs. 149.9 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble B (p values are significantly different from the actual THL potential of the PPE ensemble tested on STM, (2) physiological benefits from wearing a more breathable PPE ensemble may not be feasible with incremental THL values (SHP test) less than approximately 150-200 W·m(2), and (3) the effects of thermal environments on a level of heat stress in PPE ensemble wearers are greater than ensemble thermal characteristics.

  14. Nrf2 Activation Protects against Solar-Simulated Ultraviolet Radiation in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knatko, Elena V; Ibbotson, Sally H; Zhang, Ying; Higgins, Maureen; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Dawe, Robert S; Ferguson, James; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Clarke, Rosemary; Zheng, Suqing; Saito, Akira; Kalra, Sukirti; Benedict, Andrea L; Honda, Tadashi; Proby, Charlotte M; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2015-06-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 determines the ability to adapt and survive under conditions of electrophilic, oxidative, and inflammatory stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks comprising nearly 500 genes encoding proteins with versatile cytoprotective functions. In mice, disruption of Nrf2 increases susceptibility to carcinogens and accelerates disease pathogenesis. Paradoxically, Nrf2 is upregulated in established human tumors, but whether this upregulation drives carcinogenesis is not known. Here we show that the incidence, multiplicity, and burden of solar-simulated UV radiation-mediated cutaneous tumors that form in SKH-1 hairless mice in which Nrf2 is genetically constitutively activated are lower than those that arise in their wild-type counterparts. Pharmacologic Nrf2 activation by topical biweekly applications of small (40 nmol) quantities of the potent bis(cyano enone) inducer TBE-31 has a similar protective effect against solar-simulated UV radiation in animals receiving long-term treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine. Genetic or pharmacologic Nrf2 activation lowers the expression of the pro-inflammatory factors IL6 and IL1β, and COX2 after acute exposure of mice to UV radiation. In healthy human subjects, topical applications of extracts delivering the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane reduced the degree of solar-simulated UV radiation-induced skin erythema, a quantifiable surrogate endpoint for cutaneous damage and skin cancer risk. Collectively, these data show that Nrf2 is not a driver for tumorigenesis even upon exposure to a very potent and complete carcinogen and strongly suggest that the frequent activation of Nrf2 in established human tumors is a marker of metabolic adaptation.

  15. The criminal offence of torture in the context of criminal-law protection of human person in the Western Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etlon Peppo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the transition of the countries from a social system to another, it is understood that major changes have happened in all the areas of life, affecting even the field of the illegal criminal offences including the criminal offences directed against the human person. The human rights movements have played an important role in different time periods of the human history. The human rights and their further development represent one of the ways of the realization of the social changes. The states themselves have undertaken long-term social changes through the protection of the human rights. Due to the commitments of the civil movements for the human rights, nowadays we have laws that protect, respect and guarantee the human rights and fundamental freedoms, among which: the prohibition of torture. As a consequence of the efforts of such movements, international documents or acts have been ratified and national laws have been implemented by the state authorities resulting in providing a complete and wide protection for the citizens. In this context, the prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatments or punishments constitutes a guarantee for the citizens against any kind of abuse and it represents an incontestable norm.

  16. Association of cGH EcoRV Gene with Production in Tolaki Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amrullah Pagala

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available cGH (Chicken Growth Hormone gene plays a crucial role in production responses of chicken. The objective of the research was to investigate the association of cGH gene with production in Tolaki chicken. Tolaki chicken is native chickens from Southeast Sulawesi Province of Indonesian. cGH gene was genotyped in 58 Tolaki chicken with PCR-RFLP. PCR was used to amplify genomic DNA for GH gene (399 bp. The amplicon was cutted by EcoRV and produced three genotypes: AA, AG, and GG and two alleles: A and G allele. The study showed the association of GH gene polymorphism with Production traits. GG genotype have better production (daily weight gain and feed conversion than AG genotype in Tolaki chicken, providing evidence that GH gene might be an important candidate gene for production traits.

  17. Identifying the gaps: Armenian health care legislation and human rights in patient care protections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopunyan, Violeta; Krmoyan, Suren; Quinn, Ryan

    2013-12-12

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has undergone an extensive legislative overhaul. Although a number of developments have aimed to improve the quality and accessibility of Armenia's health care system, a host of factors has prevented the country from fully introducing measures to ensure respect for human rights in patient care. In particular, inadequate health care financing continues to oblige patients to make both formal and informal payments to obtain basic medical care and services. More generally, a lack of oversight and monitoring mechanisms has obstructed the implementation of Armenia's commitments to human rights in several international agreements. Within the framework of a broader project on promoting human rights in patient care, research was carried out to examine Armenia’s health care legislation with the aim of identifying gaps in comparison with international and regional standards. This research was designed using the 14 rights enshrined in the European Charter on Patient Rights as guiding principles, along with domestic legal acts relevant to the rights of health care providers. The gaps analysis revealed numerous problems with Armenian legislation governing the relationships between stakeholders in health care service delivery. It also identified several practical inconsistencies with the international legal instruments ratified by the Armenian government. These legislative shortcomings are illustrated by highlighting key health-related rights violations experienced by patients and their health care providers, and by indicating opportunities for improved rights protections. A full list of human rights relevant to patient care and recommendations for promoting them in the Armenian context is provided in Tables 1